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1

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

through March 3, 2011, Phoenix, Arizona. C.H. Benson, W.J. Waugh, W.H. Albright, G.M. Smith, R.P. Bush Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test More Documents...

2

Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

Benson, C.H. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Waugh, W.J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Grand Junction, Colorado; Albright, W.H. [Desert Research Institute, Reno, Nevada; Smith, G.M. [Geo-Smith Engineering, Grand Junction, Colorado; Bush, R.P. [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado

2011-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

disposal_cell.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

With the With the April 24, 1997, ceremonial ground-breaking for disposal facility construction, the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) moved into the final stage of cleanup, treatment, and disposal of uranium- processing wastes. The cleanup of the former uranium- refining plant consisted of three primary operations: Demolition and removal of remaining concrete pads and foundations that supported the 44 structures and buildings on site Treatment of selected wastes Permanent encapsulation of treated and untreated waste in an onsite engineered disposal facility In September l993, a Record of Decision (ROD) was signed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), with concurrence by the Missouri Department of Natural

4

New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Services Ecosystem Management Team New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal...

5

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cheney Disposal Cell - 008  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Cheney Disposal Cell (008) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: All of the uranium mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials from the former Grand Junction uranium mill site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The cell is authorized to remain open until 2003 to accept any additional byproduct materials from Title I UMTRA sites and the Monticello, Utah site; e.g. materials from additional vicinity properties that may be identified. The Department of Energy¿s Grand Junction Office is responsible for Long Term Surveillance and Maintenance

6

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories… (more)

Hoag, Christopher Ian.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

materials from the Slick RockOld North Continent site and the Slick RockUnion Carbide site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The Department of Energys...

8

A microelectronic design for low-cost disposable chemical sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept and design of integrated microelectronics for a low-cost disposable chemical sensor. The critical aspects of this chemical sensor are the performance of the microelectronic chip ...

Laval, Stuart S. (Stuart Sean), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Canister design for deep borehole disposal of nuclear waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis was to design a canister for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other high-level waste in deep borehole repositories using currently available and proven oil, gas, and geothermal drilling ...

Hoag, Christopher Ian

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Design of a Large Explosive Ordnance Disposal Robot  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The explosive ordnance disposal robot (EOD robot) can replace man to reconnoiter, remove and deal with explosives or other dangerous articles in the dangerous environment. We design a large EOD robot which is constituted by the vehicle body, the mechanical ... Keywords: EOD robot, vehicle body, mechanical hand, vision system

Boyu Wei; Junyao Gao; Jianguo Zhu; Kejie Li

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance

12

Long-Term Performance of Uranium Tailings Disposal Cells - 13340  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recently, there has been interest in the performance and evolution of Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell covers because some sites are not compliant with groundwater standards. Field observations of UMTRA disposal cells indicate that rock covers tend to become vegetated and that saturated conductivities in the upper portion of radon barriers may increase due to freeze/thaw cycles and biointrusion. This paper describes the results of modeling that addresses whether these potential changes and transient drainage of moisture in the tailings affect overall performance of the disposal cells. A numerical unsaturated/saturated 3-dimensional flow model was used to simulate whether increases in saturated conductivities in radon barriers with rock covers affect the overall performance of the disposal cells using field data from the Shiprock, NM, UMTRA site. A unique modeling approach allowed simulation with daily climatic conditions to determine changes in moisture and moisture flux from the disposal cell. Modeling results indicated that increases in the saturated conductivity at the top of radon barrier do not influence flux from the tailings with time because the tailings behave similar hydraulically to the radon barrier. The presence of a thin layer of low conductivity material anywhere in the cover or tailings restricts flux in the worst case to the saturated conductivity of that material. Where materials are unsaturated at depth within the radon barrier of tailings slimes, conductivities are typically less than 10{sup -8} centimeters per second. If the low conductivity layer is deep within the disposal cell, its saturated properties are less likely to change with time. The significance of this modeling is that operation and maintenance of the disposal cells can be minimized if they are allowed to progress to a natural condition with some vegetation and soil genesis. Because the covers and underlying tailings have a very low saturated hydraulic conductivity after transient drainage, eventually the amount of moisture leaving the tailings has a negligible effect on groundwater quality. Although some of the UMTRA sites are not in compliance with the groundwater standards, the explanation may be legacy contamination from mining, or earlier higher fluxes from the tailings or unlined processing ponds. Investigation of other legacy sources at the UMTRA sites may help explain persistent groundwater contamination. (authors)

