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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Records Disposition  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To assign responsibilities and authorities and to prescribe policies, procedures, standards, and guidelines for the orderly disposition of records of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its management and operating contractors. Cancels DOE O 1324.2 dated 5-28-80. Chg 1 dated 4-9-92. Canceled by DOE O 1324.2B dated 1-12-95.

1988-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

2

Records Disposition  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To assign responsibilities and authorities and to prescribe policies, procedures, standards, and guidelines for the orderly disposition of records of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its operating and onsite service contractors. Cancels DOE O 1324.1 dated 7-10-78. Chg 1 dated 7-2-81. Chg 2 dated 11-9-82. Canceled by DOE O 1324.2A dated 9-13-88.

1980-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

3

Plasma Production via Field Ionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu,; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

2007-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

Production Hydraulic Packer Field Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 1999, the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Halliburton Energy Services cooperated on a field test of Halliburton's new Production Hydraulic Packer technology on Well 46-TPX-10 at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 near Casper, WY. Performance of the packer was evaluated in set and unset operations. The packer's ability to seal the annulus between the casing and tubing was hydraulically tested and the results were recorded.

Schneller, Tricia; Salas, Jose

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

5

Plutonium Disposition Program | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposition Plutonium Disposition Program Plutonium Disposition Program The U.S.-Russia Plutonium Management and Disposition Agreement (PMDA), which entered into force on...

6

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Preliminary Quality Assurance Implementation Plan The primary...

7

Particle Production and Dissipative Cosmic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large amplitude oscillation of cosmic field that may occur right after inflation and in the decay process of weakly interacting fields gives rise to violent particle production via the parametric resonance. In the large amplitude limit the problem of back reaction against the field oscillation is solved and the energy spectrum of created particles is determined in a semi-classical approximation. For large enough coupling or large enough amplitude the resulting energy spectrum is broadly distributed, implying larger production of high energy particles than what a simple estimate of the reheating temperature due to the Born formula would suggest.

H. Fujisaki; K. Kumekawa; M. Yamaguchi; M. Yoshimura

1995-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

8

Assistant Manager for Waste Disposition  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The incumbent of this position is responsible for providing overall leadership and direction for oversight of assigned contractor and Federal programs and activities associated with the disposition...

9

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Depleted uranium (DU) is produced as a by-product of the uranium enrichment process. Over 340,000 MTU of DU in the form of UF{sub 6} have been accumulated at the US government gaseous diffusion plants and the stockpile continues to grow. An overview of issues and objectives associated with the inventory management and the ultimate disposition of this material is presented.

Lemons, T.R. [Uranium Enrichment Organization, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

10

Schwinger Pair Production in Pulsed Electric Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically investigate the temporal behavior and the structure of longitudinal momentum spectrum and the field polarity effect on pair production in pulsed electric fields in scalar quantum electrodynamics (QED). Using the evolution operator expressed in terms of the particle and antiparticle operators, we find the exact quantum states under the influence of electric pulses and measure the number of pairs of the Minkowski particle and antiparticle. The number of pairs, depending on the configuration of electric pulses, exhibits rich structures in the longitudinal momentum spectrum and undergoes diverse dynamical behaviors at the onset of the interaction but always either converges to a momentum-dependent constant or oscillates around a momentum-dependent time average after the completion of fields.

Sang Pyo Kim; Hyung Won Lee; Remo Ruffini

2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

11

Depleted uranium disposition study -- Supplement, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy Office of Weapons and Materials Planning has requested a supplemental study to update the recent Depleted Uranium Disposition report. This supplemental study addresses new disposition alternatives and changes in status.

Becker, G.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gas plants, new fields spark production rise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas plant construction is welcomed by operators in the Williston Basin, North Dakota. Petroleum and gas production has increased. The Montana portion of the Williston Basin shows new discoveries. Some secondary recovery efforts are in operation. Industrial officials share the same enthusiasm and optimism for rising production as they do for exploration potential in the basin. 5 tables.

Lenzini, D.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Remote control of off-shore oil field production equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

REMOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Sissom 1949 Approve as to style and on n by Cha1rman of omm1ttee REMOTE CONTROL OF OFFSHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT A Thesis Alton W. Oissom 1949 REMOTE...-Carrier Channel 26 PZNOTE CONTROL OF OFF-SHORE OIL FIELD PRODUCTION K, 'UIPMENT I GENERAL IiPOPPUi TION Since the beginning of the exploitation of the under-sea oil deposits in the Gulf' of qexico, most, of the territory off the shores of Texas and Louisiana...

Sissom, Alton Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

14

Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface Light Field Rendering for Virtual Product Design Jan MESETH, Gero MÃ?LLER, Reinhard KLEIN illumination solution including accurate materials, which is stored as an outgoing Surface Light Field (SLF-facto standard in manufacturing industries like the automotive industry. They are used, e.g., for performing

Behnke, Sven

15

Fissile Materials Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administrati...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

uranium have become surplus to the defense needs of both the United States and Russia. The Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (FMD) plays an important role in...

16

Weapons Dismantlement and Disposition NNSS Capabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has tasked the WDD working group to disposition the large inventory of legacy classified weapon components scattered across the complex.

Pat Arnold

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Summary - Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& ORNL, Oak Ridge, TN EM Project: Integrated Facility Disposition Project (IFDP) ETR Report Date: August 2008 ETR-15 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental...

18

Personal Property Disposition - Community Reuse Organizations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Owen (signed) Director, Office of Worker and Community Transition Department of Energy Washington, DC 20505 January 22, 2003 Disposition of Excess Personal Property...

19

Preliminary siting characterization Salt Disposition Facility - Site B  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A siting and reconnaissance geotechnical program has been completed in S-Area at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. This program investigated the subsurface conditions for the area known as ``Salt Disposition Facility (SDF), Site B'' located northeast of H-Area and within the S-Area. Data acquired from the Site B investigation includes both field exploration and laboratory test data.

Wyatt, D.

2000-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Disposition Decision Analysis and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Disposition Decision Analysis and Timeline Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 Disposition Decision Analysis and Timeline This Report to Congress provides a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste at Idaho Site EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste at Idaho Site December 24, 2013 -...

22

Surplus Plutonium Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In December 1996, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (Storage and Disposition PEIS)'' (DOE 1996a). That PEIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternative strategies for the long-term storage of weapons-usable plutonium and highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the disposition of weapons-usable plutonium that has been or may be declared surplus to national security needs. The Record of Decision (ROD) for the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', issued on January 14, 1997 (DOE 1997a), outlines DOE's decision to pursue an approach to plutonium disposition that would make surplus weapons-usable plutonium inaccessible and unattractive for weapons use. DOE's disposition strategy, consistent with the Preferred Alternative analyzed in the ''Storage and Disposition PEIS'', allows for both the immobilization of some (and potentially all) of the surplus plutonium and use of some of the surplus plutonium as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel in existing domestic, commercial reactors. The disposition of surplus plutonium would also involve disposal of both the immobilized plutonium and the MOX fuel (as spent nuclear fuel) in a potential geologic repository.

N /A

1999-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Steve Birrer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

PRODUCTION ANALYSIS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

ESTIMATING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States holds at least 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition of the National Nuclear Security Administration and the DOE Office of Environmental Management. Many of the items that require disposition are only partially characterized, and SRNL uses a variety of techniques to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that are important for processing through the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility and alternative disposition paths. Recent advances in laboratory tools, including Prompt Gamma Analysis and Peroxide Fusion treatment, provide data on the existing inventories that will enable disposition without additional, costly sampling and destructive analysis.

Allender, J.; Moore, E.

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

27

Semiclassical pair production rate for rotating electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We semiclassically investigate Schwinger pair production for pulsed rotating electric fields depending on time. To do so we solve the Dirac equation for two-component fields in a WKB-like approximation. The result shows that for two-component fields the spin distribution of produced pairs is generally not $1:1$. As a result the pair creation rates of spinor and scalar quantum electro dynamics (QED) are different even for one pair of turning points. For rotating electric fields the pair creation rate is dominated by particles with a specific spin depending on the sense of rotation for a certain range of pulse lengths and frequencies. We present an analytical solution for the momentum spectrum of the constant rotating field. We find interference effects not only in the momentum spectrum but also in the total particle number of rotating electric fields.

Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

28

Vorticity and magnetic field production in relativistic ideal fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the framework of relativistic ideal hydrodynamics, we study the production mechanism for vorticity and magnetic field in relativistic ideal fluids. It is demonstrated that in the uncharged fluids the thermal vorticity will always satisfy the Kelvin's theorem and the circulation must be conserved. However, in the charged fluids, the vorticity and magnetic field can be produced by the interaction between the entropy gradients and the fluid velocity gradients. Especially, in the multiple charged fluids, the vorticity and magnetic field can be produced by the interaction between the inhomogenous charge density ratio and the fluid velocity gradients even if the entropy distribution is homogeneous, which provides another mechanism for the production of vorticity and magnetic field in relativistic plasmas or in the early universe.

Jian-Hua Gao; Bin Qi; Shou-Yu Wang

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

29

Improved Approximations for Fermion Pair Production in Inhomogeneous Electric Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reformulating the instantons in a complex plane for tunneling or transmitting states, we calculate the pair-production rate of charged fermions in a spatially localized electric field, illustrated by the Sauter electric field E_0 sech^2 (z/L), and in a temporally localized electric field such as E_0 sech^2 (t/T). The integration of the quadratic part of WKB instanton actions over the frequency and transverse momentum leads to the pair-production rate obtained by the worldline instanton method, including the prefactor, of Phys. Rev. D72, 105004 (2005) and D73, 065028 (2006). It is further shown that the WKB instanton action plus the next-to-leading order contribution in spinor QED equals the WKB instanton action in scalar QED, thus justifying why the WKB instanton in scalar QED can work for the pair production of fermions. Finally we obtain the pair-production rate in a spatially localized electric field together with a constant magnetic field in the same direction.

Sang Pyo Kim; Don N. Page

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

30

Processing and Disposition of Special Actinide Target Materials - 13138  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) manages an inventory of materials that contains a range of long-lived radioactive isotopes that were produced from the 1960's through the 1980's by irradiating targets in high-flux reactors at the Savannah River Site (SRS) to produce special heavy isotopes for DOE programmatic use, scientific research, and industrial and medical applications. Among the products were californium-252, heavy curium (including Cm-246 through Cm-248), and plutonium-242 and -244. Many of the isotopes are still in demand today, and they can be recovered from the remaining targets previously irradiated at SRS or produced from the recovered isotopes. Should the existing target materials be discarded, the plutonium (Pu) and curium (Cm) isotopes cannot be replaced readily with existing production sources. Some of these targets are stored at SRS, while other target material is stored at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) at several stages of processing. The materials cannot be stored in their present form indefinitely. Their long-term management involves processing items for beneficial use and/or for disposition, using storage and process facilities at SRS and ORNL. Evaluations are under way for disposition options for these materials, and demonstrations of improved flow sheets to process the materials are being conducted at ORNL and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). The disposition options and a management evaluation process have been developed. Processing demonstrations and evaluations for these unique materials are under way. (authors)

Robinson, Sharon M.; Patton, Brad D. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)] [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Allender, Jeffrey S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Accelerated Life Tests Results to Predict Product Field Reliability William Q. Meeker Dept State University Ames, IA 50011 June 22, 2008 Abstract Accelerated life tests (ALTs) provide timely, invariably, accelerated life tests (ALTs) to assess the effect of the change is accompanied by a question

32

EIS-0283: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with alternatives for the disposition of surplus plutonium.

33

New concepts used in the Murchison field submerged production system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New concepts were used to install three satellite subsea wells at Conoco's Murchison field, located in 510 feet of water in the North Sea. Originally drilled as exploratory wells, they were re-entered and completed. The sequence of events in bringing the wells to production incorporate the following concepts: Completion with dual 3/one-half/sub d/ouble prime/ tubing retrievable safety valves inside 9 5/8/double prime/-47 pound casing; subsea controllers were not used; flowline bundles were constructed onshore and towed below the surface 264 miles to the field; six high-pressure lines were connected at one time using metal to metal gaskets while the flowline bundle was buoyant nine feet off the seafloor. Production from two satellite subsea wells demonstrated the viability of using exploratory wells for field development.

Morton, A.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1994 National Academy of Sciences study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This report proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

Close, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Rutherford, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Duggan, R.A.; Jaeger, C.D.; Mangan, D.L.; Moya, R.W.; Moore, L.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Usefulness of effective field theory for boosted Higgs production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Higgs + jet channel at the LHC is sensitive to the effects of new physics both in the total rate and in the transverse momentum distribution at high p_T. We examine the production process using an effective field theory (EFT) language and discuss the possibility of determining the nature of the underlying high scale physics from boosted Higgs production. The effects of heavy color triplet scalars and top partner fermions with TeV scale masses are considered as examples and Higgs-gluon couplings of dimension-5 and dimension-7 are included in the EFT. As a by-product of our study, we examine the region of validity of the EFT. Dimension-7 contributions in realistic new physics models give effects in the high p_T tail of the Higgs signal which are so tiny that they are likely to be unobservable.

S. Dawson; I. M. Lewis; Mao Zeng

2015-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

Topologically Stratified Energy Minimizers in a Product Abelian Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recently developed product Abelian gauge field theory by Tong and Wong hosting magnetic impurities is reformulated into an extended model that allows the coexistence of vortices and anti-vortices. The two Abelian gauge fields in the model induce two species of magnetic vortex-lines resulting from $N_s$ vortices and $P_s$ anti-vortices ($s=1,2$) realized as the zeros and poles of two complex-valued Higgs fields, respectively. An existence theorem is established for the governing equations over a compact Riemann surface $S$ which states that a solution with prescribed $N_1, N_2$ vortices and $P_1,P_2$ anti-vortices of two designated species exists if and only if the inequalities \\[ \\left|N_1+N_2-(P_1+P_2)\\right|area of $S$. The minimum energy of these solutions is shown to assume the explicit value \\...

Han, Xiaosen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Used Fuel Disposition Research & Development | Department of Energy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEMUsed Fuel Disposition Research &

38

NRC comprehensive records disposition schedule. Revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 44 US Code, ``Public Printing and Documents,`` regulations issued by the General Service Administration (GSA) in 41 CFR Chapter 101, Subchapter B, ``Management and Use of Information and Records,`` and regulations issued by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) in 36 CFR Chapter 12, Subchapter B, ``Records Management,`` require each agency to prepare and issue a comprehensive records disposition schedule that contains the NARA approved records disposition schedules for records unique to the agency and contains the NARA`s General Records Schedules for records common to several or all agencies. The approved records disposition schedules specify the appropriate duration of retention and the final disposition for records created or maintained by the NRC. NUREG-0910, Rev. 3, contains ``NRC`s Comprehensive Records Disposition Schedule,`` and the original authorized approved citation numbers issued by NARA. Rev. 3 incorporates NARA approved changes and additions to the NRC schedules that have been implemented since the last revision dated March, 1992, reflects recent organizational changes implemented at the NRC, and includes the latest version of NARA`s General Records Schedule (dated August 1995).

NONE

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium Disposition Agreement | National...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium Disposition Agreement U.S. and Russia Sign Plutonium Disposition...

40

IDENTIFYING IMPURITIES IN SURPLUS NON PIT PLUTONIUM FEEDS FOR MOX OR ALTERNATIVE DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a technical basis for estimating the level of corrosion products in materials stored in DOE-STD-3013 containers based on extrapolating available chemical sample results. The primary focus is to estimate the levels of nickel, iron, and chromium impurities in plutonium-bearing materials identified for disposition in the United States Mixed Oxide fuel process.

Allender, J; Moore, E

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Field Testing of Pre-Production Prototype Residential Heat Pump Water Heaters  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Provides and overview of field testing of 18 pre-production prototype residential heat pump water heaters

42

Mission Need Statement: Calcine Disposition Project Major Systems Acquisition Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document identifies the need to establish the Calcine Disposition Project to determine and implement the final disposition of calcine including characterization, retrieval, treatment (if necessary), packaging, loading, onsite interim storage pending shipment to a repository or interim storage facility, and disposition of related facilities.

J. T. Beck

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

Characterizing Surplus US Plutonium for Disposition - 13199  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems. (authors)

Allender, Jeffrey S. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken SC 29808 (United States); Moore, Edwin N. [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)] [Moore Nuclear Energy, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Characterizing surplus US plutonium for disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (US) has identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium that is permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs, including 47.2 MT of weapons-grade plutonium. Surplus inventories will be stored safely by the Department of Energy (DOE) and then transferred to facilities that will prepare the plutonium for permanent disposition. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) operates a Feed Characterization program for the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (OFMD) of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the DOE Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM). SRNL manages a broad program of item tracking through process history, laboratory analysis, and non-destructive assay. A combination of analytical techniques allows SRNL to predict the isotopic and chemical properties that qualify materials for disposition through the Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF). The research also defines properties that are important for other disposition paths, including disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as transuranic waste (TRUW) or to high-level waste (HLW) systems.

Allender, Jeffrey S.; Moore, Edwin N.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Development of a Techno-Economic Model to Optimize DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNF) Program is evaluating final disposition of spent nuclear fuel (SNE) in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Final disposition of SNF may require that the fuel be treated to minimize material concerns. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment (EMT) and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on fuel type and location of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the EMT process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs can be applied to determine the life cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating SNF.

Ramer, R. J.; Plum, M. M.; Adams, J. P.; Dahl, C. A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Study of fusion product effects in field-reversed mirrors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of fusion products (fps) on Field-Reversed Mirror (FRM) reactor concepts has been evaluated through the development of two new computer models. The first code (MCFRM) treats fps as test particles in a fixed background plasma, which is represented as a fluid. MCFRM includes a Monte Carlo treatment of Coulomb scattering and thus provides an accurate treatment of fp behavior even at lower energies where pitch-angle scattering becomes important. The second code (FRMOD) is a steady-state, globally averaged, two-fluid (ion and electron), point model of the FRM plasma that incorporates fp heating and ash buildup values which are consistent with the MCFRM calculations. These codes have been used extensively in the development of an advanced-fuel FRM reactor design (SAFFIRE). A Catalyzed-D version of the plant is also discussed along with an investigation of the steady-state energy distribution of fps in the FRM. User guides for the two computer codes are also included.

Driemeyer, D.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Development of an Enhanced Two-Phase Production System at the Geysers Geothermal Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method was developed to enhance geothermal steam production from two-phase wells at THE Geysers Geothermal Field. The beneficial result was increased geothermal production that was easily and economically delivered to the power plant.

Steven Enedy

2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electron-Positron Pair Production in Space- or Time-Dependent Electric Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Treating the production of electron and positron pairs by a strong electric field from the vacuum as a quantum tunneling process we derive, in semiclassical approximation, a general expression for the pair production rate in a $z$-dependent electric field $E(z)$ pointing in the $z$-direction. We also allow for a smoothly varying magnetic field parallel to $E(z)$. The result is applied to a confined field $E(z)\

Hagen Kleinert; Remo Ruffini; She-Sheng Xue

2008-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

DRAFT EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Waste Disposition Strategies...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EM HQ Updates Waste Disposition Overview Christine Gelles Associate Deputy Assistant Secretary for Waste Management Office of Environmental Management EM SSAB Chairs Meeting 5...

50

Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Authority-Nuclear Weapons Request For Records Disposition Authority-Nuclear Weapons This document identifies the nuclear weapon records generated by the Department of Energy's...

51

A study of production/injection data from slim holes and production wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production and injection data from slim holes and large-diameter wells at the Oguni Geothermal Field, Japan, were examined in an effort to establish relationships (1) between productivity of large-diameter wells and slim holes, (2) between injectivity and productivity indices and (3) between productivity index and borehole diameter. The production data from Oguni boreholes imply that the mass production from large-diameter wells may be estimated based on data from slim holes. Test data from both large- and small-diameter boreholes indicate that to first order the productivity and the injectivity indices are equal. Somewhat surprisingly, the productivity index was found to be a strong function of borehole diameter; the cause for this phenomenon is not understood at this time.

Garg, S.K.; Combs, J.; Abe, M.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Steamflood production mechanism in an edge pattern Duri field, Indonesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Duri field, located in Riau Province in Central Sumatra, Indonesia, is currently the site of the largest steamflood project in the world. Roughly half of the field is being flooded in eight project areas. Low oil rate has been encountered...

Yuwono, Ipung Punto

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement, EIS-0287 (September 2002) EIS-0287: Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition...

54

Asymmetric neutrino production in magnetized proto-neutron stars in fully relativistic mean-field approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the neutrino production cross-section in the proto-neutron-star matter under a strong magnetic field in the relativistic mean-field approach. We introduce a new parameter-set which can reproduce the 1.96 solar mass neutron star. We find that the production process increases emitted neutrinos along the direction parallel to the magnetic field and decrease those along its opposite direction. It means that resultant asymmetry due to the neutrino absorption and scattering process in the magnetic field becomes larger by the addition of the neutrino production process.

Maruyama, Tomoyuki [College of Bioresource Sciences, Nihon University, Fujisawa 252-8510 (Japan); Kajino, Toshitaka; Hidaka, Jun; Takiwaki, Tomoya [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Yasutake, Nobutoshi [Department of Physics, Chiba Institute of Technology, Narashino 275-0023 (Japan); Kuroda, Takami [Department of Physics, University of Basel, CH-4056 Basel (Switzerland); Cheoun, Myung-Ki [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul, 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Chung-Yeol [General Education Curriculum Center, Hanyang University, Seoul, 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, Grant J. [Center of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

Waste Disposition Update by Christine Gelles  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPSWaste Disposition Update

56

Waste Disposition Update by Doug Tonkay  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation | Department of EnergyDepartmentEnergy WRPSWaste Disposition

57

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Peak production in an oil depletion model with triangular field profiles Dudley Stark School.S.A. would occur between 1965 and 1970. Oil production in the U.S.A. actually peaked in 1970 and has been declining since then. Hubbert used a logistic curve to approximate the rate of oil production. Deffeyes [2

Stark, Dudley

58

Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular-dynamics simulations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Defect production in tungsten: A comparison between field-ion microscopy and molecular defect production efficiencies obtained by FIM are a consequence of a surface effect, which greatly enhances defect production compared to that in the crystal interior. Comparison of clustering of vacancies

Nordlund, Kai

59

ACCELERATION OF LOS ALAMOS NATIONAL LABORATORY TRANSURANIC WASTE DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of Los Alamos National Laboratory's (LANL's) most significant risks is the site's inventory of transuranic waste retrievably stored above and below-ground in Technical Area (TA) 54 Area G, particularly the dispersible high-activity waste stored above-ground in deteriorating facilities. The high activity waste represents approximately 50% (by activity) of the total 292,000 PE-Ci inventory remaining to be disposed. The transuramic waste inventory includes contact-handled and remote-handled waste packaged in drums, boxes, and oversized containers which are retrievably stored both above and below-ground. Although currently managed as transuranic waste, some of the inventory is low-level waste that can be disposed onsite or at approved offsite facilities. Dispositioning the transuranic waste inventory requires retrieval of the containers from above and below-ground storage, examination and repackaging or remediation as necessary, characterization, certification and loading for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in Carlsbad New Mexico, all in accordance with well-defined requirements and controls. Although operations are established to process and characterize the lower-activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, LAN L does not currently have the capability to repack high activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers (> 56 PE-Ci) or to process oversized containers with activity levels over 0.52 PE-Ci. Operational issues and compliance requirements have resulted in less than optimal processing capabilities for lower activity contact-handled transuranic waste containers, limiting preparation and reducing dependability of shipments to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Since becoming the Los Alamos National Laboratory contract in June 2006, Los Alamos National Security (LANS) L.L.C. has developed a comprehensive, integrated plan to effectively and efficiently disposition the transuranic waste inventory, working in concert with the Department of Energy Los Alamos Site Office, Carlsbad Field Office and the Department of Energy Headquaeters. Rather than simply processing containers as retrieved, the plan places priority on efficient curie disposition, a direct correlation to reducing risk. Key elements of the approch include balancing inventory and operational risks, tailoring methods to meet requirements, optimizing existing facilities, equipment and staff, and incorporating best practices from other Department of Energy sites. With sufficient funding this will enable LANL to ship the above-ground high activity contact-handled transuranic waste offsite by the end of Fiscal Year (FY) 2007 and to disposition the remaining above- and below-ground contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic waste inventory by December 2010. Nearly 70% of the contact-handled transuranic waste containers, including the high activity waste, require processing and repackaging before characterization and certification for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. LANL is employing a balanced risk approach that accomplishes significant long-term risk reduction by accepting short-term increased facility operations risk under well-developed and justified interim controls. Reviews of facility conditions and additional analyses show that the Waste Characterization, Reduction and Repackaging Facility and the Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing Facility are the most appropriate facilities to safetly remediate, repackage, and ship lower activity and the remaining high activity drums. Updated safety documentation supporting limited Hazard Category 2 operations in these facilities has been developed. Once approved, limited-term operations to process the high activity drums can begin in early 2007, building upon the experience base established performing Hazard Category 3 operations processing lower activity waste in these facilities. LANL is also implementing a series of actions to improve and sustain operations for processing contact-handled transuranic waste inventory. Building 412 Decontamination and Volume Facility and Dom

O'LEARY, GERALD A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

60

Particle production of vector fields: Scale invariance is attractive  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a model of an Abelian vector boson with a Maxwell kinetic term and non-negative mass-squared it is demonstrated that, under fairly general conditions during inflation, a scale-invariant spectrum of perturbations for the components of a vector field, massive or not, whose kinetic function (and mass) is modulated by the inflaton field is an attractor solution. If the field is massless, or if it remains light until the end of inflation, this attractor solution also generates anisotropic stress, which can render inflation weakly anisotropic. The above two characteristics of the attractor solution can source (independently or combined together) significant statistical anisotropy in the curvature perturbation, which may well be observable in the near future.

Wagstaff, Jacques M.; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos [Physics Department, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4YB (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Disposition of PUREX facility tanks D5 and E6 uranium and plutonium solutions. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately 9 kilograms of plutonium and 5 metric tons of uranium in a 1 molar nitric acid solution are being stored in two PUREX facility vessels, tanks D5 and E6. The plutonium was accumulated during cleanup activities of the plutonium product area of the PUREX facility. Personnel at PUREX recently completed a formal presentation to the Surplus Materials Peer Panel (SMPP) regarding disposition of the material currently in these tanks. The peer panel is a group of complex-wide experts who have been chartered by EM-64 (Office of Site and Facility Transfer) to provide a third party independent review of disposition decisions. The information presented to the peer panel is provided in the first section of this report. The panel was generally receptive to the information provided at that time and the recommendations which were identified.

Harty, D.P.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Development of a techno-economic model to optimization DOE spent nuclear fuel disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the National Spent Nuclear Fuel (NSNF) Program conducted by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Co. (LMITCO) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is to evaluate what to do with the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Final disposition of the SNF may require that the fuel be treated to minimize material concerns. The treatments may range from electrometallurgical treatment and chemical dissolution to engineering controls. Treatment options and treatment locations will depend on the fuel type and the current locations of the fuel. One of the first steps associated with selecting one or more sites for treating the SNF in the DOE complex is to determine the cost of each option. An economic analysis will assist in determining which fuel treatment alternative attains the optimum disposition of SNF at the lowest possible cost to the government and the public. For this study, a set of questions was developed for the electrometallurgical treatment process for fuels at several locations. The set of questions addresses all issues associated with the design, construction, and operation of a production facility. A matrix table was developed to determine questions applicable to various fuel treatment options. A work breakdown structure (WBS) was developed to identify a treatment process and costs from initial design to shipment of treatment products to final disposition. Costs will be applied to determine the life-cycle cost of each option. This technique can also be applied to other treatment techniques for treating spent nuclear fuel.

Ramer, R.J.; Plum, M.M.; Adams, J.P.; Dahl, C.A.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fermion production by a dependent of time electric field in de Sitter universe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermion production by the electric field of a charge on de Sitter expanding universe is analyzed. The amplitude and probability of pair production are computed. We obtain from our calculations that the modulus of the momentum is no longer conserved and that there are probabilities for production processes where the helicity is no longer conserved. The rate of pair production in an electric field is found to be important in the early universe when the expansion factor was large comparatively with the particle mass.

Cosmin Crucean

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

64

Field Labeling to Ensure the Electrical Safety of Production Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

not including equipment that is designed for use in hazardous locations. This publication provides compressive information on how to apply electrical components, wiring and control systems to both ensure safety of personnel and aid in the delivery..., by delivering safe products at a reasonable price a company will not be eliminated as a potential equipment supplier by being viewed in a negative light as a result of a poor safety evaluation. OSHA posts information on their website detailing the number...

Mills, Todd

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

65

Weapons-grade plutonium dispositioning. Volume 2: Comparison of plutonium disposition options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Secretary of Energy requested the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Committee on International Security and Arms Control to evaluate disposition options for weapons-grade plutonium. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) offered to assist the NAS in this evaluation by investigating the technical aspects of the disposition options and their capability for achieving plutonium annihilation levels greater than 90%. This report was prepared for the NAS to document the gathered information and results from the requested option evaluations. Evaluations were performed for 12 plutonium disposition options involving five reactor and one accelerator-based systems. Each option was evaluated in four technical areas: (1) fuel status, (2) reactor or accelerator-based system status, (3) waste-processing status, and (4) waste disposal status. Based on these evaluations, each concept was rated on its operational capability and time to deployment. A third rating category of option costs could not be performed because of the unavailability of adequate information from the concept sponsors. The four options achieving the highest rating, in alphabetical order, are the Advanced Light Water Reactor with plutonium-based ternary fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with plutonium-based fuel, the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor with uranium-plutonium-based fuel, and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor with plutonium-based fuel. Of these four options, the Advanced Light Water Reactor and the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor do not propose reprocessing of their irradiated fuel. Time constraints and lack of detailed information did not allow for any further ratings among these four options. The INEL recommends these four options be investigated further to determine the optimum reactor design for plutonium disposition.

Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Blackman, H.S. [and others

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing ReservoirsYear-Month Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 WeekMarketProduct:

67

Proliferation resistance criteria for fissile material disposition issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1994 National Acdaemy of Sciences study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium`` defined options for reducing the national and international proliferation risks of materials declared excess to the nuclear weapons program. This paper proposes criteria for assessing the proliferation resistance of these options as well defining the ``Standards`` from the report. The criteria are general, encompassing all stages of the disposition process from storage through intermediate processing to final disposition including the facilities, processing technologies and materials, the level of safeguards for these materials, and the national/subnational threat to the materials.

Rutherford, D.A.; Fearey, B.L.; Markin, J.T.; Close, D.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Tolk, K.M.; Mangan, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Moore, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The ultimate disposition of depleted uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant amounts of the depleted uranium (DU) created by past uranium enrichment activities have been sold, disposed of commercially, or utilized by defense programs. In recent years, however, the demand for DU has become quite small compared to quantities available, and within the US Department of Energy (DOE) there is concern for any risks and/or cost liabilities that might be associated with the ever-growing inventory of this material. As a result, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems), was asked to review options and to develop a comprehensive plan for inventory management and the ultimate disposition of DU accumulated at the gaseous diffusion plants (GDPs). An Energy Systems task team, under the chairmanship of T. R. Lemons, was formed in late 1989 to provide advice and guidance for this task. This report reviews options and recommends actions and objectives in the management of working inventories of partially depleted feed (PDF) materials and for the ultimate disposition of fully depleted uranium (FDU). Actions that should be considered are as follows. (1) Inspect UF{sub 6} cylinders on a semiannual basis. (2) Upgrade cylinder maintenance and storage yards. (3) Convert FDU to U{sub 3}O{sub 8} for long-term storage or disposal. This will include provisions for partial recovery of costs to offset those associated with DU inventory management and the ultimate disposal of FDU. Another recommendation is to drop the term tails'' in favor of depleted uranium'' or DU'' because the tails'' label implies that it is waste.'' 13 refs.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer-tilization field experiment with Eucalyptus globulus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aboveground biomass production in an irrigation and fer- tilization field experiment). To assess optimum biomass production of Eucalyp- tus globulus in Portugal and to study the physiological in March 1986 (Pereira et al., 1988). In this paper, we present the results of aboveground biomass

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

70

On the kinetic equation approach to pair production by time-dependent electric field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the quantum kinetic approach to pair production from vacuum by time-dependent electric field. Equivalence between this approach and the more familiar S-matrix approach is explicitly established for both scalar and fermion cases. For the particular case of a constant electric field exact solution for kinetic equations is provided and the accuracy of low-density approximation is estimated.

A. M. Fedotov; E. G. Gelfer; K. Yu. Korolev; S. A. Smolyansky

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

PROGRESS IN REDUCING THE NUCLEAR THREAT: UNITED STATES PLUTONIUM CONSOLIDATION AND DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the end of the Cold War, the United States identified 61.5 metric tons (MT) of plutonium and larger quantities of enriched uranium that are permanently excess to use in nuclear weapons programs. The Department of Energy (DOE) also began shutting down, stabilizing, and removing inventories from production facilities that were no longer needed to support weapons programs and non-weapons activities. The storage of 'Category I' nuclear materials at Rocky Flats, Sandia National Laboratories, and several smaller sites has been terminated to reduce costs and safeguards risks. De-inventory continues at the Hanford site and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Consolidation of inventories works in concert with the permanent disposition of excess inventories, including several tonnes of plutonium that have already been disposed to waste repositories and the preparation for transfers to the planned Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Facility (for the bulk of the excess plutonium) and alternative disposition methods for material that cannot be used readily in the MOX fuel cycle. This report describes status of plutonium consolidation and disposition activities and their impacts on continuing operations, particularly at the Savannah River Site.

