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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A. E.; Copp, J. F. . 111991. Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field. Proceedings of () ; () : Sixteenth workshop on...

2

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids from the Coso geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Relationships in soluble and insoluble gases preclude derivation of these waters from a common parent by boiling or condensation alone. These two regions may

3

Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,...

4

Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

5

,"Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

6

New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs, Wet (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

7

,"New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

8

,"New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion...

9

,"California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

10

,"California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

11

,"Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

12

,"Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ame","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

13

,"Federal Offshore California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Federal Offshore California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

14

,"California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease...

15

,"New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves,...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation",10,"Annua...

16

Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 13 1980's 23 25 1990's 25 23 30 46 56 44 38 30 28 27 2000's 29 26 31 32 32 29 18 20 19 29 2010's 38 48 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Alabama Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

17

California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 249 1980's 307 1,110 1,249 1,312 1,252 1990's 1,229 995 987 976 1,077 1,195 1,151 498 437 488 2000's 500 490 459 456 412 776 756 752 702 731 2010's 722 711 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

18

Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Michigan Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 733 1980's 883 758 719 824 774 689 577 569 491 432 1990's 408 437 352 328 357 326 347 281 228 227 2000's 214 159 214 269 193 153 192 179 148 77 2010's 72 77 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

19

Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Miscellaneous States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 14 1980's 34 12 27 31 14 25 41 13 28 39 1990's 22 14 11 9 11 32 28 31 17 54 2000's 19 19 20 14 12 14 19 15 9 78 2010's 10 104 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

20

Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,038 1980's 1,374 1,228 1,060 959 867 710 691 691 616 581 1990's 573 572 624 502 611 879 824 850 794 713 2000's 652 488 561 450 362 384 347 365 223 362 2010's 334 318 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Arkansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 166 1980's 194 184 174 194 189 157 150 145 157 145 1990's 67 136 133 93 85 104 89 56 38 41 2000's 39 30 38 37 40 46 44 37 12 20 2010's 29 46 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

22

California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 307 1980's 265 265 325 344 256 254 261 243 220 233 1990's 228 220 196 135 145 109 120 129 116 233 2000's 244 185 197 173 188 269 208 211 150 168 2010's 178 172 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

23

Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Montana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 51 1980's 122 89 81 108 77 91 98 97 101 68 1990's 86 66 61 53 55 53 51 42 52 67 2000's 70 85 94 112 130 161 195 219 197 312 2010's 302 270 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

24

Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - North Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 765 1980's 916 1,040 832 775 690 632 567 488 249 237 1990's 241 192 160 120 134 133 255 287 183 260 2000's 186 168 159 139 107 98 90 73 78 53 2010's 73 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

25

California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 175 1980's 207 162 103 114 162 185 149 155 158 141 1990's 110 120 100 108 108 115 112 143 153 174 2000's 203 194 218 196 184 186 161 154 81 91 2010's 92 102 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

26

Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2 1980's 11 14 12 19 17 13 17 19 19 22 1990's 8 10 8 6 47 27 24 26 20 29 2000's 27 25 25 25 19 30 36 34 34 32 2010's 111 98 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Kentucky Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

27

Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 108 1980's 122 99 86 64 90 81 69 62 69 57 1990's 53 45 55 59 117 110 119 112 106 100 2000's 93 96 102 92 88 87 50 110 1 7 2010's 30 2 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 Florida Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After

28

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 181 1980's 200 259 206 173 208 167 190 219 177 236 1990's 510 682 762 1,162 1,088 1,072 1,055 533 772 781 2000's 960 1,025 1,097 1,186 1,293 1,326 1,541 1,838 2,010 1,882 2010's 2,371 2,518 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

29

California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,961 1980's 3,345 2,660 2,663 2,546 2,507 1990's 2,400 2,213 2,093 1,982 1,698 1,619 1,583 1,820 1,879 2,150 2000's 2,198 1,922 1,900 1,810 2,006 2,585 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2010's 2,282 2,532 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

30

Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 3,360 2,391 2,128 1,794 1,741 1990's 1,554 1,394 1,167 926 980 1,001 1,039 1,016 911 979 2000's 807 796 670 586 557 588 561 641 1,235 1,072 2010's 679 639 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

31

California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California - San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,253 1980's 2,713 2,664 2,465 2,408 2,270 2,074 2,006 2,033 1,947 1,927 1990's 1,874 1,818 1,738 1,676 1,386 1,339 1,304 1,494 1,571 1,685 2000's 1,665 1,463 1,400 1,365 1,549 2,041 1,701 1,749 1,632 2,002 2010's 1,949 2,179 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

32

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers Modeled by CRiSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved Gas in the Snake and Columbia Rivers 1969-1984 Modeled by CRiSP Pamela Shaw Columbia Basin Research School of Fisheries, UW #12;Introduction These dissolved gas profiles for 1969-1984 were created using CRiSP and historic spill and flow data. In CRiSP the gas going into the tailwater

Washington at Seattle, University of

33

,"U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves...

34

Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 449 251 260 207 231 1990's 207 207 154 157 168 148 157 130 98 120 2000's 129 145 84 79 61 63 56 65 686 513 2010's 107 51 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31 LA, State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves,

35

Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 2 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 955 1980's 921 806 780 747 661 570 517 512 428 430 1990's 407 352 308 288 299 245 252 235 204 202 2000's 115 65 70 81 76 109 118 137 72 72 2010's 134 924 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

36

New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - West Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 151 1980's 156 150 146 180 194 181 214 213 259 178 1990's 184 156 127 107 97 119 108 106 98 92 2000's 115 99 103 89 90 98 82 87 86 82 2010's 105 143 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

37

Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Utah Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 367 1980's 414 335 325 360 341 391 410 471 475 442 1990's 455 469 309 289 286 277 301 310 209 321 2000's 348 303 359 299 290 308 317 368 321 601 2010's 631 909 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

38

Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Kansas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 167 1980's 185 139 112 132 110 115 132 115 103 101 1990's 114 115 94 93 75 67 82 51 60 52 2000's 40 105 66 85 80 83 82 83 85 83 2010's 79 127 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

39

North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) North Dakota Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 201 1980's 239 253 248 257 267 331 293 276 266 313 1990's 334 243 266 274 275 263 255 257 261 250 2000's 264 270 315 316 320 343 357 417 484 1,070 2010's 1,717 2,511 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

40

Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Ohio Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,047 1980's 1,417 800 984 1,635 1,178 938 898 594 480 589 1990's 371 376 381 343 315 355 399 391 342 402 2000's 469 340 346 304 208 184 174 101 99 97 2010's 90 74 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 4 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,416 1980's 1,292 1,005 890 765 702 684 596 451 393 371 1990's 301 243 228 215 191 209 246 368 394 182 2000's 176 140 150 136 165 148 110 117 127 96 2010's 91 61 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

42

California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) California State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 226 1980's 160 244 232 221 206 1990's 188 55 59 63 59 56 47 54 39 58 2000's 86 80 85 76 85 89 85 79 54 53 2010's 63 79 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

43

Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas - RRC District 1 Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 209 1980's 172 180 216 175 170 260 241 205 204 251 1990's 333 401 361 191 151 248 446 68 51 67 2000's 69 43 47 48 45 57 61 72 60 67 2010's 267 900 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

44

Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore - Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 474 320 541 522 532 494 1990's 446 407 691 574 679 891 794 1,228 1,224 1,383 2000's 1,395 1,406 1,267 1,119 886 547 378 377 465 629 2010's 689 539 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

45

West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) West Virginia Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 76 1980's 122 63 83 86 73 73 65 150 141 98 1990's 86 159 198 190 133 74 71 59 43 88 2000's 98 48 21 23 20 19 16 16 23 24 2010's 29 52 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

46

Table 13: Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, an  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" : Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011" "billion cubic feet" ,,"Changes in Reserves During 2011" ,"Published",,,,,,,,"New Reservoir" ,"Proved",,"Revision","Revision",,,,"New Field","Discoveries","Estimated","Proved" ,"Reserves","Adjustments","Increases","Decreases","Sales","Acquisitions","Extensions","Discoveries","in Old Fields","Production","Reserves" "State and Subdivision",40543,"(+,-)","(+)","(-)","(-)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(+)","(-)",40908

47

Raman gas analyzer for determining the composition of natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe a prototype of a Raman gas analyzer designed for measuring the composition of natural gas. Operation of the gas analyzer was tested on a real natural gas. We show that our Raman gas analyzer prototype...

M. A. Buldakov; B. V. Korolev; I. I. Matrosov…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

The effects of total dissolved gas on chum salmon fry survival, growth, gas bubble disease, and seawater tolerance  

SciTech Connect

Chum salmon Oncorhynchus keta alevin developing in gravel habitats downstream of Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River are exposed to elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) when water is spilled at the dam to move migrating salmon smolts downstream to the Pacific Ocean. Current water quality criteria for the management of dissolved gas in dam tailwaters were developed primarily to protect salmonid smolts and are assumed to be protective of alevin if adequate depth compensation is provided. We studied whether chum salmon alevin exposed to six levels of dissolved gas ranging from 100% to 130% TDG at three development periods between hatch and emergence (hereafter early, middle, and late stage) suffered differential mortality, growth, gas bubble disease, or seawater tolerance. Each life stage was exposed for 50 d (early stage), 29 d (middle stage), or 16 d (late stage) beginning at 13, 34, and 37 d post-hatch, respectively, through 50% emergence. The mortality for all stages from exposure to emergence was estimated to be 8% (95% confidence interval (CI) of 4% to 12%) when dissolved gas levels were between 100% and 117% TDG. Mortality significantly increased as dissolved gas levels rose above 117% TDG,; with the lethal concentration that produced 50% mortality (LC50 ) was estimated to be 128.7% TDG (95% CI of 127.2% to 130.2% TDG) in the early and middle stages. By contrast, there was no evidence that dissolved gas level significantly affected growth in any life stage except that the mean wet weight at emergence of early stage fish exposed to 130% TDG was significantly less than the modeled growth of unexposed fish. The proportion of fish afflicted with gas bubble disease increased with increasing gas concentrations and occurred most commonly in the nares and gastrointestinal tract. Early stage fish exhibited higher ratios of filament to lamellar gill chloride cells than late stage fish, and these ratios increased and decreased for early and late stage fish, respectively, as gas levels increased; however, there were no significant differences in mortality between life stages after 96 h in seawater. The study results suggest that current water quality guidelines for the management of dissolved gas appear to offer a conservative level of protection to chum salmon alevin incubating in gravel habitat downstream of Bonneville Dam.

Geist, David R.; Linley, Timothy J.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Deng, Zhiqun

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Federal Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 6,773 6,487 6,315 6,120 6,738 7,471 7,437 7,913 7,495 7,093 2000's 7,010 8,649 8,090 7,417 6,361 5,904 4,835 4,780 5,106 5,223 2010's 5,204 5,446 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation, as of Dec. 31

50

Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Louisiana - South Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 2,304 1980's 2,134 1,871 1,789 1,582 1,488 1,792 1,573 1,380 1,338 1,273 1990's 1,106 995 853 649 678 720 627 599 630 599 2000's 492 483 427 368 389 427 415 503 471 506 2010's 499 490 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

51

Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 10,832 10,753 9,735 9,340 9,095 9,205 1990's 8,999 8,559 8,667 7,880 7,949 7,787 8,160 7,786 7,364 7,880 2000's 6,833 6,089 6,387 6,437 6,547 7,003 7,069 7,530 7,559 8,762 2010's 10,130 13,507 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease

52

Total Dissolved Gas Monitoring in Chum Salmon Spawning Gravels Below Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted research to determine whether total dissolved gas concentrations are elevated in chum salmon redds during spring spill operations at Bonneville Dam. The study involved monitoring the total dissolved gas levels at egg pocket depth and in the river at two chum salmon spawning locations downstream from Bonneville Dam. Dissolved atmospheric gas supersaturation generated by spill from Bonneville Dam may diminish survival of chum (Oncorhynchus keta) salmon when sac fry are still present in the gravel downstream from Bonneville Dam. However, no previous work has been conducted to determine whether total dissolved gas (TDG) levels are elevated during spring spill operations within incubation habitats. The guidance used by hydropower system managers to provide protection for pre-emergent chum salmon fry has been to limit TDG to 105% after allowing for depth compensation. A previous literature review completed in early 2006 shows that TDG levels as low as 103% have been documented to cause mortality in sac fry. Our study measured TDG in the incubation environment to evaluate whether these levels were exceeded during spring spill operations. Total dissolved gas levels were measured within chum salmon spawning areas near Ives Island and Multnomah Falls on the Columbia River. Water quality sensors screened at egg pocket depth and to the river were installed at both sites. At each location, we also measured dissolved oxygen, temperature, specific conductance, and water depth to assist with the interpretation of TDG results. Total dissolved gas was depth-compensated to determine when levels were high enough to potentially affect sac fry. This report provides detailed descriptions of the two study sites downstream of Bonneville Dam, as well as the equipment and procedures employed to monitor the TDG levels at the study sites. Results of the monitoring at both sites are then presented in both text and graphics. The findings and recommendations for further research are discussed, followed by a listing of the references cited in the report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Geist, David R.; Panther, Jennifer L.; Dawley, Earl

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

53

On-line fast response device and method for measuring dissolved gas in a fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device for the measurement of dissolved gas within a fluid. The fluid, substantially a liquid, is pumped into a pipe. The flow of the fluid is temporally restricted, creating one or more low pressure regions. A measurement indicative of trapped air is taken before and after the restriction. The amount of dissolved air is calculated from the difference between the first and second measurements. Preferably measurements indicative of trapped air is obtained from one or more pressure transducers, capacitance transducers, or combinations thereof. In the alternative, other methods such as those utilizing x-rays or gamma rays may also be used to detect trapped air. Preferably, the fluid is a hydraulic fluid, whereby dissolved air in the fluid is detected.

Tutu, Narinder Kumar (Manorville, NY)

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

54

Composition for absorbing hydrogen from gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen storage composition is provided which defines a physical sol-gel matrix having an average pore size of less than 3.5 angstroms which effectively excludes gaseous metal hydride poisons while permitting hydrogen gas to enter. The composition is useful for separating hydrogen gas from diverse gas streams which may have contaminants that would otherwise render the hydrogen absorbing material inactive.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC); Lee, Myung W. (Aiken, SC)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 264 1980's 369 271 365 326 296 341 189 155 339 174 1990's 250 334 292 163 202 634 338 187 218 424 2000's 249 477 331 124 97 79 65 73 820 169 2010's 186 160 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages: Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields, Wet After Lease Separation

56

Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Alaska Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 27,217 1980's 28,567 28,676 30,814 30,408 30,356 31,092 30,893 30,732 6,269 6,198 1990's 6,927 6,729 6,723 6,494 6,487 6,265 6,080 7,716 7,275 7,209 2000's 6,768 6,592 6,376 6,267 6,469 6,362 8,886 10,752 6,627 8,093 2010's 7,896 8,535 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

57

New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,823 1980's 1,689 1,649 1,520 1,503 1,569 1,490 1,446 1,445 1,453 1,378 1990's 1,435 1,554 1,597 1,585 1,641 1,678 1,693 1,420 1,443 1,578 2000's 1,588 1,447 1,482 1,545 1,578 1,661 1,772 1,841 1,755 1,982 2010's 2,213 2,552 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

58

New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) New Mexico - East Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 1,672 1980's 1,533 1,499 1,374 1,323 1,375 1,309 1,232 1,232 1,194 1,200 1990's 1,251 1,398 1,470 1,478 1,544 1,559 1,585 1,314 1,345 1,486 2000's 1,473 1,348 1,379 1,456 1,488 1,563 1,690 1,754 1,669 1,900 2010's 2,108 2,409 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014 Referring Pages:

59

Lower 48 States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Lower 48 States Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1970's 32,208 1980's 33,443 32,870 31,268 31,286 30,282 29,515 28,684 27,457 26,609 26,611 1990's 26,242 25,088 24,701 23,551 23,913 24,532 24,715 24,666 23,385 24,206 2000's 23,065 23,232 23,165 22,285 21,180 21,874 20,754 21,916 22,396 25,290 2010's 27,850 34,288 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 8/1/2013 Next Release Date: 8/1/2014

60

Pressure, temperature, and dissolved gas dependence of dielectric breakdown in water.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been shown experimentally that the optical breakdown strength of water is a pressure dependent quantity growing with increasing pressure. The dependence of the breakdown strength on temperature and dissolved gas concentration over a larger range of pressures will be observed. Using a custom fabricated pressure vessel and high?power Nd:YAG laser breakdown events will be generated and observed over a range of pressures from 0 to 25 kpsi. Observations of breakdown events will be made using a high?speed photodetector located behind the pressure vessel’s optical windows. Dissolved gas concentration will be controlled and varied using a custom water preparation system over a range from water’s vapor pressure (?20 torr) to atmospheric pressure.Temperature will be monitored using a thermocouple attached to the pressure vessel and the temperature dependence will be measured over a range from 20 to 35 °C. A comparison between current single detector methods and previous imaging methods of using breakdown to determine absolute pressure will then be made. [Work supported by Impulse Devices Inc.

Jonathan Sukovich; R. Glynn Holt

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Author's personal copy Chemical and isotopic composition of high-molecular-weight dissolved organic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and radiocarbon (14 C) signatures, and relative molecular composition using pyrolysis-gas chromatography of 19­20 at lower salinity stations with a strong influence by terrestrial DOM and 12­15 at higher salinity stations with more freshly photosynthesized marine DOM. While OC-normalized protein contents

Guo, Laodong

62

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node No. 1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node No. 2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred. 5 figures.

Gross, K.C.

1995-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

63

Method for designing gas tag compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags such as employed in a nuclear reactor gas tagging failure detection system, a method for designing gas tagging compositions utilizes an analytical approach wherein the final composition of a first canister of tag gas as measured by a mass spectrometer is designated as node #1. Lattice locations of tag nodes in multi-dimensional space are then used in calculating the compositions of a node #2 and each subsequent node so as to maximize the distance of each node from any combination of tag components which might be indistinguishable from another tag composition in a reactor fuel assembly. Alternatively, the measured compositions of tag gas numbers 1 and 2 may be used to fix the locations of nodes 1 and 2, with the locations of nodes 3-N then calculated for optimum tag gas composition. A single sphere defining the lattice locations of the tag nodes may be used to define approximately 20 tag nodes, while concentric spheres can extend the number of tag nodes to several hundred.

Gross, Kenny C. (1433 Carriage La., Bolingbrook, IL 60440)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Table 19. Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, : Reported proved nonproducing reserves of crude oil, lease condensate, nonassociated gas, associated dissolved gas, and total gas (wet after lease separation), 2011 a Lease Nonassociated Associated Total Crude Oil Condensate Gas Dissolved Gas Gas State and Subdivision (Million bbls) (Million bbls) (Bcf) (Bcf) (Bcf) Alaska 566 0 288 63 351 Lower 48 States 8,483 880 104,676 13,197 117,873 Alabama 1 0 101 1 102 Arkansas 0 0 5,919 0 5,919 California 542 2 267 128 395 Coastal Region Onshore 248 0 0 20 20 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 69 0 0 23 23 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 163 0 265 54 319 State Offshore 62 2 2 31 33 Colorado 208 30 5,316 1,478 6,794 Florida 4 0 4 0 4 Kansas 4 0 244 39 283 Kentucky 0 0 75 0 75 Louisiana 152 29 14,905 257 15,162 North 30 10 13,820 12 13,832 South Onshore 113 17 1,028 232 1,260 State Offshore 9 2 57 13 70 Michigan 0

65

Coupling of a two phase gas liquid compositional 3D Darcy flow with a 1D compositional free gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coupling of a two phase gas liquid compositional 3D Darcy flow with a 1D compositional free gas. Masson1 , L. Trenty2 , Y. Zhang1 Coupling of a two phase gas liquid compositional 3D Darcy flow #12 analysis K, Brenner1 , R. Masson1 , L. Trenty2 , Y. Zhang1 Coupling of a two phase gas liquid compositional

Ribot, Magali

66

Effects of Total Dissolved Gas on Chum Salmon Fry Incubating in the Lower Columbia River  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in FY 2007 for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District, to characterize the effects of total dissolved gas (TDG) on the incubating fry of chum salmon (Onchorhynchus keta) in the lower Columbia River. The tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of three objectives are summarized: * to conduct a field monitoring program at the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites, collecting empirical data on TDG to obtain a more thorough understanding of TDG levels during different river stage scenarios (i.e., high-water year versus low-water year) * to conduct laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry at gas levels likely to occur downstream from Bonneville Dam * to sample chum salmon sac fry during Bonneville Dam spill operations to determine if there is a physiological response to TDG levels. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the study methdology and results are provided in Appendixes A through D.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Panther, Jenny; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Dawley, Earl M.; Elston, Ralph A.

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

67

Prediction of Total Dissolved Gas (TDG) at Hydropower Dams throughout the Columbia  

SciTech Connect

The network of dams throughout the Columbia River Basin (CRB) are managed for irrigation, hydropower production, flood control, navigation, and fish passage that frequently result in both voluntary and involuntary spillway releases. The entrainment of air in spillway releases and the subsequent exchange of atmospheric gasses into solution during passage through the stilling basin cause elevated levels of total dissolved gas (TDG) saturation. Physical processes that affect TDG exchange at hydropower facilities have been characterized throughout the CRB in site-specific studies and at real-time water quality monitoring stations. These data have been used to develop predictive models of TDG exchange which are site specific and account for the fate of spillway and powerhouse flows in the tailrace channel and resultant transport and exchange in route to the downstream dam. Currently, there exists a need to summarize the findings from operational and structural TDG abatement programs conducted throughout the CRB and for the development of a generalized prediction model that pools data collected at multiple projects with similar structural attributes. A generalized TDG exchange model can be tuned to specific projects and coupled with water regulation models to allow for the formulation of optimal water regulation schedules subject to water quality constraints for TDG supersaturation. It is proposed to develop a methodology for predicting TDG levels downstream of hydropower facilities with similar structural properties as a function of a set of variables that affect TDG exchange; such as tailwater depth, spill discharge and pattern, project head, and entrainment of powerhouse releases.

Pasha, MD Fayzul K [ORNL] [ORNL; Hadjerioua, Boualem [ORNL] [ORNL; Stewart, Kevin M [ORNL] [ORNL; Bender, Merlynn [Bureau of Reclamation] [Bureau of Reclamation; Schneider, Michael L. [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Total Dissolved Gas Effects on Incubating Chum Salmon Below Bonneville Dam  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Portland District), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook a project in 2006 to look further into issues of total dissolved gas (TDG) supersaturation in the lower Columbia River downstream of Bonneville Dam. In FY 2008, the third year of the project, PNNL conducted field monitoring and laboratory toxicity testing to both verify results from 2007 and answer some additional questions about how salmonid sac fry respond to elevated TDG in the field and the laboratory. For FY 2008, three objectives were 1) to repeat the 2006-2007 field effort to collect empirical data on TDG from the Ives Island and Multnomah Falls study sites; 2) to repeat the static laboratory toxicity tests on hatchery chum salmon fry to verify 2007 results and to expose wild chum salmon fry to incremental increases in TDG, above those of the static test, until external symptoms of gas bubble disease were clearly present; and 3) to assess physiological responses to TDG levels in wild chum salmon sac fry incubating below Bonneville Dam during spill operations. This report summarizes the tasks conducted and results obtained in pursuit of the three objectives. Chapter 1 discusses the field monitoring, Chapter 2 reports the findings of the laboratory toxicity tests, and Chapter 3 describes the field-sampling task. Each chapter contains an objective-specific introduction, description of the study site and methods, results of research, and discussion of findings. Literature cited throughout this report is listed in Chapter 4. Additional details on the monitoring methodology and results are provided in Appendices A and B included on the compact disc bound inside the back cover of the printed version of this report.

Arntzen, Evan V.; Hand, Kristine D.; Carter, Kathleen M.; Geist, David R.; Murray, Katherine J.; Dawley, Earl M.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Elston, Ralph A.; Vavrinec, John

2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

69

Apparatus for gas sorption measurement with integrated gas composition measurement device and gas mixing  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for testing of multiple material samples includes a gas delivery control system operatively connectable to the multiple material samples and configured to provide gas to the multiple material samples. Both a gas composition measurement device and pressure measurement devices are included in the apparatus. The apparatus includes multiple selectively openable and closable valves and a series of conduits configured to selectively connect the multiple material samples individually to the gas composition device and the pressure measurement devices by operation of the valves. A mixing system is selectively connectable to the series of conduits and is operable to cause forced mixing of the gas within the series of conduits to achieve a predetermined uniformity of gas composition within the series of conduits and passages.

Micklash. II, Kenneth James; Dutton, Justin James; Kaye, Steven

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

70

Compositional controls on melting and dissolving a salt into a ternary melt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dissolves into a multi-component...mechanism for heat and mass transport, building from the classical...for much lower heat fluxes than...greater latent heat. (c) Dissolution...solid into a multi-component...developed a family of similarity...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Dissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan de Fuca Ridge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan deDissolved inorganic carbon isotopic composition of low-temperature axial and ridge-flank hydrothermal fluids of the Juan de Fuca Ridge Brett D. Walker a,, Matthew D. McCarthy a , Andrew T. Fisher b

Fisher, Andrew

72

Table 13. Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

: Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 : Associated-dissolved natural gas proved reserves, reserves changes, and production, wet after lease separation, 2011 billion cubic feet Published New Reservoir Proved Revision Revision New Field Discoveries Estimated Proved Reserves Adjustments Increases Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions Discoveries in Old Fields Production Reserves State and Subdivision 12/31/10 (+,-) (+) (-) (-) (+) (+) (+) (+) (-) 12/31/11 Alaska 7,896 -1 843 79 2 51 3 0 0 176 8,535 Lower 48 States 27,850 391 7,245 5,874 1,336 1,833 5,954 611 160 2,546 34,288 Alabama 38 3 2 0 9 20 0 2 0 8 48 Arkansas 29 24 50 13 38 0 0 0 0 6 46 California 2,282 929 1,424 1,927 1 11 74 0 0 260 2,532 Coastal Region Onshore 178 15 21 31 0 0 1 0 0 12 172 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 92 6 12 4 0 3 0 0 0 7 102 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1,949 907 1,382 1,892 0 0 70 0 0 237 2,179 State Offshore 63 1 9 0 1 8 3 0 0 4 79

73

,"U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease Separation" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

74

Effects of gas composition on the performance and emissions of compressed natural gas engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is considered to be a promising alternative ... energy security. However, since the composition of natural gas fuel varies with location, climate and other ... emission characteristics and performance...

Byung Hyouk Min; Jin Taek Chung; Ho Young Kim; Simsoo Park

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of Natural Gas Composition on the Design of Natural Gas Liquid Demethanizers ... The hydrocarbon composition of natural gas varies fairly significantly from location to location. ... The relative amounts of methane (C1) and ethane (C2) have a profound effect on the cryogenic high-pressure distillation column used to recover the C2 and heavier components as a bottoms product called “natural gas liquid” (NGL). ...

William L. Luyben

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chemical Composition of Aquatic Dissolved Organic Matter in Five Boreal Forest Catchments Sampled in Spring and Fall Seasons  

SciTech Connect

The chemical composition and carbon isotope signature of aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) in five boreal forest catchments in Scandinavia were investigated. The DOM was isolated during spring and fall seasons using a reverse osmosis technique. The DOM samples were analyzed by elemental analysis, FT-IR, solid-state CP-MAS {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. In addition, the relative abundance of carbon isotopes ({sup 12}C, {sup 13}C, {sup 14}C) in the samples was measured. There were no significant differences in the chemical composition or carbon isotope signature of the DOM sampled in spring and fall seasons. Also, differences in DOM composition between the five catchments were minor. Compared to reference peat fulvic and humic acids, all DOM samples were richer in O-alkyl carbon and contained less aromatic and phenolic carbon, as shown by FT-IR, {sup 13}C-NMR, and C-1s NEXAFS spectroscopy. The DOM was clearly enriched in {sup 14}C relative to the NBS oxalic acid standard of 1950, indicating that the aquatic DOM contained considerable amounts of organic carbon younger than about 50 years. The weight-based C:N ratios of 31 {+-} 6 and the {delta}{sup 13}Cvalues of -29 {+-} 2{per_thousand}indicate that the isolated DOM is of terrestrial rather than aquatic origin. We conclude that young, hydrophilic carbon compounds of terrestrial origin are predominant in the samples investigated, and that the composition of the aquatic DOM in the studied boreal forest catchments is rather stable during low to intermediate flow conditions.

