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1

Distributed Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain...

2

Nuclear Power Generating Facilities (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The first subchapter of the statute concerning Nuclear Power Generating Facilities provides for direct citizen participation in the decision to construct any nuclear power generating facility in...

3

DISTRIBUTION COEFICIENTS (KD) GENERATED FROM A CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core samples originating from Vault 4, Cell E of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) were collected in September of 2008 (Hansen and Crawford 2009, Smith 2008) and sent to SRNL to measure chemical and physical properties of the material including visual uniformity, mineralogy, microstructure, density, porosity, distribution coefficients (K{sub d}), and chemical composition. Some data from these experiments have been reported (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). In this study, leaching experiments were conducted with a single core sample under conditions that are representative of saltstone performance. In separate experiments, reducing and oxidizing environments were targeted to obtain solubility and Kd values from the measurable species identified in the solid and aqueous leachate. This study was designed to provide insight into how readily species immobilized in saltstone will leach from the saltstone under oxidizing conditions simulating the edge of a saltstone monolith and under reducing conditions, targeting conditions within the saltstone monolith. Core samples were taken from saltstone poured in December of 2007 giving a cure time of nine months in the cell and a total of thirty months before leaching experiments began in June 2010. The saltstone from Vault 4, Cell E is comprised of blast furnace slag, class F fly ash, portland cement, and Deliquification, Dissolution, and Adjustment (DDA) Batch 2 salt solution. The salt solution was previously analyzed from a sample of Tank 50 salt solution and characterized in the 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) report (Zeigler and Bibler 2009). Subsequent to Tank 50 analysis, additional solution was added to the tank solution from the Effluent Treatment Project as well as from inleakage from Tank 50 pump bearings (Cozzi and Duncan 2010). Core samples were taken from three locations and at three depths at each location using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit (1-1, 1-2, 1-3; 2-1, 2-2, 2-3; 3-1, 3-2, 3-3) (Hansen and Crawford 2009). Leaching experiments were conducted with a section of core sample 3-2. All cores from location 3 were drilled without using water. Core sample 3-2 was drilled from approximately six inches to a depth of approximately 13 inches. Approximately six inches of the core was removed but it broke into two pieces during removal from the bit. At the time of drilling, core material appeared olive green in color (Smith 2008). The fact that the samples were cored as olive green and were received after storage with a gray outer layer is indicative that some oxidation had occurred prior to leaching studies.

Almond, P.; Kaplan, D.

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

4

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION INTEGRATION COST STUDY Analytical Framework energy development, or distributed generation, in California. In May 2012, Southern California Edison Southern California Edison's approach to evaluating distributed generation impacts, and to conduct

5

Renewable Energy Co-Location of Distribution Facilities (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to distribution facilities, which include poles and wires, cables, pipelines, or other underground conduits by which a renewable generator is able to (i) supply electricity...

6

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Arnold Schwarzenegger DISTRIBUTED GENERATION DRIVETRAIN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor DISTRIBUTED GENERATION DRIVETRAIN FOR WINDPOWER APPLICATION Prepared GENERATION DRIVETRAIN FOR WINDPOWER APPLICATION EISG AWARDEE Dehlsen Associates, LLC 7985 Armas Canyon Road

8

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION DISTRIBUTED GENERATION AND COGENERATION POLICY ROADMAP FOR CALIFORNIA to the development of this report by the Energy Commission's Distributed Generation Policy Advisory Team; Melissa;ABSTRACT This report defines a year 2020 policy vision for distributed generation and cogeneration

9

Distributed generation - the fuel processing example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI EA-1726: Kahuku Wind Power, LLC Wind Power Generation Facility, O'ahu, HI May 3, 2010 EA-1726: Final...

11

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects Webinar May 23, 2012 Document covers the Regulatory...

12

A Distributed Facilities Automation System For IBM Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the host would be via an IBM-supplied local communications network protocol. Remote appli cations would include process control, security, energy manage ment, facilities automation or any other automation application. The remote systems... of these areas which are affected are: - HVAC - Chemical Processes Control - Utilities Generation - Tank Farm Monitoring Resource Management - Solvent Supply and Recovery Systems - DI Water Distribution - Sewage and Waste Treatment Plant Control...

Houle, W. D. Sr.

13

NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV...

14

1170 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 28, NO. 2, MAY 2013 Independent Distributed Generation Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation Planning to Profit Both Utility and DG Investors H. A. Hejazi, Ali R. Araghi, Behrooz Vahidi, S. H-scale electric generation facilities to participate in distributed generation (DG) with few requirements on power Terms--Distributed generation, investment incentives, op- timal location, price allocation, size

Mohsenian-Rad, Hamed

15

Facility Microgrids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Proposed strontium radiosotope thermoelectric generator fuel encapsulation facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed Fuel Encapsulation Facility is a fully equipped facility for processing and encapsulating strontium Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) fuel from presently available Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) capsules. The facility location is on the second building level below ground of the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), Cells 142, 143, and 145. Capsules containing strontium fluoride (SrF[sub 2]) would be received from the WESF in Cell 145 and transferred to the three adjacent cells for processing and encapsulation into the final RTG fuel configuration.

Adkins, H.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

17

Sales and Use Tax Exemption for Electrical Generating Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electrical generating facilities are exempt from sales and use taxes in North Dakota. The exemption is granted for the purchase of building materials, production equipment, and any other tangible...

18

Cold Vacuum Drying (CVD) Facility Diesel Generator Fire Protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the Fire Protection and Detection System installed by Project W-441 (Cold Vacuum Drying Facility and Diesel Generator Building) functions as required by project specifications.

SINGH, G.

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

19

Applications for Certificates for Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An applicant for a certificate to site an electric power generating facility shall provide a project summary and overview of the proposed project. In general, the summary should be suitable as a...

20

A reliability assessment methodology for distribution systems with distributed generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reliability assessment is of primary importance in designing and planning distribution systems that operate in an economic manner with minimal interruption of customer loads. With the advances in renewable energy sources, Distributed Generation (DG...

Duttagupta, Suchismita Sujaya

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability Database, Final Report, January 2004 This final...

22

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

23

Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

Jensen, Kevin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

24

Native American Technical Assistance and Training for Renewable Energy Resource Development and Electrical Generation Facilities Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Council of Energy Resource Tribes (CERT) will facilitate technical expertise and training of Native Americans in renewable energy resource development for electrical generation facilities, and distributed generation options contributing to feasibility studies, strategic planning and visioning. CERT will also provide information to Tribes on energy efficiency and energy management techniques.This project will provide facilitation and coordination of expertise from government agencies and private industries to interact with Native Americans in ways that will result in renewable energy resource development, energy efficiency program development, and electrical generation facilities management by Tribal entities. The intent of this cooperative agreement is to help build capacity within the Tribes to manage these important resources.

A. David Lester

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

25

Report on Distributed Generation Penetration Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents part of a multiyear research program dedicated to the development of requirements to support the definition, design, and demonstration of a distributed generation-electric power system interconnection interface concept. The report focuses on the dynamic behavior of power systems when a significant portion of the total energy resource is distributed generation. It also focuses on the near-term reality that the majority of new DG relies on rotating synchronous generators for energy conversion.

Miller, N.; Ye, Z.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option on natural gas generation, which increases in valueL ABORATORY Distributed Generation Investment by a MicrogridORMMES’06 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-54447. Distributed Generation Dispatch OptimizationA Business Case for On-Site Generation: The BD Biosciencesrelated work. Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Voltage Management of Networks with Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At present there is much debate about the impacts and benefits of increasing the amount of generation connected to the low voltage areas of the electricity distribution network. The UK government is under political ...

O'Donnell, James

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Generation and Renewable Energy in the Electric Cooperative Sector Ed Torrero Cooperative Research Network (CRN) National Rural Electric Cooperative Association September 22, 2004 #12 in Durango, CO Plug Power Fuel Cell at Fort Jackson, SC LoganEnergy #12;Power Supply Program Distributed

30

Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities Worakarn Wongsaichua, Wei-Jen Lee Soontorn Oraintara Chiman Kwan Frank Zhang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated High Speed Intelligent Utility Tie Unit for Disbursed/Renewable Generation Facilities is to rejuvenate the idea of integrated resource planning and promote the distributed generation via traditional or renewable generation facilities for the deregulated utility systems. Fuel cell and photovoltaic are the most

Oraintara, Soontorn

31

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility experience with RTP tariffs is described in 3. Distributed GenerationUtilities Commission, Division of Ratepayer Advocates have also provided support on related work. Distributed Generation

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies This report examines backup power and prime power...

33

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related Issues That May Impede Its Expansion The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the Rate-Related...

34

DISTRIBUTED GENERATION USE AND CONTROL IN BUILDINGS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONTROLS DISTRIBUTED GENERATION USE AND CONTROL IN BUILDINGS ABSTRACT The increasing commercial is designed to continuously minimize energy costs by monitoring utility prices and building demand, while.g., thermal energy storage) have been developed. Measurements of building electrical and thermal demand were

Mease, Kenneth D.

35

Worst Case Scenario for Large Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tides, and geothermal heat, is the best choice as alternative source of energy. The interconnection and distribution networks, finally to the electric energy consumers. The life style of a nation is measured of these renewable energy sources and other forms of small generation such as combined heat and power (CHP) units

Pota, Himanshu Roy

36

Assessment of Distributed Generation Potential in JapaneseBuildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To meet growing energy demands, energy efficiency, renewable energy, and on-site generation coupled with effective utilization of exhaust heat will all be required. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems (or microgrids). This research investigates a method of choosing economically optimal DER, expanding on prior studies at the Berkeley Lab using the DER design optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM finds the optimal combination of installed equipment from available DER technologies, given prevailing utility tariffs, site electrical and thermal loads, and a menu of available equipment. It provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the site energy loads can be served at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, and cooling. Five prototype Japanese commercial buildings are examined and DER-CAM applied to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Based on the optimization results, energy and emission reductions are evaluated. Furthermore, a Japan-U.S. comparison study of policy, technology, and utility tariffs relevant to DER installation is presented. Significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the DER-CAM results. Savings were most noticeable in the sports facility (a very favourable CHP site), followed by the hospital, hotel, and office building.

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida,Masaru

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

37

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility electricity and natural gas purchases, amortized capital and maintenance costs for distributed generation (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

time of use United States Postal Service v Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Construction of Distribution Lines, Service Lines, and Appurtenant Facilities in Residential Subdivisions (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any proposed construction of electricity-related facilities in residential subdivisions, including distribution and service lines and appurtenant facilities, is subject to these regulations, which...

40

Power Hardware-in-the-Loop (PHIL) Testing Facility for Distributed Energy Storage (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing deployment of distributed, variable generation and evolving end-user load profiles presents a unique set of challenges to grid operators responsible for providing reliable and high quality electrical service. Mass deployment of distributed energy storage systems (DESS) has the potential to solve many of the associated integration issues while offering reliability and energy security benefits other solutions cannot. However, tools to develop, optimize, and validate DESS control strategies and hardware are in short supply. To fill this gap, NREL has constructed a power hardware-in-the-loop (PHIL) test facility that connects DESS, grid simulator, and load bank hardware to a distribution feeder simulation.

Neubauer.J.; Lundstrom, B.; Simpson, M.; Pratt, A.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Distributed Generation: Challenges and Opportunities, 7. edition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report is a comprehensive study of the Distributed Generation (DG) industry. The report takes a wide-ranging look at the current and future state of DG and both individually and collectively addresses the technologies of Microturbines, Reciprocating Engines, Stirling Engines, Fuel Cells, Photovoltaics, Concentrating Solar, Wind, and Microgrids. Topics covered include: the key technologies being used or planned for DG; the uses of DG from utility, energy service provider, and customer viewpoints; the economics of DG; the benefits of DG from multiple perspectives; the barriers that exist to implementing DG; the government programs supporting the DG industry; and, an analysis of DG interconnection and net metering rules.

NONE

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Distributed Generation Systems Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has Type TermOpenDistributed Generation Systems

43

City of San Marcos- Distributed Generation Rebate Program (Texas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of San Marcos offers a Distributed Generation Rebate Program for the installation of grid-tied renewable energy systems. The Distributed Generation Rebate Program is offered on a first...

44

Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed multicast tree generation with dynamic group membership Frank Adelsteina , Golden G. Another distinguishing character- istic for tree generation algorithms is centralized versus distributed, efficient network utilization becomes a growing concern. Multicast transmission may use network bandwidth

Richard III, Golden G.

45

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility tari?s, the electricity price may be revised only Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

selection of on-site power generation with combined heat andTotal Electricity Generation Figure 13. Small MercantileWeekday Total Electricity Generation (No Storage Adoption

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 A Distributed Generation Control Architecture for Islanded AC Microgrids Stanton T. Cady, Student Member, IEEE Abstract In this paper, we propose a distributed architecture for generation control in islanded ac microgrids with both synchronous generators and inverter-interfaced power supplies. Although

Dominguez-Garcia, Alejandro

48

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of fossil fuel sources of waste heat and other lossesthat this is only the waste heat from fossil generation,an estimate of the total waste heat from fossil generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L, editor. 11 th Annual Real Options Conference, Berkeley,from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find aDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment;

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility. Using the real options approach, we find naturalDistributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1.based microgrid via the real options approach to determine

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Valuation-Based Framework for Considering Distributed Generation Photovoltaic Tariff Design Preprint Owen R. Zinaman National Renewable Energy Laboratory Nam R. Darghouth...

52

Distributed Generation and Virtual Power Plants: Barriers and Solutions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The present technological and regulatory power system needs to adapt to the increase in the share of distributed generation. This research focuses on the applicability… (more)

Olejniczak, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Distributed Renewable Energy Generation and Landscape Architecture: A Critical Review.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Governments and utility organizations around the world have mandated and provided incentives for new distributed renewable energy generation (DREG) capacity, and market projections indicate strong… (more)

Beck, Osmer DeVon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study Type Field Test Technology Internal Combustion...

55

Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation to enhance voltage stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear DSTATCOM controller design for distribution network with distributed generation Accepted 19 June 2013 Keywords: Distributed generation Distribution network DSATACOM Partial feedback linearization Voltage control a b s t r a c t This paper presents a nonlinear controller design for a DSTATCOM

Pota, Himanshu Roy

56

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIGHT SOURCE FACILITY AT LBNL * J.N. Corlett # , B. Austin,R. Wilcox, J. Wurtele, LBNL, Berkeley, CA94720, U.S.A. A.concept, under development at LBNL, for a multi- beamline

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Road Map to Capitalization of Power Generating Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the strengths and weaknesses of the original design, and can actually maximize the production capabilities of the facility. Recapitalization Progress Where Are The Conversions? if Europe, First 1990 Finland, 11 Mills Converted Germany, Starting...

Kangas, M. Y. O.

58

SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is produced in under Contract DE-FC26-00NT40914, awarded in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy solicitation DE-PS26-00FT40759, ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Fossil Energy-Wide Coal, Natural Gas and Oil R&D Programs'', area of interest 7, ''Advanced Turbines and Engines.'' As a result of ten years of collaborative fuel cell systems studies with U.S. fuel cell manufacturers, initiated to evaluate the gas turbine opportunities likely to result from this technology, Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis has established a clear need for the creation of a turbogenerator to a specification that cannot be met by available units. Many of the required qualities are approached, but not fully met, by microturbines, which tend to be too small and low in pressure ratio. Market evaluation suggests a 1 MW fuel cell hybrid, incorporating a turbogenerator of about 250 kW, is a good market entry product (large enough to spread the costs of a relatively complex plant, but small enough to be acceptable to early adopters). The fuel cell stack occupies the position of a combustor in the turbogenerator, but delivers relatively low turbine entry temperature (1600 F [870 C]). If fitted with a conventional combustor and run stand-alone at full uncooled turbine temperature (1800 F [980 C]), the turbogenerator will develop more power. The power can be further enhanced if the turbogenerator is designed to have flow margin in its fuel cell role (by running faster). This margin can be realized by running at full speed and it is found that power can be increased to the 0.7 to 1.0 MW range, depending on initial fuel cell stack flow demand. The fuel cell hybrid applications require increased pressure ratio (at least 6 rather than the 3-4 of microturbines) and very long life for a small machine. The outcome is a turbogenerator that is very attractive for stand-alone operation and has been the subject of unsolicited enthusiasm from potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

Sy Ali; Bob Moritz

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Renewable Energy: Distributed Generation Policies and Programs...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

resources. Net Metering State net metering policies allow customers to produce onsite electricity and sell excess generation to the utility at a set price, which creates an...

60

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reduces the energy content of forest residues delivered to a bio-fuel facility as mobile facilities use by bio-oil, bio-slurry and torrefied wood is 45%, 65% and 87% of the initial forest residue energyUsing mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio

Victoria, University of

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61

Distributed Generation in Buildings (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Currently, distributed generation provides a very small share of residential and commercial electricity requirements in the United States. The Annual Energy Outlook 2005 reference case projects a significant increase in electricity generation in the buildings sector, but distributed generation is expected to remain a small contributor to the sectors energy needs. Although the advent of higher energy prices or more rapid improvement in technology could increase the use of distributed generation relative to the reference case projection, the vast majority of electricity used in buildings is projected to continue to be purchased from the grid.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power generation with combined heat and power applications,”of carbon tax on combined heat and power adoption by a131(1), 2-25. US Combined Heat and Power Association (

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We model the operating decisions of a commercial enterprisethatneeds to satisfy its periodic electricity demand with either on-sitedistributed generation (DG) or purchases from the wholesale market. Whilethe former option involves electricity generation at relatively high andpossibly stochastic costs from a set of capacity-constrained DGtechnologies, the latter implies unlimited open-market transactions atstochastic prices. A stochastic dynamic programme (SDP) is used to solvethe resulting optimisation problem. By solving the SDP with and withoutthe availability of DG units, the implied option values of the DG unitsare obtained.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

64

Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for a proposed solar chimney facility in southwestern Australia. A range of temperatures and updraft velocities technology for converting solar energy into electricity that has shown promise in recent years is the so1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

Nenes, Athanasios

65

Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive...

66

Application Filing Requirements for Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facilities (Ohio)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Chapter 4906-17 of the Ohio Administrative Code states the Application Filing Requirements for wind-powered electric generating facilities in Ohio. The information requested in this rule shall be...

67

Electric generating or transmission facility: determination of rate-making principles and treatment: procedure (Kansas)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation permits the KCC to determine rate-making principles that will apply to a utility’s investment in generation or transmission before constructing a facility or entering into a...

68

Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat and the force produced from the detonation wave. In previous experimental work, a single that involve coupling a PDE with different systems to drive a generator and produce electricity [2, 3]. One. For instance, it may be possible to design a generator that uses the force created by the pressure rise from

Texas at Arlington, University of

69

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design de...

Sulc, Petr; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocusOski Energy LLC Place: Reno, Nevada Sector:Generation

71

Ris Energy Report 4 Distributed generation 1 What is distributed generation?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation (DG) refers to an emerging evolu- tion of the electric power generation systems, in which all electricity generation it is obviously understood as consisting of small size generation units only, but when referred to as large-scale electricity generation it is usually understood as containing a high proportion

72

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of2007) and the 2007 Real Options Conference in Berkeley, CA,distributed generation, real options JEL Codes: D81, Q40

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under Various Electricity Tariffs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

purchase abs. cooling offset electric supply (kW) hourTariffs electric supply (kW) abs. cooling offset purchasecooling offset Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization Under Various Electricity Tariffs electric supply (

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Fault Current Issues for Market Driven Power Systems with Distributed Generation Natthaphob of installing distributed generation (DG) to electric power systems. The proliferation of new generators creates Terms--Distributed / dispersed generation, power distri- bution, power system protection, fault

75

Local Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the re...

Turitsyn, Konstantin S; Backhaus, Scott; Chertkov, Misha

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Local control of reactive power by distributed photovoltaic generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic (PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit may severely degrade power quality due to voltage sags and swells caused by rapidly varying PV generation during cloud transients coupled with the slow response of existing utility compensation and regulation equipment. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We suggest a local control scheme that dispatches reactive power from each PV inverter based on local instantaneous measurements of the real and reactive components of the consumed power and the real power generated by the PVs. Using one adjustable parameter per circuit, we balance the requirements on power quality and desire to minimize thermal losses. Numerical analysis of two exemplary systems, with comparable total PV generation albeit a different spatial distribution, show how to adjust the optimization parameter depending on the goal. Overall, this local scheme shows excellent performance; it's capable of guaranteeing acceptable power quality and achieving significant saving in thermal losses in various situations even when the renewable generation in excess of the circuit own load, i.e. feeding power back to the higher-level system.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turitsyn, Konstantin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sulc, Petr [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Backhaus, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power generation A. Der Minassians, K. H. Aschenbach discuss the technical and economic feasibility of a low-cost distributed solar-thermal-electric power technologies should be judged by output power per dollar rather than by efficiency or other technical merits

Sanders, Seth

78

Insertion of Distributed Generation into Rural Feeders , R. MORENO+  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-generating technologies with new technologies that pollute less. Therefore, the use of renewable energies in the worldwide of renewable energy distributed generators (DG) to radial feeders is assessed. Often, the long distance between, however, are not usually designed to receive energy at the consumer end. This problem intensifies

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

79

Cogeneration and Distributed Generation1 This appendix describes cogeneration and distributed generating resources. Also provided is an  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reinforcement, remote loads more economically served by small-scale generation than by distribution system. · Reliability upgrade for systems susceptible to outages. · Alternative to the expansion of transmission

80

Assessment and Mitigation of Diagnostic-Generated Electromagnetic Interference at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an ever-present challenge at laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The major source of EMI at such facilities is laser-target interaction that can generate intense electromagnetic fields within, and outside of, the laser target chamber. In addition, the diagnostics themselves can be a source of EMI, even interfering with themselves. In this paper we describe EMI generated by ARIANE and DIXI, present measurements, and discuss effects of the diagnostic-generated EMI on ARIANE's CCD and on a PMT nearby DIXI. Finally we present some of the efforts we have made to mitigate the effects of diagnostic-generated EMI on NIF diagnostics.

Brown, C G; Ayers, M J; Felker, B; Ferguson, W; Holder, J P; Nagel, S R; Piston, K W; Simanovskaia, N; Throop, A L; Chung, M; Hilsabeck, T

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

A facility to remotely assemble radioisotope thermoelectric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) are electrical power sources that use heat from decaying radioisotopes to directly generate electrical power. The RTG assembly process is performed in an inert atmosphere inside a large glovebox, which is surrounded by radiation shielding to reduce exposure to neutron and gamma radiation from the radioisotope heat source. In the past, allowable dose rate limits have allowed direct, manual assembly methods; however, current dose rate limits require a thicker radiation shielding that makes direct, manual assembly infeasible. To minimize RTG assembly process modifications, telerobotic systems are being investigated to perform remote assembly tasks. Telerobotic systems duplicate human arm motion and incorporate force feedback sensitivity to handle objects and tools in a human-like manner. A telerobotic system with two arms and a three-dimensional (3-D) vision system can be used to perform remote RTG assembly tasks inside gloveboxes and cells using unmodified, normal hand tools.

Engstrom, J.W.; Goldmann, L.H.; Truitt, R.W.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Distributed Wind - Economical, Clean Energy for Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed wind energy works for industrial clients. Corporations and other organizations are choosing to add Distributed Wind energy to their corporate goals for a numerous reasons: economic, environmental, marketing, values, and attracting new...