Bostick, Kent; Daniel, Anamary; Pill, Ken [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States)] [Professional Project Services, Inc., 1100 Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN, 37922 (United States); Tachiev, Georgio; Noosai, Nantaporn; Villamizar, Viviana [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)] [Florida International University, 10555 W. Flagler St., EC 2100, Miami FL, 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

System design for disposal of tritium at TFTR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) has cleanup systems which convert tritium gas to the oxide form and absorb it on molecular sieve beds. These beds are regenerated by transferring their moisture content to disposable sieve beds. Preparing this sieve for disposal can be awkward and hazardous. Monitoring the tritium and moisture content of the disposable sieve is not straightforward. Modifications to the regeneration system at the TFTR are being made to address these concerns and others relating to maintainability.

Tuohy, J.M.; Cherdack, R.; Lacy, N.H.

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Conceptual Design Report for Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This conceptual design report addresses development of replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability for the Idaho National Laboratory. Current disposal capability at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex is planned until the facility is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). This conceptual design report includes key project assumptions; design options considered in development of the proposed onsite disposal facility (the highest ranked alternative for providing continued uninterrupted remote-handled low level waste disposal capability); process and facility descriptions; safety and environmental requirements that would apply to the proposed facility; and the proposed cost and schedule for funding, design, construction, and operation of the proposed onsite disposal facility.

Lisa Harvego; David Duncan; Joan Connolly; Margaret Hinman; Charles Marcinkiewicz; Gary Mecham

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

Seitz, Roger R. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Suttora, Linda C. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Site Restoration, Germantown, MD (United States); Phifer, Mark [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved about two miles per hour on a trailer with 224 tires towed by a semi-truck. Workers safely transported the cell from the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR-C) to an onsite landfill two miles away. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination Occupational Safety Performance Trends

17

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved about two miles per hour on a trailer with 224 tires towed by a semi-truck. Workers safely transported the cell from the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR-C) to an onsite landfill two miles away. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters CX-002327: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001627: Categorical Exclusion Determination

18

Graphene sheets fabricated from disposable paper cups as a catalyst support material for fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Graphene sheets fabricated from disposable paper cups as a catalyst support material for fuel cells Hong Zhao and T. S. Zhao* Disposable paper-cups are used for the formation of graphene sheets with Fe2+ as a catalyst. The proposed synthesis strategy not only enables graphene sheets to be produced in high yield

Zhao, Tianshou

19

Engineering safety evaluation for 22 ton steel disposal box lifting bail design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this analysis is to design and analyze the lifting bail of the 22 Ton Steel Waste Disposal Box (SWDB). The new design takes the original lifting bail and adds a hinge allowing the top portion of the bail to fold over towards the lid.

BOEHNKE, W.M.

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

20

Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NITROGEN REMOVAL FOR ON-SITE SEWAGE DISPOSAL: A RECIRCULATING SAND FILTER/ROCK TANK DESIGN, C. G. McKiel ABSTRACT: The nitrogen removal abilities of recirculating sand filter/rock tank (RSF) systems and conventional septic tank/soil absorption trench systems were compared in a field laboratory

Gold, Art

22

Reference design and operations for deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reference design and operational procedures for the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in deep boreholes have been developed and documented. The design and operations are feasible with currently available technology and meet existing safety and anticipated regulatory requirements. Objectives of the reference design include providing a baseline for more detailed technical analyses of system performance and serving as a basis for comparing design alternatives. Numerous factors suggest that deep borehole disposal of high-level radioactive waste is inherently safe. Several lines of evidence indicate that groundwater at depths of several kilometers in continental crystalline basement rocks has long residence times and low velocity. High salinity fluids have limited potential for vertical flow because of density stratification and prevent colloidal transport of radionuclides. Geochemically reducing conditions in the deep subsurface limit the solubility and enhance the retardation of key radionuclides. A non-technical advantage that the deep borehole concept may offer over a repository concept is that of facilitating incremental construction and loading at multiple perhaps regional locations. The disposal borehole would be drilled to a depth of 5,000 m using a telescoping design and would be logged and tested prior to waste emplacement. Waste canisters would be constructed of carbon steel, sealed by welds, and connected into canister strings with high-strength connections. Waste canister strings of about 200 m length would be emplaced in the lower 2,000 m of the fully cased borehole and be separated by bridge and cement plugs. Sealing of the upper part of the borehole would be done with a series of compacted bentonite seals, cement plugs, cement seals, cement plus crushed rock backfill, and bridge plugs. Elements of the reference design meet technical requirements defined in the study. Testing and operational safety assurance requirements are also defined. Overall, the results of the reference design development and the cost analysis support the technical feasibility of the deep borehole disposal concept for high-level radioactive waste.

