Sample records for distributed generation systems

  1. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, Distributed Generation (DG...

  2. Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future ElectricCentralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Future Grid Initiative Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Prepared

  3. Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

    2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The “customer-owned” backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the “customer owned” backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

  4. SOFC combined cycle systems for distributed generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The final phase of the tubular SOFC development program will focus on the development and demonstration of pressurized solid oxide fuel cell (PSOFC)/gas turbine (GT) combined cycle power systems for distributed power applications. The commercial PSOFC/GT product line will cover the power range 200 kWe to 50 MWe, and the electrical efficiency for these systems will range from 60 to 75% (net AC/LHV CH4), the highest of any known fossil fueled power generation technology. The first demonstration of a pressurized solid oxide fuel cell/gas turbine combined cycle will be a proof-of-concept 250 kWe PSOFC/MTG power system consisting of a single 200 kWe PSOFC module and a 50 kWe microturbine generator (MTG). The second demonstration of this combined cycle will be 1.3 MWe fully packaged, commercial prototype PSOFC/GT power system consisting of two 500 kWe PSOFC modules and a 300 kWe gas turbine.

  5. A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, ...

  6. Physical Effects of Distributed PV Generation on California's Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Michael A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deployment of high-penetration photovoltaic (PV) power is expected to have a range of effects -- both positive and negative -- on the distribution grid. The magnitude of these effects may vary greatly depending upon feeder topology, climate, PV penetration level, and other factors. In this paper we present a simulation study of eight representative distribution feeders in three California climates at PV penetration levels up to 100\\%, supported by a unique database of distributed PV generation data that enables us to capture the impact of PV variability on feeder voltage and voltage regulating equipment. When comparing the influence of feeder location (i.e. climate) versus feeder type on outcomes, we find that location more strongly influences the incidence of reverse power flow, reductions in peak loading and the presence of voltage excursions. On the other hand, we find that feeder characteristics more strongly influence the magnitude of loss reduction and changes in voltage regulator operations. We find th...

  7. Distributed Generation Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy Information At1986)Distributed

  8. Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments.

  9. Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petto, S.

    RELIABILITY IIIPROVEfWlT PROGRAMS IN STEAM DISTRIBUTION AND POVER GENERATION SYSTEItS Steve Petto Tech/Serv Corporation Blue Bell, PA Abstract This paper will present alternatives to costly corrective maintenance of the steam trap... In the reliability and efficiency of the system. Recent studies have shownt hat more than 40% of all In stalled steam traps and 20% of certain types of valves need some form of corrective action. The majority of all high backpressure problems In condensate return...

  10. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  11. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  12. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

  13. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  14. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  15. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the July 2001 to September 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. An internal program kickoff was held at Honeywell in Torrance, CA. The program structure was outlined and the overall technical approach for the program was presented to the team members. Detail program schedules were developed and detailed objectives were defined. Initial work has begun on the system design and pressurized SOFC operation.

  16. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

  17. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers SubfoldersU.S. RefiningDistributed EnergyUntapped

  18. 1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed Generation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    -scale electric generation facilities to participate in distributed generation (DG) with few requirements on power-purchase1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed is maximized via procuring power from DGs and the market at a minimum expense. On the other hand, each DG unit

  19. Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required for the selection of interruption devices, protective relays, and their coordination. Systems must Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault in siting conventional generation ­ but, for whatever reason, protection engineers as well as transmission

  20. Applying epoch-era analysis for homeowner selection of distributed generation power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piña, Alexander L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current shift from centralized energy generation to a more distributed model has opened a number of choices for homeowners to provide their own power. While there are a number of systems to purchase, there are no tools ...

  1. Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atlas, R. D.

    improvements in the reliability and efficiency of the system. Recent studies have shown that more than 40% of all in stalled steam traps and 20% of certain types of valves n~ed ' some form of corrective action. The majority of all high backpressure... problems in condensate return systems are due to poor design criteria in expanding or retrofitting existing return systems. By instituting a maintenance management program,a 95% reliability can be gained with two to four annual maintenance cyc...

  2. Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion Engine Prime Mover Caterpillar G379 Heat Recovery Systems Built-in Fuel Biogas...

  3. Operation and Control of Distribution Systems with high level integration of Renewable Generation units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    models Probabilistic methodologies are being applied to power system analysis since 70' [9] becauseOperation and Control of Distribution Systems with high level integration of Renewable Generation. Diagonal 649 Pavelló A, 08028 Barcelona, Spain Summary Traditional power systems have a hierarchical

  4. Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : bDistributed

  5. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  6. Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

    2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

  7. Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off-grid systems where extending the grid is too expensive or impractical. Because they are installed close to the load, DG systems avoid some of the disadvantages of large, central power plants, such as transmission and distribution losses over long electric lines.

  8. CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    an independent cost analysis to interconnect and integrate increased penetration levels of renewable distributed costs. The Energy Commission considers this study a first step toward the 2012 Integrated Energy Policy Generation Integration Cost Study: Analytical Framework. California Energy Commission. CEC2002013007. i

  9. Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy Policies & Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs Distributed generation...

  10. Distributed generation and demand side management : applications to transmission system operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayes, Barry Patrick

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity networks are undergoing a period of rapid change and transformation, with increased penetration levels of renewable-based distributed generation, and new influences on electricity end-use patterns from ...

  11. Index for the Evaluation of Distributed Generation Impacts on Distribution System Luis F. Ochoa (1,2)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    decisions that lead to the best management of the system, regarding both technical and economical aspects. Various studies have demonstrated that integration of DG in distribution networks may create technical in voltage control processes, diminish or increase losses, etc. In fact, all our knowledge about distribution

  12. Subsystem Interaction Analysis in Power Distribution Systems of Next Generation Airlifters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindner, Douglas K.

    . Quan Keenan of Lockheed Martin Control Systems, Johnson City, New York, in providing the models control actuator systems. The aircraft power distribution system plays a central role in the development tolerant, autonomously controlled electrical power system to deliver high quality power from the sources

  13. Agent-Based Simulation of Distribution Systems with High Penetration of Photovoltaic Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    of strategic trading in restructured wholesale power markets with congestion managed by locational marginal when coupled with increased price-sensitivity of demand as realized through demand response, demand dispatch, and/or price-sensitive demand bidding. Index Terms--Distributed power generation, multiagent sys

  14. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system

  15. Report on Distributed Generation Penetration Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.; Ye, Z.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents part of a multiyear research program dedicated to the development of requirements to support the definition, design, and demonstration of a distributed generation-electric power system interconnection interface concept. The report focuses on the dynamic behavior of power systems when a significant portion of the total energy resource is distributed generation. It also focuses on the near-term reality that the majority of new DG relies on rotating synchronous generators for energy conversion.

  16. DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Director EFFICIENCY, RENEWABLES & DEMAND ANALYSIS DIVISION B.B. Blevins Executive Director DISCLAIMER capacity targets. KEYWORDS Distributed generation, cogeneration, photovoltaics, wind, biomass, combined

  17. A Study of Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Protective Load Control Strategy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhe

    different type of WTs are integrated into a DGS, the DGS presents different properties. Therefore Turbines (WT) have attracted significant attentions. A DGS with renewable sources such as WTs and solar panels is distinct from a conventional power system. The renewable generation units make a DGS

  18. Practical stability assessment of distributed synchronous generators under variations in the system equilibrium conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    synchro- nous generators driven by steam turbines have been connected to the system using a byproduct of Brazil, this sector of the national industry had already considerable experience in the usage of steam turbines, which have been extensively employed within its internal production [1­3]. As a result, several

  19. Impact of Renewable Distributed Generation on Power Systems M. Begovi, A. Pregelj, A. Rohatgi D. Novosel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , improve the voltage profile across the feeder, may reduce the loading level of branches and substation the effect of DG penetration on the actual load demand and voltage profile of the distribution feeder. However, DG systems inherently provide some benefits to the utility. They may level the load curve

  20. Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schauder, C.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

  1. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2004 This report summarizes the results of the project, "Distributed Generation Market Transformation Tools: Distributed Generation Reliability and Availability Database,"...

  2. Panel on Microgrids Systems International Conference on System of Systems Engineering, April 16-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are included. Keywords: CHP, UPS, distributed generation, intentional islanding, inverters, microgrid, power vs-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to realize the emerging potential of distributed generation is to take

  3. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Milan, Italy, Dipartimento di Energia Enrico.zio@polimi.it Abstract The current and future developments renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number

  4. Distributed generation - the fuel processing example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

  5. City of San Marcos- Distributed Generation Rebate Program (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The City of San Marcos offers a Distributed Generation Rebate Program for the installation of grid-tied renewable energy systems. The Distributed Generation Rebate Program is offered on a first...

  6. Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

  7. Evaluating shortfalls in mixed-integer programming approaches for the optimal design and dispatch of distributed generation systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    heat and power Fuel cells Building energy a b s t r a c t The distributed generation (DG) of combined Wisconsin, retrofitted with solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and a hot water storage tank. The simpler model of renewable or non- renewable sources of power generation (e.g., photovoltaic (PV) cells, fuel cells

  8. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  9. NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV...

  10. Distributed vs. Centralized Power Systems Frequency Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimarogonas, Dimos

    Distributed vs. Centralized Power Systems Frequency Control Martin Andreasson12 , Dimos V control of electrical power systems. We propose a distributed controller which retains the reference class of large- scale systems are electrical power systems, which employ automatic generation control

  11. A planning scheme for penetrating embedded generation in power distribution grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Penetrating Embedded Generation, or Distributed Generation (DG), in power distribution grids presents great benefits and substantial positive social impacts to utilities, system operators and electricity consumers. Existing ...

  12. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  13. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

  14. Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 This final...

  15. Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation M. A. Mahmud) in distri- bution network has significant effects on voltage profile for both customers and distribution on variation of the voltage and the amount of DG that can be connected to the distribution networks. This paper

  16. Microgrids: distributed on-site generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    : · Diversity of the load profile as a function of microgrid size; · Feasibility of accurate control of bothMicrogrids: distributed on-site generation Suleiman Abu-Sharkh, Rachel Li, Tom Markvart, Neil Ross for Climate Change Research Technical Report 22 #12;1 Microgrids: distributed on-site generation Tyndall

  17. Distributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Platzer, André

    system with a varying number of arbitrarily many cars. 1 Introduction Hybrid systems with joint discrete a multi-agent system, e.g., distributed car control systems. Such systems form distributed hybrid systemsDistributed Theorem Proving for Distributed Hybrid Systems David W. Renshaw, Sarah M. Loos

  18. Introduction to Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pous, Damien

    1 Introduction to Distributed Systems Fabienne Boyer, LIG, fabienne.boyer@inria.fr Sources: Cours d'Olivier Gruber, Sacha Krakowiak, Sara Bouchenak, UJF Fabienne Boyer, Distributed Programming 2 Objectives Study conceptual and practical aspects of distributed systems l Client-server model l Distributed protocols l

  19. Steam generator support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  20. Steam generator support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  1. Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation to enhance voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation Accepted 19 June 2013 Keywords: Distributed generation Distribution network DSATACOM Partial feedback connected to a distribution network with distributed generation (DG) to regulate the line voltage

  2. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  3. FRIB cryogenic distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

  4. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch OptimizationA Business Case for On-Site Generation: The BD Biosciencesrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization

  5. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    option on natural gas generation, which increases in valueL ABORATORY Distributed Generation Investment by a MicrogridORMMES’06 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid

  6. Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Minnesota net metering policy is to give the maximum possible encouragement to distributed generation assets, especially solar electric systems (MN 2008). However, according to a published set of best practices (NNEC 2008) that prioritize the maximum development of solar markets within states, the Minnesota policy does not incorporate many of the important best practices that may help other states transform their solar energy markets and increase the amount of grid-connected distributed solar generation assets. Reasons cited include the low system size limit of 40kW (the best practices document recommends a 2 MW limit) and a lack of language protecting generators from additional utility fees. This study was conducted to compare Minnesota's policies to national best practices. It provides an overview of the current Minnesota policy in the context of these best practices and other jurisdictions' net metering policies, as well as a qualitative assessment of the impacts of raising the system size cap within the policy based on the experiences of other states.

  7. Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For the purpose of these regulations, a distributed generator is defined as any equipment that converts primary fuel, including fossil fuel and renewable fuel, into electricity or electricity and...

  8. Voltage Management of Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, James

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At present there is much debate about the impacts and benefits of increasing the amount of generation connected to the low voltage areas of the electricity distribution network. The UK government is under political ...

  9. Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

  10. Centralized and Decentralized Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Electric Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison ApproachCentralized and Decentralized Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Future Grid Initiative White Paper Power Systems Engineering Research Center Empowering Minds to Engineer the Future

  11. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

  12. Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

  13. The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

  14. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility experience with RTP tariffs is described in 3. Distributed GenerationUtilities Commission, Division of Ratepayer Advocates have also provided support on related work. Distributed Generation

  15. The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets, September 2005 The Value of Distributed Generation and CHP Resources in Wholesale Power Markets,...

  16. Cooling water distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  17. Next generation information systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limback, Nathan P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Medina, Melanie A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Silva, Michelle E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Information Systems Analysis and Development (ISAD) Team of the Safeguards Systems Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been developing web based information and knowledge management systems for sixteen years. Our vision is to rapidly and cost effectively provide knowledge management solutions in the form of interactive information systems that help customers organize, archive, post and retrieve nonproliferation and safeguards knowledge and information vital to their success. The team has developed several comprehensive information systems that assist users in the betterment and growth of their organizations and programs. Through our information systems, users are able to streamline operations, increase productivity, and share and access information from diverse geographic locations. The ISAD team is also producing interactive visual models. Interactive visual models provide many benefits to customers beyond the scope of traditional full-scale modeling. We have the ability to simulate a vision that a customer may propose, without the time constraints of traditional engineering modeling tools. Our interactive visual models can be used to access specialized training areas, controlled areas, and highly radioactive areas, as well as review site-specific training for complex facilities, and asset management. Like the information systems that the ISAD team develops, these models can be shared and accessed from any location with access to the internet. The purpose of this paper is to elaborate on the capabilities of information systems and interactive visual models as well as consider the possibility of combining the two capabilities to provide the next generation of infonnation systems. The collection, processing, and integration of data in new ways can contribute to the security of the nation by providing indicators and information for timely action to decrease the traditional and new nuclear threats. Modeling and simulation tied to comprehensive databases are progressions of the tools that can be used in new ways and further developed to enhance the mission of nonproliferation and threat reduction.

  18. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

  19. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

  20. Design of a Norm-Bounded LQG Controller for Power Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . Therefore, control of modern electric power systems becomes more and more challenging as the present trends control is essential. Moreover, induction motor loads account for a large portion of domestic loadsDesign of a Norm-Bounded LQG Controller for Power Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation

  1. Power spectrum estimates of high frequency noise generated by high impedance arcing faults on distribution systems / by Thomas James Talley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Talley, Thomas James

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    faults, and to search for possible solutions, Pennsylvania Power and Light Company (PP&L) gathered data on instances of downed conductors. [ 4 ] In a breakdown of 390 cases of downed conductors on 12 KV overhead distribution lines in 1974...-75, they found that over- current protective devices did not operate for 23%%d of the cases where the feeder had bare wire conductors, and 727. of the cases where the feeder had XLP covered conductors. These figures indicate the severity of the problem...

  2. A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

    1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student architecture for generation control in islanded microgrids, and illustrate the performance Member, IEEE Abstract In this paper, we propose a distributed architecture for generation control

  3. Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

    2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

  4. Control and Protection of Power Electronics Interfaced Distri-buted Generation Systems in a Customer-Driven Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tolbert, Leon M.

    in a Customer-Driven Microgrid Fang Z. Peng, Yun Wei Li and Leon M. Tolbert Abstract ­ This paper discusses-driven microgrid (CDM). Particularly, the following topics will be addressed: microgrid system configurations); renewable energy source (RES); micro-source; microgrid; customer-driven micro- grid (CDM), power electronics

  5. SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sy Ali; Bob Moritz

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is produced in under Contract DE-FC26-00NT40914, awarded in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy solicitation DE-PS26-00FT40759, ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Fossil Energy-Wide Coal, Natural Gas and Oil R&D Programs'', area of interest 7, ''Advanced Turbines and Engines.'' As a result of ten years of collaborative fuel cell systems studies with U.S. fuel cell manufacturers, initiated to evaluate the gas turbine opportunities likely to result from this technology, Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis has established a clear need for the creation of a turbogenerator to a specification that cannot be met by available units. Many of the required qualities are approached, but not fully met, by microturbines, which tend to be too small and low in pressure ratio. Market evaluation suggests a 1 MW fuel cell hybrid, incorporating a turbogenerator of about 250 kW, is a good market entry product (large enough to spread the costs of a relatively complex plant, but small enough to be acceptable to early adopters). The fuel cell stack occupies the position of a combustor in the turbogenerator, but delivers relatively low turbine entry temperature (1600 F [870 C]). If fitted with a conventional combustor and run stand-alone at full uncooled turbine temperature (1800 F [980 C]), the turbogenerator will develop more power. The power can be further enhanced if the turbogenerator is designed to have flow margin in its fuel cell role (by running faster). This margin can be realized by running at full speed and it is found that power can be increased to the 0.7 to 1.0 MW range, depending on initial fuel cell stack flow demand. The fuel cell hybrid applications require increased pressure ratio (at least 6 rather than the 3-4 of microturbines) and very long life for a small machine. The outcome is a turbogenerator that is very attractive for stand-alone operation and has been the subject of unsolicited enthusiasm from potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

  6. Ris Energy Report 4 Distributed generation 1 What is distributed generation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation (DG) refers to an emerging evolu- tion of the electric power generation systems, in which all of the Euro- pean Union (CEU) as an essential part of the develop- ment of the European power system the use of modelling in these contexts, including: · strategic planning and policymaking · detailed system

  7. High-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic module integrated converter system with high-speed communication interfaces for small-scale distribution power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Woo-Young; Lai, Jih-Sheng (Jason) [Future Energy Electronics Center, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a high-efficiency grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) module integrated converter (MIC) system with reduced PV current variation. The proposed PV MIC system consists of a high-efficiency step-up DC-DC converter and a single-phase full-bridge DC-AC inverter. An active-clamping flyback converter with a voltage-doubler rectifier is proposed for the step-up DC-DC converter. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter reduces the switching losses by eliminating the reverse-recovery current of the output rectifying diodes. To reduce the PV current variation introduced by the grid-connected inverter, a PV current variation reduction method is also suggested. The suggested PV current variation reduction method reduces the PV current variation without any additional components. Moreover, for centralized power control of distributed PV MIC systems, a PV power control scheme with both a central control level and a local control level is presented. The central PV power control level controls the whole power production by sending out reference power signals to each individual PV MIC system. The proposed step-up DC-DC converter achieves a high-efficiency of 97.5% at 260 W output power to generate the DC-link voltage of 350 V from the PV voltage of 36.1 V. The PV MIC system including the DC-DC converter and the DC-AC inverter achieves a high-efficiency of 95% with the PV current ripple less than 3% variation of the rated PV current. (author)

  8. Distributed Generation: Challenges and Opportunities, 7. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is a comprehensive study of the Distributed Generation (DG) industry. The report takes a wide-ranging look at the current and future state of DG and both individually and collectively addresses the technologies of Microturbines, Reciprocating Engines, Stirling Engines, Fuel Cells, Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar, Wind, and Microgrids. Topics covered include: the key technologies being used or planned for DG; the uses of DG from utility, energy service provider, and customer viewpoints; the economics of DG; the benefits of DG from multiple perspectives; the barriers that exist to implementing DG; the government programs supporting the DG industry; and, an analysis of DG interconnection and net metering rules.

  9. ANALYSIS OF DISTRIBUTION FEEDER LOSSES DUE TO ADDITION OF DISTRIBUTED PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Singh, Ruchi

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generators (DG) are small scale power supplying sources owned by customers or utilities and scattered throughout the power system distribution network. Distributed generation can be both renewable and non-renewable. Addition of distributed generation is primarily to increase feeder capacity and to provide peak load reduction. However, this addition comes with several impacts on the distribution feeder. Several studies have shown that addition of DG leads to reduction of feeder loss. However, most of these studies have considered lumped load and distributed load models to analyze the effects on system losses, where the dynamic variation of load due to seasonal changes is ignored. It is very important for utilities to minimize the losses under all scenarios to decrease revenue losses, promote efficient asset utilization, and therefore, increase feeder capacity. This paper will investigate an IEEE 13-node feeder populated with photovoltaic generators on detailed residential houses with water heater, Heating Ventilation and Air conditioning (HVAC) units, lights, and other plug and convenience loads. An analysis of losses for different power system components, such as transformers, underground and overhead lines, and triplex lines, will be performed. The analysis will utilize different seasons and different solar penetration levels (15%, 30%).

  10. Distributed Optimization System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hurtado, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Dohrmann, Clark R. (Albuquerque, NM); Robinett, III, Rush D. (Tijeras, NM)

    2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A search system and method for controlling multiple agents to optimize an objective using distributed sensing and cooperative control. The search agent can be one or more physical agents, such as a robot, and can be software agents for searching cyberspace. The objective can be: chemical sources, temperature sources, radiation sources, light sources, evaders, trespassers, explosive sources, time dependent sources, time independent sources, function surfaces, maximization points, minimization points, and optimal control of a system such as a communication system, an economy, a crane, and a multi-processor computer.

  11. Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard III, Golden G.

    Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina , Golden G. Another distinguishing character- istic for tree generation algorithms is centralized versus distributed, efficient network utilization becomes a growing concern. Multicast transmission may use network bandwidth

  12. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2005-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generated by distributed energy resources (DER) located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumer requirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid. Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associated with transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricity delivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities to purchase energy when attractive. On-site thermal power generation is typically less efficient than central station generation, but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and utilizing combined heat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scale on-site generation to displace fuel purchases, then DER can become attractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts, the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressed using a mixed-integer linear programme, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, and information (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies, DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selecting the units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. In this paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion of the option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep an inventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lower costs even further by reducing off-peak generation and relying on storage. This and other effects of storages are demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in San Francisco, California, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacity of heat storage is calculated.

  13. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility tari?s, the electricity price may be revised only Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation

  14. MHD Generating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrick, Michael (Joliet, IL); Pierson, Edward S. (Chicago, IL); Schreiner, Felix (Mokena, IL)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  15. Distributed computing systems programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duce, D.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Publication of this volume coincides with the completion of the U.K. Science and Engineering Research Council's coordinated programme of research in Distributed Computing Systems (DCS) which ran from 1977 to 1984. The volume is based on presentations made at the programme's final conference. The first chapter explains the origins and history of DCS and gives an overview of the programme and its achievements. The remaining sixteen chapters review particular research themes (including imperative and declarative languages, and performance modelling), and describe particular research projects in technical areas including local area networks, design, development and analysis of concurrent systems, parallel algorithm design, functional programming and non-von Neumann computer architectures.