Allender, J.; Koenig, R.; Davies, S.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Americium/Curium Disposition Life Cycle Planning Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of the Department of Energy Savannah River Office (DOE- SR), Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC) evaluated concepts to complete disposition of Americium and Curium (Am/Cm) bearing materials currently located at the Savannah River Site (SRS).

Jackson, W.N. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Krupa, J.; Stutts, P.; Nester, S.; Raimesch, R.

1998-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

73

EIS-0327: Disposition of Scrap Metals Programmatic EIS  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS will evaluate the environmental impacts of policy alternatives for the disposition of scrap metals (primarily carbon steel and stainless steel) that may have residual surface radioactivity. DOE is cancelling this EIS.

74

SELECTION OF SURPLUS PLUTONIUM MATERIALS FOR DISPOSITION TO WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is preparing a Surplus Plutonium Disposition (SPD) Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS). Included in the evaluation are up to 6 metric tons (MT) of plutonium in the form of impure oxides and metals for which a disposition plan has not been decided, among options that include preparation as feed for the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility; disposing to high-level waste through the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB Line and H Canyon; can-in-canister disposal using the SRS Defense Waste Processing Facility; and preparation for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). DOE and SRS have identified at least 0.5 MT of plutonium that, because of high levels of chemical and isotopic impurities, is impractical for disposition by methods other than the WIPP pathway. Characteristics of these items and the disposition strategy are discussed.

Allender, J.; Mcclard, J.; Christopher, J.

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

75

Electron Production and Collective Field Generation in Intense Particle Beams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron cloud effects (ECEs) are increasingly recognized as important, but incompletely understood, dynamical phenomena, which can severely limit the performance of present electron colliders, the next generation of high-intensity rings, such as PEP-II upgrade, LHC, and the SNS, the SIS 100/200, or future high-intensity heavy ion accelerators such as envisioned in Heavy Ion Inertial Fusion (HIF). Deleterious effects include ion-electron instabilities, emittance growth, particle loss, increase in vacuum pressure, added heat load at the vacuum chamber walls, and interference with certain beam diagnostics. Extrapolation of present experience to significantly higher beam intensities is uncertain given the present level of understanding. With coordinated LDRD projects at LLNL and LBNL, we undertook a comprehensive R&D program including experiments, theory and simulations to better understand the phenomena, establish the essential parameters, and develop mitigating mechanisms. This LDRD project laid the essential groundwork for such a program. We developed insights into the essential processes, modeled the relevant physics, and implemented these models in computational production tools that can be used for self-consistent study of the effect on ion beams. We validated the models and tools through comparison with experimental data, including data from new diagnostics that we developed as part of this work and validated on the High-Current Experiment (HCX) at LBNL. We applied these models to High-Energy Physics (HEP) and other advanced accelerators. This project was highly successful, as evidenced by the two paragraphs above, and six paragraphs following that are taken from our 2003 proposal with minor editing that mostly consisted of changing the tense. Further benchmarks of outstanding performance are: we had 13 publications with 8 of them in refereed journals, our work was recognized by the accelerator and plasma physics communities by 8 invited papers and we have 5 additional invitations for invited papers at upcoming conferences, we attracted collaborators who had SBIR funding, we are collaborating with scientists at CERN and GSI Darmstadt on gas desorption physics for submission to Physical Review Letters, and another PRL on absolute measurements of electron cloud density and Phys. Rev. ST-AB on electron emission physics are also being readied for submission.

Molvik, A W; Vay, J; Cohen, R; Friedman, A; Lee, E; Verboncoeur, J; Covo, M K

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

76

DISPOSITION PATHS FOR ROCKY FLATS GLOVEBOXES: EVALUATING OPTIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC has the responsibility for closure activities at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). One of the challenges faced for closure is the disposition of radiologically contaminated gloveboxes. Evaluation of the disposition options for gloveboxes included a detailed analysis of available treatment capabilities, disposal facilities, and lifecycle costs. The Kaiser-Hill Company, LLC followed several processes in determining how the gloveboxes would be managed for disposition. Currently, multiple disposition paths have been chosen to accommodate the needs of the varying styles and conditions of the gloveboxes, meet the needs of the decommissioning team, and to best manage lifecycle costs. Several challenges associated with developing a disposition path that addresses both the radiological and RCRA concerns as well as offering the most cost-effective solution were encountered. These challenges included meeting the radiological waste acceptance criteria of available disposal facilities, making a RCRA determination, evaluating treatment options and costs, addressing void requirements associated with disposal, and identifying packaging and transportation options. The varying disposal facility requirements affected disposition choices. Facility conditions that impacted decisions included radiological and chemical waste acceptance criteria, physical requirements, and measurement for payment options. The facility requirements also impacted onsite activities including management strategies, decontamination activities, and life-cycle cost.

Lobdell, D.; Geimer, R.; Larsen, P.; Loveland, K.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geometric Origin of Pair Production by Electric Field in de Sitter Space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The particle production in a de Sitter space provides an interesting model to understand the curvature effect on Schwinger pair production by a constant electric field or Schwinger mechanism on the de Sitter radiation. For that purpose, we employ the recently introduced complex analysis method, in which the quantum evolution in the complex time explains the pair production via the geometric transition amplitude and gives the pair-production rate as the contour integral. We compare the result by the contour integral with that of the phase-integral method.

Sang Pyo Kim

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

78

TRACKING SURPLUS PLUTONIUM FROM WEAPONS TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supporting nuclear nonproliferation and global security principles, beginning in 1994 the United States has withdrawn more than 50 metric tons (MT) of government-controlled plutonium from potential use in nuclear weapons. The Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, established protocols for the tracking of this "excess" and "surplus" plutonium, and for reconciling the current storage and utilization of the plutonium to show that its management is consistent with the withdrawal policies. Programs are underway to ensure the safe and secure disposition of the materials that formed a major part of the weapons stockpile during the Cold War, and growing quantities have been disposed as waste, after which they are not included in traditional nuclear material control and accountability (NMC&A) data systems. A combination of resources is used to perform the reconciliations that form the basis for annual reporting to DOE, to U.S. Department of State, and to international partners including the International Atomic Energy Agency.

Allender, J.; Beams, J.; Sanders, K.; Myers, L.

2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

79

A novel approach to particle production in an uniform electric field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a different method of describing scalar field particle production in a uniform electric field. In the standard approach, the (analytically continued) harmonic oscillator paradigm is important in describing particle production. However, there is another gauge in which the particle production process has striking similarities with the one used to describe Hawking radiation in black holes. The gauge we use to describe the electric field in is the lightcone gauge, so named because the mode functions for a scalar field are found to be singular on the lightcone. We use these modes in evaluating the effective Lagrangian using the proper time technique. The key feature of this analysis is that these modes can be explicitly "normalized" by using the criterion that they reduce to the usual flat space modes in the limit of the electric field tending to zero. We find that the proper time kernel is not the same as the analytically continued oscillator kernel though the effective Lagrangian is the standard result as it should be. We also consider an example of a confined electric field system using the lightcone gauge modes. Our analysis indicates that the Bogolubov coefficients, in taking the limit to the uniform electric field case, are multiplied by energy dependent boundary factors that have not been taken into account before.

K. Srinivasan; T. Padmanabhan

1999-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

80

Controls of coal fabric on coalbed gas production and compositional shift in both field production and canister desorption tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production rates of coalbed gas wells commonly vary significantly, even in the same field with similar reservoir permeability and gas content. The compositional variation in produced gas is also not everywhere predictable, although in most fields produced gas becomes progressively enriched in CO, through the production life of a reservoir, such as parts of the San Juan basin. In contrast, it is generally observed that the ratio of CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 4} declines with time during field and laboratory desorption testing of coal cores. In this study, we investigate numerically the importance of coal fabric, namely cleat spacing and aperture width, on the performance of coalbed gas wells and gas compositional shifts during production. Because of the cubic relationship between fracture permeability and fracture aperture width (and thus fracture porosity) for a given cleat permeability, the production profile of coal seams varies depending on whether the permeability is distributed among closely spaced fractures (cleat) with narrower apertures or more widely spaced fractures (cleat) with wider apertures. There is a lower fracture porosity for coal with widely spaced fractures than for coal with closely spaced fractures. Therefore, the relative permeability to gas increases more rapidly for coals with more widely spaced cleats as less dewatering from fractures is required, assuming that the fractures are initially water saturated. The enrichment of CO{sub 2} in the production gas with time occurs because of the stronger adsorption of coals for CO{sub 2} than CH{sub 4}. However, during desorption of coal cores, CO{sub 2} desorbs more rapidly than methane because desorption rate is governed more by diffusion than by sorption affinity, and CO{sub 2} has much higher effective diffusivity in microporous coals than CH{sub 4}.

Cui, X.J.; Bustin, R.M. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Field-induced decay of quantum vacuum: visualizing pair production in a classical photonic system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenon of vacuum decay, i.e. electron-positron pair production due to the instability of the quantum electrodynamics vacuum in an external field, is a remarkable prediction of Dirac theory whose experimental observation is still lacking. Here a classic wave optics analogue of vacuum decay, based on light propagation in curved waveguide superlattices, is proposed. Our photonic analogue enables a simple and experimentally-accessible visualization in space of the process of pair production as break up of an initially negative-energy Gaussian wave packet, representing an electron in the Dirac sea, under the influence of an oscillating electric field.

Stefano Longhi

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Matrix Product State and mean field solutions for one-dimensional systems can be found efficiently  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the problem of approximating ground states of one-dimensional quantum systems within the two most common variational ansatzes, namely the mean field ansatz and Matrix Product States. We show that both for mean field and for Matrix Product States of fixed bond dimension, the optimal solutions can be found in a way which is provably efficient (i.e., scales polynomially). This implies that the corresponding variational methods can be in principle recast in a way which scales provably polynomially. Moreover, our findings imply that ground states of one-dimensional commuting Hamiltonians can be found efficiently.

Norbert Schuch; J. Ignacio Cirac

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

SLIGHTLY IRRADIATED FUEL (SIF) INTERIM DISPOSITION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL PRC) is proud to submit the Slightly Irradiated Fuel (SIF) Interim Disposition Project for consideration by the Project Management Institute as Project of the Year for 2010. The SIF Project was a set of six interrelated sub-projects that delivered unique stand-alone outcomes, which, when integrated, provided a comprehensive and compliant system for storing high risk special nuclear materials. The scope of the six sub-projects included the design, construction, testing, and turnover of the facilities and equipment, which would provide safe, secure, and compliant Special Nuclear Material (SNM) storage capabilities for the SIF material. The project encompassed a broad range of activities, including the following: Five buildings/structures removed, relocated, or built; Two buildings renovated; Structural barriers, fencing, and heavy gates installed; New roadways and parking lots built; Multiple detection and assessment systems installed; New and expanded communication systems developed; Multimedia recording devices added; and A new control room to monitor all materials and systems built. Project challenges were numerous and included the following: An aggressive 17-month schedule to support the high-profile Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) decommissioning; Company/contractor changeovers that affected each and every project team member; Project requirements that continually evolved during design and construction due to the performance- and outcome-based nature ofthe security objectives; and Restrictions imposed on all communications due to the sensitive nature of the projects In spite of the significant challenges, the project was delivered on schedule and $2 million under budget, which became a special source of pride that bonded the team. For years, the SIF had been stored at the central Hanford PFP. Because of the weapons-grade piutonium produced and stored there, the PFP had some of the tightest security on the Hanford nuclear reservation. Workers had to pass through metal detectors when they arrived at the plant and materials leaving the plant had to be scanned for security reasons. Whereas other high-security nuclear materials were shipped from the PFP to Savannah River, S.C. as part ofa Department of Energy (DOE) program to consolidate weapons-grade plutonium, it was determined that the SIF should remain onsite pending disposition to a national repository. Nevertheless, the SIF still requires a high level of security that the PFP complex has always provided. With the 60-year PFP mission of producing and storing plutonium concluded, the environmental cleanup plans for Hanford call for the demolition of the 63-building PFP complex. Consequently, if the SIF remained at PFP it not only would have interfered with the environmental cleanup plans, but would have required $100 million in facility upgrades to meet increased national security requirements imposed after the 9/11 terrorist attacks. A new smaller and more cost-effective area was needed to store this material, which led to the SIF Project. Once the SIF project was successfully completed and the SIF was safely removed from PFP, the existing Protected Area at PFP could be removed, and demolition could proceed more quickly without being encumbered by restrictive security requirements that an active Protected Area requires. The lightened PFP security level brought by safely removing and storing the SIF would also yield lowered costs for deactivation and demolition, as well as reduce overall life-cycle costs.

NORTON SH

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S; (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated; (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass; and (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Jones, R.; Carter, J.

2010-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

85

FUEL CYCLE POTENTIAL WASTE FOR DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States (U.S.) currently utilizes a once-through fuel cycle where used nuclear fuel (UNF) is stored on-site in either wet pools or in dry storage systems with ultimate disposal in a deep mined geologic repository envisioned. Within the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), the Fuel Cycle Research and Development Program (FCR&D) develops options to the current commercial fuel cycle management strategy to enable the safe, secure, economic, and sustainable expansion of nuclear energy while minimizing proliferation risks by conducting research and development of advanced fuel cycles, including modified open and closed cycles. The safe management and disposition of used nuclear fuel and/or nuclear waste is a fundamental aspect of any nuclear fuel cycle. Yet, the routine disposal of used nuclear fuel and radioactive waste remains problematic. Advanced fuel cycles will generate different quantities and forms of waste than the current LWR fleet. This study analyzes the quantities and characteristics of potential waste forms including differing waste matrices, as a function of a variety of potential fuel cycle alternatives including: (1) Commercial UNF generated by uranium fuel light water reactors (LWR). Four once through fuel cycles analyzed in this study differ by varying the assumed expansion/contraction of nuclear power in the U.S. (2) Four alternative LWR used fuel recycling processes analyzed differ in the reprocessing method (aqueous vs. electro-chemical), complexity (Pu only or full transuranic (TRU) recovery) and waste forms generated. (3) Used Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel derived from the recovered Pu utilizing a single reactor pass. (4) Potential waste forms generated by the reprocessing of fuels derived from recovered TRU utilizing multiple reactor passes.

Carter, J.

2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

86

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubicfrom CanadaYear 1993 4,746

87

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubicfrom CanadaYear 1993

88

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet)per Thousand Cubic Feet) DecadeCubicfrom CanadaYear 199311,627

89

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9, View 341,419

90

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9, View

91

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9, View12,338

92

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,

93

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,11,627 1,054

94

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,11,627

95

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,11,627236 27

96

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,11,627236

97

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota (MillionState9,11,627236265

98

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota

99

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota6,979 89 7,728 3,868 -3,269

100

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota6,979 89 7,728 3,868

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota6,979 89 7,728 3,868975 15 684

102

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota6,979 89 7,728 3,868975 15

103

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYear Jan FebThousand Cubicin North Dakota6,979 89 7,728 3,868975

104

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia,(Million Barrels) Crude Oil Reserves in Nonproducing Reservoirs Year2per6.48(Millionthroughthroughthrough

105

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0,InformationU.S. Crude Oil31 E npriceYear Jan Monthly

106

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe Energy8April

107

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe

108

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,458 759 97,739

109

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,458 759

110

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,458 75967,934

111

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,458

112

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,45808,066

113

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the Energythe7,45808,0667,431

114

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the

115

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the1,033 15 678 364 -602 -76

116

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the1,033 15 678 364 -602

117

Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c : U.S.Welcome to the1,033 15 678 364 -6021,181

118

Natural Gas Dry Production (Annual Supply & Disposition)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelinesProved ReservesFeet) Year Jan Feb Marthrough 1996) inthroughthrough 1996)20,623,854

119

Dobson Butte field, Williston basin, Stark County, North Dakota: nontypical oil production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Dobson Butte field (T139N, R96W), Stark County, North Dakota, was discovered in 1982 following a detailed seismic program. Production is primarily from a structural trap in the Interlake Formation of Silurian age. Three oil wells are presently producing from a dolomite reservoir at about 11,000 ft in depth. Primary recoverable reserves of these three producing wells is calculated to be about 2 million bbl of oil. Additional reserves will come from further development of the Interlake reservoir as well as from the deeper Red River (Ordovician) Formation. The Dobson Butte field is a nontypical oil field within the Williston basin as to its high pour point oil (90/sup 0/F), high production water cuts (85-95%), lack of good oil shows in samples, unpredictable noncontinuous oil-producing reservoirs throughout the entire 600-ft Interlake Formation, difficulty in log interpretations, and difficulty in determining the source bed. The interpretation of these nontypical characteristics of Interlake oil production in the Dobson Butte field compared to other Interlake oil production within the Williston basin will have a profound effect upon future Interlake exploration.

Guy, W.J.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Water alternating enriched gas injection to enhance oil production and recovery from San Francisco Field, Colombia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main objectives of this study are to determine the most suitable type of gas for a water-alternating-gas (WAG) injection scheme, the WAG cycle time, and gas injection rate to increase oil production rate and recovery from the San Francisco field...

Rueda Silva, Carlos Fernando

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mass shift effects in nonperturbative multiphoton pair production for arbitrary polarized electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The mass shift effects in multiphoton pair production of a nonperturbative nature for arbitrary polarized electric fields are investigated numerically by employing the real-time Dirac-Heisenberg-Wigner formalism, and theoretically by proposing an effective energy concept. It is found that the theoretical results are agreement with the numerical ones very well. It is the first time to consider the roles of the momenta of created particles and the polarizations of external fields played in the mass shift effects. These results can deepen the understanding of pair production in the nonperturbative threshold regime. Moreover, the distinct mass shift effects are observable in the forthcoming experiments and can be used as a probe to distinguish the electron-positron pair production from other background events.

Z. L. Li; D. Lu; B. F. Shen; L. B. Fu; J. Liu; B. S. Xie

2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

122

Schwinger Mechanism for Fermion Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Background Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Schwinger mechanism for the pair production of fermions in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent background electric field E(t) by directly evaluating the path integral. We obtain an exact non-perturbative result for the probability of fermion-antifermion pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum (of the fermion or antifermion) from the arbitrary time dependent electric field E(t) via Schwinger mechanism. We find that the exact non-perturbative result is independent of all the time derivatives d^nE(t)/dt^n, where n=1,2,....\\infty. This result has the same functional dependence on E as the Schwinger's constant electric field E result with the replacement: E -> E(t).

Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

2006-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fissile material disposition program final immobilization form assessment and recommendation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), in its role as the lead laboratory for the development of plutonium immobilization technologies for the Department of Energy`s Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD), has been requested by MD to recommend an immobilization technology for the disposition of surplus weapons- usable plutonium. The recommendation and supporting documentation was requested to be provided by September 1, 1997. This report addresses the choice between glass and ceramic technologies for immobilizing plutonium using the can-in-canister approach. Its purpose is to provide a comparative evaluation of the two candidate technologies and to recommend a form based on technical considerations.

Cochran, S.G.; Dunlop, W.H.; Edmunds, T.A.; MacLean, L.M.; Gould, T.H. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1997-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

124

Quantum field theory in curved spacetime, the operator product expansion, and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To make sense of quantum field theory in an arbitrary (globally hyperbolic) curved spacetime, the theory must be formulated in a local and covariant manner in terms of locally measureable field observables. Since a generic curved spacetime does not possess symmetries or a unique notion of a vacuum state, the theory also must be formulated in a manner that does not require symmetries or a preferred notion of a ``vacuum state'' and ``particles''. We propose such a formulation of quantum field theory, wherein the operator product expansion (OPE) of the quantum fields is elevated to a fundamental status, and the quantum field theory is viewed as being defined by its OPE. Since the OPE coefficients may be better behaved than any quantities having to do with states, we suggest that it may be possible to perturbatively construct the OPE coefficients--and, thus, the quantum field theory. By contrast, ground/vacuum states--in spacetimes, such as Minkowski spacetime, where they may be defined--cannot vary analytically with the parameters of the theory. We argue that this implies that composite fields may acquire nonvanishing vacuum state expectation values due to nonperturbative effects. We speculate that this could account for the existence of a nonvanishing vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor of a quantum field occurring at a scale much smaller than the natural scales of the theory.

S. Hollands; R. M. Wald

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

125

Vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons in time-dependent electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Based on the quantum mechanical scattering model, the dynamical assist effect and the multiple-slit interference effect in electron-positron pair production from vacuum are generalized to vacuum pair production of charged scalar bosons. For the former effect some combinations of a strong but slowly varying electric field and a weak but rapidly varying one with different time delay are studied. Results indicate that the oscillation intensity of momentum spectrum and the number density of created bosons reduce with increasing of the time delay. Obviously, they achieve the maximum if the time delay equals zero. For the latter effect, it is shown that this effect does not exist for equal-sign $N$-pulse electric field in contrast to its existence for alternating-sign $N$-pulse. An approximate solution of boson momentum spectrum is got and it is agreeable well with the exact numerical one in alternating-sign $N$-pulse electric field, especially for $2$-pulse field and for small longitudinal momentum. The difference of vacuum pair production between bosons and fermions are also compared for their longitudinal momentum spectra.

Zi-Liang Li; Ding Lu; Bai-Song Xie

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

126

Independent Assessment of the Savannah River Site High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Alternatives Evaluation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Independent Project Evaluation (IPE) Team assessment of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company High-Level Waste Salt Disposition Systems Engineering (SE) Team's deliberations, evaluations, and selections. The Westinghouse Savannah River Company concluded in early 1998 that production goals and safety requirements for processing SRS HLW salt to remove Cs-137 could not be met in the existing In-Tank Precipitation Facility as currently configured for precipitation of cesium tetraphenylborate. The SE Team was chartered to evaluate and recommend an alternative(s) for processing the existing HLW salt to remove Cs-137. To replace the In-Tank Precipitation process, the Savannah River Site HLW Salt Disposition SE Team downselected (October 1998) 140 candidate separation technologies to two alternatives: Small-Tank Tetraphenylborate (TPB) Precipitation (primary alternative) and Crystalline Silicotitanate (CST) Nonelutable Ion Exchange (backup alternative). The IPE Team, commissioned by the Department of Energy, concurs that both alternatives are technically feasible and should meet all salt disposition requirements. But the IPE Team judges that the SE Team's qualitative criteria and judgments used in their downselection to a primary and a backup alternative do not clearly discriminate between the two alternatives. To properly choose between Small-Tank TPB and CST Ion Exchange for the primary alternative, the IPE Team suggests the following path forward: Complete all essential R and D activities for both alternatives and formulate an appropriate set of quantitative decision criteria that will be rigorously applied at the end of the R and D activities. Concurrent conceptual design activities should be limited to common elements of the alternatives.

J. T. Case (DOE-ID); M. L. Renfro (INEEL)

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

The South Atlantic Magnetic Field Anomaly and Its Effect on the Calculated Production of Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theoretical calculations of the production of neutrinos via cosmic rays incident upon the earth's atmosphere (Barr et al., 1989; Becker-Szendy et al., 1992; Bugaev & Naumov, 1989; Gaisser et al, 1988; Honda et al., 1995) are examined. These calculations use a one-dimensional approximation in the production, transport, and decay of the produced particles. Examined are various additional effects of the earth's magnetic field and the three-dimensional nature of the problem which have the effect of decreasing the calulated ratio of muon neutrinos to electron neutrinos.

J. Poirier

2000-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

128

Matrix product states and variational methods applied to critical quantum field theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the second-order quantum phase-transition of massive real scalar field theory with a quartic interaction ($\\phi^4$ theory) in (1+1) dimensions on an infinite spatial lattice using matrix product states (MPS). We introduce and apply a naive variational conjugate gradient method, based on the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP) for imaginary time, to obtain approximate ground states, using a related ansatz for excitations to calculate the particle and soliton masses and to obtain the spectral density. We also estimate the central charge using finite-entanglement scaling. Our value for the critical parameter agrees well with recent Monte Carlo results, improving on an earlier study which used the related DMRG method, verifying that these techniques are well-suited to studying critical field systems. We also obtain critical exponents that agree, as expected, with those of the transverse Ising model. Additionally, we treat the special case of uniform product states (mean field theory) separately, showing that they may be used to investigate non-critical quantum field theories under certain conditions.

Ashley Milsted; Jutho Haegeman; Tobias J. Osborne

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Plutonium stabilization and disposition focus area, FY 1999 and FY 2000 multi-year program plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consistent with the Environmental Management`s (EM`s) plan titled, ``Accelerating Cleanup: Paths to Closure``, and ongoing efforts within the Executive Branch and Congress, this Multi-Year Program Plan (MYPP) for the Plutonium Focus Area was written to ensure that technical gap projects are effectively managed and measured. The Plutonium Focus Area (PFA) defines and manages technology development programs that contribute to the effective stabilization of nuclear materials and their subsequent safe storage and final disposition. The scope of PFA activities includes the complete spectrum of plutonium materials, special isotopes, and other fissile materials. The PFA enables solutions to site-specific and complex-wide technology issues associated with plutonium remediation, stabilization, and preparation for disposition. The report describes the current technical activities, namely: Plutonium stabilization (9 studies); Highly enriched uranium stabilization (2 studies); Russian collaboration program (2 studies); Packaging and storage technologies (6 studies); and PFA management work package/product line (3 studies). Budget information for FY 1999 and FY 2000 is provided.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fusion in conformal field theory as the tensor product of the symmetry algebra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following a recent proposal of Richard Borcherds to regard fusion as the ring-like tensor product of modules of a {\\em quantum ring}, a generalization of rings and vertex operators, we define fusion as a certain quotient of the (vector space) tensor product of representations of the symmetry algebra ${\\cal A}$. We prove that this tensor product is associative and symmetric up to equivalence. We also determine explicitly the action of ${\\cal A}$ on it, under which the central extension is preserved. \\\\ Having given a precise meaning to fusion, determining the fusion rules is now a well-posed algebraic problem, namely to decompose the tensor product into irreducible representations. We demonstrate how to solve it for the case of the WZW- and the minimal models and recover thereby the well-known fusion rules. \\\\ The action of the symmetry algebra on the tensor product is given in terms of a comultiplication. We calculate the $R$-matrix of this comultiplication and find that it is triangular. This seems to shed some new light on the possible r\\^{o}le of the quantum group in conformal field theory.

M. Gaberdiel

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

131

Los Alamos National Laboratory summary plan to fabricate mixed oxide lead assemblies for the fissile material disposition program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes an approach for using existing Los Alamos National Laboratory (Laboratory) mixed oxide (MOX) fuel-fabrication and plutonium processing capabilities to expedite and assure progress in the MOX/Reactor Plutonium Disposition Program. Lead Assembly MOX fabrication is required to provide prototypic fuel for testing in support of fuel qualification and licensing requirements. It is also required to provide a bridge for the full utilization of the European fabrication experience. In part, this bridge helps establish, for the first time since the early 1980s, a US experience base for meeting the safety, licensing, safeguards, security, and materials control and accountability requirements of the Department of Energy and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In addition, a link is needed between the current research and development program and the production of disposition mission fuel. This link would also help provide a knowledge base for US regulators. Early MOX fabrication and irradiation testing in commercial nuclear reactors would provide a positive demonstration to Russia (and to potential vendors, designers, fabricators, and utilities) that the US has serious intent to proceed with plutonium disposition. This report summarizes an approach to fabricating lead assembly MOX fuel using the existing MOX fuel-fabrication infrastructure at the Laboratory.

Buksa, J.J.; Eaton, S.L.; Trellue, H.R.; Chidester, K.; Bowidowicz, M.; Morley, R.A.; Barr, M.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO{sub 2} flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Integration of the geological/engineering model with production performance for Patrick Draw Field, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NIPER Reservoir Assessment and Characterization Research Program incorporates elements of the near-term, mid-term and long-term objectives of the National Energy Strategy-Advanced Oil Recovery Program. The interdisciplinary NIPER team focuses on barrier island reservoirs, a high priority class of reservoirs, that contains large amounts of remaining oil in place located in mature fields with a high number of shut-in and abandoned wells. The project objectives are to: (1) identify heterogeneities that influence the movement and trapping of reservoir fluids in two examples of shoreline barrier reservoirs (Patrick Draw Field, WY and Bell Creek Field, MT); (2) develop geological and engineering reservoir characterization methods to quantify reservoir architecture and predict mobile oil saturation distribution for application of targeted infill drilling and enhanced oil recovery (EOR) processes; and (3) summarize reservoir and production characteristics of shoreline barrier reservoirs to determine similarities and differences. The major findings of the research include: (1) hydrogeochemical analytical techniques were demonstrated to be an inexpensive reservoir characterization tool that provides information on reservoir architecture and compartmentalization; (2) the formation water salinity in Patrick Draw Field varies widely across the field and can result in a 5 to 12% error in saturation values calculated from wireline logs if the salinity variations and corresponding resistivity values are not accounted for; and (3) an analysis of the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential of Patrick Draw Field indicates that CO[sub 2] flooding in the Monell Unit and horizontal drilling in the Arch Unit are potential methods to recover additional oil from the field.

Jackson, S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

SELECTION AND TREATMENT OF STRIPPER GAS WELLS FOR PRODUCTION ENHANCEMENT, MOCANE-LAVERNE FIELD, OKLAHOMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Advanced Resources International (ARI) began performing R&D targeted at enhancing production and reserves from natural gas fields. The impetus for the effort was a series of field R&D projects in the early-to-mid 1990's, in eastern coalbed methane and gas shales plays, where well remediation and production enhancement had been successfully demonstrated. As a first step in the R&D effort, an assessment was made of the potential for restimulation to provide meaningful reserve additions to the U.S. gas resource base, and what technologies were needed to do so. That work concluded that: (1) A significant resource base did exist via restimulation (multiples of Tcf). (2) The greatest opportunities existed in non-conventional plays where completion practices were (relatively) complex and technology advancement was rapid. (3) Accurate candidate selection is the greatest single factor that contributes to a successful restimulation program. With these findings, a field-oriented program targeted at tight sand formations was initiated to develop and demonstrate successful candidate recognition technology. In that program, which concluded in 2001, nine wells were restimulated in the Green River, Piceance and East Texas basins, which in total added 2.9 Bcf of reserves at an average cost of $0.26/Mcf. In addition, it was found that in complex and heterogeneous reservoirs (such as tight sand formations), candidate selection procedures should involve a combination of fundamental engineering and advanced pattern recognition approaches, and that simple statistical methods for identifying candidate wells are not effective. In mid-2000, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded ARI an R&D contract to determine if the methods employed in that project could also be applied to stripper gas wells. In addition, the ability of those approaches to identify more general production enhancement opportunities (beyond only restimulation), such as via artificial lift and compression, was also sought. A key challenge in this effort was that, whereas the earlier work suggested that better (producing) wells tended to make better restimulation candidates, stripper wells are by definition low-volume producers (either due to low pressure, low permeability, or both). Nevertheless, the potential application of this technology was believed to hold promise for enhancing production for the thousands of stripper gas wells that exist in the U.S. today. The overall procedure for the project was to select a field test site, apply the candidate recognition methodology to select wells for remediation, remediate them, and gauge project success based on the field results. This report summarizes the activities and results of that project.

Scott Reeves; Buckley Walsh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Polarization Effects In The Charged Lepton Pair Production By A Neutrino (Antineutrino) In A Magnetic Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The probability of the process of the charged lepton pair production by a neutrino (an antineutrino) with allowance for the longitudinal and transverse polarizations of the charged leptons in a magnetic field is presented. The dependence of the probability of the process on the spin variables of the charged leptons and on the azimuthal and polar angles of the initial and final neutrinos (antineutrinos) are investigated. It is shown that the probability of the process is sensitive to the spin variables of the charged leptons and to the direction of the neutrino (antineutrino) momentum. It is determined that the neutrino (antineutrino) energy and momentum loss through the production of a charged lepton pair happens asymmetrically.

Huseynov, Vali A. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Laboratory of Physical Research, Nakhchivan Division of Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan); Ahmad, Ali S. [Department of General and Theoretical Physics, Nakhchivan State University, AZ 7000, Nakhchivan (Azerbaijan)

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

136

Spectral representation of the particle production out of equilibrium - Schwinger mechanism in pulsed electric fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop a formalism to describe the particle production out of equilibrium in terms of dynamical spectral functions, i.e. Wigner transformed Pauli-Jordan's and Hadamard's functions. We take an explicit example of a spatially homogeneous scalar theory under pulsed electric fields and investigate the time evolution of the spectral functions. In the out-state we find an oscillatory peak in Hadamard's function as a result of the mixing between positive- and negative-energy waves. The strength of this peak is of the linear order of the Bogoliubov mixing coefficient, whereas the peak corresponding to the Schwinger mechanism is of the quadratic order. Between the in- and the out-states we observe a continuous flow of the spectral peaks together with two transient oscillatory peaks. We also discuss the medium effect at finite temperature and density. We emphasise that the entire structure of the spectral functions conveys rich information on real-time dynamics including the particle production.

Kenji Fukushima

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

137

Neutron production using a pyroelectric driven target coupled with a gated field ionization source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A palm sized, portable neutron source would be useful for widespread implementation of detection systems for shielded, special nuclear material. We present progress towards the development of the components for an ultracompact neutron generator using a pulsed, meso-scale field ionization source, a deuterated (or tritiated) titanium target driven by a negative high voltage lithium tantalate crystal. Neutron production from integrated tests using an ion source with a single, biased tungsten tip and a 3 Multiplication-Sign 1 cm, vacuum insulated crystal with a plastic deuterated target are presented. Component testing of the ion source with a single tip produces up to 3 nA of current. Dielectric insulation of the lithium tantalate crystals appears to reduce flashover, which should improve the robustness. The field emission losses from a 3 cm diameter crystal with a plastic target and 6 cm diameter crystal with a metal target are compared.