Herrick, Courtney Grant; Brady, Patrick Vane; Pye, Steven; Arnold, Bill Walter; Finger, John Travis; Bauer, Stephen J.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy GJO-99-96-TAR Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance and Risk June 1999 DOE Grand Junction Office June 1999 Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell Page iii Contents Page Executive Summary .....................................................................................................................vii 1.0 Introduction ........................................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Purpose......................................................................................................................... 1

24

Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Depar Depar tment of Energy | Office of Environmental Management For More Information on EM Recovery Act Work, Visit Us on the Web: http://www.em.doe.gov/emrecovery/ EM Recovery NEWS FLASH RECOVERY.GOV ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF November 9, 2011 Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s. Unlike the aircrafts, the 1-million-pound concrete structure moved

25

Hot cell facility design for large fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large hot cell facilities will be necessary to support the operation of large fusion devices. The supporting hot cells will be needed to serve a variety of different functions and tasks, which include reactor component maintenance, tool and maintenance equipment repair, and preparation of radioactive material for shipment and disposal. This paper discusses hot cell facility functions, requirements, and design issues and techniques. Suggested solutions and examples are given.

Barrett, R.J.; Bussell, G.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Hot cell facility design for large fusion devices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large hot cell facilities will be necessary to support the operation of large fusion devices. The supporting hot cells will be needed to serve a variety of different functions and tasks, which include reactor component maintenance, tool and maintenance equipment repair, and preparation of radioactive material for shipment and disposal. This paper discusses hot cell facility functions, requirements, and design issues and techniques. Suggested solutions and examples are given.

Barrett, R.J.; Bussell, G.T.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

PORFLOW MODELING FOR A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE PERFORMANCE OF NEW SALTSTONE DISPOSAL UNIT DESIGNS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the request of Savannah River Remediation (SRR), SRNL has analyzed the expected performance obtained from using seven 32 million gallon Saltstone Disposal Units (SDUs) in the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) to store future saltstone grout. The analysis was based on preliminary SDU final design specifications. The analysis used PORFLOW modeling to calculate the release of 20 radionuclides from an SDU and transport of the radionuclides and daughters through the vadose zone. Results from this vadose zone analysis were combined with previously calculated releases from existing saltstone vaults and FDCs and a second PORFLOW model run to calculate aquifer transport to assessment points located along a boundary 100 m from the nearest edge of the SDF sources. Peak concentrations within 12 sectors spaced along the 100 m boundary were determined over a period of evaluation extending 20,000 years after SDF closure cap placement. These peak concentrations were provided to SRR to use as input for dose calculations.

Smith, F.

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of Long-Term Performance More Documents & Publications Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings Performance Evaluation of the...

29

Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

Boyd D. Chirstensen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Safety Design Strategy for the Remote Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3A, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3A and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project.

Boyd D. Chirstensen

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Functional design criteria for Project W-252, Phase II Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal: Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the functional design criteria required for the Phase 2 Liquid Effluent Treatment and Disposal Project, Project W-252. Project W-252 shall provide new facilities and existing facility modifications required to implement Best Available Technology/All Known, Available, and Reasonable Methods of Prevention, Control, and Treatment (BAT/AKART) for the 200 East Phase II Liquid Effluent Streams. The project will also provide a 200 East Area Phase II Effluent Collection System (PTECS) for connection to a disposal system for relevant effluent streams to which BAT/AKART has been applied. Liquid wastestreams generated in the 200 East Area are currently discharged to the soil column. Included in these wastestreams are cooling water, steam condensate, raw water, and sanitary wastewaters. It is the policy of the DOE that the use of soil columns to treat and retain radionuclides and nonradioactive contaminants be discontinued at the earliest practical time in favor of wastewater treatment and waste minimization. In 1989, the DOE entered into an interagency agreement with Ecology and EPA. This agreement is referred to as the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement). Project W-252 is one of the projects required to achieve the milestones set forth in the Tri-Party Agreement. One of the milestones requires BAT/AKART implementation for Phase II streams by October 1997. This Functional Design Criteria (FDC) document provides the technical baseline required to initiate Project W-252 to meet the Tri-Party Agreement milestone for the application of BAT/AKART to the Phase II effluents.