  16. Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

  17. Micro-grid operation of inverter based distributed generation with voltage and frequency dependent loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeineldin, H. H.

    Distribution systems are experiencing increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG). One attractive option is to use the available DG capacity during utility outages by forming planned micro-grids. Load sharing ...

  18. Automatically Generating Symbolic Prefetches for Distributed Transactional Memories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Automatically Generating Symbolic Prefetches for Distributed Transactional Memories Alokika Dash and Brian Demsky University of California, Irvine Abstract. Developing efficient distributed applications for distributed applications. We propose a new approach to prefetching, symbolic prefetching, that can prefetch

  19. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andTotal Electricity Generation Figure 13. Small MercantileWeekday Total Electricity Generation (No Storage Adoption

  20. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, D.

    1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system. 6 figs.

  1. Quality monitored distributed voting system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skogmo, David (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A quality monitoring system can detect certain system faults and fraud attempts in a distributed voting system. The system uses decoy voters to cast predetermined check ballots. Absent check ballots can indicate system faults. Altered check ballots can indicate attempts at counterfeiting votes. The system can also cast check ballots at predetermined times to provide another check on the distributed voting system.

  2. NiSource Energy Technologies Inc.: System Integration of Distributed Power for Complete Building Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Summarizes NiSource Energy Technologies' work under contract to DOE's Distribution and Interconnection R&D. Includes studying distributed generation interconnection issues and CHP system performance.

  3. Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Li, Xueping [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

  4. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Spray distribution systems for wastewater are much like lawn sprinkler systems, in that they spray treated wastewater over the surface of a yard. This publication explains how spray distribution systems work, what their design requirements are...

  5. Distributed road assessment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, N. Reginald; Paglieroni, David W

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system that detects damage on or below the surface of a paved structure or pavement is provided. A distributed road assessment system includes road assessment pods and a road assessment server. Each road assessment pod includes a ground-penetrating radar antenna array and a detection system that detects road damage from the return signals as the vehicle on which the pod is mounted travels down a road. Each road assessment pod transmits to the road assessment server occurrence information describing each occurrence of road damage that is newly detected on a current scan of a road. The road assessment server maintains a road damage database of occurrence information describing the previously detected occurrences of road damage. After the road assessment server receives occurrence information for newly detected occurrences of road damage for a portion of a road, the road assessment server determines which newly detected occurrences correspond to which previously detected occurrences of road damage.

  6. A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

    2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

  7. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity produced by distributed energy resources (DER)located close to end-use loads has the potential to meet consumerrequirements more efficiently than the existing centralized grid.Installation of DER allows consumers to circumvent the costs associatedwith transmission congestion and other non-energy costs of electricitydelivery and potentially to take advantage of market opportunities topurchase energy when attractive. On-site, single-cycle thermal powergeneration is typically less efficient than central station generation,but by avoiding non-fuel costs of grid power and by utilizing combinedheat and power (CHP) applications, i.e., recovering heat from small-scaleon-site thermal generation to displace fuel purchases, DER can becomeattractive to a strictly cost-minimizing consumer. In previous efforts,the decisions facing typical commercial consumers have been addressedusing a mixed-integer linear program, the DER Customer Adoption Model(DER-CAM). Given the site s energy loads, utility tariff structure, andinformation (both technical and financial) on candidate DER technologies,DER-CAM minimizes the overall energy cost for a test year by selectingthe units to install and determining their hourly operating schedules. Inthis paper, the capabilities of DER-CAM are enhanced by the inclusion ofthe option to store recovered low-grade heat. By being able to keep aninventory of heat for use in subsequent periods, sites are able to lowercosts even further by reducing lucrative peak-shaving generation whilerelying on storage to meet heat loads. This and other effects of storageare demonstrated by analysis of five typical commercial buildings in SanFrancisco, California, USA, and an estimate of the cost per unit capacityof heat storage is calculated.

  8. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  9. INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as ��a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilities��. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

  10. Generating generalized distributions from dynamical simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Eric J.; Laird, Brian Bostian; Leimkuhler, Benedict J.

    2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    virtual momentum related to the actual momentum of the system by p˜5sp.3 The equations of motion generated by the Nose´ Hamiltonian @Eq. ~1!# are dq dt 5M 21p˜/s2, ~2! dp˜ dt 52„V~q!, ~3! ds dt 5 p Q , ~4! dp dt 5 p˜TM21p˜ s3 2gkBT/s . ~5! The Nose´ method... regulates the temperature of the sys- tem through a dynamical time transformation given by dt/dt5s , where t is the Nose´ ~virtual! time and t is real time. The remarkable property of Nose´ dynamics is that mi- crocanonical sampling of the extended phase...

  11. The Value of Distributed Generation under Different TariffStructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed generation (DG) may play a key role in a modern energy system because it can improve energy efficiency. Reductions in the energy bill, and therefore DG attractiveness, depend on the electricity tariff structure; a system created before widespread adoption of distributed generation. Tariffs have been designed to recover costs equitably amongst customers with similar consumption patterns. Recently, electric utilities began to question the equity of this electricity pricing structure for standby service. In particular, the utilities do not feel that DG customers are paying their fair share of transmission and distribution costs - traditionally recovered through a volumetric($/kWh) mechanism - under existing tariff structures. In response, new tariff structures with higher fixed costs for DG have been implemented in New York and in California. This work analyzes the effects of different electricity tariff structures on DG adoption. First, the effects of the new standby tariffs in New York are analyzed in different regions. Next generalized tariffs are constructed, and the sensitivity to varying levels of the volumetric and the demand ($/kW, i.e. maximum rate) charge component are analyzed on New York's standard and standby tariff as well as California's standby tariff. As expected, DG profitability is reduced with standby tariffs, but often marginally. The new standby structures tend to promote smaller base load systems. The amount of time-of-day variability of volumetric pricing seems to have little effect on DG economics.

  12. June 2014 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Documents for Power Generation And Distribution Science Subject Feed Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook NETL (2004) 118 > Electric power high-voltage transmission lines:...

  13. A Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tools to inform further discussions. Keywords-tariff design, ratemaking, distributed generation, photovoltaic, solar valuation, value of solar, cost-benefit analysis I....

  14. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    L, editor. 11 th Annual Real Options Conference, Berkeley,from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find aDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment;

  15. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    utility. Using the real options approach, we find naturalDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1.based microgrid via the real options approach to determine

  16. Poland - Economic and Financial Benefits of Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Distributed Generation Small-Scale, Gas-Fired CHP AgencyCompany Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Topics Background analysis Website http:...

  17. Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Only Load Electricity Generation By Fuel in the U.S.electricity generation from most sources, except oil, is growing to meet the growing demand and that fossil fuels

  18. Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

  19. Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhary, Sanjay

    Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG power system. Being able to operate in both grid-connected and islanded mode, a microgrid manages

  20. Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in JapaneseBuildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida,Masaru

    2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    To meet growing energy demands, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and on-site generation coupled with effective utilization of exhaust heat will all be required. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems (or microgrids). This research investigates a method of choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at the Berkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds the optimal combination of installed equipment from available DER technologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and thermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads can be served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, and cooling. Five prototype Japanese commercial buildings are examined and DER-CAM applied to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Based on the optimization results, energy and emission reductions are evaluated. Furthermore, a Japan-U.S. comparison study of policy, technology, and utility tariffs relevant to DER installation is presented. Significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the DER-CAM results. Savings were most noticeable in the sports facility (a very favourable CHP site), followed by the hospital, hotel, and office building.

  1. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    generation, smart grid and energy storage. Annex 9 is a list of pilot programs and case studies, with links to those resources. References Retrieved from "http:...

  2. Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency Hybrid Vehicles Thermoelectric Power Generation System with Loop Thermosyphon in Future High Efficiency...

  3. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, weInvestment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty Afzal Siddiqui Karl Maribu 13 for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via

  4. Distributed Generation in Buildings (released in AEO2005)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, distributed generation provides a very small share of residential and commercial electricity requirements in the United States. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case projects a significant increase in electricity generation in the buildings sector, but distributed generation is expected to remain a small contributor to the sectors energy needs. Although the advent of higher energy prices or more rapid improvement in technology could increase the use of distributed generation relative to the reference case projection, the vast majority of electricity used in buildings is projected to continue to be purchased from the grid.

  5. Next generation solar bimodal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babanin, V.I.; Ender, A.Y.; Kolyshkin, I.N.; Kuznetsov, V.I.; Sitnov, V.I. [Ioffe Physico-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Paramonov, D.V. [Westinghouse Science and Technology Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the principal advantages of a solar thermal propulsion system as compared to a conventional chemical propulsion one is high specific impulse which is proportional to the square root of a propellant temperature. Obviously, next generation solar propulsion and bimodal systems must take advantage of high and ultra-high temperatures. This requires use of an appropriate energy conversion system capable to take advantage of high temperature potentially achievable in a solar receiver. High efficiency and power density of a high temperature thermionic converter open new perspectives in the development of advanced bimodal power systems having performance significantly higher than that achievable by the state-of-the-art technology. The paper presents an innovative concept of a cascaded solar bimodal power system with a high temperature Cs-Ba thermionic converter. The paper shows that the use of high temperature Knudsen cesium-barium thermionic converter in a solar bimodal system allows to eliminate thermal insulation sleeve, generate electrical power in the propulsion mode, and precise control thermal state of the solar receiver. In the Cs-Ba thermionic converter an electron instability and high amplitude current oscillations develop. These effects can be used to obtain alternate current power directly in the converter. Possibility and potential advantage of such a generator are discussed.

  6. A prototype Distributed Audit System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banning, D.L. [Sparta, Inc., El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security auditing systems are used to detect and assess unauthorized or abusive system usage. Historically, security audits were confined to a single computer system. Recent work examines ways of extending auditing to include heterogeneous groups of computers (distributed system). This paper describes the design and prototype development of a Distributed Audit System (DAS) which was developed with funding received from Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and through the Master`s thesis effort performed by the author at California State University, Long Beach. The DAS is intended to provide collection, transfer, and control of audit data on distributed, heterogeneous hosts.

  7. Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA; Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, Roger [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating potential PV impacts.

  8. Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Weihua

    Distributed Medium Access Control for Next Generation CDMA Wireless Networks Hai Jiang, Princeton wireless networks are expected to have a simple infrastructure with distributed control. In this article, we consider a generic distributed network model for future wireless multi- media communications

  9. IMPACT OF FUEL CELL BASED HYBRID DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN AN ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    Recent developments in distributed generation technologies have enabled new options for supplying electrical energy in remote and off-grid areas. The importance of fuel cells has increased during the past decade due to the extensive use of fossil fuels for electrical power has resulted in many negative consequences. Fuel cells are now closer to commercialization than past and they have the ability to fulfill all of the global power needs while meeting the economic and environmental expectations..The objective of this paper is to study the economic performance and operation of a fuel cell distributed generation and to provide an assessment of the economic issues associated in electrical network. In this study, with HOMER (Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables) software, NREL’s micro power optimization model performed a range of equipment options over varying constraints and sensitivities to optimize small power distribution systems. Its flexibility makes it useful in the evaluation of design issues in the planning and early decision-making phase of rural electrification projects. This study concludes that fuel cell systems appear competitive today if is connected with proposed hybrid DG in an AC distribution grid. The overall energy management strategy for coordinating the power flows among the different energy sources is presented with cost-effective approach.

  10. Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development 2012 DOE...

  11. Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We model the operating decisions of a commercial enterprisethatneeds to satisfy its periodic electricity demand with either on-sitedistributed generation (DG) or purchases from the wholesale market. Whilethe former option involves electricity generation at relatively high andpossibly stochastic costs from a set of capacity-constrained DGtechnologies, the latter implies unlimited open-market transactions atstochastic prices. A stochastic dynamic programme (SDP) is used to solvethe resulting optimisation problem. By solving the SDP with and withoutthe availability of DG units, the implied option values of the DG unitsare obtained.

  12. Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 5th October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Zhihua

    , and the system reliability is improved. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed secondary networks reduce the system reliability. More reliable and sparse communication networks can be accommodated of multiple photovoltaic generators in a power distribution system [16]. Networked multi-agent systems have

  13. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    purchase abs. cooling offset electric supply (kW) hourTariffs electric supply (kW) abs. cooling offset purchasecooling offset Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs electric supply (

  14. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of2007) and the 2007 Real Options Conference in Berkeley, CA,distributed generation, real options JEL Codes: D81, Q40

  15. Advanced Distributed Generation LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindeySanta Clara,Addington,Admire,CA 94105Advanced Distributed

  16. Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

  17. Dynamic equivalencing of distribution network with embedded generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Xiaodan Selina

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy generation will play an important role in solving the climate change problem. With renewable electricity generation increasing, there will be some significant changes in electric power systems, ...

  18. Insertion of Distributed Generation into Rural Feeders , R. MORENO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    -generating technologies with new technologies that pollute less. Therefore, the use of renewable energies in the worldwide of renewable energy distributed generators (DG) to radial feeders is assessed. Often, the long distance between, however, are not usually designed to receive energy at the consumer end. This problem intensifies

  19. Introduction to Network Analysis 21 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safro, Ilya

    Introduction to Network Analysis 21 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions we add zero term because of infinity #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 22 Number of second neighbors of a vertex Probability of having k second neighbors given m first neighbors degree distribution Prob excess degrees of m

  20. Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

  1. Standard Data Exchanges for Distribution System Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas E. McDermott

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Databases and software tools for electric power distribution systems have not been integrated, and this leads to extra costs and restrictions imposed on utilities and other stakeholders. For example, distributed resource integration studies and modern grid technology assessments are more difficult and costly. New vendors face high market entry barriers, because it’s necessary to interface with large and customized data systems at each potential utility customer. This project promotes data and software tool integration, through a set of data translators based on a common object model. The data translators are delivered as open-source software, using appropriate Web software technologies. The parties who benefit include electric utilities (and their ratepayers), researchers at government laboratories and universities, small software companies wishing to enter the electric utility market, and parties wishing to interconnect distributed generation to a utility system.

  2. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  3. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  4. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  5. The Effect of Distributed Energy Resource Competition with Central Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, SW

    2003-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Distributed Energy Resource (DER) has been touted as a clean and efficient way to generate electricity at end-use sites, potentially allowing the exhaust heat to be put to good use as well. However, despite its environmental acceptability compared to many other types of generation, it has faced some disapproval because it may displace other, cleaner generation technologies. The end result could be more pollution than if the DER were not deployed. On the other hand, the DER may be competing against older power plants. If the DER is built then these other plants may be retired sooner, reducing their emissions. Or it may be that DER does not directly compete against either new or old plant capacity at the decision-maker level, and increased DER simply reduces the amount of time various plants operate. The key factor is what gets displaced if DER is added. For every kWh made by DER a kWh (or more with losses) of other production is not made. If enough DER is created, some power plants will get retired or not get built so not only their production but their capacity is displaced. Various characteristics of the power system in a region will influence how DER impacts the operation of the grid. The growth in demand in the region may influence whether new plants are postponed or old plants retired. The generation mix, including the fuel types, efficiencies, and emission characteristics of the plants in the region will factor into the overall competition. And public policies such as ease of new construction, emissions regulations, and fuel availability will also come into consideration.

  6. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akopov, N Z; Nersessian, A B; Savvidy, G K; Greiner, W

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  7. Fast K System Generators of Pseudorandom Numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Z. Akopov; E. M. Madounts; A. B. Nersesian; G. K. Savvidy; W. Greiner

    1993-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest fast algorithm for the matrix generator of pseudorandom numbers based on Kolmogorov-Anosov K systems which has been earliar proposed in \\cite{savvidy1,akopov1}. This algorithm reduces $N^{2}$ operation of the matrix generator to $NlnN$ and essentially reduces the generation time. It also clarifies the algebraic structure of this type of K system generators.

  8. Constructing Reliable Distributed Communication Systems with CORBA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    Constructing Reliable Distributed Communication Systems with CORBA Silvano Maffeis Douglas C model to support reliable data- and process- oriented distributed systems that communicate through syn distributed object computing systems with CORBA. First, we examine the question of whether reliable applica

  9. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  10. Invariant Generation for Parametrized Systems using SelfReflection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    including device drivers, distributed systems, and robotic swarms. In this paper we describe a technique that enables leveraging off­the­shelf invariant generators designed for sequential programs to infer invariants settings including device drivers, distributed algorithms, concurrent data structures, robotic swarms

  11. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  12. Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power to control voltage of distribution networks with DG using reactive power compensation approach. In this paper profile within the specified limits, it is essential to regulate the reactive power of the compensators

  13. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franconi, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gabel and Andresen, HVAC Secondary Toolkil. Atlanta: ASHRAE,P_02 Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Designdesign and operation of the HVAC thermal distribution system

  14. Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems Building America Webinar: Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems This webinar was presented by research team...

  15. Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Air distribution effectiveness with stratified air distribution systems Kisup Lee* Zheng Jiang, Ph.D Qingyan Chen, Ph.D. Student Member ASHRAE Fellow ASHRAE ABSTRACT Stratified air distribution systems such as Traditional Displacement Ventilation (TDV) and Under- Floor Air Distribution (UFAD

  16. March 2015 Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation And Distribution...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report Tom McDermott (2010) 67 Frequency Control Concerns in the North American Electric Power System Kirby, B.J. (2003) 64 A...

  17. Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat and Power potentially increase exposure to air pollutants. When distributed generation is efficiently deployed to determine accurately the efficiencies and emissions of various applications of distributed generation

  18. Cascade Failures from Distributed Generation in Power Grids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scala, Antonio; Scoglio, Caterina

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power grids are nowadays experiencing a transformation due to the introduction of Distributed Generation based on Renewable Sources. At difference with classical Distributed Generation, where local power sources mitigate anomalous user consumption peaks, Renewable Sources introduce in the grid intrinsically erratic power inputs. By introducing a simple schematic (but realistic) model for power grids with stochastic distributed generation, we study the effects of erratic sources on the robustness of several IEEE power grid test networks with up to 2000 buses. We find that increasing the penetration of erratic sources causes the grid to fail with a sharp transition. We compare such results with the case of failures caused by the natural increasing power demand.

  19. Enhanced distributed energy resource system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atcitty, Stanley (Albuquerque, NM); Clark, Nancy H. (Corrales, NM); Boyes, John D. (Albuquerque, NM); Ranade, Satishkumar J. (Las Cruces, NM)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A power transmission system including a direct current power source electrically connected to a conversion device for converting direct current into alternating current, a conversion device connected to a power distribution system through a junction, an energy storage device capable of producing direct current connected to a converter, where the converter, such as an insulated gate bipolar transistor, converts direct current from an energy storage device into alternating current and supplies the current to the junction and subsequently to the power distribution system. A microprocessor controller, connected to a sampling and feedback module and the converter, determines when the current load is higher than a set threshold value, requiring triggering of the converter to supply supplemental current to the power transmission system.

  20. A New Approach to Mitigate the Impact of Distributed Generation on the Overcurrent Protection Scheme of Radial Distribution Feeders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Funmilayo, Hamed

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................5 2.3. Overcurrent Protection Coordination Rules ....................................................10 2.4. Distributed Generation (DG) in Radial Feeders ..............................................15 2.5. Radial Feeder with DG.............................................................................29 3.3. System Protection............................................................................................31 3.4. Interconnection Protection...............................................................................35 3.5. DG Unit...

  1. Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014738 Published: J. M. Pearce, "Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic + Combined Heat.08.012 Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic and power (CHP) systems has provided the opportunity for inhouse power backup of residentialscale

  2. Generate Uniform Transverse Distributed Electron Beam along a Beam Line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been reported that transverse distribution shaping can help to further enhance the energy extraction efficiency in a terawatt, tapered X-ray free-electron laser. Thus, methods of creating and keeping almost uniform transverse distributed (UTD) beam within undulators are required. This study shows that a UTD electron beam can be generated within evenly distributed drift sections where undulators can be placed, by means of octupoles and particular optics. A concrete design is presented, and numerical simulations are done to verify the proposed method.

  3. Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 8th July 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Yong

    , in a practical power system, the transmission topology can change as a result of maintenance and network network topology in an electric power system. The modelling is accomplished in a coordinatedPublished in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 8th July 2013 Revised on 31st

  4. Introduction to Network Analysis 15 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Introduction to Network Analysis 15 Generating Functions and Degree Distributions #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 16 Polylogarithm drawn values add to a specific sum #12;Introduction to Network Analysis-loops, multi-edges #12;Introduction to Network Analysis 18 Configuration Model Conclusion: expected number

  5. Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte Dipartimento di Fisica ingredient in achieving all of these goals is the integration of parton distri- butions within Monte Carlo, and data collected in an experimental fiducial region. Whereas next-to-leading (NLO) order Monte Carlo

  6. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transport trailer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ard, K.E.; King, D.A.; Leigh, H.; Satoh, J.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, MSIN N1-25, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System, designated as System 100, comprises four major systems. The four major systems are designated as the Packaging System (System 120), Trailer System (System 140), Operations and Ancillary Equipment System (System 160), and Shipping and Receiving Facility Transport System (System 180). Packaging System (System 120), including the RTG packaging is licensed (regulatory) hardware; it is certified by the U.S. Department of Energy to be in accordance with Title 10, {ital Code} {ital of} {ital Federal} {ital Regulations}, Part 71 (10 CFR 71). System 140, System 160, and System 180 are nonlicensed (nonregulatory) hardware. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

  7. Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

  8. RANDOM VARIATE GENERATION FOR THE DIGAMMA AND TRIGAMMA DISTRIBUTIONS Luc Devroye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devroye, Luc

    RANDOM VARIATE GENERATION FOR THE DIGAMMA AND TRIGAMMA DISTRIBUTIONS Luc Devroye School of Computer these distributions and selected generalized hypergeometric distributions. The generators can also be used for the discrete stable distribution, the Yule distribution, Mizutani's distribution and the Waring distribution

  9. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fortunately, inverter data from a customer with a PV systemsystem, in series with a PV array and ahead of the inverter,PV is fed into an inverter to feed energy into the distribution system.