Ellsworth, J. L.; Tang, V.; Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Naranjo, B.; Putterman, S. [University of California Los Angeles, 405 Hilgard Ave., Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

138

SNM measurement uncertainites: potential impacts for materials disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A discussion of nuclear material measurement uncertainties and impacts to the Materials Disposition (MD) Program is presented. Many of the options under consideration by the disposition program present new measurement challenges include significant material processing throughputs, a variety of material forms, unique waste streams, and difficult-to-measure matrices. There are also some questions regarding the ability to achieve International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) verification requirements and to achieve measurement uncertainties that are small enough to meet the IAEA loss detection goals. We present a detailed formalism for determining the measurement error for nondestructive assay systems applied to the MD Program, which is an essential component for planning the safeguards and security of these systems.

Fearey, B.L.; Burr, T.L.; Pickrell, M.M.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Update of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Implementation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Campaign Implementation Plan provides summary level detail describing how the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) supports achievement of the overarching mission and objectives of the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Technologies Program The implementation plan begins with the assumption of target dates that are set out in the January 2013 DOE Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste (http://energy.gov/downloads/strategy-management-and-disposal-used-nuclear-fuel-and-high-level-radioactive-waste). These target dates and goals are summarized in section III. This implementation plan will be maintained as a living document and will be updated as needed in response to progress in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign and the Fuel Cycle Technologies Program.

Jens Birkholzer; Robert MacKinnon; Kevin McMahon; Sylvia Saltzstein; Ken Sorenson; Peter Swift

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Fermion Pair Production From an Electric Field Varying in Two Dimensions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Hamiltonian describing fermion pair production from an arbitrarily time-varying electric field in two dimensions is studied using a group-theoretic approach. We show that this Hamiltonian can be encompassed by two, commuting SU(2) algebras, and that the two-dimensional problem can therefore be reduced to two one-dimensional problems. We compare the group structure for the two-dimensional problem with that previously derived for the one-dimensional problem, and verify that the Schwinger result is obtained under the appropriate conditions.

J. E. Seger; A. B. Balantekin

1995-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Accelerating the disposition of transuranic waste from LANL - 9495  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was established during World War II with a single mission -- to design and build an atomic bomb. In the 65 years since, nuclear weapons physics, design and engineering have been the Laboratory's primary and sustaining mission. Experimental and process operations -- and associated cleanout and upgrade activities -- have generated a significant inventory of transuranic (TRU) waste that is stored at LANL's Technical Area 54, Material Disposal Area G (MDA G). When the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) opened its doors in 1999, LANL's TRU inventory totaled about 10,200 m{sup 3}, with a plutonium 239-equivalent curie (PE Ci) content of approximately 250,000 curies. By December 2008, a total of about 2,300 m3 (61,000 PE Ci) had been shipped to WIPP from LANL. This has resulted in a net reduction of about 1,000 m{sup 3} of TRU inventory over that time frame. This paper presents progress in dispositioning legacy and newly-generated transuranic waste (TRU) from ongoing missions at the LANL. The plans for, and lessons learned, in dispositioning several hundred high-activity TRU waste drums are reviewed. This waste population was one of the highest risks at LANL. Technical challenges in disposition of the high-activity drums are presented. These provide a preview of challenges to be addressed in dispositioning the remaining 6,800 m{sup 3} of TRU stored above ground and 2,400 m{sup 3} of TRU waste that is 'retrievably' stored below-grade. LANL is using subcontractors for much of this work and has formed a strong partnership with WIPP and its contractor to address this cleanup challenge.

Shepard, Mark D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stiger, Susan G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blankenhorn, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rael, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moody, David C [U.S DOE

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Dismantlement and Disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct:Directives Templates The Office of Science isDisk

143

Summary - Uranium233 Downblending and Disposition Project  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNGInternational EnergyCommittee onGASRainey STAR Center |Product EM wa in Buil to

144

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

Not Available

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIS-0229: Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The EIS will evaluate the reasonable alternatives and potential environmental impacts for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three types of facilities for plutonium disposition.

147

Site selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify, assess, and rank potential sites for the proposed Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site.

Bowers, J.A.

2000-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Microsoft Word - CX-MountainAvenueDispositionFY12_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1, 2012 REPLY TO ATTN OF: KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Joan Kendall Realty Specialist - TERR-3 Proposed Action: Disposition of Mountain Avenue Substation and...

149

Drilling and Production Testing the Methane Hydrate Resource Potential Associated with the Barrow Gas Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In November of 2008, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the North Slope Borough (NSB) committed funding to develop a drilling plan to test the presence of hydrates in the producing formation of at least one of the Barrow Gas Fields, and to develop a production surveillance plan to monitor the behavior of hydrates as dissociation occurs. This drilling and surveillance plan was supported by earlier studies in Phase 1 of the project, including hydrate stability zone modeling, material balance modeling, and full-field history-matched reservoir simulation, all of which support the presence of methane hydrate in association with the Barrow Gas Fields. This Phase 2 of the project, conducted over the past twelve months focused on selecting an optimal location for a hydrate test well; design of a logistics, drilling, completion and testing plan; and estimating costs for the activities. As originally proposed, the project was anticipated to benefit from industry activity in northwest Alaska, with opportunities to share equipment, personnel, services and mobilization and demobilization costs with one of the then-active exploration operators. The activity level dropped off, and this benefit evaporated, although plans for drilling of development wells in the BGF's matured, offering significant synergies and cost savings over a remote stand-alone drilling project. An optimal well location was chosen at the East Barrow No.18 well pad, and a vertical pilot/monitoring well and horizontal production test/surveillance well were engineered for drilling from this location. Both wells were designed with Distributed Temperature Survey (DTS) apparatus for monitoring of the hydrate-free gas interface. Once project scope was developed, a procurement process was implemented to engage the necessary service and equipment providers, and finalize project cost estimates. Based on cost proposals from vendors, total project estimated cost is $17.88 million dollars, inclusive of design work, permitting, barging, ice road/pad construction, drilling, completion, tie-in, long-term production testing and surveillance, data analysis and technology transfer. The PRA project team and North Slope have recommended moving forward to the execution phase of this project.

Steve McRae; Thomas Walsh; Michael Dunn; Michael Cook

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Uniqueness of Herndon's Georeactor: Energy Source and Production Mechanism for Earth's Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Herndon's georeactor at the center of Earth is immune to meltdown, which is not the case for recently published copy-cat georeactors, which would necessarily be subject to hot nuclear fuel, prevailing high temperature environments, and high confining pressures. Herndon's georeactor uniquely is expected to be self-regulating through establishing a balance between heat production and actinide settling out. The seventy year old idea of convection in the Earth's fluid core is refuted because thermal expansion cannot overcome the 23 percent higher density at the core's bottom than at its top. The dimensionless Rayleigh Number is an inappropriate indicator of convection in the Earth's core and mantle as a consequence of the assumptions under which it was derived. Implications bearing on the origin of the geomagnetic field, the physical impossibility of mantle convection, and the concomitant refutation of plate tectonics theory are briefly described.

J. Marvin Herndon

2009-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

151

Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condensate blockage negatively impacts large natural gas condensate reservoirs all over the world; examples include Arun Field in Indonesia, Karachaganak Field in Kazakhstan, Cupiagua Field in Colombia,Shtokmanovskoye Field in Russian Barents Sea...

Miller, Nathan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Used fuel disposition campaign international activities implementation plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through information exchange and a broader participation of experts in the field. U.S. participation in international UNF and HLW exchanges leads to safe management of nuclear materials, increased security through global oversight, and protection of the environment worldwide. Such interactions offer the opportunity to develop consensus on policy, scientific, and technical approaches. Dialogue to address common technical issues helps develop an internationally recognized foundation of sound science, benefiting the U.S. and participating countries. The UNF and HLW management programs in nuclear countries are at different levels of maturity. All countries utilizing nuclear power must store UNF, mostly in wet storage, and HLW for those countries that reprocess UNF. Several countries either utilize or plan to utilize dry storage systems for UNF, perhaps for long periods of time (several decades). Geologic disposal programs are at various different states, ranging from essentially 'no progress' to selected sites and pending license applications to regulators. The table below summarizes the status of UNF and HLW management programs in several countriesa. Thus, the opportunity exists to collaborate at different levels ranging from providing expertise to those countries 'behind' the U.S. to obtaining access to information and expertise from those countries with more mature programs. The U.S. fuel cycle is a once through fuel cycle involving the direct disposal of UNF, as spent nuclear fuel, in a geologic repository (previously identified at Yucca Mountain, Nevada), following at most a few decades of storage (wet and dry). The geology at Yucca Mountain, unsaturated tuff, is unique among all countries investigating the disposal of UNF and HLW. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of UNF at Yucca Mountain and possibly utilize very long term storage (approaching 100 years or more) while evaluating future fuel cycle alternatives for managing UNF, presents a different UNF and HLW management R&D portfolio that has been pursued in the U.S. In addition, the research and development activities managed by OCRWM have been transferred to DOE-NE. This requires a reconsideration of how the UFDC will engage in cooperative and collaborative activities with other countries. This report presents the UFDC implementation plan for international activities. The DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited OCRWM through the acquisition and exchange of information, database development, and peer reviews by experts from other countries. DOE-NE cooperates and collaborates with other countries in similar 'arenas' with similar objectives and realizing similar benefits. However the DOE-NE focus has not typically been in the area of UNF and HLW management. This report will first summarize these recent cooperative and collaborative activities. The manner that the UFDC will cooperate and collaborate in the future is expected to change as R&D is conducted regarding long-term storage and the potential disposal of UNF and HLW in different geolo

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Supplement to the Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On May 22, 1997, DOE published a Notice of Intent in the Federal Register (62 Federal Register 28009) announcing its decision to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) that would tier from the analysis and decisions reached in connection with the ''Storage and Disposition of Weapons-Usable Fissile Materials Final Programmatic EIS (Storage and Disposition PEIS)''. ''The Surplus Plutonium Disposition Draft Environmental Impact Statement'' (SPD Draft EIS) (DOWEIS-0283-D) was prepared in accordance with NEPA and issued in July 1998. It identified the potential environmental impacts of reasonable alternatives for the proposed siting, construction, and operation of three facilities for plutonium disposition. These three facilities would accomplish pit disassembly and conversion, immobilization, and MOX fuel fabrication. For the alternatives that included MOX fuel fabrication, the draft also described the potential environmental impacts of using from three to eight commercial nuclear reactors to irradiate MOX fuel. The potential impacts were based on a generic reactor analysis that used actual reactor data and a range of potential site conditions. In May 1998, DCE initiated a procurement process to obtain MOX fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services. The request for proposals defined limited activities that may be performed prior to issuance of the SPD EIS Record of Decision (ROD) including non-site-specific work associated with the development of the initial design for the MOX fuel fabrication facility, and plans (paper studies) for outreach, long lead-time procurements, regulatory management, facility quality assurance, safeguards, security, fuel qualification, and deactivation. No construction on the proposed MOX facility would begin before an SPD EIS ROD is issued. In March 1999, DOE awarded a contract to Duke Engineering & Services; COGEMA, Inc.; and Stone & Webster (known as DCS) to provide the requested services. The procurement process included the environmental review specified in DOE's NEPA regulations in 10 CFR 1021.216. The six reactors selected are Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in South Carolina McGuire Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2 in North Carolina, and North Anna Power Station Units 1 and 2 in Virginia. The Supplement describes the potential environmental impacts of using MOX fuel in these six specific reactors named in the DCS proposal as well as other program changes made since the SPD Draft EIS was published.

N /A

1999-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Implementation Guide for Surveillance and Maintenance during Facility Transition and Disposition  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

As DOE facilities complete mission operations and are declared excess, they pass into a transition phase that ultimately prepares them for disposition. The disposition phase of a facility's life cycle usually includes deactivation, decommissioning, and surveillance and maintenance (S&M) activities.

1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein of Bio in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation and Disposition

156

MANAGING HANFORD'S LEGACY NO-PATH-FORWARD WASTES TO DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (RL) has adopted the 2015 Vision for Cleanup of the Hanford Site. This vision will protect the Columbia River, reduce the Site footprint, and reduce Site mortgage costs. The CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company's (CHPRC) Waste and Fuels Management Project (W&FMP) and their partners support this mission by providing centralized waste management services for the Hanford Site waste generating organizations. At the time of the CHPRC contract award (August 2008) slightly more than 9,000 m{sup 3} of waste was defined as 'no-path-forward waste.' The majority of these wastes are suspect transuranic mixed (TRUM) wastes which are currently stored in the low-level Burial Grounds (LLBG), or stored above ground in the Central Waste Complex (CWC). A portion of the waste will be generated during ongoing and future site cleanup activities. The DOE-RL and CHPRC have collaborated to identify and deliver safe, cost-effective disposition paths for 90% ({approx}8,000 m{sup 3}) of these problematic wastes. These paths include accelerated disposition through expanded use of offsite treatment capabilities. Disposal paths were selected that minimize the need to develop new technologies, minimize the need for new, on-site capabilities, and accelerate shipments of transuranic (TRU) waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

WEST LD

2011-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

157

Research and development of energy-efficient appliance motor-compressors. Volume IV. Production demonstration and field test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two models of a high-efficiency compressor were manufactured in a pilot production run. These compressors were for low back-pressure applications. While based on a production compressor, there were many changes that required production process changes. Some changes were performed within our company and others were made by outside vendors. The compressors were used in top mount refrigerator-freezers and sold in normal distribution channels. Forty units were placed in residences for a one-year field test. Additional compressors were built so that a life test program could be performed. The results of the field test reveal a 27.0% improvement in energy consumption for the 18 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model and a 15.6% improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ improvement in the 21 ft/sup 3/ high-efficiency model as compared to the standard production unit.

Middleton, M.G.; Sauber, R.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Soft-Gluon Production Due to a Gluon Loop in a Constant Chromo-Electric Background Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain an exact result for the soft gluon production and its p_T distribution due to a gluon loop in a constant chromo-electric background field E^a with arbitrary color. Unlike Schwinger's result for e^+e^- pair production in QED which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity, the Electric field E, we find that the p_T distribution of the gluons depend on two gauge invariant quantities, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

Gouranga C. Nayak; Peter van Nieuwenhuizen

2005-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Non-Perturbative Quark-Antiquark Production From a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production rate and its p_T distribution from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric field E^a with arbitary color index $a$ by directly evaluating the path integral. Unlike the WKB tunneling result, which depends only on one gauge invariant quantity |E|, the strength of the chromo-electric field, we find that the exact result for the p_T distribution for quark (antiquark) production rate depends on two independent Casimir (gauge) invariants, E^aE^a and [d_{abc}E^aE^bE^c]^2.

Gouranga C. Nayak

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Optimized production strategies for improved oil recovery in a caronate oil field.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??LCC field is a conventional oil field producing from the Smackover carbonate formation at a depth around 12,000 ft and was discovered in the state… (more)

Gan, Quan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies would result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies, Class III  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It was hoped that the successful application of these technologies would result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs.

City of Long Beach; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California; David K. Davies and Associates

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Effective field theory analysis of double Higgs production via gluon fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We perform a detailed study of double Higgs production via gluon fusion in the Effective Field Theory (EFT) framework where effects from new physics are parametrized by local operators. Our analysis provides a perspective broader than the one followed in most of the previous analyses, where this process was merely considered as a way to extract the Higgs trilinear coupling. We focus on the $hh \\to b\\bar b\\gamma\\gamma$ channel and perform a thorough simulation of signal and background at the 14 TeV LHC and a future 100 TeV proton-proton collider. We make use of invariant mass distributions to enhance the sensitivity on the EFT coefficients and give a first assessment of the impact of jet substructure techniques on the results. The range of validity of the EFT description is estimated, as required to consistently exploit the high-energy range of distributions, pointing out the potential relevance of dimension-8 operators. Our analysis contains a few important improvements over previous studies and identifies so...

Azatov, Aleksandr; Panico, Giuliano; Son, Minho

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column heights  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Calculation of CO2 column heights in depleted gas fields from known pre-production gas column that the CO2 is in a dense phase (either liquid or supercritical). Accurate assessment of the storage capacity also requires an estimation of the amount of CO2 that can be safely stored beneath the reservoir seal

165

Field evaluation of cotton near-isogenic lines introgressed with QTLs for productivity and drought related traits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field evaluation of cotton near-isogenic lines introgressed with QTLs for productivity and drought) between elite cultivars of the two cotton species Gossypium barbadense cv. F-177 and G. hirsutum cv. Siv, in order to (1) evaluate the potential to improve cotton drought resistance by MAS and (2) test the role

Chee, Peng W.

166

Analysis of disposition alternatives for radioactively contaminated scrap metal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Millions of tonnes of slightly radioactive, scrap iron and steel, stainless steel, and copper are likely to become available as nuclear and other facilities and equipment are withdrawn from service. Disposition of this material is an international policy issue under consideration currently. The major alternatives for managing this material are to either develop a regulatory process for decontamination and recycling that will safeguard human health or to dispose of the scrap and replace the metal stocks. To evaluate the alternatives, we estimate quantities of scrap arising from nuclear power plant decommissioning, evaluate potential price impacts of recycling on regional markets, and assess the health and environmental impacts of the management alternatives. We conclude that decontaminating and recycling the scrap is the superior alternative.

Nieves, L.A.; Chen, S.Y.; Kohout, E.J.; Nabelssi, B.; Tilbrook, R.W.; Wilson, S.E.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Integration of Environment, Safety, and Health into Facility Disposition Activities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Volume One of this Standard has been revised to provide a Department of Energy (DOE) approved methodology for preparing a Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) for decommissioning of nuclear facilities, as well as environmental restoration activities that involve work not done within a permanent structure. Methodologies provided in this Standard are intended to be compliant with Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 830, Nuclear Safety Management, Subpart B, Safety Basis Requirements. Volume Two contains the appendices that provide additional environment, safety and health (ES&H) information to complement Volume 1 of this Standard. Volume 2 of the Standard is much broader in scope than Volume 1 and satisfies several purposes. Integrated safety management expectations are provided in accordance with facility disposition requirements contained in DOE O 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Reactor-Based Plutonium Disposition: Opportunities, Options, and Issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the Cold War has created a legacy of surplus fissile materials (plutonium and highly enriched uranium) in the United States (U.S.) and the former Soviet Union. These materials pose a danger to national and international security. During the past few years, the U.S. and Russia have engaged in an ongoing dialog concerning the safe storage and disposition of surplus fissile material stockpiles. In January 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) announced the U. S. would pursue a dual track approach to rendering approximately 50 metric tons of plutonium inaccessible for use in nuclear weapons. One track involves immobilizing the plutonium by combining it with high-level radioactive waste in glass or ceramic ''logs''. The other method, referred to as reactor-based disposition, converts plutonium into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for nuclear reactors. The U.S. and Russia are moving ahead rapidly to develop and demonstrate the technology required to implement the MOX option in their respective countries. U.S. MOX fuel research and development activities were started in the 1950s, with irradiation of MOX fuel rods in commercial light water reactors (LWR) from the 1960s--1980s. In all, a few thousand MOX fuel rods were successfully irradiated. Though much of this work was performed with weapons-grade or ''near'' weapons-grade plutonium--and favorable fuel performance was observed--the applicability of this data for licensing and use of weapons-grade MOX fuel manufactured with modern fuel fabrication processes is somewhat limited. The U.S. and Russia are currently engaged in an intensive research, development, and demonstration program to support implementation of the MOX option in our two countries. This paper focuses on work performed in the U.S. and provides a brief summary of joint U.S./Russian work currently underway.

Greene, S.R.

1999-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

EM Makes Significant Progress on Dispositioning Transuranic Waste at Idaho Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – EM and contractor CH2M-WG, IDAHO, LLC (CWI) made significant progress in 2013 dispositioning transuranic (TRU) waste and helping ship it out of Idaho.

170

Environmental behavior of hafnium : the impact on the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and analytical studies were performed to examine the environmental behavior of hafnium and its utility as a neutron poison for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium in Yucca Mountain. The hydrolysis of ...

Cerefice, Gary Steven

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Seismic response to fluid injection and production in two Salton Trough geothermal fields, southern California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D I P IPPO , R. (2012). Geothermal Power Plants: Principles,in the vicinity of geothermal power plants worldwide, it isregional effects of geothermal power production. This study

Lajoie, Lia Joyce

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Schwinger Mechanism for Gluon Pair Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field in Arbitrary Gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study non-perturbative gluon pair production from arbitrary time dependent chromo-electric field E^a(t) with arbitrary color index a =1,2,...8 via Schwinger mechanism in arbitrary covariant background gauge \\alpha. We show that the probability of non-perturbative gluon pair production per unit time per unit volume per unit transverse momentum \\frac{dW}{d^4xd^2p_T} is independent of gauge fixing parameter \\alpha. Hence the result obtained in the Fynman-'t Hooft gauge, \\alpha=1, is the correct gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent result.

Gouranga C Nayak

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

173

US weapons-useable plutonium disposition policy: implementation of the MOX fuel option  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS August 1998 Major Subject: Political Science US WEAPONS-USEABLE PLUTONIUM DISPOSITION POLICY: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MOX FUEL OPTION A Thesis by VANESSA L. GONZALEZ Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment...

Gonzalez, Vanessa L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

174

SRS MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site(SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. SRS has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 2 or 3 facility with storage of bulk PuO{sub 2} and assembly, storage, and shipping of fuel bundles in an S and S Category 1 facility. The total Category 1 approach, which is the recommended option, would be done in the 221-H Canyon Building. A facility that was never in service will be removed from one area, and a hardened wall will be constructed in another area to accommodate execution of the LA fuel fabrication. The non-Category 1 approach would require removal of process equipment in the FB-Line metal production and packaging glove boxes, which requires work in a contamination area. The Immobilization Hot Demonstration Program equipment in the Savannah River Technology Center would need to be removed to accommodate pellet fabrication. This work would also be in a contaminated area.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Neutrino absorption by W production in the presence of a magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we calculate the decay rate of the electron type neutrinos into $W$ bosons and electrons in presence of an external uniform magnetic field. The decay rate is calculated from the imaginary part of the $W$ exchange neutrino self-energy diagram but in the weak field limit and compare our result with the existing one.

Kaushik Bhattacharya; Sarira Sahu

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Magnetic Field Effect on Charmonium Production in High Energy Nuclear Collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is important to understand the strong external magnetic field generated at the very beginning of high energy nuclear collisions. We study the effect of the magnetic field on the charmonium yield and anisotropic distribution in Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC energy. The time dependent Schr\\"odinger equation is employed to describe the motion of $c\\bar{c}$ pairs. We compare our model prediction of non- collective anisotropic parameter $v_2$ of $J/\\psi$s with CMS data at high transverse momentum. This is the first attempt to measure the magnetic field in high energy nuclear collisions.

Guo, Xingyu; Xu, Nu; Xu, Zhe; Zhuang, Pengfei

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Gas productivity related to cleat volumes derived from focused resistivity tools in coalbed methane (CBM) fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cleats are critical for coal-bed methane (CBM) production, but operators usually lack a viable method to determine productivity except for costly well tests. Wireline logs, run over the CBM deposits of the Drunkards Wash Unit located in the Uinta Basin of Utah, were used to develop a new method to relate productivity to the cleat volume. The latter is derived from a focused resistivity log and the wellbore-fluid resistivity. Induction tools are unsuitable for this method, because they are dominated by borehole effects in high resistivity coals and low resistivity mud. Moreover, they read too deep to be significantly affected by the substitution of formation fluid by borehole fluid in the cleats on which the method is based. The method was demonstrated by relating cleat volume to CBM gas productivity in 24 wells, an exercise that clearly separated good from poor producers.

Yang, Y.H.; Peeters, M.; Cloud, T.A.; Van Kirk, C.W. [Kerr McGee Rocky Mountain Corporation, Denver, CO (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

178

The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers in the Peruvian Andes1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Impact of Farmer-Field-Schools on Knowledge and Productivity: A Study of Potato Farmers-school (FFS) program on farmers' knowledge of integrated pest management (IPM) practices related to potato practices has the potential to significantly improve productivity in potato production. U.S. General

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

179

Potential role of ABC-assisted repositories in U.S. plutonium and high-level waste disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper characterizes the issues involving deep geologic disposal of LWR spent fuel rods, then presents results of an investigation to quantify the potential role of Accelerator-Based Conversion (ABC) in an integrated national nuclear materials and high level waste disposition strategy. The investigation used the deep geological repository envisioned for Yucca Mt., Nevada as a baseline and considered complementary roles for integrated ABC transmutation systems. The results indicate that although a U.S. geologic waste repository will continue to be required, waste partitioning and accelerator transmutation of plutonium, the minor actinides, and selected long-lived fission products can result in the following substantial benefits: plutonium burndown to near zero levels, a dramatic reduction of the long term hazard associated with geologic repositories, an ability to place several-fold more high level nuclear waste in a single repository, electricity sales to compensate for capital and operating costs.

Berwald, David; Favale, Anthony; Myers, Timothy; McDaniel, Jerry [Grumman Aerospace Corporation, Bethpage New York 11714 (United States); Bechtel Corporation, 50 Beal St., San Francisco, California 94105 (United States)

1995-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Field-project designs for carbon dioxide sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Worldwide concerns about global warming and possible contributions to it from anthropogenic carbon dioxide have become important during the past several years. Coal seams may make excellent candidates for CO{sub 2} sequestration; coal-seam sequestration could enhance methane production and improve sequestration economics. Reservoir-simulation computations are an important component of any engineering design before carbon dioxide is injected underground. We have performed such simulations for a hypothetical pilot-scale project in representative coal seams. In these simulations we assume four horizontal production wells that form a square, that is, two wells drilled at right angles to each other forming two sides of a square, with another pair of horizontal wells similarly drilled to form the other two sides. Four shorter horizontal wells are drilled from a vertical well at the center of the square, forming two straight lines orthogonal to each other. By modifying coal properties, especially sorption rate, we have approximated different types of coals. By varying operational parameters, such as injector length, injection well pressure, time to injection, and production well pressure, we can evaluate different production schemes to determine an optimum for each coal type. Any optimization requires considering a tradeoff between total CO{sub 2} sequestered and the rate of methane production. Values of total CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced are presented for multiple coal types and different operational designs. 30 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

W. Neal Sams; Grant Bromhal; Sinisha Jikich; Turgay Ertekin; Duane H. Smith [EG& amp; G Technical Services, Morgantown, WV (United States). National Energy Technology Laboratory

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of...

182

On the Vlasov equation for Schwinger pair production in a time-dependent electric field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Schwinger pair creation in a purely time-dependent electric field can be described through a quantum Vlasov equation describing the time evolution of the single-particle momentum distribution function. This equation exists in two versions, both of which can be derived by a Bogoliubov transformation, but whose equivalence is not obvious. For the spinless case, we show here that the difference between these two evolution equations corresponds to the one between the "in-out" and "in-in" formalisms. We give a simple relation between the asymptotic distribution functions generated by the two Vlasov equations. As examples we discuss the Sauter and single-soliton field cases.

Adolfo Huet; Sang Pyo Kim; Christian Schubert

2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

183

DEVELOPMENT OF GLASS AND CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC FORMS FOR DISPOSITION OF EXCESS PLUTONIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has identified up to 50 metric tons of excess plutonium that needs to be dispositioned. The bulk of the material is slated to be blended with uranium and fabricated into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel for subsequent burning in commercial nuclear reactors. Excess plutonium-containing impurity materials making it unsuitable for fabrication into MOX fuel will need to be dispositioned via other means. Glass and crystalline ceramics have been developed and studied as candidate forms to immobilize these impure plutonium feeds. A titanate-based ceramic was identified as an excellent actinide material host. This composition was based on Synroc compositions previously developed for nuclear waste immobilization. These titanate ceramics were found to be able to accommodate extremely high quantities of fissile material and exhibit excellent aqueous durability. A lanthanide borosilicate (LaBS) glass was developed to accommodate high concentrations of plutonium and to be very tolerant of impurities yet still maintain good aqueous durability. Recent testing of alkali borosilicate compositions showed promise of using these compositions to disposition lower concentrations of plutonium using existing high level waste vitrification processes. The developed waste forms all appear to be suitable for Pu disposition. Depending on the actual types and concentrations of the Pu residue streams slated for disposition, each waste form offers unique advantages.

Marra, James; Cozzi, A; Crawford, C.; Herman, C.; Marra, John; Peeler, D.

2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

184

Schwinger Mechanism for Quark-Antiquark Production in the Presence of Arbitrary Time Dependent Chromo-Electric Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the Schwinger mechanism in QCD in the presence of an arbitrary time-dependent chromo-electric background field $E^a(t)$ with arbitrary color index $a$=1,2,...8 in SU(3). We obtain an exact result for the non-perturbative quark (antiquark) production from an arbitrary $E^a(t)$ by directly evaluating the path integral. We find that the exact result is independent of all the time derivatives $\\frac{d^nE^a(t)}{dt^n}$ where $n=1,2,...\\infty$. This result has the same functional dependence on two Casimir invariants $[E^a(t)E^a(t)]$ and $[d_{abc}E^a(t)E^b(t)E^c(t)]^2$ as the constant chromo-electric field $E^a$ result with the replacement: $E^a \\rightarrow E^a(t)$. This result relies crucially on the validity of the shift conjecture, which has not yet been established.

Gouranga C. Nayak

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

185

Production of large volume, strongly magnetized laser-produced plasmas by use of pulsed external magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The production of strongly magnetized laser plasmas, of interest for laboratory astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion studies, is presented. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system. This is achieved by coupling a 16 kV pulse-power system, which generates a magnetic field by means of a split coil, with the ELFIE laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique. In order to influence the plasma dynamics in a significant manner, the system can generate, repetitively and without debris, high amplitude magnetic fields (40 T) in a manner compatible with a high-energy laser environment. A description of the system and preliminary results demonstrating the possibility to magnetically collimate plasma jets are given.

Albertazzi, B. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); INRS-EMT, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada); Beard, J.; Billette, J.; Portugall, O. [LNCMI, UPR 3228, CNRS-UFJ-UPS-INSA, 31400 Toulouse (France); Ciardi, A. [LERMA, Observatoire de Paris, Ecole Normale Superieure, Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, CNRS UMR 8112, Paris (France); Vinci, T.; Albrecht, J.; Chen, S. N.; Da Silva, D.; Hirardin, B.; Nakatsutsumi, M.; Romagnagni, L.; Simond, S.; Veuillot, E.; Fuchs, J. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Burris-Mog, T.; Dittrich, S.; Herrmannsdoerfer, T.; Kroll, F.; Nitsche, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Non-Perturbative Gluon pair production from a Constant Chromo-Electric Field via the Schwinger Mechanism in Arbitrary Gauge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-perturbative production of gluon pairs from a constant SU(3) chromo-electric background field via the Schwinger mechanism. We fix the covariant background gauge with an arbitrary gauge parameter \\alpha. We determine the transverse momentum distribution of the gluons, as well as the total probability of creating pairs per unit space time volume. We find that the result is independent of the covariant gauge parameter \\alpha used to define arbitrary covariant background gauges. We find that our non-perturbative result is both gauge invariant and gauge parameter \\alpha independent.

Fred Cooper; Gouranga C. Nayak

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

187

Alternative technical summary report for direct disposition in deep boreholes: Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound canisters, Version 4.0. Fissile Materials Disposition Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes and compares the Immobilized and Direct Beep Borehole Disposition Alternatives. The important design concepts, facility features and operational procedures are briefly described, and a discussion of the issues that affect the evaluation of each alternative against the programmatic assessment criteria that have been established for selecting the preferred alternatives for plutonium disposition.

Wijesinghe, A.M.

1996-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Algae production R&D focuses on exploring resource use and availability, algal biomass development and improvements, characterizing algal biomass components, and the ecology and engineering of cultivation systems.

189

,"Natural Gas Plant Field Production: Natural Gas Liquids "  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: EnergyShale Proved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)"ShaleCoalbedShale Proved ReservesField

190

Superfund Policy Statements and Guidance Regarding Disposition of Radioactive Waste in Non-NRC Licensed Disposal Facilities - 13407  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This talk will discuss EPA congressional testimony and follow-up letters, as well as letters to other stakeholders on EPA's perspectives on the disposition of radioactive waste outside of the NRC licensed disposal facility system. This will also look at Superfund's historical practices, and emerging trends in the NRC and agreement states on waste disposition. (author)

Walker, Stuart [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)] [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW)!in!the!United!States!A!National!Survey!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1! ! Generation!and!Disposition!of!Municipal!Solid!Waste! (MSW on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Generation and Disposition in the U.S., in collaboration with Ms. Nora Goldstein was not carried out in 2012 and in 2013 EEC and BioCycle agreed that the 2013 Survey of Waste Generation

Columbia University

192

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The successful application of these technologies will result in expanding their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, to other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs.