Hatch, C.E.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

32

Disposal of SNL-designed electronics assemblies associated with the nuclear weapons program: Challenges and progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the common waste streams generated throughout the nuclear weapon complex is ``hardware`` originating from the nuclear weapons program. The activities associated with this hardware at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) include design and development, environmental testing, reliability and stockpile surveillance testing, and military liaison training. SNL-designed electronic assemblies include radars, arming/fusing/firing systems, power sources, and use-control and safety systems. Waste stream characterization using process knowledge is difficult due to the age of some components and lack of design information oriented towards hazardous constituent identification. Chemical analysis methods such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) are complicated by the inhomogeneous character of these components and the fact that many assemblies have aluminum or stainless steel cases, with the electronics encapsulated in a foam or epoxy matrix. In addition, some components may contain explosives, radioactive materials, toxic substances (PCBs, asbestos), and other regulated or personnel hazards which must be identified prior to handling and disposal. In spite of the above difficulties, we have succeeded in characterizing a limited number of weapon components using a combination of process knowledge and chemical analysis. For these components, we have shown that if the material is regulated as RCRA hazardous waste, it is because the waste exhibits one or more hazardous characteristics; primarily reactivity and/or toxicity (Pb, Cd).

Chambers, W.B.; Chavez, S.L.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Disposal of SNL-designed electronics assemblies associated with the nuclear weapons program: Challenges and progress  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the common waste streams generated throughout the nuclear weapon complex is hardware'' originating from the nuclear weapons program. The activities associated with this hardware at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) include design and development, environmental testing, reliability and stockpile surveillance testing, and military liaison training. SNL-designed electronic assemblies include radars, arming/fusing/firing systems, power sources, and use-control and safety systems. Waste stream characterization using process knowledge is difficult due to the age of some components and lack of design information oriented towards hazardous constituent identification. Chemical analysis methods such as the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) are complicated by the inhomogeneous character of these components and the fact that many assemblies have aluminum or stainless steel cases, with the electronics encapsulated in a foam or epoxy matrix. In addition, some components may contain explosives, radioactive materials, toxic substances (PCBs, asbestos), and other regulated or personnel hazards which must be identified prior to handling and disposal. In spite of the above difficulties, we have succeeded in characterizing a limited number of weapon components using a combination of process knowledge and chemical analysis. For these components, we have shown that if the material is regulated as RCRA hazardous waste, it is because the waste exhibits one or more hazardous characteristics; primarily reactivity and/or toxicity (Pb, Cd).

Chambers, W.B.; Chavez, S.L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 ?g/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

Bush, Richard P. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (United States); Morrison, Stan J. [S.M. Stoller Corporation (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

slc_disposal.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposal Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site at Salt Lake City, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Salt Lake City, Utah, Disposal Site ENERGY Office of Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Site Description and History Regulatory Setting The Salt Lake Disposal Site is located approximately 81 miles west of Salt Lake City and 2.5 miles south of Interstate 80 on the eastern edge of the Great Salt Lake Desert. The disposal cell is adjacent to Energy Solutions, Inc., a commercial low-level radioactive materials disposal site. The surrounding area is sparsely populated, and the nearest residences are at least 15 miles from the site. Vegetation in the area is sparse and typical of semiarid low shrubland. The disposal cell encapsulates about