  10. Laser spark distribution and ignition system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woodruff, Steven (Morgantown, WV); McIntyre, Dustin L. (Morgantown, WV)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser spark distribution and ignition system that reduces the high power optical requirements for use in a laser ignition and distribution system allowing for the use of optical fibers for delivering the low peak energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. An optical distributor distributes and delivers optical pumping energy from an optical pumping source to multiple combustion chambers incorporating laser oscillators or laser amplifiers for inducing a laser spark within a combustion chamber. The optical distributor preferably includes a single rotating mirror or lens which deflects the optical pumping energy from the axis of rotation and into a plurality of distinct optical fibers each connected to a respective laser media or amplifier coupled to an associated combustion chamber. The laser spark generators preferably produce a high peak power laser spark, from a single low power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

  11. Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

  12. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage...UTILITYIINDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS INVOLVING DISTRIBUTED GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EVOLVING ELECTRICITY MARKETS Daniel M. Rastler Manager, Fuel Cells and Distributed Generation Electric Power Research Institute Palo Alto, California ABSTRACT...

  13. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid UnderUncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a California-based microgrid s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generating cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generating cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit.

  14. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a California-based microgrid?s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find a natural gas generation cost threshold that triggers DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid increases DG investment, while the option to disconnect from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generation cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit when two sources of uncertainty exist.

  15. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

    2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

  16. Distribution System Voltage Regulation by Distributed Energy Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ceylan, Oguzhan [ORNL; Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a control method to regulate voltages in 3 phase unbalanced electrical distribution systems. A constrained optimization problem to minimize voltage deviations and maximize distributed energy resource (DER) active power output is solved by harmony search algorithm. IEEE 13 Bus Distribution Test System was modified to test three different cases: a) only voltage regulator controlled system b) only DER controlled system and c) both voltage regulator and DER controlled system. The simulation results show that systems with both voltage regulators and DER control provide better voltage profile.

  17. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electricity generation currently produces about 40 percent of our CO2 emissions in per capita use of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas

  18. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

  19. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  20. Abstract--Distributed generation (DG) has brought great attention from the power community, especially

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    generation and DFACTS (distribution network Flexible AC Transmission System). In these researches, especially when it is associated with renewable energy sources, as a sustainable energy alternative. Some DG applications, especially on high penetration levels, may have adverse impact on the transmission

  1. Reliable Distributed Computing for Decision Support Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bargiela, Andrzej

    Reliable Distributed Computing for Decision Support Systems Taha Osman, Andrzej Bargiela Department of application tasks on the currently avail- able computing nodes. Distributed Systems Reliability Due decision-support systems such as water distribution net- works, involving hundreds or even thousands

  2. Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factsheet developed to describe the activites of the Distributed Energy Systems Integration Group within NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Buildings Systems Integration center.

  3. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dentinger, Paul M. (Sunol, CA); Crowell, Jeffrey A. W. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  4. Abstract--This paper presents the consequences and operating limitations of installing distributed generation (DG) to electric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are required for the selection of interruption devices, protective relays, and their coordination. Systems must Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault in siting conventional generation ­ but, for whatever reason, protection engineers as well as transmission

  5. Department of Bioengineering Spring 2013 Next Generation Hygiene System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Bioengineering Spring 2013 Next Generation Hygiene System Overview the composition of the solution. The next generation hygiene system, similar to existing industrial systems, uses. However, the next generation hygiene system overcomes several drawbacks found in existing systems

  6. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, James F. (Bonneville County, ID); Koenig, John F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  7. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  8. 1 Control Challenges of Fuel Cell-Driven Distributed Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valery Knyazkin; Lennart Söder; Claudio Canizares

    Abstract — This paper discusses the load following capability of fuel cell-driven power plants. A linear model of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power plant is obtained and utilized for the design of robust controllers which enhance tracking response of the plant and reject disturbances originating from the distribution grid. Two robust controllers are synthesized applying the H? mixed-sensitivity optimization and their performance is validated by means of nonlinear time-domain simulations. The obtained results indicate that the disturbances can be successfully attenuated; however, the tracking response cannot be significantly improved without a modification of the design of the fuel cell power plant. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion on the physical limitations on the fuel cell output power ramp and possible solutions are outlined. Index Terms — Distributed generation, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, robust control, H ? controller design, disturbance rejection.

  9. Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhamdhere, Dhananjay Madhav

    Distributed Termination Detection for Dynamic Systems D. M. Dhamdhere \\Lambda Sridhar R. Iyer E for detecting the termination of a dis­ tributed computation is presented. The algorithm does not require global are provided. Keywords Distributed algorithms, Distributed computation, Distributed termination, Dynamic

  10. Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed Generation Study

  11. Distributed Generation Study/Floyd Bennett | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed Generation

  12. Runtime Monitoring of Distributed Systems Adrian Francalanza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Gordon J.

    As systems become more complex, monolithic architec- tures are becoming less common, and distributed-based and service-oriented systems readily fit in the above architecture, as do systems adhering to the Enterpris

  13. Runtime Monitoring of Distributed Systems Adrian Francalanza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francalanza, Adrian

    As systems become more complex, monolithic architec- tures are becoming less common, and distributed-based and service-oriented systems readily fit in the above architecture, as do systems adhering to the Enterprise

  14. Voltage control of emerging distribution systems with induction motor loads using robust LQG approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    , electricity is mainly produced by large generation plants, generally located near the primary energy sources has significant performance to improve the voltage profile of the distributed generation system & Sons, Ltd. key words: distributed generation; eigenvalue; H1 norm; induction motor; linear quadratic

  15. WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mays, Larry W.

    CHAPTER 5 WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM OPERATION: APPLICATION OF SIMULATED ANNEALING Fred E. Goldman Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 5.1 INTRODUCTION The operation of water distribution systems affects the water quality in these systems. EPA regulations require that water quality be maintained

  16. Prognostics for the Maintenance of Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pencolé, Yannick

    but also higher level function prognosis. I. INTRODUCTION In the classical case, preventive maintenance of preventive maintenance for complex systems. In this sense, a distributed system can be split down into a setPrognostics for the Maintenance of Distributed Systems Pauline Ribot, Yannick Pencol´e and Michel

  17. Low jitter RF distribution system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilcox, Russell; Doolittle, Lawrence; Huang, Gang

    2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A timing signal distribution system includes an optical frequency stabilized laser signal amplitude modulated at an rf frequency. A transmitter box transmits a first portion of the laser signal and receive a modified optical signal, and outputs a second portion of the laser signal and a portion of the modified optical signal. A first optical fiber carries the first laser signal portion and the modified optical signal, and a second optical fiber carries the second portion of the laser signal and the returned modified optical signal. A receiver box receives the first laser signal portion, shifts the frequency of the first laser signal portion outputs the modified optical signal, and outputs an electrical signal on the basis of the laser signal. A detector at the end of the second optical fiber outputs a signal based on the modified optical signal. An optical delay sensing circuit outputs a data signal based on the detected modified optical signal. An rf phase detect and correct signal circuit outputs a signal corresponding to a phase stabilized rf signal based on the data signal and the frequency received from the receiver box.

  18. Decoding the `Nature Encoded' Messages for Distributed Energy Generation Control in Microgrid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shuping; Lai, Lifeng; Qiu, Robert C

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communication for the control of distributed energy generation (DEG) in microgrid is discussed. Due to the requirement of realtime transmission, weak or no explicit channel coding is used for the message of system state. To protect the reliability of the uncoded or weakly encoded messages, the system dynamics are considered as a `nature encoding' similar to convolution code, due to its redundancy in time. For systems with or without explicit channel coding, two decoding procedures based on Kalman filtering and Pearl's Belief Propagation, in a similar manner to Turbo processing in traditional data communication systems, are proposed. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity of the schemes, using a linear model of electric generator dynamic system.

  19. Building a Smarter Distribution System in Pennsylvania

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Development of an advanced distribution management system (DMS) software is at the heart of the project. The DMS monitors and controls all of the smart devices being installed...

  20. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    reliability evaluation of generation systems including Photovoltaic (PV) and Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) plants. Unit models of PV and CSP are developed first, and then generation system model is constructed to evaluate the reliability of generation systems...

  1. Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Maribu, Karl

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attraction of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplatingthe installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the natural gas price. Treatment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of the investment opportunity, which then delays the adoption decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, we take the perspective of a microgrid that can proceed in a sequential manner with DG capacity and HX investment in order to reduce its exposure to risk from natural gas price volatility. In particular, with the availability of the HX, the microgrid faces a tradeoff between reducing its exposure to the natural gas price and maximising its cost savings. By varying the volatility parameter, we find that the microgrid prefers a direct investment strategy for low levels of volatility and a sequential one for higher levels of volatility.

  2. Central power generation versus distributed generation e An air quality assessment in the South Coast Air Basin of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dabdub, Donald

    Keywords: Distributed generation Central generation Air quality modeling Reactivity a b s t r a c by the widespread installation of many stationary power generators close to the point of electricity use within from which electricity must be transmitted to end users. However, increasing electricity demand

  3. Lighting system with heat distribution face plate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arik, Mehmet; Weaver, Stanton Earl; Stecher, Thomas Elliot; Kuenzler, Glenn Howard; Wolfe, Jr., Charles Franklin; Li, Ri

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting systems having a light source and a thermal management system are provided. The thermal management system includes synthetic jet devices, a heat sink and a heat distribution face plate. The synthetic jet devices are arranged in parallel to one and other and are configured to actively cool the lighting system. The heat distribution face plate is configured to radially transfer heat from the light source into the ambient air.

  4. Hybrid solar lighting distribution systems and components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Earl, Dennis D. (Knoxville, TN); Beshears, David L. (Knoxville, TN); Maxey, Lonnie C. (Powell, TN); Jordan, John K. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Lenoir City, TN)

    2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid solar lighting distribution system and components having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one fiber receiver, at least one hybrid luminaire, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator and each hybrid luminaire. A controller operates all components.

  5. VAXclusters: A Closely-Coupled Distributed System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Richard

    of VAX computers that operate as a single system. To achieve performance in a multicomputer environment designed. The software is a distributed version of the VAX/VMS operating system that uses a distributed efficient, for example, capable of sending and receiving 3000 messages per second on a VAX-11

  6. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  7. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief...

  8. A Formal Model of Provenance in Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francalanza, Adrian

    A Formal Model of Provenance in Distributed Systems Issam Souilah2 Adrian Francalanza1 Vladimiro;Motivation Trust In a Distributed System #12;Motivation Trust In a Distributed System Distribution inherent parallelism. #12;Motivation Trust In a Distributed System Distribution inherent parallelism. Distribution

  9. GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

  10. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 6. Normalised NetCost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 7. Wait InvestCost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C Figure 8.

  11. Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jing, Qiguo

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the near source air quality impact of distributedDabdub, D. , 2003. Urban Air quality impacts of distributedDabdub, D. , 2004. Urban Air quality impacts of distributed

  12. Bringing Big Systems to Small Schools: Distributed Systems for Undergraduates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Jeannie

    Bringing Big Systems to Small Schools: Distributed Systems for Undergraduates Jeannie R. Albrecht Williams College Williamstown, MA 01267 jeannie@cs.williams.edu ABSTRACT Distributed applications have, especially at small colleges, do not offer courses that focus on the design and implementation of distributed

  13. Method and apparatus for anti-islanding protection of distributed generations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ye, Zhihong; John, Vinod; Wang, Changyong; Garces, Luis Jose; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lei; Walling, Reigh Allen; Premerlani, William James; Sanza, Peter Claudius; Liu, Yan; Dame, Mark Edward

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for anti-islanding protection of a distributed generation with respect to a feeder connected to an electrical grid is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor adapted to generate a voltage signal representative of an output voltage and/or a current signal representative of an output current at the distributed generation, and a controller responsive to the signals from the sensor. The controller is productive of a control signal directed to the distributed generation to drive an operating characteristic of the distributed generation out of a nominal range in response to the electrical grid being disconnected from the feeder.

  14. Assessing business models arising from the integration of distributed energy systems in the Chilean electric power system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Dantec, Jorge I. (Jorge Ignacio)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric power systems are more than just networks of generation, transmission and distribution assets. They are socio-technical systems, involving regulation, markets and technology availability. Presently, the dynamic ...

  15. HYBRID CONTROL OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATORS CONNECTED TO WEAK RURAL NETWORKS TO MITIGATE VOLTAGE VARIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    thermal power plants will increase the total and proportion of capacity of Distributed Generation (DG@iee.org; Robin.Wallace@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT Distributed generators are normally operated in automatic power factor-constrained bi- directional power flow may cause unacceptable voltage fluctuations that would cause generator

  16. Automated di/dt Stressmark Generation for Microprocessor Power Distribution Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Lizy Kurian

    Automated di/dt Stressmark Generation for Microprocessor Power Distribution Networks Youngtaek Kim for automated di/dt stressmark generation to test maximum voltage droop in a microprocessor power distribution and typical benchmarks in experiments covering three micro-processor architectures and five power distribution

  17. Measuring Advances in HVAC Distribution System Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franconi, E.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Substantial commercial building energy savings have been achieved by improving the performance of the HV AC distribution system. The energy savings result from distribution system design improvements, advanced control capabilities, and use of variable-speed motors. Yet, much of the commercial building stock remains equipped with inefficient systems. Contributing to this is the absence of a definition for distribution system efficiency as well as the analysis methods for quantifying performance. This research investigates the application of performance indices to assess design advancements in commercial building thermal distribution systems. The index definitions are based on a first and second law of thermodynamics analysis of the system. The second law or availability analysis enables the determination of the true efficiency of the system. Availability analysis is a convenient way to make system efficiency comparisons since performance is evaluated relative to an ideal process. A TRNSYS simulation model is developed to analyze the performance of two distribution system types, a constant air volume system and a variable air volume system, that serve one floor of a large office building. Performance indices are calculated using the simulation results to compare the performance of the two systems types in several locations. Changes in index values are compared to changes in plant energy, costs, and carbon emissions to explore the ability of the indices to estimate these quantities.

  18. Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

  19. A Distributed Facilities Automation System For IBM Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houle, W. D. Sr.

    to the host would be via an IBM-supplied local communications network protocol. Remote appli cations would include process control, security, energy manage ment, facilities automation or any other automation application. The remote systems... of these areas which are affected are: - HVAC - Chemical Processes Control - Utilities Generation - Tank Farm Monitoring Resource Management - Solvent Supply and Recovery Systems - DI Water Distribution - Sewage and Waste Treatment Plant Control...

  20. Innovative Distributed Power Grid Interconnection and Control Systems: Final Report, December 11, 2000 - August 30, 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DePodesta, K.; Birlingmair, D.; West, R.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contract goal was to further advance distributed generation in the marketplace by making installations more cost-effective and compatible with existing systems. This was achieved by developing innovative grid interconnection and control systems.

  1. Development of an Integrated Distribution Management System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Joe E.

    2010-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report details the components, functionality, costs, schedule and benefits of developing an Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) for power distribution system operation. The Distribution Automation (DA) and Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) systems used by electric power companies to manage the distribution of electric power to retail energy consumers are vital components of the Nation’s critical infrastructure. Providing electricity is an essential public service and a disruption in that service, if not quickly restored, could threaten the public safety and the Nation’s economic security. Our Nation’s economic prosperity and quality of life have long depended on the essential services that utilities provide; therefore, it is necessary to ensure that electric utilities are able to conduct their operations safely and efficiently. A fully integrated technology of applications is needed to link various remote sensing, communications and control devices with other information tools that help guide Power Distribution Operations personnel. A fully implemented IDMS will provide this, a seamlessly integrated set of applications to raise electric system operating intelligence. IDMS will enhance DA and SCADA through integration of applications such as Geographic Information Systems, Outage Management Systems, Switching Management and Analysis, Operator Training Simulator, and other Advanced Applications, including unbalanced load flow and fault isolation/service restoration. These apps are capable of utilizing and obtaining information from appropriately installed DER, and by integrating disparate systems, the Distribution Operators will benefit from advanced capabilities when analyzing, controlling and operating the electric system.

  2. Abstract--This paper proposes a distributed generator (DG) placement methodology based on newly defined term reactive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    . Index Terms--Distributed generator (DG), reactive power loadability, solar, voltage regulation, wind generator. I. INTRODUCTION istributed generation based on renewable energy sources offers a promising

  3. Impact of dispersed solar and wind systems on electric distribution planning and operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boardman, R.W.; Patton, R.; Curtice, D.H.

    1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale dispersed solar photovoltaic and wind generation (DSW) will affect the generation, transmission, and distribution systems of an electric utility. This study examines the technical and economic impacts of dispersing DSW devices within the distribution system. Dispersed intermittent generation is included. Effects of DSW devices on capital investments, reliability, operating and maintenance costs, protection requirements, and communication and control requirements are examined. A DSW operation model is developed to help determine the dependable capacity of fluctuating solar photovoltaic and wind generation as part of the distribution planning process. Specific case studies using distribution system data and renewable resource data for Southern California Edison Company and Consumers Power Company are analyzed to gain insights into the effects of interconnecting DSW devices. The DSW devices were found to offer some distribution investment savings, depending on their availability during peak loads. For a summer-peaking utility, for example, dispersing photovoltaic systems is more likely to defer distribution capital investments than dispersing wind systems. Dispersing storage devices to increase DSW's dependable capacity for distribution systems needs is not economically attractive. Substation placement of DSW and storage devices is found to be more cost effective than feeder or customer placement. Examination of the effects of DSW on distribution system operation showed that small customer-owned DSW devices are not likely to disrupt present time-current distribution protection coordination. Present maintenance work procedures, are adequate to ensure workmen's safety. Regulating voltages within appropriate limits will become more complex with intermittent generation along the distribution feeders.

  4. Plasma generators, reactor systems and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pink, Robert J. (Pocatello, ID); Lee, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A plasma generator, reactor and associated systems and methods are provided in accordance with the present invention. A plasma reactor may include multiple sections or modules which are removably coupled together to form a chamber. Associated with each section is an electrode set including three electrodes with each electrode being coupled to a single phase of a three-phase alternating current (AC) power supply. The electrodes are disposed about a longitudinal centerline of the chamber and are arranged to provide and extended arc and generate an extended body of plasma. The electrodes are displaceable relative to the longitudinal centerline of the chamber. A control system may be utilized so as to automatically displace the electrodes and define an electrode gap responsive to measure voltage or current levels of the associated power supply.

  5. Robust control strategy for PV system integration in distribution systems M.J. Hossain a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Robust control strategy for PV system integration in distribution systems M.J. Hossain a, , T t s " Robust control provides flexible photovoltaic (PV) accommodations. " A robust PV control can significantly enhance the penetration level. " The change in volatile PV generations is considered

  6. Implementation of optimum solar electricity generating system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Balbir Singh Mahinder, E-mail: balbir@petronas.com.my; Karim, Samsul Ariffin A., E-mail: samsul-ariffin@petronas.com.my [Department of Fundamental and Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Sivapalan, Subarna, E-mail: subarna-sivapalan@petronas.com.my [Department of Management and Humanities, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia); Najib, Nurul Syafiqah Mohd; Menon, Pradeep [Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, 31750 Bandar Seri Iskandar, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the 10{sup th} Malaysian Plan, the government is expecting the renewable energy to contribute approximately 5.5% to the total electricity generation by the year 2015, which amounts to 98MW. One of the initiatives to ensure that the target is achievable was to establish the Sustainable Energy Development Authority of Malaysia. SEDA is given the authority to administer and manage the implementation of the feed-in tariff (FiT) mechanism which is mandated under the Renewable Energy Act 2011. The move to establish SEDA is commendable and the FiT seems to be attractive but there is a need to create awareness on the implementation of the solar electricity generating system (SEGS). In Malaysia, harnessing technologies related to solar energy resources have great potential for implementation. However, the main issue that plagues the implementation of SEGS is the intermittent nature of this source of energy. The availability of sunlight is during the day time, and there is a need for electrical energy storage system, so that there is electricity available during the night time as well. The meteorological condition such as clouds, haze and pollution affects the SEGS as well. The PV based SEGS is seems to be promising electricity generating system that can contribute towards achieving the 5.5% target and will be able to minimize the negative effects of utilizing fossil fuels for electricity generation on the environment. Malaysia is committed to Kyoto Protocol, which emphasizes on fighting global warming by achieving stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system. In this paper, the technical aspects of the implementation of optimum SEGS is discussed, especially pertaining to the positioning of the PV panels.

  7. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Problems and Research Needs, EPRI EL-377-SR, February 1977.Electric Utility Systems, EPRI, EM-336, November, 1976. 24.of Large Generating Units EPRI WS-77-50, February 1978.

  8. Convex Models of Distribution System Reconfiguration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Joshua A.

    We derive new mixed-integer quadratic, quadratically constrained, and second-order cone programming models of distribution system reconfiguration, which are to date the first formulations of the ac problem that have convex, ...

  9. PhD Recent Graduates with background in Distributed Systems. Virtualization, Distributed Systems, Application Servers or Operating Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    and maintenance support of the project. * Work closely with internal SAP associates, external partnersPhD Recent Graduates with background in Distributed Systems. Virtualization, Distributed Systems, Application Servers or Operating Systems Global Business Incubator Location ­ Palo Alto PURPOSE

  10. A Distributed Building Evacuation System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qumsiyeh, Dany M.

    2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the feasibility of a smart building evacuation system, capable of guiding occupants along safe paths to exits and responding to changing threats. Inspired by developments in amorphous computing, ...

  11. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  12. Optimum Allocation and Sizing of DG Unit for Efficiency Enhancement of Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of appropriate size and location of DG reduces total power loss in a distribution system significantly and hence, Power loss reduction, Sensitivity analysis. I. INTRODUCTION Distributed Generation (DG) has gained its size and inappropriate allocation of generation may lead to higher power loss than when there is no DG

  13. Service and Utility Oriented Distributed Computing Systems: Challenges and Opportunities for Modeling and Simulation Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buyya, Rajkumar

    1 Service and Utility Oriented Distributed Computing Systems: Challenges and Opportunities) networks have emerged as popular platforms for the next generation parallel and distributed computing. Utility computing is envisioned to be the next generation of IT evolution that depicts how computing needs

  14. Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    & Engineering Library; Digital Library Technologies Group 5 Barb Sagraves, Head Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous Next Generation Library Taskforce

  15. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications Uses a model to predict and...

  16. Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naud, Paul S.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to Grid by Paul Naud Renewable electrical power sourcessystem based on various renewable energy resources. InCRUZ Smoothing the Effects of Renewable Generation on the

  17. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electricity markets , PhD thesis, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,USA, 1994. Joskow PL, Productivity growth and technical change in the generation of electricity,

  18. Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind. times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current state Most...

  19. Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preus, R.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses the background on IEEE 1547, including its purpose, changes, new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind.