Scott Hara

2001-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

193

Water issues associated with heavy oil production.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil occurs in many different forms throughout the world. An important characteristic of crude oil that affects the ease with which it can be produced is its density and viscosity. Lighter crude oil typically can be produced more easily and at lower cost than heavier crude oil. Historically, much of the nation's oil supply came from domestic or international light or medium crude oil sources. California's extensive heavy oil production for more than a century is a notable exception. Oil and gas companies are actively looking toward heavier crude oil sources to help meet demands and to take advantage of large heavy oil reserves located in North and South America. Heavy oil includes very viscous oil resources like those found in some fields in California and Venezuela, oil shale, and tar sands (called oil sands in Canada). These are described in more detail in the next chapter. Water is integrally associated with conventional oil production. Produced water is the largest byproduct associated with oil production. The cost of managing large volumes of produced water is an important component of the overall cost of producing oil. Most mature oil fields rely on injected water to maintain formation pressure during production. The processes involved with heavy oil production often require external water supplies for steam generation, washing, and other steps. While some heavy oil processes generate produced water, others generate different types of industrial wastewater. Management and disposition of the wastewater presents challenges and costs for the operators. This report describes water requirements relating to heavy oil production and potential sources for that water. The report also describes how water is used and the resulting water quality impacts associated with heavy oil production.

Veil, J. A.; Quinn, J. J.; Environmental Science Division

2008-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

194

Fuel qualification issues and strategies for reactor-based surplus plutonium disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has proposed irradiation of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial reactors as a disposition method for surplus plutonium from the weapons program. The burning of MOX fuel in reactors is supported by an extensive technology base; however, the infrastructure required to implement reactor-based plutonium disposition does not exist domestically. This report identifies and examines the actions required to qualify and license weapons-grade (WG) plutonium-based MOX fuels for use in domestic commercial light-water reactors (LWRs).

Cowell, B.S.; Copeland, G.L.; Moses, D.L.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The hope is that successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and, through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block II-A (Tar II-A) has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs: inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery and reduce operating costs, including: (1) Development of three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic reservoir simulation models--thermal or otherwise--to aid in reservoir management of the steamflood and post-steamflood phases and subsequent development work. (2) Development of computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid reservoir surveillance and operations. (3) Perform detailed studies of the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (4) Testing and proposed application of a novel alkaline-steam well completion technique for the containment of the unconsolidated formation sands and control of fluid entry and injection profiles. (5) Installation of a 2100 ft, 14 inch insulated, steam line beneath a harbor channel to supply steam to an island location. (6) Testing and proposed application of thermal recovery technologies to increase oil production and reserves: (a) Performing pilot tests of cyclic steam injection and production on new horizontal wells. (b) Performing pilot tests of hot water-alternating-steam (WAS) drive in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Perform a pilot steamflood with the four horizontal injectors and producers using a pseudo steam-assisted gravity-drainage (SAGD) process. (8) Advanced reservoir management, through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring and evaluation.

Unknown

2001-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

The MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco, Ersan Demiralp, Tahir Cagin, and William A. Goddard, III*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in studying oil production chemicals, including corrosion inhibitors,11 scale inhibitors,12 and dissolvers.13 and corrosion inhibition). Among the minerals present in the walls of oil reservoirs, clay minerals are believedThe MS-Q Force Field for Clay Minerals: Application to Oil Production Sungu Hwang, Mario Blanco

Ã?agin, Tahir

197

DEVELOPING AN INTEGRATED NATIONAL STRATEGY FOR THE DISPOSITION OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Department of Energy's (DOE's) current efforts to strengthen its activities for the management and disposition of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In August 2002 an integrated, ''corporate project'' was initiated by the Office of Environmental Management (EM) to develop a fully integrated strategy for disposition of the approximately {approx}250,000 DOE SNF assemblies currently managed by EM. Through the course of preliminary design, the focus of this project rapidly evolved to become DOE-wide. It is supported by all DOE organizations involved in SNF management, and represents a marked change in the way DOE conducts its business. This paper provides an overview of the Corporate Project for Integrated/Risk-Driven Disposition of SNF (Corporate SNF Project), including a description of its purpose, scope and deliverables. It also summarizes the results of the integrated project team's (IPT's) conceptual design efforts, including the identification of project/system requirements and alternatives. Finally, this paper highlights the schedule of the corporate project, and its progress towards development of a DOE corporate strategy for SNF disposition.

Gelles, C.M.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

198

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sample Results from the Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 6 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 6 for the Interim Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 6 strategy are identified.

Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

EIS-0283-S2: Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes the potential environmental impacts associated with changes to the surplus plutonium disposition program, including changes to the inventory of surplus plutonium and proposed new alternatives. The original EIS is available at http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/eis-0283-final-environmental-impact-sta....

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201

EIS-0475: Disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

NNSA/DOE announces its intent to prepare an EIS for the disposition of the Bannister Federal Complex, Kansas City, MO. NNSA previously decided in a separate NEPA review (EA-1592) to relocate its operations from the Bannister Federal Complex to a newly constructed industrial campus eight miles from the current location.

202

HLW Salt Disposition Alternatives Identification Preconceptual Phase I Summary Report (Including Attachments)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the process used by the Team to systematically develop alternative methods or technologies for final disposition of HLW salt. Additionally, this report summarizes the process utilized to reduce the total list of identified alternatives to an ''initial list'' for further evaluation. This report constitutes completion of the team charter major milestone Phase I Deliverable.

Piccolo, S.F.

1999-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

203

A HOLISTIC APPROACH FOR DISPOSITION OF LONG-LIVED RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the past 45 years, one of the most challenging scientific, engineering, socio-economic, and political tasks and obligations of our time has been to site and develop technical, politically acceptable, solutions to the safe disposition of long-lived radioactive materials (LLRMs). However, at the end of the year 2002, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in the United States of America (USA) hosts the world's only operating LLRM-disposal system, which (1) is based on the LLRM-disposal principles recommended by the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) in 1957, i.e., deep geological disposal in a ''stable'' salt vault/repository, (2) complies with the nation's ''Environmental Radiation Protection Standards for the Management and Disposal of Spent Nuclear Fuel, High-Level and Transuranic Radioactive Wastes'', and (3) may receive 175,584 cubic meters (m3) of transuranic radioactive waste (TRUW)a. Pending the scheduled opening of repositories for once-used nuclear fuel (OUNF) in the USA, Sweden, and Finland in the years 2010, 2015, and 2017, respectively, LLRM-disposal solutions remain the missing link in all national LLRM-disposition programs. Furthermore, for a variety of reasons, many nations with nuclear programs have chosen a ''spectator'' stance in terms of enhancing the global nuclear safety culture and the nuclear renaissance, and have either ''slow-tracked'' or deferred their LLRM-disposal programs to allow time for an informed national consensus to evolve based on LLRM-disposition experiences and solutions gained elsewhere. In the meantime, LLRMs will continue to amass in different types and levels of safeguarded storage facilities around the world. In an attempt to contribute to the enhancement of the global nuclear safety culture and the nuclear renaissance, the authors developed the sample holistic approach for synergistic disposition of LLRMs comprising LLRM-disposition components considered either ''proven'' or ''promising'' by the authors. The fundamental principles of the holistic approach are: (1) Risk minimization; (2) Minimization of the LLRM volume requiring deep geological disposal; and (3) LLRM-disposition flexibility. An integral element of these principles is to allow time for LLRM-disposition solutions to evolve/mature technically, financially, and politically. Furthermore, contingent upon the desired outcome(s), available financial, scientific, and technical resources, and political will, these components may be implemented separately or in combinations by one or a group of nations.

Eriksson, Leif G.; Dials, George E.; Parker, Frank L.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase the recoverable heavy oil reserves within sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California. This is realized through the testing and application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. It is hoped that the successful application of these technologies will result in their implementation throughout the Wilmington Field and through technology transfer, will be extended to increase the recoverable oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) II-A has been relatively insufficient because of several producability problems which are common in SBC reservoir; inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil and non-uniform distribution of the remaining oil. This has resulted in poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves.

City of Long Beach; David K.Davies and Associates; Tidelands Oil Production Company; University of Southern California

1999-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

205

Study of plutonium disposition using the GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the U.S. to disposition 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in parallel with a similar program in Russia. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study {open_quotes}Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium{close_quotes} identified light water reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a U.S. disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a 1350 MWe GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. The ABWR represents the integration of over 30 years of experience gained worldwide in the design, construction and operation of BWRs. It incorporates advanced features to enhance reliability and safety, minimize waste and reduce worker exposure. For example, the core is never uncovered nor is any operator action required for 72 hours after any design basis accident. Phase 1 of this study was documented in a GE report dated May 13, 1993. DOE`s Phase 1 evaluations cited the ABWR as a proven technical approach for the disposition of plutonium. This Phase 2 study addresses specific areas which the DOE authorized as appropriate for more in-depth evaluations. A separate report addresses the findings relative to the use of existing BWRs to achieve the same goal.

NONE

1994-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

206

LLNL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. LLNL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within a Category 1 area. Building 332 will be used to receive and store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, and assemble fuel rods. Building 334 will be used to assemble, store, and ship fuel bundles. Only minor modifications would be required of Building 332. Uncontaminated glove boxes would need to be removed, petition walls would need to be removed, and minor modifications to the ventilation system would be required.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Bar Mar field Point field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bone Spring Seay Nance Regional Study (Cimarex Energy) West Texas (Various Counties) West Texas Yates Seay Nance Regional Study (Lynx Production) West Texas (Various Counties) #12;Bar Mar field Umbrella Point field Nuare field East Texas field Copano Bay Bar Mar field Umbrella

Texas at Austin, University of

208

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective is to transfer technology which can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The thermal recovery operations in the Tar II-A and Tar V have been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing an 2400 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Scott Hara

2004-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

209

SUPERGLASS. Engineering field tests - Phase 3. Production, market planning, and product evaluation for a high-thermal-performance insulating glass design utilizing HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEAT MIRROR transparent window insulation consists of a clear polyester film two mils (.002'') thick with a thin, clear low-emissivity (.15) coating deposited on one side by state-of-the-art vacuum deposition processes. This neutral-colored invisible coating reflects long-wave infrared energy (heat). When mounted by being stretched with a 1/2'' air-gap on each side of the film, the resulting unit reduces heat loss by 60% compared to dual insulating glass. Southwall Corporation produces HEAT MIRROR transparent insulation and markets it to manufacturers of sealed insulating glass (I.G.) units and window and building manufacturers who make their own I.G. These companies build and sell the SUPERGLASS sealed glazing units. Units made and installed in buildings by six customers were visited. These units were located in many geographic regions, including the Pacific Northwest, Rocky Mountains, New England, Southeast, and West Coast. As much as could be obtained of their history was recorded, as was their current condition and performance. These units had been in place from two weeks to over a year. All of the units were performing thermally very well, as measured by taking temperature profiles through them and through adjacent conventional I.G. units. Some units had minor visual defects (attributed to I.G. assembly techniques) which are discussed in detail. Overall occupant acceptance was enthusiastically positive. In addition to saving energy, without compromise of optical quality or appearance, the product makes rooms with large glazing areas comfortable to be in in cold weather. All defects observed were present when built; there appears to be no in-field degradation of quality at this time.

Tilford, C L

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Used fuel disposition research and development roadmap - FY10 status.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since 1987 the U.S. has focused research and development activities relevant to the disposal of commercial used nuclear fuel and U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) owned spent nuclear fuel and high level waste on the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. At the same time, the U.S. successfully deployed a deep geologic disposal facility for defense-related transuranic waste in bedded salt at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. In 2009 the DOE established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) within the Office of Nuclear Energy. The Mission of the UFDC is to identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. national laboratories have participated on these programs and has conducted research and development related to these issues to a limited extent. However, a comprehensive research and development (R&D) program investigating a variety of geologic media has not been a part of the U.S. waste management program since the mid 1980s. Such a comprehensive R&D program is being developed in the UFDC with a goal of meeting the UFDC Grand Challenge to provide a sound technical basis for absolute confidence in the safety and security of long-term storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes from the nuclear energy enterprise. The DOE has decided to no longer pursue the development of a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Since a repository site will ultimately have to be selected, sited, characterized, designed, and licensed, other disposal options must now be considered. In addition to the unsaturated volcanic tuff evaluated at Yucca Mountain, several different geologic media are under investigation internationally and preliminary assessments indicate that disposal of used nuclear fuel and high level waste in these media is feasible. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S. and other nations in understanding disposal concepts in different geologic media, but gaps in knowledge still exist. A principal aspect of concern to the UFDC as it considers the broad issues of siting a repository in different geologic media are the marked differences in the regulatory bases for assessing suitability and safety of a repository between the U.S. and other nations. Because the probability based - risked informed nature of the current U.S. regulations for high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel is sufficiently different from other regulations, information gained in previous studies, while useful, likely need to be supplemented to enable more convincing communication with the public, better defense of the numerical models, and stronger safety cases. Thus, it was recognized when the UFDC was established that there were readily identified disposal-related R&D opportunities to address knowledge gaps. An effort to document these research opportunities was a key component of Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 engineered system, natural system, and system-level modeling activities for a range of disposal environments. A principal contribution to identifying these gaps was a workshop held to gather perspectives from experts both within and external to the UFDC regarding R&D opportunities. In the planning for FY2010 it was expected that these activities would culminate with a UFDC research and development roadmap that would identify the knowledge gaps, discuss the R&D needed to fill these gaps, and prioritize the proposed R&D over both the near- and long-term. A number of knowledge gaps and needed R&D were identified and are discussed in this report. However, these preliminary R&D topics have not been evaluated in detail nor have they been prioritized to support future planning efforts. This will be completed in FY11 and the final UFDC Research and Development Roadmap will be completed. This report discusses proposed R&D topics in three areas related to repository siting, design, and performance: natural systems

Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Alternative technical summary report for immobilized disposition in deep boreholes: Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout without canisters, Version 4.0. Fissile materials disposition program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes and compares the immobilized and direct borehole disposition alternatives previously presented in the alternative technical summary. The important design concepts, facility features and operational procedures are first briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the issues that affect the evaluation of each alternative against the programmatic assessment criteria that have been established for selecting the preferred alternatives for plutonium disposition.

Wijesinghe, A.M.

1996-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

212

Inversion of synthetic aperture radar interferograms for sources of production-related subsidence at the Dixie Valley geothermal field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

site and the Okuaizu geothermal field, Japan", Geothermics,at the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, Baja California,and seismicity in the Coso geothermal area, Inyo County,

Foxall, B.; Vasco, D.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

INCREASING HEAVY OIL RESERVES IN THE WILMINGTON OIL FIELD THROUGH ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND THERMAL PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies to improve thermal recovery techniques and lower operating and capital costs in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., CA. Through June 2002, project work has been completed on the following activities: data preparation; basic reservoir engineering; developing a deterministic three dimensional (3-D) geologic model, a 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and a rock-log model; well drilling and completions; and surface facilities on the Fault Block II-A Tar Zone (Tar II-A). Work is continuing on research to understand the geochemistry and process regarding the sand consolidation well completion technique, final reservoir tracer work, operational work and research studies to prevent thermal-related formation compaction in the Tar II-A steamflood area, and operational work on the Tar V post-steamflood pilot and Tar II-A post-steamflood projects. During the Third Quarter 2002, the project team essentially completed implementing the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan for the Tar II-A post-steamflood project developed in March 2002 and is proceeding with additional related work. The project team has completed developing laboratory research procedures to analyze the sand consolidation well completion technique and will initiate work in the fourth quarter. The Tar V pilot steamflood project terminated hot water injection and converted to post-steamflood cold water injection on April 19, 2002. Proposals have been approved to repair two sand consolidated horizontal wells that sanded up, Tar II-A well UP-955 and Tar V well J-205, with gravel-packed inner liner jobs to be performed next quarter. Other well work to be performed next quarter is to convert well L-337 to a Tar V water injector and to recomplete vertical well A-194 as a Tar V interior steamflood pattern producer. Plans have been approved to drill and complete well A-605 in Tar V in the first quarter 2003. Plans have been approved to update the Tar II-A 3-D deterministic reservoir simulation model and run sensitivity cases to evaluate the accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan. The Tar II-A post-steamflood operation started in February 1999 and steam chest fillup occurred in September-October 1999. The targeted reservoir pressures in the ''T'' and ''D'' sands are maintained at 90 {+-} 5% hydrostatic levels by controlling water injection and gross fluid production and through the bimonthly pressure monitoring program enacted at the start of the post-steamflood phase. Well work related to the Tar II-A accelerated oil recovery and reservoir cooling plan began in March 2002 with oil production increasing from 1009 BOPD in the first quarter to 1145 BOPD in the third quarter. Reservoir pressures have been increased during the quarter from 88% to 91% hydrostatic levels in the ''T'' sands and from 91% to 94% hydrostatic levels in the ''D'' sands. Well work during the quarter is described in the Reservoir Management section. The post-steamflood production performance in the Tar V pilot project has been below projections because of wellbore mechanical limitations and the loss of a horizontal producer a second time to sand inflow that are being addressed in the fourth quarter. As the fluid production temperatures exceeded 350 F, our self-imposed temperature limit, the pilot steamflood was converted to a hot waterflood project in June 2001 and converted to cold water injection on April 19, 2002.

Scott Hara

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

214

U.S. weapons-usable plutonium disposition policy: Implementation of the MOX fuel option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive case study was conducted on the policy problem of disposing of US weapons-grade plutonium, which has been declared surplus to strategic defense needs. Specifically, implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel disposition option was examined in the context of national and international nonproliferation policy, and in contrast to US plutonium policy. The study reveals numerous difficulties in achieving effective implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option including unresolved licensing and regulatory issues, technological uncertainties, public opposition, potentially conflicting federal policies, and the need for international assurances of reciprocal plutonium disposition activities. It is believed that these difficulties can be resolved in time so that the implementation of the mixed-oxide fuel option can eventually be effective in accomplishing its policy objective.

Woods, A.L. [ed.] [Amarillo National Resource Center for Plutonium, TX (United States); Gonzalez, V.L. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Political Science

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Disposition and transportation of surplus radioactive low specific activity nitric acid. Volume 1, Environmental Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE is deactivating the PUREX plant at Hanford; this will involve the disposition of about 692,000 liters (183,000 gallons) of surplus nitric acid contaminated with low levels of U and other radionuclides. The nitric acid, designated as low specific activity, is stored in 4 storage tanks at PUREX. Five principal alternatives were evaluated: transfer for reuse (sale to BNF plc), no action, continued storage in Hanford upgraded or new facility, consolidation of DOE surplus acid, and processing the LSA nitric acid as waste. The transfer to BNF plc is the preferred alternative. From the analysis, it is concluded that the proposed disposition and transportation of the acid does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of NEPA; therefore an environmental impact statement is not required.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DOE Plutonium Disposition Study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document, Volume 1, presents a technical description of the various elements of the System 80 + Standard Plant Design upon which the Plutonium Disposition Study was based. The System 80 + Standard Design is fully developed and directly suited to meeting the mission objectives for plutonium disposal. The bass U0{sub 2} plant design is discussed here.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Study of plutonium disposition using existing GE advanced Boiling Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The end of the cold war and the resulting dismantlement of nuclear weapons has resulted in the need for the US to dispose of 50 to 100 metric tons of excess of plutonium in a safe and proliferation resistant manner. A number of studies, including the recently released National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study, have recommended conversion of plutonium into spent nuclear fuel with its high radiation barrier as the best means of providing permanent conversion and long-term diversion resistance to this material. The NAS study ``Management and Disposition of Excess Weapons Plutonium identified Light Water Reactor spent fuel as the most readily achievable and proven form for the disposition of excess weapons plutonium. The study also stressed the need for a US disposition program which would enhance the prospects for a timely reciprocal program agreement with Russia. This summary provides the key findings of a GE study where plutonium is converted into Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel and a typical 1155 MWe GE Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) is utilized to convert the plutonium to spent fuel. A companion study of the Advanced BWR has recently been submitted. The MOX core design work that was conducted for the ABWR enabled GE to apply comparable fuel design concepts and consequently achieve full MOX core loading which optimize plutonium throughput for existing BWRs.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Life cycle costs for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Projected constant dollar life cycle cost (LCC) estimates are presented for the domestic reactor-based plutonium disposition program being managed by the US Department of Energy Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE/MD). The scope of the LCC estimate includes: design, construction, licensing, operation, and deactivation of a mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility (FFF) that will be used to purify and convert weapons-derived plutonium oxides to MOX fuel pellets and fabricate MOX fuel bundles for use in commercial pressurized-water reactors (PWRs); fuel qualification activities and modification of facilities required for manufacture of lead assemblies that will be used to qualify and license this MOX fuel; and modification, licensing, and operation of commercial PWRs to allow irradiation of a partial core of MOX fuel in combination with low-enriched uranium fuel. The baseline cost elements used for this document are the same as those used for examination of the preferred sites described in the site-specific final environmental impact statement and in the DOE Record of Decision that will follow in late 1999. Cost data are separated by facilities, government accounting categories, contract phases, and expenditures anticipated by the various organizations who will participate in the program over a 20-year period. Total LCCs to DOE/MD are projected at approximately $1.4 billion for a 33-MT plutonium disposition mission.

Williams, K.A.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Safeguards and security requirements for weapons plutonium disposition in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper explores the issues surrounding the safeguarding of the plutonium disposition process in support of the United States nuclear weapons dismantlement program. It focuses on the disposition of the plutonium by burning mixed oxide fuel in light water reactors (LWR) and addresses physical protection, material control and accountability, personnel security and international safeguards. The S and S system needs to meet the requirements of the DOE Orders, NRC Regulations and international safeguards agreements. Experience has shown that incorporating S and S measures into early facility designs and integrating them into operations provides S and S that is more effective, more economical, and less intrusive. The plutonium disposition safeguards requirements with which the US has the least experience are the implementation of international safeguards on plutonium metal; the large scale commercialization of the mixed oxide fuel fabrication; and the transportation to and loading in the LWRs of fresh mixed oxide fuel. It is in these areas where the effort needs to be concentrated if the US is to develop safeguards and security systems that are effective and efficient.

Thomas, L.L.; Strait, R.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Fission Energy and Systems Safety Program

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of an alternate pathway for materials destined for disposition to WIPP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Los Alamos National Laboratory currently has an inventory of process residues that may be viable candidates for disposition to the Waste Isolation Pilot Project (WIPP) located at Carlsbad, New Mexico. A recent 'Attractiveness Level D' exemption allows for the discard of specified intractable materials regardless of the percent plutonium. However, the limits with respect to drum loadings must be met. Cementation is a key component of the aqueous nitrate flowsheet and serves as a 'bleed-off' stream for impurities separated from the plutonium during processing operations. The main 'feed' to the cementation operations are the 'bottoms' from the evaporation process. In the majority of cases, the cemented bottoms contain less than the allowed amount per drum for WIPP acceptance. This project would expand the route to WIPP for items that have no defined disposition path, are difficult to process, have been through multiple passes, have no current recovery operations available to recover the plutonium and that are amenable to cementation. This initial work will provide the foundation for a full scale disposition pathway of the candidate materials. Once the pathway has been expanded and a cementation matrix developed, routine discard activities will be initiated.

Ayers, Georgette Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mckerley, Bill [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veazey, Gerald W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ricketts, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

U.S. Crude Oil Supply & Disposition  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State OffshoreProduction Forecast- Analysis of Crude2009

223

Major Risk Factors Integrated Facility Disposition Project - Oak Ridge  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | DepartmentEnergyMagna: Product Capabilities D D e e p p a a r r t t m m

224

Major Risk Factors to the Integrated Facility Disposition Project |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | DepartmentEnergyMagna: Product Capabilities D D e e p p a a r r t t m

225

Disposition of nuclear waste using subcritical accelerator-driven systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spent fuel from nuclear power plants contains large quantities of Pu, other actinides, and fission products (FP). This creates challenges for permanent disposal because of the long half-lives of some isotopes and the potential for diversion of the fissile material. Two issues of concern for the US repository concept are: (1) long-term radiological risk peaking tens-of-thousands of years in the future; and (2) short-term thermal loading (decay heat) that limits capacity. An accelerator-driven neutron source can destroy actinides through fission, and can convert long-lived fission products to shorter-lived or stable isotopes. Studies over the past decade have established that accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW) can have a major beneficial impact on the nuclear waste problem. Specifically, the ATW concept the authors are evaluating: (1) destroys over 99.9% of the actinides; (2) destroys over 99.9% of the Tc and I; (3) separates Sr-90 and Cs-137; (4) separates uranium from the spent fuel; (5) produces electric power.

Venneri, F.; Li, N.; Williamson, M.; Houts, M.; Lawrence, G.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. Resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain oil fields located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP), determine if this system can reduce lift costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improved the economics. Three Phases of work have been defined in the DOE Form 4600.1 Notice of Financial Assistance Award for this project, in which the project objectives are to be attained through a joint venture between Enerdyne LLC (Enerdyne), owner and operator of the fields and Pumping Solutions Inc. (PSI), developer of the submersible pumping system. Upon analysis of the results of each Phase, the DOE will determine if the results justify the continuation of the project and approve the next Phase to proceed or terminate the project and request that the wells be plugged. This topical report shall provide the DOE with Phase I results and conclusions reached by Enerdyne and PSI.

Pat Fort; Don L. Hanosh

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Disposal R&D in the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign: A Discussion of Opportunities for Active International Collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For DOE's Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), international collaboration is a beneficial and cost-effective strategy for advancing disposal science with regards to multiple disposal options and different geologic environments. While the United States disposal program focused solely on Yucca Mountain tuff as host rock over the past decades, several international programs have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other geologic repository options, most of which are very different from the Yucca Mountain site in design and host rock characteristics. Because Yucca Mountain was so unique (e.g., no backfill, unsaturated densely fractured tuff), areas of direct collaboration with international disposal programs were quite limited during that time. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent fuel at Yucca Mountain has shifted UFDC's interest to disposal options and geologic environments similar to those being investigated by disposal programs in other nations. Much can be gained by close collaboration with these programs, including access to valuable experience and data collected over recent decades. Such collaboration can help to efficiently achieve UFDC's long-term goals of conducting 'experiments to fill data needs and confirm advanced modeling approaches' (by 2015) and of having a 'robust modeling and experimental basis for evaluation of multiple disposal system options' (by 2020). This report discusses selected opportunities of active international collaboration, with focus on both Natural Barrier System (NBS) and Engineered Barrier System (EBS) aspects and those opportunities that provide access to field data (and respective interpretation/modeling) or allow participation in ongoing field experiments. This discussion serves as a basis for the DOE/NE-53 and UFDC planning process for FY12 and beyond.

Birkholzer, J.T.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ANL-W MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement (EIS). This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. The DOE Office of fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD) has developed a dual-path strategy for disposition of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. One of the paths is to disposition surplus plutonium through irradiation of MOX fuel in commercial nuclear reactors. MOX fuel consists of plutonium and uranium oxides (PuO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2}), typically containing 95% or more UO{sub 2}. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. The paper describes the following: Site map and the LA facility; process descriptions; resource needs; employment requirements; wastes, emissions, and exposures; accident analysis; transportation; qualitative decontamination and decommissioning; post-irradiation examination; LA fuel bundle fabrication; LA EIS data report assumptions; and LA EIS data report supplement.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Modeling of CBM production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer movement at a field CO{sub 2} sequestration site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of carbon dioxide in unmineable coal seams is a potential technology mainly because of the potential for simultaneous enhanced coalbed methane production (ECBM). Several pilot tests have been performed around the globe leading to mixed results. Numerous modeling efforts have been carried out successfully to model methane production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Sensitivity analyses and history matching along with several optimization tools were used to estimate reservoir properties and to investigate reservoir performance. Geological and geophysical techniques have also been used to characterize field sequestration sites and to inspect reservoir heterogeneity. The fate and movement of injected CO{sub 2} can be determined by using several monitoring techniques. Monitoring of perfluorocarbon (PFC) tracers is one of these monitoring technologies. As a part of this monitoring technique, a small fraction of a traceable fluid is added to the injection wellhead along with the CO{sub 2} stream at different times to monitor the timing and location of the breakthrough in nearby monitoring wells or offset production wells. A reservoir modeling study was performed to simulate a pilot sequestration site located in the San Juan coal basin of northern New Mexico. Several unknown reservoir properties at the field site were estimated by modeling the coal seam as a dual porosity formation and by history matching the methane production and CO{sub 2} injection. In addition to reservoir modeling of methane production and CO{sub 2} injection, tracer injection was modeled. Tracers serve as a surrogate for determining potential leakage of CO{sub 2}. The tracer was modeled as a non-reactive gas and was injected into the reservoir as a mixture along with CO{sub 2}. Geologic and geometric details of the field site, numerical modeling details of methane production, CO{sub 2} injection, and tracer injection are presented in this paper. Moreover, the numerical predictions of the tracer arrival times were compared with the measured field data. Results show that tracer modeling is useful in investigating movement of injected CO{sub 2} into the coal seam at the field site. Also, such new modeling techniques can be utilized to determine potential leakage pathways, and to investigate reservoir anisotropy and heterogeneity.

Siriwardane, Hema J.; Bowes, Benjamin D.; Bromhal, Grant S.; Gondle, Raj K.; Wells, Arthur W.; Strazisar, Brian R.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAM JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Plan and schedule for disposition and regulatory compliance for miscellaneous streams. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On December 23, 1991, the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL) and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) agreed to adhere to the provisions of Department of Ecology Consent Order No. DE 91NM-177 (Consent Order). The Consent Order lists regulatory milestones for liquid effluent streams at the Hanford Site to comply with the permitting requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-216 (State Waste Discharge Permit Program) or WAC 173-218 (Washington Underground Injection Control Program) where applicable. Hanford Site liquid effluent streams discharging to the soil column have been categorized in the Consent Order as follows: Phase I Streams Phase II Streams Miscellaneous Streams. Phase I and Phase II Streams are addressed in two RL reports: {open_quotes}Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes} (DOE-RL 1987), and {open_quotes}Annual Status of the Report of the Plan and Schedule to Discontinue Disposal of Contaminated Liquids into the Soil Column at the Hanford Site{close_quotes}. Miscellaneous Streams are those liquid effluent streams discharged to the ground that are not categorized as Phase I or Phase II Streams. Miscellaneous Streams discharging to the soil column at the Hanford Site are subject to the requirements of several milestones identified in the Consent Order. This document provides a plan and schedule for the disposition of Miscellaneous Streams. The disposition process for the Miscellaneous Streams is facilitated using a decision tree format. The decision tree and corresponding analysis for determining appropriate disposition of these streams is presented in this document.

NONE

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

A preliminary analysis of the reactor-based plutonium disposition alternative deployment schedules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the preliminary analysis of the implementation schedules of the reactor-based plutonium disposition alternatives. These schedule analyses are a part of a larger process to examine the nine decision criteria used to determine the most appropriate method of disposing of U.S. surplus weapons plutonium. The preliminary analysis indicates that the mission durations for the reactor-based alternatives range from eleven years to eighteen years and the initial mission fuel assemblies containing surplus weapons-usable plutonium could be loaded into the reactors between nine and fourteen years after the Record of Decision.

Zurn, R.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 for the Integrated Salt Disposition Project (ISDP). This document reports partial results of the analyses of samples of Tank 21H. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 5 strategy are identified. Results of the analyses of the Tank 21H samples from this report in conjunction with the findings of the previous report, indicates that the material does not display any unusual characteristics.

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

234

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE'S H-CANYON FACILITY: IMPACTS OF FOREIGN OBLIGATIONS ON SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL DISPOSITION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US has a non-proliferation policy to receive foreign and domestic research reactor returns of spent fuel materials of US origin. These spent fuel materials are returned to the Department of Energy (DOE) and placed in storage in the L-area spent fuel basin at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The foreign research reactor returns fall subject to the 123 agreements for peaceful cooperation. These “123 agreements” are named after section 123 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and govern the conditions of nuclear cooperation with foreign partners. The SRS management of these foreign obligations while planning material disposition paths can be a challenge.

Magoulas, V.

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

235

DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES SUMMARY REPORT FOR WASTE DISPOSITION OF FY2004 ISRM INJECTION & MONITORING WELLS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this data quality objective (DQO) summary report is to develop a sampling plan for waste disposition of soil cuttings and other drilling-related wastes that will result from the drilling of 21 injection wells and one groundwater monitoring well west of the 184-D Powerhouse Ash Pit in the 100-D Area of the Hanford Site. The 21 In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) wells will inject treatment solutions to assist in intercepting and preventing the discharge of a hexavalent chromium plume to the Columbia River. The monitoring well will help establish groundwater chemistry downgradient of the ISRM zone. The proposed well locations are shown.

THOMAS, G.

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

236

DOE plutonium disposition study: Pu consumption in ALWRs. Volume 2, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Asea Brown Boveri-Combustion Engineering (ABB-CE) to provide information on the capability of ABB-CE`s System 80 + Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) to transform, through reactor burnup, 100 metric tonnes (MT) of weapons grade plutonium (Pu) into a form which is not readily useable in weapons. This information is being developed as part of DOE`s Plutonium Disposition Study, initiated by DOE in response to Congressional action. This document Volume 2, provides a discussion of: Plutonium Fuel Cycle; Technology Needs; Regulatory Considerations; Cost and Schedule Estimates; and Deployment Strategy.

Not Available

1993-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

237

,"U.S. Natural Gas Monthly Supply and Disposition Balance"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 103.Monthly","2/2015"Monthly Supply and Disposition

238

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 4; mid-continent aquifer gas storage reservoir. Volume 1. Topical report, January 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed reservoir characterization and numerical simulation study is presented for a mid-continent aquifer gas storage field. It is demonstrated that rate optimization during both injection and withdrawal cycles can significantly improve the performance of the storage reservoir. Performance improvements are realized in the form of a larger working volume of gas, a reduced cushion volume of gas, and decrease in field water production. By utilizing these reservoir management techniques gas storage operators will be able to minimize their base gas requirements, improve their economics, and determine whether the best use for a particular storage field is base loading or meeting peak day requirements. Volume I of this two-volume set contains a detailed technical discussion.