Trapanese, A.; James, F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Using mobile distributed pyrolysis facilities to deliver a forest residue resource for bio-fuel production.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Distributed mobile conversion facilities using either fast pyrolysis or torrefaction processes can be used to convert forest residues to more energy dense substances (bio-oil, bio-slurry… (more)

Brown, Duncan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voltage Control of Distribution Networks with Distributed Generation using Reactive Power to control voltage of distribution networks with DG using reactive power compensation approach. In this paper profile within the specified limits, it is essential to regulate the reactive power of the compensators

Pota, Himanshu Roy

85

Options for Control of Reactive Power by Distributed Photovoltaic Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High penetration levels of distributed photovoltaic(PV) generation on an electrical distribution circuit present several challenges and opportunities for distribution utilities. Rapidly varying irradiance conditions may cause voltage sags and swells that cannot be compensated by slowly responding utility equipment resulting in a degradation of power quality. Although not permitted under current standards for interconnection of distributed generation, fast-reacting, VAR-capable PV inverters may provide the necessary reactive power injection or consumption to maintain voltage regulation under difficult transient conditions. As side benefit, the control of reactive power injection at each PV inverter provides an opportunity and a new tool for distribution utilities to optimize the performance of distribution circuits, e.g. by minimizing thermal losses. We discuss and compare via simulation various design options for control systems to manage the reactive power generated by these inverters. An important design decision that weighs on the speed and quality of communication required is whether the control should be centralized or distributed (i.e. local). In general, we find that local control schemes are capable for maintaining voltage within acceptable bounds. We consider the benefits of choosing different local variables on which to control and how the control system can be continuously tuned between robust voltage control, suitable for daytime operation when circuit conditions can change rapidly, and loss minimization better suited for nighttime operation.

Petr Sulc; Konstantin Turitsyn; Scott Backhaus; Michael Chertkov

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

A planning scheme for penetrating embedded generation in power distribution grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Penetrating Embedded Generation, or Distributed Generation (DG), in power distribution grids presents great benefits and substantial positive social impacts to utilities, system operators and electricity consumers. Existing ...

Wang, Jiankang, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

The New 2nd-Generation SRF R&D Facility at Jefferson Lab: TEDF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy has funded a near-complete renovation of the SRF-based accelerator research and development facilities at Jefferson Lab. The project to accomplish this, the Technical and Engineering Development Facility (TEDF) Project has completed the first of two phases. An entirely new 3,100 m{sup 2} purpose-built SRF technical work facility has been constructed and was occupied in summer of 2012. All SRF work processes with the exception of cryogenic testing have been relocated into the new building. All cavity fabrication, processing, thermal treatment, chemistry, cleaning, and assembly work is collected conveniently into a new LEED-certified building. An innovatively designed 800 m2 cleanroom/chemroom suite provides long-term flexibility for support of multiple R&D and construction projects as well as continued process evolution. The characteristics of this first 2nd-generation SRF facility are described.

Reece, Charles E.; Reilly, Anthony V.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parton distributions and event generators Stefano Carrazza, Stefano Forte Dipartimento di Fisica ingredient in achieving all of these goals is the integration of parton distri- butions within Monte Carlo, and data collected in an experimental fiducial region. Whereas next-to-leading (NLO) order Monte Carlo

Heller, Barbara

89

Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems -A Comparison Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy System #12;Centralized and Distributed Generated Power Systems - A Comparison Approach Prepared for the Project "The Future Grid to Enable Sustainable Energy Systems" Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Robert Saint National Rural Electric Cooperative Association PSERC Publication 12-08 June 2012 #12;For

90

Considerations Related to Connecting Solar Generating Facilities to the Electrical Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Considerations Related to Connecting Solar Generating Facilities to the Electrical Grid March 2011 voltages are nominally 4.5kv and 13 2kv The solar system must maintain voltageand 13.2kv. The solar system) or multiple sites (multiple leases, interconnect points, construction forces) Ground based, roof top (weight

Homes, Christopher C.

91

Energy Storage and Distributed Energy Generation Project, Final Project Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report serves as a Final Report under the “Energy Storage and Distribution Energy Generation Project” carried out by the Transportation Energy Center (TEC) at the University of Michigan (UM). An interdisciplinary research team has been working on fundamental and applied research on: -distributed power generation and microgrids, -power electronics, and -advanced energy storage. The long-term objective of the project was to provide a framework for identifying fundamental research solutions to technology challenges of transmission and distribution, with special emphasis on distributed power generation, energy storage, control methodologies, and power electronics for microgrids, and to develop enabling technologies for novel energy storage and harvesting concepts that can be simulated, tested, and scaled up to provide relief for both underserved and overstressed portions of the Nation’s grid. TEC’s research is closely associated with Sections 5.0 and 6.0 of the DOE "Five-year Program Plan for FY2008 to FY2012 for Electric Transmission and Distribution Programs, August 2006.”

Schwank, Johannes; Mader, Jerry; Chen, Xiaoyin; Mi, Chris; Linic, Suljo; Sastry, Ann Marie; Stefanopoulou, Anna; Thompson, Levi; Varde, Keshav

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

92

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid UnderUncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines a California-based microgrid s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit that operates on natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find natural gas generating cost thresholds that trigger DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid accelerates DG investment, while the option to disconnect entirely from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generating cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

93

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines a California-based microgrid?s decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity at a fixed retail rate from its utility. Using the real options approach, we find a natural gas generation cost threshold that triggers DG investment. Furthermore, the consideration of operational flexibility by the microgrid increases DG investment, while the option to disconnect from the utility is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold boundary and find that high electricity price volatility relative to that of natural gas generation cost delays investment while simultaneously increasing the value of the investment. We conclude by using this result to find the implicit option value of the DG unit when two sources of uncertainty exist.

Marnay, Chris; Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Laboratories for the 21st Century Best Practices: Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Guide describes general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments.

96

Reliability Improvement Programs in Steam Distribution and Power Generation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RELIABILITY IIIPROVEfWlT PROGRAMS IN STEAM DISTRIBUTION AND POVER GENERATION SYSTEItS Steve Petto Tech/Serv Corporation Blue Bell, PA Abstract This paper will present alternatives to costly corrective maintenance of the steam trap... In the reliability and efficiency of the system. Recent studies have shownt hat more than 40% of all In stalled steam traps and 20% of certain types of valves need some form of corrective action. The majority of all high backpressure problems In condensate return...

Petto, S.

97

A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

99

A policy letter. DG-GRID Improving distribution network regulation for enhancing the share of sustainable distributed generation in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A policy letter. DG-GRID Improving distribution network regulation for enhancing the share-generation of electricity and heat (CHP). This drives the growth of distributed generation (DG) ­ generators connected to the distribution network ­ to significant levels. The DG-GRID project1 carried out by nine European universities

100

New Construction of Distribution Lines, Service Lines, and Appurtenant Facilities in Certain Visually Significant Resources Outside Residential Subdivisions (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any proposed construction of distribution lines, service lines, and appurtenant facilities to electric utilities located near scenic areas of statewide significance, including Adirondack park...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Optimal Solar PV Arrays Integration for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solar photovoltaic (PV) systems hold great potential for distributed energy generation by installing PV panels on rooftops of residential and commercial buildings. Yet challenges arise along with the variability and non-dispatchability of the PV systems that affect the stability of the grid and the economics of the PV system. This paper investigates the integration of PV arrays for distributed generation applications by identifying a combination of buildings that will maximize solar energy output and minimize system variability. Particularly, we propose mean-variance optimization models to choose suitable rooftops for PV integration based on Markowitz mean-variance portfolio selection model. We further introduce quantity and cardinality constraints to result in a mixed integer quadratic programming problem. Case studies based on real data are presented. An efficient frontier is obtained for sample data that allows decision makers to choose a desired solar energy generation level with a comfortable variability tolerance level. Sensitivity analysis is conducted to show the tradeoffs between solar PV energy generation potential and variability.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Li, Xueping [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

The Value of Distributed Generation under Different TariffStructures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed generation (DG) may play a key role in a modern energy system because it can improve energy efficiency. Reductions in the energy bill, and therefore DG attractiveness, depend on the electricity tariff structure; a system created before widespread adoption of distributed generation. Tariffs have been designed to recover costs equitably amongst customers with similar consumption patterns. Recently, electric utilities began to question the equity of this electricity pricing structure for standby service. In particular, the utilities do not feel that DG customers are paying their fair share of transmission and distribution costs - traditionally recovered through a volumetric($/kWh) mechanism - under existing tariff structures. In response, new tariff structures with higher fixed costs for DG have been implemented in New York and in California. This work analyzes the effects of different electricity tariff structures on DG adoption. First, the effects of the new standby tariffs in New York are analyzed in different regions. Next generalized tariffs are constructed, and the sensitivity to varying levels of the volumetric and the demand ($/kW, i.e. maximum rate) charge component are analyzed on New York's standard and standby tariff as well as California's standby tariff. As expected, DG profitability is reduced with standby tariffs, but often marginally. The new standby structures tend to promote smaller base load systems. The amount of time-of-day variability of volumetric pricing seems to have little effect on DG economics.

Firestone, Ryan; Magnus Maribu, Karl; Marnay, Chris

2006-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

103

1 Control Challenges of Fuel Cell-Driven Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract — This paper discusses the load following capability of fuel cell-driven power plants. A linear model of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power plant is obtained and utilized for the design of robust controllers which enhance tracking response of the plant and reject disturbances originating from the distribution grid. Two robust controllers are synthesized applying the H? mixed-sensitivity optimization and their performance is validated by means of nonlinear time-domain simulations. The obtained results indicate that the disturbances can be successfully attenuated; however, the tracking response cannot be significantly improved without a modification of the design of the fuel cell power plant. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion on the physical limitations on the fuel cell output power ramp and possible solutions are outlined. Index Terms — Distributed generation, Solid Oxide Fuel Cells, robust control, H ? controller design, disturbance rejection.

Valery Knyazkin; Lennart Söder; Claudio Canizares

104

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

Distributed Generation Systems Inc DISGEN | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 No revision has Type TermOpenDistributed Generation Systems

106

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 89-270-2080, Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility, Harrisburg, Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In response to a request from the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a health hazard evaluation was conducted at the Harrisburg Steam Generation Facility (HSGF)(SIC-4953) concerning possible exposure to fly ash, combustion products and asbestos (1332214). The facility was a waste to energy site where municipal refuse was incinerated at approximately 1400 degrees-F. The steam generated was either sold directly or converted to electricity via an on site turbine. Employees used hard hats, safety shoes and glasses, work clothes and single use disposable dust and mist respirators. There was a potential for exposure to fly ash for employees working in the boiler and basement areas. Total particulate exposures ranged from 5 to llmg/m3 for laborers. The concentration of lead (7439921) exceeded the standards set by OSHA permissible exposure level of 0.05mg/kg in three of the personal breathing zone air samples. Amosite (12172735) and chrysotile (12001295) asbestos were identified in bulk samples of insulation and asbestos taken from a settled dust sample in the boiler area. Surface wipe samples indicated the possibility of hand to mouth contact with fly ash, particularly in the break and locker rooms. The author concludes that there is a need for reducing worker exposure to fly ash particulate. The author recommends engineering and work practice controls to reduce particulate exposures, increased cleaning and maintenance activities; and further evaluation of asbestos contamination at the facility.

Seitz, T.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Time series power flow analysis for distribution connected PV generation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed photovoltaic (PV) projects must go through an interconnection study process before connecting to the distribution grid. These studies are intended to identify the likely impacts and mitigation alternatives. In the majority of the cases, system impacts can be ruled out or mitigation can be identified without an involved study, through a screening process or a simple supplemental review study. For some proposed projects, expensive and time-consuming interconnection studies are required. The challenges to performing the studies are twofold. First, every study scenario is potentially unique, as the studies are often highly specific to the amount of PV generation capacity that varies greatly from feeder to feeder and is often unevenly distributed along the same feeder. This can cause location-specific impacts and mitigations. The second challenge is the inherent variability in PV power output which can interact with feeder operation in complex ways, by affecting the operation of voltage regulation and protection devices. The typical simulation tools and methods in use today for distribution system planning are often not adequate to accurately assess these potential impacts. This report demonstrates how quasi-static time series (QSTS) simulation and high time-resolution data can be used to assess the potential impacts in a more comprehensive manner. The QSTS simulations are applied to a set of sample feeders with high PV deployment to illustrate the usefulness of the approach. The report describes methods that can help determine how PV affects distribution system operations. The simulation results are focused on enhancing the understanding of the underlying technical issues. The examples also highlight the steps needed to perform QSTS simulation and describe the data needed to drive the simulations. The goal of this report is to make the methodology of time series power flow analysis readily accessible to utilities and others responsible for evaluating potential PV impacts.

Broderick, Robert Joseph; Quiroz, Jimmy Edward; Ellis, Abraham; Reno, Matthew J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA; Smith, Jeff [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN; Dugan, Roger [Electric Power Research Institute, Knoxville, TN

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Onsite Distributed Generation Systems For Laboratories, Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices (Brochure)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide provides general information on implementing onsite distributed generation systems in laboratory environments. Specific technology applications, general performance information, and cost data are provided to educate and encourage laboratory energy managers to consider onsite power generation or combined heat and power (CHP) systems for their facilities. After conducting an initial screening, energy managers are encouraged to conduct a detailed feasibility study with actual cost and performance data for technologies that look promising. Onsite distributed generation systems are small, modular, decentralized, grid-connected, or off-grid energy systems. These systems are located at or near the place where the energy is used. These systems are also known as distributed energy or distributed power systems. DG technologies are generally considered those that produce less than 20 megawatts (MW) of power. A number of technologies can be applied as effective onsite DG systems, including: (1) Diesel, natural gas, and dual-fuel reciprocating engines; (2) Combustion turbines and steam turbines; (3) Fuel cells; (4) Biomass heating; (5) Biomass combined heat and power; (6) Photovoltaics; and (7) Wind turbines. These systems can provide a number of potential benefits to an individual laboratory facility or campus, including: (1) High-quality, reliable, and potentially dispatchable power; (2) Low-cost energy and long-term utility cost assurance, especially where electricity and/or fuel costs are high; (3) Significantly reduced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Typical CHP plants reduce onsite GHG by 40 to 60 percent; (4) Peak demand shaving where demand costs are high; (5) CHP where thermal energy can be used in addition to electricity; (6) The ability to meet standby power needs, especially where utility-supplied power is interrupted frequently or for long periods and where standby power is required for safety or emergencies; and (7) Use for standalone or off-grid systems where extending the grid is too expensive or impractical. Because they are installed close to the load, DG systems avoid some of the disadvantages of large, central power plants, such as transmission and distribution losses over long electric lines.

Not Available

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

LO Generation and Distribution for 60GHz Phased Array Transceivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goal of the LO distribution network design was minimizing7. Given a distribution impedance, Z o , design an input5. LO DISTRIBUTION Mixer LO Buffer Design Methodology The

Marcu, Cristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Making the Economic Case for Small-Scale Distributed Wind -- A Screening for Distributed Generation Wind Opportunities: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was an offshoot of a previous assessment, which examined the potential for large-scale, greater than 50 MW, wind development on occupied federal agency lands. The study did not find significant commercial wind development opportunities, primarily because of poor wind resource on available and appropriately sized land areas or land use or aesthetic concerns. The few sites that could accommodate a large wind farm failed to have transmission lines in optimum locations required to generate power at competitive wholesale prices. The study did identify a promising but less common distributed generation (DG) development option. This follow-up study documents the NREL/Global Energy Concepts team efforts to identify economic DG wind projects at a select group of occupied federal sites. It employs a screening strategy based on project economics that go beyond quantity of windy land to include state and utility incentives as well as the value of avoided power purchases. It attempts to account for the extra costs and difficulties associated with small projects through the use of project scenarios that are more compatible with federal facilities and existing land uses. These benefits and barriers of DG are discussed, and the screening methodology and results are included. The report concludes with generalizations about the screening method and recommendations for improvement and other potential applications for this methodology.

Kandt, A.; Brown, E.; Dominick, J.; Jurotich, T.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A shielded storage rack has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which processes and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGs. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L. (Westinghouse Hanford Company, P.O. Box 1970, Mail Stop N1-42, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States))

1993-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

IMPACT OF FUEL CELL BASED HYBRID DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN AN ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent developments in distributed generation technologies have enabled new options for supplying electrical energy in remote and off-grid areas. The importance of fuel cells has increased during the past decade due to the extensive use of fossil fuels for electrical power has resulted in many negative consequences. Fuel cells are now closer to commercialization than past and they have the ability to fulfill all of the global power needs while meeting the economic and environmental expectations..The objective of this paper is to study the economic performance and operation of a fuel cell distributed generation and to provide an assessment of the economic issues associated in electrical network. In this study, with HOMER (Hybrid Optimization Model for Electric Renewables) software, NREL’s micro power optimization model performed a range of equipment options over varying constraints and sensitivities to optimize small power distribution systems. Its flexibility makes it useful in the evaluation of design issues in the planning and early decision-making phase of rural electrification projects. This study concludes that fuel cell systems appear competitive today if is connected with proposed hybrid DG in an AC distribution grid. The overall energy management strategy for coordinating the power flows among the different energy sources is presented with cost-effective approach.

unknown authors

116

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Investment and Upgrade in Distributed Generation under Uncertainty  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing deregulation of electricity industries worldwide is providing incentives for microgrids to use small-scale distributed generation (DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications via heat exchangers (HXs) to meet local energy loads. Although the electric-only efficiency of DG is lower than that of central-station production, relatively high tariff rates and the potential for CHP applications increase the attraction of on-site generation. Nevertheless, a microgrid contemplatingthe installation of gas-fired DG has to be aware of the uncertainty in the natural gas price. Treatment of uncertainty via real options increases the value of the investment opportunity, which then delays the adoption decision as the opportunity cost of exercising the investment option increases as well. In this paper, we take the perspective of a microgrid that can proceed in a sequential manner with DG capacity and HX investment in order to reduce its exposure to risk from natural gas price volatility. In particular, with the availability of the HX, the microgrid faces a tradeoff between reducing its exposure to the natural gas price and maximising its cost savings. By varying the volatility parameter, we find that the microgrid prefers a direct investment strategy for low levels of volatility and a sequential one for higher levels of volatility.

Siddiqui, Afzal; Maribu, Karl

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

118

FEMTOSECOND TIMING DISTRIBUTION AND CONTROL FOR NEXT GENERATION ACCELERATORS AND LIGHT SOURCES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Femtosecond Timing Distribution At LCLS Free-electron-lasers (FEL) have the capability of producing high photon flux from the IR to the hard x-ray wavelength range and to emit femtosecond and eventually even at-tosecond pulses. This makes them an ideal tool for fundamental as well as applied re-search. Timing precision at the Stanford Linear Coherent Light Source (LCLS) between the x-ray FEL (XFEL) and ultrafast optical lasers is currently no better than 100 fs RMS. Ideally this precision should be much better and could be limited only by the x-ray pulse duration, which can be as short as a few femtoseconds. An increasing variety of science problems involving electron and nuclear dynamics in chemical and material systems will become accessible as the timing improves to a few femtoseconds. Advanced methods of electron beam conditioning or pulse injection could allow the FEL to achieve pulse durations less than one femtosecond. The objec-tive of the work described in this proposal is to set up an optical timing distribution sys-tem based on modelocked Erbium doped fiber lasers at LCLS facility to improve the timing precision in the facility and allow time stamping with a 10 fs precision. The primary commercial applications for optical timing distributions systems are seen in the worldwide accelerator facilities and next generation light sources community. It is reasonable to expect that at least three major XFELs will be built in the next decade. In addition there will be up to 10 smaller machines, such as FERMI in Italy and Maxlab in Sweden, plus the market for upgrading already existing facilities like Jefferson Lab. The total market is estimated to be on the order of a 100 Million US Dollars. The company owns the exclusive rights to the IP covering the technology enabling sub-10 fs synchronization systems. Testing this technology, which has set records in a lab environment, at LCLS, hence in a real world scenario, is an important corner stone of bringing the technology to market.

Chen, Li-Jin [Idesta Quantum Electronics, LLC

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

120

Central power generation versus distributed generation e An air quality assessment in the South Coast Air Basin of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: Distributed generation Central generation Air quality modeling Reactivity a b s t r a c by the widespread installation of many stationary power generators close to the point of electricity use within from which electricity must be transmitted to end users. However, increasing electricity demand

Dabdub, Donald

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Air Quality Impact of Distributed Generation of Electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the near source air quality impact of distributedDabdub, D. , 2003. Urban Air quality impacts of distributedDabdub, D. , 2004. Urban Air quality impacts of distributed

Jing, Qiguo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 6. Normalised NetCost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 7. Wait InvestCost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C Figure 8.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Distributed Feedback Fiber Laser The Heart of the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a world-class laser fusion machine that is currently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The 192 laser beams that converge on the target at the output of the NIF laser system originate from a low power fiber laser in the Master Oscillator Room (MOR). The MOR is responsible for generating the single pulse that seeds the entire NIF laser system. This single pulse is phase-modulated to add bandwidth, and then amplified and split into 48 separate beam lines all in single-mode polarizing fiber. Before leaving the MOR, each of the 48 output beams are temporally sculpted into high contrast shapes using Arbitrary Waveform Generators. The 48 output beams of the MOR are amplified in the Preamplifier Modules (PAMs), split and amplified again to generate 192 laser beams. The 192 laser beams are frequency converted to the third harmonic and then focused at the center of a 10-meter diameter target chamber. The MOR is an all fiber-based system utilizing highly reliable Telecom-Industry type hardware. The nearly 2,000,000 joules of energy at the output of the NIF laser system starts from a single fiber oscillator that fits in the palm of your hand. This paper describes the design and performance of the laser source that provides the precision light to the National Ignition Facility. Shown below is a simplified diagram illustrating the MOR's basic functions.

Browning, D F; Erbert, G V

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Treatment of Uranium and Plutonium Solutions Generated in the Atalante Facility, France - 12004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Atalante complex operated by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) at the Rhone Valley Research Center consolidates research programs on actinide chemistry, especially separation chemistry, processing for recycling spent fuel, and fabrication of actinide targets for innovative concepts in future nuclear systems. The design of future systems (Generation IV reactors, material recycling) will increase the uranium and plutonium flows in the facility, making it important to anticipate the stepped-up activity and provide Atalante with equipment dedicated to processing these solutions to obtain a mixed uranium-plutonium oxide that will be stored pending reuse. Ongoing studies for integral recycling of the actinides have highlighted the need for reserving equipment to produce actinides mixed oxide powder and also minor actinides bearing oxide for R and D purpose. To meet this double objective a new shielded line should be built in the facility and should be operational 6 years after go decision. The main functions of the new unit would be to receive, concentrate and store solutions, purify them, ensure group conversion of actinides and conversion of excess uranium. This new unit will be constructed in a completely refurbished building devoted to subcritical and safe geometry of the process equipments. (author)

Lagrave, Herve [French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission - CEA, Rhone Valley Research Center, BP 17171, 30207 Bagnols-sur-Ceze Cedex (France)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Method and apparatus for anti-islanding protection of distributed generations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for anti-islanding protection of a distributed generation with respect to a feeder connected to an electrical grid is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor adapted to generate a voltage signal representative of an output voltage and/or a current signal representative of an output current at the distributed generation, and a controller responsive to the signals from the sensor. The controller is productive of a control signal directed to the distributed generation to drive an operating characteristic of the distributed generation out of a nominal range in response to the electrical grid being disconnected from the feeder.

Ye, Zhihong; John, Vinod; Wang, Changyong; Garces, Luis Jose; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lei; Walling, Reigh Allen; Premerlani, William James; Sanza, Peter Claudius; Liu, Yan; Dame, Mark Edward

2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

126

Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Index for the Evaluation of Distributed Generation Impacts on Distribution System Luis F. Ochoa (1,2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Index for the Evaluation of Distributed Generation Impacts on Distribution System Protection Luis F and distribution systems, in addition to the presence of customers with energy exportation capabilities a special attention since they may weaken the reliability of the system [2]-[3]. In this work, the impacts

Harrison, Gareth

128

USE OF PRODUCED WATER IN RECIRCULATING COOLING SYSTEMS AT POWER GENERATING FACILITIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate produced water as a supplemental source of water for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS). This study incorporates elements that identify produced water volume and quality, infrastructure to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements to use it at the plant, delivery and treatment economics, etc. SJGS, which is operated by Public Service of New Mexico (PNM) is located about 15 miles northwest of Farmington, New Mexico. It has four units with a total generating capacity of about 1,800 MW. The plant uses 22,400 acre-feet of water per year from the San Juan River with most of its demand resulting from cooling tower make-up. The plant is a zero liquid discharge facility and, as such, is well practiced in efficient water use and reuse. For the past few years, New Mexico has been suffering from a severe drought. Climate researchers are predicting the return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters. Deliverable 2 focuses on transportation--the largest obstacle to produced water reuse in the San Juan Basin (the Basin). Most of the produced water in the Basin is stored in tanks at the well head and must be transported by truck to salt water disposal (SWD) facilities prior to injection. Produced water transportation requirements from the well head to SJGS and the availability of existing infrastructure to transport the water are discussed in this deliverable.