  20. Virtualizing Operating Systems for Seamless Distributed Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dasgupta, Partha

    Virtualizing Operating Systems for Seamless Distributed Environments 1 Tom Boyd and Partha Dasgupta of the "Computing Communities" project, a joint effort between Arizona State University and New York University. Abstract Applications and operating systems can be augmented with extra functionality by injecting

  1. A Distributed System for Cooperative MIMO Transmissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

    a distributed system for facilitating cooperative MIMO transmissions in networks without multiple antenna diversity can be leveraged at the network, link or physical layers to provide energy efficient transmissions for reliable low-power transmissions. The rest of this paper is organized as follows: the proposed system

  2. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed.

  3. Distributed expert systems for nuclear reactor control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A network of distributed expert systems is the heart of a prototype supervisory control architecture developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for an advanced multimodular reactor. Eight expert systems encode knowledge on signal acquisition, diagnostics, safeguards, and control strategies in a hybrid rule-based, multiprocessing and object-oriented distributed computing environment. An interactive simulation of a power block consisting of three reactors and one turbine provides a realistic, testbed for performance analysis of the integrated control system in real-time. Implementation details and representative reactor transients are discussed.

  4. Comprehensive Diagnosis of Complex Electrical Power Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daigle, Matthew

    Comprehensive Diagnosis of Complex Electrical Power Distribution Systems Indranil Roychoudhury Abstract: Electrical power distribution systems are composed of heterogeneous components, which include and discrete faults in electrical power distribution systems that include dc and ac components. We use a hybrid

  5. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Spray Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A spray distribution system is very similar to a lawn irrigation system. Spray heads are used to distribute treated wastewater to the surface of the yard. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of spray distribution systems...

  6. Control and Analysis of Droop and Reverse Droop Controllers for Distributed Generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    Control and Analysis of Droop and Reverse Droop Controllers for Distributed Generations Dan Wu1 University, P. R. China ftang_nego@126.com Abstract--This paper addresses control and analysis of droop and reverse droop control for distributed generations (DG). The droop control is well known applied

  7. Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumder, Sudip K.

    1 Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids Muhammad. I. INTRODUCTION Effective integration of multiple distributed generation (DG) units in microgrids. Conventionally the secondary control in a microgrid is based on a centralized control structure using periodic

  8. Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    -loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

  9. Method and system for radioisotope generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toth, James J.; Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Mattigod, Shas V.; Fryxell, Glen E.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and a process for producing selected isotopic daughter products from parent materials characterized by the steps of loading the parent material upon a sorbent having a functional group configured to selectively bind the parent material under designated conditions, generating the selected isotopic daughter products, and eluting said selected isotopic daughter products from the sorbent. In one embodiment, the process also includes the step of passing an eluent formed by the elution step through a second sorbent material that is configured to remove a preselected material from said eluent. In some applications a passage of the material through a third sorbent material after passage through the second sorbent material is also performed.

  10. OPTIMAL DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION UNDER NETWORK LOAD CONSTRAINTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jason

    of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, small wind turbine or central-producers. Decentralized Power Generation (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat

  11. SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

  12. Evaluating the Impact of Solar Generation on Balancing Requirements in Southern Nevada System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Jian; Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Makarov, Yuri V.

    2012-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—In this paper, the impacts of solar photovoltaic (PV) generation on balancing requirements including regulation and load following in the Southern Nevada balancing area are analyzed. The methodology is based on the “swinging door” algorithm and a probability box method developed by PNNL. The regulation and load following signals are mimicking the system’s scheduling and real-time dispatch processes. Load, solar PV generation and distributed PV generation (DG) data are used in the simulation. Different levels of solar PV generation and DG penetration profiles are used in the study. Sensitivity of the regulation requirements with respect to real-time solar PV generation forecast errors is analyzed.

  13. Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

  14. Distributed Storage Systems for Data Intensive Computing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S [ORNL; Butt, Ali R [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Ma, Xiaosong [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this chapter, the authors present an overview of the utility of distributed storage systems in supporting modern applications that are increasingly becoming data intensive. Their coverage of distributed storage systems is based on the requirements imposed by data intensive computing and not a mere summary of storage systems. To this end, they delve into several aspects of supporting data-intensive analysis, such as data staging, offloading, checkpointing, and end-user access to terabytes of data, and illustrate the use of novel techniques and methodologies for realizing distributed storage systems therein. The data deluge from scientific experiments, observations, and simulations is affecting all of the aforementioned day-to-day operations in data-intensive computing. Modern distributed storage systems employ techniques that can help improve application performance, alleviate I/O bandwidth bottleneck, mask failures, and improve data availability. They present key guiding principles involved in the construction of such storage systems, associated tradeoffs, design, and architecture, all with an eye toward addressing challenges of data-intensive scientific applications. They highlight the concepts involved using several case studies of state-of-the-art storage systems that are currently available in the data-intensive computing landscape.

  15. Energy optimization of water distribution system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to analyze pump operating scenarios for the system with the computer model, information on existing pumping equipment and the distribution system was collected. The information includes the following: component description and design criteria for line booster stations, booster stations with reservoirs, and high lift pumps at the water treatment plants; daily operations data for 1988; annual reports from fiscal year 1987/1988 to fiscal year 1991/1992; and a 1985 calibrated KYPIPE computer model of DWSD`s water distribution system which included input data for the maximum hour and average day demands on the system for that year. This information has been used to produce the inventory database of the system and will be used to develop the computer program to analyze the system.

  16. Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

  17. Integrated Simulation Development and Decision Support Tool-Set for Utility Market and Distributed Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daye, Tony [Green Power Labs

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will enable utilities to develop long-term strategic plans that integrate high levels of renewable energy generation, and to better plan power system operations under high renewable penetration. The program developed forecast data streams for decision support and effective integration of centralized and distributed solar power generation in utility operations. This toolset focused on real time simulation of distributed power generation within utility grids with the emphasis on potential applications in day ahead (market) and real time (reliability) utility operations. The project team developed and demonstrated methodologies for quantifying the impact of distributed solar generation on core utility operations, identified protocols for internal data communication requirements, and worked with utility personnel to adapt the new distributed generation (DG) forecasts seamlessly within existing Load and Generation procedures through a sophisticated DMS. This project supported the objectives of the SunShot Initiative and SUNRISE by enabling core utility operations to enhance their simulation capability to analyze and prepare for the impacts of high penetrations of solar on the power grid. The impact of high penetration solar PV on utility operations is not only limited to control centers, but across many core operations. Benefits of an enhanced DMS using state-of-the-art solar forecast data were demonstrated within this project and have had an immediate direct operational cost savings for Energy Marketing for Day Ahead generation commitments, Real Time Operations, Load Forecasting (at an aggregate system level for Day Ahead), Demand Response, Long term Planning (asset management), Distribution Operations, and core ancillary services as required for balancing and reliability. This provided power system operators with the necessary tools and processes to operate the grid in a reliable manner under high renewable penetration.

  18. Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed Cooling/Heating...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices Energy Efficient HVAC System for Distributed CoolingHeating with Thermoelectric Devices 2012 DOE...

  19. Distributed/Stationary Fuel Cell Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DistributedStationary Fuel Cell Systems DistributedStationary Fuel Cell Systems Photo of stationary fuel cell The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing high-efficiency fuel...

  20. Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

  1. Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2: L A City, DWP Valley Generating 1: Hunters Point 2: PG &E Co, Hunters Point Power 1: SDG & E Co/Kearny Mesa GT 2:Angeles ST(4) BF(2) Hunters Point San Francisco NG, Diesel

  2. Random Boolean networks with number of parents generated by certain probability distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matache, Dora

    Random Boolean networks with number of parents generated by certain probability distributions Ray A following a Power Law distribution. Others have examined how highly connected networks use a Popularity network where the number of parents are obtained using a Power Law distribution and are connected based

  3. Topic 1: Basics of Power Systems A.H. MohsenianRad (U of T) 1Networking and Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

    ) Transmission Lines Several Hundred Miles Switching Stations Transformers Circuit Breakers #12;Power Systems Grid 7 · Power Distribution: Medium Voltage (MV) Transmission Lines ( in Smart Grid 11 Nodes: Buses Links: Transmission Lines Generator Load #12;Power Grid Graph Representation

  4. LVT: A Layered Verification Technique for Distributed Computing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olsson, Ron

    LVT: A Layered Verification Technique for Distributed Computing Systems Cui Zhang ? , Brian R of distributed computing systems with multiple component layers. Each lower layer in such a system provides languages as interfaces of systems, LVT treats each layer in a distributed computing system as a distributed

  5. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the Optimization of Cogeneration Dispatch in a Deregulatedheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use ofheat and power (CHP), or cogeneration, systems make use of

  6. A Sparse Representation Approach to Online Estimation of Power System Distribution Factors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    , constructed from the transmission network, line parameters, and historical and forecasted power generation.g., a transmission line or generator), a condition known as N-1 security [2]. Using an up-to- date system model1 A Sparse Representation Approach to Online Estimation of Power System Distribution Factors Yu

  7. Real-Time PEV Charging/Discharging Coordination in Smart Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuang, Weihua

    , if not managed effectively, can entail potential risk to the electric power system, even with low PEV penetration to the power system infrastructure or through the deployment of distributed generation (DG) units to meet for the charging of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) in smart distribution networks. The goal of the proposed

  8. Scalable Distributed Automation System: Scalable Real-time Decentralized Volt/VAR Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: Caltech is developing a distributed automation system that allows distributed generators—solar panels, wind farms, thermal co-generation systems—to effectively manage their own power. To date, the main stumbling block for distributed automation systems has been the inability to develop software that can handle more than 100,000 distributed generators and be implemented in real time. Caltech’s software could allow millions of generators to self-manage through local sensing, computation, and communication. Taken together, localized algorithms can support certain global objectives, such as maintaining the balance of energy supply and demand, regulating voltage and frequency, and minimizing cost. An automated, grid-wide power control system would ease the integration of renewable energy sources like solar power into the grid by quickly transmitting power when it is created, eliminating the energy loss associated with the lack of renewable energy storage capacity of the grid.

  9. High temperature hot water distribution system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existing High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System has been plagued with design and construction deficiencies since startup of the HTHW system, in October 1988. In October 1989, after one year of service, these deficiencies were outlined in a technical evaluation. The deficiencies included flooded manholes, sump pumps not hooked up, leaking valves, contaminated HTHW water, and no cathodic protection system. This feasibility study of the High Temperature Hot Water (HTHW) Distribution System was performed under Contract No. DACA0l-94-D-0033, Delivery Order 0013, Modification 1, issued to EMC Engineers, Inc. (EMC), by the Norfolk District Corps of Engineers, on 25 April 1996. The purpose of this study was to determine the existing conditions of the High Temperature Hot Water Distribution System, manholes, and areas of containment system degradation. The study focused on two areas of concern, as follows: * Determine existing conditions and areas of containment system degradation (leaks) in the underground carrier pipes and protective conduit. * Document the condition of underground steel and concrete manholes. To document the leaks, a site survey was performed, using state-of-the-art infrared leak detection equipment and tracer gas leak detection equipment. To document the condition of the manholes, color photographs were taken of the insides of 125 manholes, and notes were made on the condition of these manholes.

  10. Developing and Implementing the Foundation for a Renewable Energy-Based "Distribution Generation Micro-grid": A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Co-Funded Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lilly, P.; Sebold, F. D.; Carpenter, M.; Kitto, W.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The California Energy Commission has been implementing its Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) and Renewable Energy Programs since early 1998. In the last two years, the demand for renewable distributed generation systems has increased rapidly...

  11. PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith (Opal RT Technologies, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

  12. SELECTING THE BEST POINT OF CONNECTION FOR SHUNT ACTIVE FILTERS IN MULTI-BUS POWER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    and reliability. The selection of the active filter point of connection in multi-bus power distribution systems to the power distribution system, the point of connection must be carefully selected so the generated harmonic components flow to the nonlinear loads and do not propagate through the distribution system. In this paper

  13. Distributed Power Control in Wireless Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chronopoulos, Anthony T.

    Distributed Power Control in Wireless Communication Systems S. Jagannathan A. T. Chronopoulos, S layered structure in that we jointly address the issue of transmitted power levels in point to point commu the transmitter power at a given node increases not only the operating life of the bat- tery but also the overall

  14. Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillas, Serge

    , CA 94720-8163, USA, c_marnay@lbl.gov ABSTRACT. This paper examines a California-based microgrid-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold

  15. Optimal distributed power generation under network load constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, mainly because of the development of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat power (CHP) connected

  16. Distributed Power Generation: Requirements and Recommendations for an ICT Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

    . In the future of energy markets, the distributed energy production through wind and hydroelectric power plants. Some of these are sustainable (wind and hydroelectric power plants, solar cells), some are controllable, one has to distinguish between two in principle different products: consumption power and balance

  17. Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torrey, David A.

    2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

  18. Electron beam dynamics for the ISIS bremsstrahlung beam generation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Block, Robert E. (Robert Edward)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electron beam transport system was designed for use in the Bremsstrahlung Beam Generation System of the Integrated Stand-off Inspection System (ISIS). The purpose of this electron transport system was to provide for ...

  19. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation Polyethylene Polyvinyl chloride Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry Water Distribution System

  20. Study and Development of Anti-Islanding Control for Synchronous Machine-Based Distributed Generators: November 2001--March 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Z.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the study and development of new active anti-islanding control schemes for synchronous machine-based distributed generators, including engine generators and gas turbines.

  1. The Value of Distributed Solar Electric Generation to San Antonio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Nic [Solar San Antonio, TX (United States); Norris, Ben [Clean Power Research, Napa, CA (United States); Meyer, Lisa [City of San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an analysis of value provided by grid-connected, distributed PV in San Antonio from a utility perspective. The study quantified six value components, summarized in Table ES- 1. These components represent the benefits that accrue to the utility, CPS Energy, in accepting solar onto the grid. This analysis does not treat the compensation of value, policy objectives, or cost-effectiveness from the retail consumer perspective.

  2. Distributed parallel messaging for multiprocessor systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Dong; Heidelberger, Philip; Salapura, Valentina; Senger, Robert M; Steinmacher-Burrow, Burhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for distributed parallel messaging in a parallel computing system. The apparatus includes, at each node of a multiprocessor network, multiple injection messaging engine units and reception messaging engine units, each implementing a DMA engine and each supporting both multiple packet injection into and multiple reception from a network, in parallel. The reception side of the messaging unit (MU) includes a switch interface enabling writing of data of a packet received from the network to the memory system. The transmission side of the messaging unit, includes switch interface for reading from the memory system when injecting packets into the network.

  3. System Integration of Distributed Power for Complete Building Systems: Phase 1 Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, R.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes NiSource Energy Technologies Inc.'s base year of a planned 3-year effort to advance distributed power development, deployment, and integration. Its long-term goal is to design ways to extend distributed generation into the physical design and controls of buildings. NET worked to meet this goal through advances in the implementation and control of CHP systems in end-user environments and a further understanding of electric interconnection and siting issues. Important results from the first year were a survey of the state of the art of interconnection issues associated with distributed generation, a survey of the local zoning requirements for the NiSource service territory, and the acquisition of data about the operation, reliability, interconnection, and performance of CHP systems and components of two test sites.

  4. Generating the local oscillator "locally" in continuous-variable quantum key distribution based on coherent detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bing Qi; Pavel Lougovski; Raphael Pooser; Warren Grice; Miljko Bobrek

    2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocols based on coherent detection have been studied extensively in both theory and experiment. In all the existing implementations of CV-QKD, both the quantum signal and the local oscillator (LO) are generated from the same laser and propagate through the insecure quantum channel. This arrangement may open security loopholes and also limit the potential applications of CV-QKD. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a pilot-aided feedforward data recovery scheme which enables reliable coherent detection using a "locally" generated LO. Using two independent commercial laser sources and a spool of 25 km optical fiber, we construct a coherent communication system. The variance of the phase noise introduced by the proposed scheme is measured to be 0.04 (rad^2), which is small enough to enable secure key distribution. This technology also opens the door for other quantum communication protocols, such as the recently proposed measurement-device-independent (MDI) CV-QKD where independent light sources are employed by different users.

  5. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and not only by PV / solar thermal systems. To satisfy theheat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorptionphotovoltaics and solar thermal collectors; • electrical

  6. Most Viewed Documents - Power Generation and Distribution | OSTI...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of CO2 Recovery Process Charles W. White III (2003) Systems and economic analysis of microalgae ponds for conversion of COsub 2 to biomass. Quarterly technical progress report,...

  7. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging ...

  8. High Penetration Solar Distributed Generation Study on Oahu | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To:Department of Energy CompletingPresentedGeneration FY13

  9. Distributed Generation Study/Harbec Plastics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < Distributed

  10. Distributed Generation Study/Hudson Valley Community College | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm < DistributedInformation

  11. Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering ­ Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator Currently 70 biodiesel boiler system to drive a steam engine generator. This system is to provide electricity the customer needs, a boiler fueled by biodiesel and outputting to a steam engine was decided upon. The system

  12. air distribution system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by bringingArnold Schwarzenegger Governor AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR Board, South Coast Air Quality Management District, and San...

  13. air distribution systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by bringingArnold Schwarzenegger Governor AIR QUALITY IMPACTS OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN THE SOUTH COAST AIR Board, South Coast Air Quality Management District, and San...

  14. GENERATING CLIMBING PLANTS USING L-SYSTEMS Johan Knutzen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assarsson, Ulf

    GENERATING CLIMBING PLANTS USING L-SYSTEMS Johan Knutzen1 , Suguru Saito2 , Masayuki Nakajima3.cs.titech.ac.jp ABSTRACT We propose a novel method of procedurally generating climb- ing plants using L-systems. The goal and heliotropism, as well pseudo- tropisms. The structure of the generated climbing plants is discretized

  15. Velocity distribution measurements in atomic beams generated using laser induced back-ablation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denning, A; Lee, S; Ammonson, M; Bergeson, S D

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present measurements of the velocity distribution of calcium atoms in an atomic beam generated using a dual-stage laser back-ablation apparatus. Distributions are measured using a velocity selective Doppler time-of-flight technique. They are Boltzmann-like with rms velocities corresponding to temperatures above the melting point for calcium. Contrary to a recent report in the literature, this method does not generate a sub-thermal atomic beam.

  16. Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and may also be charged by CHP systems during off-peak andDarrow, K et al. (2009), “CHP Market Assessment”, Integratedwith combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within

  17. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel Cell Development Status Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes...

  18. A system for distributed intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Snapp, S.R.; Brentano, J.; Dias, G.V.; Goan, T.L.; Heberlein, L.T.; Ho, Che-Lin; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA). Div. of Computer Science); Grance, T. (Air Force Cryptologic Support Center, San Antonio, TX (USA)); Mansur, D.L.; Pon, K.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)); Smaha, S.E. (Haystack Labs., Inc., Austin, TX (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of providing security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because the network is the medium over which most attacks or intrusions on computer systems are launched. One approach to solving this problem is the intrusion-detection concept, whose basic premise is that not only abandoning the existing and huge infrastructure of possibly-insecure computer and network systems is impossible, but also replacing them by totally-secure systems may not be feasible or cost effective. Previous work on intrusion-detection systems were performed on stand-alone hosts and on a broadcast local area network (LAN) environment. The focus of our present research is to extend our network intrusion-detection concept from the LAN environment to arbitarily wider areas with the network topology being arbitrary as well. The generalized distributed environment is heterogeneous, i.e., the network nodes can be hosts or servers from different vendors, or some of them could be LAN managers, like our previous work, a network security monitor (NSM), as well. The proposed architecture for this distributed intrusion-detection system consists of the following components: a host manager in each host; a LAN manager for monitoring each LAN in the system; and a central manager which is placed at a single secure location and which receives reports from various host and LAN managers to process these reports, correlate them, and detect intrusions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  19. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well as estimated costs...

  20. Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    is to perform demand side management (DSM) [1], which aims at matching the consum- ers' electricity demand between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps upDistributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue

  1. A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

  2. Distributed Power Electronics for PV Systems (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deline, C.

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of the benefits and applications of microinverters and DC power optimizers in residential systems. Some conclusions from this report are: (1) The impact of shade is greater than just the area of shade; (2) Additional mismatch losses include panel orientation, panel distribution, inverter voltage window, soiling; (3) Per-module devices can help increase performance, 4-12% or more depending on the system; (4) Value-added benefits (safety, monitoring, reduced design constraints) are helping their adoption; and (5) The residential market is growing rapidly. Efficiency increases, cost reductions are improving market acceptance. Panel integration will further reduce price and installation cost. Reliability remains an unknown.

  3. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage... Residential Single Family Multi Family 1-10 kW 15- 50 kW Ultra micro-turbines Stirling Engines Fuel Cells PEMFC SOFC PV BatterylUPS Remote Loads 5 kW - 1,000 kW IC engines Off Grid Diesel Engine Micro turbine Stirling Engines Distribution...

  4. Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph A. Doucet and Shmuel S. Oren

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph customerownedonsitebackupdecisionswillpre-emptthe utility'splan to mitigatecompensationpaymentsbyprovidingonsitebackup generation access to The Energy Journal. http://www.jstor.org #12;Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption

  5. Impact of High Wind Penetration on the Voltage Profile of Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of wind generator the voltage of the system may become lower than acceptable voltage level due and wind generator is presented. Simulation results are given in Section III which shows the impact of high--In this paper, simulation results showing the effect of lower and higher penetration of distributed wind

  6. An Electricity Trade Model for Multiple Power Distribution Networks in Smart Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    . A microgrid is a small scale power network, which contains one or multiple types of renewable power generators complicated with the adoption of energy storage [5]. For a power network, the amount of energy generationAn Electricity Trade Model for Multiple Power Distribution Networks in Smart Energy Systems

  7. Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility Grid-Connected Distributed Power Systems National Solar Energy Conference ASES Solar 96 at least half of its energy obtained from energy efficiency and renewable resources by the year 2000. Solar energy, distributed generation resource. Investments made in solar power today are expected to provide

  8. Thermoelectric generator cooling system and method of control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prior, Gregory P; Meisner, Gregory P; Glassford, Daniel B

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided that includes a thermoelectric generator and an exhaust gas system operatively connected to the thermoelectric generator to heat a portion of the thermoelectric generator with exhaust gas flow through the thermoelectric generator. A coolant system is operatively connected to the thermoelectric generator to cool another portion of the thermoelectric generator with coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator. At least one valve is controllable to cause the coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator in a direction that opposes a direction of the exhaust gas flow under a first set of operating conditions and to cause the coolant flow through the thermoelectric generator in the direction of exhaust gas flow under a second set of operating conditions.