Schumacher,M.; Christl, I.; Vogt, R.; Barmettler, K.; Jacobsen, C.; Kretzschmar, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A method for the determination of dissolved organic carbon in sea water by gas chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of organic matter was carried out at elevated temperature and pressure after collection of a large number of samples. The resulting carbon dioxide was flushed through a gas chromatograph with helium as the carrier gas and the signal was recorded on a strip... chart recorder. Chromatographic analysis time was approximately eleven minutes per sample with a precision of + Q. 1 mg C/l. The organic carbon content of the sample was determined by measurement of the peak area using an appropriate carbon dioxide...

Fredericks, Alan D

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Total Dissolved Gas submodel parameter calibration for use with CRiSP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas levels · included dissipation of gases in reservoirs · included entrainment of powerhouse waters which allows for powerhouse-passed water to become gassed by spill water. The entrainment parameter that powerhouse water is either always or never mixed. CRiSP parameters generally reflect changes in the dam

Washington at Seattle, University of

79

Real-TIme Raman Gas Composition Analyzer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analyzer Analyzer Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research partners interested in implementing United States Provisional Patent Application entitled "Gas Sensing System Employing Raman Scattering". Disclosed in this application is a gas analyzing sensor that characterizes gaseous fuel, exhaust gases, or other process gas streams. The sensor reports concentrations of all majority gases at better than 0.3% accuracy in 1 second or less, and can be used for real-time gas analysis and system control. The sensor relies on novel techniques to enhance usually weak spontaneous Raman emissions from sample gases, enabling the application of Raman spectroscopy to rapid gas analysis. No commercially available sensor or sensing

80

California GAMA Special Study: An isotopic and dissolved gas investigation of nitrate source and transport to a public supply well in California's Central Valley  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates nitrate contamination of a deep municipal drinking water production well in Ripon, CA to demonstrate the utility of natural groundwater tracers in constraining the sources and transport of nitrate to deep aquifers in the Central Valley. The goal of the study was to investigate the origin (source) of elevated nitrate and the potential for the deep aquifer to attenuate anthropogenic nitrate. The site is ideal for such an investigation. The production well is screened from 165-325 feet below ground surface and a number of nearby shallow and deep monitoring wells were available for sampling. Furthermore, potential sources of nitrate contamination to the well had been identified, including a fertilizer supply plant located approximately 1000 feet to the east and local almond groves. A variety of natural isotopic and dissolved gas tracers including {sup 3}H-{sup 3}He groundwater age and the isotopic composition of nitrate are applied to identify nitrate sources and to characterize nitrate transport. An advanced method for sampling production wells is employed to help identify contaminant contributions from specific screen intervals. Nitrate transport: Groundwater nitrate at this field site is not being actively denitrified. Groundwater parameters indicate oxic conditions, the dissolved gas data shows no evidence for excess nitrogen as the result of denitrification, and nitrate-N and -O isotope compositions do not display patterns typical of denitrification. Contaminant nitrate source: The ambient nitrate concentration in shallow groundwater at the Ripon site ({approx}12 mg/L as nitrate) is typical of shallow groundwaters affected by recharge from agricultural and urban areas. Nitrate concentrations in Ripon City Well 12 (50-58 mg/L as nitrate) are significantly higher than these ambient concentrations, indicating an additional source of anthropogenic nitrate is affecting groundwater in the capture zone of this municipal drinking water well. This study provides two new pieces of evidence that the Ripon Farm Services Plant is the source of elevated nitrate in Ripon City Well 12. (1) Chemical mass balance calculations using nitrate concentration, nitrate isotopic composition, and initial tritium activity all indicate that that the source water for elevated nitrate to Ripon City Well 12 is a very small component of the water produced by City Well 12 and thus must have extremely high nitrate concentration. The high source water nitrate concentration ({approx}1500 mg/L as nitrate) required by these mass balance calculations precludes common sources of nitrate such as irrigated agriculture, dairy wastewater, and septic discharge. Shallow groundwater under the Ripon Farm Services RFS plant does contain extremely high concentrations of nitrate (>1700 mg/L as nitrate). (2) Nitrogen and oxygen isotope compositions of nitrate indicate that the additional anthropogenic nitrate source to Ripon City Well 12 is significantly enriched in {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, an isotopic signature consistent with synthetic nitrate fertilizer, and not with human or animal wastewater discharge (i.e. dairy operations, septic system discharge, or municipal wastewater discharge), or with organic fertilizer. Monitoring wells on and near the RFS plant also have high {delta}{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}, and the plant has handled and stored synthetic nitrate fertilizer that will have this isotopic signature. The results described here highlight the complexity of attributing nitrate found in long screened, high capacity wells to specific sources. In this case, the presence of a very high concentration source near the well site combined with sampling using multiple isotopic tracer techniques and specialized depth-specific techniques allowed fingerprinting of the source in the mixed-age samples drawn from the production well.

Singleton, M J; Moran, J E; Esser, B K; Roberts, S K; Hillegonds, D J

2010-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Hydrothermal alteration and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago. Deep drill holes provide a complete transect across the thermal system and samples of the modern-day steam. The hydrothermal system was liquid-dominated prior to formation of the modern vapor-dominated regime at 0.25 to 0.28 Ma. Maximum

82

Rapid Analysis of Dissolved Methane, Ethylene, Acetylene and Ethane using Partition Coefficients and Headspace-Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......stations due to over pressurization of storage tanks (8). Monitoring dissolved C1-C2...municipal wastewater outflow, or petroleum storage facility. The 250 mL sampling vials were...determination of methane dissolved in seawater. Anal.Chem.62: 24082412 (1990......

Jasmine S. Lomond; Anthony Z. Tong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Defect Analysis of Vehicle Defect Analysis of Vehicle Compressed Natural Gas Composite Cylinder A China Paper on Type 4 Cylinder, translated and presented by J. P. Hsu, PhD, Smart Chemistry Reason for Defect Analysis of CNG Composite Cylinder * Safety Issue - Four explosion accidents of auto used CNG composite material cylinders resulting huge personnel and vehicles loss. * Low Compliance Rate - Inspect 12119 Auto used CNG composite cylinders and only 3868 are qualified with compliance rate of 32%. Plastic CNG Composite Cylinder Process Fitting Internal Plastic Liner External Composite Layer Metal Fitting HDPE Cylinder Liner * HDPE has a high density, great stiffness, good anti-permeability and high melting point, but poor environmental stress cracking Resistance (ESCR). * The defects of cylinder liner quality can be

84

Real-Time Raman Gas Composition Sensor.pdf  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensor Sensor Opportunity Technology/Capability Overview Benefits to Partner Development Status Contact The NETL Real-time Raman Gas Composition Analyzer determines the composition of a flowing gaseous sample in real-time and provides the concentration of each gas in that sample. . . . ‡ Testing partners would have the opportunity to evaluate the performance of the prototype system, implement new feed-forward controls, and may help shape the commercial product configuration ‡ This sensor will greatly benefit the power industry, as well as other industries utilizing gaseous input or output streams by enabling smarter control to increase process efficiency and reduce emissions ‡ We are seeking opportunities to field test the prototype instruments in power and industrial applications, as well

85

Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites (Hipercomp) for Gas Turbine Engine Applications  

SciTech Connect

This report covers work performed under the Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites (CFCC) program by GE Global Research and its partners from 1994 through 2005. The processing of prepreg-derived, melt infiltrated (MI) composite systems based on monofilament and multifilament tow SiC fibers is described. Extensive mechanical and environmental exposure characterizations were performed on these systems, as well as on competing Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) systems. Although current monofilament SiC fibers have inherent oxidative stability limitations due to their carbon surface coatings, the MI CMC system based on multifilament tow (Hi-Nicalon ) proved to have excellent mechanical, thermal and time-dependent properties. The materials database generated from the material testing was used to design turbine hot gas path components, namely the shroud and combustor liner, utilizing the CMC materials. The feasibility of using such MI CMC materials in gas turbine engines was demonstrated via combustion rig testing of turbine shrouds and combustor liners, and through field engine tests of shrouds in a 2MW engine for >1000 hours. A unique combustion test facility was also developed that allowed coupons of the CMC materials to be exposed to high-pressure, high-velocity combustion gas environments for times up to {approx}4000 hours.

Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm[sup 3]-atm)[sup 1/2]. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes. 3 figs.

Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

87

Acid gas scrubbing by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite immobilized liquid membrane suitable for acid gas scrubbing is disclosed. The membrane is a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous polymeric support, the solvent being selected from a class of highly polar solvents containing at least one atom selected from nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous and sulfur, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a solubility parameter of from about 7.5 to about 13.5 (cal/cm.sup.3 -atm).sup.1/2. Such solvents are homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. Also disclosed are methods of acid gas scrubbing of high- and low-Btu gas effluents with such solvent-swollen membranes.

Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

E ects of the Driving Force on the Composition of Natural Gas Hydrates Odd I. Levik(1) , Jean for storage and transport of natural gas. Storage of natural gas in the form of hydrate at elevated pressure concept) (Gud- mundsson et al. 1998). Natural gas hydrate contains up to 182 Sm3 gas per m3 hydrate

Gudmundsson, Jon Steinar

89

Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

299 Gas Composition and Oxygen Supply in the Root Environment of Substrates in Closed Hydroponic Abstract The objective of this study was to get more information about the root zone, mainly the gas and ethylene, a gas sampling system was used to get gas samples from the root zone. CO2 gas samples of 20 ml

Lieth, J. Heinrich

90

Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a composite immobilized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100 C and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation. 3 figs.

Matson, S.L.; Lee, E.K.L.; Friesen, D.T.; Kelly, D.J.

1989-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

91

Gas separation by composite solvent-swollen membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed a composite immobulized liquid membrane of a solvent-swollen polymer and a microporous organic or inorganic support, the solvent being at least one highly polar solvent containing at least one nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorous or sulfur atom, and having a boiling point of at least 100.degree. C. and a specified solubility parameter. The solvent or solvent mixture is homogeneously distributed through the solvent-swollen polymer from 20% to 95% by weight. The membrane is suitable for acid gas scrubbing and oxygen/nitrogen separation.

Matson, Stephen L. (Harvard, MA); Lee, Eric K. L. (Acton, MA); Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Kelly, Donald J. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabrics for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling of Multilayer Composite Fabrics for Gas Turbine Engine Containment Systems J. Sharda1 ; C of multilayer composite fabrics used in a gas turbine engine containment system is developed. Specifically: Tensile strength; Stress analysis; Stress strain relations; Fabrics; Composite materials; Finite element

Mobasher, Barzin

93

A method for measuring dissolved gases in pore waters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sep 5, 1973 ... Pore water intended for dissolved gas analysis is .... solubility values for 35gc, 21

2000-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Rapid Analysis of Dissolved Methane, Ethylene, Acetylene and Ethane using Partition Coefficients and Headspace-Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......technique, water samples are...high-purity inert gas, such as helium or nitrogen. The analytes...chromatographic gases including...purity air, nitrogen, and hydrogen...Deionized water was supplied...coefficient The solubility of gases in water changes with......

Jasmine S. Lomond; Anthony Z. Tong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and the active vapor-dominated geothermal system at The Geysers, CA are related to a composite hypabyssal granitic pluton emplaced beneath the field 1.1 to 1.2 million years ago....

96

Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor: Experimental measurements, model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Influence of gas composition on wafer temperature in a tungsten chemical vapor deposition reactor-wafer, lamp-heated chemical vapor deposition system were used to study the wafer temperature response to gas composition. A physically based simulation procedure for the process gas and wafer temperature was developed

Rubloff, Gary W.

97

Gas-phase detonation propagation in mixture composition gradients  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unconfined gas detonations in hydrocarbon-air mixtures by a sympathetic...Meeting (International) of the Combustion Institute, Bordeaux, France...and A. Linan1995Effects of heat release on triple flamesPhys...model for partially premixed hydrocarbon combustionCombust. Flame...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Preparation and characterization of composite membrane for high temperature gas separation  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop thin film palladium membranes for separation of hydrogen in high temperature applications. The authors plan to use electroless plating to deposit thin palladium films on microporous ceramic and silver substrates and then characterize the membrane in terms of permeability and selectivity for gas separation. To accomplish the research objective, the project requires three tasks: Development of a process for composite membrane fabrication; Characterization of composite membrane; and Development of theoretical model for hydrogen gas separation. The experimental procedures are described.

Ilias, S.; King, F.G.; Su, N.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characterization of Landfill Gas Composition at the Fresh Kills Municipal Solid-Waste Landfill ... The most common disposal method in the United States for municipal solid waste (MSW) is burial in landfills. ... Under the New Source Performance Standards and Emission Guidelines for MSW landfills, MSW operators are required to determine the nonmethane organic gas generation rate of their landfill through modeling and/or measurements. ...

Bart Eklund; Eric P. Anderson; Barry L. Walker; Don B. Burrows

1998-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Secondary porosity and permeability of coal vs. gas composition and pressure  

SciTech Connect

We have been investigating the sequestration of atmospheric pollutants by injection into coal seams while at the same time enhancing hydrocarbon productivity by displacement of methane with pollutants. We found that changing the composition of the gas sorbed into the coal changes the porosity and permeability of the coal natural-fracture system owing to gas-content changes, which cause matrix swelling or shrinkage due to relative adsorption of different gases. We collected sufficient information to develop a method for predicting the permeability and porosity of a coalbed as a function of the secondary porosity system (SPS) pressure and the gas content and composition of the primary porosity system (PPS). The method uses data from injection/falloff tests with water and/or a weaker adsorbing gas (WAG) than CH{sub 4} and a stronger adsorbing gas (SAG) than CH{sub 4}. Estimates of effective permeability to gas and water obtained from these tests are used with an iterative computation procedure subject to constraints to solve for equivalent SPS porosity and absolute permeability at atmospheric pressure. Once calibrated, the model can be used to predict a coalbed's permeability and porosity as a function of injection pressure and injected-fluid composition, which in turn are used to predict injection performance. The model is applicable to production forecasts to account for SPS permeability and porosity changes as reservoir pressure declines with changes in gas composition. This paper describes the new model and discusses well-test procedures to obtain the data required for model calibration. Also included are coal property estimates resulting from Alberta Medicine River (Manville) coal core and test data and an example model calibration.

Mavor, M.J,; Gunter, W.D. [Tesseract Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The influence of fuel composition on the combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As global energy demand rises, natural gas (NG) plays an important strategic role in energy supply. Natural gas is the cleanest fossil fuel that has been investigated extensively for use in spark-ignition (SI) and compression-ignition (CI) engines. This paper reviews the research on the effects of natural gas composition on combustion and emission characteristics of natural gas fueled internal combustion engines (ICEs) and reports the most achievements obtained by researchers in this field. It has been reported that the engine performance and emission are greatly affected by varying compositions of natural gas. The most important NG fuel property is the Wobbe number (WN). Generally, it was agreed by researchers that the fuels with higher hydrocarbons, higher WN, and higher energy content exhibited better fuel economy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions were also increased for gases with higher levels of higher WN, while total hydrocarbons (THCs), carbon monoxide (CO), showed some reductions for these gases. On the other hand, particulate matter (PM) emissions did not show any fuel effects. Moreover, adding of small fractions of higher alkanes, such as ethane and propane, significantly improved ignition qualities of natural gas engines. The results presented provide a good insight for researchers to pursue their future research on natural gas fueled ICEs.

Amir-Hasan Kakaee; Amin Paykani; Mostafa Ghajar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Network Model for The Genesis and Migration of Gas Phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Network Model for The Genesis and Migration of Gas Phase Koukung Alex Chang and W. Brent, of a compositional fluid consisting of water with a dissolved hydrocarbon gas. The model captures both single phase 99% of the (effectively) stored CO2 resides in the liquid phase. Key Words: network model, gas

New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

103

Development of fiberglass composite systems for natural gas pipeline service. Final report, January 1987-March 1994  

SciTech Connect

Fiberglass composites suitable for use in the repair and reinforcement of natural gas transmission line pipe were developed and evaluated. Three types of composite systems were studied: (1) a nonintrusive system for on-line field of corrosion and mechanical damage, (2) line pipe reinforced with filament wound composite, and (3) low-cost systems suitable for over-the-ditch rehabilitation of long pipeline sections. Effort during this program concentrated on the first two areas. A unique fiberglass/polyester device, called Clock Spring, was developed and successfully tested both as a means of terminating rapidly propagating cracks and for on-line repair of metal loss defects. Composite reinforced pipe was produced and hydrotested, and subsequently installed in an operating pipeline to evaluate its long-term behavior in pipeline service.

Fawley, N.C.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Composite wrap approved for U.S. gas-pipeline repairs  

SciTech Connect

The US agency that oversees pipeline safety has taken the unusual step of waiving certain natural-gas pipeline maintenance regulations and permitted a group of gas-pipeline operators to perform repairs with a patented composite wrap formerly used only on liquids lines. The waivers ar subject to conditions and to future performance evaluations. The wrap is made of polyester resin reinforced by glass filament. On installation, it is tightly wound and adhesively bonded to damaged pipe. The paper describes the 2 waivers, the development of this new technology, savings, and training required by the Dept. of Transportation.

True, W.R.

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

105

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","8/2013" Monthly","8/2013" ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtum.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

106

,"U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","10/31/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","11/29/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_plc_nus_dmmbtua.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

107

Failure assessment of composite cooler tubes in a gas boosting station  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present study describes origin and failure mechanisms of air cooled heat exchangers tubes, in a gas pressure boosting station. Hydrocarbon gas was circulating within aluminum finned tubes and cooling was done by forcing ambient air over the exterior of the tubes, made of carbon steel A-214 material. The hydrocarbon gas was contained traces of H2S and substantial level of CO2. The investigation was carried out in a station located in southern part of Iran. The process involved condensation of water and hydrocarbon along the length of tubes, resulting in a wet gas multiphase flow situation. Such type of coolers is also called composite coolers. The failure of tubes was characterized on the bases of all the available evidences and metallurgical examinations, such as analysis of tube materials, feeding gas, condensate water, and the residue inside the tubes. The processing was also simulated by Hysis-3.1 software, in order to evaluate and compare various parameters such as gas flow rate, liquid water and hydrocarbon formation, in actual and design condition. The air cooled tubes showed highest corrosion rate and was experienced leakage regularly. The results indicated that, low velocity assisted sweet corrosion caused severe pitting inside the tubes, and led to failure.

Khalil Ranjbar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Effects of Natural Recharge on Gas Composition in the Larderello - Castelnuovo Area  

SciTech Connect

A study of the temporal behaviour of gas compsition in the Larderello-Castelnuovo area shows that this behaviour varies, depending on whether the wells are affected or not by natural recharge. Where no natural recharge exists, gas composition seems to be governed by chemical equilibria. The recharge water, and the steam it produces, mix with the fluid already existing in the reservoir. At Larderello (far from absorption areas) the gas composition resulting from this mixing does not undergo further changes by chemical reaction. This is due either to a lack of reactivity where there is no liquid phase or to an ineffective fluid-rock interaction. At Castelnuovo (close to absorption areas) the H{sub 2}S and CH{sub 4} contents in the gas have gradually decreased with the increase in recharge effects. The decrease in H{sub 2}S can be attributed to dissolution in liquid water and oxidation. Various hypotheses have been forwarded for the methane. The correlation existing between CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2} concentrations, even when methane decreases in the areas affected by recharge, suggests that CH{sub 4} may be governed by more than just the Fisher-Tropsch reaction.

D'Amore, Franco; Celati, Romano; Calore, Claudio; Bertrami, Rino

1983-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

109

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Multifunctional Nanowire/Film Composites-Based Bimodular Sensors for In Situ, Real-Time High Temperature Gas Detection Background Real time monitoring of combustion gas composition is important for improving the efficiency of combustion processes and reducing the emission of pollutants. However, such measurement usually requires sensors to be operated at high temperatures in harsh environments. Currently, commercially available sensor technology capable of withstanding such harsh environments is extremely

110

Vapour nucleation in a cryogenic–fluid–dissolved–nitrogen mixture during rapid depressurization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the dissolved nitrogen comes out of the...effect of dissolved nitrogen was not addressed...non-condensable gas (nitrogen) in a cryogenic...g. superheated water or pure refrigerants...to estimate the solubility of nitrogen in...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

A critical review of methods used in the estimation of natural gas reserves: Natural gas reserves in the state of Texas. Some educational prerequisites in the field of petroleum economics and evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Associated Gas Reserves Volumetr ic Method Discussion of the Factors in tne Volumetri. Formula The Decline Curve Method 7 7 12 Ie Methods of Estimating Associated Gas Reserves Methods of Estimatmg Dissolved Gas Reserves Water Drive Constant Voluxne... Bibliography 58 TABLE of ILLUSTRATIONS ~Pa e A CRITICAI REVIEW OF METHODS USED IN THE ESTIMATION OF NATURAL GAS RESERVES Curves Curve No Curves Showing Change in the Compressi- bility Factor with Depth and Composition of the Wet Gas. Z4-A Curve No...

Crichton, John Alston

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

112

Seawater desalination by gas hydrate process and removal characteristics of dissolved ions (Na+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, B3 +, Cl?, SO42 ?)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In order to evaluate hydrate-based desalination (HBD), experiments with seawater samples were carried out at various conditions (i.e. hydraulic pressure, washing step, and hydrate-forming gas). Before and after the hydrate process, cations (Na+, K+, Mg2 +, Ca2 +, and B3 +) and anions (Cl? and SO42 ?) were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and ion chromatography (IC). In a single stage of CO2 hydrate process without any pretreatment, 71%–94% of each cation was removed in the following order: K+ > Na+ ? Mg2 + ? Ca2 + > B3 + and 73%–83% of each anion was removed. When the brines on the surface of hydrate pellets were removed, the ion removal efficiency increased above 4%. It was also found that the desalting efficiency depended on the hydrate-forming gas (CO2 > CH4) and the hydraulic pressure (6–10 MPa) to produce hydrate pellets. In this study, the removal efficiency of cations and anions in a real seawater sample using HBD processes were reported for the first time.

Kyung Chan Kang; Praveen Linga; Kyeong-nam Park; Sang-June Choi; Ju Dong Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Simulation of a continuous rotary dissolver  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the simulation of a rotating, multistage chemical reactor that dissolves spent nuclear fuel for reprocessing in a breeder cycle. The continuous, time-dependent process model of a dissolver was developed using the Advanced Continuous Simulation Language (ACSL) to calculate various temperatures and the masses of the chemical constituents of the solution in each stage. The Gear integration algorithm (Gear 1971) was used to accommodate the stiff dynamics. An arrangement of interacting discrete sections was employed to cause fresh fuel to be added and dissolver rotations to occur at appropriate times. By changing various constants, the model can simulate the effect of different fuel compositions and operational scenarios. The model code is a valuable tool for analysis of the performance of the dissolution system and has been instrumental in its design. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Carnal, C.L.; Hardy, J.E.; Lewis, B.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Process for coal liquefaction in staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a pasting oil, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals, are separated from the condensed reactor effluent. In accordance with the improved process, the first dissolver is operated at a higher temperature than the second dissolver. This temperature sequence produces improved product selectivity and permits the incorporation of sufficient hydrogen in the solvent for adequate recycle operations.

Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA); Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Skinner, Ronald W. (Allentown, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect

This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Synthetic crystalline metallosilicate compositions, the preparation thereof and their use in the conversion of synthesis gas to low molecular weight hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for the conversion of synthesis gas comprising: contacting synthesis gas which consists of hydrogen and carbon monoxide with a catalytically effective amount of a crystalline ferrometallosilicate composition represented in terms of mole ratios.

Hinnenkamp, J.A.; Walatka, V.V.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effect of steam partial pressure on gasification rate and gas composition of product gas from catalytic steam gasification of HyperCoal  

SciTech Connect

HyperCoal was produced from coal by a solvent extraction method. The effect of the partial pressure of steam on the gasification rate and gas composition at temperatures of 600, 650, 700, and 750{sup o}C was examined. The gasification rate decreased with decreasing steam partial pressure. The reaction order with respect to steam partial pressure was between 0.2 and 0.5. The activation energy for the K{sub 2}CO{sub 3}-catalyzed HyperCoal gasification was independent of the steam partial pressure and was about 108 kJ/mol. The gas composition changed with steam partial pressure and H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} decreased and CO increased with decreasing steam partial pressure. By changing the partial pressure of the steam, the H{sub 2}/CO ratio of the synthesis gas can be controlled. 18 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Atul Sharma; Ikuo Saito; Toshimasa Takanohashi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki (Japan). Advanced Fuel Group

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Raw Gas Composition from a Black Liquor Gasifier—Comparison with Experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Raw Gas Composition from a Black Liquor Gasifier—Comparison with Experiments ... The black liquor spray was represented by 1003 discrete particles having a fitted Rosin Rammler distribution of power 2 and a characteristic size of 200 ?m. ... Additional PFR calculations were performed using different inlet gas compositions with similar results (not presented here), i.e. the Jones and Lindstedt model showed a significantly higher reformation rate of methane than GRI-Mech at gasification conditions in the medium temperature range (1150 < T < 1500 K). ...

Per Carlsson; Kristiina Iisa; Rikard Gebart

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems  

SciTech Connect

Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

RA Wolf

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

120

Process for coal liquefaction by separation of entrained gases from slurry exiting staged dissolvers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is described an improved liquefaction process by which coal is converted to a low ash and low sulfur carbonaceous material that can be used as a fuel in an environmentally acceptable manner without costly gas scrubbing equipment. In the process, coal is slurried with a solvent, passed through a preheater and at least two dissolvers in series in the presence of hydrogen-rich gases at elevated temperatures and pressures. Solids, including mineral ash and unconverted coal macerals are separated from the condensed dissolver effluent. In accordance with the improved process, fresh hydrogen is fed to each dissolver and the entrained gas from each dissolver is separated from the slurry phase and removed from the reactor system before the condensed phase is passed to the next dissolver in the series. In accordance with another process, the feeds to the dissolvers are such that the top of each downstream dissolver is used as a gas-liquid separator.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Ying, David H. S. (Macungie, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas (INEEL/EXT-02-00992)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

992 992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Patrick Laney July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC INEEL/EXT-02-00992 Use of Composite Pipe Materials in the Transportation of Natural Gas Sponsored by Natural Gas Pipeline Infrastructure Reliability Program National Energy Technology Laboratory INEEL Field Work Proposal # 4340-70 Prepared by: Patrick Laney Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Idaho Falls, Idaho With Contributions From: Ian Kopp Kenway Corporation Augusta, Maine July 2002 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Fossil Energy Technologies Department Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

122

Ni(NiO)/single-walled carbon nanotubes composite: Synthesis of electro-deposition, gas sensing property for NO gas and density functional theory calculation  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: The Ni(NiO)/semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes composite collected from the cathode after electro-deposition shows a high sensitivity to low-concentration NO gas at room temperature (18 °C). Display Omitted Highlights: ? Ni(NiO) nanoparticles were deposited on semiconducting SWCNTs by electro-deposition. ? Ni(NiO)/semiconducting SWCNTs film shows a high sensitivity to NO gas at 18 °C. ?Theoretical calculation reveals electron transfer from SWCNTs to NO via Ni. -- Abstract: Single-walled carbon nanotubes which contains metallic SWCNTs (m-SWCNTs) and semiconducting SWCNTs (s-SWCNTs) have been obtained under electric arc discharge. Their separation can be effectively achieved by the electro-deposition method. The Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite was found on cathode where Ni was partially oxidized to NiO at ambient condition with Ni(NiO) nanoparticles deposited uniformly on the bundles of SWCNTs. These results were confirmed by Raman spectra, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV–vis–NIR and TG characterizations. Furthermore, investigation of the gas sensing property of Ni(NiO)/s-SWCNTs composite film to NO gas at 18 °C demonstrated the sensitivity was approximately 5% at the concentration of 97 ppb. Moreover, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to explore the sensing mechanism which suggested the adsorption of NO molecules onto the composite through N–Ni interaction as well as the proposition of electron transfer mechanisms from SWCNTs to NO via the Ni medium.