Michael N. DiFilippo

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

HYBRID CONTROL OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATORS CONNECTED TO WEAK RURAL NETWORKS TO MITIGATE VOLTAGE VARIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal power plants will increase the total and proportion of capacity of Distributed Generation (DG@iee.org; Robin.Wallace@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT Distributed generators are normally operated in automatic power factor-constrained bi- directional power flow may cause unacceptable voltage fluctuations that would cause generator

Harrison, Gareth

130

Distributed data access in the LAMPF (Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility) control system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have extended the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) control system software to allow uniform access to data and controls throughout the control system network. Two aspects of this work are discussed here. Of primary interest is the use of standard interfaces and standard messages to allow uniform and easily expandable inter-node communication. A locally designed remote procedure call protocol will be described. Of further interest is the use of distributed databases to allow maximal hardware independence in the controls software. Application programs use local partial copies of the global device description database to resolve symbolic device names.

Schaller, S.C.; Bjorklund, E.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

132

Dynamic equivalencing of distribution network with embedded generation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable energy generation will play an important role in solving the climate change problem. With renewable electricity generation increasing, there will be some significant changes in electric power systems, ...

Feng, Xiaodan Selina

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

133

WRI 50: Strategies for Cooling Electric Generating Facilities Utilizing Mine Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Power generation and water consumption are inextricably linked. Because of this relationship DOE/NETL has funded a competitive research and development initiative to address this relationship. This report is part of that initiative and is in response to DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS26-03NT41719-0. Thermal electric power generation requires large volumes of water to cool spent steam at the end of the turbine cycle. The required volumes are such that new plant siting is increasingly dependent on the availability of cooling circuit water. Even in the eastern U.S., large rivers such as the Monongahela may no longer be able to support additional, large power stations due to subscription of flow to existing plants, industrial, municipal and navigational requirements. Earlier studies conducted by West Virginia University (WV 132, WV 173 phase I, WV 173 Phase II, WV 173 Phase III, and WV 173 Phase IV in review) have identified that a large potential water resource resides in flooded, abandoned coal mines in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin, and likely elsewhere in the region and nation. This study evaluates the technical and economic potential of the Pittsburgh Coal Basin water source to supply new power plants with cooling water. Two approaches for supplying new power plants were evaluated. Type A employs mine water in conventional, evaporative cooling towers. Type B utilizes earth-coupled cooling with flooded underground mines as the principal heat sink for the power plant reject heat load. Existing mine discharges in the Pittsburgh Coal Basin were evaluated for flow and water quality. Based on this analysis, eight sites were identified where mine water could supply cooling water to a power plant. Three of these sites were employed for pre-engineering design and cost analysis of a Type A water supply system, including mine water collection, treatment, and delivery. This method was also applied to a ''base case'' river-source power plant, for comparison. Mine-water system cost estimates were then compared to the base-case river source estimate. We found that the use of net-alkaline mine water would under current economic conditions be competitive with a river-source in a comparable-size water cooling system. On the other hand, utilization of net acidic water would be higher in operating cost than the river system by 12 percent. This does not account for any environmental benefits that would accrue due to the treatment of acid mine drainage, in many locations an existing public liability. We also found it likely that widespread adoption of mine-water utilization for power plant cooling will require resolution of potential liability and mine-water ownership issues. In summary, Type A mine-water utilization for power plant cooling is considered a strong option for meeting water needs of new plant in selected areas. Analysis of the thermal and water handling requirements for a 600 megawatt power plant indicated that Type B earth coupled cooling would not be feasible for a power plant of this size. It was determined that Type B cooling would be possible, under the right conditions, for power plants of 200 megawatts or less. Based on this finding the feasibility of a 200 megawatt facility was evaluated. A series of mines were identified where a Type B earth-coupled 200 megawatt power plant cooling system might be feasible. Two water handling scenarios were designed to distribute heated power-plant water throughout the mines. Costs were developed for two different pumping scenarios employing a once-through power-plant cooling circuit. Thermal and groundwater flow simulation models were used to simulate the effect of hot water injection into the mine under both pumping strategies and to calculate the return-water temperature over the design life of a plant. Based on these models, staged increases in required mine-water pumping rates are projected to be part of the design, due to gradual heating and loss of heat-sink efficiency of the rock sequence above the mines. Utilizing pumping strategy No.1 (two mines) capital costs were 25 percent lower a

Joseph J. Donovan; Brenden Duffy; Bruce R. Leavitt; James Stiles; Tamara Vandivort; Paul Ziemkiewicz

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Distributed Power Generation: Requirements and Recommendations for an ICT Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some of these are sustainable (wind and hydroelectric power plants, solar cells), some are controllable), distrib- uted generation, energy management systems (EMS) , IEC standards 1 Power Generation possible to generate energy efficiently in large-scale power plants, a complex infrastructure is needed

Appelrath, Hans-Jürgen

135

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methodology The electricity generation and distribution network in the Western United States is comprised of power plants, electric utilities, electrical transformers, transmission and distribution infrastructure, etc. We conceptualize the system as a transportation network with resources (electricity

Hall, Sharon J.

136

Micro-grid operation of inverter based distributed generation with voltage and frequency dependent loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distribution systems are experiencing increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG). One attractive option is to use the available DG capacity during utility outages by forming planned micro-grids. Load sharing ...

Zeineldin, H. H.

137

Abstract--This paper proposes a distributed generator (DG) placement methodology based on newly defined term reactive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Index Terms--Distributed generator (DG), reactive power loadability, solar, voltage regulation, wind generator. I. INTRODUCTION istributed generation based on renewable energy sources offers a promising

Pota, Himanshu Roy

138

Role of solid oxide fuel cell distributed generation for stationary power application.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Based on an availabe fuel cell dyanmical model, an inportant concept feasible operating area is introduced. Fuel cell based distributed generator is studied to solve… (more)

Li, Yonghui.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Most Viewed Documents for Power Generation and Distribution:...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Methods for Power Distribution Systems: Final Report Tom McDermott (2010) 34 Industrial Power Factor Analysis Guidebook. Electrotek Concepts. (1995) 29 Recovery of Water from...

140

Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind. times redirected to final destination ShortURL Code Published Current state Most...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Future of Distributed Generation and IEEE 1547 (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the background on IEEE 1547, including its purpose, changes, new boundary issues and requirements, islanding issues, and how it impacts distributed wind.

Preus, R.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DG) and combined heat and power (CHP) applications matchedpower generation with combined heat and power applications,tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption, Journal

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Smoothing the Eects of Renewable Generation on the Distribution Grid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Grid by Paul Naud Renewable electrical power sourcessystem based on various renewable energy resources. InCRUZ Smoothing the Effects of Renewable Generation on the

Naud, Paul S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity markets , PhD thesis, University of California, Berkeley, CA, USA,USA, 1994. Joskow PL, Productivity growth and technical change in the generation of electricity,

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Thirty-year solid waste generation forecast for facilities at SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The information supplied by this 30-year solid waste forecast has been compiled as a source document to the Waste Management Environmental Impact Statement (WMEIS). The WMEIS will help to select a sitewide strategic approach to managing present and future Savannah River Site (SRS) waste generated from ongoing operations, environmental restoration (ER) activities, transition from nuclear production to other missions, and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) programs. The EIS will support project-level decisions on the operation of specific treatment, storage, and disposal facilities within the near term (10 years or less). In addition, the EIS will provide a baseline for analysis of future waste management activities and a basis for the evaluation of the specific waste management alternatives. This 30-year solid waste forecast will be used as the initial basis for the EIS decision-making process. The Site generates and manages many types and categories of waste. With a few exceptions, waste types are divided into two broad groups-high-level waste and solid waste. High-level waste consists primarily of liquid radioactive waste, which is addressed in a separate forecast and is not discussed further in this document. The waste types discussed in this solid waste forecast are sanitary waste, hazardous waste, low-level mixed waste, low-level radioactive waste, and transuranic waste. As activities at SRS change from primarily production to primarily decontamination and decommissioning and environmental restoration, the volume of each waste s being managed will change significantly. This report acknowledges the changes in Site Missions when developing the 30-year solid waste forecast.

Not Available

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Engineering/design of a co-generation waste-to-energy facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Five hundred fifteen thousand tons of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) is being generated every day in America. At present 68% of this trash is dumped into landfill operations. As the amount of garbage is increasing daily, the amount of land reserved for landfills is diminishing rapidly. With the sentiment of the public that you produce it, you keep it, the import-export of waste between the counties and states for the landfills, no longer appears to be feasible, especially when combined with expensive disposal costs. One method of reducing the quantity of waste sent to landfills is through the use of waste-to-energy facilities - the technology of resource recovery - the technology of today INCINERATION. All cogeneration projects are not alike. This paper examines several aspects of the electrical system of a particular municipal solid waste-to-energy project at Charleston, S.C. which includes plant auxiliary loads as well as a utility interconnection through a step-up transformer.

Bajaj, K.S.; Virgilio, R.J. (Foster Wheeler USA Corp., Clinton, NJ (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Reactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-loadability Reactive power margin Wind turbine a b s t r a c t This paper proposes static and dynamic VAR planningReactive power management of distribution networks with wind generation for improving voltage February 2013 Available online Keywords: Composite load Distributed generation D-STATCOM Q

Pota, Himanshu Roy

148

Efficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a manner that recovers waste heat for heating and/or cooling--called combined heat and power-- negativeEfficiency and Air Quality Implications of Distributed Generation and Combined Heat and Power environmental impacts can be decreased. Distributed generation/combined heat and power has been identified

149

Integrating Small Scale Distributed Generation into a Deregulated Market: Control Strategies and Price Feedback  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small scale power generating technologies, such as gas turbines, small hydro turbines, photovoltaics, wind turbines and fuel cells, are gradually replacing conventional generating technologies, for various applications, in the electric power system. The industry restructuring process in the United States is exposing the power sector to market forces, which is creating competitive structures for generation and alternative regulatory structures for the transmission and distribution systems. The potentially conflicting economic and technical demands of the new, independent generators introduce a set of significant uncertainties. What balance between market forces and centralized control will be found to coordinate distribution system operations? How will the siting of numerous small scale generators in distribution feeders impact the technical operations and control of the distribution system? Who will provide ancillary services (such as voltage support and spinning reserves) in the new competitive environment? This project investigates both the engineering and market integration of distributed generators into the distribution system. On the technical side, this project investigates the frequency performance of a distribution system that has multiple small scale generators. Using IEEE sample distribution systems and new dynamic generator models, this project develops general methods for

Judith Cardell; Marija Ili?; Richard D. Tabors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power generation with combined heat and power applications.tax on microgrid combined heat and power adoption. JournalCHP Application Center. Combined heat and power in a dairy.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2: L A City, DWP Valley Generating 1: Hunters Point 2: PG &E Co, Hunters Point Power 1: SDG & E Co/Kearny Mesa GT 2:Angeles ST(4) BF(2) Hunters Point San Francisco NG, Diesel

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Elimination Of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In Defense Waste Processing Facility Slurries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Based on lab-scale simulations of Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) slurry chemistry, the addition of sodium nitrite and sodium hydroxide to waste slurries at concentrations sufficient to take the aqueous phase into the alkaline region (pH > 7) with approximately 500 mg nitrite ion/kg slurry (assuming <25 wt% total solids, or equivalently 2,000 mg nitrite/kg total solids) is sufficient to effectively deactivate the noble metal catalysts at temperatures between room temperature and boiling. This is a potential strategy for eliminating catalytic hydrogen generation from the list of concerns for sludge carried over into the DWPF Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) or Recycle Collection Tank (RCT). These conclusions are drawn in large part from the various phases of the DWPF catalytic hydrogen generation program conducted between 2005 and 2009. The findings could apply to various situations, including a solids carry-over from either the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) or Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) into the SMECT with subsequent transfer to the RCT, as well as a spill of formic acid into the sump system and transfer into an RCT that already contains sludge solids. There are other potential mitigating factors for the SMECT and RCT, since these vessels are typically operated at temperatures close to the minimum temperatures that catalytic hydrogen has been observed to occur in either the SRAT or SME (pure slurry case), and these vessels are also likely to be considerably more dilute in both noble metals and formate ion (the two essential components to catalytic hydrogen generation) than the two primary process vessels. Rhodium certainly, and ruthenium likely, are present as metal-ligand complexes that are favored under certain concentrations of the surrounding species. Therefore, in the SMECT or RCT, where a small volume of SRAT or SME material would be significantly diluted, conditions would be less optimal for forming or sustaining the catalytic ligand species. Such conditions are likely to adversely impact the ability of the transferred mass to produce hydrogen at the same rate (per unit mass SRAT or SME slurry) as in the SRAT or SME vessels.

Koopman, D. C.

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effect of steam generator configuration in a loss of the RHR during mid-loop operation at PKL facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The loss of the residual heat removal system in mid-loop conditions may occur with a non-negligible contribution to the plant risk, so the analysis of the accidental sequences and the actions to mitigate the accident are of great interest in shutdown conditions. In order to plan the appropriate measures to mitigate the accident is necessary to understand the thermal-hydraulic processes following the loss of the residual heat removal system during shutdown. Thus, transients of this kind have been simulated using best-estimate codes in different integral test facilities and compared with experimental data obtained in different facilities. In PKL (Primaerkreislauf-Versuchsanlage, primary coolant loop test facility) test facility different series of experiments have been undertaken to analyze the plant response in shutdown. In this context, the E3 and F2 series consist of analyzing the loss of the residual heat removal system with a reduced inventory in the primary system. In particular, the experiments were developed to investigate the influence of the steam generators secondary side configuration on the plant response, what involves the consideration of different number of steam generators filled with water and ready for activation, on the heat transfer mechanisms inside the steam generators U-tubes. This work presents the results of such experiments calculated using, RELAP5/Mod 3.3. (authors)

Villanueva, J. F.; Carlos, S.; Martorell, S.; Sanchez, F. [Dpto. Ingenieria Quimica Y Nuclear, Universitat Politecnica de Valencia, Camino Vera s/n, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Load Demand Scheduling in Smart Grid to Minimize Electricity Generation Cost Siyu Yue- ple users cooperate to perform load demand scheduling in order to minimize the electricity generation between electricity consumption and generation. On the consumption side, electric demand ramps up

Pedram, Massoud

155

Distributed State Space Generation of Discrete-State Stochastic Models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the numerical approach, since the size of the state space can easily be orders of magnitude larger than the main charts [17], and ad hoc textual languages [14], the correct logical behavior can, in principle--it makes sense to distribute the state-space principally when one has to in order to avoid paging overhead

Ciardo, Gianfranco

156

OPTIMAL DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION UNDER NETWORK LOAD CONSTRAINTS,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-producers. Decentralized Power Generation (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat (the approach used in the traditional electric power paradigm), DPG systems employ numerous, but small¨EL BLOEMHOF, JOOST BOSMAN§, DAAN CROMMELIN¶, JASON FRANK , AND GUANGYUAN YANG Abstract. In electrical power

Frank, Jason

157

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, CA 94720-8163, USA, c_marnay@lbl.gov ABSTRACT. This paper examines a California-based microgrid-term natural gas generation cost is stochastic, we initially assume that the microgrid may purchase electricity is not attractive. By allowing the electricity price to be stochastic, we next determine an investment threshold

Guillas, Serge

158

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Optimal distributed power generation under network load constraints  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind turbines and heat pumps). This gives rise to the question how many units of each type (solar panel, mainly because of the development of novel components for decentral power generation (solar panels, small (DPG) refers to an electric power source such as solar, wind or combined heat power (CHP) connected

Utrecht, Universiteit

160

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation oftheAmperometricEnergy AnalysisDistributed

162

Distributed Generation Study/Emerling Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor,Discount PowerEmerling Farm < Distributed

163

Novel Control of PV Solar and Wind Farm Inverters as STATCOM for Increasing Connectivity of Distributed Generators.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The integration of distributed generators (DGs) such as wind farms and PV solar farms in distribution networks is getting severely constrained due to problems of… (more)

AC, Mahendra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Study and Development of Anti-Islanding Control for Synchronous Machine-Based Distributed Generators: November 2001--March 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the study and development of new active anti-islanding control schemes for synchronous machine-based distributed generators, including engine generators and gas turbines.

Ye, Z.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Applying epoch-era analysis for homeowner selection of distributed generation power systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current shift from centralized energy generation to a more distributed model has opened a number of choices for homeowners to provide their own power. While there are a number of systems to purchase, there are no tools ...

Pińa, Alexander L

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Distributed generation and demand side management : applications to transmission system operation   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity networks are undergoing a period of rapid change and transformation, with increased penetration levels of renewable-based distributed generation, and new influences on electricity end-use patterns from ...

Hayes, Barry Patrick

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Investigation of anti-islanding schemes for utility interconnection of distributed fuel cell powered generations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The rapid emergence of distributed fuel cell powered generations (DFPGs) operating in parallel with utility has brought a number of technical concerns as more DFPGs are connected to utility grid. One of the most challenging problems is known...

Jeraputra, Chuttchaval

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member...

Rastler, D. M.

169

A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

Oxford, University of

170

The Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A. Carreras M. Kirchner I. Dobson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributed generation if not done carefully. 1. Introduction With the increased utilization of local, oftenThe Impact of Distributed Generation on Power Transmission Grid Dynamics D. E. Newman B. A@engr.wisc.edu Abstract In this paper we investigate the impact of the introduction of distributed generation

Dobson, Ian

171

Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph A. Doucet and Shmuel S. Oren  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption Insurance for Electricity Distribution Author(s): Joseph customerownedonsitebackupdecisionswillpre-emptthe utility'splan to mitigatecompensationpaymentsbyprovidingonsitebackup generation access to The Energy Journal. http://www.jstor.org #12;Onsite Backup Generation and Interruption

Oren, Shmuel S.

172

Office of Facilities and Grounds Future Power Distribution Grid Requirements for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrical Cost Trends FY 2011 vs. FY 2012 UHM Office of Facilities and Grounds 7 $484 FTE Increase 31 and Expense Trends 1Q FY2008 ­ 1Q FY2012 #12;Office of Facilities and Grounds 29 November 2011 © UHM Office of capital investments in HVAC mechanical upgrades and energy retrofits as part of the campus' biennium

173

Potential Economic Impact of Constructing and Operating Solar Power Generation Facilities in Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nevada has a vast potential for electricity generation using solar power. An examination of the stock of renewable resources in Nevada proves that the state has the potential to be a leader in renewable-electric generation--one of the best in the world. This study provides estimates on the economic impact in terms of employment, personal income, and gross state product (GSP) of developing a portion of Nevada's solar energy generation resources.

Schwer, R. K.; Riddel, M.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Key factors affecting voltage oscillations of distribution networks with distributed generation and induction motor loads  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of distributed energy sources such as, combined heat and power (CHP), wind, solar, and fuel cells, are expected and IT, The University of New South Wales, Canberra, ACT 2600, Australia b Future Grid Research Centre, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia c Griffith School of Engineering, Griffith University

Pota, Himanshu Roy

175

Surface water transport and distribution of uranium in contaminated sediments near a nuclear weapons processing facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The extent of remobilization of uranium from contaminated soils adjacent to a nuclear weapons processing facility during episodic rain events was investigated. In addition, information on the solid phase associations of U in floodplain and suspended...

Batson, Vicky Lynn

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Distributed Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesDataTranslocation oftheAmperometricEnergy Analysis EnergyUntapped

177

Power Flow Analysis Algorithm for Islanded LV Microgrids Including Distributed Generator Units with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of virtual impedance parameters and (ii) higher accuracy in reactive power flow calculation. The improved With larger portion of growing electricity demand which is being fed through distributed generation (DG, in order to decouple real and reactive power, to increase the stability margin and also to improve

Chaudhary, Sanjay

178

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

Li, Baochun

179

Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 5th October 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the system reliability is improved. The simulation results verify the effectiveness of the proposed secondary networks reduce the system reliability. More reliable and sparse communication networks can be accommodated of multiple photovoltaic generators in a power distribution system [16]. Networked multi-agent systems have

Qu, Zhihua

180

Agent-Based Simulation of Distribution Systems with High Penetration of Photovoltaic Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of strategic trading in restructured wholesale power markets with congestion managed by locational marginal when coupled with increased price-sensitivity of demand as realized through demand response, demand dispatch, and/or price-sensitive demand bidding. Index Terms--Distributed power generation, multiagent sys

Tesfatsion, Leigh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Competitive Bidding Process for Electric Distribution Companies’ Procurement of Default and Back-up Electric Generation Services (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electric distribution companies shall utilize a competitive bidding process for electric generation services. The Department of Public Utility Control will be responsible for setting the criteria...

182

Contaminant distributions at typical U.S. uranium milling facilities and their effect on remedial action decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Past operations at uranium processing sites throughout the US have resulted in local contamination of soils and ground water by radionuclides, toxic metals, or both. Understanding the origin of contamination and how the constituents are distributed is a basic element for planning remedial action decisions. This report describes the radiological and nonradiological species found in ground water at a typical US uranium milling facility. The report will provide the audience with an understanding of the vast spectrum of contaminants that must be controlled in planning solutions to the long-term management of these waste materials.

Hamp, S. [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Jackson, T.J. [Geraghty and Miller, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dotson, P.W. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Characterization of 618-11 solid waste burial ground, disposed waste, and description of the waste generating facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 618-11 (Wye or 318-11) burial ground received transuranic (TRTJ) and mixed fission solid waste from March 9, 1962, through October 2, 1962. It was then closed for 11 months so additional burial facilities could be added. The burial ground was reopened on September 16, 1963, and continued operating until it was closed permanently on December 31, 1967. The burial ground received wastes from all of the 300 Area radioactive material handling facilities. The purpose of this document is to characterize the 618-11 solid waste burial ground by describing the site, burial practices, the disposed wastes, and the waste generating facilities. This document provides information showing that kilogram quantities of plutonium were disposed to the drum storage units and caissons, making them transuranic (TRU). Also, kilogram quantities of plutonium and other TRU wastes were disposed to the three trenches, which were previously thought to contain non-TRU wastes. The site burial facilities (trenches, caissons, and drum storage units) should be classified as TRU and the site plutonium inventory maintained at five kilograms. Other fissile wastes were also disposed to the site. Additionally, thousands of curies of mixed fission products were also disposed to the trenches, caissons, and drum storage units. Most of the fission products have decayed over several half-lives, and are at more tolerable levels. Of greater concern, because of their release potential, are TRU radionuclides, Pu-238, Pu-240, and Np-237. TRU radionuclides also included slightly enriched 0.95 and 1.25% U-231 from N-Reactor fuel, which add to the fissile content. The 618-11 burial ground is located approximately 100 meters due west of Washington Nuclear Plant No. 2. The burial ground consists of three trenches, approximately 900 feet long, 25 feet deep, and 50 feet wide, running east-west. The trenches constitute 75% of the site area. There are 50 drum storage units (five 55-gallon steel drums welded together) buried in three rows in the northeast comer. In addition, five eight-foot diameter caissons are located at the west end of the center row of the drum storage units. Initially, wastes disposed to the caissons and drum storage units were from the 325 and 327 building hot cells. Later, a small amount of remote-handled (RH) waste from the 309 building Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) cells, and the newly built 324 building hot cells, was disposed at the site.