  9. Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssues DOE's NuclearSpurring SolarSystem,Department ofTechnology

  10. Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support Features Electric Energy System #12;#12;Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV project titled "Distribution System Analysis Tools for Studying High Penetration of PV with Grid Support

  11. Guest Editorial: Special Issue on Reliable Distributed Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firenze, Università degli Studi di

    Guest Editorial: Special Issue on Reliable Distributed Systems Shambhu J. Upadhyaya, Senior Member, designers, and implementers of distributed systems, with emphasis on system properties such as reliability with the 19th IEEE Symposium on Reliable Distributed Systems held at Nuernberg, Germany, 2000, but the topics

  12. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in San Bernardino...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Available for Download October 22, 2010 EIS-0416: EPA Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System (07-AFC-5)...

  13. Next-generation information systems for genomics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mungall, Christopher

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is transforming biology by enabling individual researchers to sequence the genomes of individual organisms or cells on a massive scale. In order to realize the ...

  14. Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed generating resources. Also provided is an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    expansion and loads needing additional electrical reliability or power quality. This introductory section of the barriers to the development of cogeneration. The final section describes solar photovoltaic technology. · Reliability upgrade for systems susceptible to outages. · Alternative to the expansion of transmission

  15. Impact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liberzon, Daniel

    in load and generation are modeled as random variables and the output of the power flow computationImpact of Power Generation Uncertainty on Power System Static Performance Yu Christine Chen, Xichen--The rapid growth in renewable energy resources such as wind and solar generation introduces significant

  16. Hot Water Distribution System Model Enhancements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoeschele, M.; Weitzel, E.

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project involves enhancement of the HWSIM distribution system model to more accurately model pipe heat transfer. Recent laboratory testing efforts have indicated that the modeling of radiant heat transfer effects is needed to accurately characterize piping heat loss. An analytical methodology for integrating radiant heat transfer was implemented with HWSIM. Laboratory test data collected in another project was then used to validate the model for a variety of uninsulated and insulated pipe cases (copper, PEX, and CPVC). Results appear favorable, with typical deviations from lab results less than 8%.

  17. Development of a Thermal Oxidizer for Distributed Microturbine Based Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Barton

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project concerns the replacement of the catalytic bed in a microturbine with a thermal oxidizer. The advantage of a thermal oxidizer over a traditional combustion chamber is that the length and temperature of the device allows the volatile species to oxidize relatively slowly and without a flame front. With no flame, the temperature increase throughout the unit is spread over a much larger volume so there is no hot spot for thermal NO{sub x} formation, and the gas Btu level does not have to be above the ignition concentration. Project specific objectives included assessment of the materials and performance requirements of the thermal oxidizer, design the thermal oxidizer system, fabrication of the thermal oxidizer, testing of the oxidizer's performance in concert with the microturbine and comparison of the performance of the oxidizer with catalytic beds and traditional combustion chambers. The thermal oxidizer was designed and fabricated with the assistance of High Country Fabrication of Casper, Wyoming. The design consists of a long set of tubes surrounded by a packed bed of loose ceramic material. The outer vessel containing the tubes and packing is a 3-foot diameter steel shell with multiple layers of thermal insulation. After the metal components were fabricated, the vessel was shipped to Denver where the insulation was poured. The unit was shipped to the cosponsor site for integration with the 100 kW microturbine device. Connection of the thermal oxidizer to the Elliot microturbine turned out to be problematic. The high flow rate of gas tended to push the hot zone out of the oxidizer as assembled. The research team identified several approaches to improve the oxidizer performance including a longer gas path, increased residence time, higher surface area packing material and improved combustion catalysts. The cosponsor is working with an engineering form with oxidizer experience to reconfigure the hardware before moving to a field trial on landfill gas.

  18. Diagnostic probes for particle and molecule distributions in laser-generated plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbrell, S.M.

    1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser microprobe analysis (LMA) offers good spatial and depth resolution for solid sampling of virtually any material. Coupled with numerous optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric detection methods, LMA is a powerful analytical tool. Yet, fundamental understanding of the interaction between the laser and the sample surface leading to the formation of the high temperature plasma (plume) is far from complete. To better understand the process of plume formation, an imaging method based on acousto-optic laser beam deflection has been coupled with light scattering methods and absorption methods to record temporal and spatial maps of the particle and molecule distributions in the plume with good resolution. Because particles can make up a major fraction of the vaporized material under certain operating conditions, they can reflect a large loss of atomic signal for elemental analysis, even when using auxiliary excitation to further vaporized the particles. Characterization of the particle size distributions in plumes should provide insight into the vaporization process and information necessary for studies of efficient particle transfer. Light scattering methods for particle size analysis based on the Mie Theory are used to determine the size of particles in single laser-generated plumes. The methods used, polarization ratio method and dissymmetry ratio method, provide good estimates of particle size with good spatial and temporal resolution for this highly transient system. Large particles, on the order of 0.02-0.2{mu}m in radius, were observed arising directly from the sample surface and from condensation.

  19. Interconnecting PV on New York City's Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.; Coddington, M.; Burman, K.; Hayter, S.; Kroposki, B.; Watson, A.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study describes technical assistance provided by NREL to help New York City and Con Edison improve the interconnection of distributed PV systems on a secondary network distribution system.

  20. Modeling of Distributed Systems by Concurrent Regular Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Modeling of Distributed Systems by Concurrent Regular Expressions Vijay K. Garg Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 We propose an algebraic model called concurrent regular expressions for modeling and anal- ysis of distributed systems

  1. Modeling of Distributed Systems by Concurrent Regular Expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Modeling of Distributed Systems by Concurrent Regular Expressions Vijay K. Garg Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 We propose an algebraic model called concurrent regular expressions for modeling and anal­ ysis of distributed systems

  2. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zavriyev, Anton

    2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  3. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  4. Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell system and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liso, Vincenzo

    Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell system. Keywords: Energy system modeling, Solid oxide fuel cell, Absorption heat pump. 1. Introduction 1

  5. Key factors affecting voltage oscillations of distribution networks with distributed generation and induction motor loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    of distributed energy sources such as, combined heat and power (CHP), wind, solar, and fuel cells, are expected and IT, The University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia b Future Grid Research Centre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia c Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University

  6. Opis: Reliable Distributed Systems in OCaml Pierre-Evariste Dagand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuncak, Viktor

    Opis: Reliable Distributed Systems in OCaml Pierre-´Evariste Dagand ENS Cachan-Bretagne, France languages provide an excellent vehicle for developing and debugging distributed systems. We present Opis, a functional-reactive approach for de- veloping distributed systems in Objective Caml. An Opis protocol

  7. Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friedman, Eby G.

    Distributed Power Delivery for Energy Efficient and Low Power Systems Selc¸uk K¨ose Department throughout a power distribution system. Due to the parasitic impedances of the power distribution networks current to the load circuits [3]. The complexity of the high performance power delivery systems has

  8. Electric Grid State Estimators for Distribution Systems with Microgrids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Vijay

    46556 Emails: {jhuang6,vgupta2,huang}@nd.edu Abstract--In the development of smart grid, state] into the distribution systems of the power grid. Such integration complicates the operation of distribution systemsElectric Grid State Estimators for Distribution Systems with Microgrids Jing Huang, Vijay Gupta

  9. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    station plants or wind generators and compare bulk storageutilization and the wind generator at 30 percent average,in one case, and by wind generators in the other. tion

  10. FEMTOSECOND TIMING DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR NEXT GENERATION ACCELERATORS AND LIGHT SOURCES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Li-Jin [Idesta Quantum Electronics, LLC

    2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Femtosecond Timing Distribution At LCLS Free-electron-lasers (FEL) have the capability of producing high photon flux from the IR to the hard x-ray wavelength range and to emit femtosecond and eventually even at-tosecond pulses. This makes them an ideal tool for fundamental as well as applied re-search. Timing precision at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) between the x-ray FEL (XFEL) and ultrafast optical lasers is currently no better than 100 fs RMS. Ideally this precision should be much better and could be limited only by the x-ray pulse duration, which can be as short as a few femtoseconds. An increasing variety of science problems involving electron and nuclear dynamics in chemical and material systems will become accessible as the timing improves to a few femtoseconds. Advanced methods of electron beam conditioning or pulse injection could allow the FEL to achieve pulse durations less than one femtosecond. The objec-tive of the work described in this proposal is to set up an optical timing distribution sys-tem based on modelocked Erbium doped fiber lasers at LCLS facility to improve the timing precision in the facility and allow time stamping with a 10 fs precision. The primary commercial applications for optical timing distributions systems are seen in the worldwide accelerator facilities and next generation light sources community. It is reasonable to expect that at least three major XFELs will be built in the next decade. In addition there will be up to 10 smaller machines, such as FERMI in Italy and Maxlab in Sweden, plus the market for upgrading already existing facilities like Jefferson Lab. The total market is estimated to be on the order of a 100 Million US Dollars. The company owns the exclusive rights to the IP covering the technology enabling sub-10 fs synchronization systems. Testing this technology, which has set records in a lab environment, at LCLS, hence in a real world scenario, is an important corner stone of bringing the technology to market.

  11. Control and regulation of modern distribution system, ForskEL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    system, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Control and regulation of modern distribution system, ForskEL Country Denmark Coordinates...

  12. 6.824 Distributed Computer Systems, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, Robert Tappan

    Abstractions and implementation techniques for design of distributed systems; server design, network programming, naming, storage systems, security, and fault tolerance. Readings from current literature. 6 Engineering ...

  13. Best Management Practice #3: Distribution System Audits, Leak...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Leaks in distribution systems are caused by a number of factors, including pipe corrosion, high system pressure, construction disturbances, frost damage, damaged joints, and...

  14. Co-generation: a new energy system to generate both steam and electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carraway, P.M.; Kloth, T.L.; Bull, A.D.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A discussion is presented of the installation and operation of a co-generation system at Tenneco's Fee ''C'' Lease, whereby hot combustion gas from a turbine fueled by gas or lease crude will be used to generate steam for enhanced recovery, with the same turbine providing the power to generate electricity for sale to a utility. A summary is also given of the history of the project, some of the contractual requirements, the physical layout of the system, component descriptions, environmental considerations, and the composition of the final system.

  15. Architectural Concerns in Distributed and Mobile Collaborative Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dustdar, Schahram

    Architectural Concerns in Distributed and Mobile Collaborative Systems Schahram Dustdar Harald Gall Distributed Systems Group, Vienna University of Technology Argentinierstrasse 8/184-1 A-1040 Wien, Austria to integrate Workflow Management Systems (WfMS), Groupware Systems, and Busi- ness Process Modeling Systems

  16. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  17. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at customer sites to address peak load. 2 Using these resources could reduce required installed capacity and would increase the operating reserve margins for the network,...

  18. Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

  19. Interconnecting PV on New York City's Secondary Network Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Anderson; M. Coddington; K. Burman; S. Hayter; B. Kroposki; and A. Watson

    2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has teamed with cities across the country through the Solar America Cities (SAC) partnership program to help reduce barriers and accelerate implementation of solar energy. The New York City SAC team is a partnership between the City University of New York (CUNY), the New York City Mayor s Office of Long-term Planning and Sustainability, and the New York City Economic Development Corporation (NYCEDC).The New York City SAC team is working with DOE s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Con Edison, the local utility, to develop a roadmap for photovoltaic (PV) installations in the five boroughs. The city set a goal to increase its installed PV capacity from1.1 MW in 2005 to 8.1 MW by 2015 (the maximum allowed in 2005). A key barrier to reaching this goal, however, is the complexity of the interconnection process with the local utility. Unique challenges are associated with connecting distributed PV systems to secondary network distribution systems (simplified to ���¢��������networks���¢������� in this report). Although most areas of the country use simpler radial distribution systems to distribute electricity, larger metropolitan areas like New York City typically use networks to increase reliability in large load centers. Unlike the radial distribution system, where each customer receives power through a single line, a network uses a grid of interconnected lines to deliver power to each customer through several parallel circuits and sources. This redundancy improves reliability, but it also requires more complicated coordination and protection schemes that can be disrupted by energy exported from distributed PV systems. Currently, Con Edison studies each potential PV system in New York City to evaluate the system s impact on the network, but this is time consuming for utility engineers and may delay the customer s project or add cost for larger installations. City leaders would like to streamline this process to facilitate faster, simpler, and less expensive distributed PV system interconnections. To assess ways to improve the interconnection process, NREL conducted a four-part study with support from DOE. The NREL team then compiled the final reports from each study into this report. In Section 1���¢��������PV Deployment Analysis for New York City���¢��������we analyze the technical potential for rooftop PV systems in the city. This analysis evaluates potential PV power production in ten Con Edison networks of various locations and building densities (ranging from high density apartments to lower density single family homes). Next, we compare the potential power production to network loads to determine where and when PV generation is most likely to exceed network load and disrupt network protection schemes. The results of this analysis may assist Con Edison in evaluating future PV interconnection applications and in planning future network protection system upgrades. This analysis may also assist other utilities interconnecting PV systems to networks by defining a method for assessing the technical potential of PV in the network and its impact on network loads. Section 2���¢��������A Briefing for Policy Makers on Connecting PV to a Network Grid���¢��������presents an overview intended for nontechnical stakeholders. This section describes the issues associated with interconnecting PV systems to networks, along with possible solutions. Section 3���¢��������Technical Review of Concerns and Solutions to PV Interconnection in New Y

  20. Detection of contamination of municipal water distribution systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the detection of contaminates of a fluid in a conduit. The conduit is part of a fluid distribution system. A chemical or biological sensor array is connected to the conduit. The sensor array produces an acoustic signal burst in the fluid upon detection of contaminates in the fluid. A supervisory control system connected to the fluid and operatively connected to the fluid distribution system signals the fluid distribution system upon detection of contaminates in the fluid.

  1. Individual Module Maximum Power Point Tracking for Thermoelectric Generator Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaltz, Erik

    of Thermo Electric Generator (TEG) systems a power converter is often inserted between the TEG system that the TEG system produces the maximum power. However, if the conditions, e.g. temperature, health, age, etc find the best compromise of all modules. In order to increase the power production of the TEG system

  2. A design approach to a risk review for fuel cell-based distributed cogeneration systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luthringer, Kristin Lyn

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A risk review of a fuel cell-based distributed co-generation (FC-Based DCG) system was conducted to identify and quantify the major technological system risks in a worst-case scenario. A risk review entails both a risk ...

  3. A design approach to a risk review for fuel cell-based distributed cogeneration systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luthringer, Kristin Lyn

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A risk review of a fuel cell-based distributed co-generation (FC-Based DCG) system was conducted to identify and quantify the major technological system risks in a worst-case scenario. A risk review entails both a risk assessment and a risk...

  4. Energy Efficiency of Distributed Environmental Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalifa, H. Ezzat; Isik, Can; Dannenhoffer, John F. III

    2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we present an analytical evaluation of the potential of occupant-regulated distributed environmental control systems (DECS) to enhance individual occupant thermal comfort in an office building with no increase, and possibly even a decrease in annual energy consumption. To this end we developed and applied several analytical models that allowed us to optimize comfort and energy consumption in partitioned office buildings equipped with either conventional central HVAC systems or occupant-regulated DECS. Our approach involved the following interrelated components: 1. Development of a simplified lumped-parameter thermal circuit model to compute the annual energy consumption. This was necessitated by the need to perform tens of thousands of optimization calculations involving different US climatic regions, and different occupant thermal preferences of a population of ~50 office occupants. Yearly transient simulations using TRNSYS, a time-dependent building energy modeling program, were run to determine the robustness of the simplified approach against time-dependent simulations. The simplified model predicts yearly energy consumption within approximately 0.6% of an equivalent transient simulation. Simulations of building energy usage were run for a wide variety of climatic regions and control scenarios, including traditional “one-size-fits-all” (OSFA) control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected “have-it-your-way” (HIYW) control with a thermostat at each workstation. The thermal model shows that, un-optimized, DECS would lead to an increase in building energy consumption between 3-16% compared to the conventional approach depending on the climate regional and personal preferences of building occupants. Variations in building shape had little impact in the relative energy usage. 2. Development of a gradient-based optimization method to minimize energy consumption of DECS while keeping each occupant’s thermal dissatisfaction below a given threshold. The DECS energy usage was calculated using the simplified thermal model. OSFA control; providing a uniform temperature to the entire building, and occupant-selected HIYW control with a thermostat at each workstation were implemented for 3 cities representing 3 different climatic regions and control scenarios. It is shown that optimization allows DECS to deliver a higher level of individual and population thermal comfort while achieving annual energy savings between 14 and 26% compared to OSFA. The optimization model also allowed us to study the influence of the partitions’ thermal resistance and the variability of internal loads at each office. These influences didn’t make significant changes in the optimized energy consumption relative to OSFA. The results show that it is possible to provide thermal comfort for each occupant while saving energy compared to OSFA Furthermore, to simplify the implementation of this approach, a fuzzy logic system has been developed to generalize the overall optimization strategy. Its performance was almost as good as the gradient system. The fuzzy system provided thermal comfort to each occupant and saved energy compared to OSFA. The energy savings of the fuzzy system were not as high as for the gradient-optimized system, but the fuzzy system avoided complete connectivity, and the optimization did not have to be repeated for each population. 3. We employed a detailed CFD model of adjacent occupied cubicles to extend the thermal-circuit model in three significant ways: (a) relax the “office wall” requirement by allowing energy to flow between zones via advection as well as conduction, (b) improve the comfort model to account both for radiation as well as convection heat transfer, and (c) support ventilation systems in which the temperature is stratified, such as in underfloor air distribution systems. Initially, three-dimensional CFD simulations of several cubicle configurations, with an adjoining corridor, were performed both to understand the advection between cubicles and the

  5. Clock distribution system for digital computers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wyman, Robert H. (Brentwood, CA); Loomis, Jr., Herschel H. (Davis, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for eliminating, in each clock distribution amplifier of a clock distribution system, sequential pulse catch-up error due to one pulse "overtaking" a prior clock pulse. The apparatus includes timing means to produce a periodic electromagnetic signal with a fundamental frequency having a fundamental frequency component V'.sub.01 (t); an array of N signal characteristic detector means, with detector means No. 1 receiving the timing means signal and producing a change-of-state signal V.sub.1 (t) in response to receipt of a signal above a predetermined threshold; N substantially identical filter means, one filter means being operatively associated with each detector means, for receiving the change-of-state signal V.sub.n (t) and producing a modified change-of-state signal V'.sub.n (t) (n=1, . . . , N) having a fundamental frequency component that is substantially proportional to V'.sub.01 (t-.theta..sub.n (t) with a cumulative phase shift .theta..sub.n (t) having a time derivative that may be made uniformly and arbitrarily small; and with the detector means n+1 (1.ltoreq.n

  6. Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

  7. STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CERTIFICATE OF ACCEPTANCE MECH-14A NA7.5.13 Distributed Energy Storage DX AC DISTRIBUTED ENERGY STORAGE DX AC SYSTEMES ACCEPTANCE CEC-MECH-14A (Revised 08/09) CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

  8. System Designs for Adaptive, Distributed Network Monitoring and Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baras, John S.

    1 System Designs for Adaptive, Distributed Network Monitoring and Control H. Li, S. Yang, H. Xi.umd.edu Abstract We present system designs for adaptive, distributed network monitoring and control. The ideas are to distribute some processing intelligence to network elements, and to design a dynamic interface

  9. Reliability of Heterogeneous Distributed Computing Systems in the Presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    Reliability of Heterogeneous Distributed Computing Systems in the Presence of Correlated Failures of distributed-computing systems (DCSs) has been widely studied under the assumption that computing elements (CEs of correlated failures are also investigated. Index Terms--Distributed computing, load balancing, reliability

  10. Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies’ Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Electric distribution companies shall utilize a competitive bidding process for electric generation services. The Department of Public Utility Control will be responsible for setting the criteria...

  11. Design and implementation of a prototype generator monitoring system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jianyong

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated monitoring of large generators is a well established practice in the in- dustry. Several computer systems are employed today in a, control room to monitor various part of the generator such as boiler controls, turning and cooling gear, as well...

  12. Concentrated Solar Power Generation Systems: The SAIC Dish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Concentrated Solar Power Generation Systems: The SAIC Dish Center for Energy Research at UNLV #12;Concentrating Solar Dishes Work has been underway at UNLV's Center for Energy Research since 2001 in the use of concentrating solar dishes for electrical power generation. One of these solar dishes was marketed by Science

  13. Decentralized Detector Generation in Cooperative Intrusion Detection Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpcan, Tansu

    mechanisms, distributed monitoring-detection-prevention with self- * properties and a security simulation/evaluation) which is a distributed AIS-based (Artificial Immune System) IDS where nodes collaborate over a peer-to-peer overlay network. The AIS uses the negative selection algorithm for the selection of detectors (e

  14. Remote Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Next Generation SCADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Pai H.

    Remote Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Next Generation SCADA Sehwan Kim1 Marco Torbol2, and to validate its effectiveness with long-term field deployment results. Keywords: structural health monitoring, SCADA system, remote monitoring system 1. INTRODUCTION Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the use

  15. Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Sizing Storage and Wind Generation Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B Capacities in Remote Power Systems by Andy Gassner B.Sc., University of Wisconsin ­ Madison, 2003 Supervisory and small power systems. However, the variability due to the stochastic nature of the wind resource

  16. El Dorado County Water Systems Energy Generation Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    water systems within the El Dorado Irrigation District and the Georgetown Divide Public UtilityEl Dorado County Water Systems Energy Generation Project RENEWABLE ENERGY RESEARCH www systems, there is significant room for improvement in energy management, efficiency, and reducing demand

  17. To appear in IET Generation, Transmission and Distribution, special issue on "Markets and Economics in Power Systems" 1 Abstract: This paper proposes a novel reactive power dispatch model that takes into account both the technical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cañizares, Claudio A.

    -Defining the Reactive Power Dispatch Problem in the Context of Competitive Electricity Markets C. A. Cañizares K in Power Systems" 1 Abstract: This paper proposes a novel reactive power dispatch model that takes into account both the technical and economical aspects associated with reactive power dispatch in the context

  18. Design and implementation of a prototype generator monitoring system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Jianyong

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A PROTOTYPE GENERATOR MONITORING SYSTEM A Thesis JIANYONG SUN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1996 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering DESIGN AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A PROTOTYPE GENERATOR MONITORING SYSTEM A Thesis by JIANYONG SUN Submitted to Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER...