Li, Li; Zhang, Guo; Chen, Lei [Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, College of Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Chemical Engineering Process and Technology for High-efficiency Conversion, College of Heilongjiang Province, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Bi, Hong-Mei [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China); Shi, Ke-Ying, E-mail: shikeying2008@yahoo.cn [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Functional Inorganic Material Chemistry, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Heilongjiang University, Harbin 150080 (China)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

123

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

124

Vertical composition gradient effects on original hydrocarbon in place volumes and liquid recovery for volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Place Volumes and Liquid Recovery for Volatile Oil and Gas Condensate Reservoirs. (December 2000) Juan Manual Jaramillo Arias, B. S. , Universidad de America; B. S. , Universidad Nacional de Colombia Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Maria A. Barrufet... Reservoir Performance 2. 2 Equation of State Review. . 2. 3 Peng Robinson Equation of State (PR EOS). 2. 4 Vapor Liquid Equilibria. . 2. 5 Volume Translation. 2. 6 Pseudoization or Lumping. 2. 7 Heavy Fraction Characterization. . 2. 8 Compositional...

Jaramillo Arias, Juan Manuel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

The influence of air inflow on CH4 composition ratio in landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When landfill gas is collected, air inflow into the landfill...4 productivity. The decline of CH4 content in landfill gas (LFG) negatively affects energy projects. We...2 was an effective indicator of air inflow ...

Seung-Kyu Chun

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Variability in natural gas fuel composition and its effects on the performance of catalytic combustion systems. Final report for period September 18, 1998 - September 17, 2000  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is composed primarily of methane with small amounts of higher hydrocarbons and diluents, which vary by region and over time. Compositions of natural gas from domestic and worldwide sources were surveyed with respect to content of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. The survey showed slight compositional variability between most of the gases, with a small fraction of them containing significantly larger contents of higher hydrocarbons than the mean. As gas-fired turbines will be used for power generation all over the world, they will need to tolerate operation with fuels with a wide variety of compositions, particularly with respect to the concentration of higher hydrocarbons and diluents. Subscale catalytic combustion modules typical of those used in gas turbine power generation with ultra low emissions of pollutants were tested in a subscale test system with natural gas alone and with added known levels of hydrocarbon compounds and diluents. The range of compositions tested contained the range observed in the survey. Test results were used to calculate the effect of composition on catalyst performance. The compositional variability is of little consequence to the catalyst for most of the gases in the survey, including nearly all of the gases delivered in the U.S. To accommodate the remaining gases, the catalyst inlet temperature must be lowered to maintain combustor durability. These results support commercial acceptance of catalytic combustion systems for use in natural gas fired turbines in distributed power generation with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions.

Ginter, David; Simchick, Chuck; Schlatter, Jim

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Prediction of the effects of compositional mixing in a reservoir on conversion to natural gas storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increased interest in the development of new Gas Storage Fields over the lastseveral decades has created some interesting challenges for the industry. Most existinggas… (more)

Brannon, Alan W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li{sub 2}O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li{sub 2}O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li{sub 2}ZrO{sub 3} spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Baker, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Effect of sweep gas composition on ionization chamber response in the BEATRIX-II tritium recovery experiment  

SciTech Connect

The BEATRIX-II irradiation experiment was an in situ tritium recovery experiment to evaluate the tritium release characteristics of fusion ceramic breeder materials and to characterize their stability under fast neutron irradiation to extended burnups. This is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored experiment which is being carried out in the Materials Open Test Assembly of Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). The participants are Japan, Canada and the US The in situ tritium recovery experiment consisted of two individual in-reactor experimental assemblies (Phase I and Phase II) that were irradiated for 300 and 200 EFPD, respectively. Each experimental phase included two specimens: a thin annular specimen capable of temperature changes and a larger temperature-gradient specimen. In Phase I both specimens were Li[sub 2]O while for Phase II the temperature-change specimen consisted of Li[sub 2]O and the temperature-gradient specimen was a Li[sub 2]ZrO[sub 3] spherebed. Real-time measurements of the tritium release from the specimens during changing conditions (neutronics, temperature and sweep gas composition) were made using ion chambers. In order to correctly interpret the response of the ionization chambers it is necessary to understand the effect of changing sweep gas composition on the operation of the chambers. The purpose of this paper is to describe activities carried out to determine the effect of hydrogen additions to a helium sweep gas on the operation of these ionization chambers.

Slagle, O.D.; Hollenberg, G.W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Baker, D.E. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

ON THE UNUSUAL GAS COMPOSITION IN THE {beta} PICTORIS DEBRIS DISK  

SciTech Connect

The metallic gas associated with the {beta} Pic debris disk is not believed to be primordial, but arises from the destruction of dust grains. Recent observations have shown that carbon and oxygen in this gas are exceptionally overabundant compared to other elements, by some 400 times. We study the origin of this enrichment under two opposing hypotheses: preferential production, where the gas is produced with the observed unusual abundance (as may happen if gas is produced by photodesorption from C/O-rich icy grains), and preferential depletion, where the gas evolves to the observed state from an original solar abundance (if outgassing occurs under high-speed collisions) under a number of dynamical processes. We include in our study the following processes: radiative blowout of metallic elements, dynamical coupling between different species, and viscous accretion onto the star. We find that, if gas viscosity is sufficiently low (the conventional {alpha} parameter {approx}< 10{sup -3}), differential blowout dominates. While gas accumulates gradually in the disks, metallic elements subject to strong radiation forces, such as Na and Fe, deplete more quickly than C and O, naturally leading to the observed overabundance of C and O. On the other hand, if gas viscosity is high ({alpha} {approx}> 10{sup -1}, as expected for this largely ionized disk), gas is continuously produced and viscously accreted toward the star. This removal process does not discriminate between elements so the observed overabundance of C and O has to be explained by a preferential production that strongly favors C and O to other metallic elements. One such candidate is photodesorption off the grains. We compare our calculation against all observed elements ({approx}10) in the gas disk and find a mild preference for the second scenario, based on the abundance of Si alone. If true, {beta} Pic should still be accreting at an observable rate, well after its primordial disk has disappeared.

Xie, Ji-Wei; Wu, Yanqin [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Brandeker, Alexis, E-mail: jwxie@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: wu@astro.utoronto.ca, E-mail: alexis@astro.su.se [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)] [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

131

Calculation of geothermal reservoir temperatures and steam fractions from gas compositions  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the chemical equilibria and physical characteristics of the fluid in the reservoir (temperature, steam fraction with respect to total water, gas/steam ratio, redox conditions), which seem to be responsible for the observed concentrations of some reactive species found in the geothermal fluids (CO2, H2, H2S and CH4). Gas geochemistry is of particular interest in vapor-dominated fields where the fluid discharged consists of almost pure steam containing a limited number of volatile chemical species. Considering several geothermal systems, a good correlation has been obtained among the temperatures calculated from the gas geothermometers and the temperatures measured in the reservoir of evaluated by other physical or chemical methods. 24 refs., 5 figs.

D'Amore, F.; Truesdell, A.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Magmatic Gas Composition Reveals the Source Depth of Slug-Driven Strombolian Explosive Activity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hydrothermal meteoric steam during shallow...closed- to open-system conditions...entrainment of meteoric steam from the shallow hydrothermal system. (ii) The gas slugs...prevented quantitative assessment of the slug source...is a powerful tool in such studies...

Mike Burton; Patrick Allard; Filippo Muré; Alessandro La Spina

2007-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modelling and Numerical Simulation of Gas Migration in a Nuclear Waste Repository  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a compositional compressible two-phase, liquid and gas, flow model for numerical simulations of hydrogen migration in deep geological radioactive waste repository. This model includes capillary effects and the gas diffusivity. The choice of the main variables in this model, Total or Dissolved Hydrogen Mass Concentration and Liquid Pressure, leads to a unique and consistent formulation of the gas phase appearance and disappearance. After introducing this model, we show computational evidences of its adequacy to simulate gas phase appearance and disappearance in different situations typical of underground radioactive waste repository.

Bourgeat, Alain; Smai, Farid

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Gas hydrate formation in fine sand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas hydrate formation from two types of dissolved gas (methane and mixed gas) was studied under varying thermodynamic conditions in ... Sea. The testing media consisted of silica sand particles with diameters of ...

XiaoYa Zang; DeQing Liang; NengYou Wu

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Influence of Heteroanion and Ammonium Cation Size on the Composition and Gas-Phase Fragmentation of Polyoxovanadates  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of a systematic experimental investigation of the influence of different size cationic ammonium ligands and heteroanions on the composition, ionic charge state and gas-phase fragmentation pathways of anionic polyoxovanadates synthesized in solution. Four separate solutions of olyoxometalates (POMs) were prepared using all possible combinations of the tetraethylammonium [(C2H5)4N+] ligand, chloride (Cl-) heteroanion, tetrabutylammonium [(C4H9)4N+] ligand and acetate (CH3CO2-) heteroanion. Employing electrospray ionization combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) we demonstrate that POM solutions synthesized using the small [(C2H5)4N+] ligand and Cl-heteroanion are composed predominately of large doubly and triply charged chlorine containing clusters with a size distribution centered at fourteen vanadium atoms. POM solutions prepared using the Cl- anion and [(C4H9)4N+] ligand are shown to contain slightly larger clusters with fifteen and sixteen vanadium atoms, thereby indicating that the size of the cationic ammonium ligand exerts only a weak influence on the polymerization of polyoxovanadates. POM solutions prepared using (C2H5)4NCl and (C4H9)4NCl also produced peaks consistent with the attachment of one and two ammonium cations to the larger clusters. Solutions prepared using the large CH3CO2 - heteroanion, in contrast, are demonstrated to contain much smaller singly and doubly *Manuscript Click here to view linked References 2 charged clusters with a size distribution centered at six vanadium atoms. In addition, while incorporation of one and two ammonium ligands into the smaller clusters was observed, no POMs containing the CH3CO2 - heteroanion were identified. The gas-phase fragmentation pathways of representative POMs containing one and two ammonium ligands were examined using collision induced dissociation (CID) and mass spectrometry. Similar primary fragmentation pathways involving partial loss of a ligand -[(CxHy)3N+ x = 2,4; y = 5,9] were observed for clusters containing both one and two ligands largely independent of the size, composition and charge state of the precursor ion. The [(C4H9)4N+] ligand was found to exhibit stronger interactions with the core of the POMs resulting in higher abundances of fragment ions containing (C4H9) units compared to (C2H5) units from [(C2H5)4N+]. These results provide fundamental insight into the interactions between anionic metal oxide clusters, heteroanions and cationic ammonium ligands that are responsible for the size and composition controlled synthesis of POMs in solution.

Johnson, Grant E.; Al Hasan, Naila M.; Laskin, Julia

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

136

A layered surface acoustic wave gas sensor based on a polyaniline/In2O3 nanofibre composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polyaniline/In 2 O 3 Nanofiber Composite A. Z. Sadek *1 , W.In 2 O 3 nanofiber composite based layered surface acousticIn 2 O 3 nanoparticle composite. The nanocomposite was

Sadek, A Z; Wlodarski, W; Shin, K; Kaner, Richard B; Kalantar-zadeh, K

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition dissolved organic carbon concentration. On two occasions during the austral summer, bacteria-free water of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR

Sommaruga, Ruben

138

Genetic optimization of two-material composite laminates Laurent Grosset  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the power of GAs for this application. COMPOSITE LAMINATE DESIGN Composite laminate optimization typically

Coello, Carlos A. Coello

139

Excretion of dissolved organic carbon by eelgrass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract. The release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) by eelgrass (Zosteru marina) and its epiphytic ... tive agreement between the U.S. Energy Research.

2000-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

140

A preliminary evaluation model for reservoir hydrocarbon-generating potential established based on dissolved hydrocarbons in oilfield water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A large number of oilfield water samples were analyzed in this work. Research ... relationship between the concentrations and distribution of dissolved hydrocarbons suggested that the contents and composition of ...

Hongjing Zhao; Weilin Sun; Baotian He; Bowen Mei…

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

2, 537549, 2005 Dissolved iron input  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the semblance of a dissolved load are coagulated and settled as their freshwater carrier is mixed with seawater of the iron load from the suspended and dissolved mobile fraction to storage in the sediments was measured masses beyond the mixing zone, a process known as the "marine biological carbon pump". This export5

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

Impact of natural gas fuel composition on criteria, toxic, and particle emissions from transit buses equipped with lean burn and stoichiometric engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study investigated the impacts of varying natural gas composition on the exhaust emissions from different technology transit buses. For this study, two CNG (compressed natural gas) buses equipped with lean burn combustion and \\{OCs\\} (oxidation catalysts), and one stoichiometric CNG bus equipped with a TWC (three-way catalyst) and EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) were tested on a chassis dynamometer over the CBD (Central Business District) cycle on six different gas blends each. The gases represented a range of compositions from gases with high levels of methane and correspondingly lower energy contents/WN (Wobbe number) to gases with higher levels of heavier hydrocarbons and correspondingly higher energy contents/WN. For the lean burn buses, gases with low methane contents exhibited higher \\{NOx\\} (nitrogen oxides) (19%–53%) and NMHC (non-methane hydrocarbon) (39%–102%) emissions, but lower emissions of THC (total hydrocarbon) (9%–24%), CH4 (methane) (23%–33%), and formaldehyde emissions (14%–45%). The stoichiometric engine bus with a TWC showed significantly reduced \\{NOx\\} and THC emissions compared to the lean burn buses, but did show higher levels of CO (carbon monoxide) and NH3 (ammonia). PM (particulate matter) mass emissions did not show any fuel effects, while PN (particle number) emissions exhibited some reductions for the higher WN gases.

Maryam Hajbabaei; Georgios Karavalakis; Kent C. Johnson; Linda Lee; Thomas D. Durbin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Dissolved state of chromium in seawater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... dissolved in a small amount of diluted nitric acid. The resulting solution was used for flameless atomic absorption analysis. The total amount of inorganic Cr(III) present was determined from ...

Eiichiro Nakayama; Hiroyuki Tokoro; Tooru Kuwamoto; Taitiro Fujinaga

1981-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

Biochemical composition of particles and dissolved organic matter ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... was examined along the salinity gradient of the Delaware Estuary. DOM was collected and frac-tionated by tangential-flow ultrafiltration into 1-30 kDa (HDOM;

145

Baseline studies of surface gas exchange and soil-gas composition in preparation for CO{sub 2} sequestration research: Teapot Dome, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

A baseline determination of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes and soil-gas concentrations of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} was made over the Teapot Dome oil field in the Naval Petroleum Reserve 3 in Natrona County, Wyoming, United States. This was done in anticipation of the experimentation with CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone underlying the field at a depth of 1680 m. The measurements were made in January 2004 to capture the system with minimum biological activity in the soils, resulting in a minimum CO{sub 2} flux and a maximum CH{sub 4} flux. The CO{sub 2} fluxes were measured in the field with an infrared spectroscopic method. The CH{sub 4} fluxes were determined from gas-chromatographic measurements on discrete samples from under the flux chambers. The CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} were determined at 30-, 60-, and 100-cm depths in soil gas by gas chromatography. A total of 40 locations had triplicate flux measurements using 1.00-m{sup 2} chambers, and soil gas was sampled at single points at each of the 40 locations. Carbon dioxide fluxes averaged 227.1 CO{sub 2} m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, a standard deviation of 186.9 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, and a range of - 281.7 to 732.9 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, not including one location with subsurface infrastructure contamination. Methane fluxes averaged 0.137 mg CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, standard deviation of 0.326 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, and a range of -0.481 to 1.14 mg m{sup -2} day{sup -1}, not including the same contaminated location.

Klusman, R.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (US). Dept. of Chemistry & Geochemistry

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Revision Increases, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5,372 5,400 2,943 5,522 4,983 8,088 1979-2011 5,372 5,400 2,943 5,522 4,983 8,088 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 525 622 609 854 1,028 1,583 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 35 48 23 71 23 39 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 384 514 383 693 907 1,410 1981-2011 Texas 106 60 203 90 98 134 1981-2011 Alaska 2,850 2,098 37 1,696 236 843 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 2,522 3,302 2,906 3,826 4,747 7,245 1979-2011 Alabama 4 12 1 11 6 2 1979-2011 Arkansas 2 11 3 5 12 50 1979-2011 California 96 292 164 177 525 1,424 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 29 33 21 42 38 21 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 7 16 1 38 9 12 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 53 231 142 95 467 1,382 1979-2011 State Offshore 7 12 0 2 11 9 1979-2011 Colorado 234 214 211 11 142 122 1979-2011

147

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

960 1,350 938 678 2,469 1,884 2000-2011 960 1,350 938 678 2,469 1,884 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 360 231 74 21 250 56 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 3 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 234 219 68 12 222 49 2000-2011 Texas 126 9 6 9 28 7 2000-2011 Alaska 0 1 0 0 0 51 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 1,960 1,349 938 678 2,469 1,833 2000-2011 Alabama 0 1 1 0 0 20 2000-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 California 219 9 8 58 0 11 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 60 6 6 0 0 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 41 0 1 0 0 3 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 118 3 1 58 0 0 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 8 2000-2011 Colorado 579 15 14 10 160 5 2000-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Kansas 0 0 0 0 3 1 2000-2011

148

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Adjustments, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-54 276 455 877 -482 390 1979-2011 -54 276 455 877 -482 390 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 0 -4 7 12 -14 -22 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 1 -5 0 1 1 -1 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 0 0 8 7 -14 -21 1981-2011 Texas -1 1 -1 4 -1 0 1981-2011 Alaska -1 1 -1 1 -1 -1 1979-2011 Lower 48 States -53 275 456 876 -481 391 1979-2011 Alabama 1 -1 0 5 13 3 1979-2011 Arkansas 3 -7 3 12 -3 24 1979-2011 California -62 6 1 6 7 929 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore -64 2 1 2 2 15 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore -1 2 4 4 3 6 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 2 3 -4 -2 2 907 1979-2011 State Offshore 1 -1 0 2 0 1 1979-2011 Colorado -2 9 -4 14 68 -38 1979-2011 Florida 1 -1 78 6 31 -28 1979-2011 Kansas 3 8 4 -5 -2 -4 1979-2011

149

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,782 1,804 7,385 2,698 3,964 5,953 1979-2011 2,782 1,804 7,385 2,698 3,964 5,953 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 984 351 430 517 879 1,393 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 22 10 38 7 5 18 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 827 304 282 442 841 1,152 1981-2011 Texas 135 37 110 68 33 223 1981-2011 Alaska 111 10 3,954 5 260 79 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 2,671 1,794 3,431 2,693 3,704 5,874 1979-2011 Alabama 8 1 0 1 4 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 2 7 28 0 0 13 1979-2011 California 391 102 388 139 389 1,927 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 12 22 72 14 17 31 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 31 17 71 25 5 4 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 341 49 217 97 367 1,892 1979-2011 State Offshore 7 14 28 3 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 35 14 50 185 71 269 1979-2011

150

Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,640 32,668 29,023 33,383 35,746 42,823 1979-2011 29,640 32,668 29,023 33,383 35,746 42,823 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 4,835 4,780 5,106 5,223 5,204 5,446 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 756 752 702 731 722 711 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 3,701 3,651 3,939 3,863 3,793 4,196 1981-2011 Texas 378 377 465 629 689 539 1981-2011 Alaska 8,886 10,752 6,627 8,093 7,896 8,535 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 20,754 21,916 22,396 25,290 27,850 34,288 1979-2011 Alabama 18 20 19 29 38 48 1979-2011 Arkansas 44 37 12 20 29 46 1979-2011 California 2,155 2,193 1,917 2,314 2,282 2,532 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 208 211 150 168 178 172 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 161 154 81 91 92 102 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 1,701 1,749 1,632 2,002 1,949 2,179 1979-2011

151

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Extensions, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

810 1,098 1,488 2,669 2,660 5,957 1979-2011 810 1,098 1,488 2,669 2,660 5,957 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 61 136 287 90 87 32 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 60 133 280 90 54 32 1981-2011 Texas 1 3 7 0 33 0 1981-2011 Alaska 4 6 0 0 2 3 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 806 1,092 1,488 2,669 2,658 5,954 1979-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 4 0 1979-2011 California 21 4 100 470 12 74 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 5 0 0 0 0 1 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 4 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 11 1 95 468 9 70 1979-2011 State Offshore 1 3 5 2 3 3 1979-2011 Colorado 113 180 127 165 318 506 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 1 6 6 1 3 53 1979-2011

152

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Estimated Production, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,281 2,296 2,349 2,556 2,445 2,722 1979-2011 2,281 2,296 2,349 2,556 2,445 2,722 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 635 625 563 659 564 514 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 35 39 35 36 28 31 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 462 507 436 522 468 415 1981-2011 Texas 138 79 92 101 68 68 1981-2011 Alaska 218 227 207 225 174 176 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 2,063 2,069 2,142 2,331 2,271 2,546 1979-2011 Alabama 4 4 3 5 6 8 1979-2011 Arkansas 5 4 3 4 4 6 1979-2011 California 180 163 163 171 186 260 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 9 12 11 12 12 12 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 8 8 7 7 6 7 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 157 139 143 148 164 237 1979-2011 State Offshore 6 4 2 4 4 4 1979-2011 Colorado 96 104 125 134 126 160 1979-2011

153

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Acquisitions, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

960 1,350 938 678 2,469 1,884 2000-2011 960 1,350 938 678 2,469 1,884 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 360 231 74 21 250 56 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 3 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 234 219 68 12 222 49 2000-2011 Texas 126 9 6 9 28 7 2000-2011 Alaska 0 1 0 0 0 51 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 1,960 1,349 938 678 2,469 1,833 2000-2011 Alabama 0 1 1 0 0 20 2000-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 California 219 9 8 58 0 11 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 60 6 6 0 0 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 41 0 1 0 0 3 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 118 3 1 58 0 0 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 8 2000-2011 Colorado 579 15 14 10 160 5 2000-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Kansas 0 0 0 0 3 1 2000-2011

154

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Extensions, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

810 1,098 1,488 2,669 2,660 5,957 1979-2011 810 1,098 1,488 2,669 2,660 5,957 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 61 136 287 90 87 32 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 60 133 280 90 54 32 1981-2011 Texas 1 3 7 0 33 0 1981-2011 Alaska 4 6 0 0 2 3 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 806 1,092 1,488 2,669 2,658 5,954 1979-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 4 0 1979-2011 California 21 4 100 470 12 74 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 5 0 0 0 0 1 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 4 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 11 1 95 468 9 70 1979-2011 State Offshore 1 3 5 2 3 3 1979-2011 Colorado 113 180 127 165 318 506 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 1 6 6 1 3 53 1979-2011

155

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Data Series: Proved Reserves as of Dec. 31 Adjustments Revision Increases Revision Decreases Sales Acquisitions Extensions New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 View History U.S. 29,640 32,668 29,023 33,383 35,746 42,823 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 4,835 4,780 5,106 5,223 5,204 5,446 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 756 752 702 731 722 711 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 3,701 3,651 3,939 3,863 3,793 4,196 1981-2011 Texas 378 377 465 629 689 539 1981-2011 Alaska 8,886 10,752 6,627 8,093 7,896 8,535 1979-2011

156

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Revision Decreases, Wet After  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,782 1,804 7,385 2,698 3,964 5,953 1979-2011 2,782 1,804 7,385 2,698 3,964 5,953 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 984 351 430 517 879 1,393 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 22 10 38 7 5 18 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 827 304 282 442 841 1,152 1981-2011 Texas 135 37 110 68 33 223 1981-2011 Alaska 111 10 3,954 5 260 79 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 2,671 1,794 3,431 2,693 3,704 5,874 1979-2011 Alabama 8 1 0 1 4 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 2 7 28 0 0 13 1979-2011 California 391 102 388 139 389 1,927 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 12 22 72 14 17 31 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 31 17 71 25 5 4 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 341 49 217 97 367 1,892 1979-2011 State Offshore 7 14 28 3 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 35 14 50 185 71 269 1979-2011

157

Colorado Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2,010 1,882 2,371 2,518 3,448 4,280 1979-2013 Adjustments -4 14 68 -38 -32 35 1979-2013 Revision Increases 211 11 142 122 514 332 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 50 185 71 269 243 291...

158

New Mexico Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves,...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,755 1,982 2,213 2,552 2,819 3,413 1979-2013 Adjustments -18 170 -103 20 -1 -151 1979-2013 Revision Increases 278 302 230 335 655 789 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 163 299 249 214...

159

Federal Offshore California Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

702 731 722 711 652 264 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 1 1 -1 -51 14 1979-2013 Revision Increases 23 71 23 39 16 6 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 38 7 5 18 14 387 1979-2013 Sales 0 0 0 0 0...

160

Federal Offshore Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

465 629 689 539 854 973 1981-2013 Adjustments -1 4 -1 0 -20 7 1981-2013 Revision Increases 203 90 98 134 389 200 1981-2013 Revision Decreases 110 68 33 223 88 83 1981-2013 Sales 0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CA, State Offshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

54 53 63 79 65 75 1979-2013 Adjustments 0 2 0 1 0 3 1979-2013 Revision Increases 0 2 11 9 0 12 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 28 3 0 0 14 2 1979-2013 Sales 0 0 0 1 0 0 2000-2013...

162

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,632 2,002 1,949 2,179 1,381 1,329 1979-2013 Adjustments -4 -2 2 907 -594 -19 1979-2013 Revision Increases 142 95 467 1,382 319 126 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 217 97 367 1,892...

163

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

50 168 178 172 303 282 1979-2013 Adjustments 1 2 2 15 2 -8 1979-2013 Revision Increases 21 42 38 21 157 14 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 72 14 17 31 17 15 1979-2013 Sales 6 0 1 0 0...

164

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

81 91 92 102 98 90 1979-2013 Adjustments 4 4 3 6 12 -9 1979-2013 Revision Increases 1 38 9 12 9 9 1979-2013 Revision Decreases 71 25 5 4 18 3 1979-2013 Sales 1 0 0 0 0 37 2000-2013...

165

Texas Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

7,559 8,762 10,130 13,507 19,033 22,167 1981-2013 Adjustments 4 226 206 -381 871 192 1981-2013 Revision Increases 982 1,133 1,450 2,099 2,234 3,607 1981-2013 Revision Decreases...

166

,"TX, RRC District 3 Onshore Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Excel File Name:","ngenradngdcurtx03a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http:www.eia.govdnavngngenradngdcurtx03a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information...

167

Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The composition of noble gases in both gas and water samples collected from Horseshoe Spring, Yellowstone National Park, was found to be depth dependent. The deeper the sample collection within the spring, the greater the enrichment in Kr, Xe, radiogenic 4He, and 40Ar and the greater the depletion in Ne relative to 36Ar. The compositional variations are consistent with multi-component mixing. The dominant component consists of dissolved atmospheric gases acquired by the pool at the surface in contact with air. This component is mixed in varying degree with two other

168

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2 seepage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in seal capacity of fractured claystone caprocks induced by dissolved and gaseous CO2; accepted 17 June 2008; published 31 July 2008. [1] Claystone caprocks are often the ultimate seal for CO2 underground storage when residual CO2 gas reaches the reservoir top due to buoyancy. Permeability changes

Luquot, Linda

169

Mathematical models of interconnections between composition and properties of oils in the Apsheron oil-and gas-bearing region of Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on the example of oils in the Apsheron oil- and gas-bearing region and Apsheron archipelago located in the western part of the Southern Caspian depression, of which the authors have developed mathematical models of a group hydrocarbon composition; interconnection between oil density and content of asphalt-resin materials, benzine, and ligroin; interconnections between oil density and viscosity and temperature; and interconnections between content of asphalt-resin properties and low-temperature fractions. The models obtained enable us to extrapolate factual data on composition and properties of oils beyond the limits of fixed depths of burial of oil-saturated reservoirs both to a zone of great depths and increased temperatures where hydrocarbons were in a gaseous or oil and gaseous state, and to a zone of near-surface conditions where oils acquire the consistency of asphalts.