Hladek, K.L.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Use of Produced Water in Recirculated Cooling Systems at Power Generating Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tree ring studies indicate that, for the greater part of the last three decades, New Mexico has been relatively 'wet' compared to the long-term historical norm. However, during the last several years, New Mexico has experienced a severe drought. Some researchers are predicting a return of very dry weather over the next 30 to 40 years. Concern over the drought has spurred interest in evaluating the use of otherwise unusable saline waters to supplement current fresh water supplies for power plant operation and cooling and other uses. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. These were (1) an assessment of using water produced with oil and gas as a supplemental supply for the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS); (2) a field evaluation of the wet-surface air cooling (WSAC) system at SJGS; and (3) the development of a ZeroNet systems analysis module and an application of the Watershed Risk Management Framework (WARMF) to evaluate a range of water shortage management plans. The study of the possible use of produced water at SJGS showed that produce water must be treated to justify its use in any reasonable quantity at SJGS. The study identified produced water volume and quality, the infrastructure needed to deliver it to SJGS, treatment requirements, and delivery and treatment economics. A number of produced water treatment alternatives that use off-the-shelf technology were evaluated along with the equipment needed for water treatment at SJGS. Wet surface air-cooling (WSAC) technology was tested at the San Juan Generating Station (SJGS) to determine its capacity to cool power plant circulating water using degraded water. WSAC is a commercial cooling technology and has been used for many years to cool and/or condense process fluids. The purpose of the pilot test was to determine if WSAC technology could cool process water at cycles of concentration considered highly scale forming for mechanical draft cooling towers. At the completion of testing, there was no visible scale on the heat transfer surfaces and cooling was sustained throughout the test period. The application of the WARMF decision framework to the San Juan Basis showed that drought and increased temperature impact water availability for all sectors (agriculture, energy, municipal, industry) and lead to critical shortages. WARMF-ZeroNet, as part of the integrated ZeroNet decision support system, offers stakeholders an integrated approach to long-term water management that balances competing needs of existing water users and economic growth under the constraints of limited supply and potential climate change.

C. McGowin; M. DiFilippo; L. Weintraub

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

185

Distributed computer control system in the Nova Laser Fusion Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EE Technical Review has two purposes - to inform readers of various activities within the Electronics Engineering Department and to promote the exchange of ideas. The articles, by design, are brief summaries of EE work. The articles included in this report are as follows: Overview - Nova Control System; Centralized Computer-Based Controls for the Nova Laser Facility; Nova Pulse-Power Control System; Nova Laser Alignment Control System; Nova Beam Diagnostic System; Nova Target-Diagnostics Control System; and Nova Shot Scheduler. The 7 papers are individually abstracted.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Ionic Liquids for Utilization of Waste Heat from Distributed Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research project was the development of ionic liquids to capture and utilize waste heat from distributed power generation systems. Ionic Liquids (ILs) are organic salts that are liquid at room temperature and they have the potential to make fundamental and far-reaching changes in the way we use energy. In particular, the focus of this project was fundamental research on the potential use of IL/CO2 mixtures in absorption-refrigeration systems. Such systems can provide cooling by utilizing waste heat from various sources, including distributed power generation. The basic objectives of the research were to design and synthesize ILs appropriate for the task, to measure and model thermophysical properties and phase behavior of ILs and IL/CO2 mixtures, and to model the performance of IL/CO2 absorption-refrigeration systems.

Joan F. Brennecke; Mihir Sen; Edward J. Maginn; Samuel Paolucci; Mark A. Stadtherr; Peter T. Disser; Mike Zdyb

2009-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

187

Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs) not only to inject power into the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 1 Abstract--Recently, there is an increasing interest in using distributed generators (DGs, it is well-known that the Distributed Generators (DGs) often consist of a prime mover connected through-frame control method for voltage unbalance compensation in an islanded microgrid is proposed. This method

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

188

Abstract --With the increasing acceptance, micro-grid, combined with distributed generation (DG), may be operated in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract --With the increasing acceptance, micro-grid, combined with distributed generation (DG generation (DG) technology [1-3]. DG units may be located in distribution network or on the local load side), may be operated in two modes: grid-connected mode and island mode. In grid connected mode, energy

Chen, Zhe

189

Soil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a,*, Randal J. Southard a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on gravimetric soil water content (GWC) and soil texture. A mechanical laboratory dust generator was used to testSoil water and particle size distribution influence laboratory-generated PM10 Nicholaus M. Madden a Soil particle size distribution Soil water content a b s t r a c t Management of soils to reduce

Ahmad, Sajjad

190

Temperature and thermal stress distributions for the HFIR permanent reflector generated by nuclear heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The beryllium permanent reflector of the High Flux Isotope Reactor has the main functions for slowing down and reflecting the neutrons and housing the experimental facilities. The reflector is heated as a result of the nuclear reaction. Heat is removed mainly by the cooling water passing through the densely distributed coolant holes along the vertical or axial direction of the reflector. The reflector neutronic distribution and its heating rate are calculated by J.C. Gehin of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory by applying the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. The heat transfer boundary conditions along several reflector interfaces are estimated to remove additional heat from the reflector. The present paper is to report the calculation results of the temperature and the thermal stress distributions of the permanent reflector by applying the computer aided design code I-DEAS and the finite element code ABAQUS. The present calculation is to estimate the high stress areas as a result of the new beam tube cutouts along the horizontal mid-plane of the reflector of the recent reactor upgrade project. These high stresses were not able to be calculated in the preliminary design analysis in earlier 60`s. The heat transfer boundary conditions are used in this redesigned calculation. The material constants and the acceptance criteria for the allowable stresses are mainly based on that assumed in the preliminary design report.

Chang, S.J.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SIZE DISTRIBUTION AND RATE OF PRODUCTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER GENERATED DURING METAL CUTTING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During deactivation and decommissioning activities, thermal cutting tools, such as plasma torch, laser, and gasoline torch, are used to cut metals. These activities generate fumes, smoke and particulates. These airborne species of matter, called aerosols, may be inhaled if suitable respiratory protection is not used. Inhalation of the airborne metallic aerosols has been reported to cause ill health effects, such as acute respiratory syndrome and chromosome damage in lymphocytes. In the nuclear industry, metals may be contaminated with radioactive materials. Cutting these metals, as in size reduction of gloveboxes and tanks, produces high concentrations of airborne transuranic particles. Particles of the respirable size range (size < 10 {micro}m) deposit in various compartments of the respiratory tract, the fraction and the site in the respiratory tract depending on the size of the particles. The dose delivered to the respiratory tract depends on the size distribution of the airborne particulates (aerosols) and their concentration and radioactivity/toxicity. The concentration of airborne particulate matter in an environment is dependent upon the rate of their production and the ventilation rate. Thus, measuring aerosol size distribution and generation rate is important for (1) the assessment of inhalation exposures of workers, (2) the selection of respiratory protection equipment, and (3) the design of appropriate filtration systems. Size distribution of the aerosols generated during cutting of different metals by plasma torch was measured. Cutting rates of different metals, rate of generation of respirable mass, as well as the fraction of the released kerf that become respirable were determined. This report presents results of these studies. Measurements of the particles generated during cutting of metal plates with a plasma arc torch revealed the presence of particles with mass median aerodynamic diameters of particles close to 0.2 {micro}m, arising from condensation of vaporized material and subsequent rapid formation of aggregates. Particles of larger size, resulting from ejection of melted material or fragments from the cutting zone, were also observed. This study presents data regarding the metal cutting rate, particle size distribution, and their generation rate, while using different cutting tools and metals. The study shows that respirable particles constitute only a small fraction of the released kerf.

M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.; S.K. Dua, Ph.D., C.H.P.; Hillol Guha, Ph.D.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Magnetic field distribution in the plasma flow generated by a plasma focus discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic field in the plasma jet propagating from the plasma pinch region along the axis of the chamber in a megajoule PF-3 plasma focus facility is studied. The dynamics of plasma with a trapped magnetic flow is analyzed. The spatial sizes of the plasma jet region in which the magnetic field concentrates are determined in the radial and axial directions. The magnetic field configuration in the plasma jet is investigated: the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the magnetic field inside the jet is determined. It is shown that the magnetic induction vector at a given point in space can change its direction during the plasma flight. Conclusions regarding the symmetry of the plasma flow propagation relative to the chamber axis are drawn.

Mitrofanov, K. N., E-mail: mitrofan@triniti.ru [Troitsk Institute for Innovaiton and Fusion Research (Russian Federation); Krauz, V. I., E-mail: krauz_vi@nrcki.ru; Myalton, V. V.; Velikhov, E. P.; Vinogradov, V. P.; Vinogradova, Yu. V. [National Research Centre Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Optimizing Geographic Allotment of Photovoltaic Capacity in a Distributed Generation Setting: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-objective optimization was performed to allocate 2MW of PV among four candidate sites on the island of Lanai such that energy was maximized and variability in the form of ramp rates was minimized. This resulted in an optimal solution set which provides a range of geographic allotment alternatives for the fixed PV capacity. Within the optimal set, a tradeoff between energy produced and variability experienced was found, whereby a decrease in variability always necessitates a simultaneous decrease in energy. A design point within the optimal set was selected for study which decreased extreme ramp rates by over 50% while only decreasing annual energy generation by 3% over the maximum generation allocation. To quantify the allotment mix selected, a metric was developed, called the ramp ratio, which compares ramping magnitude when all capacity is allotted to a single location to the aggregate ramping magnitude in a distributed scenario. The ramp ratio quantifies simultaneously how much smoothing a distributed scenario would experience over single site allotment and how much a single site is being under-utilized for its ability to reduce aggregate variability. This paper creates a framework for use by cities and municipal utilities to reduce variability impacts while planning for high penetration of PV on the distribution grid.

Urquhart, B.; Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Decoding the `Nature Encoded' Messages for Distributed Energy Generation Control in Microgrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The communication for the control of distributed energy generation (DEG) in microgrid is discussed. Due to the requirement of realtime transmission, weak or no explicit channel coding is used for the message of system state. To protect the reliability of the uncoded or weakly encoded messages, the system dynamics are considered as a `nature encoding' similar to convolution code, due to its redundancy in time. For systems with or without explicit channel coding, two decoding procedures based on Kalman filtering and Pearl's Belief Propagation, in a similar manner to Turbo processing in traditional data communication systems, are proposed. Numerical simulations have demonstrated the validity of the schemes, using a linear model of electric generator dynamic system.

Gong, Shuping; Lai, Lifeng; Qiu, Robert C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characterization of Vertical Velocity and Drop Size Distribution Parameters in Widespread Precipitation at ARM Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extended, high-resolution measurements of vertical air motion and median volume drop diameter D0 in widespread precipitation from three diverse Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program (ARM) locations [Lamont, Oklahoma, Southern Great Plains site (SGP); Niamey, Niger; and Black Forest, Germany] are presented. The analysis indicates a weak (0-10 cm{sup -1}) downward air motion beneath the melting layer for all three regions, a magnitude that is to within the typical uncertainty of the retrieval methods. On average, the hourly estimated standard deviation of the vertical air motion is 0.25 m s{sup -1} with no pronounced vertical structure. Profiles of D0 vary according to region and rainfall rate. The standard deviation of 1-min-averaged D0 profiles for isolated rainfall rate intervals is 0.3-0.4 mm. Additional insights into the form of the raindrop size distribution are provided using available dual-frequency Doppler velocity observations at SGP. The analysis suggests that gamma functions better explain paired velocity observations and radar retrievals for the Oklahoma dataset. This study will be useful in assessing uncertainties introduced in the measurement of precipitation parameters from ground-based and spaceborne remote sensors that are due to small-scale variability.

Giangrande S. E.; Luke, E. P.; Kollias, P.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Generating the local oscillator "locally" in continuous-variable quantum key distribution based on coherent detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continuous-variable quantum key distribution (CV-QKD) protocols based on coherent detection have been studied extensively in both theory and experiment. In all the existing implementations of CV-QKD, both the quantum signal and the local oscillator (LO) are generated from the same laser and propagate through the insecure quantum channel. This arrangement may open security loopholes and also limit the potential applications of CV-QKD. In this paper, we propose and demonstrate a pilot-aided feedforward data recovery scheme which enables reliable coherent detection using a "locally" generated LO. Using two independent commercial laser sources and a spool of 25 km optical fiber, we construct a coherent communication system. The variance of the phase noise introduced by the proposed scheme is measured to be 0.04 (rad^2), which is small enough to enable secure key distribution. This technology also opens the door for other quantum communication protocols, such as the recently proposed measurement-device-independent (MDI) CV-QKD where independent light sources are employed by different users.

Bing Qi; Pavel Lougovski; Raphael Pooser; Warren Grice; Miljko Bobrek

2015-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Viability of Small Wind Distributed Generation for Farmers Who Irrigate (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

About 14% of U.S. farms are irrigated, representing 55 million acres of irrigated land. Irrigation on these farms is a major energy user in the United States, accounting for one-third of water withdrawals and 137 billion gallons per day. More than half of the Irrigation systems use electric energy. Wind energy can be a good choice for meeting irrigation energy needs. Nine of the top 10 irrigation states (California, Texas, Idaho, Arkansas, Colorado, Nebraska, Arizona, Kansas, Washington, and Oregon) have good to excellent wind resources. Many rural areas have sufficient wind speeds to make wind an attractive alternative, and farms and ranches can often install a wind energy system without impacting their ability to plant crops and graze livestock. Additionally, the rising and uncertain future costs of diesel, natural gas, and even electricity increase the potential effectiveness for wind energy and its predictable and competitive cost. In general, wind-powered electric generation systems generate more energy in the winter months than in the summer months when most crops need the water. Therefore, those states that have a supportive net metering policy can dramatically impact the viability of an onsite wind turbine. This poster presentation highlights case studies that show favorable and unfavorable policies that impact the growth of small wind in this important sector and demonstrate how net metering policies affect the viability of distributed wind generation for farmers who irrigate.

Meadows, B.; Forsyth, T.; Johnson, S.; Healow, D.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electronic copy available at: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2014738 Published: J. M. Pearce, "Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic + Combined Heat.08.012 Expanding Photovoltaic Penetration with Residential Distributed Generation from Hybrid Solar Photovoltaic and power (CHP) systems has provided the opportunity for inhouse power backup of residentialscale

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Study of the longitudinal distribution of power generated in a random distributed feedback Raman fibre laser with unidirectional pumping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The longitudinal distribution of the Stokes-component power in a Raman fibre laser with a random distributed feedback and unidirectional pumping is measured. The fibre parameters (linear loss and Rayleigh backscattering coefficient) are calculated based on the distributions obtained. A numerical model is developed to describe the lasing power distribution. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental data. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

Churkin, D V; El-Taher, A E; Vatnik, I D; Babin, Sergei A

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

202

Panel on Microgrids Systems International Conference on System of Systems Engineering, April 16-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are included. Keywords: CHP, UPS, distributed generation, intentional islanding, inverters, microgrid, power vs-18, 2007 San Antonio Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to realize the emerging potential of distributed generation is to take

203

EA-0995: Drum Storage Facility for Interim Storage of Materials Generated by Environmental Restoration Operations, Golden, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to construct and operate a drum storage facility at the U.S. Department of Energy's Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in Golden,...

204

Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Commercialization of a 2.5kW Utility Interactive Inverter for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through this project, Advanced Energy Conversion (AEC) has developed, tested, refined and is preparing to commercialize a 2.5kW utility-interactive inverter system for distributed generation. The inverter technology embodies zero-voltage switching technology that will ultimately yield a system that is smaller, less expensive and more efficient than existing commercial technologies. This program has focused on commercial success through careful synthesis of technology, market-focus and business development. AEC was the primary participant. AEC is utilizing contract manufacturers in the early stages of production, allowing its technical staff to focus on quality control issues and product enhancements. The objective of this project was to bring the AEC inverter technology from its current pre-production state to a commercial product. Federal funds have been used to build and test production-intent inverters, support the implementation of the commercialization plan and bring the product to the point of UL certification.

Torrey, David A.

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Diagnostic probes for particle and molecule distributions in laser-generated plumes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laser microprobe analysis (LMA) offers good spatial and depth resolution for solid sampling of virtually any material. Coupled with numerous optical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric detection methods, LMA is a powerful analytical tool. Yet, fundamental understanding of the interaction between the laser and the sample surface leading to the formation of the high temperature plasma (plume) is far from complete. To better understand the process of plume formation, an imaging method based on acousto-optic laser beam deflection has been coupled with light scattering methods and absorption methods to record temporal and spatial maps of the particle and molecule distributions in the plume with good resolution. Because particles can make up a major fraction of the vaporized material under certain operating conditions, they can reflect a large loss of atomic signal for elemental analysis, even when using auxiliary excitation to further vaporized the particles. Characterization of the particle size distributions in plumes should provide insight into the vaporization process and information necessary for studies of efficient particle transfer. Light scattering methods for particle size analysis based on the Mie Theory are used to determine the size of particles in single laser-generated plumes. The methods used, polarization ratio method and dissymmetry ratio method, provide good estimates of particle size with good spatial and temporal resolution for this highly transient system. Large particles, on the order of 0.02-0.2{mu}m in radius, were observed arising directly from the sample surface and from condensation.

Kimbrell, S.M.

1990-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

PV Ramping in a Distributed Generation Environment: A Study Using Solar Measurements; Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variability in Photovoltaic (PV) generation resulting from variability in the solar radiation over the PV arrays is a topic of continuing concern for those involved with integrating renewables onto existing electrical grids. The island of Lanai, Hawaii is an extreme example of the challenges that integrators will face due to the fact that it is a small standalone grid. One way to study this problem is to take high-resolution solar measurements in multiple locations and model simultaneous PV production for various sizes at those locations. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected high-resolution solar data at four locations on the island where proposed PV plants will be deployed in the near future. This data set provides unique insight into how the solar radiation may vary between points that are proximal in distance, but diverse in weather, due to the formation of orographic clouds in the center of the island. Using information about each proposed PV plant size, power output was created at high resolution. The team analyzed this output to understand power production ramps at individual locations and the effects of aggregating the production from all four locations. Hawaii is a unique environment, with extremely variable events occurring on a daily basis. This study provided an excellent opportunity for understanding potential worst-case scenarios for PV ramping. This paper provides an introduction to the datasets that NREL collected over a year and a comprehensive analysis of PV variability in a distributed generation scenario.

Sengupta, M.; Keller, J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and “play back” of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of “playing back” at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authority’s Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the “grid visibility” question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The “energy function” based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to “play back” disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with “play back” capability.

Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

Distributed Generation Potential of the U.S. CommercialSector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems in developed countries over the next two decades. In the U.S., private and public expectations for this technology are heavily influenced by forecasts published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), most notably the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO). EIA's forecasts are typically made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. Annual penetration is forecast by estimating the payback period for each technology, for each of a limited number of representative building types, for each of nine regions. This process results in an AEO2004 forecast deployment of about a total 3 GW of DG electrical generating capacity by 2025, which is only 0.25 percent of total forecast U.S. capacity. Analyses conducted using both the AEO2003 and AEO2004 versions of NEMS changes the baseline costs and performance characteristics of DG to reflect a world without U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) research into several thermal DG technologies, which is then compared to a case with enhanced technology representative of the successful achievement of DOE research goals. The net difference in 2025 DG penetration is dramatic using the AEO2003 version of NEMS, but much smaller in the AEO2004 version. The significance and validity of these contradictory results are discussed, and possibilities for improving estimates of commercial U.S. DG potential are explored.

LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Gumerman,Etan; Marnay, Chris

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Milan, Italy, Dipartimento di Energia Enrico.zio@polimi.it Abstract The current and future developments renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number

Boyer, Edmond

211

THE NEXT GENERATION ATLAS OF QUASAR SPECTRAL ENERGY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM RADIO TO X-RAYS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have produced the next generation of quasar spectral energy distributions (SEDs), essentially updating the work of Elvis et al. by using high-quality data obtained with several space- and ground-based telescopes, including NASA's Great Observatories. We present an atlas of SEDs of 85 optically bright, non-blazar quasars over the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to X-rays. The heterogeneous sample includes 27 radio-quiet and 58 radio-loud quasars. Most objects have quasi-simultaneous ultraviolet-optical spectroscopic data, supplemented with some far-ultraviolet spectra, and more than half also have Spitzer mid-infrared Infrared Spectrograph spectra. The X-ray spectral parameters are collected from the literature where available. The radio, far-infrared, and near-infrared photometric data are also obtained from either the literature or new observations. We construct composite SEDs for radio-loud and radio-quiet objects and compare these to those of Elvis et al., finding that ours have similar overall shapes, but our improved spectral resolution reveals more detailed features, especially in the mid- and near-infrared.

Shang Zhaohui; Li Jun; Xie Yanxia [Department of Physics, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Brotherton, Michael S.; Cales, Sabrina L.; Dale, Daniel A.; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Kelly, Benjamin J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Wills, Beverley J.; Wills, D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, C1400 Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Green, Richard F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Nemmen, Rodrigo S. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Gallagher, Sarah C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Ganguly, Rajib [Department of Computer Science, Engineering, and Physics, University of Michigan-Flint, 213 Murchie Science Building, 303 Kearsley Street, Flint, MI 48502 (United States); Hines, Dean C. [Space Science Institute, 4750 Walnut Street, Suite 205, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Kriss, Gerard A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Tang, Baitian, E-mail: zshang@gmail.com [Department of Physics, 1245 Webster Hall, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164-2814 (United States)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Generation of Initial Kinetic Distributions for Simulation of Long-Pulse Charged Particle Beams with High Space-Charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov-Poisson simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel--both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of kinetic distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of unbunched or weakly bunched beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial kinetic distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, Steven M.; Kikuchi, Takashi; Davidson, Ronald C.

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Generation of initial Vlasov distributions for simulation of charged particle beams with high space-charge intensity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Self-consistent Vlasov simulations of beams with high space-charge intensity often require specification of initial phase-space distributions that reflect properties of a beam that is well adapted to the transport channel, both in terms of low-order rms (envelope) properties as well as the higher-order phase-space structure. Here, we first review broad classes of distributions commonly in use as initial Vlasov distributions in simulations of beams with intense space-charge fields including: the Kapchinskij-Vladimirskij (KV) equilibrium, continuous-focusing equilibria with specific detailed examples, and various non-equilibrium distributions, such as the semi-Gaussian distribution and distributions formed from specified functions of linear-field Courant-Snyder invariants. Important practical details necessary to specify these distributions in terms of usual accelerator inputs are presented in a unified format. Building on this presentation, a new class of approximate initial distributions are constructed using transformations that preserve linear-focusing single-particle Courant-Snyder invariants to map initial continuous-focusing equilibrium distributions to a form more appropriate for non-continuous focusing channels. Self-consistent particle-in-cell simulations are employed to show that the approximate initial distributions generated in this manner are better adapted to the focusing channels for beams with high space-charge intensity. This improved capability enables simulation applications that more precisely probe intrinsic stability properties and machine performance.

Lund, S M; Kikuchi, T; Davidson, R C

2007-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

214

Idaho National Laboratory Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor Sustainability Idaho Regional Optical Network LDRD Next Generation Nuclear Plant Docs...

215

Evaluating shortfalls in mixed-integer programming approaches for the optimal design and dispatch of distributed generation systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associated with volatile utility pricing and potentially high system capital costs. Energy technology and boilers), and/or thermal energy storage (e.g., hot water). For some markets, volatile utility pricing heat and power Fuel cells Building energy a b s t r a c t The distributed generation (DG) of combined

216

Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed photovoltaic generation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed, the depression in wholesale prices has significant value. c 5 GW of solar generation would have saved $1.8 billion in the market over two years. c The depression of wholesale prices offsets the cost of support

Sandiford, Mike

217

PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith (Opal RT Technologies, Montreal, Quebec, Canada); Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

Provenzano, J.J.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Generation of lower hybrid and whistler waves by an ion velocity ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using fully kinetic simulations in two and three spatial dimensions, we consider the generation and nonlinear evolution of lower hybrid waves produced by a cold ion ring velocity distribution in a low beta plasma. We show that the initial development of the instability is very similar in two and three dimensions and not significantly modified by electromagnetic effects, consistent with linear theory. At saturation, the level of electric field fluctuations is a small fraction of the background thermal energy; the electric field and corresponding density fluctuations consist of long, field-aligned striations. Energy extracted from the ring goes primarily into heating the background ions and the electrons at comparable rates. The initial growth and saturation of the magnetic components of the lower hybrid waves are related to the electric field components, consistent with linear theory. As the growing electric field fluctuations saturate, parallel propagating whistler waves develop by the interaction of two lower hybrid waves. At later times, these whistlers are replaced by longer wavelength, parallel propagating whistlers that grow through the decay of the lower hybrid fluctuations. Wave matching conditions demonstrate these conversion processes of lower hybrid waves to whistler waves. The conversion efficiency (=ratio of the whistler wave energy to the energy in the saturated lower hybrid waves) is computed and found to be significant ({approx}15%) for the parameters of the three-dimensional simulation (and even larger in the two-dimensional simulation), although when normalized in terms of the initial kinetic energy in the ring ions the overall efficiency is very small (<10{sup -4}). The results are compared with relevant linear and nonlinear theory.