  19. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dreier, Ken Wayne (Madison, CT); Kowalski, Michael Thomas (Seymour, CT); Porter, Stephen Charles (Burlington, CT); Chow, Oscar Ken (Simsbury, CT); Borland, Nicholas Paul (Montpelier, VT); Goyette, Stephen Arthur (New Hartford, CT)

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  20. Solar Electric Generating System II finite element analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohner, J.L.; Anderson, J.R.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 2, 1992, Landers` earthquake struck the Solar Electric Generating System II, located in Daggett, California. The 30 megawatt power station, operated by the Daggett Leasing Corporation (DLC), suffered substantial damage due to structural failures in the solar farm. These failures consisted of the separation of sliding joints supporting a distribution of parabolic glass mirrors. At separation, the mirrors fell to the ground and broke. It was the desire of the DLC and the Solar Thermal Design Assistance Center (STDAC) of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and to redesign these joints so that, in the event of future quakes, costly breakage will be avoided. To accomplish this task, drawings of collector components were developed by the STDAC, from which a detailed finite element computer model of a solar collector was produced. This nonlinear dynamic model, which consisted of over 8,560 degrees of freedom, underwent model reduction to form a low order nonlinear dynamic model containing only 40 degrees of freedom. This model was then used as a design tool to estimate joint dynamics. Using this design tool, joint configurations were modified, and an acceptable joint redesign determined. The results of this analysis showed that the implementation of metal stops welded to support shafts for the purpose of preventing joint separation is a suitable joint redesign. Moreover, it was found that, for quakes of Landers` magnitude, mirror breakage due to enhanced vibration in the trough assembly is unlikely.

  1. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 1: National assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Van Dyke, J.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Tesche, F.M. [6714 Norway Road, Dallas, TX (United States); Zaininger, H.W. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Renewable energy technologies such as photovoltaic, solar thermal electricity, and wind turbine power are environmentally beneficial sources of electric power generation. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems can provide additional economic benefits because of a reduction in the losses associated with transmission and distribution lines. Benefits associated with the deferment of transmission and distribution investment may also be possible for cases where there is a high correlation between peak circuit load and renewable energy electric generation, such as photovoltaic systems in the Southwest. Case studies were conducted with actual power distribution system data for seven electric utilities with the participation of those utilities. Integrating renewable energy systems into electric power distribution systems increased the value of the benefits by about 20 to 55% above central station benefits in the national regional assessment. In the case studies presented in Vol. II, the range was larger: from a few percent to near 80% for a case where costly investments were deferred. In general, additional savings of at least 10 to 20% can be expected by integrating at the distribution level. Wind energy systems were found to be economical in good wind resource regions, whereas photovoltaic systems costs are presently a factor of 2.5 too expensive under the most favorable conditions.

  2. Large Distributed Data Acquisition System at the Z Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Jerry A.; Potter, James E.

    1999-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments at the Z machine generate over four hundred channels of waveform data on each accelerator shot. Most experiments require timing accuracy to better than one nanosecond between multiple distributed recording locations throughout the facility. Experimental diagnostics and high speed data recording equipment are typically located within a few meters of the 200 to 300 terawatt X- ray source produced during Z-pinch experiments. This paper will discuss techniques used to resolve the timing of the several hundred data channels acquired on each shot event and system features which allow viewing of waveforms within a few minutes after a shot. Methods for acquiring high bandwidth signals in a severe noise environment will also be discussed.

  3. The integration of renewable energy sources into electric power distribution systems. Volume 2, Utility case assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaininger, H.W.; Ellis, P.R.; Schaefer, J.C. [Zaininger Engineering Co., San Jose, CA (United States)

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electric utility distribution system impacts associated with the integration of renewable energy sources such as photovoltaics (PV) and wind turbines (WT) are considered in this project. The impacts are expected to vary from site to site according to the following characteristics: (1) The local solar insolation and/or wind characteristics; (2) renewable energy source penetration level; (3) whether battery or other energy storage systems are applied; and (4) local utility distribution design standards and planning practices. Small, distributed renewable energy sources are connected to the utility distribution system like other, similar kW- and MW-scale equipment and loads. Residential applications are expected to be connected to single-phase 120/240-V secondaries. Larger kw-scale applications may be connected to three-phase secondaries, and larger hundred-kW and MW-scale applications, such as MW-scale windfarms or PV plants, may be connected to electric utility primary systems via customer-owned primary and secondary collection systems. Small, distributed renewable energy sources installed on utility distribution systems will also produce nonsite-specific utility generation system benefits such as energy and capacity displacement benefits, in addition to the local site-specific distribution system benefits. Although generation system benefits are not site-specific, they are utility-specific, and they vary significantly among utilities in different regions. In addition, transmission system benefits, environmental benefits and other benefits may apply. These benefits also vary significantly among utilities and regions. Seven utility case studies considering PV, WT, and battery storage were conducted to identify a range of potential renewable energy source distribution system applications.

  4. A digital-based excitation system for generator voltage control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Antonio, M.J.; Lawson, R.A.; Pearson, W.R. (General Electric Co., Salem, VA (US)); Speer, G.W. (General Electric Canada, Peterborough, Ontario (CA)); Crenshaw, M.L.; Murdoch, A. (GE Industrial and Power Systems, Power Systems Engineering Dept., Schenectady, NY (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Excitation systems have evolved over the years as new technology is introduced, offering easier implementations, higher reliability, less maintenance, enhanced functionality, and user friendly interfaces. Microprocessor based controls are now common in electric drives, protective relaying, turbine controls, power plant displays and supervisory control functions. The flexibility, functionality, and user friendly interface capabilities of digital controls are now available for excitation systems. This paper provides an overview of GE's first generation digital excitation system, SILCO 5, and an introduction to GE's second generation system, EX2000, currently in development.

  5. Tools for Continuously Evaluating Distributed System Qualities James H. Hill

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Douglas C.

    throughout the software lifecycle [9]. For ex- ample, test-driven development and continuous integration, and security) for distributed systems has historically occurred late in the software lifecycle. As a result the software lifecycle. Keywords. agile techniques, continuous system inte- gration, distributed systems

  6. Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianchini, Ricardo

    Dynamically Quantifying and Improving the Reliability of Distributed Storage Systems Rekha Bachwani-scale storage systems can be significantly improved by using bet- ter reliability metrics and more efficient on a distributed storage system based on erasure codes. We find that MinI improves relia- bility significantly

  7. Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayat, Majeed M.

    Maximizing Service Reliability in Distributed Computing Systems with Random Node Failures: Theory Member, IEEE Abstract--In distributed computing systems (DCSs) where server nodes can fail permanently with nonzero probability, the system performance can be assessed by means of the service reliability, defined

  8. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutz, Jim

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transportation Water Heaters and Hot Water DistributionLaboratory). 2008. Water Heaters and Hot Water Distributionfor instantaneous gas water heaters; and pressure loss

  9. RELIABILITY PLANNING IN DISTRIBUTED ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, E.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and deal only with solar cogeneration units that are assumedand Distributed. cogeneration). These provide just underparameters. as conventional cogeneration units. technologies

  10. Sensor Networks for Monitoring and Control of Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whittle, Andrew

    Water distribution systems present a significant challenge for structural monitoring. They comprise a complex network of pipelines buried underground that are relatively inaccessible. Maintaining the integrity of these ...

  11. Laser spark distribution and ignition system - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    power pulse. The laser spark distribution and ignition system has application in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives and laser induced...

  12. Carbon and Water Resource Management for Water Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Thomas Peter

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    23 4.5 Water-Energy SustainabilityWater Distribution System Water-energy Sustainability ToolWastewater-energy Sustainability Tool v   Acknowledgements

  13. Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs) not only to inject power into the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Juan Carlos

    1 1 Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs, it is well-known that the Distributed Generators (DGs) often consist of a prime mover connected through-frame control method for voltage unbalance compensation in an islanded microgrid is proposed. This method

  14. Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce earlier work of predicting tillage-generated dust emissions based on soil properties. We focus

  15. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  16. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)); Kasturi, S. (MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  17. GSpace: Tailorable Data Distribution in Shared Data Space Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    GSpace: Tailorable Data Distribution in Shared Data Space Systems Giovanni Russello1, Michel. The shared data space model has proven to be an effective paradigm for building distributed applications. However, building an efficient distributed implementation remains a challenge. A plethora of different

  18. Single module pressurized fuel cell turbine generator system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized fuel cell system (10), operates within a common pressure vessel (12) where the system contains fuel cells (22), a turbine (26) and a generator (98) where preferably, associated oxidant inlet valve (52), fuel inlet valve (56) and fuel cell exhaust valve (42) are outside the pressure vessel.

  19. Extreme events in excitable systems and mechanisms of their generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerrit Ansmann; Rajat Karnatak; Klaus Lehnertz; Ulrike Feudel

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We study deterministic systems, composed of excitable units of FitzHugh-Nagumo type, that are capable of self-generating and self-terminating strong deviations from their regular dynamics without the influence of noise or parameter change. These deviations are rare, short-lasting, and recurrent and can therefore be regarded as extreme events. Employing a range of methods we analyze dynamical properties of the systems, identifying features in the systems' dynamics that may qualify as precursors to extreme events. We investigate these features and elucidate mechanisms that may be responsible for the generation of the extreme events.

  20. Fig. 1. Single line diagram of 3-phase distribution power system with five inverters in parallel.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da

    (PV) generation, it has been showed that occasionally the PV inverters were switched off undesirably or exceeded the harmonic regulations [2]. Even though each of the PV inverter meets the grid codes, the power distribution power system with five inverters in parallel. Harmonic Stability Assessment for Multi- Paralleled

  1. Numerical Analysis of a Cold Air Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, L.; Li, R.; Yuan, D.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cold air distribution systems may reduce the operating energy consumption of air-conditioned air supply system and improve the outside air volume percentages and indoor air quality. However, indoor temperature patterns and velocity field are easily...

  2. Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

    2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

  3. Current Generated Harmonics and Their Effect Upon Electrical Industrial Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, H. R.; Rogge, D. S.

    of the nonlinear loads with respect to that system. The distortion increases as the percentage of nonlinear loads increases. (2) PROBLEMS ENCOUNTERED WITH HARMONICS High Neutral Conductor Currcnts Perhaps the dominant harmonic problem encountered... in commercial facilities and some industrial plants has been the overheating of neutral conductors of 3-phase, 4-wire branch and feeder distribution systems. In a balanced, 3-phase, 4-wire wye system with phase-to-ncutral linear loads, the neutral current...

  4. Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

  5. THE DEVELOPMENT OF DISTRI-bution systems poses new challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    are covered in a separate article. The six articles in this issue review the past, present, and the future level to respond to new energy challenges and the restruc- tured environment. The need for a change in the distribution systems of the 21st century. The Past Toward the end of the 19th century, dc distribution systems

  6. On Correlated Availability in Internet-Distributed Systems Derrick Kondo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    On Correlated Availability in Internet-Distributed Systems Derrick Kondo INRIA, France dkondo measure and characterize the time dynamics of availability in a large-scale Internet- distributed system with over 110,000 hosts. Our char- acterization focuses on identifying patterns of corre- lated availability

  7. Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, Seth

    Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation Mike He on the design of a Stirling engine for distributed solar thermal ap- plications. In particular, we design for experimentation. Stirling engines can have broad significance and technological advantages for distributed

  8. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas Turbine Commercial Microturbine Commercial ConventionalTurbine Commercial Microturbine Residential PV ResidentialGas Turbine Commercial Microturbine Commercial Conventional

  9. Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Year-0E (2001)gasoline353/06) 2Yonthly Energy : b

  10. Property:Distributed Generation System Enclosure | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump to:DeploymentSectorFunction

  11. Property:Distributed Generation System Heating-Cooling Application | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump to:DeploymentSectorFunctionEnergy

  12. Property:Distributed Generation System Power Application | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,PillarPublicationType JumpDOEInvolve Jump

  13. Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm <Site Description OtherBiogas |

  14. Distributed Generation Systems Inc DISGEN | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision| Open Energy Information At1986)

  15. Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

  16. Minimizing Energy Consumption in a Water Distribution System: A Systems Modeling Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, John

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In a water distribution system from groundwater supply, the bulk of energy consumption is expended at pump stations. These pumps pressurize the water and transport it from the aquifer to the distribution system and to elevated storage tanks. Each...

  17. Impact of Distributed Wind on Bulk Power System Operations in ISO-NE: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brancucci Martinez-Anido, C.; Hodge, B. M.; Palchak, D.; Miettinen, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented in this paper aims to study the impact of a range of penetration levels of distributed wind on the operation of the electric power system at the transmission level. This paper presents a case study on the power system in Independent System Operator New England. It is analyzed using PLEXOS, a commercial power system simulation tool. The results show that increasing the integration of distributed wind reduces total variable electricity generation costs, coal- and gas-fired electricity generation, electricity imports, and CO2 emissions, and increases wind curtailment. The variability and uncertainty of wind power also increases the start-up and shutdown costs and ramping of most conventional power plants.

  18. A DISTRIBUTED AUTOMATION SYSTEM FOR ELECTROPHYSICAL INSTALLATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kozak, Victor R.

    on CAMAC devices. Growing requirements to functions, parameters and reliability of automation components and distributing panels between terminal equipment and control devices implemented in CAMAC standard. For avoiding this problem there was decided to implement new devices as embedded devices into end equipment. We assumed

  19. Ultrashort laser ablation of bulk copper targets: Dynamics and size distribution of the generated nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsakiris, N.; Gill-Comeau, M.; Lewis, L. J. [Département de Physique et Regroupement Québécois sur les Matériaux de Pointe (RQMP), Université de Montréal, C.P. 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Anoop, K. K.; Ausanio, G.; Bruzzese, R.; Amoruso, S., E-mail: amoruso@na.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Napoli Federico II and CNR-SPIN, Complesso Universitario di Monte S. Angelo, Via Cintia, I-80126 Napoli (Italy)

    2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the role of laser pulse fluence on expansion dynamics and size distribution of the nanoparticles produced by irradiating a metallic target with an ultrashort laser pulse in a vacuum, an issue for which contrasting indications are present in the literature. To this end, we have carried out a combined theoretical and experimental analysis of laser ablation of a bulk copper target with ?50 fs, 800?nm pulses, in an interval of laser fluencies going from few to several times the ablation threshold. On one side, molecular dynamics simulations, with two-temperature model, describe the decomposition of the material through the analysis of the evolution of thermodynamic trajectories in the material phase diagram, and allow estimating the size distribution of the generated nano-aggregates. On the other side, atomic force microscopy of less than one layer nanoparticles deposits on witness plates, and fast imaging of the nanoparticles broadband optical emission provide the corresponding experimental characterization. Both experimental and numerical findings agree on a size distribution characterized by a significant fraction (?90%) of small nanoparticles, and a residual part (?10%) spanning over a rather large size interval, evidencing a weak dependence of the nanoparticles sizes on the laser pulse fluence. Numerical and experimental findings show a good degree of consistency, thus suggesting that modeling can realistically support the search for experimental methods leading to an improved control over the generation of nanoparticles by ultrashort laser ablation.

  20. Optimizing Geographic Allotment of Photovoltaic Capacity in a Distributed Generation Setting: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urquhart, B.; Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-objective optimization was performed to allocate 2MW of PV among four candidate sites on the island of Lanai such that energy was maximized and variability in the form of ramp rates was minimized. This resulted in an optimal solution set which provides a range of geographic allotment alternatives for the fixed PV capacity. Within the optimal set, a tradeoff between energy produced and variability experienced was found, whereby a decrease in variability always necessitates a simultaneous decrease in energy. A design point within the optimal set was selected for study which decreased extreme ramp rates by over 50% while only decreasing annual energy generation by 3% over the maximum generation allocation. To quantify the allotment mix selected, a metric was developed, called the ramp ratio, which compares ramping magnitude when all capacity is allotted to a single location to the aggregate ramping magnitude in a distributed scenario. The ramp ratio quantifies simultaneously how much smoothing a distributed scenario would experience over single site allotment and how much a single site is being under-utilized for its ability to reduce aggregate variability. This paper creates a framework for use by cities and municipal utilities to reduce variability impacts while planning for high penetration of PV on the distribution grid.

  1. Hybrid Control Network Intrusion Detection Systems for Automated Power Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parvania, Masood; Koutsandria, Georgia; Muthukumar, Vishak; Peisert, Sean; McParland, Chuck; Scaglione, Anna

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Security protocols against cyber attacks in the distributioncyber security weak- ness and system fragility of power distribution

  2. Distributed Energy System Validation, Commissioning and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................................................... 4 2.2 Sunny Boy PV Inverter System................................................................................ 9 3.1 PV System to Sunny Boy Inverter............................................................................ 9 3.2 Sunny Boy Inverter to PV Sub

  3. An analysis of distributed solar fuel systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Alex, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While solar fuel systems offer tremendous potential to address global clean energy needs, most existing analyses have focused on the feasibility of large centralized systems and applications. Not much research exists on ...

  4. World Class Boilers and Steam Distribution System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portell, V. P.

    “World class” is a term used to describe steam systems that rank in the top 20% of their industry based on quantitative system performance data and energy management for the facility. The rating is determined through a proceduralized assessment...

  5. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (US))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable U.S. Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The U.S. Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992.

  6. Procurement of a fully licensed radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adkins, H.E.; Bearden, T.E.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully licensed transportation system for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators and Light-Weight Radioisotope Heater Units is currently being designed and built. The system will comply with all applicable US Department of Transportation regulations without the use of a DOE Alternative.'' The US Department of Transportation has special double containment'' requirements for plutonium. The system packaging uses a doubly contained bell jar'' concept. A refrigerated trailer is used for cooling the high-heat payloads. The same packaging is used for both high- and low-heat payloads. The system is scheduled to be available for use by mid-1992. 4 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Collaborative process control: Observation of tracks generated by PLM system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkadiri, Soumaya; Delattre, Miguel; Bouras, Abdelaziz

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper aims at analyzing the problems related to collaborative work using a PLM system. This research is mainly focused on the organisational aspects of SMEs involved in networks composed of large companies, subcontractors and other industrial partners. From this analysis, we propose the deployment of an approach based on an observation process of tracks generated by PLM system. The specific contributions are of two fold. First is to identify the brake points of collaborative work. The second, thanks to the exploitation of generated tracks, it allows reducing risks by reacting in real time to the incidents or dysfunctions that may occur. The overall system architecture based on services technology and supporting the proposed approach is described, as well as associated prototype developed using an industrial PLM system.

  8. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator transportation system subsystem 143 software development plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, D.A.

    1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes the activities to be performed and the controls to be applied to the process of specifying, developing, and qualifying the data acquisition software for the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) Transportation System Subsystem 143 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition System (IDAS). This plan will serve as a software quality assurance plan, a verification and validation (V and V) plan, and a configuration management plan.

  9. Colibri: Towards a New Generation of Advanced Planning Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    forecasting consists in forecasting future sales based on past sales. In a company, one or several forecasters a company to another. However, in gen- eral, this period concerns the twelve future months. 4. Future salesColibri: Towards a New Generation of Advanced Planning Systems Fatoumata Camara Objet Direct

  10. Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation , P. Bydlowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Storage System Sizing for Smoothing Power Generation of Direct J. Aubry1 , P. Bydlowski 1 E as the SEAREV. The ESS is to insure a smoothed output power profile. First, the output set point power) control strategies in order to maintain SOC between two limits and also two power quality criteria

  11. An Analysis of Patch Plausibility and Correctness for Generate-And-Validate Patch Generation Systems (Supplementary Material)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qi, Zichao

    2015-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze reported patches for three prior generate-and-validate patch generation systems (GenProg, RSRepair, and AE). Because of experimental error, the majority of the reported patches violate the basic principle behind ...

  12. Integrated Distribution Management System for Alabama Principal Investigator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schatz, Joe

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Company Services, under contract with the Department of Energy, along with Alabama Power, Alstom Grid (formerly AREVA T&D) and others moved the work product developed in the first phase of the Integrated Distribution Management System (IDMS) from “Proof of Concept” to true deployment through the activity described in this Final Report. This Project – Integrated Distribution Management Systems in Alabama – advanced earlier developed proof of concept activities into actual implementation and furthermore completed additional requirements to fully realize the benefits of an IDMS. These tasks include development and implementation of a Distribution System based Model that enables data access and enterprise application integration.

  13. Concurrency control in heterogeneous distributed database systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Md. Rezaur

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    APPROACHES IN HDDBS . III. A Approaches Requiring Local DBMS Modihcations 17 19 III. B Approaches Without Local DBMS Modifications 22 IV A NEW APPROACH TO HDDBS CONCURRENCY CONTROL 30 IV. A The Concurrency Control Scheme 30 CIIA PTER Page IV. B... related to Database Systems in general which will be used consistently throughout this thesis. A Database system (DBS) consists of a set of dutiibiises (DB) which contain the data of interest and software, the database msnageinent system (DBMS), which...

  14. Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

  15. Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced...

  16. Distributed Control of Residential Energy Systems using a Market Maker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knobloch,Jürgen

    , in particular reverse power flow during daytime periods of peak generation coupled with low residential load distribution networks and shave peak demand without large-scale capital costs for feeder replacement.weller}@newcastle.edu.au) Abstract: The recent rapid uptake of residential solar photovoltaic (PV) installations provides many

  17. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Lodewyck; Matthieu Bloch; Raul Garcia-Patron; Simon Fossier; Evgueni Karpov; Eleni Diamanti; Thierry Debuisschert; Nicolas J. Cerf; Rosa Tualle-Brouri; Steven W. McLaughlin; Philippe Grangier

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient LDPC error correcting codes.

  18. Quantum key distribution over 25 km with an all-fiber continuous-variable system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lodewyck, Jerome; Fossier, Simon [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bloch, Matthieu; McLaughlin, Steven W. [GeorgiaTech-CNRS UMI 2958, 2-3 rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Garcia-Patron, Raul; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J. [Centre for Quantum Information and Communication, Ecole Polytechnique, CP 165/59, Universite libre de Bruxelles, 50 av. F. D. Roosevelt, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Diamanti, Eleni; Tualle-Brouri, Rosa; Grangier, Philippe [Laboratoire Charles Fabry de l'Institut d'Optique-CNRS-Universite Paris-Sud, Campus Polytechnique, RD 128, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Debuisschert, Thierry [Thales Research and Technologies, RD 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a reverse-reconciliated coherent-state continuous-variable quantum key distribution system, with which we generated secret keys at a rate of more than 2 kb/s over 25 km of optical fiber. Time multiplexing is used to transmit both the signal and phase reference in the same optical fiber. Our system includes all experimental aspects required for a field implementation of a quantum key distribution setup. Real-time reverse reconciliation is achieved by using fast and efficient low-density parity check error correcting codes.