36

Design and operational considerations of United States commercial near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In accordance with the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, states are responsible for providing for disposal of commercially generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) within their borders. LLW in the US is defined as all radioactive waste that is not classified as spent nuclear fuel, high-level radioactive waste, transuranic waste, or by-product material resulting from the extraction of uranium from ore. Commercial waste includes LLW generated by hospitals, universities, industry, pharmaceutical companies, and power utilities. LLW generated by the country`s defense operations is the responsibility of the Federal government and its agency, the Department of Energy. The commercial LLRW disposal sites discussed in this report are located near: Sheffield, Illinois (closed); Maxey Flats, Kentucky (closed); Beatty, Nevada (closed); West Valley, New York (closed); Barnwell, South Carolina (operating); Richland, Washington (operating); Ward Valley, California, (proposed); Sierra Blanca, Texas (proposed); Wake County, North Carolina (proposed); and Boyd County, Nebraska (proposed). While some comparisons between the sites described in this report are appropriate, this must be done with caution. In addition to differences in climate and geology between sites, LLW facilities in the past were not designed and operated to today`s standards. This report summarizes each site`s design and operational considerations for near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste. The report includes: a description of waste characteristics; design and operational features; post closure measures and plans; cost and duration of site characterization, construction, and operation; recent related R and D activities for LLW treatment and disposal; and the status of the LLW system in the US.

Birk, S.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

The WIPP is the nation's first geologic facility designed for permanent disposal of transuranic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to report to EPA planned and unplanned changes in activities and con- ditions at WIPP. EPA reviews in the 1980's, DOE excavated a mine 2,100 feet under- ground in the natural salt formations outside Carlsbad disposal standards. The first shipment of waste arrived at the WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory

38

Annotated bibliography for the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of spent fuel and high-level waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography identifies documents that are pertinent to the design of waste packages for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The bibliography is divided into fourteen subject categories so that anyone wishing to review the subject of leaching, for example, can turn to the leaching section and review the abstracts of reports which are concerned primarily with leaching. Abstracts are also cross referenced according to secondary subject matter so that one can get a complete list of abstracts for any of the fourteen subject categories. All documents which by their title alone appear to deal with the design of waste packages for the geologic disposal of spent fuel or high-level waste were obtained and reviewed. Only those documents which truly appear to be of interest to a waste package designer were abstracted. The documents not abstracted are listed in a separate section. There was no beginning date for consideration of a document for review. About 1100 documents were reviewed and about 450 documents were abstracted.

Wurm, K.J.; Miller, N.E.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

Phifer, M.

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

40

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 1 0 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

dsvdoped regulations for tfw issuanca of e general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTM Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general Iiamse...

42

Disposal of boiler ash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As more boilers are converted from oil to solid fuels such as coal, the quantity of ash requiring disposal will increase dramatically. The factors associated with the development of land disposal systems for ash landfills are presented, including ash characterization, site selection procedures, design parameters, and costs.

Atwell, J.S.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Impact of Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea SCR System Impact of Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea SCR System Honeycomb ceramic substrates with 3 cell...

44

In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Definitive design report: Design report project W-025, Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Land Disposal Facility NON-DRAG-OFF. Revision 1, Volume 1 and 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the definitive design of the Radioactive Mixed Waste (RMW) Non-Drag-Off disposal facility, Project W-025. This report presents a n of the major landfill design features and a discussion of how each of the criteria is addressed in the design. The appendices include laboratory test results, design drawings, and individual analyses that were conducted in support of the design. Revision 1 of this document incorporates design changes resulting from an increase in the required operating life of the W-025 landfill from 2 to 20 years. The rationale for these design changes is described in Golder Associates Inc. 1991a. These changes include (1) adding a 1.5-foot-thick layer of compacted admix directory-under the primary FML on the floor of the landfill to mitigate the effects of possible stress cracking in the primary flexible membrane liner (FML), and (2) increasing the operations layer thickness from two to three feet over the entire landfill area, to provide additional protection for the secondary admix layer against mechanical damage and the effects of freezing and desiccation. The design of the W-025 Landfill has also been modified in response to the results of the EPA Method 9090 chemical compatibility testing program (Golder Associates Inc. 1991b and 1991c), which was completed after the original design was prepared. This program consisted of testing geosynthetic materials and soil/bentonite admix with synthetic leachate having the composition expected during the life of the W-025 Landfill., The results of this program indicated that the polyester geotextile originally specified for the landfill might be susceptible to deterioration. On this basis, polypropylene geotextiles were substituted as a more chemically-resistant alternative. In addition, the percentage of bentonite in the admix was increased to provide sufficiently low permeability to the expected leachate.

Roscha, V.