Winske, D.; Daughton, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

THE GALACTIC SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OB ASSOCIATIONS AND THEIR SURROUNDING SUPERNOVA-GENERATED SUPERBUBBLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Galactic spatial distribution of OB associations and their surrounding superbubbles (SBs) reflect the distribution of a wide range of important processes in our Galaxy. In particular, it can provide a three-dimensional measure not only of the major source distribution of Galactic cosmic rays, but also the Galactic star formation distribution, the Lyman continuum ionizing radiation distribution, the core-collapse supernova distribution, the neutron star and stellar black hole production distribution, and the principal source distribution of freshly synthesized elements. Thus, we construct a three-dimensional spatial model of the massive-star distribution based primarily on the emission of the H II envelopes that surround the giant SBs and are maintained by the ionizing radiation of the embedded O stars. The Galactic longitudinal distribution of the 205 ?m N II radiation, emitted by these H II envelopes, is used to infer the spatial distribution of SBs. We find that the Galactic SB distribution is dominated by the contribution of massive-star clusters residing in the spiral arms.

Higdon, J. C. [W. M. Keck Science Center, Claremont Colleges, Claremont, CA 91711-5916 (United States); Lingenfelter, R. E., E-mail: jhigdon@kecksci.claremont.edu, E-mail: rlingenfelter@ucsd.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply and maintenance of six 380 V 50 Hz diesel generators for the LEP electrical distribution system

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

None

2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

224

Impact of Renewable Distributed Generation on Power Systems M. Begovi, A. Pregelj, A. Rohatgi D. Novosel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions, defer capital cost, reduce maintenance investments and improve the distribution feeder voltage, eliminating the unnecessary transmission and distribution costs. In addition, it can reduce fossil fuel that the knowledge of total penetration of small PV systems is sufficient to estimate the effects of DG on the feeder

225

transmission april may 2003 re-gen56 Privately-owned distributed generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

overhead line circuits (known as radial feeders) extending out to consumers at the most rural edges distribution networks. Historically, the networks in these areas were designed to supply demand that tended Historically, distribution networks were designed to convey electrical energy from the high voltage

Harrison, Gareth

226

3D phase-differentiated GDL microstructure generation with binder and PTFE distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

December 2011 Keywords: PEM fuel cell Gas diffusion layer Stochastic generation a b s t r a c exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are an attractive alternative for electrical power generation, partic) digital 3D micro- structures in a cost- and time-effective manner for the first time. The results

Kandlikar, Satish

227

Characterization of a Thermo Scientific D711 D-T Neutron Generator Located in a Low-Scatter Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dosimetry experiment used to measure the neutron flux and spectrum of a D-T neutron generator is presented. The D-T generator at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is installed in the middle of a large room to minimize scatter of neutrons back to the sample. The efficacy of maintaining a pure fast neutron field for the sample is investigated. Twenty-one positions within 13 cm of the neutron source contained foils or wires of Fe, Ni, Al with additional Au, and In monitors at some locations. Spectral adjustment of the neutron flux at each position based on measured reaction rates and theoretical Monte Carlo calculations show that at least 99.1% of the spectrum lies above 110 keV for all measured positions, and neutrons above 14 MeV can account for as much as 91% at locations along the axis of the generator and close to the source. The 14 MeV component drops to 77% in radial positions far from the source. The largest total flux observed was 8.29E+08 n/cm2-s (±1.4%) in the center of the cooling cap, although additional experiments have shown this value could be as high as 1.20E+09 n/cm2-s.

Hayes, John W.; Finn, Erin C.; Greenwood, Lawrence R.; Wittman, Richard S.

2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Performance Analysis of Positive-feedback-based Active Anti-islanding Schemes for Inverter-Based Distributed Generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently proposed positive-feedback-based anti-islanding schemes (AI) are highly effective in preventing islanding without causing any degradation in power quality. This paper aims to analyze the performance of these schemes quantitatively in the context of the dynamic models of inverter-based distributed generators (DG). In this study, the characteristics of these active anti-islanding methods are discussed and design guidelines are derived.

Du, Pengwei; Aponte, Erick E.; Nelson, J. Keith

2010-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Supercritical-water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) and the Very-high-temperature Reactor (VHTR). An international effort to develop these new... and the hydrogen production plant4,5. Davis et al. investigated the possibility of helium and molten salts in the IHTL2. The thermal efficiency of the power conversion unit is paramount to the success of this next generation technology. Current light water...

Barner, Robert Buckner

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

231

Predicting Electricity Distribution Feeder Failures Using Machine Learning Susceptibility Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) from the generating station to substations closer to the customers 3.Primary Distribution: electricity into the city from upstate New York, New Jersey and Long Island, as well as from in-city generation facilitiesPredicting Electricity Distribution Feeder Failures Using Machine Learning Susceptibility Analysis

Tomkins, Andrew

232

Utilizing Electric Vehicles to Assist Integration of Large Penetrations of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation Capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Executive Summary Introduction and Motivation This analysis provides the first insights into the leveraging potential of distributed photovoltaic (PV) technologies on rooftop and electric vehicle (EV) charging. Either of the two technologies by themselves - at some high penetrations – may cause some voltage control challenges or overloading problems, respectively. But when combined, there – at least intuitively – could be synergistic effects, whereby one technology mitigates the negative impacts of the other. High penetration of EV charging may overload existing distribution system components, most prominently the secondary transformer. If PV technology is installed at residential premises or anywhere downstream of the secondary transformer, it will provide another electricity source thus, relieving the loading on the transformers. Another synergetic or mitigating effect could be envisioned when high PV penetration reverts the power flow upward in the distribution system (from the homes upstream into the distribution system). Protection schemes may then no longer work and voltage violation (exceeding the voltage upper limited of the ANSI voltage range) may occur. In this particular situation, EV charging could absorb the electricity from the PV, such that the reversal of power flow can be reduced or alleviated. Given these potential mutual synergistic behaviors of PV and EV technologies, this project attempted to quantify the benefits of combining the two technologies. Furthermore, of interest was how advanced EV control strategies may influence the outcome of the synergy between EV charging and distributed PV installations. Particularly, Californian utility companies with high penetration of the distributed PV technology, who have experienced voltage control problems, are interested how intelligent EV charging could support or affect the voltage control

Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, Forrest S.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Gowri, Krishnan

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

233

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

234

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

235

Abstract--Distributed generation (DG) has brought great attention from the power community, especially  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/distribution losses, reliability and power quality, especially when they are associated to stochastic or partially power flow, Reliability, Line losses I. INTRODUCTION RADITIONAL power grids are based on large and sun (photovoltaic) also falls into the DG classification, but they are more variable and can

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad CatĂłlica de Chile)

236

Self-triggered Communication Enabled Control of Distributed Generation in Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tahir Member, IEEE Dept. of Elect. Eng. and Al-Khwarizmi Institute of Comp. Science University. System reliability for secondary control in microgrids can be improved by using a distributed cooperative control approach. For realizing the cooperative control of multiple DGs in smart-grid, a multi-agent based

Mazumder, Sudip K.

237

Dynamically generated electric charge distributions in Abelian projected SU(2) lattice gauge theories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show in the maximal Abelian gauge the dynamical electric charge density generated by the coset fields, gauge fixing and ghosts shows antiscreening as in the case of the non-Abelian charge. We verify that with the completion of the ghost term all contributions to flux are accounted for in an exact lattice Ehrenfest relation.

A. Hart; R. W. Haymaker; Y. Sasai

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

238

A Study of Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Protective Load Control Strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

different type of WTs are integrated into a DGS, the DGS presents different properties. Therefore Turbines (WT) have attracted significant attentions. A DGS with renewable sources such as WTs and solar panels is distinct from a conventional power system. The renewable generation units make a DGS

Chen, Zhe

239

Published in IET Generation, Transmission & Distribution Received on 20th July 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

interfaces is the current trend, many directly connected induction-generator-based wind turbines are still the requirements of grid code to connect wind turbines, considerable advances in the control of this system regulation and transient stability enhancement for wind turbines equipped with fixed-speed induction

Pota, Himanshu Roy

240

Advanced Inverter Technology for High Penetration Levels of PV Generation in Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This subcontract report was completed under the auspices of the NREL/SCE High-Penetration Photovoltaic (PV) Integration Project, which is co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and the California Solar Initiative (CSI) Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment (RD&D) program funded by the California Public Utility Commission (CPUC) and managed by Itron. This project is focused on modeling, quantifying, and mitigating the impacts of large utility-scale PV systems (generally 1-5 MW in size) that are interconnected to the distribution system. This report discusses the concerns utilities have when interconnecting large PV systems that interconnect using PV inverters (a specific application of frequency converters). Additionally, a number of capabilities of PV inverters are described that could be implemented to mitigate the distribution system-level impacts of high-penetration PV integration. Finally, the main issues that need to be addressed to ease the interconnection of large PV systems to the distribution system are presented.

Schauder, C.

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Distributively generated near rings on the dihedral group of order eight  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DISTRIBHvlri "LY GEZERKTED NEZR RINGS ON THE DIH ', DRAL GRODP OP ORDER EIGHT A Thesis INRy LING VILLHITE Submitted to the Gra~', . ate ' allege of Tezas jan& Rnid e'r, si!, y in Parti "1 fulfillment of the reGui rom nt fo- the eSree o MASTER... GP BC. E. ":lOE December le~70 Major Subject: llathematics DISTRIBUTIVELY GMWRA ED NEAR RINGE ON THE DIHED tAL GROUP OF ORDER EIGHT A Thesis NARY LYNN VILLHITE Approved as to st'yle and. content 'by: ax man. of Gom; i ee , member A &. ~;g...

Willhite, Mary Lynn

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Developing and Implementing the Foundation for a Renewable Energy-Based "Distribution Generation Micro-grid": A California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Co-Funded Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The California Energy Commission has been implementing its Public Interest Energy Research (PIER) and Renewable Energy Programs since early 1998. In the last two years, the demand for renewable distributed generation systems has increased rapidly...

Lilly, P.; Sebold, F. D.; Carpenter, M.; Kitto, W.

243

Experimental Component Characterization, Monte-Carlo-Based Image Generation and Source Reconstruction for the Neutron Imaging System of the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Neutron Imaging System (NIS) is one of seven ignition target diagnostics under development for the National Ignition Facility. The NIS is required to record hot-spot (13-15 MeV) and downscattered (6-10 MeV) images with a resolution of 10 microns and a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 at the 20% contour. The NIS is a valuable diagnostic since the downscattered neutrons reveal the spatial distribution of the cold fuel during an ignition attempt, providing important information in the case of a failed implosion. The present study explores the parameter space of several line-of-sight (LOS) configurations that could serve as the basis for the final design. Six commercially available organic scintillators were experimentally characterized for their light emission decay profile and neutron sensitivity. The samples showed a long lived decay component that makes direct recording of a downscattered image impossible. The two best candidates for the NIS detector material are: EJ232 (BC422) plastic fibers or capillaries filled with EJ399B. A Monte Carlo-based end-to-end model of the NIS was developed to study the imaging capabilities of several LOS configurations and verify that the recovered sources meet the design requirements. The model includes accurate neutron source distributions, aperture geometries (square pinhole, triangular wedge, mini-penumbral, annular and penumbral), their point spread functions, and a pixelated scintillator detector. The modeling results show that a useful downscattered image can be obtained by recording the primary peak and the downscattered images, and then subtracting a decayed version of the former from the latter. The difference images need to be deconvolved in order to obtain accurate source distributions. The images are processed using a frequency-space modified-regularization algorithm and low-pass filtering. The resolution and SNR of these sources are quantified by using two surrogate sources. The simulations show that all LOS configurations have a resolution of 7 microns or better. The 28 m LOS with a 7 x 7 array of 100-micron mini-penumbral apertures or 50-micron square pinholes meets the design requirements and is a very good design alternative.

Barrera, C A; Moran, M J

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

244

Registration of Electric Generators (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

All electric generating facilities operating in the state, with the exception of hydroelectric and nuclear facilities, must obtain a certificate of registration from the Department of Public...

245

Development and Testing of a 6-Cylinder HCCI Engine for Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the technical approach for converting a Caterpillar 3406 natural gas spark ignited engine into HCCI mode. The paper describes all stages of the process, starting with a preliminary analysis that determined that the engine can be operated by preheating the intake air with a heat exchanger that recovers energy from the exhaust gases. This heat exchanger plays a dual role, since it is also used for starting the engine. For start-up, the heat exchanger is preheated with a natural gas burner. The engine is therefore started in HCCI mode, avoiding the need to handle the potentially difficult transition from SI or diesel mode to HCCI. The fueling system was modified by replacing the natural gas carburetor with a liquid petroleum gas (LPG) carburetor. This modification sets an upper limit for the equivalence ratio at {phi} {approx} 0.4, which is ideal for HCCI operation and guarantees that the engine will not fail due to knock. Equivalence ratio can be reduced below 0.4 for low load operation with an electronic control valve. Intake boosting has been a challenge, as commercially available turbochargers are not a good match for the engine, due to the low HCCI exhaust temperature. Commercial introduction of HCCI engines for stationary power will therefore require the development of turbochargers designed specifically for this mode of operation. Considering that no appropriate off-the-shelf turbocharger for HCCI engines exists at this time, we are investigating mechanical supercharging options, which will deliver the required boost pressure (3 bar absolute intake) at the expense of some reduction in the output power and efficiency. An appropriate turbocharger can later be installed for improved performance when it becomes available or when a custom turbocharger is developed. The engine is now running in HCCI mode and producing power in an essentially naturally aspirated mode. Current work focuses on developing an automatic controller for obtaining consistent combustion in the 6 cylinders. The engine will then be tested for 1000 hours to demonstrate durability. This paper presents intermediate progress towards development of an HCCI engine for stationary power generation and next steps towards achieving the project goals.

Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Killingsworth, N; Aceves, S M; Dibble, R; Kristic, M; Bining, A

2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

246

Distributed Generation Standard Contracts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

'''''Note: The second enrollment period for standard contracts in 2013 closed June 28. The third is scheduled to begin in September.'''''

247

Effect of electron energy distribution functions on plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet in a diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma generated vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) in diffusion plasma excited by a microwave surface wave has been studied by using dielectric-based VUV sensors. Evolution of plasma VUV in the diffusion plasma as a function of the distance from the power coupling surface is investigated. Experimental results have indicated that the energy and spatial distributions of plasma VUV are mainly controlled by the energy distribution functions of the plasma electrons, i.e., electron energy distribution functions (EEDFs). The study implies that by designing EEDF of plasma, one could be able to tailor plasma VUV in different applications such as in dielectric etching or photo resist smoothing.

Zhao, J. P.; Chen, L.; Funk, M.; Sundararajan, R. [Austin Plasma Laboratory, Tokyo Electron America, Inc., Austin, Texas 78741 (United States); Nozawa, T. [Tokyo Electron Limited, TEL Technology Center Sendai, 2-1 Osawa 3-chome, Izumi-ku, Sendai 981-3137 (Japan); Samukawa, S. [Institute of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

249

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation.

1995-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

International Facility Management Association Strategic Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Facility Management Association Strategic Facility Planning: A WhIte PAPer Strategic Facility Planning: A White Paper on Strategic Facility Planning 2009 | International...

251

South Africa is shortlisted to host a major scientific facility -the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The SKA is a next-generation radio telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

South Africa is shortlisted to host a major scientific facility - the Square Kilometre Array (SKA instrument in a radio-quiet area in the arid Karoo region of South Africa's Northern Cape Province. Further the fron- tiers of science and technology, South Africa's SKA project attracts the brightest and most

Jarrett, Thomas H.

252

Abstract--Application of individual distributed generators can cause as many problems as it may solve. A better way to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, microturbines, photovoltaic, fuel cells and wind- power. Most emerging technologies such as micro-turbines, photovoltaic, fuel cells and gas internal combustion engines with permanent magnet generator require generation technologies permits generators to be placed optimally in relation to heat loads allowing for use

253

Energy Conversion and Transmission Facilities (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to energy conversion facilities designed for or capable of generating 100 MW or more of electricity, wind energy facilities with a combined capacity of 100 MW, certain...

254

Heat Transfer Simulation of Reactor Cavity Cooling System Experimental Facility using RELAP5-3D and Generation of View Factors using MCNP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with nine pipes in the cavity, return and supply manifolds connecting standing pipes with water tank and a cylindrical water tank situated at top of the cavity (as shown in Figure 5). In the facility, the cylindrical reactor vessel is approximately... Simulation ......................................................................... 14 2.3.1 Water Tank as Single Volume Without Secondary Loop ............................. 14 2.3.2 Water Tank as Pipe with Secondary Loop...

Wu, Huali

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

D-DOG: Securing Sensitive Data in Distributed Storage Space by Data Division and Out-of-order keystream Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

or unreliable storage service providers. For example, in applications such as cloud computing where data storage, most designs of distributed storage chose the form of either Storage Area Networks (SANs) or Network1 D-DOG: Securing Sensitive Data in Distributed Storage Space by Data Division and Out

Chen, Yu

256

Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

257

Device Assembly Facility (DAF) Glovebox Radioactive Waste Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) provides programmatic support to the Joint Actinide Shock Physics Experimental Research (JASPER) Facility in the form of target assembly. The target assembly activities are performed in a glovebox at DAF and include Special Nuclear Material (SNM). Currently, only activities with transuranic SNM are anticipated. Preliminary discussions with facility personnel indicate that primarily two distributions of SNM will be used: Weapons Grade Plutonium (WG-Pu), and Pu-238 enhanced WG-Pu. Nominal radionuclide distributions for the two material types are included in attachment 1. Wastes generated inside glove boxes is expected to be Transuranic (TRU) Waste which will eventually be disposed of at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Wastes generated in the Radioactive Material Area (RMA), outside of the glove box is presumed to be low level waste (LLW) which is destined for disposal at the NTS. The process knowledge quantification methods identified herein may be applied to waste generated anywhere within or around the DAF and possibly JASPER as long as the fundamental waste stream boundaries are adhered to as outlined below. The method is suitable for quantification of waste which can be directly surveyed with the Blue Alpha meter or swiped. An additional quantification methodology which requires the use of a high resolution gamma spectroscopy unit is also included and relies on the predetermined radionuclide distribution and utilizes scaling to measured nuclides for quantification.

Dominick, J L

2001-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

258

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for Department of Energy facilities, which includes nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards mitigation, and the System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1A. DOE O 420.1B Chg 1 issued 4-19-10.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

259

In situ diagnostic of the size distribution of nanoparticles generated by ultrashort pulsed laser ablation in vacuum  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We aim to characterize the size distribution of nanoparticles located in the ablation plume produced by femtosecond laser interaction. The proposed method relies on the use of white-light extinction spectroscopy setup assisted by ultrafast intensified temporal gating. This method allows measurement of optical absorbance of a nickel nanoparticles cloud. Simulation of the extinction section of nickel nanoparticles size distributions has been developed in order to compare the measured optical absorbance to the optical extinction by theoretical and experimental nanoparticles size distributions (measured by scanning electron microscopy). A good agreement has been found between the in situ measured optical absorbance and the optical extinction cross section calculated from ex situ nanoparticles size distribution measurements.

Bourquard, Florent; Loir, Anne-Sophie; Donnet, Christophe; Garrelie, Florence, E-mail: florence.garrelie@univ-st-etienne.fr [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)] [Université de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5516, Laboratoire Hubert Curien, Université Jean Monnet, Saint-Étienne (France)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

Design of a 2.5kW Low Temperature Stirling Engine for Distributed Solar Thermal Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-flexible with respect to the source of thermal energy and unprocessed waste heat can be harvested for CHP purposes for residential solar generation or on a small commercial building scale. The Stirling engine is a key component

Sanders, Seth

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Space-based solar power generation using a distributed network of satellites and methods for efficient space power transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-based solar power (SSP) generation is being touted as a solution to our ever-increasing energy consumption and dependence on fossil fuels. Satellites in Earth's orbit can capture solar energy through photovoltaic ...

McLinko, Ryan M.

262

Canastota Renewable Energy Facility Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was implemented at the Madison County Landfill located in the Town of Lincoln, Madison County, New York. Madison County has owned and operated the solid waste and recycling facilities at the Buyea Road site since 1974. At the onset of the project, the County owned and operated facilities there to include three separate landfills, a residential solid waste disposal and recycled material drop-off facility, a recycling facility and associated administrative, support and environmental control facilities. This putrescible waste undergoes anaerobic decomposition within the waste mass and generates landfill gas, which is approximately 50% methane. In order to recover this gas, the landfill was equipped with gas collection systems on both the east and west sides of Buyea Road which bring the gas to a central point for destruction. In order to derive a beneficial use from the collected landfill gases, the County decided to issue a Request for Proposals (RFP) for the future use of the generated gas.

Blake, Jillian; Hunt, Allen

2013-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

263

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To establish facility safety requirements for the Department of Energy, including National Nuclear Security Administration. Cancels DOE O 420.1. Canceled by DOE O 420.1B.

2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

DOE-STD-1104 contains the Department's method and criteria for reviewing and approving nuclear facility's documented safety analysis (DSA). This review and approval formally document the basis for DOE, concluding that a facility can be operated safely in a manner that adequately protects workers, the public, and the environment. Therefore, it is appropriate to formally require implementation of the review methodology and criteria contained in DOE-STD-1104.

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

265

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for nuclear and explosives safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and the System Engineer Program.Chg 1 incorporates the use of DOE-STD-1189-2008, Integration of Safety into the Design Process, mandatory for Hazard Category 1, 2 and 3 nuclear facilities. Cancels DOE O 420.1A.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

266

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The objective of this Order is to establish facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. The Order has Change 1 dated 11-16-95, Change 2 dated 10-24-96, and the latest Change 3 dated 11-22-00 incorporated. The latest change satisfies a commitment made to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) in response to DNFSB recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety.

2000-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

267

Policy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been supported by the federal government since that time. Indirect costs are also called "Facilities and Administrative" or F&A costs. These costs include facilities costs such as electricity, heating and airPolicy Title: Policy Number: Facilities and Administrative Distribution 2.1.11 Category: Financial

Papautsky, Ian

268

Net Metering Policy Development and Distributed Solar Generation in Minnesota: Overview of Trends in Nationwide Policy Development and Implications of Increasing the Eligible System Size Cap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Minnesota net metering policy is to give the maximum possible encouragement to distributed generation assets, especially solar electric systems (MN 2008). However, according to a published set of best practices (NNEC 2008) that prioritize the maximum development of solar markets within states, the Minnesota policy does not incorporate many of the important best practices that may help other states transform their solar energy markets and increase the amount of grid-connected distributed solar generation assets. Reasons cited include the low system size limit of 40kW (the best practices document recommends a 2 MW limit) and a lack of language protecting generators from additional utility fees. This study was conducted to compare Minnesota's policies to national best practices. It provides an overview of the current Minnesota policy in the context of these best practices and other jurisdictions' net metering policies, as well as a qualitative assessment of the impacts of raising the system size cap within the policy based on the experiences of other states.