  19. Seismic Fragility of the LANL Fire Water Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mertz

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a site-wide system fragility assessment. This assessment focuses solely on the performance of the water distribution systems that supply Chemical and Metallurgy Research (CMR), Weapons Engineering and Tritium Facility (WETF), Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility (RLWTF), Waste Characterization, Reduction, Repackaging Facility (WCRRF), and Transuranic Waste Inspectable Storage Project (TWISP). The analysis methodology is based on the American Lifelines Alliance seismic fragility formulations for water systems. System fragilities are convolved with the 1995 LANL seismic hazards to develop failure frequencies. Acceptance is determined by comparing the failure frequencies to the DOE-1020 Performance Goals. This study concludes that: (1) If a significant number of existing isolation valves in the water distribution system are closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in specific nuclear facilities; (2) Then, the water distribution systems for WETF, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP meet the PC-2 performance goal and the water distribution system for CMR is capable of surviving a 0.06g earthquake. A parametric study of the WETF water distribution system demonstrates that: (1) If a significant number of valves in the water distribution system are NOT closed to dedicate the entire water system to fighting fires in WETF; (2) Then, the water distribution system for WETF has an annual probability of failure on the order of 4 x 10{sup -3} that does not meet the PC-2 performance goal. Similar conclusions are expected for CMR, RLWTF, WCRRF, and TWISP. It is important to note that some of the assumptions made in deriving the results should be verified by personnel in the safety-basis office and may need to be incorporated in technical surveillance requirements in the existing authorization basis documentation if credit for availability of fire protection water is taken at the PC-2 level earthquake levels. Assumptions are presented in Section 2.2 of this report.

  20. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  1. Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    perspectives, some of the apparent advantages include distribution and transmission capacity relief, load peak shaving, deferral of high cost transmission and distribution (T&D) system upgrades, etc. Utility customers also gain benefits from efficient use... power variation ? P and load real power PLoad (see (1.5)) as, 1 LoadP PV ?? (1.8) From (1.8), the real power variation ? P must be set at least ? 0.20 (per-unit) so that a change in the voltage at inverter (DFPG) terminal is out of the threshold (0...

  2. Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Issaeva, Natalia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid a significant mismatch between supply and demand. Power ...

  3. THE DISTRIBUTED SPACECRAFT ATTITUDE CONTROL SYSTEM SIMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Christopher D.

    compensation of an under-actuated system and coupled attitude control and energy storage techniques. Formation. INTRODUCTION Complex space systems are often both high-visibility and high-risk. However, programs that might@vt.edu 1 #12;custom hardware and software we have developed. The body of the paper presents information

  4. Ductless Hydronic Distribution Systems | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471Site-WideonDuctless Hydronic Distribution

  5. Dynamic Interactions of PV units in Low Volatge Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Dynamic Interactions of PV units in Low Volatge Distribution Systems M. J. Hossain, J. Lu Griffith. Abstract--Photovoltaic (PV) units along with other distributed energy resources (DERs) are located close, robust control, stability. I. Introduction The integration level of PV units in low and medium voltage

  6. A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beigl, Michael

    A Smart Energy System: Distributed Resource Management, Control and Optimization Yong Ding, Student of distributed energy resource and consumption management, which proposes to design a networked and embedded platform for realizing a dynamic energy mix and optimizing the energy consumption dy- namically. Based

  7. Systems engineering approach towards performance monitoring of emergency diesel generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramli, Nurhayati, E-mail: nurhayati14@gmail.com; Yong-kwan, Lee, E-mail: nurhayati14@gmail.com [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 1456-1 Shinam-ri, Ulsan 689-882 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems engineering is an interdisciplinary approach and means to enable the realization of successful systems. In this study, systems engineering approach towards the performance monitoring of Emergency Diesel Generator (EDG) is presented. Performance monitoring is part and parcel of predictive maintenance where the systems and components conditions can be detected before they result into failures. In an effort to identify the proposal for addressing performance monitoring, the EDG boundary has been defined. Based on the Probabilistic Safety Analysis (PSA) results and industry operating experiences, the most critical component is identified. This paper proposed a systems engineering concept development framework towards EDG performance monitoring. The expected output of this study is that the EDG reliability can be improved by the performance monitoring alternatives through the systems engineering concept development effort.

  8. On the Equivalence of Distributed Systems with Queries and Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the Equivalence of Distributed Systems with Queries and Communication Serge Abiteboul INRIA, such as evaluate some query. We study the equivalence of such systems. We model a dis- tributed system such as sending, receiving and querying data. As our model is quite general, the equivalence problem turns out

  9. Low-Cost Hydrogen Distributed Production System Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.E. (Sandy) Thomas, Ph.D., President; Principal Investigator, and

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    H{sub 2}Gen, with the support of the Department of Energy, successfully designed, built and field-tested two steam methane reformers with 578 kg/day capacity, which has now become a standard commercial product serving customers in the specialty metals and PV manufacturing businesses. We demonstrated that this reformer/PSA system, when combined with compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) equipment could produce hydrogen that is already cost-competitive with gasoline per mile driven in a conventional (non-hybrid) vehicle. We further showed that mass producing this 578 kg/day system in quantities of just 100 units would reduce hydrogen cost per mile approximately 13% below the cost of untaxed gasoline per mile used in a hybrid electric vehicle. If mass produced in quantities of 500 units, hydrogen cost per mile in a FCEV would be 20% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in an HEV in the 2015-2020 time period using EIA fuel cost projections for natural gas and untaxed gasoline, and 45% below the cost of untaxed gasoline in a conventional car. This 20% to 45% reduction in fuel cost per mile would accrue even though hydrogen from this 578 kg/day system would cost approximately $4.14/kg, well above the DOE hydrogen cost targets of $2.50/kg by 2010 and $2.00/kg by 2015. We also estimated the cost of a larger, 1,500 kg/day SMR/PSA fueling system based on engineering cost scaling factors derived from the two H{sub 2}Gen products, a commercial 115 kg/day system and the 578 kg/day system developed under this DOE contract. This proposed system could support 200 to 250 cars per day, similar to a medium gasoline station. We estimate that the cost per mile from this larger 1,500 kg/day hydrogen fueling system would be 26% to 40% below the cost per mile of untaxed gasoline in an HEV and ICV respectively, even without any mass production cost reductions. In quantities of 500 units, we are projecting per mile cost reductions between 45% (vs. HEVs) and 62% (vs ICVs), with hydrogen costing approximately $2.87/kg, still above the DOE's 2010 $2.50/kg target. We also began laboratory testing of reforming ethanol, which we showed is currently the least expensive approach to making renewable hydrogen. Extended testing of neat ethanol in micro-reactors was successful, and we also were able to reform E-85 acquired from a local fueling station for 2,700 hours, although some modifications were required to handle the 15% gasoline present in E-85. We began initial tests of a catalyst-coated wall reformer tube that showed some promise in reducing the propensity to coke with E-85. These coated-wall tests ran for 350 hours. Additional resources would be required to commercialize an ethanol reformer operating on E-85, but there is no market for such a product at this time, so this ethanol reformer project was moth-balled pending future government or industry support. The two main objectives of this project were: (1) to design, build and test a steam methane reformer and pressure swing adsorption system that, if scaled up and mass produced, could potentially meet the DOE 2015 cost and efficiency targets for on-site distributed hydrogen generation, and (2) to demonstrate the efficacy of a low-cost renewable hydrogen generation system based on reforming ethanol to hydrogen at the fueling station.

  10. Power-Demand Routing in massive geo-distributed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qureshi, Asfandyar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an increasing trend toward massive, geographically distributed systems. The largest Internet companies operate hundreds of thousands of servers in multiple geographic locations, and are growing at a fast clip. A ...

  11. A Calculus for Access Control in Distributed Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abadi, Martin; Burrows, Michael; Lampson, Butler; Plotkin, Gordon

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study some of the concepts, protocols, and algorithms for access control in distributed systems, from a logical perspective. We account for how a principal may come to believe that another principal is making a request, ...

  12. Impact of SolarSmart Subdivisions on SMUD's Distribution System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNutt, P.; Hambrick, J.; Keesee, M.; Brown, D.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study analyzes the distribution impacts of high penetrations of grid-integrated renewable energy systems, specifically photovoltaic (PV) equipped SolarSmart Homes found in the Anatolia III Residential Community.

  13. Voices of Experience | Advanced Distribution Management Systems...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    systems and a move from reactive to predictive models increases the need for electrical engineering knowledge and IT skills in the operations center as well as in the fi eld. It...

  14. World Class Boilers and Steam Distribution System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Portell, V. P.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    environmental impacts are mitigated. Successful upgrading and maintenance of the energy system requires management support. This may necessitate changes in current practices, technical upgrades to equipment, additional personnel, or other resources. Managers...

  15. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called “agents” from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards “what to observe” rather than “how to observe” in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using “sensor teams,” system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  16. Abstract--The reliability and quality of power distribution systems are usually affected by many different distribution faults.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Mo-Yuen

    1 Abstract--The reliability and quality of power distribution systems are usually affected by many and to provide a more effective fault restoration system. Index Terms-- power distribution systems, statistical analysis, tree-caused distribution faults. I. INTRODUCTION OWER systems play a very important role in our

  17. Designing a 3rd generation, authenticatable attribute measurement system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Karpius, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Santi, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vo, Duc [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Williams, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Attribute measurement systems (AMS) are designed to measure potentially sensitive items containing Special Nuclear Materials to determine if the items possess attributes which fall within an agreed-upon range. Such systems could be used in a treaty to inspect and verify the identity of items in storage without revealing any sensitive information associated with the item. An AMS needs to satisfy two constraints: the host party needs to be sure that none of their sensitive information is released, while the inspecting party wants to have confidence that the limited amount of information they see accurately reflects the properties of the item being measured. The former involves 'certifying' the system and the latter 'authenticating' it. Previous work into designing and building AMS systems have focused more on the questions of certifiability than on the questions of authentication - although a few approaches have been investigated. The next step is to build a 3rd generation AMS which (1) makes the appropriate measurements, (2) can be certified, and (3) can be authenticated (the three generations). This paper will discuss the ideas, options, and process of producing a design for a 3rd generation AMS.

  18. PVUSA: The value of photovoltaics in the distribution system. The Kerman Grid-Support Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wenger, H.J.; Hoff, T.E. [Pacific Energy Group, Walnut Creek, CA (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Photovoltaics for Utility Scale Applications Applications (PVUSA) Project Pacific Gas Electric Company (PG&E) built the Kerman 500-kW photovoltaic power plant. Located near the end of a distribution feeder in a rural section of Fresno County, the plant was not built so much to demonstrate PV technology, but to evaluate its interaction with the local distribution grid and quantify available nontraditional grid-support benefits (those other than energy and capacity). As demand for new generation began to languish in the 1980s, and siting and permitting of power plants and transmission lines became more involved, utilities began considering smaller, distributed power sources. Potential benefits include shorter construction lead time, less capital outlay, and better utilization of existing assets. The results of a PG&E study in 1990/1991 of the benefits from a PV system to the distribution grid prompted the PVUSA Project to construct a plant at Kerman. Completed in 1993, the plant is believed to be the first one specifically built to evaluate the multiple benefits to the grid of a strategically sited plant. Each of nine discrete benefits were evaluated in detail by first establishing the technical impact, then translating the results into present economic value. Benefits span the entire system from distribution feeder to the generation fleet. This work breaks new ground in evaluation of distributed resources, and suggests that resource planning practices be expanded to account for these non-traditional benefits.

  19. Photovoltaic Systems Interconnected onto Secondary Network Distribution Systems – Success Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report examines six case studies of photovoltaic (PV) systems integrated into secondary network systems. The six PV systems were chosen for evaluation because they are interconnected to secondary network systems located in four major Solar America Cities.

  20. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  1. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynne M. Stevens

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

  2. Abstract--The capacity of distributed generation (DG) is set to increase significantly with much of the plant connecting to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrison, Gareth

    limiting network capability in absorbing new DG. Finally, it demonstrates the use of optimal power flow market. Index Terms-- distributed generation, optimal power flow, power distribution. I. INTRODUCTION O in England and Wales (18% in Scotland) is derived from renewable resources. With existing large hydro

  3. Parallel and Distributed Systems Speaker: Dick Epema

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzmanov, Georgi

    systems Online Social Netw. #12;3 M.Sc. Thesis Projects: The Supervision · We help you excel, without is international · We often organize the top international conferences in our field #12;4 M.Sc. Thesis Projects concepts and show that they work · For examples of previous MSc projects see the theses on the PDS website

  4. CSE 513: Distributed Systems (Fault-tolerance)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guohong

    fails to operate correctly, nothing catastrophic happens; e.g., in nuclear power plans at all servers in the same order. 8 The Two-Army Problem · Without failure, agreement is trivial, but agreement in faulty systems is much harder. ­ Agreement is needed in electing a coordinator, deciding

  5. Distributed Timing and Triggering Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowen, T., Huerta, J. A.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a slide show type presentation regarding the need and realization of a new control system for work at the Nevada National Security Site. Commercial products that met the need are identified, both hardware and software. Particular emphasis is on the Integrated Signal Programmer.

  6. Plan generation strategies for a knowledge based process planning system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hari, Umesh

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    August 1993 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering PLAN GENERATION STRATEGIES FOR A KNOWLEDGE BASED PROCESS PLANNING SYSTEM A Thesis by UMESH HARI Approved as to style and content by: Ri ar . Maye (Chair of Committee) / i en ember) Newton C... valuable comments on the thesis work. I am indebted to Dr. C. J. Su for arousing my interest in process planning. I have learned a lot about process planning and solid modeling from him. I also thank him for directing me to relevant literature...

  7. A Better Steam Engine: Designing a Distributed Concentrating Solar Combined Heat and Power System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norwood, Zachary Mills

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts the levelized cost of energy generated. ThePV systems. The levelized cost of energy generated by theemissions. The levelized cost of energy generated by the

  8. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transporation System Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, J.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The US Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent ma or changes in the US Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined.

  9. An overview of the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCoy, J.C.; Becker, D.L. [Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) convert the heat generated by radioactive decay to electricity using thermocouples. RTGs have a long operating life, are reasonably lightweight, and require little or no maintenance once assembled and tested. These factors make RTGs particularly attractive for use in spacecraft. However, because RTGs contain significant quantities of radioactive materials, normally plutonium-238 and its decay products, they must be transported in packages built in accordance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. The U.S. Department of Energy assigned the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Transportation System (RTGTS) Program to Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988 to develop a system meeting the regulatory requirements. The program objective was to develop a transportation system that would fully comply with 10 CFR 71 while protecting RTGs from adverse environmental conditions during normal conditions of transport (e.g., shock and heat). The RTGTS is scheduled for completion in December 1996 and will be available to support the National Aeronautics and Space Administration{close_quote}s Cassini mission to Saturn in October 1997. This paper provides an overview of the RTGTS and discusses the hardware being produced. Additionally, various program management innovations mandated by recent major changes in the U.S. Department of Energy structure and resources will be outlined. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The distribution of Voronoi cells generated by Southern California earthquake epicenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schoenberg, Frederic P; Barr, Christopher; Jungju Seo

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous Univariate Distributions. 2nd ed. Wiley, Newfor the tapered Pareto distribution. Journal of AppliedWoods, J. (2003) On the distribution of wild?re sizes. Envi-

  11. Study of the longitudinal distribution of power generated in a random distributed feedback Raman fibre laser with unidirectional pumping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Churkin, D V; El-Taher, A E; Vatnik, I D; Babin, Sergei A

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The longitudinal distribution of the Stokes-component power in a Raman fibre laser with a random distributed feedback and unidirectional pumping is measured. The fibre parameters (linear loss and Rayleigh backscattering coefficient) are calculated based on the distributions obtained. A numerical model is developed to describe the lasing power distribution. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  12. Photovoltaic Systems Interconnected onto Network Distribution Systems--Success Stories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coddington, M.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Lynn, K.; Sammon, D.; Vaziri, M.; Yohn, T.

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report examines six case studies of photovoltaic systems integrated into secondary network systems in four major U.S. Solar America cities.

  13. On the Equivalence of Distributed Systems with Queries and Communication$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    On the Equivalence of Distributed Systems with Queries and Communication$ Serge Abiteboula , Balder a common goal, such as eval- uating some query. We study the equivalence of such systems. We model for performing tasks such as sending, receiving and querying data. As our model is quite general, the equivalence

  14. Literature Review on Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, P.; Cho, S.; Haberl, J. S.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ..................................................... 6 3.5. Task Ventilation Systems ................................................................................. 7 3.6. Recommendations from Experiences.............................................................. 8 IV. SUMMARY... transactions and journal papers are main sources about the UFAD systems. (More than 100 papers found) Elsevier Literature Search Engine: Keyword: Displacement Ventilation (26 papers found) Keyword: UnderFloor Air Distribution (2 papers found) Center...

  15. Towards a Discipline of Geospatial Distributed Event Based Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    Towards a Discipline of Geospatial Distributed Event Based Systems Annie Liu Computer Science, Caltech 1200 E California Blvd Pasadena, CA 91125, USA mani@cms.caltech.edu ABSTRACT A geospatial system is one in which the state space in- cludes one, two or three-dimensional space and time. A geospatial

  16. Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    May 2014 1 21st Century Electric Distribution System Operations Lorenzo Kristov,1 California Independent System Operator Paul De Martini, Caltech Resnick Institute Introduction The electric industry has to provide similar functions for their area of responsibility. Many states also opened retail electricity

  17. Optimal Dispatch of Photovoltaic Inverters in Residential Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannakis, Georgios

    method for determining the active- and reactive-power set points for PV inverters in residential systems and ensuring voltage regulation. Binary PV-inverter selection variables and nonlinear power-flow relations--Distribution networks, inverter control, optimal power flow (OPF), photovoltaic (PV) systems, sparsity, voltage

  18. STOCHASTIC CONTROL FOR DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS TO WIRELESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Minyi

    communication systems, power control is important at the user level in order to minimize energy requirements, a class of stochastic control problems is for- mulated which includes a fading channel model and a powerSTOCHASTIC CONTROL FOR DISTRIBUTED SYSTEMS WITH APPLICATIONS TO WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS Minyi Huang

  19. Fuzzy logic based operated device identification in power distribution systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manivannan, Karthick Muthu

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by the po~er lines and the other components of distribution systems make them vulnerable to various factors like weather, disturbances caused by animals or human activity, overloading of the system and the aging of or defect in, the components...

  20. Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

  1. 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing SCR system provides direct...

  2. Hardware simulation of diesel generator and microgrid stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zieve, Michael M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the last few years, people have begun to depend less on large power plants with extensive distribution systems, and more on local distributed generation sources. A microgrid, a local collection of distributed generators, ...

  3. Experimental laboratory system to generate high frequency test environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, D.L.; Paez, T.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an extension of two previous analytical studies to investigate a technique for generating high frequency, high amplitude vibration environments. These environments are created using a device attached to a common vibration exciter that permits multiple metal on metal impacts driving a test surface. These analytical studies predicted that test environments with an energy content exceeding 10 kHz could be achieved using sinusoidal and random shaker excitations. The analysis predicted that chaotic vibrations yielding random like test environments could be generated from sinusoidal inputs. In this study, a much simplified version of the proposed system was fabricated and tested in the laboratory. Experimental measurements demonstrate that even this simplified system, utilizing a single impacting object, can generate environments on the test surface with significant frequency content in excess of 40 kHz. Results for sinusoidal shaker inputs tuned to create chaotic impact response are shown along with the responses due to random vibration shaker inputs. The experiments and results are discussed. 4 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Computation, measurement and mitigation of neutral-to-earth potentials on electrical distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dick, W.K.; Winter, D.F.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents computer generated profiles of primary-neutral-to-earth potentials of electrical distribution systems which incorporate a variety of techniques used to mitigate neutral-to-earth potential (''stray voltage'') at dairy farm facilities. Techniques available to the power supplier and power user include an Electronic Grounding System which provides voltage reduction factors of as much as 200 to 1. A new method of measuring these voltages using a computer data acquisition system which monitors every cycle of the power-frequency voltages on eight totally independent channels for extended periods is described.

  5. PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

  6. Generation of potential/surface density pairs in flat disks Power law distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -M. Hure; D. Pelat; A. Pierens

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a simple method to generate potential/surface density pairs in flat axially symmetric finite size disks. Potential/surface density pairs consist of a ``homogeneous'' pair (a closed form expression) corresponding to a uniform disk, and a ``residual'' pair. This residual component is converted into an infinite series of integrals over the radial extent of the disk. For a certain class of surface density distributions (like power laws of the radius), this series is fully analytical. The extraction of the homogeneous pair is equivalent to a convergence acceleration technique, in a matematical sense. In the case of power law distributions, the convergence rate of the residual series is shown to be cubic inside the source. As a consequence, very accurate potential values are obtained by low order truncation of the series. At zero order, relative errors on potential values do not exceed a few percent typically, and scale with the order N of truncation as 1/N**3. This method is superior to the classical multipole expansion whose very slow convergence is often critical for most practical applications.

  7. System and method for generating current by selective electron heating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisch, Nathaniel J. (Princeton, NJ); Boozer, Allen H. (Rocky Hill, NJ)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the generation of toroidal current in a plasma which is prepared in a toroidal magnetic field. The system utilizes the injection of high-frequency waves into the plasma by means of waveguides. The wave frequency and polarization are chosen such that when the waveguides are tilted in a predetermined fashion, the wave energy is absorbed preferentially by electrons traveling in one toroidal direction. The absorption of energy in this manner produces a toroidal electric current even when the injected waves themselves do not have substantial toroidal momentum. This current can be continuously maintained at modest cost in power and may be used to confine the plasma. The system can operate efficiently on fusion grade tokamak plasmas.

  8. AGIS: Evolution of Distributed Computing Information system for ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anisenkov, Alexey; The ATLAS collaboration; Alandes Pradillo, Maria; Karavakis, Edward

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The variety of the ATLAS Computing Infrastructure requires a central information system to define the topology of computing resources and to store the different parameters and configuration data which are needed by the various ATLAS software components. The ATLAS Grid Information System is the system designed to integrate configuration and status information about resources, services and topology of the computing infrastructure used by ATLAS Distributed Computing applications and services.

  9. Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Low-Cost Hydrogen-from-Ethanol: A Distributed Production System (Presentation) Presented at the 2007...