Hower, T.L.; Obernyer, S.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The Nuclear Material Focus Area Roadmapping Process Utilizing Environmental Management Complex-Wide Nuclear Material Disposition Pathways  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes the process that the Nuclear Materials Focus Area (NMFA) has developed and utilizes in working with individual Department of Energy (DOE) sites to identify, address, and prioritize research and development efforts in the stabilization, disposition, and storage of nuclear materials. By associating site technology needs with nuclear disposition pathways and integrating those with site schedules, the NMFA is developing a complex wide roadmap for nuclear material technology development. This approach will leverage technology needs and opportunities at multiple sites and assist the NMFA in building a defensible research and development program to address the nuclear material technology needs across the complex.

Sala, D. R.; Furhman, P.; Smith, J. D.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

240

Implementation of safeguards and security for fissile materials disposition reactor alternative facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of different disposition alternatives are being considered and include facilities which provide for long-ten-n and interim storage, convert and stabilize fissile materials for other disposition alternatives, immobilize fissile material in glass and/or ceramic material, fabricate fissile material into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for reactors, use reactor based technologies to convert material into spent fuel, and dispose of fissile material using a number of geologic alternatives. Particular attention will be given to the reactor alternatives which include existing, partially completed, advanced or evolutionary LWRs and CANDU reactors. The various reactor alternatives are all very similar and include processing which converts Pu to a usable form for fuel fabrication, a MOX fuel fab facility located in either the US or in Europe, US LWRs or the CANDU reactors and ultimate disposal of spent fuel in a geologic repository. This paper focuses on how the objectives of reducing security risks and strengthening arms reduction and nonproliferation will be accomplished and the possible impacts of meeting these objectives on facility operations and design. Some of the areas in this paper include: (1) domestic and international safeguards requirements, (2) non-proliferation criteria and measures, (3) the threat, and (4) potential proliferation risks, the impacts on the facilities, and safeguards and security issues unique to the presence of Category 1 or strategic special nuclear material.

Jaeger, C.D.; Duggan, R.A.; Tolk, K.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 4 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H to qualify them for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 4 processing. All sample results agree with expectations based on prior analyses where available. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 4 strategy are identified. This revision includes additional data points that were not available in the original issue of the document, such as additional plutonium results, the results of the monosodium titanate (MST) sorption test and the extraction, scrub strip (ESS) test. This report covers the revision to the Tank 21H qualification sample results for Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 4 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). A previous document covers initial characterization which includes results for a number of non-radiological analytes. These results were used to perform aluminum solubility modeling to determine the hydroxide needs for Salt Batch 4 to prevent the precipitation of solids. Sodium hydroxide was then added to Tank 21 and additional samples were pulled for the analyses discussed in this report. This work was specified by Task Technical Request and by Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP).

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2011-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

242

Optimization and implementation study of plutonium disposition using existing CANDU Reactors. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since early 1994, the Department of Energy has been sponsoring studies aimed at evaluating the merits of disposing of surplus US weapons plutonium as Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in existing commercial Canadian Pressurized Heavy Water reactors, known as CANDU`s. The first report, submitted to DOE in July, 1994 (the 1994 Executive Summary is attached), identified practical and safe options for the consumption of 50 to 100 tons of plutonium in 25 years in some of the existing CANDU reactors operating the Bruce A generating station, on Lake Huron, about 300 km north east of Detroit. By designing the fuel and nuclear performance to operate within existing experience and operating/performance envelope, and by utilizing existing fuel fabrication and transportation facilities and methods, a low cost, low risk method for long term plutonium disposition was developed. In December, 1995, in response to evolving Mission Requirements, the DOE requested a further study of the CANDU option with emphasis on more rapid disposition of the plutonium, and retaining the early start and low risk features of the earlier work. This report is the result of that additional work.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

DOE standard: Integration of environment, safety, and health into facility disposition activities. Volume 1: Technical standard  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Department of Energy (DOE) technical standard (referred to as the Standard) provides guidance for integrating and enhancing worker, public, and environmental protection during facility disposition activities. It provides environment, safety, and health (ES and H) guidance to supplement the project management requirements and associated guidelines contained within DOE O 430.1A, Life-Cycle Asset Management (LCAM), and amplified within the corresponding implementation guides. In addition, the Standard is designed to support an Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), consistent with the guiding principles and core functions contained in DOE P 450.4, Safety Management System Policy, and discussed in DOE G 450.4-1, Integrated Safety Management System Guide. The ISMS guiding principles represent the fundamental policies that guide the safe accomplishment of work and include: (1) line management responsibility for safety; (2) clear roles and responsibilities; (3) competence commensurate with responsibilities; (4) balanced priorities; (5) identification of safety standards and requirements; (6) hazard controls tailored to work being performed; and (7) operations authorization. This Standard specifically addresses the implementation of the above ISMS principles four through seven, as applied to facility disposition activities.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Disposition of Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators Currently Located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory - 12232  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded SEC Federal Services Corporation (SEC) a 34-building demolition and disposal (D and D) project at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) that included the disposition of six Strontium (Sr-90) powered Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) stored outside of ORNL Building 3517. Disposition of the RTGs is very complex both in terms of complying with disposal facility waste acceptance criteria (WAC) and U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) requirements for packaging and transportation in commerce. Two of the RTGs contain elemental mercury which requires them to be Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) compliant prior to disposal. In addition, all of the RTGs exceed the Class C waste concentration limits under Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Waste Classification Guidelines. In order to meet the LDR requirements and Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) WAC, a site specific treatability variance for mercury was submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow macro-encapsulation to be an acceptable treatment standard for elemental mercury. By identifying and confirming the design configuration of the mercury containing RTGs, the SEC team proved that the current configuration met the macro-encapsulation standard of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 268.45. The SEC Team also worked with NNSS to demonstrate that all radioisotope considerations are compliant with the NNSS low-level waste (LLW) disposal facility performance assessment and WAC. Lastly, the SEC team determined that the GE2000 Type B cask met the necessary size, weight, and thermal loading requirements for five of the six RTGs. The sixth RTG (BUP-500) required a one-time DOT shipment exemption request due to the RTG's large size. The DOT exemption justification for the BUP-500 relies on the inherent robust construction and material make-up of the BUP- 500 RTG. DOE-ORO, SEC, and the entire SEC RTG team are nearing the conclusion of the Sr-90 RTG disposition challenge - a legacy now 50 years in the making. Over 600,000 Ci of Sr-90 waste await disposal and its removal from ORNL will mark an historical moment in the clean-up of the cold-war legacy in the ORNL central industrial area. Elimination (i.e., removal) of the RTGs will reduce security risks at ORNL and disposal will permanently eliminate security risks. The RTGs will eventually decay to benign levels within a reasonable timeframe relative to radiological risks posed by long-lived isotopes. The safety authorization basis at ORNL Building 3517 will be reduced enabling greater operational flexibility in future clean-out and D and D campaigns. Upon disposition the Department of Energy will realize reduced direct and indirect surveillance and maintenance costs that can be reapplied to accelerated and enhanced clean-up of the Oak Ridge Reservation. At present, waste profiles for the RTGs are developed and under review by NNSS RWAP staff and approval authorities. Disposition schedule is driven by the availability of compliant shipping casks necessary to safely transport the RTGs from ORNL to NNSS. The first disposal of the RCA RTG is expected in April 2012 and the remaining RTGs disposed in 2012 and 2013. (authors)

Glenn, J. [U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge Operations Office, 200 Administrative Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Patterson, J.; DeRoos, K. [SEC Federal Services Corporation (SEC), 2800 Solway Road, Knoxville, TN 37931 (United States); Patterson, J.E.; Mitchell, K.G. [Strata-G, LLC, 2027 Castaic Lane, Knoxville, TN 37932 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Verification and Validation Strategy for Implementation of Hybrid Potts-Phase Field Hydride Modeling Capability in MBM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) program has initiated a project to develop a hydride formation modeling tool using a hybrid Potts­phase field approach. The Potts model is incorporated in the SPPARKS code from Sandia National Laboratories. The phase field model is provided through MARMOT from Idaho National Laboratory.

Jason D. Hales; Veena Tikare

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production Networks in the field of Microsystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A cooperation model and demand-oriented ICT Infrastructure for SME Development and Production of Small Medium Enterprises (SME) in this branch refers to organizational issues, arising from the specific SME´s lack of sufficient human resources and an effective management of cross company knowledge about

Boyer, Edmond

247

End of FY10 report - used fuel disposition technical bases and lessons learned : legal and regulatory framework for high-level waste disposition in the United States.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report examines the current policy, legal, and regulatory framework pertaining to used nuclear fuel and high level waste management in the United States. The goal is to identify potential changes that if made could add flexibility and possibly improve the chances of successfully implementing technical aspects of a nuclear waste policy. Experience suggests that the regulatory framework should be established prior to initiating future repository development. Concerning specifics of the regulatory framework, reasonable expectation as the standard of proof was successfully implemented and could be retained in the future; yet, the current classification system for radioactive waste, including hazardous constituents, warrants reexamination. Whether or not consideration of multiple sites are considered simultaneously in the future, inclusion of mechanisms such as deliberate use of performance assessment to manage site characterization would be wise. Because of experience gained here and abroad, diversity of geologic media is not particularly necessary as a criterion in site selection guidelines for multiple sites. Stepwise development of the repository program that includes flexibility also warrants serious consideration. Furthermore, integration of the waste management system from storage, transportation, and disposition, should be examined and would be facilitated by integration of the legal and regulatory framework. Finally, in order to enhance acceptability of future repository development, the national policy should be cognizant of those policy and technical attributes that enhance initial acceptance, and those policy and technical attributes that maintain and broaden credibility.

Weiner, Ruth F.; Blink, James A. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Rechard, Robert Paul; Perry, Frank (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C. (University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK); Carter, Joe (Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, Aiken, SC); Nutt, Mark (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Cotton, Tom (Complex Systems Group, Washington DC)

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green River Locks and Dams 3, 4, 5, 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 Disposition, Kentucky 16 September 2014 ABSTRACT: Green River Locks and Dams 3 through 6 and Barren River Lock and Dam 1 were. The Green River Locks and Dams 5 and 6 ceased operations in 1951 due to a marked decline in navigation

US Army Corps of Engineers

249

A little here, a little there, a fairly big problem everywhere: Small quantity site transuranic waste disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound Laboratory. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

D. Luke; D. Parker; J. Moss; T. Monk (INEEL); L. Fritz (DOE-ID); B. Daugherty (SRS); K. Hladek (WM Federal Services Hanford); S. Kosiewicx (LANL)

2000-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Little Here, A Little There, A Fairly Big Problem Everywhere: Small Quantity Site Transuranic Waste Disposition Alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste represent a significant challenge to the waste disposition and facility closure plans of several sites in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. This paper presents the results of a series of evaluations, using a systems engineering approach, to identify the preferred alternative for dispositioning TRU waste from small quantity sites (SQSs). The TRU waste disposition alternatives evaluation used semi-quantitative data provided by the SQSs, potential receiving sites, and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to select and recommend candidate sites for waste receipt, interim storage, processing, and preparation for final disposition of contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH) TRU waste. The evaluations of only four of these SQSs resulted in potential savings to the taxpayer of $33 million to $81 million, depending on whether mobile systems could be used to characterize, package, and certify the waste or whether each site would be required to perform this work. Small quantity shipping sites included in the evaluation included the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL), University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), and Mound. Candidate receiving sites included the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), the Savannah River Site (SRS), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge (OR), and Hanford. At least 14 additional DOE sites having TRU waste may be able to save significant money if cost savings are similar to the four evaluated thus far.

Luke, Dale Elden; Parker, Douglas Wayne; Moss, J.; Monk, Thomas Hugh; Fritz, Lori Lee; Daugherty, B.; Hladek, K.; Kosiewicx, S.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sample results from the integrated salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualifications MST solids sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

Peters, T. B.

2013-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

A Roadmap and Discussion of Issues for Physics Analyses Required to Support Plutonium Disposition in VVER-1000 Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the physics analyses that must be performed to successfully disposition weapons-usable plutonium in VVER-1000 reactors in the Russian Federation. The report is a document to support programmatic and financial planning. It does not include documentation of the technical procedures by which physics analyses are performed, nor are the results of any analyses included.

Primm, R.T.; Drischler, J.D.; Pavlovichev, A.M. Styrine, Y.A.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Production management teachniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 3. Offshore gulf coast normally pressured, dry gas reservoir. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoir, the study conducted on an offshore, normally pressured, dry gas reservoir is reported. The strategies that were particularly effective in increasing both the ultimate recovery and the net present value of the field are high volume water production from strategically located downdip wells and the recompletion of an upstructure well to recover trapped attic gas. High volume water production lowered the average reservoir pressure, which liberated residual gas trapped in the invaded region. Recompleting a new well into the reservoir also lowered the pressure and improved the volumetric displacement efficiency by recovering trapped attic gas. Ultimate recovery is predicted to increase 5-12% of the original gas-in-place.

Hower, T.L.; Uttley, S.J.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

LANL MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. LANL has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. This includes receipt and storage of PuO{sub 2} powder, fabrication of MOX fuel pellets, assembly of fuel rods and bundles, and shipping of the packaged fuel to a commercial reactor site. Support activities will take place within both Category 1 and 2 areas. Technical Area (TA) 55/Plutonium Facility 4 will be used to store the bulk PuO{sub 2} powder, fabricate MOX fuel pellets, assemble rods, and store fuel bundles. Bundles will be assembled at a separate facility, several of which have been identified as suitable for that activity. The Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Building (at TA-3) will be used for analytical chemistry support. Waste operations will be conducted in TA-50 and TA-54. Only very minor modifications will be needed to accommodate the LA program. These modifications consist mostly of minor equipment upgrades. A commercial reactor operator has not been identified for the LA irradiation. Postirradiation examination (PIE) of the irradiated fuel will take place at either Oak Ridge National Laboratory or ANL-W. The only modifications required at either PIE site would be to accommodate full-length irradiated fuel rods. Results from this program are critical to the overall plutonium distribution schedule.

Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R.; Ludwig, S.B. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Hanford MOX fuel lead assemblies data report for the surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to support the US Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Program`s preparation of the draft surplus plutonium disposition environmental impact statement. This is one of several responses to data call requests for background information on activities associated with the operation of the lead assembly (LA) mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication facility. DOE-MD requested that the DOE Site Operations Offices nominate DOE sites that meet established minimum requirements that could produce MOX LAs. Six initial site combinations were proposed: (1) Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) with support from Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), (2) Hanford, (3) Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) with support from Pantex, (4) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), (5) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), and (6) Savannah River Site (SRS). After further analysis by the sites and DOE-MD, five site combinations were established as possible candidates for producing MOX LAs: (1) ANL-W with support from INEEL, (2) Hanford, (3) LANL, (4) LLNL, and (5) SRS. Hanford has proposed an LA MOX fuel fabrication approach that would be done entirely inside an S and S Category 1 area. An alternate approach would allow fabrication of fuel pellets and assembly of fuel rods in an S and S Category 1 facility. In all, a total of three LA MOX fuel fabrication options were identified by Hanford that could accommodate the program. In every case, only minor modification would be required to ready any of the facilities to accept the equipment necessary to accomplish the LA program.

O`Connor, D.G.; Fisher, S.E.; Holdaway, R. [and others

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Engineering evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of Niagara Falls Storage Site, its residues and wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final disposition scenarios selected by DOE for assessment in this document are consistent with those stated in the Notice of Intent to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) (DOE, 1983d) and the modifications to the alternatives resulting from the public scoping process. The scenarios are: take no action beyond interim remedial measures other than maintenance and surveillance of the NFSS; retain and manage the NFSS as a long-term waste management facility for the wastes and residues on the site; decontaminate, certify, and release the NFSS for other use, with long-term management of the wastes and residues at other DOE sites; and partially decontaminate the NFSS by removal and transport off site of only the more radioactive residues, and upgrade containment of the remaining wastes and residues on site. The objective of this document is to present to DOE the conceptual engineering, occupational radiation exposure, construction schedule, maintenance and surveillance requirements, and cost information relevant to design and implementation of each of the four scenarios. The specific alternatives within each scenario used as the basis for discussion in this document were evaluated on the bases of engineering considerations, technical feasibility, and regulatory requirements. Selected alternatives determined to be acceptable for each of the four final disposition scenarios for the NFSS were approved by DOE to be assessed and costed in this document. These alternatives are also the subject of the EIS for the NFSS currently being prepared by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). 40 figures, 38 tables.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Idaho High-Level Waste & Facilities Disposition, Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This EIS analyzes the potential environmental consequences of alternatives for managing high-level waste (HLW) calcine, mixed transuranic waste/sodium bearing waste (SBW) and newly generated liquid waste at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) in liquid and solid forms. This EIS also analyzes alternatives for the final disposition of HLW management facilities at the INEEL after their missions are completed. After considering comments on the Draft EIS (DOE/EIS-0287D), as well as information on available treatment technologies, DOE and the State of Idaho have identified separate preferred alternatives for waste treatment. DOE's preferred alternative for waste treatment is performance based with the focus on placing the wastes in forms suitable for disposal. Technologies available to meet the performance objectives may be chosen from the action alternatives analyzed in this EIS. The State of Idaho's Preferred Alternative for treating mixed transuranic waste/SBW and calcine is vitrification, with or without calcine separations. Under both the DOE and State of Idaho preferred alternatives, newly generated liquid waste would be segregated after 2005, stored or treated directly and disposed of as low-level, mixed low-level, or transuranic waste depending on its characteristics. The objective of each preferred alternative is to enable compliance with the legal requirement to have INEEL HLW road ready by a target date of 2035. Both DOE and the State of Idaho have identified the same preferred alternative for facilities disposition, which is to use performance-based closure methods for existing facilities and to design new facilities consistent with clean closure methods.

N /A

2002-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

258

Measurements of actinide-fission product yields in Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactor fission neutron fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the 1970's and early 1980's, an experimental program was performed on the facilities of the CEA Valduc Research Center to measure several actinide-fission product yields. Experiments were, in particular, completed on the Caliban and Prospero metallic core reactors to study fission-neutron-induced reactions on {sup 233}U, {sup 235}U, and {sup 239}Pu. Thick actinide samples were irradiated and the number of nuclei of each fission product was determined by gamma spectrometry. Fission chambers were irradiated simultaneously to measure the numbers of fissions in thin deposits of the same actinides. The masses of the thick samples and the thin deposits were determined by mass spectrometry and alpha spectrometry. The results of these experiments will be fully presented in this paper for the first time. A description of the Caliban and Prospero reactors, their characteristics and performances, and explanations about the experimental approach will also be given in the article. A recent work has been completed to analyze and reinterpret these measurements and particularly to evaluate the associated uncertainties. In this context, calculations have also been carried out with the Monte Carlo transport code Tripoli-4, using the published benchmarked Caliban description and a three-dimensional model of Prospero, to determine the average neutron energy causing fission. Simulation results will be discussed in this paper. Finally, new fission yield measurements will be proposed on Caliban and Prospero reactors to strengthen the results of the first experiments. (authors)

Casoli, P.; Authier, N. [CEA, Centre de Valduc, 21120 Is-sur-Tille (France); Laurec, J.; Bauge, E.; Granier, T. [CEA, Centre DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Annual report, March 30, 1995--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to increase heavy oil reserves in a portion of the Wilmington Oil Field, near Long Beach, California, by implementing advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Based on the knowledge and experience gained with this project, these technologies are intended to be extended to other sections of the Wilmington Oil Field, and, through technology transfer, will be available to increase heavy oil reserves in other slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs. The project involves implementing thermal recovery in the southern half of the Fault Block II-A Tar zone. The existing steamflood in Fault Block II-A has been relatively inefficient due to several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. A suite of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies are being applied during the project to improve oil recovery efficiency and reduce operating costs.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

DOE plutonium disposition study: Analysis of existing ABB-CE Light Water Reactors for the disposition of weapons-grade plutonium. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core reactivity and basic fuel management calculations were conducted on the selected reactors (with emphasis on the System 80 units as being the most desirable choice). Methods used were identical to those reported in the Evolutionary Reactor Report. From these calculations, the basic mission capability was assessed. The selected reactors were studied for modification, such as the addition of control rod nozzles to increase rod worth, and internals and control system modifications that might also be needed. Other system modifications studied included the use of enriched boric acid as soluble poison, and examination of the fuel pool capacities. The basic geometry and mechanical characteristics, materials and fabrication techniques of the fuel assemblies for the selected existing reactors are the same as for System 80+. There will be some differences in plutonium loading, according to the ability of the reactors to load MOX fuel. These differences are not expected to affect licensability or EPA requirements. Therefore, the fuel technology and fuel qualification sections provided in the Evolutionary Reactor Report apply to the existing reactors. An additional factor, in that the existing reactor availability presupposes the use of that reactor for the irradiation of Lead Test Assemblies, is discussed. The reactor operating and facility licenses for the operating plants were reviewed. Licensing strategies for each selected reactor were identified. The spent fuel pool for the selected reactors (Palo Verde) was reviewed for capacity and upgrade requirements. Reactor waste streams were identified and assessed in comparison to uranium fuel operations. Cost assessments and schedules for converting to plutonium disposition were estimated for some of the major modification items. Economic factors (incremental costs associated with using weapons plutonium) were listed and where possible under the scope of work, estimates were made.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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261

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Comparative laboratory selection and field testing of polymers for selective control of water production in gas wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intensive comparative feasibility studies were performed in different laboratories in order to select the most promising polymer based technology for water control in gas production and storage wells exhibiting low matrix permeability, high temperature and high produced brine salinity. Core flow experiments performed under reservoir conditions with different commercially available chemical systems have pointed to the superiority of two relatively low-molecular-weight vinyl sulfonated/vinyl amide/acrylamide terpolymers over other polymers to decrease selectively and effectively the water permeability without affecting the gas flow. These polymers have excellent compatibility with all types of reservoir brines and good thermal stability up to 150 C. Furthermore, because of their high shear resistance, and excellent injectability even in low permeability cores, solutions of these polymers can be pumped at high injection rates with a moderate wellhead pressure.

Ranjbar, M. [Technical Univ., Clausthal (Germany); Czolbe, P. [DBI-GUT, Freiberg (Germany); Kohler, N. [IFP, Rueil-Malmaison (France)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Using Cable Suspended Submersible Pumps to Reduce Production Costs to Increase Ultimate Recovery in the Red Mountain Field of the San Juan Basin Region  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells, installing cable suspended submersible pumps ( Phase I ) and operating the oil field for approximately one year ( Phase II ). Upon the completion of Phases I and II ( Budget Period I ), Enerdyne LLC commenced work on Phase III which required additional drilling in an attempt to improve field economics ( Budget Period II ). The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for the two Budget Periods, of the Agreement, was $1,205,008.00 as detailed in Phase I, II & III Authorization for Expenditures (AFE). This report describes tasks performed and results experienced by Enerdyne LLC during the three phases of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Class III Mid-Term Project, "Increasing Heavy Oil Reserves in the Wilmington Oil Field Through Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Thermal Production Technologies"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this project was to increase heavy oil reserves in slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoirs through the application of advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The project involved improving thermal recovery techniques in the Tar Zone of Fault Blocks II-A and V (Tar II-A and Tar V) of the Wilmington Field in Los Angeles County, near Long Beach, California. A primary objective has been to transfer technology that can be applied in other heavy oil formations of the Wilmington Field and other SBC reservoirs, including those under waterflood. The first budget period addressed several producibility problems in the Tar II-A and Tar V thermal recovery operations that are common in SBC reservoirs. A few of the advanced technologies developed include a three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic geologic model, a 3-D deterministic thermal reservoir simulation model to aid in reservoir management and subsequent post-steamflood development work, and a detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rocks and fluids. State of the art operational work included drilling and performing a pilot steam injection and production project via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors), implementing a hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steamflood area to improve thermal efficiency, installing a 2400-foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location, testing a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems, and starting on an advanced reservoir management system through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation. The second budget period phase (BP2) continued to implement state-of-the-art operational work to optimize thermal recovery processes, improve well drilling and completion practices, and evaluate the geomechanical characteristics of the producing formations. The objectives were to further improve reservoir characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, test the proficiency of the three-dimensional geologic and thermal reservoir simulation models, identify the high permeability thief zones to reduce water breakthrough and cycling, and analyze the nonuniform distribution of the remaining oil in place. This work resulted in the redevelopment of the Tar II-A and Tar V post-steamflood projects by drilling several new wells and converting idle wells to improve injection sweep efficiency and more effectively drain the remaining oil reserves. Reservoir management work included reducing water cuts, maintaining or increasing oil production, and evaluating and minimizing further thermal-related formation compaction. The BP2 project utilized all the tools and knowledge gained throughout the DOE project to maximize recovery of the oil in place.

Scott Hara

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD IN SAN JUAN BASIN REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A joint venture between Enerdyne LLC, a small independent oil and gas producer, and Pumping Solutions Inc., developer of a low volume electric submersible pump, suspended from a cable, both based in Albuquerque, New Mexico, has re-established marginal oil production from the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in the San Juan Basin, New Mexico by working over 17 existing wells and installing submersible pumps. The project was funded through a cooperative 50% cost sharing agreement between Enerdyne LLC and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), United States Department of Energy, executed on April 16, 2003. The total estimated cost for this first phase of the agreement was $386,385.00 as detailed in Phase I Authorization For Expenditure (AFE). This report describes the tasks performed, the results, and conclusions for the first phase (Phase I) of the cooperative agreement.

Don L. Hanosh

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

SAMPLE RESULTS FROM THE INTEGRATED SALT DISPOSITION PROGRAM MACROBATCH 5 TANK 21H QUALIFICATION MST, ESS AND PODD SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 5 processing. This qualification material was a composite created from recent samples from Tank 21H and archived samples from Tank 49H to match the projected blend from these two tanks. Additionally, samples of the composite were used in the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and extraction-scrub-strip (ESS) tests. ARP and ESS test results met expectations. A sample from Tank 21H was also analyzed for the Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) requirements. SRNL was able to meet all of the requirements, including the desired detection limits for all the PODD analytes. This report details the results of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP), Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) and Performance Objectives Demonstration Document (PODD) samples of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 5 of the Integrated Salt Disposition Program (ISDP).

Peters, T.; Fink, S.

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

269

The Effects of Music-Mathematics Integrated Curriculum and Instruction on Elementary Students’ Mathematics Achievement and Dispositions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECTS OF MUSIC-MATHEMATICS INTEGRATED CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION ON ELEMENTARY STUDENTS? MATHEMATICS ACHIEVEMENT AND DISPOSITIONS A Dissertation by SONG AN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE EFFECTS OF MUSIC-MATHEMATICS INTEGRATED CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION ON ELEMENTARY STUDENTS...

An, Song

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Evaluation of Udder Conformation, Weight, Body Condition, Reproduction, Disposition, and Calf Growth in Bos indicus – Bos taurus Cows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Condition, Reproduction, Disposition, and Calf Growth in Bos indicus ? Bos taurus Cows. (August 2011) Aaron Jay Cooper, B.S., Texas A&M University; M.S., University of Nebraska-Lincoln Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. James O. Sanders Data were... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2011 Major Subject: Animal Breeding Evaluation of Udder Conformation, Weight, Body...

Cooper, Aaron Jay

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

271

Evaluation of Possible Surrogates for Validation of the Oxidation Furnace for the Plutonium Disposition Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plutonium Disposition project (PuD) is considering an alternative furnace design for direct metal oxidation (DMO) of plutonium metal to use as a feed for potential disposition routes. The proposed design will use a retort to oxidize the feed at temperatures up to 500 C. The atmosphere will be controlled using a metered mixture of oxygen, helium and argon to control the oxidation at approximately 400 torr. Since plutonium melts at 664 C, and may potentially react with retort material to form a lower melting point eutectic, the oxidation process will be controlled by metering the flow of oxygen to ensure that the bulk temperature of the material does not exceed this temperature. A batch processing time of <24 hours is desirable to meet anticipated furnace throughput requirements. The design project includes demonstration of concept in a small-scale demonstration test (i.e., small scale) and validation of design in a full-scale test. These tests are recommended to be performed using Pu surrogates due to challenges in consideration of the nature of plutonium and operational constraints required when handling large quantities of accountable material. The potential for spreading contamination and exposing workers to harmful levels of cumulative radioactive dose are motivation to utilize non-radioactive surrogates. Once the design is demonstrated and optimized, implementation would take place in a facility designed to accommodate these constraints. Until then, the use of surrogates would be a safer, less expensive option for the validation phase of the project. This report examines the potential for use of surrogates in the demonstration and validation of the DMO furnace for PuD. This report provides a compilation of the technical information and process requirements for the conversion of plutonium metal to oxide by burning in dry environments. Several potential surrogates were evaluated by various criteria in order to select a suitable candidate for large scale demonstration. First, the structure of the plutonium metal/oxide interface was compared to potential surrogates. Second the data for plutonium oxidation kinetics were reviewed and rates for oxidation were compared with surrogates. The criteria used as a basis for recommendation was selected in order to provide a reasonable oxidation rate during the validation phase. Several reference documents were reviewed and used to compile the information in this report. Since oxidation of large monolithic pieces of plutonium in 75% oxygen is the preferable oxidizing atmosphere for the intended process, this report does not focus on the oxidation of powders, but focuses instead on larger samples in flowing gas.

Duncan, A.

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Supplement Analysis for the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In October 2002, DOE issued the Idaho High-Level Waste and Facilities Disposition Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) (DOE 2002) that provided an analysis of the potential environmental consequences of alternatives/options for the management and disposition of Sodium Bearing Waste (SBW), High-Level Waste (HL W) calcine, and HLW facilities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), now known as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and referred to hereafter as the Idaho Site. Subsequent to the issuance of the Final EIS, DOE included the requirement for treatment of SBW in the Request for Proposals for Environmental Management activities on the Idaho Site. The new Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP) Contractor identified Steam Reforming as their proposed method to treat SBW; a method analyzed in the Final EIS as an option to treat SBW. The proposed Steam Reforming process for SBW is the same as in the Final EIS for retrieval, treatment process, waste form and transportation for disposal. In addition, DOE has updated the characterization data for both the HLW Calcine (BBWI 2005a) and SBW (BBWI 2004 and BBWI 2005b) and identified two areas where new calculation methods are being used to determine health and safety impacts. Because of those changes, DOE has prepared this supplement analysis to determine whether there are ''substantial changes in the proposed action that are relevant to environmental concerns'' or ''significant new circumstances or information'' within the meaning of the Council of Environmental Quality and DOE National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Regulations (40 CFR 1502.9 (c) and 10 CFR 1021.314) that would require preparation of a Supplemental EIS. Specifically, this analysis is intended to determine if: (1) the Steam Reforming Option identified in the Final EIS adequately bounds impacts from the Steam Reforming Process proposed by the new ICP Contractor using the new characterization data, (2) the new characterization data is significantly different than the data presented in the Final EIS, (3) the new calculation methods present a significant change to the impacts described in the Final EIS, and (4) would the updated characterization data cause significant changes in the environmental impacts for the action alternatives/options presented in the Final EIS. There are no other aspects of the Final EIS that require additional review because DOE has not identified any additional new significant circumstances or information that would warrant such a review.

N /A

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

273

Increasing heavy oil reservers in the Wilmington oil Field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies, technical progress report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project involves improving thermal recovery techniques in a slope and basin clastic (SBC) reservoir in the Wilmington field, Los Angeles Co., Calif. using advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. The existing steamflood in the Tar zone of Fault Block (FB) 11-A has been relatively inefficient because of several producibility problems which are common in SBC reservoirs. Inadequate characterization of the heterogeneous turbidite sands, high permeability thief zones, low gravity oil, and nonuniform distribution of remaining oil have all contributed to poor sweep efficiency, high steam-oil ratios, and early steam breakthrough. Operational problems related to steam breakthrough, high reservoir pressure, and unconsolidated formation sands have caused premature well and downhole equipment failures. In aggregate, these reservoir and operational constraints have resulted in increased operating costs and decreased recoverable reserves. The advanced technologies to be applied include: (1) Develop three-dimensional (3-D) deterministic and stochastic geologic models. (2) Develop 3-D deterministic and stochastic thermal reservoir simulation models to aid in reservoir management and subsequent development work. (3) Develop computerized 3-D visualizations of the geologic and reservoir simulation models to aid in analysis. (4) Perform detailed study on the geochemical interactions between the steam and the formation rock and fluids. (5) Pilot steam injection and production via four new horizontal wells (2 producers and 2 injectors). (6) Hot water alternating steam (WAS) drive pilot in the existing steam drive area to improve thermal efficiency. (7) Installing a 2100 foot insulated, subsurface harbor channel crossing to supply steam to an island location. (8) Test a novel alkaline steam completion technique to control well sanding problems and fluid entry profiles. (9) Advanced reservoir management through computer-aided access to production and geologic data to integrate reservoir characterization, engineering, monitoring, and evaluation.

Hara, S. [Tidelands Oil Production Co., Long Beach, CA (United States)], Casteel, J. [USDOE Bartlesville Project Office, OK (United States)

1997-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

Lessons Learned from Three Mile Island Packaging, Transportation and Disposition that Apply to Fukushima Daiichi Recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the massive earthquake and resulting tsunami damage in March of 2011 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, interest was amplified for what was done for recovery at the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) in the United States following its meltdown in 1979. Many parallels could be drawn between to two accidents. This paper presents the results of research done into the TMI-2 recovery effort and its applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi cleanup. This research focused on three topics: packaging, transportation, and disposition. This research work was performed as a collaboration between Japan’s Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Hundreds of TMI-2 related documents were searched and pertinent information was gleaned from these documents. Other important information was also obtained by interviewing employees who were involved first hand in various aspects of the TMI-2 cleanup effort. This paper is organized into three main sections: (1) Transport from Three Mile Island to Central Facilities Area at INL, (2) Transport from INL Central Receiving Facility to INL Test Area North (TAN) and wet storage at TAN, and (3) Transport from TAN to INL Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) and Dry Storage at INTEC. Within each of these sections, lessons learned from performing recovery activities are presented and their applicability to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant cleanup are outlined.