Doris, E.; Busche, S.; Hockett, S.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources: Accommodating Distributed Resources in Wholesale Markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed resources can provide cost-effective reliability and energy services - in many cases, obviating the need for more expensive investments in wires and central station electricity generating facilities. Given the unique features of distributed resources, the challenge facing policymakers today is how to restructure wholesale markets for electricity and related services so as to reveal the full value that distributed resources can provide to the electric power system (utility grid). This report looks at the functions that distributed resources can perform and examines the barriers to them. It then identifies a series of policy and operational approaches to promoting DR in wholesale markets. This report is one in the State Electricity Regulatory Policy and Distributed Resources series developed under contract to NREL (see Annual Technical Status Report of the Regulatory Assistance Project: September 2000-September 2001, NREL/SR-560-32733). Other titles in this series are: (1) Distributed Resource Distribution Credit Pilot Programs - Revealing the Value to Consumers and Vendors, NREL/SR-560-32499; (2) Distributed Resources and Electric System Reliability, NREL/SR-560-32498; (3) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation, NREL/SR-560-32500; (4) Distribution System Cost Methodologies for Distributed Generation Appendices, NREL/SR-560-32501

Weston, F.; Harrington, C.; Moskovitz, D.; Shirley, W.; Cowart, R.; Sedano, R.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

The Order establishes facility and programmatic safety requirements for DOE and NNSA for nuclear safety design criteria, fire protection, criticality safety, natural phenomena hazards (NPH) mitigation, and System Engineer Program. Cancels DOE O 420.1B, DOE G 420.1-2 and DOE G 420.1-3.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

272

Facility Safety  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Establishes facility safety requirements related to: nuclear safety design, criticality safety, fire protection and natural phenomena hazards mitigation. Cancels DOE 5480.7A, DOE 5480.24, DOE 5480.28 and Division 13 of DOE 6430.1A. Canceled by DOE O 420.1A.

1995-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Flare-energy Distributions Generated by Kink-unstable Ensembles of Zero-net-current Coronal Loops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been proposed that the million degree temperature of the corona is due to the combined effect of barely-detectable energy releases, so called nanoflares, that occur throughout the solar atmosphere. Alas, the nanoflare density and brightness implied by this hypothesis means that conclusive verification is beyond present observational abilities. Nevertheless, we investigate the plausibility of the nanoflare hypothesis by constructing a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model that can derive the energy of a nanoflare from the nature of an ideal kink instability. The set of energy-releasing instabilities is captured by an instability threshold for linear kink modes. Each point on the threshold is associated with a unique energy release and so we can predict a distribution of nanoflare energies. When the linear instability threshold is crossed, the instability enters a nonlinear phase as it is driven by current sheet reconnection. As the ensuing flare erupts and declines, the field transitions to a lower energy sta...

Bareford, M R; Van der Linden, R A M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Information related to low-level mixed waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report was prepared to support the analysis of risks and costs associated with the proposed treatment of low-level mixed waste (LLMW) under management of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The various waste management alternatives for treatment of LLMW have been defined in the DOE`s Office of Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. This technical memorandum estimates the waste material throughput expected at each proposed LLMW treatment facility and analyzes potential radiological and chemical releases at each DOE site resulting from treatment of these wastes. Models have been developed to generate site-dependent radiological profiles and waste-stream-dependent chemical profiles for these wastes. Current site-dependent inventories and estimates for future generation of LLMW have been obtained from DOE`s 1994 Mixed Waste Inventory Report (MWIR-2). Using treatment procedures developed by the Mixed Waste Treatment Project, the MWIR-2 database was analyzed to provide waste throughput and emission estimates for each of the different waste types assessed in this report. Uncertainties in the estimates at each site are discussed for waste material throughputs and radiological and chemical releases.

Wilkins, B.D.; Dolak, D.A.; Wang, Y.Y.; Meshkov, N.K.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Middlesex Generating Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 -Energieprojekte GmbH Jump to:Michigan: EnergyChinaKuskokwimMiddlesex County

276

Methods for Analyzing the Benefits and Costs of Distributed Photovoltaic Generation to the U.S. Electric Utility System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the methods, data, and tools that could be used at different levels of sophistication and effort to estimate the benefits and costs of DGPV. In so doing, we identify the gaps in current benefit-cost-analysis methods, which we hope will inform the ongoing research agenda in this area. The focus of this report is primarily on benefits and costs from the utility or electricity generation system perspective. It is intended to provide useful background information to utility and regulatory decision makers and their staff, who are often being asked to use or evaluate estimates of the benefits and cost of DGPV in regulatory proceedings. Understanding the technical rigor of the range of methods and how they might need to evolve as DGPV becomes a more significant contributor of energy to the electricity system will help them be better consumers of this type of information. This report is also intended to provide information to utilities, policy makers, PV technology developers, and other stakeholders, which might help them maximize the benefits and minimize the costs of integrating DGPV into a changing electricity system.

Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.; Palmintier, B.; Barrows, C.; Ibanez, E.; Bird, L.; Zuboy, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Overview of M-C Power`s MCFC power generation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IMHEX{reg_sign} fuel cell power generation system is a skid mounted power plant which efficiently generates electricity and useful thermal energy. The primary benefits are its high electric generation efficiency (50% or greater), modular capacities (500 kW to 3 MW per unit) and minimal environmental impacts (less than 1 ppM NO{sub x}). A cost effective, modular capacity fuel cell power plant provides the industry with an attractive alternative to large central station facilities, and its advantages have the potential to optimize the way electric power is generated and distributed to the users. Environmental issues are becoming the single most uncertain aspect of the power business. These issues may be manifested in air emissions permits or allowances for NO{sub x} or SO{sub 2}, energy taxes, CO{sub 2} limits, ``carbon taxes,`` etc. and may appear as siting permits for generation, transmission, or distribution facilities. Utilities are ``down-sizing`` with the goal of becoming the lowest cost supplier of electricity and are beginning to examine the concepts of ``energy service`` to improve their economic competitiveness. These issues are leading utilities to examine the benefits of distributed generation. Siting small capacity generation near the customer loads or at distribution substations can improve system efficiency and quality while reducing distribution system costs. The advantages that fuel cell power plants have over conventional technologies are critical to the success of these evolving opportunities in the power generation marketplace.

Benjamin, T.G.; Woods, R.R.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (Jefferson Lab) in Newport News, Virginia, USA, is one of ten national laboratories under the aegis of the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). It is managed and operated by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC. The primary facility at Jefferson Lab is the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) as shown in an aerial photograph in Figure 1. Jefferson Lab was created in 1984 as CEBAF and started operations for physics in 1995. The accelerator uses superconducting radio-frequency (srf) techniques to generate high-quality beams of electrons with high-intensity, well-controlled polarization. The technology has enabled ancillary facilities to be created. The CEBAF facility is used by an international user community of more than 1200 physicists for a program of exploration and study of nuclear, hadronic matter, the strong interaction and quantum chromodynamics. Additionally, the exceptional quality of the beams facilitates studies of the fundamental symmetries of nature, which complement those of atomic physics on the one hand and of high-energy particle physics on the other. The facility is in the midst of a project to double the energy of the facility and to enhance and expand its experimental facilities. Studies are also pursued with a Free-Electron Laser produced by an energy-recovering linear accelerator.

Joseph Grames, Douglas Higinbotham, Hugh Montgomery

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Energy Generation Project Permitting (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Vermont Energy Generation Siting Policy Commission is mandated to survey best practices for siting approval of electric generation projects (all facilities except for net- and group-net-metered...

280

SERAPH facility capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SERAPH (Solar Energy Research and Applications in Process Heat) facility addresses technical issues concerning solar thermal energy implementation in industry. Work will include computer predictive modeling (refinement and validation), system control and evaluation, and the accumulation of operation and maintenance experience. Procedures will be consistent (to the extent possible) with those of industry. SERAPH has four major components: the solar energy delivery system (SEDS); control and data acquisition (including sequencing and emergency supervision); energy distribution system (EDS); and areas allocated for storage development and load devices.

Castle, J.; Su, W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Impact of Electric Generating Facilities (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

After a proposed power plant has received approval from the State Corporation Commission (SCC) and location approval from the local government, it must apply for all applicable permits from the...

282

Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many local governments are using green power in their facilities and providing assistance to local businesses and residents to do the same. Green power is a subset of renewable energy that is produced with no GHG emissions, typically from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, or low-impact small hydroelectric sources, includes three types of products: utility products (i.e., green power purchased from the utility through the electricity grid), renewable energy certificates (RECs), and on-site generation. Opportunities to purchase these products are increasing significantly, with annual green power market growth rates

Green Power

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

EIA - Distributed Generation in Buildings  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed NewcatalystNeutron scattering characterizesAnalysis & Projections Glossary ›

284

Understanding the use of natural gas storage for generators of electricity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground natural gas storage is aggressively used by a handful of utility electric generators in the United States. While storage facilities are often utilized by the natural gas pipeline industry and the local distribution companies (LDCs), regional electric generators have taken advantgage of abundant storage and pipeline capacity to develop very cost efficient gas fired electric generating capacity, especially for peaking demand. Most types of natural gas storage facilities are located underground, with a few based above-ground. These facilities have served two basic types of natural gas storage service requirements: seasonal baseload and needle peakshaving. Baseload services are typically developed in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and aquifers while mined caverns and LNG facilities (also Propane-air facilities) typically provide needle peakshaving services. Reengineering of the natural gas infrastructure will alter the historical use patterns, and will provide the electric industry with new gas supply management tools. Electric generators, as consumers of natural gas, were among the first open access shippers and, as a result of FERC Order 636, are now attempting to reposition themselves in the {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} gas industry. Stated in terms of historical consumption, the five largest gas burning utilities consume 40% of all the gas burned for electric generation, and the top twenty accounted for approximately 70%. Slightly more than 100 utilities, including municipals, have any gas fired generating capacity, a rather limited number. These five are all active consumers of storage services.

Beckman, K.L. [International Gas Consulting, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

FRIB cryogenic distribution system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

Ganni, Venkatarao [JLAB; Dixon, Kelly D. [JLAB; Laverdure, Nathaniel A. [JLAB; Knudsen, Peter N. [JLAB; Arenius, Dana M. [JLAB; Barrios, Matthew N. [Michigan State; Jones, S. [Michigan State; Johnson, M. [Michigan State; Casagrande, Fabio [Michigan State

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

FRIB cryogenic distribution system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Michigan State University Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (MSU-FRIB) helium distribution system has been revised to include bayonet/warm valve type disconnects between each cryomodule and the transfer line distribution system, similar to the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) cryogenic distribution systems. The heat loads at various temperature levels and some of the features in the design of the distribution system are outlined. The present status, the plans for fabrication, and the procurement approach for the helium distribution system are also included.

Ganni, V.; Dixon, K.; Laverdure, N.; Knudsen, P.; Arenius, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab), Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Barrios, M.; Jones, S.; Johnson, M.; Casagrande, F. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB), Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Development of a High-Speed Static Switch for Distributed Energy and Microgrid Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Distributed energy resources can provide power to local loads in the electric distribution system and benefits such as improved reliability. Microgrids are intentional islands formed at a facility or in an electrical distribution system that contains at least one distributed resource and associated loads. Microgrids that operate both electrical generation and loads in a coordinated manner can offer additional benefits to the customer and local utility. The loads and energy sources can be disconnected from and reconnected to the area or local utility with minimal disruption to the local loads, thereby improving reliability. This paper details the development and testing of a highspeed static switch for distributed energy and microgrid applications.

Kroposki, B.; Pink, C.; Lynch, J.; John, V.; Meor Daniel, S.; Benedict, E.; Vihinen, I.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAM Analysis of Policy, Tariff Design, Building Energy Use,14 3.3 Comparison of Utility Tariffs in Japan and the14 Table 4: Electricity Tariffs at Several Facilities in the

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Colorado and South Carolina: New Wind Test Facilities Open |...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Act, the new facilities will accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation wind energy technologies for both offshore and land-based applications. Located on a...

290

Property:Specializations, Capabilities, and Key Facility Attributes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

biologists are highly experienced in assessing the impacts of generation devices on fish and the facilities allow for accurate testing with fish in a highly controlled...

291

Appendix D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibratio...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D: Facility Process Data and Appendix E: Equipment Calibration Data Sheets from Final Report: Particulate Emissions Testing, Unit 1, Potomac River Generating Station, Alexandria,...

292

Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities Project Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This feasibility study report presents a draft design of the Vitrified Waste Interim Storage Facility (VWISF), which is one of three subprojects of the Idaho Waste Vitrification Facilities (IWVF) project. The primary goal of the IWVF project is to design and construct a treatment process system that will vitrify the sodium-bearing waste (SBW) to a final waste form. The project will consist of three subprojects that include the Waste Collection Tanks Facility, the Waste Vitrification Facility (WVF), and the VWISF. The Waste Collection Tanks Facility will provide for waste collection, feed mixing, and surge storage for SBW and newly generated liquid waste from ongoing operations at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The WVF will contain the vitrification process that will mix the waste with glass-forming chemicals or frit and turn the waste into glass. The VWISF will provide a shielded storage facility for the glass until the waste can be disposed at either the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant as mixed transuranic waste or at the future national geological repository as high-level waste glass, pending the outcome of a Waste Incidental to Reprocessing determination, which is currently in progress. A secondary goal is to provide a facility that can be easily modified later to accommodate storage of the vitrified high-level waste calcine. The objective of this study was to determine the feasibility of the VWISF, which would be constructed in compliance with applicable federal, state, and local laws. This project supports the Department of Energy’s Environmental Management missions of safely storing and treating radioactive wastes as well as meeting Federal Facility Compliance commitments made to the State of Idaho.

Bonnema, Bruce Edward

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Tandem mirror technology demonstration facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes a facility for generating engineering data on the nuclear technologies needed to build an engineering test reactor (ETR). The facility, based on a tandem mirror operating in the Kelley mode, could be used to produce a high neutron flux (1.4 MW/M/sup 2/) on an 8-m/sup 2/ test area for testing fusion blankets. Runs of more than 100 h, with an average availability of 30%, would produce a fluence of 5 mW/yr/m/sup 2/ and give the necessary experience for successful operation of an ETR.

Not Available

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Facilities Services Overview & Discussion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Finance Facilities Services Director: Jeff Butler Human Resources Administrative Services Engineering) Environmental Services Morrison (3) Admin Services Evans (1) Human Resources Engineering (4) ·EngineeringFacilities Services Overview & Discussion Jeff Butler Director ­ Facilities Services November 2011

Maxwell, Bruce D.

295

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

296

Fuel Fabrication Facility  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility Construction of the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility November 2005 May 2007 June 2008 May 2012...

297

Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector Over the Long-Term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Distributed Energy: Modeling Penetration in Industrial Sector over the Long-Term Lorna Greening, Private Consultant, Los Alamos, NM Distributed energy (DE) sources provide a number of benefits when utilized. For industrial facilities... and the generation of steam. Within the framework of a US energy system model (MARKAL using the assumptions underlying AEO 2005), where all sources of energy supply and demand are depicted, the potential penetration of DE options is evaluated. The industrial...

Greening, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Guide to research facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal...

300

Power Systems Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

Southern Company Services

2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Future Fixed Target Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review plans for future fixed target lepton- and hadron-scattering facilities, including the 12 GeV upgraded CEBAF accelerator at Jefferson Lab, neutrino beam facilities at Fermilab, and the antiproton PANDA facility at FAIR. We also briefly review recent theoretical developments which will aid in the interpretation of the data expected from these facilities.

Melnitchouk, Wolodymyr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Second Harmonic Generation From Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Second Harmonic Generation From Surfaces Nicolas Tancogne-Dejean, Valérie Véniard Condensed Matter/DSM European Theoretical Spectroscopy Facility #12;2 Outline Nonlinear optic and second harmonic generation;4 Second harmonic generation First nonlinear term Centrosymmetric material : (2) = 0 (3)First nonlinear

Botti, Silvana

303

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

304

Advanced hybrid gasification facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this procurement is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology for electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may react with aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their concentration in the hot raw coal gas passing through the system to the gas turbine. This paper describes a novel, staged, airblown, fixed-bed gasifier designed to solve both through the incorporation of pyrolysis (carbonization) with gasification. It employs a pyrolyzer (carbonizer) to avoid sticky coal agglomeration which occurs in a fixed-bed process when coal is gradually heated through the 400{degrees}F to 900{degrees}F range. In a pyrolyzer, the coal is rapidly heated such that coal tar is immediately vaporized. Gaseous tars are then thermally cracked prior to the completion of the gasification process. During the subsequent endothermic gasification reactions, volatilized alkali can be chemically bound to aluminosilicates in (or added to) the ash. To reduce NOx from fuel home nitrogen, moisture is minimized to control ammonia generation, and HCN in the upper gasifier region is partially oxidized to NO which reacts with NH3/HCN to form N2.

Sadowski, R.S.; Skinner, W.H. [CRS Sirrine, Inc., Greenville, SC (United States); Johnson, S.A. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States); Dixit, V.B. [Riley Stoker Corp., Worcester, MA (United States). Riley Research Center

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

CRAD, Facility Safety- Nuclear Facility Safety Basis  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) that can be used for assessment of a contractor's Nuclear Facility Safety Basis.

306

Control system for the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new accelerator control system is being implemented as part of the development of the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF), a first generation radioactive ion beam (RIB) facility. The pre- existing accelerator control systems are based on 1970`s technology and addition or alteration of controls is cumbersome and costly. A new, unified control system for the cyclotron and tandem accelerators, the RIB injector, ion sources, and accelerator beam lines is based on a commercial product from Vista Control Systems, Inc. Several other accelerator facilities, as well as numerous industrial sites, are now using this system. The control system is distributed over a number of computers which communicate over Ethernet and is easily extensible. Presently, implementation at the HRIBF is based on VAX/VMS, VAX/ELN, VME, and Allen-Bradley PLC5 programmable logic controller architectures. Expansion to include UNIX platforms and CAMAC hardware support is planned. Operator interface is via X- terminals. The system has proven to be quite powerful, yet is has been easy to implement with a small staff. A Vista users group has resulted in shared software to implement specific controls. This paper details present system features and future implementations at the HRIBF.

Tatum, B.A.; Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Electrical Model Development and Validation for Distributed Resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project focuses on the development of electrical models for small (1-MW) distributed resources at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Distributed Energy Resources Test Facility.

Simoes, M. G.; Palle, B.; Chakraborty, S.; Uriarte, C.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FACILITY SAFETY (FS) OBJECTIVE FS.1 - (Core Requirement 7) Facility safety documentation in support of SN process operations,is in place and has been implemented that describes the...

309

Technology Transitions Facilities Database  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The types of R&D facilities at the DOE Laboratories available to the public typically fall into three broad classes depending on the mode of access: Designated User Facilities, Shared R&D...

310

Better building: LEEDing new facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Better building: LEEDing new facilities Better building: LEEDing new facilities We're taking big steps on-site to create energy efficient facilities and improve infrastructure....

311

Sandia National Laboratories: Distribution Grid Integration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Systems Symposium On April 15, 2014, in Concentrating Solar Power, Distribution Grid Integration, Energy, Facilities, Grid Integration, News, News & Events, Photovoltaic,...

312

Abundance and distribution of macro-crustaceans in the intake and discharge areas before and during early operation of the Cedar Bayou Generating Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Discharge Areas Before and During Early Operation of the Cedar Bayou Generating Station. (May 1972) Monroe Schmidt, A. A. , Blinn College; B. S. , Texas A&M University Directed by: Dr. Kirk Strawn Two trawl and 1 seine station in Tabbs Bay, 2 trawl... were collected twice monthly from May through October 1970. Genera- tion of electric power (and discharge of heated water) by Unit 1, a 750 MW steam-electric unit of the Houston Lighting and Power Company's Cedar Bayou Generating Station, began...

Schmidt, Monroe

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Power Systems Development Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses Test Campaign TC15 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Power Generation, Inc. (SPG) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC15 began on April 19, 2004, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier startup burner. The Transport Gasifier was shutdown on April 29, 2004, accumulating 200 hours of operation using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. About 91 hours of the test run occurred during oxygen-blown operations. Another 6 hours of the test run was in enriched-air mode. The remainder of the test run, approximately 103 hours, took place during air-blown operations. The highest operating temperature in the gasifier mixing zone mostly varied from 1,800 to 1,850 F. The gasifier exit pressure ran between 200 and 230 psig during air-blown operations and between 110 and 150 psig in oxygen-enhanced air operations.

Southern Company Services

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Thermodynamic estimation of minor element distribution between immiscible liquids in Fe-Cu-based metal phase generated in melting treatment of municipal solid wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two liquids separation of metal occurs in the melting of municipal solid waste. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The distribution of PGMs etc. between two liquid metal phases is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quite simple thermodynamic model is applied to predict the distribution ratio. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Au and Ag originated from WEEE are found to be concentrated into Cu-rich phase. - Abstract: Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has become an important target in managing material cycles from the viewpoint of not only waste management and control of environmental pollution but also resource conservation. This study investigated the distribution tendency of trace elements in municipal solid waste (MSW) or incinerator ash, including valuable non-ferrous metals (Ni, Co, Cr, Mn, Mo, Ti, V, W, Zr), precious group metals (PGMs) originated from WEEE (Ag, Au, Pd, Pt), and others (Al, B, Pb, Si), between Fe-rich and Cu-rich metal phases by means of simple thermodynamic calculations. Most of the typical alloying elements for steel (Co, Cr, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti, V, and W) and Rh were preferentially distributed into the Fe-rich phase. PGMs, such as Au, Ag, and Pd, were enriched in the Cu-rich phase, whereas Pt was almost equally distributed into both phases. Since the primary metallurgical processing of Cu is followed by an electrolysis for refining, and since PGMs in crude copper have been industrially recovered from the resulting anode slime, our results indicated that Ag, Au, and Pd could be effectively recovered from MSW if the Cu-rich phase could be selectively collected.

Lu, X. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nakajima, K.; Sakanakura, H. [Research Center for Material Cycles and Waste Management, National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba 305-8506 (Japan); Matsubae, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Bai, H. [School of Metallurgical and Ecological Engineering, The University of Science and Technology Beijing, 30 Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100083 (China); Nagasaka, T., E-mail: t-nagasaka@m.tohoku.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-11 Aza-Aoba, Aramaki, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Small Power Production Facilities (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of these regulations, a small power production facility is defined as a facility that:...

316

A framework for nuclear facility safeguard evaluation using probabilistic methods and expert elicitation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the advancement of the next generation of nuclear fuel cycle facilities, concerns of the effectiveness of nuclear facility safeguards have been increasing due to the inclusion of highly enriched material and reprocessing ...

Iamsumang, Chonlagarn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Balance-of-Plant Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) operates a number of research and development (R and D) facilities for the Department of Energy on the Hanford Site. According to DOE Order 5400.1, a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan is required for each site, facility, or process that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant pollutants or hazardous materials. Three of the R and D facilities: the 325, 331, and 3720 Buildings, are considered major emission points for radionuclide air sampling and thus individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (FEMPs) have been developed for them. Because no definition of ''significant'' is provided in DOE Order 5400.1 or the accompanying regulatory guide DOE/EH-0173T, this FEMP was developed to describe monitoring requirements in the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities that do not have individual FEMPs. The remainder of the DOE-owned, PNNL-operated facilities are referred to as Balance-of-Plant (BOP) facilities. Activities in the BOP facilities range from administrative to laboratory and pilot-scale R and D. R and D activities include both radioactive and chemical waste characterization, fluid dynamics research, mechanical property testing, dosimetry research, and molecular sciences. The mission and activities for individual buildings are described in the FEMP.

Ballinger, M.Y.; Shields, K.D.

1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

KRS Chapter 278: Electric Generation and Transmission Siting (Kentucky)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No person shall commence to construct a merchant electric generating facility until that person has applied for and obtained a construction certificate for the facility from the Kentucky State...

319

Interconnection Standards for Small Generators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) adopted "small generator" interconnection standards for distributed energy resources up to 20 megawatts (MW) in capacity in May 2005.* The FERC's...