1994-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

46

RH-LLW Disposal Facility Project CD-2/3 to Design/Build Proposal Reconciliation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reconciliation plan was developed and implemented to address potential gaps and responses to gaps between the design/build vendor proposals and the Critical Decision-2/3 approval request package for the Remote-Handled Low Level Waste Disposal Facility Project. The plan and results of the plan implementation included development of a reconciliation team comprised of subject matter experts from Battelle Energy Alliance and the Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office, identification of reconciliation questions, reconciliation by the team, identification of unresolved/remaining issues, and identification of follow-up actions and subsequent approvals of responses. The plan addressed the potential for gaps to exist in the following areas: • Department of Energy Order 435.1, “Radioactive Waste Management,” requirements, including the performance assessment, composite analysis, monitoring plan, performance assessment/composite analysis maintenance plan, and closure plan • Environmental assessment supporting the National Environmental Policy Act • Nuclear safety • Safeguards and security • Emplacement operations • Requirements for commissioning • General project implementation. The reconciliation plan and results of the plan implementation are provided in a business-sensitive project file. This report provides the reconciliation plan and non-business sensitive summary responses to identified gaps.

Annette L. Schafer

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

GCTool: Design, Analyze and Compare Fuel Cell Systems and Power...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GCTool: Design, Analyze and Compare Fuel Cell Systems and Power Plants GCTool allows you to design, analyze, and compare different fuel cell configurations, including automotive,...

48

Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Monticello, Utah, Disposal Cell Cover Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the...

49

Septage Disposal, Licensure (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute describes licensing requirements for septage disposal, and addresses land disposal and processing facilities.

50

Evolution of repository and waste package designs for Yucca Mountain disposal system for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper summarizes the evolution of the engineered barrier design for the proposed Yucca Mountain disposal system. Initially, the underground facility used a fairly standard panel and drift layout excavated mostly by drilling and blasting. By 1993, the layout of the underground facility was changed to accommodate construction by a tunnel boring machine. Placement of the repository in unsaturated zone permitted an extended period without backfilling; placement of the waste package in an open drift permitted use of much larger, and thus hotter packages. Hence in 1994, the underground facility design switched from floor emplacement of waste in small, single walled stainless steel or nickel alloy containers to in-drift emplacement of waste in large, double-walled containers. By 2000, the outer layer was a high nickel alloy for corrosion resistance and the inner layer was stainless steel for structural strength. Use of large packages facilitated receipt and disposal of high volumes of spent nuclear fuel. In addition, in-drift package placement saved excavation costs. Options considered for in-drift emplacement included different heat loads and use of backfill. To avoid dripping on the package during the thermal period and the possibility of localized corrosion, titanium drip shields were added for the disposal drifts by 2000. In addition, a handling canister, sealed at the reactor to eliminate further handling of bare fuel assemblies, was evaluated and eventually adopted in 2006. Finally, staged development of the underground layout was adopted to more readily adjust to changes in waste forms and Congressional funding.

Rob P. Rechard; Michael D. Voegele

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Electrochemical Cell Design With A Hollow Gate  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell having a spiral winding around a central core, wherein the central core is provided with longitudinal grooves on its outer surface to facilitate electrolyte filing and accommodate overpressure. The core itself improves dissipation of heat generated along the center of the cell, and the hollow core design allows the cell core to have a larger radius, permitting the "jelly roll" winding to begin at a larger radius and thereby facilitate the initial turns of the winding by decreasing the amount of bending required of the electrode laminate at the beginning of the winding operation. The hollow core also provides mechanical support end-to-end. A pair of washers are used at each end of the cell to sandwich current collection tabs in a manner that improves electrical and thermal conductivity while also providing structural integrity.

Romero, Antonio (Parkton, MD); Oweis, Salah (Ellicott City, MD); Chagnon, Guy (Columbia, MD); Staniewicz, Robert (Hunt Valley, MD); Briscoe, Douglas (Westminster, MD)

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal...

53

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch Disposal Site, Lakeview, Oregon. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lakeview (Collins Ranch) disposal cell, which will be referred to as the Collins Ranch disposal cell throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Innovative Cell Materials and Designs for 300 Mile Range EVs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Multiple On track Test Cell Multiple On track Delivered year 2013 high energy density cells on 11014 On track Systems Integration Design 93112 On track Test Reports...