Buryakovsky, L.A.; Dzhevanshir, R.D. (Inst. of Deep Oil and Gas Deposits, Azerbaijan Academy of Sciences, 33 Narimanov Prospect, Baku 370143, Azerbaijan (SU))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Simulation of the dependence of gas composition on the conditions of the thermal treatment of oil shale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Empirical formulas for calculating the concentrations of substances such as hydrogen and carbon(II) oxide and also the smallest possible concentration of carbon(IV) oxide in gas prepared by the steam treatment of...

A. N. Ryzhov; T. A. Avakyan; L. K. Maslova; E. A. Sakharova…

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Effect of fuel gas composition in chemical-looping combustion with Ni-based oxygen carriers. 1. Fate of sulfur  

SciTech Connect

Chemical-looping combustion (CLC) has been suggested among the best alternatives to reduce the economic cost of CO{sub 2} capture using fuel gas because CO{sub 2} is inherently separated in the process. For gaseous fuels, natural gas, refinery gas, or syngas from coal gasification can be used. These fuels may contain different amounts of sulfur compounds, such as H{sub 2}S and COS. An experimental investigation of the fate of sulfur during CH{sub 4} combustion in a 500 W{sub th} CLC prototype using a Ni-based oxygen carrier has been carried out. The effect on the oxygen carrier behavior and combustion efficiency of several operating conditions such as temperature and H{sub 2}S concentration has been analyzed. Nickel sulfide, Ni3S{sub 2}, was formed at all operating conditions in the fuel reactor, which produced an oxygen carrier deactivation and lower combustion efficiencies. However, the oxygen carrier recovered their initial reactivity after certain time without sulfur addition. The sulfides were transported to the air reactor where SO{sub 2} was produced as final gas product. Agglomeration problems derived from the sulfides formation were never detected during continuous operation. Considering both operational and environmental aspects, fuels with sulfur contents below 100 vppm H{sub 2}S seem to be adequate to be used in an industrial CLC plant.

Garcia-Labiano, F.; de Diego, L.F.; Gayan, P.; Adanez, J.; Abad, A.; Dueso, C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Performance analysis of compositional and modified black-oil models for rich gas condensate reservoirs with vertical and horizontal wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been known that volatile oil and gas condensate reservoirs cannot be modeled accurately with conventional black-oil models. One variation to the black-oil approach is the modified black-oil (MBO) model that allows the use of a simple...

Izgec, Bulent

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

174

Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade there has been an overall decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice cover. Changes to the ice cover have important consequences for organic carbon cycling, especially over the continental shelves. When sea ice is formed, dissolved organic...

Smith, Stephanie 1990-

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

175

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry Studies to Evaluate High-Temperature Aqueous Pretreatment as a Way to Modify the Composition of Bio-Oil from Fast Pyrolysis of Wheat Straw ... ?-Cellulose was obtained from Sigma-Aldrich (St. Louis, Missouri). ... This evidence suggests that CHW pretreatment may produce bio-oil that is composed of a greater amount of sugars and furanics and fewer small molecules and may therefore be a viable option to modify the chemical composition of bio-oils. ...

Robert Lee Johnson; Shi-Shen Liaw; Manuel Garcia-Perez; Su Ha; Sean S.-Y. Lin; Armando G. McDonald; Shulin Chen

2009-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Montana Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

14 993 959 792 616 590 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 817 681 657 522 327 286 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease...

177

Mississippi Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

35 922 858 868 612 600 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 990 884 822 806 550 557 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease...

178

Miscellaneous Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

72 349 363 393 233 188 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 263 271 353 270 219 169 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease...

179

Florida Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 7 56 6 16 15 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 26 4 16 14 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 1 7 30 2 0 1...

180

CA, Coastal Region Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

151 169 180 173 305 284 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1 1 2 1 2 2 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 150 168...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

81 91 92 102 98 90 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 81 91 92 102...

182

Detailed compositional analysis of gas seepage at the National Carbon Storage Test Site, Teapot Dome, Wyoming, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A baseline determination of CO2 and CH4 fluxes and soil gas concentrations of CO2 and CH4 was made over the Teapot Dome oil field in the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, USA. This was done in anticipation of experimentation with CO2 sequestration in the Pennsylvanian Tensleep Sandstone underlying the field at a depth of 1680 m. The baseline data were collected during the winter, 2004 in order to minimize near-surface biological activity in the soil profile. The baseline data were used to select anomalous locations that may be the result of seeping thermogenic gas, along with background locations. Five 10-m holes were drilled, 3 of which had anomalous gas microseepage, and 2 were characterized as “background.” These were equipped for nested gas sampling at depths of 10-, 5-, 3-, 2-, and 1-m depths. Methane concentrations as high as 170,000 ppmv (17%) were found, along with high concentrations of C2H6, C3H8, n-C4H10, and i-C4H10. Much smaller concentrations of C2H4 and C3H6 were observed indicating the beginning of hydrocarbon oxidation in the anomalous holes. The anomalous 10-m holes also had high concentrations of isotopically enriched CO2, indicating the oxidation of hydrocarbons. Concentrations of the gases decreased upward, as expected, indicating oxidation and transport into the atmosphere. The ancient source of the gases was confirmed by 14C determinations on CO2, with radiocarbon ages approaching 38 ka within 5 m of the surface. Modeling was used to analyze the distribution of hydrocarbons in the anomalous and background 10-m holes. Diffusion alone was not sufficient to account for the hydrocarbon concentration distributions, however the data could be fit with the addition of a consumptive reaction. First-order rate constants for methanotrophic oxidation were obtained by inverse modeling. High rates of oxidation were found, particularly near the surface in the anomalous 10-m holes, demonstrating the effectiveness of the process in the attenuation of CH4 microseepage. The results also demonstrate the importance of CH4 measurements in the planning of a monitoring and verification program for geological CO2 sequestration in sites with significant remaining hydrocarbons (i.e. spent oil reservoirs).

Ronald W. Klusman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 IMPROVEMENTS IN MODELLING DISSOLVED OXYGEN IN ACTIVATED SLUDGE SYSTEMS Jacek Makinia*, Scott A in a full-scale activated sludge reactor. The Activated Sludge Model No. 1 was used to describe for dissolved oxygen. KEYWORDS Activated sludge; dispersion; dissolved oxygen dynamics; mass transfer

Wells, Scott A.

184

Photochemical and microbial degradation of dissolved lignin phenols: Implications for the fate of terrigenous dissolved organic matter in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photochemical and microbial degradation of dissolved lignin phenols: Implications for the fate level characterizations of dissolved lignin were conducted in Mississippi River plume waters to study degradation were the primary factors affecting lignin concentrations. At salinities >25 psu, photooxidation

Hernes, Peter J.

185

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

186

Correlation of rocket propulsion fuel properties with chemical composition using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography with time-of-flight mass spectrometry followed by partial least squares regression analysis  

SciTech Connect

There is an increased need to more fully assess and control the composition of kerosene based rocket propulsion fuels, namely RP-1 and RP-2. In particular, it is crucial to be able to make better quantitative connections between the following three attributes: (a) fuel performance, (b) fuel properties (flash point, density, kinematic viscosity, net heat of combustion, hydrogen content, etc) and (c) the chemical composition of a given fuel (i.e., specific chemical compounds and compound classes present as a result of feedstock blending and processing). Indeed, recent efforts in predicting fuel performance through modeling put greater emphasis on detailed and accurate fuel properties and fuel compositional information. In this regard, advanced distillation curve (ADC) metrology provides improved data relative to classical boiling point and volatility curve techniques. Using ADC metrology, data obtained from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provides compositional variation information that is directly relevant to predictive modeling of fuel performance. Often, in such studies, one-dimensional gas chromatography (GC) combined with mass spectrometry (MS) is typically employed to provide chemical composition information. Building on approaches using GC-MS, but to glean substantially more chemical composition information from these complex fuels, we have recently studied the use of comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography combined with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC × GC - TOFMS) to provide chemical composition data that is significantly richer than that provided by GC-MS methods. In this report, by applying multivariate data analysis techniques, referred to as chemometrics, we are able to readily model (correlate) the chemical compositional information from RP-1 and RP-2 fuels provided using GC × GC - TOFMS, to the fuel property information such as that provided by the ADC method and other specification properties. We anticipate that this new chemical analysis strategy will have broad implications for the development of high fidelity composition-property models, leading to an optimized approach to fuel formulation and specification for advanced engine cycles.

Kehimkar, Benjamin; Hoggard, Jamin C.; Marney, Luke C.; Billingsley, Matthew; Fraga, Carlos G.; Bruno, Thomas J.; Synovec, Robert E.

2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

187

STUDIES ON THE USE OF CARBON DIOXIDE DISSOLVED IN REFRIGERATED BRINE FOR THE PRESERVATION OF WHOLE FISH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of water by species of low oil content, such as sole and cod, and an increase in total salt. Con- trolling, NO. Z, 1971. Use of carbon dioxide gas dissolved in re- frigerated seawater seemed promising as an in experiments on holding fish in tanks, carbon dioxide decreased the rate at which their quality was degraded

188

DISSOLVED CONCENTRATION LIMITS OF RADIOACTIVE ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to evaluate dissolved concentration limits (also referred to as solubility limits) of elements with radioactive isotopes under probable repository conditions, based on geochemical modeling calculations using geochemical modeling tools, thermodynamic databases, field measurements, and laboratory experiments. The scope of this modeling activity is to predict dissolved concentrations or solubility limits for 14 elements with radioactive isotopes (actinium, americium, carbon, cesium, iodine, lead, neptunium, plutonium, protactinium, radium, strontium, technetium, thorium, and uranium) important to calculated dose. Model outputs for uranium, plutonium, neptunium, thorium, americium, and protactinium are in the form of tabulated functions with pH and log (line integral) CO{sub 2} as independent variables, plus one or more uncertainty terms. The solubility limits for the remaining elements are either in the form of distributions or single values. The output data from this report are fundamental inputs for Total System Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA) to determine the estimated release of these elements from waste packages and the engineered barrier system. Consistent modeling approaches and environmental conditions were used to develop solubility models for all of the actinides. These models cover broad ranges of environmental conditions so that they are applicable to both waste packages and the invert. Uncertainties from thermodynamic data, water chemistry, temperature variation, and activity coefficients have been quantified or otherwise addressed.

NA

2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography—1966 November 1, 1965 to November 1, 1966  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......SEPARATION BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY...Mayo K., J. Gas Chromatog. 4...DETERMINATION OF THE SOLUBILITY OF NEON IN WATER AND EXTRACTED HUMAN...Feb. 1964) 798 GAS CHROMATOGRAPH IC...SMALL VOLUMES OF NITROGEN DISSOLVED IN BLOOD......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Mignon Gill

1966-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A thermodynamic model for calculating nitrogen solubility, gas phase composition and density of the N2–H2O–NaCl system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A thermodynamic model is presented to calculate N2 solubility in pure water (273–590 K and 1–600 bar) and aqueous NaCl solutions (273–400 K, 1–600 bar and 0–6 mol kg?1) with or close to experimental accuracy. This model is based on a semi-empirical equation used to calculate gas phase composition of the H2O–N2 system and a specific particle interaction theory for liquid phase. With the parameters evaluated from N2–H2O–NaCl system and using a simple approach, the model is extended to predict the N2 solubility in seawater accurately. Liquid phase density of N2–H2O–NaCl system at phase equilibrium and the homogenization pressure of fluid inclusions containing N2–H2O–NaCl can be calculated from this model. A computer code is developed for this model and can be downloaded from the website: www.geochem-model.org/programs.htm.

Shide Mao; Zhenhao Duan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Concentrations of dissolved radon-222 in water from selected wells and springs in Idaho, 1989-91  

SciTech Connect

Concentrations of dissolved radon-222, a naturally occurring radioactive gas, are found in water in Idaho. The U.S. Geological Survey collected water samples for radon-222 analyses from 338 Idaho wells and springs during 1989-91. These water samples were collected as part of ongoing monitoring programs with the Idaho Department of Water Resources and the U.S. Department of Energy. Concentrations of dissolved radon-222 in 372 of the water samples ranged from -58{+-}30 to 5,715{+-}66 picocuries per liter; the mean and median concentrations were 446{+-}35 and 242{+-}25 picocuries per liter, respectively.

Cecil, L.D.; Parliman, D.J.; Edwards, D.D.; Young, H.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

On dissolved phosphorus in the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Oceanography ON DISSOLVED PHOSPHOHUS IN THE GULF OF I~1~XICO A Tbesls by DAVID JOHN liRIGHT Approved as to style and content by: l && ~ ~Ohs ' ~f'". . r ead of epact tmen rN 1 tv&ay 1970 ABSTRACT On Dissolved Phosphorus 1n the Gulf of Nexico. (Nay... 1970) David J. Wright, B. S. , Oregon State University; D1rected by: Dr. Lela N. Jeffrey Dissolved phosphorus (P) in the mid-Gulf of Nexico water column during November ranged from 6. l to 79 micro- grams Pjl. In mid-Gulf dissolved inorganic...

Wright, David John

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Determination of Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Solids in Biomass and Total Dissolved Solids in Liquid Process Samples Laboratory Analytical Procedure (LAP) Issue Date: 3312008 A. Sluiter, B. Hames, D. Hyman, C. Payne,...

194

Dissolved Organic Carbon Thresholds Affect Mercury Bioaccumulation in Arctic Lakes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Barkay, T.; Gillman, M.; Turner, R. R.Effects of dissolved organic carbon and salinity on bioavailability of mercury Appl. ... Barkay, Tamar; Gillman, Mark; Turner, Ralph R. ...

Todd D. French; Adam J. Houben; Jean-Pierre W. Desforges; Linda E. Kimpe; Steven V. Kokelj; Alexandre J. Poulain; John P. Smol; Xiaowa Wang; Jules M. Blais

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Unsteady-state material balance model for a continuous rotary dissolver  

SciTech Connect

The unsteady-state continuous rotary dissolver material balance code (USSCRD) is a useful tool with which to study the performance of the rotary dissolver under a wide variety of operating conditions. The code does stepwise continuous material balance calculations around each dissolver stage and the digester tanks. Output from the code consists of plots and tabular information on the stagewise concentration profiles of UO{sub 2}, PuO{sub 2}, fission products, Pu(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}, UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}, fission product nitrates, HNO{sub 3}, H{sub 2}O, stainless steel, total particulate, and total fuel in pins. Other information about material transfers, stagewise liquid volume, material inventory, and dissolution performance is also provided. This report describes the development of the code, its limitations, key operating parameters, usage procedures, and the results of the analysis of several sets of operating conditions. Of primary importance in this work was the estimation of the steady-state heavy metal inventory in a 0.5-t/d dissolver drum. Values ranging from {similar_to}12 to >150 kg of U + Pu were obtained for a variety of operating conditions. Realistically, inventories are expected to be near the lower end of this range. Study of the variation of operating parameters showed significant effects on dissolver product composition from intermittent solids feed. Other observations indicated that the cycle times for the digesters and shear feed should be closely coupled in order to avoid potential problems with off-specification product. 19 references, 14 tables.

Lewis, B.E.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Dissolved organic matter in Chesapeake Bay sediment pore waters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved organic matter in Chesapeake Bay sediment pore waters David J. Burdige * Department of recent studies of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in Chesapeake Bay sediment pore waters are summar- ized water DOM. This analysis shows that much of the DOM accumulating in sediment pore waters appears

Burdige, David

197

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining oceanic dust deposition using surface ocean dissolved Al Qin Han,1 J. Keith Moore,1; accepted 7 December 2007; published 12 April 2008. [1] We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al (DEAD) model to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains all available

Zender, Charles

198

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1997 annual report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1997, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1997. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1997 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

CA, State Offshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

57 57 66 82 66 75 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3 4 3 3 1 0 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease Separation 54 53 63 79 65...

200

Production of biodiesel using expanded gas solvents  

SciTech Connect

A method of producing an alkyl ester. The method comprises providing an alcohol and a triglyceride or fatty acid. An expanding gas is dissolved into the alcohol to form a gas expanded solvent. The alcohol is reacted with the triglyceride or fatty acid in a single phase to produce the alkyl ester. The expanding gas may be a nonpolar expanding gas, such as carbon dioxide, methane, ethane, propane, butane, pentane, ethylene, propylene, butylene, pentene, isomers thereof, and mixtures thereof, which is dissolved into the alcohol. The gas expanded solvent may be maintained at a temperature below, at, or above a critical temperature of the expanding gas and at a pressure below, at, or above a critical pressure of the expanding gas.

Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID; Fox, Robert V [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a 2D 1-phase simulator in order to help us to better understand the results of gas condensate simulation. Then during the research, gas condensate models with various gas compositions were simulated using a commercial simulator (CMG). The results...

Reza, Rostami Ravari

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

202

Landfill Gas Fueled HCCI Demonstration System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Journal of Engineering for Gas Turbines and Power, 121:569-operations with natural gas: Fuel composition implications,”USA ICEF2006-1578 LANDFILL GAS FUELED HCCI DEMONSTRATION

Blizman, Brandon J.; Makel, Darby B.; Mack, John Hunter; Dibble, Robert W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Iodine Pathways and Off-Gas Stream Characteristics for Aqueous Reprocessing Plants – A Literature Survey and Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Used nuclear fuel is currently being reprocessed in only a few countries, notably France, England, Japan, and Russia. The need to control emissions of the gaseous radionuclides to the air during nuclear fuel reprocessing has already been reported for the entire plant. But since the gaseous radionuclides can partition to various different reprocessing off-gas streams, for example, from the head end, dissolver, vessel, cell, and melter, an understanding of each of these streams is critical. These off-gas streams have different flow rates and compositions and could have different gaseous radionuclide control requirements, depending on how the gaseous radionuclides partition. This report reviews the available literature to summarize specific engineering data on the flow rates, forms of the volatile radionuclides in off-gas streams, distributions of these radionuclides in these streams, and temperatures of these streams. This document contains an extensive bibliography of the information contained in the open literature.

R. T. Jubin; D. M. Strachan; N. R. Soelberg

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Photolytic processing of secondary organic aerosols dissolved in cloud droplets  

SciTech Connect

The effect of UV irradiation on the molecular composition of aqueous extracts of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) was investigated. SOA was prepared by the dark reaction of ozone and d-limonene at 0.05 - 1 ppm precursor concentrations and collected with a particle-into-liquid sampler (PILS). The PILS extracts were photolyzed by 300 - 400 nm radiation for up to 24 hours. Water-soluble SOA constituents were analyzed using high-resolution electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ESI-MS) at different stages of photolysis for all SOA precursor concentrations. Exposure to UV radiation increased the average O/C ratio and decreased the average double bond equivalent (DBE) of the dissolved SOA compounds. Oligomeric compounds were significantly reduced by photolysis relative to the monomeric compounds. Direct pH measurements showed that compounds containing carboxylic acids increased upon photolysis. Methanol reactivity analysis revealed significant photodissociation of molecules containing carbonyl groups and formation of carboxylic acids. Aldehydes, such as limononaldehyde, were almost completely removed. The removal of carbonylswas confirmed by the UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy of the SOA extracts where the absorbance in the carbonyl n??* band decreased significantly upon photolysis. The effective quantum yield (the number of carbonyls destroyed per photon absorbed) was estimated as ~ 0.03. The concentration of peroxides did not change significantly during photolysis as quantified with an iodometric test. Although organic peroxides were photolyzed, the likely end products of photolysis were smaller peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, resulting in a no net change in the peroxide content.

Bateman, Adam P.; Nizkorodov, Serguei; Laskin, Julia; Laskin, Alexander

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

205

Natural Gas Monthly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

issues Go CorrectionUpdate February 22, 2013 Two Year-To-Date values, for 2010 NGL Composite Spot Price and Natural Gas Spot Price, were incorrectly displayed in Table 3. These...

206

Acidic gas capture by diamines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions and methods related to the removal of acidic gas. In particular, the present disclosure relates to a composition and method for the removal of acidic gas from a gas mixture using a solvent comprising a diamine (e.g., piperazine) and carbon dioxide. One example of a method may involve a method for removing acidic gas comprising contacting a gas mixture having an acidic gas with a solvent, wherein the solvent comprises piperazine in an amount of from about 4 to about 20 moles/kg of water, and carbon dioxide in an amount of from about 0.3 to about 0.9 moles per mole of piperazine.

Rochelle, Gary (Austin, TX); Hilliard, Marcus (Missouri City, TX)

2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

207

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The formation of dissolved gaseous mercury (DGM) can be an important pathway for mercury removal from an aquatic environment. DGM evasional fluxes from an aquatic system can account for up to 95% of atmospheric Hg and its deposition pathways. While...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microbial production and consumption of marine dissolved organic matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marine phytoplankton are the principal producers of oceanic dissolved organic matter (DOM), the organic substrate responsible for secondary production by heterotrophic microbes in the sea. Despite the importance of DOM in ...

Becker, Jamie William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Dissolved Organic Matter Kinetically Controls Mercury Bioavailability to Bacteria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Predicting the bioavailability of inorganic mercury (Hg) to bacteria that produce the potent bioaccumulative neurotoxin monomethylmercury remains one of the greatest challenges in predicting the environmental fate and transport of Hg. Dissolved organic ...

Sophie A. Chiasson-Gould; Jules M. Blais; Alexandre J. Poulain

2014-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Measurements of dissolved nonmethane hydrocarbons in sea water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An automated stripping technique for the measurement of dissolved hydrocarbons in sea water is presented together with some results obtained ... cruise from Europe to Brazil. The sea water concentrations of NMHC ...

C. Plass; R. Koppmann; J. Rudolph

211

Dissolved gaseous mercury behavior in shallow water estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2007 Major Subject: Oceanography DISSOLVED GASEOUS MERCURY BEHAVIOR IN SHALLOW WATER ESTUARIES A Thesis by CHARLES MELCHOR LANDIN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

Landin, Charles Melchor

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modeling of multiphase behavior for gas flooding simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Miscible gas flooding is a common method for enhanced oil recovery. Reliable design of miscible gas flooding requires compositional reservoir simulation that can accurately predict… (more)

Okuno, Ryosuke, 1974-

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Strontium isotope quantification of siderite, brine and acid mine drainage contributions to abandoned gas well discharges in the Appalachian Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Unplugged abandoned oil and gas wells in the Appalachian region can serve as conduits for the movement of waters impacted by fossil fuel extraction. Strontium isotope and geochemical analysis indicate that artesian discharges of water with high total dissolved solids (TDS) from a series of gas wells in western Pennsylvania result from the infiltration of acidic, low Fe (Fe < 10 mg/L) coal mine drainage (AMD) into shallow, siderite (iron carbonate)-cemented sandstone aquifers. The acidity from the AMD promotes dissolution of the carbonate, and metal- and sulfate-contaminated waters rise to the surface through compromised abandoned gas well casings. Strontium isotope mixing models suggest that neither upward migration of oil and gas brines from Devonian reservoirs associated with the wells nor dissolution of abundant nodular siderite present in the mine spoil through which recharge water percolates contribute significantly to the artesian gas well discharges. Natural Sr isotope composition can be a sensitive tool in the characterization of complex groundwater interactions and can be used to distinguish between inputs from deep and shallow contamination sources, as well as between groundwater and mineralogically similar but stratigraphically distinct rock units. This is of particular relevance to regions such as the Appalachian Basin, where a legacy of coal, oil and gas exploration is coupled with ongoing and future natural gas drilling into deep reservoirs.

Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Stewart, Brian W.; Hedin, Robert S.; Weaver, Theodore J.; Edenborn, Harry M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Dissolved Oxygen in Allen CreekDissolved Oxygen in Allen Creek Dissolved oxygen (DO) enters the water by diffusion from air, as a by-product of photosynthesis and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved Oxygen in Allen CreekDissolved Oxygen in Allen Creek Dissolved oxygen (DO) enters and rapids. There is an inverse relationship between temperature and DO, i.e. colder water holds more oxygen it supplies oxygen to aquatic organisms. Higher DO levels also give the water a better taste. Figure 2. During

Tyler, Christy

215

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission...gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects. The N isotopic composition...discrepancies in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The...

D. S. Burnett; Genesis Science Team

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop: Summary...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

for carbon fiber, including bio-based materials or natural gas; lower energy conversion of white fiber to carbon fiber; and composite manufacturing. Dr. Johnson then...

217

Water extraction kinetics of metals, arsenic and dissolved organic carbon from industrial contaminated poplar leaves  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In industrial areas, tree leaves contaminated by metals and metalloids could constitute a secondary source of pollutants. In the present study, water extraction kinetics of inorganic elements (IE: Pb, Zn, Cd, As, Fe and Mn), dissolved organic carbon, pH and biological activity were studied for industrial contaminated poplar leaves. Moreover, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the associated top soil was measured. High quantities of Mn, Zn and As and polysaccharides were released in the solution from the strongly contaminated leaves. The kinetic of release varied with time and metal type. The solution pH decreased while dissolved organic contents increased with time after 30 days. Therefore, these contaminated leaves could constitute a source of more available organic metals and metalloids than the initial inorganic process particles. However, the distribution of the IE through the size fractions of the top soil suggested that a great part of the released IE was adsorbed, reducing in consequence their transfers and bioavailability. It's concluded that mobility/bioavailability and speciation of metals and metalloids released from the decomposition of polluted tree leaves depends on soil characteristics, pollutant type and litter composition, with consequences for environmental risk assessment.

Muhammad Shahid; Tiantian Xiong; Maryse Castrec-Rouelle; Tibo Leveque; Camille Dumat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Free Zinc Ion and Dissolved Orthophosphate Effects on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

historic heavy-metal mining and smelting areas. The lake transitions longitudinally from mesotrophic toxic response by phytoplankton and higher- trophic-level organisms due to elevated dissolved-metal of nutrients, toxicants, and sediment from two major riverine inputs; the St. Joe River from the south

219

The Minnesota Filter: A Tool for Capturing Stormwater Dissolved Phosphorus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of urban storm water best management practices, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, D.C. #12 in Agricultural Runoff. Journal of Environmental Quality 21(1), 30-35. U.S. EPA. (1999) Preliminary data summary treatment practices provide: ­ Filtration (solids) ­ Infiltration (solids, dissolved?) ­ Sedimentation

Minnesota, University of

220

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Kinetic Model of Gas Bubble Dissolution in Groundwater and Its  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that rely on the actual dissolved gas content of gases such as oxygen or nitrogen. To describe the bubble of this excess gas is controlled by the solubility and the molecular diffusivity of the gases considered to water in the pore space. In the case of noble gases in a through-flow system, solubility differences

Aeschbach-Hertig, Werner

222

California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,879 2,538 2,926 2,785 3,042 2,119 1979-2012 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 686 621 612 503 510 272 1979-2012 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After...

223

Alaska Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,766 9,183 8,917 9,511 9,667 7,383 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 1,139 1,090 1,021 976 995 955 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet...

224

Utah Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6,714 7,411 7,146 8,108 7,775 7,057 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 6,393 6,810 6,515 7,199 6,774 6,162 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved,...

225

California Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,538 2,926 2,785 3,042 2,119 2,023 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 621 612 503 510 272 247 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After...

226

Ohio Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

985 896 832 758 1,235 3,201 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 886 799 742 684 1,012 2,887 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After Lease...

227

Michigan Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3,253 2,805 2,975 2,549 1,781 1,839 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,105 2,728 2,903 2,472 1,687 1,714 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved,...

228

Alabama Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

3,379 2,948 2,724 2,570 2,304 1,670 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,360 2,919 2,686 2,522 2,204 1,624 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved,...