Layne Pincock; Wendell Hintze; Dr. Koji Shirai

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Disposition of plutonium as non-fertile fuel for water reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The original intent of this project was to investigate the possible use of a new fuel form as a means of dispositioning the declared surplus inventory of weapons-grade plutonium. The focus soon changed, however, to managing the larger and rapidly growing inventories of plutonium arising in commercial spent nuclear fuel through implementation of a new fuel form in existing nuclear reactors. LANL embarked on a parallel path effort to study fuel performance using advanced physics codes, while also demonstrating the ability to fabricate a new fuel form using standard processes in LANL's Plutonium Facility. An evolutionary fuel form was also examined which could provide enhanced performance over standard fuel forms, but which could be implemented in a much shorter time frame than a completely new fuel form. Recent efforts have focused on implementation of results into global energy models and development of follow-on funding to continue this research.

Chidester, K.; Eaton, S.L.; Ramsey, K.B.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Transportable Vitrification System RCRA Closure Practical Waste Disposition Saves Time And Money  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Transportable Vitrification System (TVS) was a large-scale vitrification system for the treatment of mixed wastes. The wastes contained both hazardous and radioactive materials in the form of sludge, soil, and ash. The TVS was developed to be moved to various United States Department of Energy (DOE) facilities to vitrify mixed waste as needed. The TVS consists of four primary modules: (1) Waste and Additive Materials Processing Module; (2) Melter Module; (3) Emissions Control Module; and (4) Control and Services Module. The TVS was demonstrated at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) during September and October of 1997. During this period, approximately 16,000 pounds of actual mixed waste was processed, producing over 17,000 pounds of glass. After the demonstration was complete it was determined that it was more expensive to use the TVS unit to treat and dispose of mixed waste than to direct bury this waste in Utah permitted facility. Thus, DOE had to perform a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) closure of the facility and find a reuse for as much of the equipment as possible. This paper will focus on the following items associated with this successful RCRA closure project: TVS site closure design and implementation; characterization activities focused on waste disposition; pollution prevention through reuse; waste minimization efforts to reduce mixed waste to be disposed; and lessons learned that would be integrated in future projects of this magnitude.

Brill, Angie; Boles, Roger; Byars, Woody

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

277

Site Selection for the Salt Disposition Facility at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A site selection study was conducted to identify a suitable location for the construction and operation of a new Salt Disposition Facility (SDF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The facility to be sited is a single processing facility and support buildings that could house either of three technology alternatives being developed by the High Level Waste Systems Engineering Team: Small Tank Tetraphenylborate Precipitation, Crystalline Silicotitanate Non-Elutable Ion Exchange or Caustic Side Solvent Extraction. A fourth alternative, Direct Disposal in grout, is not part of the site selection study because a location has been identified that is unique to this technology (i.e., Z-Area). Facility site selection at SRS is a formal, documented process that seeks to optimize siting of new facilities with respect to facility-specific engineering requirements, sensitive environmental resources, and applicable regulatory requirements. In this manner, the prime objectives of cost minimization, environmental protection, and regulatory compliance are achieved. The results from this geotechnical characterization indicated that continued consideration be given to Site B for the proposed SDF. Suitable topography, the lack of surface hydrology and floodplain issues, no significant groundwater contamination, the presence of minor soft zones along the northeast portion of footprint, and no apparent geological structure in the Gordon Aquitard support this recommendation.

Gladden, J.B.; Rueter, K.J.; Morin, J.P.

2000-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) analyzed samples from Tank 21H in support of qualification of Macrobatch (Salt Batch) 7 for the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP). An ARP and several ESS tests were also performed. This document reports characterization data on the samples of Tank 21H as well as simulated performance of ARP/MCU. No issues with the projected Salt Batch 7 strategy are identified, other than the presence of visible quantities of dark colored solids. A demonstration of the monosodium titanate (0.2 g/L) removal of strontium and actinides provided acceptable 4 hour average decontamination factors for Pu and Sr of 3.22 and 18.4, respectively. The Four ESS tests also showed acceptable behavior with distribution ratios (D(Cs)) values of 15.96, 57.1, 58.6, and 65.6 for the MCU, cold blend, hot blend, and Next Generation Solvent (NGS), respectively. The predicted value for the MCU solvent was 13.2. Currently, there are no models that would allow a prediction of extraction behavior for the other three solvents. SRNL recommends that a model for predicting extraction behavior for cesium removal for the blended solvent and NGS be developed. While no outstanding issues were noted, the presence of solids in the samples should be investigated in future work. It is possible that the solids may represent a potential reservoir of material (such as potassium) that could have an impact on MCU performance if they were to dissolve back into the feed solution. This salt batch is intended to be the first batch to be processed through MCU entirely using the new NGS-MCU solvent.

Peters, T. B.; Washington, A. L. II

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

279

Lab Scale Production of NpO2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to disposition its legacy H-Canyon neptunium to Oak Ridge National Laboratory after converting it to oxide in HB-Line. Neptunium oxide, (NpO{sub 2}) was produced at the Savannah River Technology Center using the anticipated HB-Line flowsheet conditions. The oxide was produced from a neptunium nitrate solution via anion exchange, oxalate precipitation, and calcination at either 600 C or 650 C. The 98 grams of NpO{sub 2} produced in the laboratory should be representative of material produced in HB-Line and is to be used for gas generation testing to support radioactive material transportation safety analysis as part of the neptunium stabilization and disposition program at SRS. Results of each step of the oxide production will be presented.

Duffey, J

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

280

PROJECT STRATEGY FOR THE REMEDIATION AND DISPOSITION OF LEGACY TRANSURANIC WASTE AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE, South Carolina, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper discusses the Savannah River Site Accelerated Transuranic (TRU) Waste Project that was initiated in April of 2009 to accelerate the disposition of remaining legacy transuranic waste at the site. An overview of the project execution strategy that was implemented is discussed along with the lessons learned, challenges and improvements to date associated with waste characterization, facility modifications, startup planning, and remediation activities. The legacy waste was generated from approximately 1970 through 1990 and originated both on site as well as at multiple US Department of Energy sites. Approximately two thirds of the waste was previously dispositioned from 2006 to 2008, with the remaining one third being the more hazardous waste due to its activity (curie content) and the plutonium isotope Pu-238 quantities in the waste. The project strategy is a phased approach beginning with the lower activity waste in existing facilities while upgrades are made to support remediation of the higher activity waste. Five waste remediation process lines will be used to support the full remediation efforts which involve receipt of the legacy waste container, removal of prohibited items, venting of containers, and resizing of contents to fit into current approved waste shipping containers. Modifications have been minimized to the extent possible to meet the accelerated goals and involve limited upgrades to address life safety requirements, radiological containment needs, and handling equipment for the larger waste containers. Upgrades are also in progress for implementation of the TRUPACT III for the shipment of Standard Large Boxes to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, the US TRU waste repository. The use of this larger shipping container is necessary for approximately 20% of the waste by volume due to limited size reduction capability. To date, approximately 25% of the waste has been dispositioned, and several improvements have been made to the overall processing plan as well as facility processing rates. These lessons learned, challenges, and improvements will be discussed to aid other sites in their efforts to conduct similar activities.

Rodriguez, M.

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Evaluation/disposition of observations no. 6-17, 6-18, and 6-22 from site electrical assessment report, 300 area powerhouse and emergency sys.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Disposition of Observations 6-17, 6-18, 6-22 of Site Electrical Assessment Report. Application of generator differential protection, and synchro-check relay rewiring for generators of building 3621-D. In 1990, the WHC Site Electrical Task Group issued a Site Electrical Assessment Report, ``300 Area Powerhouse and Emergency System.`` This report included numerous findings and observations relating to observed deficiencies or opportunities for improvement in maintenance of the inspected electrical systems. The purpose of this letter report is to provide an evaluation and proposed disposition of Observations No. 6-1 7, 6-1 8, and 6-22 of the Site Electrical Assessment Report.

Ahola, E.L.

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

282

Fuel-Cycle and Nuclear Material Disposition Issues Associated with High-Temperature Gas Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to facilitate a better understanding of the fuel-cycle and nuclear material disposition issues associated with high-temperature gas reactors (HTGRs). This paper reviews the nuclear fuel cycles supporting early and present day gas reactors, and identifies challenges for the advanced fuel cycles and waste management systems supporting the next generation of HTGRs, including the Very High Temperature Reactor, which is under development in the Generation IV Program. The earliest gas-cooled reactors were the carbon dioxide (CO2)-cooled reactors. Historical experience is available from over 1,000 reactor-years of operation from 52 electricity-generating, CO2-cooled reactor plants that were placed in operation worldwide. Following the CO2 reactor development, seven HTGR plants were built and operated. The HTGR came about from the combination of helium coolant and graphite moderator. Helium was used instead of air or CO2 as the coolant. The helium gas has a significant technical base due to the experience gained in the United States from the 40-MWe Peach Bottom and 330-MWe Fort St. Vrain reactors designed by General Atomics. Germany also built and operated the 15-MWe Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor (AVR) and the 300-MWe Thorium High-Temperature Reactor (THTR) power plants. The AVR, THTR, Peach Bottom and Fort St. Vrain all used fuel containing thorium in various forms (i.e., carbides, oxides, thorium particles) and mixtures with highly enriched uranium. The operational experience gained from these early gas reactors can be applied to the next generation of nuclear power systems. HTGR systems are being developed in South Africa, China, Japan, the United States, and Russia. Elements of the HTGR system evaluated included fuel demands on uranium ore mining and milling, conversion, enrichment services, and fuel fabrication; fuel management in-core; spent fuel characteristics affecting fuel recycling and refabrication, fuel handling, interim storage, packaging, transportation, waste forms, waste treatment, decontamination and decommissioning issues; and low-level waste (LLW) and high-level waste (HLW) disposal.

Shropshire, D.E.; Herring, J.S.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

The U.S.-Russian joint studies on using power reactors to disposition surplus weapon plutonium as spent fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, the US and the Russian Federation completed an initial joint study of the candidate options for the disposition of surplus weapons plutonium in both countries. The options included long term storage, immobilization of the plutonium in glass or ceramic for geologic disposal, and the conversion of weapons plutonium to spent fuel in power reactors. For the latter option, the US is only considering the use of existing light water reactors (LWRs) with no new reactor construction for plutonium disposition, or the use of Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) heavy water reactors. While Russia advocates building new reactors, the cost is high, and the continuing joint study of the Russian options is considering only the use of existing VVER-1000 LWRs in Russia and possibly Ukraine, the existing BN-60O fast neutron reactor at the Beloyarsk Nuclear Power Plant in Russia, or the use of the Canadian CANDU reactors. Six of the seven existing VVER-1000 reactors in Russia and the eleven VVER-1000 reactors in Ukraine are all of recent vintage and can be converted to use partial MOX cores. These existing VVER-1000 reactors are capable of converting almost 300 kg of surplus weapons plutonium to spent fuel each year with minimum nuclear power plant modifications. Higher core loads may be achievable in future years.

Chebeskov, A.; Kalashnikov, A. [State Scientific Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering; Bevard, B.; Moses, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pavlovichev, A. [State Scientific Center, Moscow (Russian Federation). Kurchatov Inst.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cost-effective facility disposition planning with safety and health lessons learned and good practices from the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An emphasis on transition and safe disposition of DOE excess facilities has brought about significant challenges to managing worker, public, and environmental risks. The transition and disposition activities involve a diverse range of hazardous facilities that are old, poorly maintained, and contain radioactive and hazardous substances, the extent of which may be unknown. In addition, many excess facilities do not have historical facility documents such as operating records, plant and instrumentation diagrams, and incident records. The purpose of this report is to present an overview of the Oak Ridge Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program, its safety performance, and associated safety and health lessons learned and good practices. Illustrative examples of these lessons learned and good practices are also provided. The primary focus of this report is on the safety and health activities and implications associated with the planning phase of Oak Ridge facility disposition projects. Section 1.0 of this report provides the background and purpose of the report. Section 2.0 presents an overview of the facility disposition activities from which the lessons learned and good practices discussed in Section 3.0 were derived.

NONE

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME OF OCCURRENCE DATE & TIME REPORTED 1304224 None  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INCIDENT # CHARGE SECTION OF NYS PENAL LAW DISPOSITION TYPE REPORTED TO PLACE OF OCCURRENCE DATE Public Safety Department Music Building 6442 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 April 29, 2013 2:15PM Building 6660 Kissena Blvd., Flushing, NY 11367 May 1, 2013 12:15PM May 1, 2013 2:50PM 1305279 None Petit

Johnson Jr.,, Ray

286

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Theft Norco Mountain bike BPD notified  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PSI # Date Time Location Incident Description Disposition 4341 9/2/2011 8:00 Blue Ridge Bicycle Four or more citations received Fine issued 4353 9/8/2011 16:00 Elizabeth Rogers Bicycle Theft Bluish Green bicycle BPD notified 4354 9/9/2011 13:49 Short St Hair Salon Criminal Damage Graffiti on the rear

Baltisberger, Jay H.

287

Final Demolition and Disposition of 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory - 12267  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 209-E Critical Mass Laboratory was constructed in 1960 to provide a heavy shielded reactor room where quantities of plutonium or uranium in solution could be brought to near-critical configurations under carefully controlled and monitored conditions. In the late 1980's, the responsible contractor, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), was directed by the Department of Energy (DOE) to prepare the facility for unoccupied status. The facility was demolished under a Removal Action Work Plan pursuant to the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA). The funding for this project was provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The primary rooms of concern with regards to contamination in 209-E facility, which is over 9,000 square feet, are the criticality assembly room (CAR), the mix room, and the change room. The CAR contained two reactor hoods (HO-140 and HO-170), which each had a high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filter system. The CAR contained 13 tanks ranging from 38 L (10 gal) to 401 L (106 gal). Tanks TK-109 and TK-110 are below grade, and were removed as part of this demolition and disposition remedy. Nonradiological and radiological hazardous substances were removed, decontaminated, or fixed in place, prior to demolition. Except for the removal of below grade tanks TK-109 and TK-110, the facility was demolished to slab-on-grade. PNNL performed stabilization and deactivation activities that included removal of bulk fissile material and chemicals, flushing tanks, stabilizing contamination within gloveboxes and hoods, and packaging and removing waste. The removal of the contaminated plutonium equipment and materials from the 209E facility presented a number of challenges similar in nature to those associated with the inventory reduction and cleanup activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant. Although there were no bulk fissile materials or chemicals within the facility, there were residual radiological materials (isotopes of plutonium and americium) in the tanks and hoods. The complexity of the remedy was present because of the various configurations of the tanks and hoods, combined with the residual contaminants. Because of the weight and dimensional configuration, size reduction of the slab tanks, as well as removal and disposal of the different material used for moderation and absorption, were two examples of challenges that were resolved to complete the remedy. One of the key methods developed and implemented at the facility was the design and construction of a shroud to allow the cutting of the Pu contaminated tanks. The shroud design, development and implementation at the 209E Project was an example of enhanced work planning and task hazards analysis with worker involvement. This paper will present the lessons learned from the 209E facility inventory reduction activities including the shroud and other methodologies used. The initial Lessons Learned discussion for this project was scheduled for late January 2012. This facility is the first open-air demolition of a highly contaminated plutonium-contaminated facility accomplished by CH2M Hill under the Plateau Remediation Contract. The demolition was completed without spread of contamination to the workers and the surrounding area. As with any project of this complexity, there are significant accomplishments, as well as experience that can be applied to future demolition of plutonium-contaminated facilities on the Hanford Site. These experiences will be documented at a later date. (authors)

Woolery, Wade [US Department of Energy, Richland WA (United States); Dodd, Edwin III [CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company, Richland WA (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Complications Associated with Long-Term Disposition of Newly-Generated Transuranic Waste: A National Laboratory Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a multipurpose national laboratory delivering specialized science and engineering solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sponsorship of INL was formally transferred to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) by Secretary Spencer Abraham in July 2002. The move to NE, and designation as the DOE lead nuclear energy laboratory for reactor technology, supports the nation’s expanding nuclear energy initiatives, placing INL at the center of work to develop advanced Generation IV nuclear energy systems; nuclear energy/hydrogen coproduction technology; advanced nuclear energy fuel cycle technologies; and providing national security answers to national infrastructure needs. As a result of the Laboratory’s NE mission, INL generates both contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from ongoing operations. Generation rates are relatively small and fluctuate based on specific programs and project activities being conducted; however, the Laboratory will continue to generate TRU waste well into the future in association with the NE mission. Currently, plans and capabilities are being established to transfer INL’s contact-handled TRU waste to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (AMWTP) for certification and disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Remote-handled TRU waste is currently placed in storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). In an effort to minimize future liabilities associated with the INL NE mission, INL is evaluating and assessing options for the management and disposition of all its TRU waste on a real-time basis at time of generation. This paper summarizes near-term activities to minimize future re handling of INL’s TRU waste, as well as, potential complications associated with the long-term disposition of newly-generated TRU waste. Potential complications impacting the disposition of INL newly-generated TRU waste include, but are not limited to: 1) required remote-handled TRU packaging configuration(s) vs. current facility capabilities, 2) long-term NE mission activities, 3) WIPP certification requirements, and 4) budget considerations.

B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; T.L. Carlson; R.P. Grant

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Experimental studies of steam and steam-propane injection using a novel smart horizontal producer to enhance oil production in the San Ardo field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in an attempt to mitigate the effects of steam override. The experimental model was scaled using the conditions in the San Ardo field in California and crude oil from the same field was used for the tests. Superheated steam at 190 â�� 200�ºC was injected...

Rivero Diaz, Jose Antonio

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Sample Results From The Interim Salt Disposition Program Macrobatch 7 Tank 21H Qualification MST Solids Sample  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 7 processing. The Marcrobatch 7 material was received with visible fine particulate solids, atypical for these samples. The as received material was allowed to settle for a period greater than 24 hours. The supernatant was then decanted and utilized as our clarified feed material. As part of this qualification work, SRNL performed an Actinide Removal Process (ARP) test using the clarified feed material. From this test, the residual monosodium titanate (MST) was analyzed for radionuclide uptake after filtration from H-Tank Farm (HTF) feed salt solution. The results of these analyses are reported and are within historical precedent.

Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.

2013-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

291

Peluchi : product development of a programmable robotic toy to stimulate interest in the fields of science and technology amongst young girls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistically speaking, science, technology, and engineering are male dominated fields. Peluchi is a second-generation prototype of a programmable robotic toy targeted towards young girls in hope of promoting more interest ...

Vu, My (My H.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Petroleum Supply Annual 2005, Volume 1  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 2. U.S. Daily Average Supply and Disposition of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products, 2005 (Thousand Barrels per Day) Field Production Refinery and Blender Net Production Imports...

293

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field No. 2, offshore gulf coast over-pressured, dry gas reservoirs. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation of reservoir management strategies for optimization of ultimate hydrocarbon recovery and net present value from an overpressured, high yield gas condensate reservoir with water influx is reported. This field evaluation was based on a reservoir simulation. Volumetric and performance-derived original gas-in-place estimates did not agree: the performance-derived values were significantly lower than those predicted from volumetric analysis. Predicted field gas recovery was improved significantly by methods which accelerated gas withdrawals. Recovery was also influenced by well location. Accelerated withdrawals from wells near the aquifer tended to reduce sweep by cusping and coning water. This offset any benefits of increased gas rates.

Jones, R.E.; Jirik, L.A.; Hower, T.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Modeling the Syn Disposition of Nitrogen Donors in Non-Heme Diiron Enzymes. Synthesis, Characterization, and Hydrogen Peroxide Reactivity of Diiron(III) Complexes with the Syn N-Donor Ligand H[subscript 2]BPG[subscript 2]DEV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In order to model the syn disposition of histidine residues in carboxylate-bridged non-heme diiron enzymes, we prepared a new dinucleating ligand, H[subscript 2]BPG[subscript 2]DEV, that provides this geometric feature. ...

Friedle, Simone

295

Field-to-Fuel Performance Testing of Various Biomass Feedstocks: Production and Catalytic Upgrading of Bio-Oil to Refinery Blendstocks (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large-scale, cost-competitive deployment of thermochemical technologies to replace petroleum oil with domestic biofuels will require inclusion of high volumes of low-cost, diverse biomass types into the supply chain. However, a comprehensive understanding of the impacts of feedstock thermo-physical and chemical variability, particularly inorganic matter (ash), on the yield and product distribution

Carpenter, D.; Westover, T.; Howe, D.; Evans, R.; French, R.; Kutnyakov, I.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Production Analysis of a Niobrara Field Using Intelligent Top-Down S. Alireza Haghighat, Shahab D. Mohaghegh, Vida Gholami, David Moreno, West Virginia University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unconventional hydrocarbon resources are going to play an important role in the US energy strategy. Conventional tools and techniques that are used for analysis of unconventional resources include decline curve of unconventional resources. This technology is completely data-driven, incorporating field measurements (drilling

Mohaghegh, Shahab

297

Semiclassical pair production rate for time-dependent electrical fields with more than one component: -WKB-approach and world-line instantons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analytic calculation of the semiclassical electron-positron pair creation rate by time-dependent electrical fields. We use two methods, first the imaginary time method in the WKB-approximation and second the world-line instanton approach. The analytic tools for both methods are generalized to time-dependent electric fields with more than one component. For the WKB method an expansion of the momentum spectrum of produced pairs around the canonical momentum $\\vec{P}=0$ is presented which simplifies the computation of the pair creation rate. We argue that the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] implicitly performs this expansion of the momentum spectrum around $\\vec{P}=0$. Accordingly the generalization to more than one component is shown to agree with the WKB result obtained via this expansion. However the expansion is only a good approximation for the cases where the momentum spectrum is peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$. Thus the expanded WKB result and the world-line instanton method of [Dunne et al., Phys. Rev. D73, 065028 (2006)] as well as the generalized method presented here are only applicable in these cases. We study the two component case of a rotating electric field and find a new analytic closed form for the momentum spectrum using the generalized WKB method. The momentum spectrum for this field is not peaked around $\\vec{P}=0$.

Eckhard Strobel; She-Sheng Xue

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

298

Production management techniques for water-drive gas reservoirs. Field number 1, onshore gulf coast over-pressured, high yield condensate reservoir. Topical report, July 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To develop improved completion and reservoir management strategies for water-drive gas reservoirs, the study conducted on an overpressured high yield gas condensate reservoir is reported. The base recovery factor for the field was projected to be only 47.8%, due to high residual gas saturation and a relatively strong aquifer which maintained reservoir pressure.

Hower, T.L.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Fissile Material Disposition Program: Deep Borehole Disposal Facility PEIS data input report for direct disposal. Direct disposal of plutonium metal/plutonium dioxide in compound metal canisters. Version 3.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is examining options for disposing of excess weapons-usable nuclear materials [principally plutonium (Pu) and highly enriched uranium (HEU)] in a form or condition that is substantially and inherently more difficult to recover and reuse in weapons production. This report is the data input report for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS). The PEIS examines the environmental, safety, and health impacts of implementing each disposition alternative on land use, facility operations, and site infrastructure; air quality and noise; water, geology, and soils; biotic, cultural, and paleontological resources; socioeconomics; human health; normal operations and facility accidents; waste management; and transportation. This data report is prepared to assist in estimating the environmental effects associated with the construction and operation of a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility, an alternative currently included in the PEIS. The facility projects under consideration are, not site specific. This report therefore concentrates on environmental, safety, and health impacts at a generic site appropriate for siting a Deep Borehole Disposal Facility.

Wijesinghe, A.M.; Shaffer, R.J.

1996-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

EA-1977: Acceptance and Disposition of Used Nuclear Fuel Containing U.S.-Origin Highly Enriched Uranium from the Federal Republic of Germany  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This environmental assessment (EA) will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a DOE proposal to accept used nuclear fuel from the Federal Republic of Germany at DOE’s Savannah River Site (SRS) for processing and disposition. This used nuclear fuel is composed of kernels containing thorium and U.S.-origin highly enriched uranium (HEU) embedded in small graphite spheres that were irradiated in nuclear reactors used for research and development purposes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

DRAFT EM SSAB Chairs Meeting Waste Disposition Strategies Update  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOffice ofINL is a U.S.11-26-2013 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

302

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL ASSESSMENT OF MANAGEMENT OF STORMWATER AND WASTEWATER AT THE SEPARATIONS PROCESS RESEARCH UNIT (SPRU) DISPOSITION PROJECT, NEW YORK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is currently evaluating the water management procedures at the Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU). The facility has three issues related to water management that require technical assistance: (1) due to a excessive rainfall event in October, 2010, contaminated water collected in basements of G2 and H2 buildings. As a result of this event, the contractor has had to collect and dispose of water offsite; (2) The failure of a sump pump at a KAPL outfall resulted in a Notice of Violation issued by the New York State Department of Environment and Conservation (NYSDEC) and subsequent Consent Order. On-site water now requires treatment and off-site disposition; and (3) stormwater infiltration has resulted in Strontium-90 levels discharged to the storm drains that exceed NR standards. The contractor has indicated that water management at SPRU requires major staff resources (at least 50 persons). The purpose of this review is to determine if the contractor's technical approach warrants the large number of staff resources and to ensure that the technical approach is compliant and in accordance with federal, state and NR requirements.

Abitz, R.; Jackson, D.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

Interim salt disposition program macrobatch 6 tank 21H qualification monosodium titanate and cesium mass transfer tests  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed experiments on qualification material for use in the Interim Salt Disposition Program (ISDP) Batch 6 processing. This qualification material was a set of six samples from Tank 21H in October 2012. This sample was used as a real waste demonstration of the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Extraction-Scrub-Strip (ESS) tests process. The Tank 21H sample was contacted with a reduced amount (0.2 g/L) of MST and characterized for strontium and actinide removal at 0 and 8 hour time intervals in this salt batch. {sup 237}Np and {sup 243}Am were both observed to be below detection limits in the source material, and so these results are not reported in this report. The plutonium and uranium samples had decontamination factor (DF) values that were on par or slightly better than we expected from Batch 5. The strontium DF values are slightly lower than expected but still in an acceptable range. The Extraction, Scrub, and Strip (ESS) testing demonstrated cesium removal, stripping and scrubbing within the acceptable range. Overall, the testing indicated that cesium removal is comparable to prior batches at MCU.

Washington, A. L. II; Peters, T. B.; Fink, S. D.

2013-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

304

221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade.

Baxter, J.T.

1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Analysis of material disposition for Illinois {number_sign}6 coal POC testing at the CFFF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois No.6 coal Proof-of-Concept (POC) bottoming cycle testing began in August of 1987 with test LMF4K. POC testing of this coal was completed in November of 1990 with test LMF4V, and included a total of over 2003 hours of coal-fired operation. This testing was conducted to permit the evaluation of effects of long duration operation on a number of critical design issues. During all of the POC testing, all Heat-Recovery/Seed Recovery (HRSR) components, with the exception of the wet electrostatic precipitator (ESP), were installed and operational. Throughout this time, measurements were made of all major solid feed and product streams entering and leaving the CFFF flow train. In addition, key process variables, including mass flowrates and gas compositions, were measured continuously during testing. Particulate samples were obtained and chemically analyzed, and dust loading measurements, at several locations in the flow train, were made during many of the tests. After testing, major waste and product streams were analyzed for chemical composition. Combined, this information was sufficient to enable an overall mass balance as well as a number of elemental balances to be performed around the flow train for each test.

Jackson, D.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Practice Field Practice Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Courts Soccer Field Swimming pool Bandeen Hall Mountain House # 3 # 2 Golf Course Security Patterson Hall.B. Scott Arena Library Centennial Theater Mc Greer Hall Pollack Hall New Johnson Science Building Dewhurst Dining Hall Champlain Regional College # 4 Mackinnon Hall Residence # 6 Memorial House Retired Faculty

307

Increasing heavy oil reserves in the Wilmington oil field through advanced reservoir characterization and thermal production technologies. Quarterly technical progress report, March 30, 1995--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project. Although the contract was awarded on March 30, 1995 and Pre-Award Approval was given on January 26, 1995, the partners of this project initiated work on October 1, 1994. As such, this progress report summarizes the work performed from project inception. The production and injection data, reservoir engineering data, and digitized and normalized log data were all completed sufficiently by the end of the quarter to start work on the basic reservoir engineering and geologic stochastic models. Basic reservoir engineering analysis began June 1 and will continue to March, 1996. Design work for the 5 observation/core holes, oil finger printing of the cored oil sands, and tracers surveys began in January, 1995. The wells will be drilled from July--August, 1995 and tracer injection work is projected to start in October, 1995. A preliminary deterministic 3-D geologic model was completed in June which is sufficient to start work on the stochastic 3-D geologic model. The four proposed horizontal wells (two injectors and two producers) have been designed, equipment has been ordered, and the wells will be drilled from mid-August through September. Four existing steam injection wells were converted to hot water injection in March, 1995. Initial rates were kept low to minimize operational problems. Injection rates will be increased significantly in July.

Clarke, D. [Long Beach City Dept. of Oil Properties, CA (United States); Ershaghi, I. [Southern California, CA (United States); Davies, D. [Davies (David K.) and Associates, Kingwood, TX (United States); Phillips, C.; Mondragon, J. [Tidelands Oil Production Company (United States)

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

A Comprehensive Solution for Managing TRU and LLW From Generation to Final Disposition - 13205  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A LANL multi-disciplinary team faced the challenge of building and delivering a waste information system capable of managing radioactive, hazardous, and industrial waste from cradle to grave. The result is the Waste Compliance and Tracking System (WCATS) a flexible, adaptive system that has allowed LANL to consolidate its legacy applications into one system, and leverage the advantages of managing all waste types within a single scalable enterprise application. Key functionality required for robust waste operations, include: waste characterization, waste identification, transportation, inventory management, waste processing, and disposal. In order to maintain data quality, field operations such as waste identification, surveillance checklists, wall-to-wall inventory assessments, waste transfers, shipment pickup and receipt, and simple consolidation operations are captured by the operator or technician using mobile computers. Work flow is managed via end-user defined work paths, to ensure that unit operations are performed in the correct order. Regulatory compliance reports and algorithms are provided to support typical U.S. EPA, DOT, NRC, and DOE requirements, including the EPA hazardous waste manifest, NRC LLW manifest, DOE nuclear material at risk, RCRA TSDF inventory rules, and so forth. The WCATS application has allowed LANL to migrate and consolidate its disparate legacy applications. The design and implementation is generalized so that facility owners can customize the user interface, setup facilities and unit operations (i.e., treatment, storage, disposal, characterization, and administrative), define inventory compliance rules, and establish custom work flow requirements. (authors)

Tozer, Justin C.; Sanchez, Edwina G.; Dorries, Alison M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Session 35 - Panel: Remaining US Disposition Issues for Orphan or Small Volume Low Level and Low Level Mixed Waste Streams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Faced with closure schedules as a driving force, significant progress has been made during the last 2 years on the disposition of DOE mixed waste streams thought previously to be problematic. Generators, the Department of Energy and commercial vendors have combined to develop unique disposition paths for former orphan streams. Recent successes and remaining issues will be discussed. The session will also provide an opportunity for Federal agencies to share lessons learned on low- level and mixed low-level waste challenges and identify opportunities for future collaboration. This panel discussion was organized by PAC member Dick Blauvelt, Navarro Research and Engineering Inc who served as co-chair along with Dave Eaton from INL. In addition, George Antonucci, Duratek Barnwell and Rich Conley, AFSC were invited members of the audience, prepared to contribute the Barnwell and DOD perspective to the issues as needed. Mr. Small provide information regarding the five year 20K M3 window of opportunity at the Nevada Test Site for DOE contractors to dispose of mixed waste that cannot be received at the Energy Solutions (Envirocare) site in Utah because of activity levels. He provided a summary of the waste acceptance criteria and the process sites must follow to be certified to ship. When the volume limit or time limit is met, the site will undergo a RCRA closure. Ms. Gelles summarized the status of the orphan issues, commercial options and the impact of the EM reorganization on her program. She also announced that there would be a follow-on meeting in 2006 to the very successful St. Louis meeting of last year. It will probably take place in Chicago in July. Details to be announced. Mr. McKenney discussed progress made at the Hanford Reservation regarding disposal of their mixed waste inventory. The news is good for the Hanford site but not good for the rest of the DOE complex since shipment for out of state of both low level and low level mixed waste will continue to be prohibited until the completion of a new NEPA study. This is anticipated to take several years. Bill Franz from Portsmouth and Dave Eaton representing the INL provided the audience with information regarding some of the problematic mixed waste streams at their respective sites. Portsmouth has some unique radiological issues with isotopes such as Tc-99 while the INL is trying to deal with mixed waste in the 10-100 nCi/g range. Kaylin Loveland spoke of the new,Energy Solutions organization and provided information on mixed waste treatment capabilities at the Clive site. Mike Lauer described the licensing activities at the WCS site in Texas where they are trying to eventually have disposal capabilities for Class A, B and C mixed waste from both DOE and the commercial sector. The audience included about 75 WM'06 attendees who asked some excellent questions and provided an active and informative exchange of information on the topic. (authors)

Blauvelt, Richard [Navarro Engineering Research Inc. (United States); Small, Ken [Doe Nevada (United States); Gelles, Christine [DOE EM HQ (United States); McKenney, Dale [Fluor Hanford (United States); Franz, Bill [LATA Portsmouth (United States); Loveland, Kaylin [Energy Solutions Inc. (United States); Lauer, Mike [Waste Control Specialists (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Status and Path Forward for the Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Storage and Transportation Program - 12571  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE/NE) has sponsored a program since Fiscal Year (FY) 09 to develop the technical basis for extended dry storage of used fuel. This program is also working to develop the transportation technical basis for the transport of used fuel after the extended storage period. As this program has progressed, data gaps associated with dry storage systems (e.g., fuel, cask internals, canister, closure, overpack, and pad) have been identified that need to be addressed to develop the technical bases for extended storage and transportation. There has also been an initiation of experimental testing and analyses based on the identified data gaps. The technical aspects of the NE program are being conducted by a multi-lab team made up of the DOE laboratories. As part of this program, a mission objective is to also collaborate closely with industry and the international sector to ensure that all the technical issues are addressed and those programs outside the DOE program can be leveraged, where possible, to maximize the global effort in storage and transportation research. The DOE/NE program is actively pursuing the development of the technical basis to demonstrate the feasibility of storing UNF for extended periods of time with subsequent transportation of the UNF to its final disposition. This program is fully integrated with industry, the U.S. regulator, and the international community to assure that programmatic goals and objectives are consistent with a broad perspective of technical and regulatory opinion. As the work evolves, assessments will be made to ensure that the work continues to focus on the overall goals and objectives of the program. (authors)

Sorenson, Ken [Sandia National Laboratories (United States); Williams, Jeffrey [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

FY 2012 USED FUEL DISPOSITION CAMPAIGN TRANSPORTATION TASK REPORT ON INL EFFORTS SUPPORTING THE MODERATOR EXCLUSION CONCEPT AND STANDARDIZED TRANSPORTATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Following the defunding of the Yucca Mountain Project, it is reasonable to assume that commercial used fuel will remain in storage for a longer time period than initially assumed. Previous transportation task work in FY 2011, under the Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Used Fuel Disposition Campaign, proposed an alternative for safely transporting used fuel regardless of the structural integrity of the used fuel, baskets, poisons, or storage canisters after an extended period of storage. This alternative assures criticality safety during transportation by implementing a concept that achieves moderator exclusion (no in-leakage of moderator into the used fuel cavity). By relying upon a component inside of the transportation cask that provides a watertight function, a strong argument can be made that moderator intrusion is not credible and should not be a required assumption for criticality evaluations during normal or hypothetical accident conditions of transportation. This Transportation Task report addresses the assigned FY 2012 work that supports the proposed moderator exclusion concept as well as a standardized transportation system. The two tasks assigned were to (1) promote the proposed moderator exclusion concept to both regulatory and nuclear industry audiences and (2) advance specific technical issues in order to improve American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 3 rules for storage and transportation containments. The common point behind both of the assigned tasks is to provide more options that can be used to resolve current issues being debated regarding the future transportation of used fuel after extended storage.