55

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts The invention also includes electrochemical apparatus that can interface with optical instrumentation. If the working electrode is transparent, light from an optical fiber may be directed through the working electrode and into a cuvette. July 3, 2013 Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts Applications: Electrochemical experiments in solution Electrochemical experiments on surfaces Bulk electrolysis experiments Fuel cells Corrosion studies Academic Labs Teaching and research Benefits: Incorporates disposable, commercially available cuvettes

56

Design methodology to develop a conceptual underground facility for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines the design methodology employed to develop conceptual underground layouts for a prospective high level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This study is in conjunction with the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI), project studying the disposal of high level waste in densely welded tuff. The fundamental design effort concentraes on the effects of the heat released from the decaying waste forms and the impact of this heat on ventilation, waste emplacement configurations, and rock stability. This effort will perfect the design of the waste emplacement layout including emplacement hole spacing, emplacement drift spacing, and the areal power density (APD) for the installed waste. This paper contains only viewgraphs. 11 figs.

Zerga, D.P.; Badie, A.

1986-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

58

22 - Radioactive waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses the disposal of radioactive wastes that arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, beneficial uses of isotopes, and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. The spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. It is anticipated that a multi-barrier system involving packaging and geologic media will provide protection of the public over the centuries. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In some countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is done by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 511 Congress Street, Suite 200, Portland, ME 04101 (United States); Collopy, P. [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States)] [AMEC E and I, Inc., 9210 Sky Park Court, Suite 200, San Diego, CA 92123 (United States); Conant, J. [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)] [ABB Inc., 5 Waterside Crossing, Windsor, CT 06095 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

20 - Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Disposal options are outlined, including geological and near-surface disposal. Alternative disposal options are briefly considered. The multi-barrier system is described, including the natural geological barrier and the engineered barrier system. The roles of both EBS and NGB are discussed. Worldwide disposal experience is reviewed and acceptance criteria for disposal are analysed.

M.I. Ojovan; W.E. Lee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Proposed design requirements for high-integrity containers used to store, transport, and dispose of high-specific-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report develops proposed design requirements for high integrity containers used to store, transport and/or dispose of high-activity, low-level radioactive wastes from Three Mile Island Unit II. The wastes considered are the dewatered resins produced by the EPICOR II waste treatment system used to clean-up the auxiliary building water. The radioactivity level of some of these EPICOR II liners is 1300 curies per container. These wastes may be disposed of in an intermediate depth burial (10 to 20 meter depth) facility. The proposed container design requirements are directed to ensure isolation of the waste and protection of the public health and safety.

Vigil, M.G.; Allen, G.C.; Pope, R.B.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Multipass absorption cell designed for high temperature UHV operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the design and performance of a tunable diode laser system, incorporating a multipass absorption cell to allow determination of water concentration below 10 ppb...

Schaeffer, Ronald D; Sproul, J C; O’Connell, J; van Vloten, C; Mantz, Arlan W

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Fuel cell design for gas hydrates exploration and research.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? In this thesis the design, manufacture and testing of an Alkaline Fuel Cell (AFC) that provide electrical power to a deep sea measurement problem… (more)

Sauer, Gerhard, (Thesis)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Long-Term Surveillance Plan for the Upper Burbank Disposal Cell, Uravan, Colorado, DOE/AL/62350-250, Revision 1, July 1999  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN LONG-TERM SURVEILLANCE PLAN FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DISPOSAL CELL URAUAN, COLORADO July 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Dhrision U MTRA Project Team Albuquerque, New Mexico DOElAU62350-250 REV. 1 Prepared by Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Albuquerque, New Mexico This page intentionally left blank LONG-TERM GURMIWNCE P U N FOR THE UPPER BURBANK DrsPosAL CEU. WYAAI. COhORAOD TABLE OF DONENTe TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 PURPOSEANDSCOPE .............................................................................................. 1-1 2 . 1 1 FINAL SlTE CONDITIONS ................... ...-.... ...............................................*.............. 2-1 ..................................................................... ................... 2

65

DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting the DOE waste canisters and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The disposal containers also interface with the SNF by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents to the waste. The disposal containers interface with the Ex-Container System's emplacement drift disposal container supports. The disposal containers interface with the Canister Transfer System, Waste Emplacement System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and remediation of the disposal container.