229

Kansas Natural Gas Reserves Summary as of Dec. 31  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3,795 3,500 3,937 3,747 3,557 3,772 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 3,710 3,417 3,858 3,620 3,231 3,339 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved,...

230

CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore Natural Gas Reserves Summary as...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2,249 2,609 2,447 2,685 1,650 1,574 1979-2013 Natural Gas Nonassociated, Wet After Lease Separation 617 607 498 506 269 245 1979-2013 Natural Gas Associated-Dissolved, Wet After...

231

Gas Atomization of Amorphous Aluminum: Part I. Thermal Behavior Calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which are summarized below: 1. Gas composition is moree?ective than gas pressure on in?uencing cooling rate for app. 210–11. 37. J.E.A. John: Gas Dynamics, Allyn and Bacon,

Zheng, Baolong; Lin, Yaojun; Zhou, Yizhang; Lavernia, Enrique J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation and Their Selective Inclusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supramolecular Composite Materials from Cellulose, Chitosan, and Cyclodextrin: Facile Preparation-performance supramolecular polysaccharide composites from cellulose (CEL), chitosan (CS), and (2,3,6-tri to dissolve and prepare the composites. Because a majority (>88%) of the IL used was recovered for reuse

Reid, Scott A.

233

Flue gas desulfurization/denitrification using metal-chelate additives  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of simultaneously removing SO/sub 2/ and NO from oxygen-containing flue gases resulting from the combustion of carbonaceous material by contacting the flue gas with an aqueous scrubber solution containing an aqueous sulfur dioxide sorbent and an active metal chelating agent which promotes a reaction between dissolved SO/sub 2/ and dissolved NO to form hydroxylamine N-sulfonates. The hydroxylamine sulfonates are then separated from the scrubber solution which is recycled. 3 figs.

Harkness, J.B.L.; Doctor, R.D.; Wingender, R.J.

1985-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

234

Coal Beneficiation by Gas Agglomeration  

SciTech Connect

Coal beneficiation is achieved by suspending coal fines in a colloidal suspension of microscopic gas bubbles in water under atmospheric conditions to form small agglomerates of the fines adhered by the gas bubbles. The agglomerates are separated, recovered and resuspended in water. Thereafter, the pressure on the suspension is increased above atmospheric to deagglomerate, since the gas bubbles are then re-dissolved in the water. During the deagglomeration step, the mineral matter is dispersed, and when the pressure is released, the coal portion of the deagglomerated gas-saturated water mixture reagglomerates, with the small bubbles now coming out of the solution. The reagglomerate can then be separated to provide purified coal fines without the mineral matter.

Thomas D. Wheelock; Meiyu Shen

2000-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

235

Sulfur geochemistry of thermogenic gas hydrate and associated sediment from the Texas-Louisiana continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

total reduced sulfide (TRS), acid volatile sulfide, and citrate-dithionate and HCl extractable iron. Pore-fluid measurements included []H?S, chloride, sulfate, ammonia and total dissolved inorganic carbon. Gas hydrate hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide...

Gledhill, Dwight Kuehl

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? One Giant Leap for Radiation Biology? What's in the Cage Matters in Iron Antimonide Thermoelectric Materials Novel Experiments on Cement Yield Concrete Results Watching a Glycine Riboswitch "Switch" Polyamorphism in a Metallic Glass Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed How Dissolved Metal Ions Interact in Solution MAY 2, 2007 Bookmark and Share Researchers at the Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Notre Dame have successfully applied X-ray scattering techniques to determine how dissolved metal ions interact in solution. Researchers from the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National

237

Major Bacterial Contribution to Marine Dissolved Organic Nitrogen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...essentially all natural...transect between Corpus Christi, Texas, and...esters by gas chromatography...Aminos Acids in Natural Waters, J...transect between Corpus Christi, Texas...esters by gas chromatography...Aminos Acids in Natural Waters, J...

Matthew D. McCarthy; John I. Hedges; Ronald Benner

1998-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural catalytic activity in marine shales. Gas is generated at ambient temperatures...differences are in degree. Mowry shale generates gas compositions that are quite different...probably a major source of natural gas. Mowry shale generates gas at thermodynamic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this thesis is the design and development of a system for rapid extraction of dissolved inorganic carbon from seawater and groundwater samples for radiocarbon dating. The Rapid Extraction of Dissolved Inorganic ...

Gospodinova, Kalina Doneva

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Mobilization of optically invisible dissolved organic matter in response to rainstorm events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mobilization of optically invisible dissolved organic matter in response to rainstorm events and includes optically invisible dissolved organic matter (iDOM) that accounts for a large proportion (4

Chappell, Nick A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Study of Multi-scale Transport Phenomena in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These challenges have impeded efficient economic development of shale resources. New fundamental insights and tools are needed to improve the state of shale gas development. Few attempts have been made to model the compositional behavior of fluids in shale gas...

Freeman, Craig Matthew

2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

242

Dissolved Oxygen Sensing in a Flow Stream using Molybdenum Chloride Optical Indicators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved Oxygen Sensing in a Flow Stream using Molybdenum Chloride Optical Indicators Reza Loloee1@msu.edu Abstract--Dissolved oxygen concentration is considered the most important water quality variable in fish culture. Reliable and continuous (24/7) oxygen monitoring of dissolved oxygen (DO) in the 1 ­ 11 mg

Ghosh, Ruby N.

243

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D.; Bourcier, William L.

2014-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

Carbon ion pump for removal of carbon dioxide from combustion gas and other gas mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A novel method and system of separating carbon dioxide from flue gas is introduced. Instead of relying on large temperature or pressure changes to remove carbon dioxide from a solvent used to absorb it from flue gas, the ion pump method, as disclosed herein, dramatically increases the concentration of dissolved carbonate ion in solution. This increases the overlying vapor pressure of carbon dioxide gas, permitting carbon dioxide to be removed from the downstream side of the ion pump as a pure gas. The ion pumping may be obtained from reverse osmosis, electrodialysis, thermal desalination methods, or an ion pump system having an oscillating flow in synchronization with an induced electric field.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Bourcier, William L. (Livermore, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Effect of Magnesite as Bed Material in a 100 kWth Steam?Oxygen Blown Circulating Fluidized-Bed Biomass Gasifier on Gas Composition and Tar Formation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Those issues, depending upon the type of the gasifier, are related to (1) scale of operation and availability of biomass, (2) size distribution of raw biomass, (3) operability of the gasifier with fuels containing large amounts of ash, especially if the fraction of alkali, chlorine, and sulfur is high,(2) (4) the formation of condensable higher hydrocarbons (tar), and (5) cleaning and upgrading of the gas for dedicated downstream application. ... The main characteristics of the rig are (i) reactor height, 5.5 m; (ii) riser inner diameter, 83 mm; downcomer inner diameter, 54 mm; material, stainless-steel AISI310, DIN 1.4845; (iii) fluidization medium electrical preheater (6 kW; Tmax = 400 °C; Tnom = 360 °C; Watlow, St. Louis, MO); (iv) electrical heating of the whole rig (22 kW; Tmax = 1200 °C; Tnom = 850 °C) using modular ceramic fiber heaters (ZMC Zamac, Poland); (v) high-temperature ceramic tissue candle filter unit (BWF, Germany) operating at 450 °C and a high-temperature Si?SiC ceramic candle filter (Pall-Schumacher, Germany) operating at 800 °C; (vi) feeding system with a maximum feed rate of ca. ... 200 and 470 ?m, while magnesite particle sizes are spread throughout the analysis domain; the fraction of fines in magnesite is significantly larger than in sand. ...

M. Siedlecki; R. Nieuwstraten; E. Simeone; W. de Jong; A. H. M. Verkooijen

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

246

Deep-Sea Research II 49 (2002) 44214437 Chemical composition and cycling of dissolved organic matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

matter in the Mid-Atlantic Bight Lihini I. Aluwiharea, *, Daniel J. Repetab , Robert F. Chenc the Middle Atlantic Bight in April 1994 and March 1996. Using proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy on ocean margins is often an order of magnitude higher than in the central ocean basins (Walsh, 1988

Aluwihare, Lihini

247

Dissolved organic matter discharge in the six largest arctic rivers-chemical composition and seasonal variability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) -1 , c) Acid to aldehyde ratios for vanillyls and syringyls, d) Syringyls/Vanillyls (S/V) & Cinnamyls/ vanillyls (C/V), e) p-coumaric acid/ferulic acid (CAD/FAD) & p- hydroxybenzaldehyde /total p-hydroxy group (PON/P), f) 3,5...-hydroxy group (PON/P), f) 3,5- dihydroxybenzoic acid/vanillyl (DiBA/V) & total p-hydroxy group/ (vanillyl + syringyl) (P/(V+S))............................................................... 72 27 Kolyma River discharge (m 3 s -1 ), and a...

Rinehart, Amanda J.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Compositional controls on melting and dissolving a salt into a ternary melt  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...far-field fluid temperature, there is more...than is needed to supply latent heat, and...contribution to interface temperature through the need...the interface to supply latent heat. This...capture the dominant controls on the dissolution...associated with the temperatures of the solid and...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

U.S. crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1995 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1995, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1995. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1995 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

US crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids reserves 1996 annual report  

SciTech Connect

The EIA annual reserves report series is the only source of comprehensive domestic proved reserves estimates. This publication is used by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and other interested parties to obtain accurate estimates of the Nation`s proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. These data are essential to the development, implementation, and evaluation of energy policy and legislation. This report presents estimates of proved reserves of crude oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids as of December 31, 1996, as well as production volumes for the US and selected States and State subdivisions for the year 1996. Estimates are presented for the following four categories of natural gas: total gas (wet after lease separation), nonassociated gas and associated-dissolved gas (which are the two major types of wet natural gas), and total dry gas (wet gas adjusted for the removal of liquids at natural gas processing plants). In addition, reserve estimates for two types of natural gas liquids, lease condensate and natural gas plant liquids, are presented. Also included is information on indicated additional crude oil reserves and crude oil, natural gas, and lease condensate reserves in nonproducing reservoirs. A discussion of notable oil and gas exploration and development activities during 1996 is provided. 21 figs., 16 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 32 54 297 122 150 42 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 24 47 222 81 138 42 1981-2011 Texas 7 7 75 41 12 0 1981-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 California 0 0 9 0 0 0 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 0 9 0 0 0 1979-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 0 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011

252

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 32 54 297 122 150 42 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 1 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 24 47 222 81 138 42 1981-2011 Texas 7 7 75 41 12 0 1981-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 65 73 820 169 186 160 1979-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 California 0 0 9 0 0 0 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 0 9 0 0 0 1979-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 0 0 1 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011

253

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas New Field Discoveries, Wet After Lease  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

40 46 107 263 102 611 1979-2011 40 46 107 263 102 611 1979-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 27 43 93 214 6 524 1990-2011 Pacific (California) 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 27 4 93 25 6 524 1981-2011 Texas 0 39 0 189 0 0 1981-2011 Alaska 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Lower 48 States 40 46 107 263 102 611 1979-2011 Alabama 0 0 0 0 2 2 1979-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 California 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 State Offshore 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Colorado 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Florida 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011 Kansas 0 0 4 0 1 0 1979-2011 Kentucky 0 0 0 0 0 0 1979-2011

254

U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved Reserves, Wet After Lease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Area: U.S. Federal Offshore U.S. Federal Offshore, Pacific (California) Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, LA & AL Federal Offshore, Gulf of Mexico, TX Alaska Lower 48 States Alabama Arkansas California CA, Coastal Region Onshore CA, Los Angeles Basin Onshore CA, San Joaquin Basin Onshore CA, State Offshore Colorado Florida Kansas Kentucky Louisiana North Louisiana LA, South Onshore LA, State Offshore Michigan Mississippi Montana Nebraska New Mexico NM, East NM, West New York North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Pennsylvania Texas TX, RRC District 1 TX, RRC District 2 Onshore TX, RRC District 3 Onshore TX, RRC District 4 Onshore TX, RRC District 5 TX, RRC District 6 TX, RRC District 7B TX, RRC District 7C TX, RRC District 8 TX, RRC District 8A TX, RRC District 9 TX, RRC District 10 TX, State Offshore Utah Virginia West Virginia Wyoming Miscellaneous Period:

255

Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Reserves Sales, Wet After Lease Separation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

726 1,115 662 564 1,146 1,338 2000-2011 726 1,115 662 564 1,146 1,338 2000-2011 Federal Offshore U.S. 455 161 48 20 83 66 2000-2011 Pacific (California) 0 1 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Louisiana & Alabama 320 156 48 20 74 66 2000-2011 Texas 135 4 0 0 9 0 2000-2011 Alaska 0 3 0 1 0 2 2000-2011 Lower 48 States 1,726 1,112 662 563 1,146 1,336 2000-2011 Alabama 4 5 0 0 2 9 2000-2011 Arkansas 0 0 0 5 0 38 2000-2011 California 133 8 7 4 1 1 2000-2011 Coastal Region Onshore 70 4 6 0 1 0 2000-2011 Los Angeles Basin Onshore 37 0 1 0 0 0 2000-2011 San Joaquin Basin Onshore 26 2 0 4 0 0 2000-2011 State Offshore 0 2 0 0 0 1 2000-2011 Colorado 578 3 1 9 2 19 2000-2011 Florida 0 48 0 0 0 0 2000-2011 Kansas 0 0 1 0 1 1 2000-2011 Kentucky

256

Federal Offshore U.S. Associated-Dissolved Natural Gas Proved...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,106 5,223 5,204 5,446 5,864 5,530 1990-2013 Adjustments 7 12 -14 -22 -165 -73 1990-2013 Revision Increases 609 854 1,028 1,583 1,894 829 1990-2013 Revision Decreases 430 517 879...

257

Gas Chromatographic Measurement of Trace Oxygen and Other Dissolved Gases in Thermally Stressed Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......additional light hydrocarbon gases (e.g...stream, and the data can be obtained...system. The output data from this analytical...F33615-87-C-2714 and the Combustion and Heat Transfer Studies...from deoxygenated hydrocarbons: I. General features......

Wayne A. Rubey; Richard C. Striebich; Michael D. Tissandier; Debra A. Tirey; Steven D. Anderson

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Bead and Process for Removing Dissolved Metal Contaminants  

SciTech Connect

A bead is provided which comprises or consists essentially of activated carbon immobilized by crosslinked poly (carboxylic acid) binder, sodium silicate binder, or polyamine binder. The bead is effective to remove metal and other ionic contaminants from dilute aqueous solutions. A method of making metal-ion sorbing beads is provided, comprising combining activated carbon, and binder solution (preferably in a pin mixer where it is whipped), forming wet beads, and heating and drying the beads. The binder solution is preferably poly(acrylic acid) and glycerol dissolved in water and the wet beads formed from such binder solution are preferably heated and crosslinked in a convection oven.

Summers, Bobby L., Jr.; Bennett, Karen L.; Foster, Scott A.

2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

259

Kinetic control of dissolved phosphate in natural rivers - American ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

gas adsorption onto solid surfaces. Since the process of solution P exchange with solids ...... OVIATT, AND S. S. HALE. 1980. Phosphorus re- generation and the ...

2000-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties of molecular hydrogen dissolved in water at pressures up to 200 MPa  

SciTech Connect

We have measured the Raman Q-branch of hydrogen in a solution with water at a temperature of about 280 K and at pressures from 20 to 200 MPa. From a least-mean-square fitting analysis of the broad Raman Q-branch, we isolated the contributions from the four lowest individual roto-vibrational lines. The vibrational lines were narrower than the pure rotational Raman lines of hydrogen dissolved in water measured previously, but significantly larger than in the gas. The separations between these lines were found to be significantly smaller than in gaseous hydrogen and their widths were slightly increasing with pressure. The lines were narrowing with increasing rotational quantum number. The Raman frequencies of all roto-vibrational lines were approaching the values of gas phase hydrogen with increasing pressure. Additionally, from the comparison of the integrated intensity signal of Q-branch of hydrogen to the integrated Raman signal of the water bending mode, we have obtained the concentration of hydrogen in a solution with water along the 280 K isotherm. Hydrogen solubility increases slowly with pressure, and no deviation from a smooth behaviour was observed, even reaching thermodynamic conditions very close to the transition to the stable hydrogen hydrate. The analysis of the relative hydrogen concentration in solution on the basis of a simple thermodynamic model has allowed us to obtain the molar volume for the hydrogen gas/water solution. Interestingly, the volume relative to one hydrogen molecule in solution does not decrease with pressure and, at high pressure, is larger than the volume pertinent to one molecule of water. This is in favour of the theory of hydrophobic solvation, for which a larger and more stable structure of the water molecules is expected around a solute molecule.

Borysow, Jacek, E-mail: jborysow@mtu.edu; Rosso, Leonardo del; Celli, Milva; Ulivi, Lorenzo, E-mail: lorenzo.ulivi@isc.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)] [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Via Madonna del piano 10, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy); Moraldi, Massimo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, I-50019 Sesto Fiorentino (Italy)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

263

Surface Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Surface Gas Sampling Surface Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Surface Gas Sampling Details Activities (12) Areas (10) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Surface Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle Introduction

264

Quantitative dynamic analysis of gas desorption contribution to production in shale gas reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Unlike in conventional gas reservoirs, gas in shale reservoirs is stored mainly as free gas and adsorbed gas, and a small amount of dissolved gas. Well production from shale gas reservoirs usually exhibits sharply decline trend in the early period of production and then turns to long-term stable production at a relatively low rate, for which gas desorption contribution has been considered as a possible explanation. This study aims at providing an accurate evaluation of the contribution from gas desorption to dynamic production. Through incorporation of artificial component subdivision in a numerical simulator, the production contributions of the free and adsorbed gas can be obtained separately. This analysis approach is validated firstly and then applied to two case studies based on conceptual models of Barnett and Antrim Shale. The results show that desorbed gas dominates the production in Antrim Shale, while it only plays a small role in the production in Barnett Shale. The impact of permeability and initial gas saturation are also analyzed. In previous studies, numerical and analytical simulators were used to investigate the difference between the production performances with or without desorption, attributing the production increase to gas desorption. However, our study shows this treatment overestimates the contribution from gas desorption. This work provides a simple but accurate method for the dynamic analysis of desorption contribution to total production, contributing to reservoir resource assessment, the understanding of production mechanisms, and shale gas production simulation.

Tingyun Yang; Xiang Li; Dongxiao Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Stable isotope geochemistry of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal bed and shale gas can be of thermogenic, microbial or of mixed origin with the distinction made primarily on the basis of the molecular and stable isotope compositions of the gases and production waters. Methane, ethane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen are the main constituents of coal bed and shale gases, with a general lack of C2+ hydrocarbon species in gases produced from shallow levels and more mature coals and shales. Evidence for the presence of microbial gas include ?13C–CH4 values less than ? 50‰, covariation of the isotope compositions of gases and production water, carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations consistent with microbial processes, and positive ?13C values of dissolved inorganic carbon in production waters. The CO2-reduction pathway is distinguished from acetate/methyl-type fermentation by somewhat lower ?13C–CH4 and higher ?D–CH4, but can also have overlapping values depending on the openness of the microbial system and the extent of substrate depletion. Crossplots of ?13C–CH4 versus ?13C–CO2 and ?D–CH4 versus ?13C–H2O may provide a better indication of the origin of the gases and the dominant metabolic pathway than the absolute carbon and hydrogen isotope compositions of methane. In the majority of cases, microbial coal bed and shale gases have carbon and hydrogen isotope fractionations close to those expected for CO2 reduction. Primary thermogenic gases have ?13C–CH4 values greater than ? 50‰, and ?13C values that systematically increase from C1 to C4 and define a relatively straight line when plotted against reciprocal carbon number. Although coals and disseminated organic matter in shales represent a continuum as hydrocarbon source rocks, current data suggest a divergence between these two rock types at the high maturity end. In deep basin shale gas, reversals or rollovers in molecular and isotopic compositions are increasingly reported in what is effectively a closed shale system as opposed to the relative openness in coal measure environments. Detailed geochemical studies of coal bed and shale gas and related production waters are essential to determine not only gas origins but also the dominant methanogenic pathway in the case of microbial gases.

Suzanne D. Golding; Chris J. Boreham; Joan S. Esterle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Exhaust gas clean up process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of cleaning an exhaust gas containing particulates, SO.sub.2 and NO.sub.x includes prescrubbing with water to remove HCl and most of the particulates, scrubbing with an aqueous absorbent containing a metal chelate and dissolved sulfite salt to remove NO.sub.x and SO.sub.2, and regenerating the absorbent solution by controlled heating, electrodialysis and carbonate salt addition. The NO.sub.x is removed as N.sub.2 or nitrogen-sulfonate ions and the oxides of sulfur are removed as a vaulable sulfate salt.

Walker, Richard J. (McMurray, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Table EA-1. Stream-water dissolved Mn at basin outflow of perennial stream at Inspiration Dam illustrating decreases in dissolved Mn in response to remediation efforts. Dissolved Mn in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Jul-98 2.8E-04 24-Nov-98 3.6E-04 11-Feb-99 1.2E-05 Remedial ground-water pumping begins 24-Mar-99 8.9E) and ground-water (GW) chemistry data for streambed sediment sampling sites. Dissolved concentrations in moleTable EA-1. Stream-water dissolved Mn at basin outflow of perennial stream at Inspiration Dam

268

Electrodialysis-ion exchange for the separation of dissolved salts  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy generates and stores a significant quantity of low level, high level, and mixed wastes. As some of the DOE facilities are decontaminated and decommissioned, additional and possibly different forms of wastes will be generated. A significant portion of these wastes are aqueous streams containing acids, bases, and salts, or are wet solids containing inorganic salts. Some of these wastes are quite dilute solutions, whereas others contain large quantities of nitrates either in the form of dissolved salts or acids. Many of the wastes are also contaminated with heavy metals, radioactive products, or organics. Some of these wastes are in storage because a satisfactory treatment and disposal processes have not been developed. This report describes the process of electrodialysis-ion exchange (EDIX) for treating aqueous wastes streams consisting of nitrates, sodium, organics, heavy metals, and radioactive species.

Baroch, C.J.; Grant, P.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation and validation of criticality codes for fuel dissolver calculations  

SciTech Connect

During the past ten years an OECD/NEA Criticality Working Group has examined the validity of criticality safety computational methods. International calculation tools which were shown to be valid in systems for which experimental data existed were demonstrated to be inadequate when extrapolated to fuel dissolver media. The spread of the results in the international calculation amounted to {plus minus} 12,000 pcm in the realistic fuel dissolver exercise n{degrees} 19 proposed by BNFL, and to {plus minus} 25,000 pcm in the benchmark n{degrees} 20 in which fissile material in solid form is surrounded by fissile material in solution. A theoretical study of the main physical parameters involved in fuel dissolution calculations was performed, i.e. range of moderation, variation of pellet size and the fuel double heterogeneity effect. The APOLLO/P{sub IC} method developed to treat latter effect, permits us to supply the actual reactivity variation with pellet dissolution and to propose international reference values. The disagreement among contributors' calculations was analyzed through a neutron balance breakdown, based on three-group microscopic reaction rates solicited from the participants. The results pointed out that fast and resonance nuclear data in criticality codes are not sufficiently reliable. Moreover the neutron balance analysis emphasized the inadequacy of the standard self-shielding formalism (NITAWL in the international SCALE package) to account for {sup 238}U resonance mutual self-shielding in the pellet-fissile liquor interaction. Improvements in the up-dated 1990 contributions, as do recent complementary reference calculations (MCNP, VIM, ultrafine slowing-down CGM calculation), confirm the need to use rigorous self-shielding methods in criticality design-oriented codes. 6 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

Santamarina, A.; Smith, H.J. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)); Whitesides, G.E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Effect of raw material and Kraft Pulping Conditions on Characteristics of Dissolved Lignin.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Lignin is one of the main components in wood and during the chemical pulping processes it is degraded and dissolved into the cooking liquor.… (more)

Svärd, Antonia

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

DOE/LX/07-0341&D1 Secondary Document Gold DIssolver Tank DMSA...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DIssolver Tank DMSA C-400-03 Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) Assessment Report SWMUAOC NUMBER: 48 DATE OF ORIGINAL SAR: 082487 DATE OF SAR REVISIONS: 061410 REGULATORY...

272

Spatial and temporal variability of absorption by dissolved material at a continental shelf  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The storms were associated with sediment resuspension events and were accompanied by an increase during sediment resuspension events. 1. Introduction Colored dissolved organic material (CDOM) absorption

Boss, Emmanuel S.

273

Chlorine Decay and Disinfection By-product Formation of Dissolved Organic Carbon Fractions with Goethite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Water from the raw water intake at Barberton, Ohio water treatment plant was collected on two separate dates and fractionated into operationally defined dissolved organic… (more)

Wannamaker, Christopher L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Effects of Photoirradiation on the Adsorption of Dissolved Organic Matter to Goethite.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??EFFECTS OF PHOTOIRRADIATION ON THE ADSORPTION OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC MATTER TO GEOTHITE Abstract by Christina Ann Progess Previous research has shown that intermediate and high… (more)

Progess, Christina Ann

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Long-term patterns of dissolved organic carbon in lakes across ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... dynamics of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in 55 lakes during ice-free periods in five regions across eastern Canada in relation to total solar radiation (

276

The Importance of Geochemical Parameters and Shale Composition on Rock Mechanical Properties of Gas Shale Reservoirs: a Case Study From the Kockatea Shale and Carynginia Formation From the Perth Basin, Western Australia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Evaluation of the gas shale mechanical properties is very important screening criteria ... for hydraulic fracturing and as a result in gas shale sweet spot mapping. Young’s modulus and ... mechanical properties t...

Mohammad Mahdi Labani; Reza Rezaee

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Shale gas development impacts on surface water quality in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Development , (2011) Plan to Study the Potential...Dissolved Solids Standard: A Guide to the...gas and solution mining regulatory program...legacy of coal mining in many Pennsylvania...description, using standard codes for brine...remediation options: A review. Sci Total...water quality standard for chloride in...

Sheila M. Olmstead; Lucija A. Muehlenbachs; Jhih-Shyang Shih; Ziyan Chu; Alan J. Krupnick

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Bibliography and Index to the Literature on Gas Chromatography: January 1, 1963 to November 1, 1963  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......OF HYDROGEN ISOTOPES BY GAS-SOLID...BLOOD OXYGEN DETERMINATIONS BY GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY...OF BUTENES BY BORON FLUORIDE- ACETIC...ONDARY KINETIC ISOTOPE EFFECT, Fal...1963) 395 DETERMINATION OF DISSOLVED...KETONES WITH BORON TRI- FLUORIDE...QUANTITATIVE DETERMINATION OF FORMIC......

Seaton T. Preston; Jr.; Geneva Hyder; Mignon Gill

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Kinetics simulation for natural gas conversion to unsaturated C? hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

value. The usual chemical composition range of natural gas is shown in Table I. l. Table 1. 1 Natural Gas Composition Component Methane Ethane Pro ane iso-Butane normal-Butane iso-Pentane normal-Pentane Hexane s lus Nitro en Carbon Dioxide... Acetylene Carbon Ethylene Hydrogen Methane Water Carbon Dioxide CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Challenge for Natural Gas Natural Gas (NG), which is comprised priinarily of methane, is found throughout the world, burns cleanly, and processes a high caloric...

Yang, Li

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Flowsheet modifications for dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible residues in the F-canyon dissolvers  

SciTech Connect

An initial flowsheet for the dissolution of sand, slag, and crucible (SS{ampersand}C) was developed for the F- Canyon dissolvers as an alternative to dissolution in FB-Line. In that flowsheet, the sand fines were separated from the slag chunks and crucible fragments. Those two SS{ampersand}C streams were packaged separately in mild-steel cans for dissolution in the 6.4D dissolver. Nuclear safety constraints limited the dissolver charge to approximately 350 grams of plutonium in two of the three wells of the dissolver insert and required 0.23M (molar) boron as a soluble neutron poison in the 9.3M nitric acid/0.013M fluoride dissolver solution. During the first dissolution of SS{ampersand}C fines, it became apparent that a significant amount of the plutonium charged to the 6.4D dissolver did not dissolve in the time predicted by previous laboratory experiments. The extended dissolution time was attributed to fluoride complexation by boron. An extensive research and development (R{ampersand}D) program was initiated to investigate the dissolution chemistry and the physical configuration of the dissolver insert to understand what flowsheet modifications were needed to achieve a viable dissolution process.