D. K. Morton

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Disposition of transuranic residues from plutonium isentropic compression experiment (Pu-ice) conducted at Z machine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, the U.S. Congress passed legislation to discontinue above- and below-ground testing of nuclear weapons. Because of this, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) must rely on laboratory experiments and computer-based calculations to verify the reliability of the nation's nuclear stockpile. The Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM) Z machine was developed by the DOE to support its science-based approach to stockpile stewardship. SNL/NM researchers also use the Z machine to test radiation effects on various materials in experiments designed to mimic nuclear explosions. Numerous components, parts, and materials have been tested. These experiments use a variety of radionuclides; however, plutonium (Pu) isotopes with greater than ninety-eight percent enrichment are the primary radionuclides used in the experiments designed for stockpile stewardship. In May 2006, SNL/NM received authority that the Z Machine Isentropic Compression Experiments could commence. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) provided the plutonium targets and loaded the target assemblies, which were fabricated by SNL/NM. LANL shipped the loaded assemblies to SNL/NM for Z machine experiments. Three experiments were conducted from May through July 2006. The residues from each experiment, which weighed up to 913 pounds, were metallic and packaged into a respective 55-gallon drum each. Based on a memorandum of understanding between the two laboratories, LANL provides the plutonium samples and the respective radio-isotopic information. SNL/NM conducts the experiments and provides temporary storage for the drums until shipment to LANL for final waste certification for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in southeastern New Mexico. This paper presents a comprehensive approach for documenting generator knowledge for characterization of waste in cooperation with scientists at the two laboratories and addresses a variety of topics such as material control and accountability, safeguards of material, termination of safeguards for eventual shipment from SNL/NM to LANL, associated approvals from DOE-Carlsbad Field Office, which governs WIPP and various notifications. It portrays a comprehensive approach needed for successful completion of a complex project between two national laboratories.

Goyal, Kapil K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; French, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Humphrey, Betty J [WESTON SOLUTIONS INC.; Gluth, Jeffry [SNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

BLENDING STUDY FOR SRR SALT DISPOSITION INTEGRATION: TANK 50H SCALE-MODELING AND COMPUTER-MODELING FOR BLENDING PUMP DESIGN, PHASE 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salt Disposition Integration (SDI) portfolio of projects provides the infrastructure within existing Liquid Waste facilities to support the startup and long term operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF). Within SDI, the Blend and Feed Project will equip existing waste tanks in the Tank Farms to serve as Blend Tanks where 300,000-800,000 gallons of salt solution will be blended in 1.3 million gallon tanks and qualified for use as feedstock for SWPF. Blending requires the miscible salt solutions from potentially multiple source tanks per batch to be well mixed without disturbing settled sludge solids that may be present in a Blend Tank. Disturbing solids may be problematic both from a feed quality perspective as well as from a process safety perspective where hydrogen release from the sludge is a potential flammability concern. To develop the necessary technical basis for the design and operation of blending equipment, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) completed scaled blending and transfer pump tests and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. A 94 inch diameter pilot-scale blending tank, including tank internals such as the blending pump, transfer pump, removable cooling coils, and center column, were used in this research. The test tank represents a 1/10.85 scaled version of an 85 foot diameter, Type IIIA, nuclear waste tank that may be typical of Blend Tanks used in SDI. Specifically, Tank 50 was selected as the tank to be modeled per the SRR, Project Engineering Manager. SRNL blending tests investigated various fixed position, non-rotating, dual nozzle pump designs, including a blending pump model provided by the blend pump vendor, Curtiss Wright (CW). Primary research goals were to assess blending times and to evaluate incipient sludge disturbance for waste tanks. Incipient sludge disturbance was defined by SRR and SRNL as minor blending of settled sludge from the tank bottom into suspension due to blending pump operation, where the sludge level was shown to remain constant. To experimentally model the sludge layer, a very thin, pourable, sludge simulant was conservatively used for all testing. To experimentally model the liquid, supernate layer above the sludge in waste tanks, two salt solution simulants were used, which provided a bounding range of supernate properties. One solution was water (H{sub 2}O + NaOH), and the other was an inhibited, more viscous salt solution. The research performed and data obtained significantly advances the understanding of fluid mechanics, mixing theory and CFD modeling for nuclear waste tanks by benchmarking CFD results to actual experimental data. This research significantly bridges the gap between previous CFD models and actual field experiences in real waste tanks. A finding of the 2009, DOE, Slurry Retrieval, Pipeline Transport and Plugging, and Mixing Workshop was that CFD models were inadequate to assess blending processes in nuclear waste tanks. One recommendation from that Workshop was that a validation, or bench marking program be performed for CFD modeling versus experiment. This research provided experimental data to validate and correct CFD models as they apply to mixing and blending in nuclear waste tanks. Extensive SDI research was a significant step toward bench marking and applying CFD modeling. This research showed that CFD models not only agreed with experiment, but demonstrated that the large variance in actual experimental data accounts for misunderstood discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. Having documented this finding, SRNL was able to provide correction factors to be used with CFD models to statistically bound full scale CFD results. Through the use of pilot scale tests performed for both types of pumps and available engineering literature, SRNL demonstrated how to effectively apply CFD results to salt batch mixing in full scale waste tanks. In other words, CFD models were in error prior to development of experimental correction factors determined during this research, which provided a technique to use CFD models fo

Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Fowley, M.

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

314

Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

NONE

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

THE DISCOVERY OF HD 37605c AND A DISPOSITIVE NULL DETECTION OF TRANSITS OF HD 37605b  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the radial velocity discovery of a second planetary mass companion to the K0 V star HD 37605, which was already known to host an eccentric, P {approx} 55 days Jovian planet, HD 37605b. This second planet, HD 37605c, has a period of {approx}7.5 years with a low eccentricity and an Msin i of {approx}3.4 M{sub Jup}. Our discovery was made with the nearly 8 years of radial velocity follow-up at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Keck Observatory, including observations made as part of the Transit Ephemeris Refinement and Monitoring Survey effort to provide precise ephemerides to long-period planets for transit follow-up. With a total of 137 radial velocity observations covering almost 8 years, we provide a good orbital solution of the HD 37605 system, and a precise transit ephemeris for HD 37605b. Our dynamic analysis reveals very minimal planet-planet interaction and an insignificant transit time variation. Using the predicted ephemeris, we performed a transit search for HD 37605b with the photometric data taken by the T12 0.8 m Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (APT) and the MOST satellite. Though the APT photometry did not capture the transit window, it characterized the stellar activity of HD 37605, which is consistent of it being an old, inactive star, with a tentative rotation period of 57.67 days. The MOST photometry enabled us to report a dispositive null detection of a non-grazing transit for this planet. Within the predicted transit window, we exclude an edge-on predicted depth of 1.9% at the >>10{sigma} level, and exclude any transit with an impact parameter b > 0.951 at greater than 5{sigma}. We present the BOOTTRAN package for calculating Keplerian orbital parameter uncertainties via bootstrapping. We made a comparison and found consistency between our orbital fit parameters calculated by the RVLIN package and error bars by BOOTTRAN with those produced by a Bayesian analysis using MCMC.

Wang, Sharon Xuesong; Wright, Jason T.; Mahadevan, Suvrath [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 525 Davey Laboratory, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Cochran, William; Endl, Michael; MacQueen, Phillip J. [McDonald Observatory, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Kane, Stephen R.; Von Braun, Kaspar [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, Caltech, MS 100-22, 770 South Wilson Avenue, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Henry, Gregory W. [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, 3500 John A. Merritt Boulevard, Box 9501, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Payne, Matthew J.; Ford, Eric B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Science Center, P.O. Box 112055, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Valenti, Jeff A. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Antoci, Victoria; Dragomir, Diana; Matthews, Jaymie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z1 (Canada); Howard, Andrew W.; Marcy, Geoffrey W.; Isaacson, Howard, E-mail: xxw131@psu.edu, E-mail: jtwright@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

316

EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOE’s operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

317

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies were performed enhanced oil recovery field pilot was performed in Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Studies were performed to determine a nutrient system to encourage growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria an inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient material were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor an additional production well in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicated the additional production well monitored during the field trial was also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels of tertiary oil was recovered. Microbial activity increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulphide concentration was experienced. These observations indicate that an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. The three production wells monitored in the pilot area demonstrated significant permeability reduction indicated by interwell pressure interference tests. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform (15 md maximum difference between post-treatment permeability values) indicating that preferential plugging had occurred.

Chisholm, J.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data sets Notice: As ofOnlineWells

319

Facility Disposition Projects  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat PumpRecord ofESPCofConstructionofFY 2011 Report toAnnuAlFaces of the Recovery Act

320

Integrated Facilities Disposition Program  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG | Department ofHTSDOE-IG-0882 Inspection SEMIANNUALC:\Documents

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Coal production expansion: a selected bibliography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The expeditious and economic transport of coal from producing regions to consuming regions is essential to any policy designed to increase the use of coal as an energy source. Obtaining an optimal coal transportation system, including terminal facilities, is significant in providing US coal to its users in the United States and abroad. Rail, barge, truck, slurry pipeline, and ship are the modes used to move coal from the producer to the user. Transportation costs represent a large percentage of the delivered price. This bibliography includes 138 selected citations on coal export, transport, and production. The references are to reports from the Department of Energy and its contractors, reports from other government or private organizations, and journal articles, books, conference papers, and monographs from US originators. These citations and hundreds of additional citations on this subject are available for on-line searching and retrieval from the Technical Information Center's Energy Data Base using the DOE/RECON interactive system. Approximately 50,000 citations on coal and coal products are a part of this data base. Current additions to data base on this subject are announced monthly in Fossil Energy Update. DOE-sponsored work is also announced in Energy Research Abstracts. The citations in this publication are arranged in broad subject categories as shown in the table of contents. Five indexes are provided: Corporate, Author, Subject, Contract Number, and Report Number. Included as an appendix are some tables and figures from Energy Information Administration reports covering coal production and disposition.

Grissom, M.C. (ed.)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

DOE/EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (12/04)  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix DOE-STD-3009-2014of Energy 6-2013,EA - 0942 E N v m o N

323

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burris Park Field Station...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

of California to conduct experiments on decontamination of soils containing Strontium-90. CA.10-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Adequate remediation activities performed...

325

Development of an inventory/archive program for the retention, management, and disposition of tank characterization samples at the 222-S laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Tank Waste Remediation Systems (TWRS) Characterization Program is responsible for coordinating the sampling and analysis of the 177 large underground storage tanks at the Hanford site. The 222-S laboratory has been the primary laboratory for chemical analysis of this highly-radioactive material and has been accumulating these samples for many years. As part of the Fiscal Year 1998 laboratory work scope, the 222-S laboratory has performed a formal physical inventory of all tank characterization samples which are currently being stored. In addition, an updated inventory/archive program has been designed. This program defines sample storage, retention, consolidation, maintenance, and disposition activities which will ensure that the sample integrity is preserved to the greatest practical extent. In addition, the new program provides for continued availability of waste material in a form which will be useful for future bench-scale studies. Finally, when the samples have exceeded their useful lifetime, the program provides for sample disposition from,the laboratory in a controlled, safe and environmentally compliant manner. The 222-S laboratory maintains custody over samples of tank waste material which have been shipped to the laboratory for chemical analysis. The storage of these samples currently requires an entire hotcell, fully dedicated to sample archive storage, and is rapidly encroaching on additional hotcell space. As additional samples are received, they are beginning to limit the 222-S laboratory hotcell utility for other activities such as sample extrusion and subsampling. The 222-S laboratory tracks the number of sample containers and the mass of each sample through an internal database which has recently been verified and updated via a physical inventory.

Seidel, C.M.

1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Entanglement Generation by Electric Field Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

Zahra Ebadi; Behrouz Mirza

2014-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

327

Entanglement Generation by Electric Field Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum vacuum is unstable under the influence of an external electric field and decays into pairs of charged particles, a process which is known as the Schwinger pair production. We propose and demonstrate that this electric field can generate entanglement. Using the Schwinger pair production for constant and pulsed electric fields, we study entanglement for scalar particles with zero spins and Dirac fermions. One can observe the variation of the entanglement produced for bosonic and fermionic modes with respect to different parameters.

Ebadi, Zahra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modeling of Energy Production Decisions: An Alaska Oil Case Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Producer profits are for oil production from known fields,Actual Prudhoe Bay Oil Production, Historical and ModeledKaufmann, R. (1991) “Oil production in the Lower 48 States:

Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Information Basic to Adjustments in Rice Production in Texas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ................... Usual Practices in the Production of Rice. ...................... Rice Varieties. .......................................... Usual Field Operations. .................................. ............. Labor and Power Requirements for Rice Production... and Production Requirements of Beef Cattle on Rice Farms. Farm Power ..................................................... Cost of Tractor Work. ........................................ Power Costs for Pumping. ..................................... Cost...

Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Magee, A. C. (Aden Combs)

1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Quantum fields in curved spacetime  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

Stefan Hollands; Robert M. Wald

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

331

Product Demonstrations  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Consortium will pursue a number of demonstrations following the general procedure used by DOE's GATEWAY demonstration program. Specific products to be featured in a demonstration may be...

332

A Quantum Production Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production system is a theoretical model of computation relevant to the artificial intelligence field allowing for problem solving procedures such as hierarchical tree search. In this work we explore some of the connections between artificial intelligence and quantum computation by presenting a model for a quantum production system. Our approach focuses on initially developing a model for a reversible production system which is a simple mapping of Bennett's reversible Turing machine. We then expand on this result in order to accommodate for the requirements of quantum computation. We present the details of how our proposition can be used alongside Grover's algorithm in order to yield a speedup comparatively to its classical counterpart. We discuss the requirements associated with such a speedup and how it compares against a similar quantum hierarchical search approach.

Luís Tarrataca; Andreas Wichert

2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

333

Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Entomology 489 Field Entomology Field Project Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with information, people, materials). Field Projects (your project should...) FEntomology 489 ­ Field Entomology Field Project Guide A small-group field project is required for ENTO 489 ­ Field Entomology. This guide provides general information about the field-project

Behmer, Spencer T.

335

Hydrogen Production  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen production technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains how different resources and processes can be used to produ

336

Transporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely etting fresh produce from the field to the market is another step where care must be taken to keep the product safe.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

points for microorganisms that cause disease or hasten spoilage. Ice used in the transport of produceTransporting Produce SafelyTransporting Produce Safely G etting fresh produce from the field contamination of the produce with microorganisms that could cause foodborne illness and also to hold the produce

Liskiewicz, Maciej

337

DETERMINATION OF AGE AND GENDER DIFFERENCES IN BIOCHEMICAL PROCESSES AFFECTING THE DISPOSITION OF 2-BUTOXYETHANOL AND ITS METABOLITES IN MICE AND RATS TO IMPROVE PBPK MODELING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2-Butoxyethanol (BE) is the most widely used glycol ether solvent. BE's major metabolite, butoxyacetic acid (BAA), causes hemolysis with significant species differences in sensitivity. Several PBPK models have been developed over the past two decades to describe the disposition of BE and BAA in male rats and humans to refine health risk assessments. More recent efforts by Lee et al. (1998) to describe the kinetics of BE and BAA in the National Toxicology Program (NTP) chronic inhalation studies required the use of several assumptions to extrapolate model parameters from earlier PBPK models developed for young male rats to include female F344 and both sexes of B6C3F1 mice and the effects of aging. To replace these assumptions, studies were conducted to determine the impact of age, gender and species on the metabolism of BE, and the tissue partitioning, renal acid transport and plasma protein binding of BAA. In the current study, the Lee et al. PBPK model was updated and expanded to include the further metabolism of BAA and the salivary excretion of BE and BAA which may contribute to the forestomach irritation observed in mice in the NTP study. The revised model predicted that peak blood concentrations of BAA achieved following 6-hr inhalation exposures are greatest in young adult female rats at concentrations up to 300 ppm. This is not the case predicted for old (>18 months) animals, where peak blood concentrations of BAA in male and female mice were similar to or greater than female rats. The revised model serves as a quantitative tool for integrating an extensive pharmacokinetic and mechanistic database into a format that can readily be used to compare internal dosimetry across dose, route of exposure and species.

Corley, Rick A.; Grant, Donna M.; Farris, Elizabeth; Weitz, Karl K.; Soelberg, Jolen J.; Thrall, K D.; Poet, Torka S.

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

338

Linking legacies: Connecting the Cold War nuclear weapons production processes to their environmental consequences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the aftermath of the Cold War, the US has begun addressing the environmental consequences of five decades of nuclear weapons production. In support of this effort, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1995 directed the Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the waste streams generated during each step in the production of nuclear weapons. Accordingly, this report responds to this mandate, and it is the Department`s first comprehensive analysis of the sources of waste and contamination generated by the production of nuclear weapons. The report also contains information on the missions and functions of nuclear weapons facilities, on the inventories of waste and materials remaining at these facilities, as well as on the extent and characteristics of contamination in and around these facilities. This analysis unites specific environmental impacts of nuclear weapons production with particular production processes. The Department used historical records to connect nuclear weapons production processes with emerging data on waste and contamination. In this way, two of the Department`s legacies--nuclear weapons manufacturing and environmental management--have become systematically linked. The goal of this report is to provide Congress, DOE program managers, non-governmental analysts, and the public with an explicit picture of the environmental results of each step in the nuclear weapons production and disposition cycle.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

On Field Constraint Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce field constraint analysis, a new technique for verifying data structure invariants. A field constraint for a field is a formula specifying a set of objects to which the field can point. Field constraints ...

Wies, Thomas

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

340

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Methane hydrate potential and development of a shallow gas field in the arctic: The Walakpa Field North Slope Alaska  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the North Slope Hydrate Study is to evaluate the methane hydrate potential of the Walakpa gas field, a shallow gas field located near Barrow, Alaska. Observing, understanding, and predicting the production characteristics of the Walakpa field will be accomplished by the analysis of the reservoir geology, and of the individual well production data, derived from reservoir engineering studies conducted in the field.

Glenn, R.K.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Lucky Mound field: A new Mississippian Sherwood shoreline field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lucky Mound field produces oil and gas from the Sherwood interval of the Mississippian Mission Canyon Formation. Presently, eight wells are producing with development ongoing. Extensive coring, testing, logging, and petrographic evaluations throughout the field have allowed for detailed analysis of reservoir characteristics and paleoenvironmental interpretation. Sherwood shoreline fields typically produce from reservoir-quality packstones and grainstones trapped by a lateral facies changes into impermeable dolomite and anhydrite. At Lucky Mound, packstones, grainstones, and a productive dolomite facies all contribute to the producing interval. The productive dolomite facies is generally found in the upper portion of the Sherwood along the eastern margin of the field. Porosity as high as 22% and permeability values up to 16 md are present in the dolomite facies. These dolomites are the result of complete to partial replacement of micrite. In addition, the dolomitization process has enhanced intercrystalline and intraparticle porosity throughout the Sherwood interval. Pore types present include vuggy, intergranular, intraparticle, and intercrystalline. Pore occluding and replacive cements include fibrous calcite, prismatic calcite spar, baroque dolomite, anhydrite, celestite, pyrite, and chert. An understanding of carbonate depositional environments, diagenetic processes, Williston basin structural development, and Sherwood reservoir behavior is essential in the exploration for new Sherwood fields.

Fisher, R.W. (Balcron Oil, Billings, MT (United States)); Hendricks, M.L. (Hendricks and Associates, Inc., Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Development of a Sorption Enhanced Steam Hydrogasification Process for In-situ Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Removal and Enhanced Synthetic Fuel Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration during energy production is an efficient wayemissions and get higher energy production simultaneously. Aapplied to the energy production field. The following

Liu, Zhongzhe

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

FEMP Designated Product Assessment for Commercial Gas Water Heaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

price for a condensing commercial water heater is $1,579.For condensing commercial water heaters with a thermalFound products for water heater in any product field and gas

Lutz, Jim

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

346

Production Economics of Potential Perennial and Annual Biomass Feedstocks.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The first essay determines the lowest cost lignocellulosic biomass feedstock production system for western Oklahoma from among seven alternatives at each of two locations. Field… (more)

Griffith, Andrew

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

On Going TRU Waste Disposition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing effort to contain dangerous, radioactive TRU waste. Under the Recovery Act, the Savannah River Site is able to safely test and transport these items to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Cody, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Disposition of Depleted Uranium Oxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes environmental information which has been collected up to June 1983 at Savannah River Plant. Of particular interest is an updating of dose estimates from changes in methodology of calculation, lower cesium transport estimates from Steel Creek, and new sports fish consumption data for the Savannah River. The status of various permitting requirements are also discussed.

Crandall, J.L.

2001-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

disposition | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

351

Disposition Schedules | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles » AlternativeUp HomeHorseDOECybersecurity andDisability

352

REQUEST FOR RECORDS DISPOSITION AUTHORITY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963American |Purpose This procedurenote:FOR RECORDS

353

Facility Disposition Safety Strategy RM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power SystemsResourcesFLASH2011-11-OPAMFY 2007 Total System12 EERE CongressionalDepartment

354

On Going TRU Waste Disposition  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The ongoing effort to contain dangerous, radioactive TRU waste. Under the Recovery Act, the Savannah River Site is able to safely test and transport these items to WIPP in Carlsbad, New Mexico.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

355

RMOTC - Production  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNewsCenter forQuality AssuranceProduction RMOTC

356

Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from the detonation of condensed explosives in air. In typical applications, the pressure of expanded detonation products gases is modeled by a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function: P{sub JWL} = f(v,s{sub CJ}); constants in that function are fit to cylinder test data. This function provides a specification of pressure as a function of specific volume, v, along the expansion isentrope (s = constant = s{sub CJ}) starting at the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) state. However, the JWL function is not a fundamental equation of thermodynamics, and therefore gives an incomplete specification of states. For example, explosions inherently involve shock reflections from surfaces; this changes the entropy of the products, and in such situations the JWL function provides no information on the products states. In addition, most explosives are not oxygen balanced, so if hot detonation products mix with air, they after-burn, releasing the heat of reaction via a turbulent combustion process. This raises the temperature of explosion products cloud to the adiabatic flame temperature ({approx}3,000K). Again, the JWL function provides no information on the combustion products states.

Kuhl, A L

2009-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

ProductSpecifications Fit. Form. Function.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

elevated our x-ray fluorescence (XRF) technology and product design to a totally new level. The Niton® FXL field x-ray lab offers our highest XRF-based performance and lowest levels of detection for up to 40 Niton FXL field x-ray lab delivers XRF-based elemental analysis with lab-quality performance

Short, Daniel

358

Noncommutative Gauge Theory with Covariant Star Product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a noncommutative gauge theory with covariant star product on a space-time with torsion. In order to obtain the covariant star product one imposes some restrictions on the connection of the space-time. Then, a noncommutative gauge theory is developed applying this product to the case of differential forms. Some comments on the advantages of using a space-time with torsion to describe the gravitational field are also given.

Zet, G. [Physics Department, 'Gh. Asachi' Technical University, 700050 Iasi (Romania)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

359

Variability in the Stability and Productivity of Transfected Genes in Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the field of biologics production, productivity and stability of the transfected gene of interest are two very important attributes that dictate if a production process is viable. To further understand and improve these ...

Ng, Say Kong

360

Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophonesSPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX-fault fracture zones above and below a producing zone. Associations with depleted production intervals indicated

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Nulljob product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on the authors' Central VAX Cluster led them to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

NULLJOB product  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ever increasing demand for more CPU cycles for data analysis on our Central VAX Cluster led us to investigate new ways to utilize more fully the resources that were available. A review of the experiment and software development VAX systems on site revealed many unused computing cycles. Furthermore, these systems were all connected by DECnet which would allow easy file transfer and remote batch job submission. A product was developed to allow jobs to be submitted on the Central VAX Cluster but actually to be run on one of the remote systems. The processing of the jobs was arranged, to the greatest extent possible, to be transparent to the user and to have minimal impact on both the Central VAX Cluster and remote systems.

Hughart, N.; Ritchie, D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Chemical Impact of Elevated CO2on Geothermal Energy Production  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This is a two phase project to assess the geochemical impact of CO2on geothermal energy production by: analyzing the geochemistry of existing geothermal fields with elevated natural CO2; measuring realistic rock-water rates for geothermal systems using laboratory and field-based experiments to simulate production scale impacts.

364

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions or the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. Injection of nutrient stimulates the growth and metabolism of reservoir bacteria, which produces beneficial products to enhance oil recovery. Sometimes, chemical treatments are used to clean or condition injection water. Such a chemical treatment has been initiated by Sullivan and Company at the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit. The unit injection water was treated with a mixture of water, methanol, isopropyl alcohol, and three proprietary chemicals. To determine if the chemicals would have an impact on the pilot, it was important to determine the effects of the chemical additives on the growth and metabolism of the bacteria from wells in this field. Two types of media were used: a mineral salts medium with molasses and nitrate, and this medium with 25 ppm of the treatment chemicals added. Samples were collected anaerobically from each of two wells, 1A-9 and 7-2. A sample from each well was inoculated and cultured in the broth tubes of molasses-nitrate medium with and without the chemicals. Culturing temperature was 35{degrees}C. Absorbance, pressure and cell number were checked to determine if the chemicals affected the growth and metabolism of bacteria in the brine samples. 12 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

subsurface geological field | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

field subsurface geological field Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

366

Quantum Field Theory & Gravity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Theory & Gravity Quantum Field Theory & Gravity Understanding discoveries at the Energy, Intensity, and Cosmic Frontiers Get Expertise Rajan Gupta (505) 667-7664 Email...

367

External split field generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

368

Language Production General Points about Speech Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Language Production #12;General Points about Speech Production 15 speech sounds per second => 2, shall I say `t' or `d'' (Levelt) Production side has gotten less attention in Psycholinguistics than the comprehension side. Evidence for speech production behaviour has until recently relied heavily on speech errors

Coulson, Seana

369

The MSW Effect in Quantum Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show in detail the general relationship between the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation approach to calculating the MSW effect and the quantum field theoretical S-matrix approach. We show the precise form a generic neutrino propagator must have to allow a physically meaningful ``oscillation probability'' to be decoupled from neutrino production fluxes and detection cross-sections, and explicitly list the conditions---not realized in cases of current experimental interest---in which the field theory approach would be useful.

Christian Y. Cardall; Daniel J. H. Chung

1999-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

Azerbaijan field to step up oil flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports that a unit of Pennzoil Co., Houston, is scheduled to operate a development program that could more than double oil production from Guneshli field off Azerbaijan in the southern Caspian Sea. Under agreements signed in Baku, Pennzoil Caspian Corp., Ramco Energy Ltd. of Aberdeen, Scotland, and state oil company Azerneft will have exclusive right to jointly develop the field. Partners' shares and other project details are to be laid out in the final development plan, expected by yearend.

Not Available

1992-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Maps between Deformed and Ordinary Gauge Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we introduce a map between the q-deformed gauge fields defined on the GL$_{q}(N) $-covariant quantum hyperplane and the ordinary gauge fields. Perturbative analysis of the q-deformed QED at the classical level is presented and gauge fixing $\\grave{a} $ la BRST is discussed. An other star product defined on the hybrid $(q,h) $% -plane is explicitly constructed .

L. Mesref

2005-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

372

High volume production of nanostructured materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for high volume production of nanoparticles, nanotubes, and items incorporating nanoparticles and nanotubes. Microwave, radio frequency, or infrared energy vaporizes a metal catalyst which, as it condenses, is contacted by carbon or other elements such as silicon, germanium, or boron to form agglomerates. The agglomerates may be annealed to accelerate the production of nanotubes. Magnetic or electric fields may be used to align the nanotubes during their production. The nanotubes may be separated from the production byproducts in aligned or non-aligned configurations. The agglomerates may be formed directly into tools, optionally in compositions that incorporate other materials such as abrasives, binders, carbon-carbon composites, and cermets.

Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN); Morrell, Jonathan S. (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ludtka, Gerard M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

373

Electromagnetic Field Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Field Theory BO THID� UPSILON BOOKS #12;#12;ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY #12;#12;Electromagnetic Field Theory BO THID� Swedish Institute of Space Physics and Department of Astronomy and Space, Sweden UPSILON BOOKS · COMMUNA AB · UPPSALA · SWEDEN #12;Also available ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD THEORY

Hart, Gus

374

Synthesis of Polycyclic Natural Products  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the continuous advancements in molecular biology and modern medicine, organic synthesis has become vital to the support and extension of those discoveries. The isolations of new natural products allow for the understanding of their biological activities and therapeutic value. Organic synthesis is employed to aid in the determination of the relationship between structure and function of these natural products. The development of synthetic methodologies in the course of total syntheses is imperative for the expansion of this highly interdisciplinary field of science. In addition to the practical applications of total syntheses, the structural complexity of natural products represents a worthwhile challenge in itself. The pursuit of concise and efficient syntheses of complex molecules is both gratifying and enjoyable.

Tuan Hoang Nguyen

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Ultra-Deepwater Production Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report herein is a summary of the work performed on three projects to demonstrate hydrocarbon drilling and production methods applicable to deep and ultra deepwater field developments in the Gulf of Mexico and other like applications around the world. This work advances technology that could lead to more economic development and exploitation of reserves in ultra-deep water or remote areas. The first project is Subsea Processing. Its scope includes a review of the ''state of the art'' in subsea components to enable primary production process functions such as first stage liquids and gas separation, flow boosting, chemical treatment, flow metering, etc. These components are then combined to allow for the elimination of costly surface production facilities at the well site. A number of studies were then performed on proposed field development projects to validate the economic potential of this technology. The second project involved the design and testing of a light weight production riser made of composite material. The proposed design was to meet an actual Gulf of Mexico deepwater development project. The various engineering and testing work is reviewed, including test results. The third project described in this report encompasses the development and testing of a close tolerance liner drilling system, a new technology aimed at reducing deepwater drilling costs. The design and prototype testing in a test well are described in detail.

Ken L. Smith; Marc E. Leveque

2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

PRODUCT SYSTEMS OF HILBERT SPACES B V RAJARAMA BHAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCT SYSTEMS OF HILBERT SPACES B V RAJARAMA BHAT Indian Statistical Institute, Bangalore. We wish to cover the basics of the theory of tensor product systems of Hilbert spaces. Concrete tensor product systems of Hilbert spaces have appeared in various fields of Mathematics and Mathematical Physics

Schürmann, Michael

377

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil and Gas Production Optimization; Lost Potential due to Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav.ntnu.no) Abstract: The information content in measurements of offshore oil and gas production is often low, and when in the context of offshore oil and gas fields, can be considered the total output of production wells, a mass

Johansen, Tor Arne

378

Minimizing casing corrosion in Kuwait oil fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Corrosion in production strings is a well known problem in Kuwait oil fields. Failure to remedy the affected wells results mainly in undesirable dump flooding of the oil reservoirs, or in oil seepage and hydrocarbon contamination in shallow water bearing strata. Any of these situations (unless properly handled) leads to a disastrous waste of oil resources. This study discusses casing leaks in Kuwait oil fields, the nature of the formations opposite the leaks and their contained fluids, and the field measures that can be adopted in order to avoid casing leak problems.