  10. INTEGRATED POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS FOR COAL MINE WASTE METHANE UTILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peet M. Soot; Dale R. Jesse; Michael E. Smith

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated system to utilize the waste coal mine methane (CMM) at the Federal No. 2 Coal Mine in West Virginia was designed and built. The system includes power generation, using internal combustion engines, along with gas processing equipment to upgrade sub-quality waste methane to pipeline quality standards. The power generation has a nominal capacity of 1,200 kw and the gas processing system can treat about 1 million cubic feet per day (1 MMCFD) of gas. The gas processing is based on the Northwest Fuel Development, Inc. (NW Fuel) proprietary continuous pressure swing adsorption (CPSA) process that can remove nitrogen from CMM streams. The two major components of the integrated system are synergistic. The byproduct gas stream from the gas processing equipment can be used as fuel for the power generating equipment. In return, the power generating equipment provides the nominal power requirements of the gas processing equipment. This Phase III effort followed Phase I, which was comprised of a feasibility study for the project, and Phase II, where the final design for the commercial-scale demonstration was completed. The fact that NW Fuel is desirous of continuing to operate the equipment on a commercial basis provides the validation for having advanced the project through all of these phases. The limitation experienced by the project during Phase III was that the CMM available to operate the CPSA system on a commercial basis was not of sufficiently high quality. NW Fuel's CPSA process is limited in its applicability, requiring a relatively high quality of gas as the feed to the process. The CPSA process was demonstrated during Phase III for a limited time, during which the processing capabilities met the expected results, but the process was never capable of providing pipeline quality gas from the available low quality CMM. The NW Fuel CPSA process is a low-cost ''polishing unit'' capable of removing a few percent nitrogen. It was never intended to process CMM streams containing high levels of nitrogen, as is now the case at the Federal No.2 Mine. Even lacking the CPSA pipeline delivery demonstration, the project was successful in laying the groundwork for future commercial applications of the integrated system. This operation can still provide a guide for other coal mines which need options for utilization of their methane resources. The designed system can be used as a complete template, or individual components of the system can be segregated and utilized separately at other mines. The use of the CMM not only provides an energy fuel from an otherwise wasted resource, but it also yields an environmental benefit by reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The methane has twenty times the greenhouse effect as compared to carbon dioxide, which the combustion of the methane generates. The net greenhouse gas emission mitigation is substantial.

  11. Performance of solar electric generating systems on the utility grid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roland, J.R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first year of performance of the Solar Electric Generating System I (SEGS I), which has been operating on the Southern California Edison (SCE) grid since December 1984 is discussed. The solar field, comprised of 71,680 m/sup 2/ of Luz parabolic trough line-focus solar collectors, supplies thermal energy at approx. 585/sup 0/F to the thermal storage tank. This energy is then used to generate saturated steam at 550 psia and 477/sup 0/F which passes through an independent natural gas-fired superheater and is brought to 780/sup 0/F superheat. The solar collector assembly (SCA) is the primary building block of this modular system. A single SCA consists of a row of eight parabolic trough collectors, a single drive motor, and a local microprocessor control unit. The basic components of the parabolic trough collector are a mirrored glass reflector, a unique and highly efficient heat collection element, and a tracking/positioning system. The heat collector element contains a stainless steel absorber tube coated with black chrome selective surface and is contained within an evacuated cylindrical glass envelope. The plant has reached the design capacity of 14.7 MW and, on a continuous basis, provides approx. 13.8 MW of net power during the utility's on-peak periods (nominally 12:00 noon to 6:00 p.m. during the summer weekdays and 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. during the winter weekdays).

  12. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

  13. Integrated Computing, Communication, and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bajura, Richard; Feliachi, Ali

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Restructuring of the electricity market has affected all aspects of the power industry from generation to transmission, distribution, and consumption. Transmission circuits, in particular, are stressed often exceeding their stability limits because of the difficulty in building new transmission lines due to environmental concerns and financial risk. Deregulation has resulted in the need for tighter control strategies to maintain reliability even in the event of considerable structural changes, such as loss of a large generating unit or a transmission line, and changes in loading conditions due to the continuously varying power consumption. Our research efforts under the DOE EPSCoR Grant focused on Integrated Computing, Communication and Distributed Control of Deregulated Electric Power Systems. This research is applicable to operating and controlling modern electric energy systems. The controls developed by APERC provide for a more efficient, economical, reliable, and secure operation of these systems. Under this program, we developed distributed control algorithms suitable for large-scale geographically dispersed power systems and also economic tools to evaluate their effectiveness and impact on power markets. Progress was made in the development of distributed intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. The methodologies employed combine information technology, control and communication, agent technology, and power systems engineering in the development of intelligent control agents for reliable and automated operation of integrated electric power systems. In the event of scheduled load changes or unforeseen disturbances, the power system is expected to minimize the effects and costs of disturbances and to maintain critical infrastructure operational.

  14. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part II: Parametric Evaluation been proposed to model thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive waste heat recovery. Details: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites INTRODUCTION In part I

  15. Optimization of auxiliary power systems design for large generating units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabri, E.I.; Kang, E.K.; Dusterdick, R.W.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern fossil and nuclear generating units require the support of a fairly large and complex electric auxiliary power system. The selection of an optimized and cost-effective auxiliary power transformer rating may be a difficult process, since the loading profile and coincident operation of the loads often cannot be firmly defined at an early stage of design. The authors believe that this important design process could be greatly aided by systematic field tests and recording of the actual auxiliary loading profiles during various modes of plant operations.

  16. Tidal Energy System for On-Shore Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruce, Allan J

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Addressing the urgent need to develop LCOE competitive renewable energy solutions for US energy security and to replace fossil-fuel generation with the associated benefits to environment impacts including a reduction in CO2 emissions, this Project focused on the advantages of using hydraulic energy transfer (HET) in large-scale Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) systems for harvesting off-shore tidal energy in US waters. A recent DOE resource assessment, identifies water power resources have a potential to meet 15% of the US electric supply by 2030, with MHK technologies being a major component. The work covered a TRL-4 laboratory proof-in-concept demonstration plus modeling of a 15MW full scale system based on an approach patented by NASA-JPL, in which submerged high-ratio gearboxes and electrical generators in conventional MHK turbine systems are replaced by a submerged hydraulic radial pump coupled to on-shore hydraulic motors driving a generator. The advantages are; first, the mean-time-between-failure (MTBF), or maintenance, can be extended from approximately 1 to 5 years and second, the range of tidal flow speeds which can be efficiently harvested can be extended beyond that of a conventional submerged generator. The approach uses scalable, commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) components, facilitating scale-up and commercialization. All the objectives of the Project have been successfully met (1) A TRL4 system was designed, constructed and tested. It simulates a tidal energy turbine, with a 2-m diameter blade in up to a 2.9 m/sec flow. The system consists of a drive motor assembly providing appropriate torque and RPM, attached to a radial piston pump. The pump circulates pressurized, environmentally-friendly, HEES hydraulic fluid in a closed loop to an axial piston motor which drives an electrical generator, with a resistive load. The performance of the components, subsystems and system were evaluated during simulated tidal cycles. The pump is contained in a tank for immersion testing. The COTS pump and motor were selected to scale to MW size and were oversized for the TRL-4 demonstration, operating at only 1-6% of rated values. Nevertheless, in for 2-18 kW drive power, in agreement with manufacturer performance data, we measured efficiencies of 85-90% and 75-80% for the pump and motor, respectively. These efficiencies being 95-96% at higher operating powers. (2) Two follow-on paths were identified. In both cases conventional turbine systems can be modified, replacing existing gear box and generator with a hydraulic pump and on-shore components. On a conventional path, a TRL5/6 15kW turbine system can be engineered and tested on a barge at an existing site in Maine. Alternatively, on an accelerated path, a TRL-8 100kW system can be engineered and tested by modifying a team member's existing MHK turbines, with barge and grid-connected test sites in-place. On both paths the work can be expedited and cost effective by reusing TRL-4 components, modifying existing turbines and using established test sites. (3) Sizing, performance modeling and costing of a scaled 15MW system, suitable for operation in Maine's Western Passage, was performed. COTS components are identified and the performance projections are favorable. The estimated LCOE is comparable to wind generation with peak production at high demand times. (4) We determined that a similar HET approach can be extended to on-shore and off-shore wind turbine systems. These are very large energy resources which can be addressed in parallel for even great National benefit. (5) Preliminary results on this project were presented at two International Conferences on renewable energy in 2012, providing a timely dissemination of information. We have thus demonstrated a proof-in-concept of a novel, tidal HET system that eliminates all submerged gears and electronics to improve reliability. Hydraulic pump efficiencies of 90% have been confirmed in simulated tidal flows between 1 and 3 m/s, and at only 1-6% of rated power. Total system efficiencies have also been modeled, up to MW-scale, for ti

  17. Effect of component failures on economics of distributed photovoltaic systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin, B

    2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an applied research program to assess the realistic costs of grid connected photovoltaic (PV) installations. A Board of Advisors was assembled that included management from the regional electric power utilities, as well as other participants from companies that work in the electric power industry. Although the program started with the intention of addressing effective load carrying capacity (ELCC) for utility-owned photovoltaic installations, results from the literature study and recommendations from the Board of Advisors led investigators to the conclusion that obtaining effective data for this analysis would be difficult, if not impossible. The effort was then re-focused on assessing the realistic costs and economic valuations of grid-connected PV installations. The 17 kW PV installation on the University of Hartford's Lincoln Theater was used as one source of actual data. The change in objective required a more technically oriented group. The re-organized working group (changes made due to the need for more technically oriented participants) made site visits to medium-sized PV installations in Connecticut with the objective of developing sources of operating histories. An extensive literature review helped to focus efforts in several technical and economic subjects. The objective of determining the consequences of component failures on both generation and economic returns required three analyses. The first was a Monte-Carlo-based simulation model for failure occurrences and the resulting downtime. Published failure data, though limited, was used to verify the results. A second model was developed to predict the reduction in or loss of electrical generation related to the downtime due to these failures. Finally, a comprehensive economic analysis, including these failures, was developed to determine realistic net present values of installed PV arrays. Two types of societal benefits were explored, with quantitative valuations developed for both. Some societal benefits associated with financial benefits to the utility of having a distributed generation capacity that is not fossil-fuel based have been included into the economic models. Also included and quantified in the models are several benefits to society more generally: job creation and some estimates of benefits from avoiding greenhouse emissions. PV system failures result in a lowering of the economic values of a grid-connected system, but this turned out to be a surprisingly small effect on the overall economics. The most significant benefit noted resulted from including the societal benefits accrued to the utility. This provided a marked increase in the valuations of the array and made the overall value proposition a financially attractive one, in that net present values exceeded installation costs. These results indicate that the Department of Energy and state regulatory bodies should consider focusing on societal benefits that create economic value for the utility, confirm these quantitative values, and work to have them accepted by the utilities and reflected in the rate structures for power obtained from grid-connected arrays. Understanding and applying the economic benefits evident in this work can significantly improve the business case for grid-connected PV installations. This work also indicates that the societal benefits to the population are real and defensible, but not nearly as easy to justify in a business case as are the benefits that accrue directly to the utility.

  18. Concept of SPDS integrated into Distributed Computer System (DCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anikanov, S. S. [Westinghouse LLC, 4350 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementation of the Safety Parameter Display System (SPDS) during the NPP modernization activities or for the new plant imposes certain requirements on the system design. In many cases, such SPDS system functionality is integrated into the non-safety part of the Distributed Computer System (DCS). The SPDS becomes organically embedded into the major I and C hardware and application software. However, from the licensing perspective, SPDS shall be designed as a functional entity which satisfies industry standards and as such imposes requirements to the other plant MMI systems. 'Other MMI systems' that are used to support the operating staff during normal, abnormal and emergency plant conditions include Main Control Room Workstations, Shared Wall Panel Display (WPD), and other information systems. The SPDS resources, used to address the system requirements, also include the Emergency Response Facilities (TSC, Emergency on-site Facilities, and Emergency off-site Facilities). (authors)

  19. Re-Dispatching Generation to Increase Power System Security Margin and Support Low Voltage Bus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dynamic stability, power system reliability, power system scheduling, power system security, power transmission control, power transmission reliability I . INTRODUCTION Power system stability problems cause many stability problems. Between the power system generation pattern and the load pattern

  20. Methods and apparatuses for information analysis on shared and distributed computing systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bohn, Shawn J [Richland, WA; Krishnan, Manoj Kumar [Richland, WA; Cowley, Wendy E [Richland, WA; Nieplocha, Jarek [Richland, WA

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatuses and computer-implemented methods for analyzing, on shared and distributed computing systems, information comprising one or more documents are disclosed according to some aspects. In one embodiment, information analysis can comprise distributing one or more distinct sets of documents among each of a plurality of processes, wherein each process performs operations on a distinct set of documents substantially in parallel with other processes. Operations by each process can further comprise computing term statistics for terms contained in each distinct set of documents, thereby generating a local set of term statistics for each distinct set of documents. Still further, operations by each process can comprise contributing the local sets of term statistics to a global set of term statistics, and participating in generating a major term set from an assigned portion of a global vocabulary.

  1. Reliability Evaluation of Electric Power Generation Systems with Solar Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samadi, Saeed

    2013-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional power generators are fueled by natural gas, steam, or water flow. These generators can respond to fluctuating load by varying the fuel input that is done by a valve control. Renewable power generators such as wind or solar, however...

  2. Thermal analysis of directly buried conduit heat-distribution systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, J.B.

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculations of heat losses and temperature field for directly buried conduit heat distribution systems were performed using the finite element computer programs. The finite element analysis solved two-dimensional, steady-state heat transfer problems involving two insulated parallel pipes encased in the same conduit casing and in separate casings, and the surrounding earth. Descriptions of the theoretical basis, computational scheme, and the data input and outputs of the developed computer programs are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out for predicting the temperature distributions within the existing high temperature hot water distribution system and two insulated pipes covered in the same metallic conduit and the surrounding soil. The predicted results generally agree with the experimental data obtained at the test site.

  3. Integrating Renewable Energy into the Transmission and Distribution System of the U. S. Virgin Islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Olis, D.; Gevorgian, V.; Warren, A.; Butt, R.; Lilienthal, P.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report focuses on the economic and technical feasibility of integrating renewable energy technologies into the U.S. Virgin Islands transmission and distribution systems. The report includes three main areas of analysis: 1) the economics of deploying utility-scale renewable energy technologies on St. Thomas/St. John and St. Croix; 2) potential sites for installing roof- and ground-mount PV systems and wind turbines and the impact renewable generation will have on the electrical subtransmission and distribution infrastructure, and 3) the feasibility of a 100- to 200-megawatt power interconnection of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA), Virgin Islands Water and Power Authority (WAPA), and British Virgin Islands (BVI) grids via a submarine cable system.

  4. Hybrid Control Network Intrusion Detection Systems for Automated Power Distribution Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peisert, Sean

    ) for protecting automated distribution systems (ADS) against certain types of cyber attacks in a new way, distribution au- tomation, network security, intrusion detection systems. I. INTRODUCTION A. Scope and Goals their development with that of an appropriate cyber security frame- work that would prevent attackers from gaining

  5. Alternative Export - Wheat Distribution Systems for the Texas - Oklahoma Panhandle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuller, Stephen W.; Shanmugham C.V.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................... and Port-Terminal Costs 9 Impacts of Alternative Distribution Systems Cost of Upgrading Country Elevators to Subterminals. . 9 O n Marketing-System Participants.. ............... 19 ............................................. Commercial T uck cost... be neces- sary to upgrade country elevators into subterminals. In which case, a potential subterminal organization would be at a relative cost disadvantage when compared to the Midwest. An additional factor is the region's relatively low density...

  6. Automated Energy Distribution and Reliability System (AEDR): Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buche, D. L.

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Northern Indiana Public Service Co. project efforts to develop an automated energy distribution and reliability system. The purpose of this project was to implement a database-driven GIS solution that would manage all of the company's gas, electric, and landbase objects.

  7. Synchronization in Multimedia Languages for Distributed Systems A. Guercio1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bansal, Arvind K.

    Synchronization in Multimedia Languages for Distributed Systems A. Guercio1 , A. Bansal2 , T. Arndt Introduction The rising popularity of multimedia content on the web has led to the development of special-purpose languages for multimedia authoring and presentations. Examples of such languages include SMIL [1], VRML [2

  8. SELFMONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SELF­MONITORING DISTRIBUTED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS (PRELIMINARY VERSION) Aldo and identification are extremely important activities for the safety of a nuclear power plant. In particular inside huge and complex production plants. 1 INTRODUCTION Safety in nuclear power plants requires

  9. Availability in the Sprite Distributed File System John Ousterhout

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Mary G.

    Availability in the Sprite Distributed File System Mary Baker John Ousterhout Computer Science faults means recovering from them quickly. Our position is that performance and availability server recovery is the most cost-effective way of providing such availability. Mechanisms used

  10. Security proof for quantum key distribution using qudit systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheridan, Lana [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Scarani, Valerio [Centre for Quantum Technologies, National University of Singapore (Singapore); Department of Physics, National University of Singapore (Singapore)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide security bounds against coherent attacks for two families of quantum key distribution protocols that use d-dimensional quantum systems. In the asymptotic regime, both the secret key rate for fixed noise and the robustness to noise increase with d. The finite key corrections are found to be almost insensitive to d < or approx. 20.

  11. A Robust Optimization Framework for Analyzing Distribution Systems with Transshipment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaudhuri, Sanjay

    A Robust Optimization Framework for Analyzing Distribution Systems with Transshipment Mabel Chou operations. Mabel Chou NUS Business School National University of Singapore Singapore 117592 Email: bizchoum Email: dscsimm@nus.edu.sg Kut C. So The Paul Merage School of Business University of California Irvine

  12. Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazards Data Distribution System (HDDS) Explorer Help Documentation Version 1.1 March 2014 #12;Page: ii Document History Number Date and Sections Notes 1 August 2013 Original document 1.0 2 September information on Access to Events #12;Page: iii Table of contents Document History

  13. Scalable Hierarchical Locking for Distributed Systems Nirmit Desai and Frank Mueller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Frank

    Scalable Hierarchical Locking for Distributed Systems Nirmit Desai and Frank Mueller Dept share computational resources in distributed environments, such as high-end clusters with ever larger requests in distributed systems. But concurrency protocols currently lack scalability. Adding

  14. Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - Generated Shockwave Treatment of Wound Infections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Shahzad Neville

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biofilm structure from confocal scanning laser microscopyAngeles Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser - GeneratedTHE THESIS Optical 2-D Scanning System for Laser-Generated

  15. Coal-fired high performance power generating system. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the investigations carried out during Phase 1 of the Engineering Development of Coal-Fired High-Performance Power Generation Systems (Combustion 2000), the UTRC-led Combustion 2000 Team is recommending the development of an advanced high performance power generation system (HIPPS) whose high efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions will enable the US to use its abundant coal resources to satisfy current and future demand for electric power. The high efficiency of the power plant, which is the key to minimizing the environmental impact of coal, can only be achieved using a modern gas turbine system. Minimization of emissions can be achieved by combustor design, and advanced air pollution control devices. The commercial plant design described herein is a combined cycle using either a frame-type gas turbine or an intercooled aeroderivative with clean air as the working fluid. The air is heated by a coal-fired high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The best performance from the cycle is achieved by using a modern aeroderivative gas turbine, such as the intercooled FT4000. A simplified schematic is shown. In the UTRC HIPPS, the conversion efficiency for the heavy frame gas turbine version will be 47.4% (HHV) compared to the approximately 35% that is achieved in conventional coal-fired plants. This cycle is based on a gas turbine operating at turbine inlet temperatures approaching 2,500 F. Using an aeroderivative type gas turbine, efficiencies of over 49% could be realized in advanced cycle configuration (Humid Air Turbine, or HAT). Performance of these power plants is given in a table.

  16. Proceedings of the Workshop on software tools for distributed intelligent control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herget, C.J. (ed.)

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Workshop on Software Tools for Distributed Intelligent Control Systems was organized by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the United States Army Headquarters Training and Doctrine Command and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The goals of the workshop were to the identify the current state of the art in tools which support control systems engineering design and implementation, identify research issues associated with writing software tools which would provide a design environment to assist engineers in multidisciplinary control design and implementation, formulate a potential investment strategy to resolve the research issues and develop public domain code which can form the core of more powerful engineering design tools, and recommend test cases to focus the software development process and test associated performance metrics. Recognizing that the development of software tools for distributed intelligent control systems will require a multidisciplinary effort, experts in systems engineering, control systems engineering, and compute science were invited to participate in the workshop. In particular, experts who could address the following topics were selected: operating systems, engineering data representation and manipulation, emerging standards for manufacturing data, mathematical foundations, coupling of symbolic and numerical computation, user interface, system identification, system representation at different levels of abstraction, system specification, system design, verification and validation, automatic code generation, and integration of modular, reusable code.

  17. Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Max H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    credit for different air distribution methods can be given.Measured Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential4   Distribution metric

  18. Transmission Pricing of Distributed Multilateral Energy Transactions to Ensure System Security and Guide Economic Dispatch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilic, Marija; Hsieh, Eric; Remanan, Prasad

    2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Transmission Pricing of Distributed Multilateral Energy Transactions to Ensure System Security and Guide Economic Dispatch...

  19. Performance Monitoring of Residential Hot Water Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liao, Anna; Lanzisera, Steven; Lutz, Jim; Fitting, Christian; Kloss, Margarita; Stiles, Christopher

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Current water distribution systems are designed such that users need to run the water for some time to achieve the desired temperature, wasting energy and water in the process. We developed a wireless sensor network for large-scale, long time-series monitoring of residential water end use. Our system consists of flow meters connected to wireless motes transmitting data to a central manager mote, which in turn posts data to our server via the internet. This project also demonstrates a reliable and flexible data collection system that could be configured for various other forms of end use metering in buildings. The purpose of this study was to determine water and energy use and waste in hot water distribution systems in California residences. We installed meters at every end use point and the water heater in 20 homes and collected 1s flow and temperature data over an 8 month period. For a typical shower and dishwasher events, approximately half the energy is wasted. This relatively low efficiency highlights the importance of further examining the energy and water waste in hot water distribution systems.

  20. The Fermilab CMTF cryogenic distribution remote control system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.; Theilacker, J.; Klebaner, A.; Martinez, A.; Bossert, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory Batavia, IL, 60510 (United States)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cryomodule Test Facility (CMTF) is able to provide the necessary test bed for measuring the performance of Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities in a cryomodule (CM). The CMTF have seven 300 KW screw compressors, two liquid helium refrigerators, and two Cryomodule Test Stands (CMTS). CMTS1 is designed for 1.3 GHz cryomodule operating in a pulsed mode (PM) and CMTS2 is for cryomodule operating in Half-Wave (HW) and Continuous Wave (CW) mode. Based on the design requirement, each subsystem has to be far away from each other and be placed in distant locations. Therefore choosing Siemens Process Control System 7-400, DL205 PLC, Synoptic and Fermilab ACNET are the ideal choices for CMTF cryogenic distribution real-time remote control system. This paper presents a method which has been successfully used by many Fermilab distribution cryogenic real-time remote control systems.