Rudisill, T.S.; Karraker, D.G.; Graham, F.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The potential source of dissolved aluminum from resuspended sediments to the North Atlantic deep water  

SciTech Connect

Laboratory and field studies were conducted to investigate the significance of resuspended sediments as a source of dissolved Al to the deep northwest Atlantic. Sediment resuspension experiments demonstrate the effect on dissolved Al concentration (initially 11 nM) of adding natural suspended sediments (ca. 0.1-10 mg/L) to seawater. The concentration of dissolved Al increased by the resuspension of sediments; for example, addition of 0.15 mg/L sediments caused dissolved Al to increase by 10 nM. Distributions of dissolved and leachable particulate Al off the tail of the Grand Banks, near the high-energy western boundary current, show elevated levels in the near-bottom waters. The authors suggest that resuspended sediments associated with nepheloid layers along the western boundary of the North Atlantic are a source of dissolved Al. Strong western boundary currents provide the energy to resuspend and maintain intense nepheloid layers of sediments. Continued resuspension and deposition of sediments within the nepheloid layer promotes the release of Al from sediments to the overlying water. The Al-rich terrigenous sediments that predominate along the deep boundary of the Denmark Strait, Labrador Sea, Newfoundland and off Nova Scotia constitute a potentially significant source of dissolved Al. Release of Al from resuspended sediments associated with nepheloid layers at a more northern location (e.g., Denmark Strait) may contribute to the near-linear increase in dissolved Al with depth observed in the deep northwest Atlantic.

Moran, S.B.; Moore, R.M. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

1 In situ Ramanbased measurements of high dissolved methane 2 concentrations in hydraterich ocean sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sediments 3 Xin Zhang,1,2 Keith C. Hester,1,3 William Ussler,1 Peter M. Walz,1 Edward T. Peltzer,1 4 XX Month 2011. 6 [1] Ocean sediment dissolved CH4 concentrations are of 7 interest for possible dissolved 28 methane concentrations in hydraterich ocean sediments, Geophys. 29 Res. Lett., 38, LXXXXX, doi

Tian, Weidong

286

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Constraining Oceanic dust deposition using surface 1 ocean dissolved Al 2 Qin Han, J. Keith Moore, Charles Zender, Chris Measures, David Hydes 3 Abstract 4 We use measurements of ocean surface dissolved Al and Deposition 6 (DEAD) model, to constrain dust deposition to the oceans. Our Al database contains 7 all

Zender, Charles

287

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved oxygen stratification in two micro-tidal partially-mixed estuaries Jing Lin a,*, Lian Xie online 21 August 2006 Abstract The controlling physical factors for vertical oxygen stratification that vertical stratification of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration can be explained by the extended Hansen

Mallin, Michael

288

Electrode compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrode composition is described for use as an electrode in a non-aqueous battery system. The electrode composition contains an electrically active powder in a solid polymer and, as a dispersant, a C{sub 8}-C{sub 15} alkyl capped oligomer of a hexanoic acid that is electrochemically inert at 2.5--4.5 volts.

Block, J.; Fan, X.

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

289

Dissolving brittle stars hint at implications of ocean acidification |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Sea urchins and brittle starfish on the seabed at Explorers Cove in Antarctica. The rate the starfish decay offers clues to ocean acidification. Photo courtesy of Shawn Harper. To view a larger version of the image, click on it. Dissolving brittle stars hint at implications of ocean acidification By Chelsea Leu * August 15, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint Under the sea ice of Explorers Cove, Antarctica, is a startling array of life. Brittle stars, sea urchins and scallops grow in profusion on the seafloor, a stark contrast to the icy moonscape on the continent's

290

The Transfer of Dissolved Cs-137 from Soil to Plants  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at the same experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Roots of the plants were side by side in the soil. During two seasons we selected samples of the plants and of the soils several times every season. Content of Cs-137 in the plant and in the soil solution extracted from the samples of soils was measured. Results of measurements of the samples show that, for the experimental site, Cs-137 content in the plant varies with date of the sample selection. The plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio depends strongly on the date of selection and also on the type of soil. After analysis of the data we conclude that Cs-137 plant uptake is approximately proportional to the content of dissolved Cs-137 in the soil per unit of volume, and the plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio for the soil is approximately proportional to the soil moisture. (authors)

Prorok, V.V.; Melnichenko, L.Yu. [Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 2, build. 1 Acad. Glushkov prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine); Mason, C.F.V. [Research Applications Corporation, 148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Ageyev, V.A.; Ostashko, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 47 Nauky prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

EXAFS studies of sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved actinides  

SciTech Connect

Sodium silicate glasses containing dissolved Th, U, Np, and Pu have been studied using the EXAFS technique. Th/sup 4 +/, U/sup 4 +/, Np/sup 4 +/, and Pu/sup 4 +/ ions in the silicate glasses are 8-fold coordinated to oxygen neighbors. The higher valent U/sup 6 +/ and Np/sup 5 +/ ions have complex local symmetries. The U/sup 6 +/ ions appear in a uranyl configuration with 2 oxygen atoms at 1.85A and 4 at 2.25A from the U ion. The Np/sup 5 +/ local symmetry is more complex and difficult to determine uniquely. The U/sup 6 +/ glasses show substantial clustering of the uranium atoms. A structural model, with nearly planar uranyl sheets sandwiched between alkali and silica layers, is used to explain the U/sup 6 +/ EXAFS data. This model allows us to understand why U/sup 6 +/ ions are much more soluble in the glasses than the actinide 4/sup +/ ions. 4 references, 2 figures.

Knapp, G.S.; Veal, B.W.; Paulikas, A.P.; Mitchell, A.W.; Lam, D.J.; Klippert, T.E.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Method of manufacturing aerogel composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herewith is a process of forming an aerogel composite which comprises introducing a gaseous material into a formed aerogel monolith or powder, and causing decomposition of said gaseous material in said aerogel in amounts sufficient to cause deposition of the decomposition products of the gas on the surfaces of the pores of the said aerogel.

Cao, W.; Hunt, A.J.

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

293

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

294

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

295

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

296

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

297

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

298

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

299

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

300

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

302

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

303

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

304

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

305

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

306

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

307

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar composition from the Genesis Discovery Mission D. S. Burnett1 and Genesis Science Team2: the isoto- pic compositions of O, N, and noble gases differ in the Sun from other inner solar system objects in the noble gas data from solar wind implanted in lunar soils. (ii) The most advanced analytical instruments

308

Significance of Secondary Porosity in Interpreting Sandstone Composition  

SciTech Connect

Secondary porosity resulting from dissolution of unstable framework grains such as feldspar and rock fragments (including chert) is common in sandstones. Extensive dissolution of framework grains may result in misinterpreting the original composition of a sandstone and, hence, in misinterpreting its provenance. To avoid these problems, secondary porosity caused by grain dissolution must be recognized. Sandstone composition may be properly evaluated by including the dissolved portion of a framework grain as a grain, rather than as porosity, while point counting. This should be useful in interpreting original composition of sandstones and in paleogeographic reconstruction of prospect areas.

Shanmugam, G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Final Flue Gas Cleaning (FFGC) Pilot Plant. The pilot plant (FFGC-PP) will be used to test and evaluate removal of air pollution constituents from the flue gas of a 160 MW, Houston-area power plant operating on 100% petcoke. The two-week long test.... TABLE III FLUE GAS COMPOSITION PETCOKE FIRED POWER PLANT H 2 O 3.2 % O 2 4.9 % CO 2 17.7 % HCl 10 ppm SO 2 6800 ppm SO 3 300 ppm H2SO4 mist 690 ppm NOx 260 ppm...

Stinger, D. H.; Romero, M. H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effect of fermentation conditions on yeast growth and volatile composition of wine produced from mango (Mangifera indica L.) fruit juice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study mango juice fermentation at laboratory scale with controlled inoculation using selected yeast strain was performed (Saccharomyces cerevisiae 101). Effect of fermentation conditions (temperature, pH, SO2 and aeration) on wine fermentation was evaluated based on yeast growth, duration, fermentation rate and volatile composition. The composition of the major volatile compounds with low boiling points was determined by gas chromatography under the different operating conditions of fermentation temperature (15–35 °C), pH (3.5–6.0), SO2 (100–300 ppm) and aeration (initial dissolved O2 and shaking at 30 rpm). Temperature had important effect on yeast growth and on the levels of volatile compounds. It was observed that the final concentrations of ethyl acetate and some of the higher alcohols decreased when fermentation temperature increased to 25 °C (35 mg/l at 15 °C and 27 mg/l at 25 °C). SO2 stimulated the yeast growth up to certain level and in excess it inhibited the yeast metabolism. Ethanol concentration slightly increased with the addition of 100 ppm SO2 (8.2 g/l) and decreased with increase in concentration of SO2 (6.2 g/l in 300 ppm SO2). Aeration by shaking increased the viable cell count (from 52 × 106 in the absence of oxygen to 98 × 106 in shaking at 30 rpm) but decreased the ethanol productivity (from 7.2 in initial dissolved O2 to 6.5 g/l shaking at 30 rpm). With the results obtained it was concluded that the temperature (25 °C), pH (5), SO2 (100 ppm) and must with initial oxygen were optimum for better quality of wine from mango fruits. The results of the present study considering the traditionally recognized preference for low alcoholic fermentation temperatures in wine making.

L.V.A. Reddy; O.V.S. Reddy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Natural gas hydrates - issues for gas production and geomechanical stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bearing sediments in offshore environments, I divided these data into different sections. The data included water depths, pore water salinity, gas compositions, geothermal gradients, and sedimentary properties such as sediment type, sediment mineralogy... .................................................................. 9 2.2 Hydrate patterns in sediments .................................................................... 24 3.1 Water depths and penetration for the Blake Ridge..................................... 31 3.2 Geothermal gradients measured...

Grover, Tarun

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

312

Simulation of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous aluminum dissolver system  

SciTech Connect

This mission of the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) is to recover highly-enriched uranium from spent nuclear reactor fuel. One fuel type is dissolved in mercury-catalyzed nitric acid, and the uranium is extracted from the resulting dissolver product by an organic solvent. This fuel is composed of an aluminum-alloy-clad matrix of particulate uranium aluminide, which dissolves more slowly than the cladding. Because of the content of fissile {sup 235}U, suspended uranium aluminide or dissolved uranyl nitrate can form a critical mass under some circumstances. The dissolver and piping are geometrically favorable from the criticality standpoint, so the digester is where a criticality event would be most likely to occur. In the digester, the mass limit for {sup 235}U (as suspended uranium aluminide particles) is approximately 790 g. depending on the uranyl nitrate concentration. In a clear dissolver product (no suspended UAl{sub 3}), the concentration limit is 7 g {sup 235}U/L (as uranyl nitrate). Both limits are substantially below the lowest values at which a criticality event could possibly occur. This document a dynamic model of uranium aluminide dissolution in a continuous dissolver system, report typical calculated results, and advance appropriate conclusions.

Evans, D.R.; Farman, R.F.; Christian, J.D.

1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

313

Complexation of mercury by dissolved organic matter in surface waters of Galveston Bay, Texas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chemical speciation of dissolved mercury in surface waters of Galveston Bay was determined using the concentrations of mercury-complexing ligands and conditional stability constants of mercury-ligand complexes. Two classes of natural ligands associated with dissolved organic matter were determined by a competitive ligand exchange-solvent solvent extraction (CLE-SSE) method: a strong class (Ls), ranging from 19 to 93 pM with an average conditional stability constant (KHgLs) of 1028, and a weak class (Lw) ranging from 1.4 to 9.8 nM with an average \\{KHgLs\\} of 1023. The range of conditional stability constants between mercury and natural ligands suggested that sulfides and thiolates are important binding sites for dissolved mercury in estuarine waters. A positive correlation between the estuarine distribution of dissolved glutathione and that of mercury-complexing ligands supported this suggestion. Thermodynamic equilibrium modeling using stability constants for HgL, HgClx, Hg(OH)x, and HgCl(OH) and concentrations of each ligand demonstrated that almost all of the dissolved mercury (> 99%) in Galveston Bay was complexed by natural ligands associated with dissolved organic matter. The importance of low concentrations of high-affinity ligands that may originate in the biological system (i.e., glutathione and phytochelatin) suggests that the greater portion of bulk dissolved organic matter may not be important for mercury complexation in estuarine surface waters.

Seunghee Han; Gary A. Gill; Ronald D. Lehman; Key-Young Choe

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

NETL: Gasification Systems - Gas Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Separation Separation Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Ion-Transport Membrane Oxygen Separation Modules Gas separation unit operations represent major cost elements in gasification plants. The gas separation technology being supported in the DOE program promises significant reduction in cost of electricity, improved thermal efficiency, and superior environmental performance. Gasification-based energy conversion systems rely on two gas separation processes: (1) separation of oxygen from air for feed to oxygen-blown gasifiers; and (2) post-gasification separation of hydrogen from carbon dioxide following (or along with) the shifting of gas composition when carbon dioxide capture is required or hydrogen is the desired product. Research efforts include development of advanced gas separation

315

Compressed natural gas measurement issues  

SciTech Connect

The Natural Gas Vehicle Coalition`s Measurement and Metering Task Group (MMTG) was established on July 1st, 1992 to develop suggested revisions to National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST) Handbook 44-1992 (Specifications, Tolerances, and Other Technical Requirements for Weighing and Measuring Devices) and NIST Handbook 130-1991 (Uniform Laws & Regulations). Specifically, the suggested revisions will address the sale and measurement of compressed natural gas when sold as a motor vehicle fuel. This paper briefly discusses the activities of the MMTG and its interaction with NIST. The paper also discusses the Institute of Gas Technology`s (IGT) support of the MMTG in the area of natural gas composition, their impact on metering technology applicable to high pressure fueling stations as well as conversion factors for the establishment of ``gallon gasoline equivalent`` of natural gas. The final portion of this paper discusses IGT`s meter research activities and its meter test facility.

Blazek, C.F.; Kinast, J.A.; Freeman, P.M.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung, W.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Hydride compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

Lee, Myung W. (North Augusta, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles. 2 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Williams, M.A.; Bagheri, R.

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Higher modulus compositions incorporating particulate rubber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Rubber particles, to be used as fillers or extenders for various composite polymer systems, are chlorinated by a gas-solid phase reaction with a chlorine-containing gas. A composite polymer containing the chlorinated rubber fillers or extenders exhibits a higher flexural modulus than if prepared using an unchlorinated rubber filler or extender. Chlorination of the rubber particles is carried out by contacting the finely divided rubber particles with a chlorine-containing gas comprising at least about 5 volume percent chlorine. Advantageously, the chlorine can be diluted with air, nitrogen or other essentially inert gases and may contain minor amounts of fluorine. Improved performance is obtained with nitrogen dilution of the chlorine gas over air dilution. Improved polymer composite systems having higher flexural modulus result from the use of the chlorinated rubber particles as fillers instead of unchlorinated rubber particles.

Bauman, Bernard D. (Emmaus, PA); Williams, Mark A. (Souderton, PA); Bagheri, Reza (Bethlehem, PA)

1997-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

320

Flammable gas project topical report  

SciTech Connect

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Phosphorescent compositions, methods of making the compositions, and methods of using the compositions  

SciTech Connect

Compositions, methods of making compositions, materials including compositions, crayons including compositions, paint including compositions, ink including compositions, waxes including compositions, polymers including compositions, vesicles including the compositions, methods of making each, and the like are disclosed.

Jia, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaojun; Jia, George D.; Lewis, Linda; Yen, Laurel C.

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

322

Direct and indirect photoreactions of chromophoric dissolved organic matter : roles of reactive oxygen species and iron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photochemical transformations of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are one of the principal processes controlling its fate in coastal waters. The photochemical decomposition of CDOM leads to the formation of a ...

Goldstone, Jared Verrill, 1971-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Degradation of proton exchange membrane by Pt dissolved/deposited in fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An accelerated single cell test and single electrode cell test were carried out to investigate membrane degradation by Pt dissolved/deposited on the membrane. For a cell operating under accelerated conditions ...

Taehee Kim; Ho Lee; Woojong Sim; Jonghyun Lee…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Dissolved strontium in the subterranean estuary Implications for the marine strontium isotope budget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dissolved strontium in the subterranean estuary ­ Implications for the marine strontium isotope concentrations among sites (0.1­24 lM Sr). Strontium isotope exchange was observed in the STE at five

325

Laser- and UV-LED-Induced Fluorescence Detection of Drinking Water and Water-Dissolved Organics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have developed a deep-UV laser-induced fluorescence system for fluorescence detection of water-dissolved organic species. Deep-UV LEDs also were used as the excitation source....

Sharikova, Anna V; Killinger, Dennis K

326

Geochemistry of dissolved rare earth elements in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Seawater samples were collected from four locations in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean during the MR02-K06 cruise of the R/V Mirai...and analyzed for dissolved rare earth elements (REEs) using inductively coupled pl...

Zhong-Liang Wang; Masatoshi Yamada

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Hydrogen Permeation in Metals as a Function of Stress, Temperature and Dissolved Hydrogen Concentration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...February 1966 research-article Hydrogen Permeation in Metals as a Function of Stress, Temperature and Dissolved Hydrogen Concentration W. Beck J. O'M...of the diffusion of electrolytic hydrogen through membranes of: (1) polycrystalline...

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

329

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

330

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect

U.S. natural gas composition is expected to be more variable in the future. Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Unconventional gas supplies, like coal-bed methane, are also expected to grow. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from existing domestic natural gas supplies. To allow the greatest use of gas supplies, end-use equipment should be able to accommodate the widest possible gas composition. For this reason, the effect of gas composition on combustion behavior is of interest. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 589K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx emissions. These results vary from data reported in the literature for some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

D. Straub; D. Ferguson; K. Casleton; G. Richards

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Method for measuring dissolved hydrogen in anaerobic ecosystems: application to the rumen.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of gas in the gas bubble, as determined by gas chromatography, by the volume of the gas bubble. To assess the accuracy...However, at this ionic strength (0.22 mol-liter-1...sediments, thick sewage sludge). Byrearrangement...

J A Robinson; R F Strayer; J M Tiedje

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

DISCOLORATION OF THE WETTED SURFACE IN THE 6.1D DISSOLVER  

SciTech Connect

During a camera inspection of a failed coil in the 6.1D dissolver, an orange discoloration was observed on a portion of the dissolver wall and coils. At the request of H-Canyon Engineering, the inspection video of the dissolver was reviewed by SRNL to assess if the observed condition (a non-uniform, orange-colored substance on internal surfaces) was a result of corrosion. Although the dissolver vessel and coil corrode during dissolution operations, the high acid conditions are not consistent with the formation of ferrous oxides (i.e., orange/rust-colored corrosion products). In a subsequent investigation, SRNL performed dissolution experiments to determine if residues from the nylon bags used for Pu containment could have generated the orange discoloration following dissolution. When small pieces of a nylon bag were placed in boiling 8 M nitric acid solutions containing other components representative of the H-Canyon process, complete dissolution occurred almost immediately. No residues were obtained even when a nylon mass to volume ratio greater than 100 times the 6.1D dissolver value was used. Degradation products from the dissolution of nylon bags are not responsible for the discoloration observed in the dissolver.

Rudisill, T.; Mickalonis, J.; Crapse, K.

2013-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of Determining the Extent to which a Nickel Structure has been Attached by a Fluorine-Containing Gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The method of determining the extent to which a nickel structure has been attacked by a halogen containing gas to which it has been exposed which comprises preparing a quantity of water substantially free from dissolved oxygen, passing ammonia gas through a cuprammonium solution to produce ammonia substantially free from oxygen, dissolving said oxygen-free ammonia in said water to produce a saturated aqueous ammonia solution free from uncombined oxygen, treating at least a portion of said nickel structure of predetermined weight with said solution to dissolve nickel compounds from the surface of said structure without dissolving an appreciable amount of said nickel and analyzing the resulting solution to determine the quantity of said nickel compounds that was associated with said said portion of said structure to determine the proportion of combined nickel in said nickel structure.

Brusie, James P.

2004-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

334

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

335

Transformation Composition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. AGTIVE'99, to appear in LNCS Graph Transformation Modules and their Composition ? Frank,knirsch,kreo,kuskeg@informatik.uni-bremen.de Abstract. In this paper, we investigate the notion of transformation modules as a structuring principle. Based on the notion of transformation units, a concept that allows to specify binary relations on graphs

Drewes, Frank

336

Neural net controlled tag gas sampling system for nuclear reactors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for providing a tag gas identifier to a nuclear fuel rod and analyze escaped tag gas to identify a particular failed nuclear fuel rod. The method and system include disposing a unique tag gas composition into a plenum of a nuclear fuel rod, monitoring gamma ray activity, analyzing gamma ray signals to assess whether a nuclear fuel rod has failed and is emitting tag gas, activating a tag gas sampling and analysis system upon sensing tag gas emission from a failed nuclear rod and evaluating the escaped tag gas to identify the particular failed nuclear fuel rod.

Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Fall, ID); Lambert, John D. B. (Wheaton, IL); Herzog, James P. (Downers Grove, IL)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

338

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

339

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

340

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

342

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

343

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

344

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

345

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

346

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

347

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

348

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

349

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

350

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

351

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

352

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

354

Morphology of Gas Release in Physical Simulants  

SciTech Connect

This report documents testing activities conducted as part of the Deep Sludge Gas Release Event Project (DSGREP). The testing described in this report focused on evaluating the potential retention and release mechanisms of hydrogen bubbles in underground radioactive waste storage tanks at Hanford. The goal of the testing was to evaluate the rate, extent, and morphology of gas release events in simulant materials. Previous, undocumented scoping tests have evidenced dramatically different gas release behavior from simulants with similar physical properties. Specifically, previous gas release tests have evaluated the extent of release of 30 Pa kaolin and 30 Pa bentonite clay slurries. While both materials are clays and both have equivalent material shear strength using a shear vane, it was found that upon stirring, gas was released immediately and completely from bentonite clay slurry while little if any gas was released from the kaolin slurry. The motivation for the current work is to replicate these tests in a controlled quality test environment and to evaluate the release behavior for another simulant used in DSGREP testing. Three simulant materials were evaluated: 1) a 30 Pa kaolin clay slurry, 2) a 30 Pa bentonite clay slurry, and 3) Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) Simulant (a simulant designed to support DSGREP RT instability testing. Entrained gas was generated in these simulant materials using two methods: 1) application of vacuum over about a 1-minute period to nucleate dissolved gas within the simulant and 2) addition of hydrogen peroxide to generate gas by peroxide decomposition in the simulants over about a 16-hour period. Bubble release was effected by vibrating the test material using an external vibrating table. When testing with hydrogen peroxide, gas release was also accomplished by stirring of the simulant.

Daniel, Richard C.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Crawford, Amanda D.; Hylden, Laura R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; MacFarlan, Paul J.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.

2014-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Composite media for fluid stream processing, a method of forming the composite media, and a related method of processing a fluid stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite media including at least one crystalline aluminosilicate material in polyacrylonitrile. A method of forming a composite media is also disclosed. The method comprises dissolving polyacrylonitrile in an organic solvent to form a matrix solution. At least one crystalline aluminosilicate material is combined with the matrix solution to form a composite media solution. The organic solvent present in the composite media solution is diluted. The composite media solution is solidified. In addition, a method of processing a fluid stream is disclosed. The method comprises providing a beads of a composite media comprising at least one crystalline aluminosilicate material dispersed in a polyacrylonitrile matrix. The beads of the composite media are contacted with a fluid stream comprising at least one constituent. The at least one constituent is substantially removed from the fluid stream.

Garn, Troy G; Law, Jack D; Greenhalgh, Mitchell R; Tranter, Rhonda

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Chapter 5 - Coal Composition and Reservoir Characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal consists of organic and mineral matter. Fixed carbon from organic matter measures the energy output of coal during combustion. Mineral matter determines how coal responds to combustion and affects reservoir porosity and permeability. Minerals infill pores, cleats, or fractures and replace the organic composition of coal. Organic composition is grouped into maceral association as microlithotypes and macrolithotypes, the latter for megascopic field descriptions (e.g. coal cores and mine face). Coal composition controls reservoir properties such as gas adsorption capacity, gas content, porosity, and permeability. Permeability is important to gas transport from coal matrix pores to the production well. Coal permeability is a function of the width, length, and height of cleats or fractures as well as the aperture, spacing, frequency or density, and connectivity of cleats or fractures. Coal cleats or fractures formed during burial, compaction, and coalification (endogenetic) and after coalification during deformation, uplift, and erosion of the basin of deposition.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - aluminide matrix composites Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Composites by Laser... -particle-reinforced titanium aluminide-matrix composites using TiC and gas-atomized Ti-48Al-2Cr-2Nb powders as the feedstock... been made to fabricate...

358

Nonaqueous composition for slip casting or cold forming refractory material into solid shapes  

SciTech Connect

A composition is described for slip casting or cold forming non-oxide refractory material(s) into solid shape comprising finely divided solid refractory materials selected from the group consisting of metal boride, refractory carbide, nitride, silicide and a refractory metal of tungsten, molybdenum, tantalum and chromium suspended in a nonaqueous liquid slip composition consisting essentially of a deflocculent composed of a vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate resin dissolved in an organic solvent.

Montgomery, L.C.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

360

Gas: A Neglected Phase in Remediation of Metals and Radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

The gas phase is generally ignored in remediation of metals and radionuclides because it is assumed that there is no efficient way to exploit it. In the literal sense, all remediations involve the gas phase because this phase is linked to the liquid and solid phases by vapor pressure and thermodynamic relationships. Remediation methods that specifically use the gas phase as a central feature have primarily targeted volatile organic contaminants, not metals and radionuclides. Unlike many organic contaminants, the vapor pressure and Henry's Law constants of metals and radionuclides are not generally conducive to direct air stripping of dissolved contaminants. Nevertheless, the gas phase can play an important role in remediation of inorganic contaminants and provide opportunities for efficient, cost effective remediation. The objective here is to explore ways in which manipulation of the gas phase can be used to facilitate remediation of metals and radionuclides.

Denham, Miles E.; Looney, Brian B

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

362

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TOWARDS AFFECTIVE ALGORITHMIC COMPOSITION Duncan Williams* , Alexis Kirke* , Eduardo Reck Miranda are driving an emerging field: affective algorithmic composition. Strate- gies for algorithmic composition within the last decade) implementing systems for algorithmic composition with the intention of targeting

Miranda, Eduardo Reck

363

PREDICTION OF DISSOLVER LIFETIMES THROUGH NON-DESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION AND LABORATORY TESTING  

SciTech Connect

Non-destructive evaluation was used as the primary method of monitoring the corrosion degradation of nuclear material dissolvers and assessing the remaining lifetimes. Materials were typically processed in nitric acid based (4-14M) solutions containing fluoride concentrations less than 0.2 M. The primary corrosion issue for the stainless steel dissolvers is the occurrence of localized corrosion near the tank bottom and the heat affected zones of the welds. Laboratory data for a range of operational conditions, including solution chemistry and temperature, was used to assess the impact of processing changes on the dissolver corrosion rate. Experimental and NDE-based general corrosion rates were found to be in reasonable agreement for standard dissolution chemistries consisting of nitric acid with fluorides and at temperatures less than 95 C. Greater differences were observed when chloride was present as an impurity and temperatures exceeded 100 C.

Mickalonis, J.; Woodsmall, T.; Hinz, W.; Edwards, T.