320

NREL Research Support Facilities (RSF)  

High Performance Buildings Database

Golden, CO NREL's Research Support Facilities building (RSF) will be a total of 218,000 sq. feet. It will have two parallel secured employee wings, one of which will be 4 stories and the other 3 stories. A connector building housing most of the public spaces will run perpendicular through both wings. The RSF will provide workspace for 742 employees. The RSF is designed to be a zero energy building through the use of innovative energy efficiency, daylighting, and renewable energy strategies, including photovoltaic solar electric systems to generate electricity.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Distribution, relative abundance and species composition of shrimp, crabs and fish in the intake area, discharge canal and cooling lake of the Cedar Bayou generating station, Baytown, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area and discharge waters of Houston Lighting S Power Company's Cedar Bayou Generating Station, Baytown, Texas. Hydrological data were taken at each sampling station. A total of 12 species of crustaceans and 53 species of fish was captured. The 10... juvenile stages risk entrainment through the plant (Mihursky and Kennedy 1967; Bascom 1974) or impingement on the intake screens. As Landry (1977) found, the impact of either entrainment or impingement depends mainly on the season of recruitment...

St. Clair, Lou Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

322

Ultrasonic generator and detector using an optical mask having a grating for launching a plurality of spatially distributed, time varying strain pulses in a sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a system are disclosed for determining at least one characteristic of a sample that contains a substrate and at least one film disposed on or over a surface of the substrate. The method includes a first step of placing a mask over a free surface of the at least one film, where the mask has a top surface and a bottom surface that is placed adjacent to the free surface of the film. The bottom surface of the mask has formed therein or thereon a plurality of features for forming at least one grating. A next step directs optical pump pulses through the mask to the free surface of the film, where individual ones of the pump pulses are followed by at least one optical probe pulse. The pump pulses are spatially distributed by the grating for launching a plurality of spatially distributed, time varying strain pulses within the film, which cause a detectable change in optical constants of the film. A next step detects a reflected or a transmitted portion of the probe pulses, which are also spatially distributed by the grating. A next step measures a change in at least one characteristic of at least one of reflected or transmitted probe pulses due to the change in optical constants, and a further step determines the at least one characteristic of the sample from the measured change in the at least one characteristic of the probe pulses. An optical mask is also disclosed herein, and forms a part of these teachings.

Maris, Humphrey J. (Barrington, RI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Ultrasonic generator and detector using an optical mask having a grating for launching a plurality of spatially distributed, time varying strain pulses in a sample  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a system are disclosed for determining at least one characteristic of a sample that contains a substrate and at least one film disposed on or over a surface of the substrate. The method includes a first step of placing a mask over a free surface of the at least one film, where the mask has a top surface and a bottom surface that is placed adjacent to the free surface of the film. The bottom surface of the mask has formed therein or thereon a plurality of features for forming at least one grating. A next step directs optical pump pulses through the mask to the free surface of the film, where individual ones of the pump pulses are followed by at least one optical probe pulse. The pump pulses are spatially distributed by the grating for launching a plurality of spatially distributed, time varying strain pulses within the film, which cause a detectable change in optical constants of the film. A next step detects a reflected or a transmitted portion of the probe pulses, which are also spatially distributed by the grating. A next step measures a change in at least one characteristic of at least one of reflected or transmitted probe pulses due to the change in optical constants, and a further step determines the at least one characteristic of the sample from the measured change in the at least one characteristic of the probe pulses. An optical mask is also disclosed herein, and forms a part of these teachings.

Maris, Humphrey J. (Barrington, RI)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Cryogenics for the superconducting module test facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A group of laboratories and universities, with Fermilab taking the lead, are constructing a superconducting cryomodule test facility (SMTF) in the Meson Detector Building (MDB) area at Fermilab. The facility will be used for testing and validating designs for both pulsed and CW systems. A multi phase approach is taken to construct the facility. For the initial phase of the project, cryogens for a single cavity cryomodule will be supplied from the existing Cryogenic Test Facility (CTF) that houses three Tevatron satellite refrigerators. The cooling capacity available for cryomodule testing at MDB results from the liquefaction capacity of the CTF cryogenic system. A cryogenic distribution system to supply cryogens from CTF to MDB is under construction. This paper describes plans, status and challenges of the initial phase of the SMTF cryogenic system.

Klebaner, A.L.; Theilacker, J.C.; /Fermilab

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A cask maintenance facility feasibility study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a transportation system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and defense high level waste (HLW) as a part of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). In early 1988, a feasibility study was undertaken to design a stand-alone, ''green field'' facility for maintaining the FWMS casks. The feasibility study provided an initial layout facility design, an estimate of the construction cost, and an acquisition schedule for a Cask Maintenance Facility (CMF). The study also helped to define the interfaces between the transportation system and the waste generators, the repository, and a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. The data, design, and estimated costs resulting from the study have been organized for use in the total transportation system decision-making process. Most importantly, the feasibility study also provides a foundation for continuing design and planning efforts. Fleet servicing facility studies, operational studies from current cask system operators, a definition of the CMF system requirements, and the experience of others in the radioactive waste transportation field were used as a basis for the feasibility study. In addition, several cask handling facilities were visited to observe and discuss cask operations to establish the functions and methods of cask maintenance expected to be used in the facility. Finally, a peer review meeting was held at Oak Ridge, Tennessee in August, 1988, in which the assumptions, design, layout, and functions of the CMF were significantly refined. Attendees included representatives from industry, the repository and transportation operations.

Rennich, M.J.; Medley, L.G.; Attaway, C.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Los Alamos Transuranic Waste Size Reduction Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos Transuranic (TRU) Waste Size Reduction Facility (SRF) is a production oriented prototype. The facility is operated to remotely cut and repackage TRU contaminated metallic wastes (e.g., glove boxes, ducting and pipes) for eventual disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. The resulting flat sections are packaged into a tested Department of Transportation Type 7A metal container. To date, the facility has successfully processed stainless steel glove boxes (with and without lead shielding construction) and retention tanks. We have found that used glove boxes generate more cutting fumes than do unused glove boxes or metal plates - possibly due to deeply embedded chemical residues from years of service. Water used as a secondary fluid with the plasma arc cutting system significantly reduces visible fume generation during the cutting of used glove boxes and lead-lined glove boxes. 2 figs., 1 tab.

Harper, J.; Warren, J.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Science and Technology Facility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

IBRF Project Lessons Learned Report Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility Lessons Learned - Stage I Acquisition through Stage II Construction Completion August 2011 This...

328

Programs & User Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Research Facility Climate, Ocean, and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Terrestrial Ecosystem and Climate Dynamics Fusion Energy Sciences Magnetic Fusion Experiments Plasma Surface...

329

FACILITY SAFETY (FS)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- (Core Requirements 4 and 6) Sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are available to conduct and support operations. Adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure...

330

ARM Mobile Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

This video provides an overview of the ARM Mobile Facilities, two portable climate laboratories that can deploy anywhere in the world for campaigns of at least six months.

Orr, Brad; Coulter, Rich

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Existing Facilities Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The NYSERDA Existing Facilities program merges the former Peak Load Reduction and Enhanced Commercial and Industrial Performance programs. The new program offers a broad array of different...

332

Supercomputing | Facilities | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

facilities, and authorization checks for physical access. An integrated cyber security plan encompasses all aspects of computing. Cyber security plans are risk-based....

333

Facility Survey & Transfer  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

As DOE facilities become excess, many that are radioactively and/or chemically contaminated will become candidate for transfer to DOE-EM for deactivation and decommissioning.

334

Hot Fuel Examination Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Working with INL Community Outreach Visitor Information Calendar of Events ATR National Scientific User Facility Center for Advanced Energy Studies Light Water Reactor...

335

DOE Designated Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reactor** Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Joint Genome Institute - Production Genomics Facility (PGF)** (joint with LLNL, LANL, ORNL and PNNL) Advanced Light Source (ALS)...

336

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

337

NREL Research Support Facility (RSF) Documentary  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

he ideas and innovations that define NREL are now shaping the next generation of commercial office buildings. DOE's Research Support Facility at NREL, will set a new benchmark for affordable, sustainable commercial design and construction. The unique form of the RSF is driven by energy-saving strategies, many researched and advanced at NREL.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

338

NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

None

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

339

NETL- High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Facility is a unique resource within the National Laboratories system. It provides the test capabilities needed to evaluate new combustion concepts for high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen and natural gas turbines. These concepts will be critical for the next generation of ultra clean, ultra efficient power systems.

None

2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

340

Cool Storage Economic Feasibility Analysis for a Large Industrial Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The analysis of economic feasibility for adding a cool storage facility to shift electric demand to off-peak hours for a large industrial facility is presented. DOE-2 is used to generate the necessary cooling load profiles for the analysis...

Fazzolari, R.; Mascorro, J. A.; Ballard, R. H.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System Facilities Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Privacy Impact Assessment OFEO Facilities Management System ­ Facilities Center I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: Facilities Management System - FacilityCenter 2. IT System Sponsor: Office. IT System Manager: Michelle T. Gooch, Facilities Management Systems Manager 5. PIA Author: Michelle T. Gooch

Mathis, Wayne N.

342

Utility Facility Siting and Environmental Protection Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This legislation applies to electric generating plants and associated facilities designed for or capable of operation at a capacity of more than 75 MW. A certificate from the Public Service...

343

Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Enhancing the Smart Grid: Integrating Clean Distributed and Renewable Generation Imagine a grid...

344

Facilities Management CAD Standards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facilities Management CAD Standards 2011 #12;Facilities Management CAD Standards Providing: Layering Standards 2.1 Layer Name Format 2.2 Layer Name Modifiers 2.3 Layer Attributes 2.4 Special Layer of PDF and DWG Files APPENDIX A: DAL FM CAD Standard Layers APPENDIX B: DAL FM CAD Special Layers

Brownstone, Rob

345

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requirements, building code, and sustainability objectives. This plan takes a long- term view, projecting workCornell University Facilities Services Contract Colleges Facilities Fernow and Rice Hall in Fernow, Rice, Bruckner, Bradfield and Plant Science buildings. It includes a surging and phasing plan

Manning, Sturt

346

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Argonne Leadership Computing Facility 2010 ANNUAL REPORT S C I E N C E P O W E R E D B Y S U P E R C O M P U T I N G ANL-11/15 The Argonne Leadership Computing States Government nor any agency thereof, nor UChicago Argonne, LLC, nor any of their employees

Kemner, Ken

347

A Materials Facilities Initiative -  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Materials Facilities Initiative - FMITS & MPEX D.L. Hillis and ORNL Team Fusion & Materials for Nuclear Systems Division July 10, 2014 #12;2 Materials Facilities Initiative JET ITER FNSF Fusion Reactor Challenges for materials: fluxes and fluence, temperatures 50 x divertor ion fluxes up to 100 x neutron

348

Nanotechnology User Facility for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A National Nanotechnology User Facility for Industry Academia Government #12;The National Institute of Commerce's nanotechnology user facility. The CNST enables innovation by providing rapid access to the tools new measurement and fabrication methods in response to national nanotechnology needs. www

349

Science &Technology Facilities Council  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Science & Technology Facilities Council invite you to The ESA Technology Transfer Network SpaceTech2012Science &Technology Facilities Council Innovations Issue 31 October 2012 This issue: 1 STFC International prize for `no needles' breast cancer diagnosis technique 6 CEOI Challenge Workshop ­ Current

350

Emergency Facilities and Equipment  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This volume clarifies requirements of DOE O 151.1 to ensure that emergency facilities and equipment are considered as part of emergency management program and that activities conducted at these emergency facilities are fully integrated. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

1997-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

351

Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations Woongsup between electric vehicle charging stations (EVCSs) with renewable electricity generation facilities (REGFs electricity generation [1]. Therefore, renewable power generation will play a significant role in smart grid

Wong, Vincent

352

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Department of Residential Facilities Facilities Student Employment Office 1205E Leonardtown Service Updated 3/09 #12;EMPLOYMENT HISTORY Have you worked for Residential Facilities before? Yes No If so list

Hill, Wendell T.

353

E-Print Network 3.0 - antenna test facility Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to create a new-generation space radio facility 12;LOFAR Low... Frequency Array Netherland, Lower Saxony, Schleswig- Holstein... Test station at Exloo, full scale......

354

Texas Facilities Commission's Facility Management Strategic Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pneumatic compressor and air distribution piping. #0;y Controls tend to drift out of calibration. #0;y Susceptible to leaks. #0;y Compressor is a single point of failure. #0;y Reconfiguration requires hardware and piping. #0;y Can not be remotely... monitored. #0;y Manual intervention required to make adjustments. #0;y No pneumatic compressor or air distribution piping. #0;y Can be remotely monitored, adjusted or (re)configured. #0;y Software calibration. #0;y Controls are distributed, so no single...

Ramirez, J. A.

355

Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Development of the Solid-State Laser System for the Accelerator Test Facility Daniil Stolyarov, Accelerator Test Facility User's Meeting April 3, 2009 Outline Motivation for...

356

Hardware simulation of diesel generator and microgrid stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last few years, people have begun to depend less on large power plants with extensive distribution systems, and more on local distributed generation sources. A microgrid, a local collection of distributed generators, ...

Zieve, Michael M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Low-level waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the US Department of Energy waste management programmatic environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides technical support information for use in analyzing environmental impacts associated with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) management alternatives in the Waste-Management (WM) Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). Waste loads treated and disposed of for each of the LLW alternatives considered in the DOE WM PEIS are presented. Waste loads are presented for DOE Waste Management (WM) wastes, which are generated from routine operations. Radioactivity concentrations and waste quantities for treatment and disposal under the different LLW alternatives are described for WM waste. 76 refs., 14 figs., 42 tabs.

Goyette, M.L.; Dolak, D.A.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Photovoltaic Research Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) funds photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R&D) at its national laboratory facilities located throughout the country. To encourage further innovation,...

359

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

360

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

's electricity from renewable resources by 2010. The Guidebook outlines eligibility and legal requirementsCALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION ` NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK March 2007 CEC-300 Executive Director Heather Raitt Technical Director RENEWABLE ENERGY OFFICE CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NEW RENEWABLE FACILITIES PROGRAM GUIDEBOOK APRIL 2006 CEC-300 Director Heather Raitt Technical Director Renewable Energy Program Drake Johnson Office Manager Renewable Energy Office Valerie Hall Deputy Director Efficiency, Renewables, and Demand Analysis Division #12;These

362

Liquidity facilities and signaling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation studies the role of signaling concerns in discouraging access to liquidity facilities like the IMF contingent credit lines (CCL) and the Discount Window (DW). In Chapter 1, I analyze the introduction of ...

Arregui, Nicolás

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

NETL - Fuel Reforming Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research using NETL's Fuel Reforming Facilities explores catalytic issues inherent in fossil-energy related applications, including catalyst synthesis and characterization, reaction kinetics, catalyst activity and selectivity, catalyst deactivation, and stability.

None

2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

Cornell University Facilities Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Description: The Large Animal Teaching Complex (LATC) will be a joint facility for the College of Veterinary or increase operating costs of the dairy barn; therefore, the College of Veterinary Medicine has agreed

Manning, Sturt

365

B Plant facility description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Buildings 225B, 272B, 282B, 282BA, and 294B were removed from the B Plant facility description. Minor corrections were made for tank sizes and hazardous and toxic inventories.

Chalk, S.E.

1996-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

366

Facilities Management Department Restructuring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ Zone 2 ­ Mission Bay/East Side: Includes Mission Bay, Mission Center Bldg, Buchanan Dental, Hunters Point, 654 Minnesota, Oyster Point 2. Recommendation that UCSF align all Facility Services and O

Mullins, Dyche

367

Hazardous Waste Facilities Siting (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations describe the siting and permitting process for hazardous waste facilities and reference rules for construction, operation, closure, and post-closure of these facilities.

368

Pollution Control Facilities (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For the purpose of this legislation, pollution control facilities are defined as any facilities designed for the elimination, mitigation or prevention of air or water pollution, including all...

369

Plantwide Energy Assessment of a Sugarcane Farming and Processing Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plantwide energy assessment was performed at Hawaiian Commercial & Sugar Co., an integrated sugarcane farming and processing facility on the island of Maui in the State of Hawaii. There were four main tasks performed for the plantwide energy assessment: 1) pump energy assessment in both field and factory operations, 2) steam generation assessment in the power production operations, 3) steam distribution assessment in the sugar manufacturing operation, and 4) electric power distribution assessment of the company system grid. The energy savings identified in each of these tasks were summarized in terms of fuel savings, electricity savings, or opportunity revenue that potentially exists mostly from increased electric power sales to the local electric utility. The results of this investigation revealed eight energy saving projects that can be implemented at HC&S. These eight projects were determined to have potential for $1.5 million in annual fuel savings or 22,337 MWh equivalent annual electricity savings. Most of the savings were derived from pump efficiency improvements and steam efficiency improvements both in generation and distribution. If all the energy saving projects were implemented and the energy savings were realized as less fuel consumed, there would be corresponding reductions in regulated air pollutants and carbon dioxide emissions from supplemental coal fuel. As HC&S is already a significant user of renewable biomass fuel for its operations, the projected reductions in air pollutants and emissions will not be as great compared to using only coal fuel for example. A classification of implementation priority into operations was performed for the identified energy saving projects based on payback period and ease of implementation.

Jakeway, L.A.; Turn, S.Q.; Keffer, V.I.; Kinoshita, C.M.

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

370

Wind Generation Feasibility Study in Bethel, AK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report studies the wind resources in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) region, located in southwestern Alaska, and the applicability of wind generation technologies to YKHC facilities.

Tom Humphrey, YKHC; Lance Kincaid, EMCOR Energy & Technologies

2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

371

Electric Power Generation and Transmission (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Electric power generating facilities with a combined capacity greater than 25 MW, as well as associated transmission lines, may not be constructed or begin operation prior to the issuance of a...

372

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

373

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Waste to energy facilities. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning technical, economic, and environmental evaluations of facilities that convert waste to energy. Solid waste and municipal waste conversion facilities are highlighted. Feasibility studies, technical design, emissions studies, and markets for the resulting energy are discussed. Heat and electrical generation facilities are emphasized. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

The DOE ARM Aerial Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is a climate research user facility operating stationary ground sites that provide long-term measurements of climate relevant properties, mobile ground- and ship-based facilities to conduct shorter field campaigns (6-12 months), and the ARM Aerial Facility (AAF). The airborne observations acquired by the AAF enhance the surface-based ARM measurements by providing high-resolution in-situ measurements for process understanding, retrieval-algorithm development, and model evaluation that are not possible using ground- or satellite-based techniques. Several ARM aerial efforts were consolidated into the AAF in 2006. With the exception of a small aircraft used for routine measurements of aerosols and carbon cycle gases, AAF at the time had no dedicated aircraft and only a small number of instruments at its disposal. In this "virtual hangar" mode, AAF successfully carried out several missions contracting with organizations and investigators who provided their research aircraft and instrumentation. In 2009, AAF started managing operations of the Battelle-owned Gulfstream I (G-1) large twin-turboprop research aircraft. Furthermore, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 provided funding for the procurement of over twenty new instruments to be used aboard the G-1 and other AAF virtual-hangar aircraft. AAF now executes missions in the virtual- and real-hangar mode producing freely available datasets for studying aerosol, cloud, and radiative processes in the atmosphere. AAF is also engaged in the maturation and testing of newly developed airborne sensors to help foster the next generation of airborne instruments.

Schmid, Beat; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Hubbe, John M.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mei, Fan; Chand, Duli; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Kluzek, Celine D.; Andrews, Elisabeth; Biraud, S.; McFarquhar, Greg

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Working with SRNL - Our Facilities - Glovebox Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 Table 1.14Working WithGlovebox Facilities

378

Brookhaven Facility Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBoston Areais a village in Cook County, Illinois. ItBrookhaven Facility

379

POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, H{sub 2}/converted carbon ratio, gasification rates, carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Test run GCT3 was started on December 1, 2000, with the startup of the thermal oxidizer fan, and was completed on February 1, 2001. This test was conducted in two parts; the loop seal was commissioned during the first part of this test run from December 1 through 15, which consisted of hot inert solids circulation testing. These initial tests provided preliminary data necessary to understand different parameters associated with the operation and performance of the loop seal. The loop seal was tested with coal feed during the second part of the test run and additional data was gathered to analyze reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance. In the second part of GCT3, the gasification portion of the test, from January 20 to February 1, 2001, the mixing zone and riser temperatures were varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures ranging from 200 to 240 psig. There were 306 hours of solid circulation and 184 hours of coal feed attained in GCT3.

Unknown

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

NEW APPROACH TO ADDRESSING GAS GENERATION IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) document why the transportation of radioactive material is safe in Type A(F) and Type B shipping containers. The content evaluation of certain actinide materials require that the gas generation characteristics be addressed. Most packages used to transport actinides impose extremely restrictive limits on moisture content and oxide stabilization to control or prevent flammable gas generation. These requirements prevent some users from using a shipping container even though the material to be shipped is fully compliant with the remaining content envelope including isotopic distribution. To avoid these restrictions, gas generation issues have to be addressed on a case by case basis rather than a one size fits all approach. In addition, SARP applicants and review groups may not have the knowledge and experience with actinide chemistry and other factors affecting gas generation, which facility experts in actinide material processing have obtained in the last sixty years. This paper will address a proposal to create a Gas Generation Evaluation Committee to evaluate gas generation issues associated with Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging material contents. The committee charter could include reviews of both SARP approved contents and new contents not previously evaluated in a SARP.

Watkins, R; Leduc, D; Askew, N

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Transuranic waste inventory, characteristics, generation, and facility assessment for treatment, storage, and disposal alternatives considered in the U.S. Department of Energy Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Transuranic waste (TRUW) loads and potential contaminant releases at and en route to treatment, storage, and disposal sites in the US Department of Energy (DOE) complex are important considerations in DOE`s Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). Waste loads are determined in part by the level of treatment the waste has undergone and the complex-wide configuration of origination, treatment, storage, and disposal sites selected for TRUW management. Other elements that impact waste loads are treatment volumes, waste characteristics, and the unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. Treatment levels and site configurations have been combined into six TRUW management alternatives for study in the WM PEIS. This supplemental report to the WM PEIS gives the projected waste loads and contaminant release profiles for DOE treatment sites under each of the six TRUW management alternatives. It gives TRUW characteristics and inventories for current DOE generation and storage sites, describes the treatment technologies for three proposed levels of TRUW treatment, and presents the representative unit operation parameters of the treatment technologies. The data presented are primary inputs to developing the costs, health risks, and socioeconomic and environmental impacts of treating, packaging, and shipping TRUW for disposal.

Hong, K.; Kotek, T.; Folga, S.; Koebnick, B.; Wang, Y.; Kaicher, C.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

INTEGRATED CONTROL OF NEXT GENERATION POWER SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control methodologies provide the necessary data acquisition, analysis and corrective actions needed to maintain the state of an electric power system within acceptable operating limits. These methods are primarily software-based algorithms that are nonfunctional unless properly integrated with system data and the appropriate control devices. Components of the control of power systems today include protective relays, supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA), distribution automation (DA), feeder automation, software agents, sensors, control devices and communications. Necessary corrective actions are still accomplished using large electromechanical devices such as vacuum, oil and gas-insulated breakers, capacitor banks, regulators, transformer tap changers, reclosers, generators, and more recently FACTS (flexible AC transmission system) devices. The recent evolution of multi-agent system (MAS) technologies has been reviewed and effort made to integrate MAS into next generation power systems. A MAS can be defined as ��a loosely-coupled network of problem solvers that work together to solve problems that are beyond their individual capabilities��. These problem solvers, often called agents, are autonomous and may be heterogeneous in nature. This project has shown that a MAS has significant advantages over a single, monolithic, centralized problem solver for next generation power systems. Various communication media are being used in the electric power system today, including copper, optical fiber and power line carrier (PLC) as well as wireless technologies. These technologies have enabled the deployment of substation automation (SA) at many facilities. Recently, carrier and wireless technologies have been developed and demonstrated on a pilot basis. Hence, efforts have been made by this project to penetrate these communication technologies as an infrastructure for next generation power systems. This project has thus pursued efforts to use specific MAS methods as well as pertinent communications protocols to imbed and assess such technologies in a real electric power distribution system, specifically the Circuit of the Future (CoF) developed by Southern California Edison (SCE). By modeling the behavior and communication for the components of a MAS, the operation and control of the power distribution circuit have been enhanced. The use of MAS to model and integrate a power distribution circuit offers a significantly different approach to the design of next generation power systems. For example, ways to control a power distribution circuit that includes a micro-grid while considering the impacts of thermal constraints, and integrating voltage control and renewable energy sources on the main power system have been pursued. Both computer simulations and laboratory testbeds have been used to demonstrate such technologies in electric power distribution systems. An economic assessment of MAS in electric power systems was also performed during this project. A report on the economic feasibility of MAS for electric power systems was prepared, and particularly discusses the feasibility of incorporating MAS in transmission and distribution (T&D) systems. Also, the commercial viability of deploying MAS in T&D systems has been assessed by developing an initial case study using utility input to estimate the benefits of deploying MAS. In summary, the MAS approach, which had previously been investigated with good success by APERC for naval shipboard applications, has now been applied with promising results for enhancing an electric power distribution circuit, such as the Circuit of the Future developed by Southern California Edison. The results for next generation power systems include better ability to reconfigure circuits, improve protection and enhance reliability.