Agiza, M.N.; Awar, S.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

ARM - Historical Field Campaign Statistics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcal Documentation(AVIRIS) ProductsAirborneOctober 11, 2011 [FacilityIndiaGVAX News Outreach HomeField Campaign

380

Productivity index and field behavior: a case study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Reservoir Simulation Group at Texas A&M University for their friendship and technical discussions. The author would especially thanks PhD candidates Bryan Maggard and Wael Helmy and Drs. Ahmed El- Banbi and Mauricio Villegas for explaining many...

Jensen, Marianne

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Field Quality Analysis as a Tool to Monitor Magnet Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Press Case I Age Difference between Upper and Lower Coils (Days) Figure 4: A correlation plot with a least square fit

Gupta, R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fair Trade in the fields : outcomes for Peruvian coffee products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Accessing specialty coffee markets is recognized as a way for some small-scale coffee farmers to earn higher prices, counteract unequal distributions of market power, and achieve a better quality of life. Members of CEPICAFE, ...

Walsh, Jean Marie, 1969-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

TENSOR PRODUCTS OF VALUED FIELDS ITA BEN YAACOV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a KÃ? , where st denotes the standard part map (so in particular, |a| RU lies in the convex hull of R

Ben Yaacov, Itaï

384

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--StateWinter 2013-14Deliveries (NumberYear JanYear Jan2009

385

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Field Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ <Information Administration (EIA) 10 MECS Survey Data9c :0.17.1Year Jan Feb MarYear Jan FebYearSep-14

386

Biological production of products from waste gases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus are designed for converting waste gases from industrial processes such as oil refining, and carbon black, coke, ammonia, and methanol production, into useful products. The method includes introducing the waste gases into a bioreactor where they are fermented to various products, such as organic acids, alcohols, hydrogen, single cell protein, and salts of organic acids by anaerobic bacteria within the bioreactor. These valuable end products are then recovered, separated and purified.

Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR)

2002-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Covered Product Category: Cool Roof Products  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including cool roof products, which are an ENERGY STAR®-qualified product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

388

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aesculap, Inc. Air Products Air Products Foundation Alaric Compliance Services, LLC Alvin H. Butz & Herger, Inc. Sodexo Campus Services Sodexo Inc. and Affiliates Stupp Bros., Inc. Sugarbush Products, Inc

Napier, Terrence

389

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a variety of rubber and plastic products, thermal incineration of waste tires for production of electricity rubber in asphalt mixes, (ii) thermal incineration of worn-out tires for the production of electricity

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

390

Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current Distributions of Infrared Optical Antennas: A Near-Field Determination of Electric-Field, Magnetic-Field, and Electric-Current...

391

Three-dimensional anatomy of a geothermal field, Coso, Southeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

distribution. The anomalies also correlate with high heat flow in the field and the termination of geothermal production to the south. I speculate that an intrusion is present in...

392

Three-Dimensional Anatomy of a Geothermal Field Coso Southeast...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

distribution. The anomalies also correlate with high heat flow in the field and the termination of geothermal production to the south. I speculate that an intrusion is present in...

393

ARM KAZR-ARSCL Value Added Product  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Ka-band ARM Zenith Radars (KAZRs) have replaced the long-serving Millimeter Cloud Radars, or MMCRs. Accordingly, the primary MMCR Value Added Product (VAP), the Active Remote Sensing of CLouds (ARSCL) product, is being replaced by a KAZR-based version, the KAZR-ARSCL VAP. KAZR-ARSCL provides cloud boundaries and best-estimate time-height fields of radar moments.

Jensen, Michael

394

Microbial field pilot study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m{sup 3}) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO{sub 2} content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

from Isotope Production Facility  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cancer-fighting treatment gets boost from Isotope Production Facility April 13, 2012 Isotope Production Facility produces cancer-fighting actinium 2:32 Isotope cancer treatment...

396

Neutron Production from the Fracture of Piezoelectric Rocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theoretical explanation is provided for the experimental evidence that fracturing piezoelectric rocks produces neutrons. The elastic energy micro-crack production ultimately yields the macroscopic fracture. The mechanical energy is converted by the piezoelectric effect into electric field energy. The electric field energy decays via radio frequency (microwave) electric field oscillations. The radio frequency electric fields accelerate the condensed matter electrons which then collide with protons producing neutrons and neutrinos.

A. Widom; J. Swain; Y. N. Srivastava

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Field scale history matching and assisted history matching using streamline simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this study, we apply the streamline-based production data integration method to condition a multimillion cell geologic model to historical production response for a giant Saudi Arabian reservoir. The field has been under peripheral water...

Kharghoria, Arun

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Production-systems analysis for fractured wells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

400

Integrated reservoir study of the Monument Northwest field: a waterflood performance evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

methodology for a deterministic approach. The data history of the wells in the field beginning from spud date were gathered and analyzed into information necessary for building an upscaled reservoir model of the field. Means of increasing production...

Nduonyi, Moses Asuquo

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural fields based Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology 18 Sharpening the Focus of Yolo County Land Use Policy Summary: of agricultural production on every field in Yolo...

402

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing Idaho B20 C C B Meats and Livestock Products Index to agriculture? Legend Overall weighted grade Weighted rank Northwest Midwest Southwest East Meats & ProductsProcessingessing Maine B11 B A A Meats & Products Agricultural Inputs Processing New York F49 F F F soductsoducts

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

403

On the defect induced gauge and Yukawa fields in graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider lattice deformations (both continuous and topological) in the hexagonal lattice Hubbard model in the tight binding approximation to graphene, involving operators with the range up to next-to-neighbor. In the low energy limit, we find that these deformations give rise to couplings of the electronic Dirac field to an external scalar (Yukawa) and gauge fields. The fields are expressed in terms of original defects. As a by-product we establish that the next-to-nearest order is the minimal range of deformations which produces the complete gauge and scalar fields. We consider an example of Stone--Wales defect, and find the associated gauge field.

Corneliu Sochichiu

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

404

Recovering Americium and Curium from Mark-42 Target Materials- New Processing Approaches to Enhance Separations and Integrate Waste Stream Disposition - 12228  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating flowsheets to enhance processing efficiencies and to address waste streams associated with recovery of americium (Am) and curium (Cm) from Mark-42 (Mk-42) target materials stored at ORNL. The objective of this work was to identify the most effective flowsheet with which to process the 104 Mk-42 oxide capsules holding a total of 80 g of plutonium (Pu), 190 g of Cm, 480 g of Am, and 5 kg of lanthanide (Ln) oxides for the recovery and purification of the Am/Cm for future use as feedstock for heavy actinide production. Studies were also conducted to solidify the process flowsheet waste streams for disposal. ORNL is investigating flowsheets to enhance processing efficiencies and address waste streams associated with recovery of Am and Cm from Mk-42 target materials stored at ORNL. A series of small-scale runs are being performed to demonstrate an improved process to recover Am/Cm and to optimize the separations of Ln fission products from the Am/Cm constituents. The first of these runs has been completed using one of the Am/Cm/Ln oxide capsules stored at ORNL. The demonstration run showed promising results with a Ln DF of 40 for the Am/Cm product and an Am/Cm DF of 75 for the Ln product. In addition, the total losses of Am, Cm, and Ln to the waste solvents and raffinates were very low at <0.2%, 0.02%, and 0.04%, respectively. However, the Ln-actinide separation was less than desired. For future Reverse TALSPEAK demonstration runs, several parameters will be adjusted (flow rates, the ratio of scrub to strip stages, etc.) to improve the removal of Ln from the actinides. The next step will also include scale-up of the processing flowsheet to use more concentrated solutions (15 g/L Ln versus 5 g/L) and larger volumes and to recycle the HDEHP solvent. This should improve the overall processing efficiency and further reduce losses to waste streams. Studies have been performed with simulated wastes to develop solidification processes for disposal of the secondary waste streams generated by this flowsheet. Formulations were successfully developed for all the waste simulants. Additional tests with actual waste will be the next step in this effort. Future plans are to process all of the remaining 103 capsules in storage at ORNL. A nine-capsule test is now under way to provide additional information to scale-up the process to a target 20-capsule batch size for future processing runs. (authors)

Patton, Brad D.; Benker, Dennis; Collins, Emory D.; Mattus, Catherine H.; Robinson, Sharon M.; Wham, Robert M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Gravitational radiation from preheating with many fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parametric resonances provide a mechanism by which particles can be created just after inflation. Thus far, attention has focused on a single or many inflaton fields coupled to a single scalar field. However, generically we expect the inflaton to couple to many other relativistic degrees of freedom present in the early universe. Using simulations in an expanding Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker spacetime, in this paper we show how preheating is affected by the addition of multiple fields coupled to the inflaton. We focus our attention on gravitational wave production — an important potential observational signature of the preheating stage. We find that preheating and its gravitational wave signature is robust to the coupling of the inflaton to more matter fields.

Jr, John T. Giblin [Department of Physics, Kenyon College, 201 North College Road, Gambier, OH 43022 (United States); Price, Larry R.; Siemens, Xavier, E-mail: giblinj@kenyon.edu, E-mail: larry@gravity.phys.uwm.edu, E-mail: siemens@gravity.phys.uwm.edu [Center for Gravitation and Cosmology, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin — Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

An improved environmental TLD field package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the design of an environmental TAD field package which can have a significant impact on the accuracy and reliability of an environmental monitoring program. Ideally, a field package should protect its TAD(s) from light and moisture, but it should not expose the TAD(s) to elevated temperatures that could increase fading and invalidate calibration factors. Furthermore, a field package must be relatively strong and tamper-proof, while at the same time maintaining an open, unshielded configuration to minimize attenuation of incident radiation. These conflicting goals - protection without interference - can be satisfied with the improved field package design described her. This package has been tested with considerable success at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, and a U.S. Patent Application has been filed in preparation for marketing the package as a commercial product.

Graham, B.D. (Southern California Edison Co., San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, San Clemente, CA (US))

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Field emission electron source  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter (Kensington, CA); Cohen, Marvin Lou (Berkeley, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Hot Pot Field Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

409

EMSL - subsurface geological field  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

subsurface-geological-field en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-s...

410

Hot Pot Field Observations  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

Lane, Michael

411

Theory of electromagnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the theory of electromagnetic fields, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to radiofrequency systems in particle accelerators. We begin by reviewing Maxwell's equations and their physical significance. We show that in free space, there are solutions to Maxwell's equations representing the propagation of electromagnetic fields as waves. We introduce electromagnetic potentials, and show how they can be used to simplify the calculation of the fields in the presence of sources. We derive Poynting's theorem, which leads to expressions for the energy density and energy flux in an electromagnetic field. We discuss the properties of electromagnetic waves in cavities, waveguides and transmission lines.

Wolski, Andrzej

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

Narasayya, Vivek

413

PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRODUCT REPRESENTATION IN LIGHTWEIGHT FORMATS FOR PRODUCT LIFECYCLE MANAGEMENT (PLM) Lian Ding environments and the entire product lifecycle. There are new requirements for product representations, including: platform/application independence, support for the product lifecycle, rapidly sharing information

Rzepa, Henry S.

414

Diamond fiber field emitters  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B. (Wilmington, DE); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Devlin, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Eaton, David F. (Wilmington, DE); Silzars, Aris K. (Landenburg, PA); Valone, Steven M. (Santa Fe, NM)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization DRAFT REPORT CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS-MILWAUKEE #12;CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN CEMENTITIOUS PRODUCTS Progress Report by Tarun R. Naik, Rakesh of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Technologies

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

416

Thermodynamic States in Explosion Fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the thermodynamic states occurring in explosion fields from condensed explosive charges. These states are often modeled with a Jones-Wilkins-Lee (JWL) function. However, the JWL function is not a Fundamental Equation of Thermodynamics, and therefore cannot give a complete specification of such states. We use the Cheetah code of Fried to study the loci of states of the expanded detonation products gases from C-4 charges, and their combustion products air. In the Le Chatelier Plane of specific-internal-energy versus temperature, these loci are fit with a Quadratic Model function u(T), which has been shown to be valid for T < 3,000 K and p < 1k-bar. This model is used to derive a Fundamental Equation u(v,s) for C-4. Given u(v,s), one can use Maxwell's Relations to derive all other thermodynamic functions, such as temperature: T(v,s), pressure: p(v,s), enthalpy: h(v,s), Gibbs free energy: g(v,s) and Helmholz free energy: f(v,s); these loci are displayed in figures for C-4. Such complete equations of state are needed for numerical simulations of blast waves from explosive charges, and their reflections from surfaces.

Kuhl, A L

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

417

Productivity & Energy Flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Productivity & Energy Flow Ecosystem approach, focuses: on flow of energy, water, and nutrients (capture) of energy by autotrophs Gross (total) Net (total ­ costs) Secondary productivity- capture of energy by herbivores http://sciencebitz.com/?page_id=204 What Controls the Primary Productivity

Mitchell, Randall J.

418

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion by-products #12;3 generated by using both conventional and clean-coal technologies. A clean-coal that obtained from clean-coal technology, are not utilized in cast-concrete masonry products (bricks, blocksCenter for By-Products Utilization RECENT ADVANCES IN RECYCLING CLEAN- COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

419

Hydrogen Production CODES & STANDARDS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrogen Production DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS for 2010 · Reduce the cost of distributed production of hydrogen from natural gas and/or liquid fuels to $1 SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pete Devlin #12;Hydrogen

420

Strangeness Production at COSY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper gives an overview of strangeness-production experiments at the Cooler Synchrotron COSY. Results on kaon-pair and phi meson production in pp, pd and dd collisions, hyperon-production experiments and Lambda p final-state interaction studies are presented.

Frank Hinterberger; Hartmut Machner; Regina Siudak

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH FOR MANAGING ASR By Zichao Wu and Tarun R College of Engineering and Applied Science THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN­MILWAUKEE #12;USE OF CLEAN-COAL ASH combustion by-products (such as clean-coal ash) from power plants. Maximum recycling of such by- products

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

422

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST OF CLASS F FLYASHAND CLEAN-COAL ASHBLENDS FOR CAST CONCRETE PRODUCTS Authors: TarunR.Naik, Director, Center,Illinois Clean Coal Institute RudolphN.Kraus, Research Associate, UWM Center forBy-Products Utilization Shiw S

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

423

Product Designation Process  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The process for designating products was developed to maximize energy savings within Federal agencies, which are required by law to purchase products designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Products that meet FEMP-designated efficiency requirements are in the upper 25% of their class in energy efficiency.

424

Covered Product Categories  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Federal agencies are required by law to purchase products that are designated by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP-designated) or qualified by ENERGY STAR. Choose a product category for information about purchasing, installing, and using energy-efficient products.

425

MECO Production Target Developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be reoptimized Tungsten target Simulations of design parameters with GEANT3 indicate that both production targetMECO Production Target Developments James L. Popp University of California, Irvine NuFact'03 Columbia, June, 2003 #12;June, 2003J.L.Popp, UCI MECO Production Target 2 MECO Collaboration Institute

McDonald, Kirk

426

CROSS SECTIONS AND FIELD MAPS: CHEROKEE AND BUG FIELDS, SAN JUAN COUNTY, UTAH, AND LITTLE UTE AND SLEEPING UTE FIELDS, MONTEZUMA COUNTY, COLORADO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 400 million barrels (64 million m{sup 3}) of oil have been produced from the shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian (Desmoinesian) Paradox Formation in the Paradox Basin, Utah and Colorado. With the exception of the giant Greater Aneth field, the other 100 plus oil fields in the basin typically contain 2 to 10 million barrels (0.3-1.6 million m{sup 3}) of original oil in place. Most of these fields are characterized by high initial production rates followed by a very short productive life (primary), and hence premature abandonment. Only 15 to 25 percent of the original oil in place is recoverable during primary production from conventional vertical wells. An extensive and successful horizontal drilling program has been conducted in the giant Greater Aneth field. However, to date, only two horizontal wells have been drilled in small Ismay and Desert Creek fields. The results from these wells were disappointing due to poor understanding of the carbonate facies and diagenetic fabrics that create reservoir heterogeneity. These small fields, and similar fields in the basin, are at high risk of premature abandonment. At least 200 million barrels (31.8 million m{sup 3}) of oil will be left behind in these small fields because current development practices leave compartments of the heterogeneous reservoirs undrained. Through proper geological evaluation of the reservoirs, production may be increased by 20 to 50 percent through the drilling of low-cost single or multilateral horizontal legs from existing vertical development wells. In addition, horizontal drilling from existing wells minimizes surface disturbances and costs for field development, particularly in the environmentally sensitive areas of southeastern Utah and southwestern Colorado.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; David E. Eby; Laura L. Wray

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Record of the facility deactivation, decommissioning, and material disposition (D and D) workshop: A new focus for technology development, opportunities for industry/government collaboration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This workshop was held at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia, on July 11--12, 1995. The workshop sought to establish a foundation for continued dialogue between industry and the DOE to ensure that industry`s experiences, lessons learned, and recommendations are incorporated into D and D program policy, strategy, and plans. The mission of the D and D Focus Area is to develop improved technologies, processes and products, to characterize, deactivate, survey, maintain, decontaminate, dismantle, and dispose of DOE surplus structures, buildings, and contents. The target is a five-to-one return on investment through cost avoidance. The cornerstone of the D and D focus area activities is large-scale demonstration projects that actually decontaminate, decommission, and dispose of a building. The aim is to demonstrate innovative D and D technologies as part of an ongoing DOE D and D project. OTD would pay the incremental cost of demonstrating the innovative technologies. The goal is to have the first demonstration project completed within the next 2 years. The intent is to select projects, or a project, with visible impact so all of the stakeholders know that a building was removed, and demonstrate at a scale that is convincing to the customers in the EM program so they feel comfortable using it in subsequent D and D projects. The plan is to use a D and D integrating contractor who can then use the expertise in this project to use in jobs at other DOE sites.

Bedick, R.C.; Bossart, S.J.; Hart, P.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

Stark, Dudley

429

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

430

Microbial-enhanced waterflood field experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A microbial-enhanced waterflood field project sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Microbial Systems Corp. (MSC), and INJECTECH, Inc., and being conducted in cooperation with the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER) was initiated in October of 1986. The purpose of the project was to determine if injection of a microbial formulation could increase oil production in a mature waterflood. The site selected for the project is in the Mink Unit of the Delaware-Childers field in Nowata County, Oklahoma. The pilot area consists of four adjacent inverted five-spot patterns drilled on five-acre spacing. Baseline monitoring was conducted to establish pretest conditions from October 28, 1986, to March 17, 1987. Fluid samples were collected on a weekly basis from producing wells and analyzed for microbial populations, total dissolved solids (TDS), trace mineral analyses, pH, and oil viscosities. Other parameters measured included total oil production (Mink unit); total water production (Mink unit); injection well pressures and fluid rates from each well; and water-oil ratio from each well. Laboratory studies were conducted to screen microbes for the test. Several different microbial formulations were tested in Berea sandstone cores with Mink Unit water and crude oil to determine oil recovery efficiency. A core from the Delaware-Childers field was flooded with the microbial formulation selected for the project. The microbial system recovered 28% of the residual crude oil remaining in the core after waterflooding.

Bryant, R.S.; Burchfield, T.E.; Hitzman, D.O.; Porter, R.E.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Radiation Field on Superspace  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the dynamics of multiwormhole configurations within the framework of the Euclidean Polyakov approach to string theory, incorporating a modification to the Hamiltonian which makes it impossible to interpret the Coleman Alpha parameters of the effective interactions as a quantum field on superspace, reducible to an infinite tower of fields on space-time. We obtain a Planckian probability measure for the Alphas that allows $\\frac{1}{2}\\alpha^{2}$ to be interpreted as the energy of the quanta of a radiation field on superspace whose values may still fix the coupling constants.

P. F. Gonzalez-Diaz

1994-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

432

Magnetic Field Measurement System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

433

Forensic Proteomics of Poxvirus Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The field of microbial forensics has recently sought to develop methods to discern biological signatures to indicate production methods for biological agents. Viral agents have received less attention to date. Their obligate propagation in living cells makes purification from cellular material a challenge. This leads to potential carryover of protein-rich signature of their production system. Here we have explored a proteomic analysis of Vaccinia virus as a model poxvirus system in which to compare samples of virus propagated in different cell lines and subjected to different purification schemes. The proteomic data sets indicated viral, host cell and culture medium proteins, and several layers of data analysis were applied to build confidence in the peptide identification and capture information on the taxonomic utility of each. The analysis showed clear shifts in protein profiles with virus purification, with successive gradient purification steps showing different levels of viral protein enrichment. Peptides from cellular proteins, including those present in purified virus preparations, provided signatures which enabled discrimination of cell line substrates, including distinguishing between cells derived from different primate species. The ability to discern multiple aspects of viral production demonstrates the potential value of proteomic analysis as tool for microbial forensics.

Wunschel, David S.; Tulman, Edan; Engelmann, Heather E.; Clowers, Brian H.; Geary, Steven J.; Robinson, Aaron C.; Liao, Xiaofen

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

434

Photovoltaic product directory and buyers guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Basic information on photovoltaic conversion technology is provided for those unfamiliar with the field. Various types of photovoltaic products and systems currently available off-the-shelf are described. These include products without batteries, battery chargers, power packages, home electric systems, and partial systems. Procedures are given for designing a photovoltaic system from scratch. A few custom photovoltaic systems are described, and a list is compiled of photovoltaic firms which can provide custom systems. Guidance is offered for deciding whether or not to use photovoltaic products. A variety of installations are described and their performance is appraised by the owners. Information is given on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments. Sources of additional information on photovoltaics are listed. A matrix is provided indicating the sources of various types of photovoltaic products. The addresses of suppliers are listed. (LEW)

Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Iran outlines oil productive capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

National Iranian Oil Co. (NIOC) tested production limits last month to prove a claim of 4 million bd capacity made at September's meeting of the organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. Onshore fields account for 3.6 million bd of the total, with offshore fields providing the rest. NIOC plans to expand total capacity to 4.5 million bd by April 1993, consisting of 4 million b/d onshore and 500,000 b/d offshore. Middle East Economic Survey says questions remain about completion dates for gas injection, drilling, and offshore projects, but expansion targets are attainable within the scheduled time. NIOC said some slippage may be unavoidable, but it is confident the objective will be reached by third quarter 1993 at the latest. More than 60 rigs are working or about to be taken under contract to boost development drilling in onshore fields and provide gas injection in some. NIOC has spent $3.2 billion in foreign exchange on the drilling program in the last 2 1/2 years.

Not Available

1992-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

Sports Field Maintenance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coaches are often more concerned with injuries, personnel problems and opponents than with the condition of the turf on their playing fields. This publication discusses management strategies, including mowing, fertilizing, watering and renovating...

Duble, Richard L.

1995-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Temporary Hourly Archaeological Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, conduct applied research, and offer career development and learning opportunities to support resource carpooled. RESPONSIBILITIES Under the general direction of the CEMML archaeological Crew Chief, conduct archaeological field work involving archaeological inventory survey operations on various tracts of military

438

Intelligent field emission arrays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Field emission arrays (FEAs) have been studied extensively as potential electron sources for a number of vacuum microelectronic device applications. For most applications, temporal current stability and spatial current ...

Hong, Ching-yin, 1973-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Reversed field pinch diagnostics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

Weber, P.G.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Salt Wash Field, Grand Country, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Salt Wash field is located 15 miles southeast of Green River, Utah, in the Paradox fold and fault belt. The field was discovered in 1961 and has produced over 1.3 million bbl of oil and 11.6 billion ft[sup 3] of gas from the Mississippian Leadville LImestone. The average surface elevation is 4389 ft above sea level, and the depth to the top of the oil production is form 8500 to 8914 ft. Salt Wash field is an anticline with over 200 ft of closure on top of the Leadville. The producing zone is in the lower Leadville with intercrystalline and vuggy porosity developed in limestone and crystalline dolomitic limestone. The produced oil is a 50 to 53 API gravity crude with a 40[degrees]F pour point. The gas, a mixture of two sources, is predominately nitrogen (>70[sup [approximately

Morgan, C.D. (Utah Geological Survey, Salt Lake City, UT (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HTP over Function Fields HTP over Function Fields Alexandra Shlapentokh East Carolina University AMS-ASL-MAA Panel on Hilberts Tenth Problem San Francisco January 14, 2010 #12;HTP over Function's known about HTP over Function Fields. Field Results for Characteristic 0 Field Results for Positive

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

442

Product development practices that matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

Gupta, Nisheeth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wood Products 201213 Student Handbook Ecosystem Science and Management College ........................................................................................................................... 2 Wood Products Undergraduate Program ...................................................................................................................................................... 3 Careers for Wood Products Majors

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

444

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relaxations for Production Planning Problems with Increasing By-products Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff, James Leudtke SILO Seminars: Feb 1, 2012 #12;One slide summary Problem Description Production process involves desirable & undesirable products. Srikrishna Sridhar, Jeff Linderoth, James Leudtke SILO Seminars

Sheridan, Jennifer

445

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multi-Period Production Capacity Planning for Integrated Product and Production System Design* Emre.ac.uk kazu@umich.edu .Abstract ­ This paper presents a simulation-based method to aid multi-period production capacity planning by quantifying the trade-off between product quality and production cost. The product

Saitou, Kazuhiro "Kazu"

446

Dictionary of petroleum exploration, drilling, and production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains more than 20,000 definitions of oil exploration, drilling, and production terms, making this dictionary mandatory for both the experienced industry professional and the nontechnical person. Completing this comprehensive reference are more than 500 detailed illustrations. Appendices include a rotary rig diagram, a cable tool drilling rig, a beam pumping unit, giant oil fields of the world, giant oil, and gas fields of the United States and Canada, a geological time chart, geological map symbols, conversion factors, the Greek alphabet atomic weights and numbers, charts of the geological features of the United States and Canada, plus much, much more.

Hyne, N.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC-DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;FIELD TEST OF A HIGH-EFFICIENCY, AUTOMATIC- DEFROST REFRIGERATOR-FREEZER By Richard F. Topping and manufacture pre-production units for home usage tests. The purpose of the field test and the associated market been promising. The first five months of field test data have shown an average 57% decrease in energy

Oak Ridge National Laboratory

448

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LENNOX HEARTH PRODUCTS April 1, 2011 Mr. Daniel Cohen U.S. Department of Energy Assistant General Council for Legislation, Regulation and Energy Efficiency Office of the General...

449

Furfuryl alcohol cellular product  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-extinguishing rigid foam products are formed by polymerization of furfuryl alcohol in the presence of a lightweight, particulate, filler, zinc chloride and selected catalysts.

Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.

1982-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

450

Sustainable hydrogen production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the Sustainable Hydrogen Production research conducted at the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) for the past year. The report presents the work done on the following four tasks: Task 1--production of hydrogen by photovoltaic-powered electrolysis; Task 2--solar photocatalytic hydrogen production from water using a dual-bed photosystem; Task 3--development of solid electrolytes for water electrolysis at intermediate temperatures; and Task 4--production of hydrogen by thermocatalytic cracking of natural gas. For each task, this report presents a summary, introduction/description of project, and results.

Block, D.L.; Linkous, C.; Muradov, N.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Microsystem product development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Biogas Production Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Biogas Production Technologies Ruihong Zhang, Professor Biological and Agricultural Engineering University of California, Davis Email: rhzhang@ucdavis.edu Biogas and Fuel Cell...

453

Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Inner product and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit II-1 Inner products 1 Unit II-1 Inner product and orthogonality Unit II-1 Inner products 2 Real inner product · V is a real vector space · for u,vV define a scalar satisfying: linear: symmetric: positive definite: · is called an inner product of u and v · V with an inner product defined is called

Birkett, Stephen

454

Understanding and Improving Software Productivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding and Improving Software Productivity Walt Scacchi Institute for Software Research;2 Introduction · What affects software productivity? ­ Software productivity has been one of the most studied aspects of software engineering ­ Goal: review sample of empirical studies of software productivity

Scacchi, Walt

455

Fields and Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The quantum field theories (QFT) constructed in [1,2] include phenomenology of interest. The constructions approximate: scattering by $1/r$ and Yukawa potentials in non-relativistic approximations; and the first contributing order of the Feynman series for Compton scattering. To have a semi-norm, photon states are constrained to transverse polarizations and for Compton scattering, the constructed cross section deviates at large momentum exchanges from the cross section prediction of the Feynman rules. Discussion includes the incompatibility of canonical quantization with the constructed interacting fields, and the role of interpretations of quantum mechanics in realizing QFT.

Glenn Eric Johnson

2014-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

456

Microbial field pilot study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot test in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate-reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been preferentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. During this quarter an additional tracer study was performed in the field to determine pre-treatment flow paths and the first nutrients were injected. 2 figs.

Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

457

Integrated reservoir management in the Carpinteria Offshore Field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carpinteria Offshore Field is located near Santa Barbara, California. The State of California owns the portion of the field nearest the coast, and the US Federal Government the portion of the field that lies beyond a statutory three-mile coastal water limit. This mature reservoir has yielded more than 100 million barrels of oil from five platforms in its 30 years of production. The US Department of Energy`s Los Alamos National Laboratory (managed by the University of California) has joined with the State Lands Commission of California, the US Department of Interior`s Minerals Management Service, and the independent operator of the field, Pacific Operators Offshore, Inc., in a unique collaboration to redevelop the field. The reservoir management strategy for the Carpinteria Field relies on a long-term investment in simulation tools and expertise. These technologies and expertise are available to all project participants through a virtual enterprise business model.

Whitney, E.M.; Pawar, R.J.; Kendall, R.P.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

458

Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

459

Production of mesoscopic superpositions with ultracold atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study mesoscopic superpositions of two component Bose-Einstein condensates. Atomic condensates, with long coherence times, are good systems in which to study such quantum phenomenon. We show that the mesoscopic superposition states can be rapidly generated in which the atoms dispersively interact with the photon field in a cavity. We also discuss the production of compass states which are generalized Schr\\"{o}dinger cat states. The physical realization of mesoscopic states is important in studying decoherence and precision measurement.

H. T. Ng

2007-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

460

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-first Century, Hyderabad, India, February 1999. Department of Civil EngineeringandMechanics College) of foundry by-products, including foundry sand and slag. Most of these by-products are landfilled, primarily due to non-availability of economically attractive use options. Landfilling is not a desirable option

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposition field production" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

include workability, water requirement, bleeding, segregation, air content, time of set, and temperature with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

462

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-strength materials (CLSM); and, future research needs. The fresh concrete properties discussed are workability, water with and without by-products, and soil and groundwater remediation technologies including bioremediation. ACI for power production. Its combustion in electric power plants produces large amounts of fly ash and bottom

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

463

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

clean coal technology, are not extensively utilized in the cast concrete masonry products (bricks both conventional and clean coal technologies. A clean coal ash is defined as the ash derived from SO2Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLASS F FLY ASH AND CLEAN-COAL ASH BLENDS FOR CAST

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

464

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ash or CFAs. Based on these properties, a number of constructive use options such as #12;pollution by saw mills, pulp mills, and the wood-products industry, by burning a combination of wood products control [3], land application [9,10,11], construction materials [13,14], have been reported. However, most

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

465

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WOOD PRODUCTS AND UTILIZATION V #12;#12;443USDA Forest Service Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-160. 1997. Section Overview Wood Products and Utilization1 John R. Shelly2 Forests are obviously a very important asset to California, and their economic and social value to the state is well documented. Wood

Standiford, Richard B.

466

& CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY PRODUCTION & CONSUMPTION US HYDROPOWER PRODUCTION In the United States hydropower supplies 12% of the nation's electricity. Hydropower produces more than 90,000 megawatts of electricity, which is enough to meet the needs of 28.3 million consumers. Hydropower accounts for over 90% of all electricity

467

Phenomenology of ``Onium'' Production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of heavy quarkonia production in hadron collisions is reviewed. The theoretical predictions are compared to data. Commonly used production models are shown to fail in explaining all the experimental findings. The shortcomings of these models are analysed and possible improvements are discussed.

Matteo Cacciari

1995-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

468

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Naik, Rudolph N. Kraus, Shiw S. Singh, Lori- Lynn C. Pennock, and Bruce Ramme Report No. CBU-2001 with numerous projects on the use of by-product materials including utilization of used foundry sand and fly ash;2 INTRODUCTION Wood FA is generated due to combustion of wood for energy production at pulp and paper mills, saw

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

469

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization USE OF CLEAN COAL ASH AS SETTING TIME REGULATOR IN PORTLAND OF WISCONSIN ­ MILWAUKEE #12;2 Use of Clean Coal Ash as Setting Time Regulator in Portland Cement by Zichao Wu as setting time regulator for portland cement production. In this paper a source of clean coal ash (CCA

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

470

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Center for By-Products Utilization HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R #12;1 HIGH-STRENGTH HVFA CONCRETE CONTAINING CLEAN COAL ASH By Tarun R. Naik, Shiw S. Singh, and Bruce for manufacture of cement-based products using ashes generated from combustion of high-sulfur coals. A clean coal

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

471