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

364

Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2, Issue 25 2, Issue 25 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing application page 2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award page 4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology page 5 the ENERGY lab NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY 2 Novel Composite Materials Demonstrate Ultra-sensitivity-Gold nanowires on graphite templates used in gas sensing applications ____________________2 Coronary Stent Wins Technology Transfer Award ________4 University of Oregon Team Wins Competition for Commercializing NETL Technology __________________5 NETL & WVU Researchers Design New Catalysts for CO 2 Management ___________________________________6 Structurally Dynamic MOF Sorbent Selectively Adsorbs

365

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, S.K.; Hames, B.R.; Myers, M.D.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

366

Method of separating lignocellulosic material into lignin, cellulose and dissolved sugars  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for separating lignocellulosic material into (a) lignin, (b) cellulose, and (c) hemicellulose and dissolved sugars. Wood or herbaceous biomass is digested at elevated temperature in a single-phase mixture of alcohol, water and a water-immiscible organic solvent (e.g., a ketone). After digestion, the amount of water or organic solvent is adjusted so that there is phase separation. The lignin is present in the organic solvent, the cellulose is present in a solid pulp phase, and the aqueous phase includes hemicellulose and any dissolved sugars.

Black, Stuart K. (Denver, CO); Hames, Bonnie R. (Westminster, CO); Myers, Michele D. (Dacono, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Dissolved Organic Matter and Inorganic Ions in a Central Himalayan Glacier—Insights into Chemical Composition and Atmospheric Sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First, the identification of biomass burning related species in snow pit samples of Himalayas indicates the need to further address the effects of biomass burning on air quality, atmospheric circulation, and snow/glacier albedo in this region. ... Hong, S. M.; Lee, K.; Hou, S. G.; Hur, S. D.; Ren, J. W.; Burn, L. J.; Rosman, K. J. R.; Barbante, C.; Boutron, C. F.An 800-Year Record of Atmospheric As, Mo, Sn, and Sb in Central Asia in High-Altitude Ice Cores from Mt. Qomolangma (Everest), Himalayas Environ. ... Crop wastes common to the region, including rice straw, mustard stalk, jute stalk, soybean stalk, and animal residue burnings, were also characterized. ...

Jianzhong Xu; Qi Zhang; Xiangying Li; Xinlei Ge; Cunde Xiao; Jiawen Ren; Dahe Qin

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

368

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

369

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

370

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

371

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

372

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

373

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

374

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

375

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

376

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

377

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

378

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

379

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

380

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

382

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

383

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

386

Analysis of video images used to study gas-liquid transfer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information about the chemical changes occurring within a CO2- water exchange system. This process2 gas is introduced at the top of the tank and gradually dummy dissolves and diffuses through experiment produces a dummy 25cm CO2 flow 25cm 2.5cm labyrinth diffuser CO2 diffusion 25cm CO2 flow 25cm 2

Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

387

Spontaneous Enrichment of Organic Molecules from Aqueous and Gas Phases into a Stable Metallogel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-concentration hazardous organics, for example, chlorobenzene or toluene in water or poly- aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs or gas phases. Using nonpolar solvents to extract organic hazards from water is hardly practical since: bacteria (e.g., alkylotrophs) develop specialized cell walls that "dissolve" and accumulate hydrocarbons

Xing, Bengang

388

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced flue gas Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(WTERT) Collection: Renewable Energy 5 INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY FOR THE CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION AT WASTE-TO-ENERGY Summary: -Beam process is applied to flue gas compositions...

389

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric pressure gas Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3... . Gas % Composition ... Source: Prestwich, Ken - Biology Department, College of the Holy Cross Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Biology and Medicine 2 Bio390...

390

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas treating alternatives for LNG plants  

SciTech Connect

This paper covers the various gas treating processes available for treating sour natural gas to specifications required for LNG production. The LNG product specification requires that the total sulfur level be less than 30--40 ppmv, the CO{sub 2} level be less than 50 ppmv and the water level be less than 100 ppmv to prevent freezing problems in the LNG cryogenic column. A wide variety of natural gas compositions are encountered in the various fields and the gas treating process selection is dependent on the type of impurities present in the gas, namely, levels of H{sub 2}S, CO{sub 2}, mercaptans and other organic sulfur compounds. This paper discusses the implications various components in the feed to the LNG plant can have on process selection, and the various treating processes that are available to condition the gas. Process selection criteria, design and operating philosophies are discussed. An economic comparison for two treating schemes is provided.

Clarke, D.S.; Sibal, P.W. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Manufacturing Workshop  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

A workshop on Fiber Reinforced Polymer (FRP) Composite Manufacturing (held January 13, 2014, in Arlington, VA) brought together stakeholders from industry and academia to discuss manufacturing of composites. The workshop explored emerging FRP composite market applications in clean energy and barriers to the development and widespread commercial use of these lightweight, high-strength and high-stiffness materials. Improving the manufacturing speed and quality-and reducing their manufacturing costs-could accelerate their use in automotive, wind, compressed gas storage and other clean energy and industrial applications.

393

Discovery of a natural CO2 seep in the German North Sea: Implications for shallow dissolved gas and seep detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

background were detected in seawater above a natural salt dome 30 km north of the EastFrisian Island Juist in the concentration of H+ in ocean surface waters since the early 1900s and may lead to a drop in seawater pH of up] To mitigate the effects on ocean acidification and climate forcing, CCS (carbon capture and storage), in which

Wehrli, Bernhard

394

NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION NATURAL GAS MARKET ASSESSMENT PRELIMINARY RESULTS In Support.................................................................................... 6 Chapter 2: Natural Gas Demand.................................................................................................. 10 Chapter 3: Natural Gas Supply

395

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Industrial Price (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural Gas Price Sold to...

396

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

natural gas production output. Rigs Natural Gas Transportation Update Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company yesterday (August 4) said it is mobilizing equipment and manpower for...

397

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate Mercuric Sulfides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methylation of Mercury by Bacteria Exposed to Dissolved, Nanoparticulate, and Microparticulate in the environment is partly controlled by the bioavailability of inorganic divalent mercury (Hg(II)) to anaerobic matter to form chemical species that include organic-coated mercury sulfide nanoparticles as reaction

398

PII S0016-7037(99)00361-0 Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates in contrasting marine sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(99)00361-0 Dissolved and particulate carbohydrates in contrasting marine sediments D) and mid-Atlantic shelf/slope break (continental margin) sediments. Particulate carbohydrates (PCHOs) rep- resented 5­9% of the total sediment particulate organic carbon (POC), and PCHO remineralization appeared

Burdige, David

399

Biogeochemical and hydrographic controls on chromophoric dissolved organic matter distribution in the Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Pacific Ocean Chantal M. Swan a,Ã?, David A. Siegel a,b , Norman B. Nelson a , Craig A. Carlson c , Elora Available online 19 September 2009 Keywords: CDOM AOU Pacific Water masses Hydrography Bio-optical a b s t r a c t Recent in situ observations of chromophoric dissolved organic material (CDOM) in the Pacific

Siegel, David A.

400

Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater Effluents Page 1 of 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GU, APRIL Occurrence and Implication of dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in tertiary wastewater wastewater effluents L. Liu1 , D. S. Smith2 , M. Bracken3 , J.B. Neethling4 , H.D. Stensel5 and S. Murthy6 levels (e.g. TPwastewater treatment plants. A few previous studies (Benisch et al., 2007

Brody, James P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Wastewater Discharge, Nutrient Loading, and Dissolved Oxygen Dynamics in a Shallow Texas Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Oso Bay, a wastewater treatment plant acts as a source of eutrophication and may have measureable impact on the health of the bay. The objectives of this study were to create a model for modeling dissolved oxygen concentrations over time...

Schroer, Lee Allen

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

402

Variable ageing and storage of dissolved organic components in the open ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Seawater dissolved organic matter (DOM) is the largest reservoir of exchangeable organic carbon in the ... carbon cycling are thus limited by the need for information on temporal scales of carbon storage in DOM subcomponents, produced via the ‘biological pump’, relative to their recycling by ...

Ai Ning Loh; James E. Bauer; Ellen R. M. Druffel

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

403

What’s in an EEM? Molecular Signatures Associated with Dissolved Organic Fluorescence in Boreal Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular Signatures Associated with Dissolved Organic Fluorescence in Boreal Canada ... Of these three humic-like components, P3 was the most photolabile,(19) possibly because its excitation maximum extends furthest into the solar spectrum(30) (Table 1; SI Figure S1). ...

A. Stubbins; J.-F. Lapierre; M. Berggren; Y. T. Prairie; T. Dittmar; P. A. del Giorgio

2014-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

404

Did BP's oil-dissolving chemical make the spill By Kate Spinner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Did BP's oil-dissolving chemical make the spill worse? By Kate Spinner Published: Monday, May 30, 2011 at 8:47 p.m. BP succeeded in sinking the oil from its blown well out of sight -- and keeping much chemicals. But the impact on the ecosystem as a whole may have been more damaging than the oil alone

Belogay, Eugene A.

405

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Shale gas is natural gas trapped inside formations of shale - fine grained sedimentary rocks that can be rich sources of petroleum and natural gas. Just a few years ago, much of...

406

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Researchers from the University of Missouri and ICx Nomadics have reported on the use of a optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor for on-column detection ?. ... Although substantial differences were noted between fresh and aged (or oxidized) oils, many of the compounds in the oxidized oil went unidentified due to lack of library mass spectral data. ... A high resolution MEMS based gas chromatography column for the analysis of benzene and toluene gaseous mixtures ...

Frank L. Dorman; Joshua J. Whiting; Jack W. Cochran; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2010-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

407

Distributions of 14 elements on 60 selected absorbers from two simulant solutions (acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate) for Hanford HLW Tank 102-SY  

SciTech Connect

Sixty commercially available or experimental absorber materials were evaluated for partitioning high-level radioactive waste. These absorbers included cation and anion exchange resins, inorganic exchangers, composite absorbers, and a series of liquid extractants sorbed on porous support-beads. The distributions of 14 elements onto each absorber were measured from simulated solutions that represent acid-dissolved sludge and alkaline supernate solutions from Hanford high-level waste (HLW) Tank 102-SY. The selected elements, which represent fission products (Ce, Cs, Sr, Tc, and Y); actinides (U, Pu, and Am); and matrix elements (Cr, Co, Fe, Mn, Zn, and Zr), were traced by radionuclides and assayed by gamma spectrometry. Distribution coefficients for each of the 1680 element/absorber/solution combinations were measured for dynamic contact periods of 30 min, 2 h, and 6 h to provide sorption kinetics information for the specified elements from these complex media. More than 5000 measured distribution coefficients are tabulated.

Marsh, S.F.; Svitra, Z.V.; Bowen, S.M.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Net Production and Consumption of Fluorescent Colored Dissolved Organic Matter by Natural Bacterial Assemblages Growing on Marine Phytoplankton Exudates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...high-molecular-weight dissolved organic matter. Appl...structure and single-cell activity in marine...Sinha. 2005. Solar UV radiation-induced...2010. Microbial production of recalcitrant dissolved organic matter: long-term...matter during cell growth and decline...

Cristina Romera-Castillo; Hugo Sarmento; Xosé Antón Álvarez-Salgado; Josep M. Gasol; Celia Marrasé

2011-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

409

Liquid absorbent solutions for separating nitrogen from natural gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Nitrogen-absorbing and -desorbing compositions, novel ligands and transition metal complexes, and methods of using the same, which are useful for the selective separation of nitrogen from other gases, especially natural gas.

Friesen, Dwayne T. (Bend, OR); Babcock, Walter C. (Bend, OR); Edlund, David J. (Redmond, OR); Lyon, David K. (Bend, OR); Miller, Warren K. (Bend, OR)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Feasibility of waterflooding Soku E7000 gas-condensate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed a simple 3D compositional reservoir simulation study to examine the possibility of waterflooding the Soku E7 gas-condensate reservoir. This study shows that water injection results in higher condensate recovery than natural depletion...

Ajayi, Arashi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Processing and Gas Barrier Behavior of Multilayer Thin Nanocomposite Films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

barrier for goods requiring long shelf life. Current gas barrier technologies like plasma-enhanced vapor deposition (PECVD) often create high barrier metal oxide films, which are prone to cracking when flexed. Bulk composites composed of polymer...

Yang, You-Hao

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gas Sampling Considerations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas sampling is carried out to measure the quality of a gas. Gas samples are sometimes acquired by in situ observation within the main gas body by using remote or visual observation for specific properties. A mor...

Alvin Lieberman

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety Program March 2011 #12;Georgia Tech Dangerous Gas Safety.......................................................................................................... 5 6. DANGEROUS GAS USAGE REQUIREMENTS................................................. 7 6.1. RESTRICTED PURCHASE/ACQUISITION RULES: ................................................ 7 7. FLAMMABLE GAS

Sherrill, David

414

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL); Laug, Matthew T. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Method and apparatus for manufacturing gas tags  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For use in the manufacture of gas tags employed in a gas tagging failure detection system for a nuclear reactor, a plurality of commercial feed gases each having a respective noble gas isotopic composition are blended under computer control to provide various tag gas mixtures having selected isotopic ratios which are optimized for specified defined conditions such as cost. Using a new approach employing a discrete variable structure rather than the known continuous-variable optimization problem, the computer controlled gas tag manufacturing process employs an analytical formalism from condensed matter physics known as stochastic relaxation, which is a special case of simulated annealing, for input feed gas selection. For a tag blending process involving M tag isotopes with N distinct feed gas mixtures commercially available from an enriched gas supplier, the manufacturing process calculates the cost difference between multiple combinations and specifies gas mixtures which approach the optimum defined conditions. The manufacturing process is then used to control tag blending apparatus incorporating tag gas canisters connected by stainless-steel tubing with computer controlled valves, with the canisters automatically filled with metered quantities of the required feed gases. 4 figs.

Gross, K.C.; Laug, M.T.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Market Digest: Natural Gas  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration's Natural Gas Market Digest provides information and analyses on all aspects of natural gas markets.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Theoretical fundamentals, critical issues, and adequate formulation of effective shale gas and condensate reservoir simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The issues of relevance to describing the storage and movement of hydrocarbon gas and condensate and water through extremely low permeability shale formations are reviewed. The shale rock is viewed as a heterogeneous quad-media continuum system. Each system has different wettability storage transport and connectivity characteristics. The hydrocarbon storage is considered as being in the free gas adsorbed gas and dissolved gas. The alteration of fluid properties and flow behavior under pore confinement are emphasized. For gas transport the effective mean-radii and apparent permeability as a function of pore-size distribution and gas adsorption are examined. The nonequilibrium fluid distribution effect produced by tortuous narrow flow paths is discussed. It is emphasized that these form the essential phenomena that must be taken into account for effective simulation of shale gas and condensate reservoirs.

Faruk Civan; Deepak Devegowda; Richard Sigal

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Gas Chromatography  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

He received his B.S. degree in 1970 from Rhodes College in Memphis, TN, his M.S. degree in 1973 from the University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, and his Ph.D. degree in 1975 from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. ... A review (with 145 references) on the role of carrier gases on the separation process (A4) demonstrates that carrier gas interactions are integral to the chromatographic process. ... In another report, activity coefficients for refrigerants were evaluated with a polyol ester oil stationary phase (C22). ...

Gary A. Eiceman; Herbert H. Hill, Jr.; Jorge Gardea-Torresdey

2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

419

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

420

RtS>-l-2437 Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

131+Xe132. This conversion is of importance in the calculation of the total Xe generation duringRtS«>-l»-2437 3*- if, -. Utilization of the Isotoplc Composition of Xe and Kr in Fission Gas 4* #12;RIS�-M-2437 UTILIZATION OF THE ISOTOPIC COMPOSITION OF Xe AND Kr IN FISSION GAS RELEASE

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Composite coatings improve engines  

SciTech Connect

About 40% of the power loss in engine systems is attributed to the adverse effects of friction in reciprocating engine components. Over half of this power loss is caused by friction between pistons, piston rings, and cylinder bores. In addition, engine parts may be attacked by corrosive gasoline substitutes such as liquid propane gas and alcohol/gasoline mixtures. To solve both friction and corrosion problems, Nihon Parkerizing Co. has improved the nickel-phosphorus based ceramic composite (NCC) plating technology that was developed for cylinder bores and pistons by Suzuki Motor Co. in the mid 1970s. Iron and nickel-based composite plating technologies have been investigated since the early 1970s, and a few have been used on small two-stroke motorcycle, outboard marine, snowmobile, and some luxury passenger car engine components. Both nickel- and iron-base plating processes are used on cylinders and pistons because they offer excellent wear and corrosion resistance. Nickel-base films have higher corrosion resistance than those based on iron, and are capable of withstanding the corrosive conditions characteristic of high methanol fuels. Unfortunately, they experience a decrease in hardness as operating temperatures increase. However, NCC coatings with phosphorus additions have high hardness even under severe operating conditions, and hardness increases upon exposure to elevated temperatures. In addition to high hardness and corrosion resistance, NCC coatings provide a low friction coefficient, which contributes to the reduction of friction losses between sliding components. When used in low-quality or alcohol fuels, the corrosion resistance of NCC coatings is far higher than that of Fe-P plating. Additionally, the coatings reduce wall and piston temperature, wear of ring groove and skirt, and carbon deposit formation, and they improve output power and torque. These advantages all contribute to the development of light and efficient engines with better fuel mileage.

Funatani, K.; Kurosawa, K. (Nihon Parkerizing Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan))

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chemical and Isotopic Composition and Gas Concentrations of Ground Water and Surface Water from Selected Sites At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1994-97  

SciTech Connect

>From May 1994 through May 1997, the US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, collected water samples from 86 wells completed in the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The samples were analyzed for a variety of chemical constituents including all major elements and 22 trace elements. Concentrations of scandium, yttrium, and the lanthanide series were measured in samples from 11 wells and 1 hot spring. The data will be used to determine the fraction of young water in the ground water. The fraction of young water must be known to calculate the ages of ground water using chlorofluorocarbons. The concentrations of the isotopes deuterium, oxygen-18, carbon-13, carbon-14, and tritium were measured in many ground water, surface-water and spring samples. The isotopic composition will provide clues to the origin and sources of water in the Snake River Plain aquifer. Concentrations ! of helium-3 , helium-4, total helium, and neon were measured in most groundwater samples, and the results will be used to determine the recharge temperature, and to date the ground waters.

E. Busenberg; L. N. Plummer; M. W. Doughten; P. K. Widman; R. C. Bartholomay (USGS)

2000-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Thermogenic and secondary biogenic gases, San Juan Basin, Colorado and New Mexico - Implications for coalbed gas producibility  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this paper are to (1) describe the types and the major components of coalbed gases, (2) evaluate the variability of Fruitland coalbed gas composition across the basin, (3) assess factors affecting coalbed gas origin and composition, (4) determine the timing and extent of gas migration and entrapment, and (5) suggest application of these results to coalbed gas producibility. Data from more than 750 Fruitland coalbed gas wells were used to make gas-composition maps and to evaluate factors controlling gas origin. The gas data were divided into overpressured, underpressured, and transitional categories based on regional pressure regime. Also, [delta][sup 13]C isotopic values from 41 methane, 7 ethane and propane, 13 carbon dioxide, and 10 formation-water bicarbonate samples were evaluated to interpret gas origin. The data suggests that only 25-50% of the gas produced in the high-productivity fairway was generated in situ during coalification. 82 refs., 14 figs., 3 tabs.

Scott, A.R.; Kaiser, W.R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)); Ayers, W.B. Jr. (Taurus Exploration, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States))

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap there between. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition. 6 figs.

Kong, P.C.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method for cracking hydrocarbon compositions using a submerged reactive plasma system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for cracking a liquid hydrocarbon composition (e.g. crude oil) to produce a cracked hydrocarbon product. A liquid hydrocarbon composition is initially provided. An electrical arc is generated directly within the hydrocarbon composition so that the arc is entirely submerged in the composition. Arc generation is preferably accomplished using a primary and secondary electrode each having a first end submerged in the composition. The first ends of the electrodes are separated from each other to form a gap therebetween. An electrical potential is then applied to the electrodes to generate the arc within the gap. A reactive gas is thereafter delivered to the arc which forms a bubble around the arc. Gas delivery may be accomplished by providing a passageway through each electrode and delivering the gas through the passageways. The arc and gas cooperate to produce a plasma which efficiently cracks the hydrocarbon composition.

Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Evaluation of the 3D-furnace simulation code AIOLOS by comparing CFD predictions of gas compositions with in-furnace measurements in a 210MW coal-fired utility boiler  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The furnace of a pulverised coal-fired utility boiler with a thermal output of 210MW, with dimensions of 8m x 8m x 29m and 12 burners located on three levels, is considered. Coal combustion is described by a five-step-reaction scheme. The model covers two heterogeneous reactions for pyrolysis and char combustion and three gas phase reactions for the oxidation of volatile matter. A standard k, ?-model is used for the description of turbulence. The interaction of turbulence and chemistry is modelled using the Eddy Dissipation Concept (EDC). The transport equations for mass, momentum, enthalpy and species are formulated in general curvilinear co-ordinates enabling an accurate treatment of boundaries and a very good control over the distribution of the grid lines. The discretisation is based on a non-staggered finite-volume approach and the coupling of velocities and pressure is achieved by the SIMPLEC method. Numerical diffusion is minimised by the use of the higher-order discretisation scheme MLU. The accuracy of the predictions is demonstrated by comparing the computational results with in-furnace measurements of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and oxygen concentrations and of temperatures.

Hermann Knaus; Uwe Schnell; Klaus R.G. Hein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Hydrogen Sulfide Measurement by Headspace-gas Chromatography-mass Spectrometry (HS-GC-MS): Application to Gaseous Samples and Gas Dissolved in Muscle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......cystathionine beta-synthase and cystathionine gamma-lyase, H2S acts as a myorelaxant and vasodilator and is also active in the brain as a neurotransmitter, where H2S increases the response of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor and facilitates long-term......

Vincent Varlet; Nicole Giuliani; Cristian Palmiere; Géraldine Maujean; Marc Augsburger

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Fuel gas conditioning process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas, so that it can be used as combustion fuel to run gas-powered equipment, including compressors, in the gas field or the gas processing plant. Compared with prior art processes, the invention creates lesser quantities of low-pressure gas per unit volume of fuel gas produced. Optionally, the process can also produce an NGL product.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The effect of fuel composition on flame dynamics  

SciTech Connect

As fuel sources diversify, the gas turbine industry is under increasing pressure to develop fuel-flexible plants, able to use fuels with a variety of compositions from a large range of sources. However, the dynamic characteristics vary considerably with composition, in many cases altering the thermoacoustic stability of the combustor. We compare the flame dynamics, or the response in heat release rate of the flame to acoustic perturbations, of the three major constituents of natural gas: methane, ethane, and propane. The heat release rate is quantified using OH* chemiluminescence and product gas temperature. Gas temperature is measured by tracking the absorption of two high-temperature water lines, via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy. The flame dynamics of the three fuels differ significantly. The changes in flame dynamics due to variations in fuel composition have the potential to have a large effect on the thermoacoustic stability of the combustor. (author)

Hendricks, Adam G.; Vandsburger, Uri [Department of Mechanical Engineering - 0238, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

Carbides composite surface layers produced by (PTA)  

SciTech Connect

The plasma transferred arc technique was applied to deposit a composite layer of nickel base with tungsten carbide in powder form on to surface of low alloy steel 18G2A type according to polish standard. Results showed that, plasma transferred arc hard facing process was successfully conducted by using Deloro alloy 22 plus tungsten carbide powders. Maximum hardness of 1489 HV and minimum dilution of 8.4 % were achieved by using an arc current of 60 A. However, when the current was further increased to 120 A and the dilution increases with current increase while the hardness decreases. Microstructure of the nickel base deposit with tungsten carbide features uniform distribution of reinforcement particles with regular grain shape half - dissolved in the matrix.

Tajoure, Meloud, E-mail: Tajoore2000@yahoo.com [MechanicalEng.,HIHM,Gharian (Libya); Tajouri, Ali, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com; Abuzriba, Mokhtar, E-mail: Tajouri-am@yahoo.com, E-mail: dr.mokhtarphd@yahoo.com [Materials and Metallurgical Eng., UOT, Tripoli (Libya); Akreem, Mosbah, E-mail: makreem@yahoo.com [Industrial Research Centre,Tripoli (Libya)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

432

Welding of cast A359/SiC/10p metal matrix composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

arc welding GTAW Gas tungsten arc welding HAZ Heat affected zone HF High frequency MMC Metal matrix composite MMCs Metal matrix composites NDE Non-destructive examination SAW Submerged arc welding SMAW Shielded metal arc... limited their applications. Further, the use of composite materials requires us to stay from the established processes and areas of practice that were relevant to more conventional engineering materials. Except for gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW...

Kothari, Mitul Arvind

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Exhaust gas treatment by an atmospheric pressure microwave plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A microwave process for treating exhaust gases from internal combustion engines is presented. The exhaust gases are ionised by microwave energy at 2.45 GHz and the resultant plasma jet discharges into ambient air and exhaust gas environment. A gas analyser was used to measure the change in exhaust gas composition due to the influence of the plasma. Large decreases in CO2, CO and hydrocarbon levels, accompanied by an increase in NO levels, were found.

Carlos A. Destefani; Elias Siores

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Noble gases identify the mechanisms of fugitive gas contamination in drinking-water wells overlying the Marcellus and Barnett Shales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...two previously normal wells that displayed increased...tectonic (e.g., geothermal springs) or microbial...subset of drinking water wells near Marcellus shale...Domestic and Municipal Water Wells for Dissolved Gas Analysis...nitrate flux to the Gulf of Mexico. Ground Water 42...

Thomas H. Darrah; Avner Vengosh; Robert B. Jackson; Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert J. Poreda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Notch sensitivity of fatigue life in a Sylramic TM composite at elevated temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sensitivity; Fatigue; SiC composite; Embrittlement 1. Introduction Continuous-fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs in advanced gas turbine engines. The motivation for this activity is the desire to increase operating are expelled during unloading and the oxidizing atmosphere drawn into the composite through matrix cracks

Zok, Frank

436

Remediation of Risks in Natural Gas Storage Produced Waters: The Potential Use of Constructed Wetland Treatment Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Natural gas storage produced waters (NGSPWs) are generated in large volumes, vary in composition, and often contain constituents in concentrations and forms that are toxic… (more)

Johnson, Brenda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Microcracking in fibrous composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are conducted on a unidirectional graphite fiber-reinforced epoxy in order to determine some aspects of nonlinear behavior, and the results of microcracking. The nature. of the microstructure of composites and the microcracking that occurs in composites... of microscopy samples. 53 21. Graphite composite surfaces, as received (top, 60X) and as prepared (bottom, 100X) ~ 56 22, Graphite composite surfaces after peeling (1000X). 58 23. Scotchply surfaces after peeling (1000X). 60 24. Graphite composite damaged...

Conrad, Nicholas

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Influence of Mixing and Fuel Composition on Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mixing and Fuel Composition Mixing and Fuel Composition on Emissions * Lean premixed combustion is effective for emission reduction More sensitive to perturbations including fuel gas composition variability * UC Irvine developed model relating fuel/air mixing and fuel composition to emissions Altering fuel distribution is a strategy to accommodate fuel composition changes * Results were used by 3 OEM's, 1 combustion technology developer and 1 user to help make decisions on how to handle the impact of LNG on combustor stability, and in the case of California installations, on how to respond to regulatory issues * As LNG is used in increasing quantities from more sources the variability of fuel gas should be more widespread, and manufacturers are likely to use this data in redesigning

439

Neutron Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We assume that the neutron-neutron potential is well-behaved and velocity-dependent. We can then apply perturbation theory to find the energy per particle of a neutron gas, in the range of Fermi wave numbers 0.5

J. S. Levinger and L. M. Simmons

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Concentration polarization in gas permeation  

SciTech Connect

It was verified that the selectivity of very thin (1 {mu}m thick) PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane) composite membranes for gaseous binary mixtures, like nitrogen and a hydrocarbon (HC), is as much as five times smaller than for the same mixture using a thick membrane (15 {mu}m-thick). This phenomenon is due to the build-up of the less permeable gas on the retentate side over the membrane and is known as the concentration polarization effect. In this paper we present a model for the gas concentration polarization effect based in the film theory and compare with the experimental results for the nitrogen-pentane separation using a PDMS membrane. 8 refs., 6 figs.