None

2010-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD FAU Research Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Harriet L.Wilkes Honors College FAU Research Facility Expansion Satellite Utility Plant Chiller Lift

Fernandez, Eduardo

385

An Injector Test Facility for the LCLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

SLAC is in the privileged position of being the site for the world's first 4th generation light source as well as having a premier accelerator research staff and facilities. Operation of the world's first x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facility will require innovations in electron injectors to provide electron beams of unprecedented quality. Upgrades to provide ever shorter wavelength x-ray beams of increasing intensity will require significant advances in the state-of-the-art. The BESAC 20-Year Facilities Roadmap identifies the electron gun as ''the critical enabling technology to advance linac-based light sources'' and recognizes that the sources for next-generation light sources are ''the highest-leveraged technology'', and that ''BES should strongly support and coordinate research and development in this unique and critical technology''.[1] This white paper presents an R&D plan and a description of a facility for developing the knowledge and technology required to successfully achieve these upgrades, and to coordinate efforts on short-pulse source development for linac-based light sources.

Colby, E., (ed.); /SLAC

2007-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

386

Hanford facility contingency plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Facility Contingency Plan, together with each TSD unit- specific contingency plan, meets the WAC 173-303 requirements for a contingency plan. Applicability of this plan to Hanford Facility activities is described in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit, Dangerous Waste Portion, General Condition II.A. General Condition II.A applies to Part III TSD units, Part V TSD units, and to releases of hazardous substances which threaten human health or the environment. Additional information about the applicability of this document may also be found in the Hanford Facility RCRA Permit Handbook (DOE/RL-96-10). This plan includes descriptions of responses to a nonradiological hazardous substance spill or release at Hanford Facility locations not covered by TSD unit-specific contingency plans or building emergency plans. The term hazardous substances is defined in WAC 173-303-040 as: ``any liquid, solid, gas, or sludge, including any material, substance, product, commodity, or waste, regardless of quantity, that exhibits any of the physical, chemical or biological properties described in WAC 173-303-090 or 173-303-100.`` Whenever the term hazardous substances is used in this document, it will be used in the context of this definition. This plan includes descriptions of responses for spills or releases of hazardous substances occurring at areas between TSD units that may, or may not, threaten human health or the environment.

Sutton, L.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Modular test facility for HTS insert coils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final beam cooling stages of a Muon Collider may require DC solenoid magnets with magnetic fields in the range of 40-50 T. In this paper we will present a modular test facility developed for the purpose of investigating very high field levels with available 2G HTS superconducting materials. Performance of available conductors is presented, together with magnetic calculations and evaluation of Lorentz forces distribution on the HTS coils. Finally a test of a double pancake coil is presented.

Lombardo, V; Bartalesi, A.; Barzi, E.; Lamm, M.; Turrioni, D.; Zlobin, A.V.; /Fermilab

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas{trademark} staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may condense onto aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their exiting with the hot raw coal gas and passing through the system to the gas turbine. The management plan calls for a three phased program. The initial phase (Phase 1), includes the CRS Sinine Engineers, Inc. proprietary gasification invention called PyGas{trademark}, necessary coal and limestone receiving/storage/reclaim systems to allow closely metered coal and limestone to be fed into the gasifier for testing. The coal gas is subsequently piped to and combusted in an existing burner of the Monongahela Power Fort Martin Generating Station Unit No. 2. Continuous gasification process steam is generated by a small GPIF packaged boiler using light oil fuel at startup, and by switching from light oil to coal gas after startup. The major peripheral equipment such as foundations, process water system, ash handling, ash storage silo, emergency vent pipe, building, lavatory, electrical interconnect, control room, provisions for Phases II & III, and control system are all included in Phase I. A future hot gas cleanup unit conceptualized to be a zinc ferrite based fluidized bed process constitutes the following phase (Phase H). The final phase (Phase III) contemplates the addition of a combustion turbine and generator set sized to accommodate the parasitic load of the entire system.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brooks, K.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Brown, M.J.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gasification Product Improvement Facility (GPIF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective is to provide a test facility to support early commercialization of advanced fixed-bed coal gasification technology electric power generation applications. The proprietary CRS Sirrine Engineers, Inc. PyGas[trademark] staged gasifier has been selected as the initial gasifier to be developed under this program. The gasifier is expected to avoid agglomeration when used on caking coals. It is also being designed to crack tar vapors and ammonia, and to provide an environment in which volatilized alkali may condense onto aluminosilicates in the coal ash thereby minimizing their exiting with the hot raw coal gas and passing through the system to the gas turbine. The management plan calls for a three phased program. The initial phase (Phase 1), includes the CRS Sinine Engineers, Inc. proprietary gasification invention called PyGas[trademark], necessary coal and limestone receiving/storage/reclaim systems to allow closely metered coal and limestone to be fed into the gasifier for testing. The coal gas is subsequently piped to and combusted in an existing burner of the Monongahela Power Fort Martin Generating Station Unit No. 2. Continuous gasification process steam is generated by a small GPIF packaged boiler using light oil fuel at startup, and by switching from light oil to coal gas after startup. The major peripheral equipment such as foundations, process water system, ash handling, ash storage silo, emergency vent pipe, building, lavatory, electrical interconnect, control room, provisions for Phases II III, and control system are all included in Phase I. A future hot gas cleanup unit conceptualized to be a zinc ferrite based fluidized bed process constitutes the following phase (Phase H). The final phase (Phase III) contemplates the addition of a combustion turbine and generator set sized to accommodate the parasitic load of the entire system.

Sadowski, R.S.; Brooks, K.S.; Skinner, W.H.; Brown, M.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fitness facilities, facilities for extracurricular activities and other purposes Facility Location Department in charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Facility Location Department in charge Student Hall (1) Common Facility 1 for Extracurricular Activities (2 tennis courts, Swimming pool (25 m, not officially approved) Rokkodai Area (Tsurukabuto 2 Campus) Martial art training facility, Japanese archery training facility, Playground, 4 tennis courts, Swimming pool

Banbara, Mutsunori

391

Secretary Bodman Opens New Science and Technology Facility at...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

generation of renewable energy technologies in electricity from solar cells, hydrogen fuel cells and distributed energy. Ground was broken for the S&TF in July 2004, and...

392

RCRA facility stabilization initiative  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The RCRA Facility Stabilization Initiative was developed as a means of implementing the Corrective Action Program`s management goals recommended by the RIS for stabilizing actual or imminent releases from solid waste management units that threaten human health and the environment. The overall goal of stabilization is to, as situations warrant, control or abate threats to human health and/or the environment from releases at RCRA facilities, and/or to prevent or minimize the further spread of contamination while long-term remedies are pursued. The Stabilization initiative is a management philosophy and should not be confused with stabilization technologies.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [FacilityMayMarch 1, 2012 [Facility

394

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [FacilityMayMarch 1, 2012 [FacilityMay

395

Facility Data Policy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series toESnet4:Epitaxial ThinFOR IMMEDIATE5Facilities SomeFacilities Glove

396

Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceElectron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light SourceBerkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The proposed facil- ity

Thompson, Neil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in floor tiles for thermal energy storage,” working paper,D. R. (2000). Thermal energy storage for space cooling,A simple model of thermal energy storage is developed as a

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy; Grid systems; Optimization; Heat flow; Financialof grid power and by utilizing combined heat and power (CHP)

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mercantile Education Office Fig. 3 January Electricity LoadEducation Small Large Office Small Large Table 5. PG&E Electricity and

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space-Heating Supply Hour Load (kW) Storage CHP NG Fig. 14Space-Heating Supply Load (kW) Storage Hour CHP NG Fig. 15Supply Load (kW) Storage CHP NG Hour Fig. 16 July Weekday

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Microgrids: distributed on-site generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity and heat supply; · Need for energy storage, both electrical and thermal; · Relationship between

Watson, Andrew

402

Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

reports from Task XVII participants, including Austria, Finland, Italy, Korea, the Netherlands, Spain and the United States. Annex 8 provides a list of software tools for...

403

Abatement of Air Pollution: Distributed Generators (Connecticut) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe Office of FossilMembershipoftheManagementHasdecDioxidePlants and

404

Distributed Generation Technologies DGT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor,Discount PowerEmerlingEnergy InformationDGT

405

Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil3 13,,8.1 64.1 4.2Modeling

406

Distributed Generation with Heat Recovery and Storage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is anErnest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan M.; Zhou, Nan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Distributed Generation Financial Incentives and Programs Resources |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA and DOW Area 5 LLRWDistributedDepartment of

408

Distributed Generation Operational Reliability and Availability Database,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA and DOW Area 5 LLRWDistributedDepartmentFinal

409

Distributed Generation Operational Reliability, Executive Summary Report,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA and DOW Area 5

410

Advanced Distributed Generation LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskeyEnergyAd-VentaAddison is aAdenaAdrian is aBooneADECOS

411

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergyDepartmentEnergy DataRemediated

412

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L dDepartmentnews-flashes OfficeTexas |4Webinar May 23, 2012 |

413

Distributed Generation Lead-by-Example Resources  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

State governments can lead by example by promoting renewable energy programs and policies. Efforts to lead by example include using renewable energy resources (including alternative fuel for...

414

Service & Reliability Equipment & Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

termites E5 Marine applications, panel & block E7 Field Stake tests (FST colonies) E9 Above ground L-joint stake test (Formosan termites & decay), E9 L- joint, E16 (horizontal lap-joint), E18 ground proximity facilities for AWPA test: A9 X-ray, E1 (termites), E10 (soil block), E11 (leaching), E12 metal corrosion

415

Graph algorithms experimentation facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAWADJMAT 2 ~e ~l 2. ~f ~2 2 ~t ~& [g H 2 O? Z Mwd a P d ed d Aid~a sae R 2-BE& T C dbms Fig. 2. External Algorithm Handler The facility is menu driven and implemented as a client to XAGE. Our implementation follows very closely the functionality...

Sonom, Donald George

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Strategies for Facilities Renewal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of steam production is from exothermic chem ical processes. A large gas fired cogeneration unit was completed in 1987 and supplies 90% of the facil ities' electrical needs and 25% of total steam demand (the remaining steam is supplied by process heat...

Good, R. L.

417

FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

Laughlin, Robert B.

418

Tailoring UNITY to Distributed Program Design ?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tailoring UNITY to Distributed Program Design ? Michel Charpentier, Mamoun Filali, Philippe Mauran. As a general framework, UNITY does not offer any specific facility for the design of distributed systems to help the design of distributed systems in UNITY. 1 Introduction UNITY is intended to be a general

Charpentier, Michel

419

Tailoring UNITY to Distributed Program Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tailoring UNITY to Distributed Program Design Michel Charpentier, Mamoun Filali, Philippe Mauran, G. As a general framework, UNITY does not offer any specific facility for the design of distributed systems to help the design of distributed systems in UNITY. 1 Introduction UNITY is intended to be a general

Grigoras, .Romulus

420

Biological shield design and analysis of KIPT accelerator-driven subcritical facility.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator-driven subcritical facility. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear research, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. This paper presents the design and analyses of the biological shield performed for the top section of the facility. The neutron source driving the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of a 100-kW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron energy is in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, and it has a uniform spatial distribution. The shield design and the associated analyses are presented including different parametric studies. In the analyses, a significant effort was dedicated to the accurate prediction of the radiation dose outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized for the transport calculation of electrons, photons, and neutrons. Weight window variance-reduction techniques were introduced, and the dose equivalent outside the shield can be calculated with reasonably good statistics.

Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Biomass Anaerobic Digestion Facilities and Biomass Gasification Facilities (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management requires permits before the construction or expansion of biomass anaerobic digestion or gasification facilities.

422

F/H effluent treatment facility. Technical data summary  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the technical basis for the design of the facility. Some of the sections are described with options to permit simplification of the process, depending on the effluent quality criteria that the facility will have to meet. Each part of the F/HETF process is reviewed with respect to decontamination and concentration efficiency, operability, additional waste generation, energy efficiency, and compatability with the rest of the process.

Ryan, J P; Stimson, R E

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Criticality Safety Evaluation of Hanford Tank Farms Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data and calculations from previous criticality safety evaluations and analyses were used to evaluate criticality safety for the entire Tank Farms facility to support the continued waste storage mission. This criticality safety evaluation concludes that a criticality accident at the Tank Farms facility is an incredible event due to the existing form (chemistry) and distribution (neutron absorbers) of tank waste. Limits and controls for receipt of waste from other facilities and maintenance of tank waste condition are set forth to maintain the margin subcriticality in tank waste.

WEISS, E.V.

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

424

Biomass Feedstock National User Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1B—Integration of Supply Chains I: Breaking Down Barriers Biomass Feedstock National User Facility Kevin L. Kenney, Director, Biomass Feedstock National User Facility, Idaho National Laboratory

425

The Caterpillar Coal Gasification Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a review of one of America's premier coal gasification installations. The caterpillar coal gasification facility located in York, Pennsylvania is an award winning facility. The plant was recognized as the 'pace setter plant of the year...

Welsh, J.; Coffeen, W. G., III

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Facilities evaluation report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program of the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development whose mission is to evaluate different new and existing technologies and determine how well they address DOE community waste remediation problems. Twenty-three Technical Task Plans (TTPs) have been identified to support this mission during FY-92; 10 of these have identified some support requirements when demonstrations take place. Section 1 of this report describes the tasks supported by BWID, determines if a technical demonstration is proposed, and if so, identifies the support requirements requested by the TTP Principal Investigators. Section 2 of this report is an evaluation identifying facility characteristics of existing Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) facilities that may be considered for use in BWID technology demonstration activities.

Sloan, P.A.; Edinborough, C.R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Loss Reduction of Power Distribution Network Using Optimum Size and Location of Distributed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation Adnan Anwar, Student Member, IEEE, and H. R. Pota, Member, IEEE Abstract--Distributed generation be reduced significantly. Index Terms--Distributed generation, Optimum size, Optimum location, Power loss directly to utility distribution system. The insulation level of the machines may not synchronize

Pota, Himanshu Roy

428

PUREX facility preclosure work plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This preclosure work plan presents a description of the PUREX Facility, the history of the waste managed, and addresses transition phase activities that position the PUREX Facility into a safe and environmentally secure configuration. For purposes of this documentation, the PUREX Facility does not include the PUREX Storage Tunnels (DOE/RL-90/24). Information concerning solid waste management units is discussed in the Hanford Facility Dangerous Waste Permit Application, General Information Portion (DOE/RL-91-28, Appendix 2D).

Engelmann, R.H.

1997-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

429

Reed Reactor Facility Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the report of the operations, experiments, modifications, and other aspects of the Reed Reactor Facility for the year.

Frantz, Stephen G.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lunch & Learn Facilities &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" 3 #12;What are F&A costs? OMB Circular A-21 provides guidance on F&A costs F&A a.k.a. Overhead a #12;F&A Rate Development Process FSU's process must be designed to ensure that Federal sponsors do usage ­ Allocate facilities costs ­ Provide productivity analysis Space survey tool WebSpace ­ On-line

McQuade, D. Tyler

431

ARM - SGP Intermediate Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtended Facility

432

Facilities | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataCombined Heat & PowerEnergy BlogExchangeSummary TableFacilities

433

Environmental assessment: South microwave communication facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Western Area Power Administration (Western) is proposing to construct, operate, and maintain eight microwave repeater stations in southwestern Colorado, southeastern Utah, and northern Arizona, in order to meet the minimum fade criteria established by the Western Systems Coordinating Council (WSCC) for the operation and protection of electric power systems. The proposed microwave facilities would increase the reliability of communication. This environmental assessment (EA) describes the existing environmental conditions and the impacts from construction of the eight microwave communication facilities. The EA was prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, the Council on Environmental Quality Regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508), and the Department of Energy Guidelines (52 FR 47662, December 15, 1987). The proposed project would consist of constructing eight microwave facilities, each of which would include a self-supported lattice tower, an equipment building, a propane tank, distribution lines to provide electric power to the sites, and access roads to the sites. The facilities would be constructed in San Miguel and Montezuma Counties in Colorado, San Juan County, Utah, and Navajo, Apache, Coconino, and Yavapai Counties in Arizona. 20 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility | ORNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BTRIC CNMS CSMB CFTF Working with CFTF HFIR MDF NTRC OLCF SNS Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Home | User Facilities | CFTF CFTF | Carbon Fiber Technology Facility SHARE Oak...

435

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Structural Concrete, May 29, 2009 May 29, 2009 Nuclear Facility...

436

Preliminary Measurements From A New Flat Plate Facility For Aerodynamic Research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the design and preliminary measurements used in the characterisation of a new flat plate research facility. The facility is designed specifically to aid in the understanding of entropy generation throughout the boundary layer with special attention given to non-equilibrium flows. Hot-wire measurements were obtained downstream of two turbulence generating grids. The turbulence intensity, integral and dissipation length scale ranges measured are 1.6%-7%, 5mm-17mm and 0.7mm-7mm, respectively. These values compared well to existing correlations. The flow downstream of both grids was found to be homogenous and isotropic. Flow visualisation is employed to determine aerodynamic parameters such as flow 2-dimensionality and the effect of the flap angle on preventing separation at the leading edge. The flow was found to be 2-dimensional over all measurement planes. The non-dimensional pressure distribution of a modern turbine blade suction surface is simulated on the flat plate through the use of a variable upper wall. The Reynolds number range based on wetted plate length and inlet velocity is 70,000-4,000,000.

D. M. McEligot; D. W. Nigg; E. J. Walsh; D. Hernon; M.R.D. Davies

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

eScholarship provides open access, scholarly publishing services to the University of California and delivers a dynamic research platform to scholars worldwide. Lawrence Berkeley...

438

Proof-of-Principle Detonation Driven, Linear Electric Generator Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Atmospheric initial mixtures of oxygen with hydrogen, propane, and methane were detonated. A load wall. Nomenclature A Piston face area, m2 CJ Chapman-Jouguet property cp Constant pressure heat capacity, kJ/(kg·K) F COMBUSTION via detonation releases the chemical energy of a reactive mixture with higher efficiency compared

Texas at Arlington, University of

439

Property Tax Exemption for Wind Energy Generation Facilities (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

[http://nebraskalegislature.gov/FloorDocs/101/PDF/Slip/LB1048.pdf Nebraska Legislative Bill 1048 (LB1048)] created a nameplate capacity tax that replaced the Nebraska Department of Revenue's...

440

Ottawa Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(UtilityCounty,Orleans County, Vermont:Ottawa County, Kansas Bennington,Station

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

WWTP Power Generation Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDS data Jump to: navigation,InformationWSP FLAKPrepWWTP

442

Blackburn Landfill Co-Generation Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS PAGE ISJump to:

443

Brent Run Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarre BiomassTHIS

444

Grand Blanc Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio: Energy ResourcesGordon, Alabama:5 Climate Zone Subtype855°,Grand

445

Peoples Generating Station Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,

446

Generating Facility Rate-Making | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligenceGainSpanRate-Making Jump to: navigation, search This

447

Faulkner I Energy Generation Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSan Leandro,LawFEMAProject JumpTechnologies FST Jump

448

Form:Energy Generation Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6Theoretical vsFlintFluxInput your dataset name below to

449

Category:Energy Generation Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWendeGuoCatalyst Renewables Jump to:En Español Jump to:source

450

Template:Energy Generation Facilities by Sector | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:Taos County,TeesAtlasTabs JumpDatabusNavDivEnd

451

Template:Energy Generation Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty LtdSteen,Ltd Jump to:Taos County,TeesAtlasTabs JumpDatabusNavDivEndIncludes

452

Electric Generating and Transmission Facilities – Emissions Management (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section details responsibilities of the Iowa Utility Board, including the policies for electricity rate-making for the state of Iowa, certification of natural gas providers, and other policies...

453

On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus for Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L ABORATORY On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlusemployer. On-Site Generation Simulation with EnergyPlus forin modeling distributed generation (DG), including DG with

Stadler, Michael; Firestone, Ryan; Curtil, Dimitri; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Waste minimization at a plutonium processing facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of Los Alamos National Laboratory`s (LANL) mission to reduce the nuclear danger throughout the world, the plutonium processing facility at LANL maintains expertise and skills in nuclear weapons technologies as well as leadership in all peaceful applications of plutonium technologies, including fuel fabrication for terrestrial and space reactors and heat sources and thermoelectric generators for space missions. Another near-term challenge resulted from two safety assessments performed by the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and the U.S. Department of Energy during the past two years. These assessments have necessitated the processing and stabilization of plutonium contained in tons of residues so that they can be stored safely for an indefinite period. This report describes waste streams and approaches to waste reduction of plutonium management.

Pillay, K.K.S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

METHODOLOGIES FOR REVIEW OF THE HEALTH AND SAFETY ASPECTS OF PROPOSED NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL SITES AND FACILITIES. VOLUME 9 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emergencies, Le. , accidents at nuclear facilities, there isas a result of nuclear accidents; these are the Protectiveassociated with a nuclear accident is of greater importance

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Canyon Facilities - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone6Energy,MUSEUM DISPLAY STATUS4Tours SHARE ToursCanyon Facilities

458

NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Facilities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | National NuclearoverAcquisitionEnergy153014TheFacilities NREL's

459

ARM - SGP Extended Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUC :ProductsSCM Forcing Data DerivedInstrumentsPolarExtended Facility SGP Related

460

Accelerator Test Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects ofAboutTest Facility Vitaly Yakimenko October 6-7,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "distributed generation facilities" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery Act Milestone Complete!

462

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery Act Milestone

463

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery Act MilestoneOctober

464

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery Act

465

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary 20, 2015

466

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary 20, 2015June

467

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary 20,

468

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary 20,August

469

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [Facility News] Final Recovery ActJanuary

470

ARM - Guest Instrument Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX News GangesListGreenhouse

471

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3, 200828,15, 2005 [Facility

472

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3, 200828,15, 2005 [Facility31,

473

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October 28, 2010 [Facility

474

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October 28, 2010 [FacilityUser

475

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October15, 2005 [Facility

476

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010 [DataDatastreamstoms3,4,3,October15, 2005 [Facility31,

477

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] New Instrumentation on

478

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] New Instrumentation

479

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] New

480

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew Look for

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481

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew Look

482

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew Look15, 2004

483

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew Look15,

484

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew Look15,August

485

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNew

486

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugust 15, 2004

487

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugust 15,

488

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugust

489

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugustHigh Speed

490

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugustHigh

491

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News] NewNewAugustHighArctic

492

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]

493

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster Plan Deflects

494

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster Plan

495

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster PlanFebruary

496

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster PlanFebruary5,

497

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster

498

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster9, 2011

499

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster9, 201125, 2011

500

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered‰PNGExperience4AJ01)3, 2010September 30, 2004 [Facility News]Disaster9, 201125,