Mendes, A.M.M. [Univ. of Porto (Portugal); Alpers, A.; Peinemann, K.V.; Ohlrogge, K. [GKSS-Research Centre, Geesthacht (Germany)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas Hydrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Hydrates ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ... Formation Characteristics of Synthesized Natural Gas Hydrates in Meso- and Macroporous Silica Gels ...

Willard I. Wilcox; D. B. Carson; D. L. Katz

1941-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Gas Kick Mechanistic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas kicks occur during drilling when the formation pressure is greater than the wellbore pressure causing influx of gas into the wellbore. Uncontrolled gas kicks could result in blowout of the rig causing major financial loss and possible injury...

Zubairy, Raheel

2014-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

The effect of mean cell residence time on the adsorbability of dissolved organic compounds found in petrochemical wastewaters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THF EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTEWATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LURING JOHNSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University ir, Partia. fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE EFFECT OF MEAN CELL RESIDENCE TIME ON THE ADSORBABILITY OF DISSOLVED ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FOUND IN PETROCHEMICAL WASTENATERS A Thesis by TIMOTHY LORING...

Johnson, Timothy Loring

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

444

Program solves for gas well inflow performance  

SciTech Connect

A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Activated carbon fiber composite material and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An activated carbon fiber composite for separation and purification, or catalytic processing of fluids is described. The activated composite comprises carbon fibers rigidly bonded to form an open, permeable, rigid monolith capable of being formed to near-net-shape. Separation and purification of gases are effected by means of a controlled pore structure that is developed in the carbon fibers contained in the composite. The open, permeable structure allows the free flow of gases through the monolith accompanied by high rates of adsorption. By modification of the pore structure and bulk density the composite can be rendered suitable for applications such as gas storage, catalysis, and liquid phase processing.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Weaver, Charles E. (Knoxville, TN); Chilcoat, Bill R. (Knoxville, TN); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

NITROGEN REMOVAL FROM NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to develop a membrane process for the denitrogenation of natural gas. Large proven reserves in the Lower-48 states cannot be produced because of the presence of nitrogen. To exploit these reserves, cost-effective, simple technology able to reduce the nitrogen content of the gas to 4-5% is required. Technology applicable to treatment of small gas streams (below 10 MMscfd) is particularly needed. In this project membranes that selectively permeate methane and reject nitrogen in the gas were developed. Preliminary calculations show that a membrane with a methane/nitrogen selectivity of 3 to 5 is required to make the process economically viable. A number of polymer materials likely to have the required selectivities were evaluated as composite membranes. Polyacetylenes such as poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) [PTMSP] and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP] had high selectivities and fluxes, but membranes prepared from these polymers were not stable, showing decreasing flux and selectivity during tests lasting only a few hours. Parel, a poly(propylene oxide allyl glycidyl ether) had a selectivity of 3 at ambient temperatures and 4 or more at temperatures of {minus}20 C. However, Parel is no longer commercially available, and we were unable to find an equivalent material in the time available. Therefore, most of our experimental work focused on silicone rubber membranes, which have a selectivity of 2.5 at ambient temperatures, increasing to 3-4 at low temperatures. Silicone rubber composite membranes were evaluated in bench-scale module tests and with commercial-scale, 4-inch-diameter modules in a small pilot plant. Over six days of continuous operation at a feed gas temperature of {minus}5 to {minus}10 C, the membrane maintained a methane/nitrogen selectivity of about 3.3. Based on the pilot plant performance data, an analysis of the economic potential of the process was prepared. We conclude that a stand-alone membrane process is the lowest-cost technology for small gas streams containing less than 10% nitrogen. The membrane process can recover more than 60-70% of the hydrocarbon content of the gas at a cost of $0.60-0.70/Mscfd. The capital cost of the process is about $100-200/Mscf. A number of small operators appear to be ready to use the technology if these costs can be demonstrated in the field. A second, and perhaps better, application of the technology is to combine the membrane process with a cryogenic process to treat large gas streams containing 10-20% nitrogen. The combination process achieves significant synergies. The membrane process performs a bulk separation of the gas, after which the cryogenic process treats the membrane residue (nitrogen-enriched) gas to recover more methane. Overall, hydrocarbon recoveries are greater than 95%. The capital cost of the combination process is lower than that of either process used alone and the processing costs are in the range $0.30-0.40/Mscf. This operating cost would be attractive to many gas producers. MTR is collaborating with a producer of cryogenic systems to further develop the combination process. A number of innovations in membrane process designs were made during the project; four U.S. patents covering various aspects of the technology were filed and issued.

K.A. Lokhandwala; M.B. Ringer; T.T. Su; Z. He; I. Pinnau; J.G. Wijmans; A. Morisato; K. Amo; A. DaCosta; R.W. Baker; R. Olsen; H. Hassani; T. Rathkamp

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

448

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

449

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

450

Historical Natural Gas Annual  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 The Historical Natural Gas Annual contains historical information on supply and disposition of natural gas at the national, regional, and State level as well as prices at...

451

Future of Natural Gas  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

technology is improving - Producers are drilling in liquids rich gas and crude oil shale plays due to lower returns on dry gas production - Improved well completion time...

452

Natural Gas Industrial Price  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Power Price Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells...

453

Conductive ceramic composition and method of preparation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic anode composition is formed of a multivalent metal oxide or oxygenate such as an alkali metal, transition metal oxygenate. The anode is prepared as a non-stoichiometric crystalline structure by reaction and conditioning in a hydrogen gas cover containing minor proportions of carbon dioxide and water vapor. The structure exhibits a single phase and substantially enhanced electrical conductivity over that of the corresponding stoichiometric structure. Unexpectedly, such oxides and oxygenates are found to be stable in the reducing anode fuel gas of a molten carbonate fuel cell. 4 figures.

Smith, J.L.; Kucera, E.H.

1991-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

454

Modeling the downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen from aeration of Cherokee and Douglas releases  

SciTech Connect

This report is an evaluation of downstream improvements in dissolved oxygen (DO) which can be anticipated as a result of different levels of aeration at Cherokee and Douglas Dams. The report describes (a) field studies undertaken to describe late summer conditions for model calibration and verification; (b) development and calibration of unsteady flow and water quality models for the tailwater reaches from Cherokee and Douglas Dams to the Holston and French Broad River confluence at the head of Fort Loudoun Reservoir; and (c) model predictions of DO in the tailwater reaches and at their confluence (after mixing) with and without aeration. 7 refs., 47 figs., 4 tabs.

Hauser, G.E.; Beard, L.M.; Brown, R.T.; McKinnon, M.K.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

In Situ Bioreduction of Uranium (VI) to Submicromolar Levels and Reoxidation by Dissolved Oxygen  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater within Area 3 of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Program (ERSP) Field Research Center at Oak Ridge, TN (ORFRC) contains up to 135 {micro}M uranium as U(VI). Through a series of experiments at a pilot scale test facility, we explored the lower limits of groundwater U(VI) that can be achieved by in-situ biostimulation and the effects of dissolved oxygen on immobilized uranium. Weekly 2 day additions of ethanol over a 2-year period stimulated growth of denitrifying, Fe(III)-reducing, and sulfate-reducing bacteria, and immobilization of uranium as U(IV), with dissolved uranium concentrations decreasing to low levels. Following sulfite addition to remove dissolved oxygen, aqueous U(VI) concentrations fell below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant limit (MCL) for drinking water (<30 {micro}g L{sup -1} or 0.126 {micro}M). Under anaerobic conditions, these low concentrations were stable, even in the absence of added ethanol. However, when sulfite additions stopped, and dissolved oxygen (4.0-5.5 mg L{sup -1}) entered the injection well, spatially variable changes in aqueous U(VI) occurred over a 60 day period, with concentrations increasing rapidly from <0.13 to 2.0 {micro}M at a multilevel sampling (MLS) well located close to the injection well, but changing little at an MLS well located further away. Resumption of ethanol addition restored reduction of Fe(III), sulfate, and U(VI) within 36 h. After 2 years of ethanol addition, X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) analyses indicated that U(IV) comprised 60-80% of the total uranium in sediment samples. At the completion of the project (day 1260), U concentrations in MLS wells were less than 0.1 {micro}M. The microbial community at MLS wells with low U(VI) contained bacteria that are known to reduce uranium, including Desulfovibrio spp. and Geobacter spp., in both sediment and groundwater. The dominant Fe(III)-reducing species were Geothrix spp.

Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew A. [Stanford University; Cardenas, Erick [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Leigh, Mary Beth [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hwang, Chaichi [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Kelly, Shelly D [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruan, Chuanmin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Gentry, Terry J [ORNL; Lowe, Kenneth Alan [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; Luo, Wensui [ORNL; Fields, Matthew Wayne [Miami University, Oxford, OH; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Fendorf, Scott [Stanford University; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Quantification of the Interaction of Tc with Dissolved Boom Clay Humic Substances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To elucidate the Tc geochemical behavior in reducing environments relevant to geological disposal and in the presence of humic substances (HS), experiments were set up that resulted for the first time in the determination of an interaction constant for Tc with dissolved humic substances. ... A number of lab-scale Boom Clay (a possible geological underground High-Level Radioactive Waste storage site in Mol, Belgium) batch experiments were set up, combining both different initial Tc(VII) concentrations and different solid/liquid ratios. ... Appendix:? Reactions and Stability Constants for Tc in a Reducing Environment ...

A. Maes; C. Bruggeman; K. Geraedts; J. Vancluysen

2003-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Effects of CO2-Induced Seawater Acidification on Microbial Processes Involving Dissolved Organic Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We used laboratory experiments covering a wide range of carbon dioxide (CO2) induced seawater acidification to simulate ocean CO2 storage and assess the potential effects on heterotrophic microbial processes associated with labile dissolved organic matter (DOM). There was no noticeable effect of increased CO2 concentration on short-term decomposition of labile DOM or nutrient uptake. However, microbial activities producing “new” DOM were apparently enhanced under treatments with 2000 or 5000 ppm CO2. Under these conditions, production of aggregates was inhibited in early stage. Both of acute and chronic effects should be included for assessment of biogeochemical cycle related to microbe process.

Namiha Yamada; Nobuo Tsurushima; Masahiro Suzumura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

459

NATURAL GAS RESOURCES IN DEEP SEDIMENTARY BASINS  

SciTech Connect

From a geological perspective, deep natural gas resources are generally defined as resources occurring in reservoirs at or below 15,000 feet, whereas ultra-deep gas occurs below 25,000 feet. From an operational point of view, ''deep'' is often thought of in a relative sense based on the geologic and engineering knowledge of gas (and oil) resources in a particular area. Deep gas can be found in either conventionally-trapped or unconventional basin-center accumulations that are essentially large single fields having spatial dimensions often exceeding those of conventional fields. Exploration for deep conventional and unconventional basin-center natural gas resources deserves special attention because these resources are widespread and occur in diverse geologic environments. In 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated that 939 TCF of technically recoverable natural gas remained to be discovered or was part of reserve appreciation from known fields in the onshore areas and State waters of the United. Of this USGS resource, nearly 114 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of technically-recoverable gas remains to be discovered from deep sedimentary basins. Worldwide estimates of deep gas are also high. The U.S. Geological Survey World Petroleum Assessment 2000 Project recently estimated a world mean undiscovered conventional gas resource outside the U.S. of 844 Tcf below 4.5 km (about 15,000 feet). Less is known about the origins of deep gas than about the origins of gas at shallower depths because fewer wells have been drilled into the deeper portions of many basins. Some of the many factors contributing to the origin of deep gas include the thermal stability of methane, the role of water and non-hydrocarbon gases in natural gas generation, porosity loss with increasing thermal maturity, the kinetics of deep gas generation, thermal cracking of oil to gas, and source rock potential based on thermal maturity and kerogen type. Recent experimental simulations using laboratory pyrolysis methods have provided much information on the origins of deep gas. Technologic problems are one of the greatest challenges to deep drilling. Problems associated with overcoming hostile drilling environments (e.g. high temperatures and pressures, and acid gases such as CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S) for successful well completion, present the greatest obstacles to drilling, evaluating, and developing deep gas fields. Even though the overall success ratio for deep wells is about 50 percent, a lack of geological and geophysical information such as reservoir quality, trap development, and gas composition continues to be a major barrier to deep gas exploration. Results of recent finding-cost studies by depth interval for the onshore U.S. indicate that, on average, deep wells cost nearly 10 times more to drill than shallow wells, but well costs and gas recoveries vary widely among different gas plays in different basins. Based on an analysis of natural gas assessments, many topical areas hold significant promise for future exploration and development. One such area involves re-evaluating and assessing hypothetical unconventional basin-center gas plays. Poorly-understood basin-center gas plays could contain significant deep undiscovered technically-recoverable gas resources.

Thaddeus S. Dyman; Troy Cook; Robert A. Crovelli; Allison A. Henry; Timothy C. Hester; Ronald C. Johnson; Michael D. Lewan; Vito F. Nuccio; James W. Schmoker; Dennis B. Riggin; Christopher J. Schenk

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

460

Composition, apparatus, and process, for sorption of gaseous compounds of group II-VII elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Scavenger compositions are disclosed, which have utility for effecting the sorptive removal of hazardous gases containing Group II-VII elements of the Periodic Table, such as are widely encountered in the manufacture of semiconducting materials and semiconductor devices. Gas sorption processes including the contacting of Group II-VII gaseous compounds with such scavenger compositions are likewise disclosed, together with critical space velocity contacting conditions pertaining thereto. Further described are gas contacting apparatus, including mesh structures which may be deployed in gas contacting vessels containing such scavenger compositions, to prevent solids from being introduced to or discharged from the contacting vessel in the gas stream undergoing treatment. A reticulate heat transfer structure also is disclosed, for dampening localized exothermic reaction fronts when gas mixtures comprising Group II-VII constituents are contacted with the scavenger compositions in bulk sorption contacting vessels according to the invention.

Tom, Glenn M. (New Milford, CT); McManus, James V. (Danbury, CT); Luxon, Bruce A. (Stamford, CT)

1991-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Oily wastewater treatment: removal of dissolved organic components by forward osmosis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water is water brought to the surface with crude oil or natural gas; it is the largest waste stream by volume associated with the… (more)

Abousnina, Rajab M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

LOW NOx EMISSIONS IN A FUEL FLEXIBLE GAS TURBINE  

SciTech Connect

In alignment with Vision 21 goals, a study is presented here on the technical and economic potential for developing a gas turbine combustor that is capable of generating less that 2 ppm NOx emissions, firing on either coal synthesis gas or natural gas, and being implemented on new and existing systems. The proposed solution involves controlling the quantity of H2 contained in the fuel. The presence of H2 leads to increased flame stability such that the combustor can be operated at lower temperatures and produce less thermal NOx. Coal gas composition would be modified using a water gas shift converter, and natural gas units would implement a catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX) reactor to convert part of the natural gas feed to a syngas before fed back into the combustor. While both systems demonstrated technical merit, the economics involved in implementing such a system are marginal at best. Therefore, Praxair has decided not to pursue the technology any further at this time.

Raymond Drnevich; James Meagher; Vasilis Papavassiliou; Troy Raybold; Peter Stuttaford; Leonard Switzer; Lee Rosen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Composite production riser assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of a deep water composite production riser from a system perspective is presented, and its advantages are articulated through comparisons with a typical steel riser under identical service conditions. The composite riser joints...

Kim, Won Ki

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

464

Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

Shelnutt, John A. (Tijeras, NM); Medforth, Craig J. (Winters, CA); Wang, Zhongchun (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

465

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Flexible Composite Radiation Detector A flexible composite scintillator was prepared by mixing fast, bright, dense rare-earth doped powdered oxyorthosilicate (such as LSO:Ce, LSO:Sm, and GSO:Ce) scintillator with a polymer binder. The binder is transparent to the scintillator emission. The composite is seamless and can be made large and in a wide variety of shapes. Importantly, the composite can be tailored to emit light in a spectral region that matches the optimum

466

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OIL & GAS INSTITUTE CONTENTS Introduction Asset Integrity Underpinning Capabilities 2 4 4 6 8 9 10 COMPETITIVENESS UNIVERSITY of STRATHCLYDE OIL & GAS INSTITUTE OIL & GAS EXPERTISE AND PARTNERSHIPS #12;1 The launch of the Strathclyde Oil & Gas Institute represents an important step forward for the University

Mottram, Nigel

468

Composite bipolar plate for electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bipolar separator plate for fuel cells consists of a molded mixture of a vinyl ester resin and graphite powder. The plate serves as a current collector and may contain fluid flow fields for the distribution of reactant gases. The material is inexpensive, electrically conductive, lightweight, strong, corrosion resistant, easily mass produced, and relatively impermeable to hydrogen gas. The addition of certain fiber reinforcements and other additives can improve the properties of the composite material without significantly increasing its overall cost.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Busick, Deanna N. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model  

SciTech Connect

The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Vibrational Damping of Composite Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Damping of Composite Laminates”, SPIE Proceedings onpublication to Journal of Composite Materials Biggerstaff,submitted for publication to Composites, Part A Biggerstaff,

Biggerstaff, Janet M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The impact of diffusion type on multiscale discrete fracture model numerical simulation for shale gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The development of unconventional gas reservoirs represents totally distinctive characteristics as compared with the conventional reservoirs. The complex pore structure in shale reservoir determines its special flow mechanism, which can be divided into several categories according to the size and type of pores- non Darcy flow, gas slippage, adsorption-desorption and gas diffusion effect. Based on the gas molecules diffusion form in porous media and combining with the multi-scale distribution structural characteristics of shale gas reservoirs, the shale gas diffusion mechanisms in the shale reservoir space including the diffusion of dissolved gases in the organic kerogen and the diffusion of free gas in the nanopores are analyzed in this paper. Meanwhile, the diffusion in the nanopores consists of Knudsen diffusion (KN ? 10), Fick diffusion (KN ? 0.1) and transition diffusion (0.1 shale gas flow in matrix and fracture networks, and also for their mass transfer in between without neglecting its varying-scale nature following the concept of discrete fracture network (DFN). In addition, we also investigate the different diffusion mechanisms' influences on the production and pressure in the tight shale gas reservoir. Ultimately, concluding that the gas diffusion mechanisms in micro-and nano-scale matrix block have a greater impact on the distribution of shale gas production (especially the production at early time) and reservoir pressure.

Lidong Mi; Hanqiao Jiang; Junjian Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Bubble retention in synthetic sludge: Testing of alternative gas retention apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Several of the underground storage tanks currently used to store waste at Hanford have been placed on the Flammable Gas Watch List, because the waste is either known or suspected to generate, store, and episodically release flammable gases. The objective of this experimental study is to develop a method to measure gas bubble retention in simulated tank waste and in diluted simulant. The method and apparatus should (1) allow for reasonably rapid experiments, (2) minimize sample disturbance, and (3) provide realistic bubble nucleation and growth. The scope of this experimental study is to build an apparatus for measuring gas retention in simulated waste and to design the apparatus to be compatible with future testing on actual waste. The approach employed for creating bubbles in sludge involves dissolving a soluble gas into the supernatant liquid at an elevated pressure, recirculating the liquid containing the dissolved gas through the sludge, then reducing the pressure to allow bubbles to nucleate and grow. Results have been obtained for ammonia as the soluble gas and SY1-SIM-91A, a chemically representative simulated tank waste. In addition, proof-of-principle experiments were conducted with both ammonia and CO{sub 2} as soluble gases and sludge composed of 90-micron glass beads. Results are described.

Rassat, S.D.; Gauglitz, P.A.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Application of composite repair for pipeline anomalies  

SciTech Connect

The cost of maintaining the structural integrity of the 650,000 kilometer high-pressure gas gathering and transmission pipeline network is a significant part of the operating budget of the US pipeline industry. To help in controlling thee costs, the Gas Research institute (GRI) has supported research resulting in the development of Clock Spring{reg_sign}, a low-cost fiberglass composite alternative to conventional steel sleeves for transmission line pipe reinforcement and repair. Investigation and development of engineering guidelines have been completed. Field validation of laboratory research on application of Clock Spring as a repair for corrosion and mechanical damage defects is in progress. This paper presents an overview of composite repair technology for pipeline corrosion and mechanical damage defects. It summarizes the results and conclusions of modeling and experiments on reinforcement and repair of both corrosion and mechanical damage (i.e., dent and gouge) pipeline defects. These investigations provide quantitative results on the operating envelope of composite reinforcements and installation requirements that ensure sound and reliable repair of pipeline defects. The paper further summarizes the work to date on field installation in verification of composite repair performance.

Stephens, D.R. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States); Lindholm, U.S. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Hill, V.L. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States); Block, N. [Clock Spring Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Natural Gas: Dry Wells Yield Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Gas Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two ... Council and Home Oil of Canada have announced plans for developing two natural ...

1969-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

475

Extractant composition including crown ether and calixarene extractants  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An extractant composition comprising a mixed extractant solvent consisting of calix[4] arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo)-crown-6 ("BOBCalixC6"), 4',4',(5')-di-(t-butyldicyclo-hexano)-18-crown-6 ("DtBu18C6"), and at least one modifier dissolved in a diluent. The DtBu18C6 may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.4M, such as at from approximately 0.086 M to approximately 0.108 M. The modifier may be 1-(2,2,3,3-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol ("Cs-7SB") and may be present at from approximately 0.01M to approximately 0.8M. In one embodiment, the mixed extractant solvent includes approximately 0.15M DtBu18C6, approximately 0.007M BOBCalixC6, and approximately 0.75M Cs-7SB modifier dissolved in an isoparaffinic hydrocarbon diluent. The extractant composition further comprises an aqueous phase. The mixed extractant solvent may be used to remove cesium and strontium from the aqueous phase.

Meikrantz, David H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Riddle, Catherine L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Law, Jack D. (Pocalello, ID); Peterman, Dean R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mincher, Bruce J. (Idaho Falls, ID); McGrath, Christopher A. (Blackfoot, ID); Baker, John D. (Blackfoot, ID)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

476

Effects of Propane/Natural Gas Blended Fuels on Gas Turbine Pollutant Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) imports to the U.S. are expected to grow significantly over the next 10-15 years. Likewise, it is expected that changes to the domestic gas supply may also introduce changes in natural gas composition. As a result of these anticipated changes, the composition of fuel sources may vary significantly from conventional domestic natural gas supplies. This paper will examine the effects of fuel variability on pollutant emissions for premixed gas turbine conditions. The experimental data presented in this paper have been collected from a pressurized single injector combustion test rig at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). The tests are conducted at 7.5 atm with a 588 K air preheat. A propane blending facility is used to vary the Wobbe Index of the site natural gas. The results indicate that propane addition of about five (vol.) percent does not lead to a significant change in the observed NOx or CO emissions. These results are different from data collected on some engine applications and potential reasons for these differences will be described.

Straub, D.L.; Ferguson, D.H.; Casleton, K.H.; Richards, G.A.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C-C composite containing continuous PAN T300 fibers · SWB: Chopped Fiber Composite containing SWB fibers Crush strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

Rollins, Andrew M.

478

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

479

South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) South Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

480

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dissolved gas compositions" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

482

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

483

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

484

New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) New York Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

485

West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) West Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

486

North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) North Dakota Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

487

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

488

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

489

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

490

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

491

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

492

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

493

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

494

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

495

Composition and method for self-assembly and mineralization of peptide-amphiphiles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a composition useful for making homogeneously mineralized self assembled peptide-amphiphile nanofibers and nanofiber gels. The composition is generally a solution comprised of a positively or negatively charged peptide-amphiphile and a like signed ion from the mineral. Mixing this solution with a second solution containing a dissolved counter-ion of the mineral and/or a second oppositely charged peptide amphiphile, results in the rapid self assembly of the peptide-amphiphiles into a nanofiber gel and templated mineralization of the ions. Templated mineralization of the initially dissolved mineral cations and anions in the mixture occurs with preferential orientation of the mineral crystals along the fiber surfaces within the nanofiber gel. One advantage of the present invention is that it results in homogenous growth of the mineral throughout the nanofiber gel. Another advantage of the present invention is that the nanofiber gel formation and mineralization reactions occur in a single mixing step and under substantially neutral or physiological pH conditions. These homogeneous nanostructured composite materials are useful for medical applications especially the regeneration of damaged bone in mammals. This invention is directed to the synthesis of peptide-amphiphiles with more than one amphiphilic moment and to supramolecular compositions comprised of such multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles. Supramolecular compositions can be formed by self assembly of multi-dimensional peptide-amphiphiles by mixing them with a solution comprising a monovalent cation.

Stupp, Samuel I. (Chicago, IL); Beniash, Elia (Newton, MA); Hartgerink, Jeffrey D. (Pearland, TX)

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

496

No more gas from Egypt? Modeling offshore discoveries and import uncertainty of natural gas in Israel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Israel depends on natural gas imports from Egypt for about 40% of its domestic needs, with the remaining met from domestic production. Gas supplies from Egypt have been erratic since their initiation: disruptions have increased after the 2011 revolution in Egypt and have been further ignited by public discontent. Despite these developments, Israeli policy makers have viewed the Egyptian gas deal as a positive factor in preserving peace with Egypt and have had no better alternatives than relying upon it. This has changed, however, after recent discoveries of three major offshore fields that are expected to satisfy domestic demand for an indefinite period and to provide gas for exports. We use an extended global CGE modeling framework that incorporates multiple households and factor ownership to investigate the effects of reduced gas imports from Egypt and the evolvement of domestic gas production as an alternative. In case of reduced gas imports from Egypt, the Israeli economy would slightly retract mainly due to lower production in energy intensive sectors. Poor households would be the most negatively affected, due to the strongest relative decline in income and the strongest increase of their consumer price index. In the case of increasing domestic gas production, Israeli GDP and domestic absorption would rise by about 0.2% and 0.4%, respectively. Poor households would be more positively affected than rich ones due to their composition of factor income and their higher expenditure shares for energy intensive commodities.

Khalid Siddig; Harald Grethe

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Gas mixing system for imaging of nanomaterials under dynamic environments by environmental transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

A gas mixing manifold system that is capable of delivering a stable pressure stream of a desired composition of gases into an environmental transmission electron microscope has been developed. The system is designed to provide a stable imaging environment upon changes of either the composition of the gas mixture or upon switching from one gas to another. The design of the system is described and the response of the pressure inside the microscope, the sample temperature, and sample drift in response to flow and composition changes of the system are reported.

Akatay, M. Cem [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)] [School of Materials Engineering and Birck Nanotechnology Center, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Zvinevich, Yury; Ribeiro, Fabio H., E-mail: fabio@purdue.edu, E-mail: estach@bnl.gov [Forney Hall of Chemical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Baumann, Philipp [Computer Sciences, University of Applied Sciences of Northeastern Switzerland, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland and Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States)] [Computer Sciences, University of Applied Sciences of Northeastern Switzerland, 4132 Muttenz, Switzerland and Department of Physics, Yeshiva University, New York, New York 10016 (United States); Stach, Eric A., E-mail: fabio@purdue.edu, E-mail: estach@bnl.gov [Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

Problems: Gas Laws & Solubility 1. You accept a position in a laboratory that is located on ground level on the planet Mars.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problems: Gas Laws & Solubility 1. You accept a position. Gas % Composition Partial Pressure Oxygen 70 CO2 3 Nitrogen Argon 2. Calculate how much humidifier holds the water vapor tension within the chamber at 10 mm Hg

Prestwich, Ken

499

Chapter Nine - Gas Sweetening  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This chapter begins by reviewing the processing of natural gas to meet gas sales contract specifications. It then describes acid gas limitations for pipelines and gas plants, before detailing the most common acid gas removal processes, such as solid-bed, chemical solvent processes, physical solvent processes, direct conversion processes, distillation process, and gas permeation processes. The chapter discusses the selection of the appropriate removal process for a given situation, and it provides a detailed design procedure for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process. The chapter ends by supplying a sample design for a solid-bed and chemical solvent process.

Maurice I. Stewart Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z