F. Habashi

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Long-term surveillance plan for the Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Collins Ranch disposal site, Lakeview, Oregon, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plasmonic Nanostructure Design for Efficient Light Coupling into Solar Cells Vivian E. Ferry, Luke in thin film solar cells. In particular, the ability of plasmonic structures to localize light sunlight into guided modes in thin film Si and GaAs plasmonic solar cells whose back interface is coated

Atwater, Harry

68

Improved Contact Design Methodology for Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A rigorous approach to optimize the layout of the front contact under the real working condition of the solar cell is proposed.

Li, Jing-Jing; Ding, Ding; Lim, Swee Hoe; Zhang, Yong-Hang

69

Design Rules for Efficient Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There has been an intensive search for cost-effective photovoltaics since the development of the first solar cells in the 1950s [1-3...]. Among all the alternative technologies to silicon-based pn-junction solar

Z. Zhu; D. Mühlbacher; M. Morana; M. Koppe…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design & Fabrication of a High-Voltage Photovoltaic Cell  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells are alternative energy sources that are important in sustainable power generation. Currently, applications of PV cells are limited by the low output voltage and somewhat low efficiency of such devices. In light of this fact, this project investigates the possibility of fabricating high-voltage PV cells on float-zone silicon wafers having output voltages ranging from 50 V to 2000 V. Three designs with different geometries of diffusion layers were simulated and compared in terms of metal coverage, recombination, built-in potential, and conduction current density. One design was then chosen and optimized to be implemented in the final device design. The results of the simulation serve as a feasibility test for the design concept and provide supportive evidence of the effectiveness of silicon PV cells as high-voltage power supplies.

Felder, Jennifer; /North Carolina State U. /SLAC

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

71

Micro-bioreactor design for Chinese hamster ovary cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The research objective is to design a micro-bioreactor for the culture of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. There is an increasing demand for upstream development in high-throughput micro-bioreactors specifically for the ...

Goh, Shireen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Optical design of organic solar cell with hybrid plasmonic system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a novel optical design of organic solar cell with a hybrid plasmonic system, which comprises a plasmonic cavity coupled with a dielectric core-metal shell nanosphere. From a...

Sha, Wei E I; Choy, Wallace C H; Chen, Yongpin P; Chew, Weng Cho

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Long-term surveillance plan for the Lowman, Idaho, disposal site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lowman, Idaho, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lowman disposal cell. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This preliminary final LTSP is being submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a requirement for issuance of a general license for custody and long-term care for the disposal site. The general license requires that the disposal cell be cared for in accordance with the provisions of this LTSP. The LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe, and describes, in detail, how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out through the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. The Lowman, Idaho, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program, (DOE, 1992).

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Design and interpretation of cell trajectory assays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...delta, j delta). Simulations are performed in...by some external chemical signal [17...stochastic exclusion process model, allowing...biased exclusion process that has been described...from the discrete simulations are related to a...design. We use Matlab's LSQNONLIN routine...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. DOE will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Long-term Surveillance Plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Falls City disposal site, Falls City, Texas, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials. This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Waste Disposal | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridges cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility....

78

Chapter 22 - Radioactive Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses safe disposal of radioactive waste in order to provide safety to workers and the public. Radioactive wastes arise from a great variety of sources, including the nuclear fuel cycle, and from beneficial uses of isotopes and radiation by institutions. Spent fuel contains uranium, plutonium, and highly radioactive fission products. In the United States spent fuel is accumulating, awaiting the development of a high-level waste repository. A multi-barrier system involving packaging and geological media will provide protection of the public over the centuries the waste must be isolated. The favored method of disposal is in a mined cavity deep underground. In other countries, reprocessing the fuel assemblies permits recycling of materials and disposal of smaller volumes of solidified waste. Transportation of wastes is by casks and containers designed to withstand severe accidents. Low-level wastes (LLWs) come from research and medical procedures and from a variety of activation and fission sources at a reactor site. They generally can be given near-surface burial. Isotopes of special interest are cobalt-60 and cesium-137. Transuranic wastes are being disposed of in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Establishment of regional disposal sites by interstate compacts has generally been unsuccessful in the United States. Decontamination of defense sites will be long and costly. Decommissioning of reactors in the future will contribute a great deal of low-level radioactive waste.

Raymond L. Murray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Waste Disposal (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This article lays an outline of waste disposal regulations, permits and fees, hazardous waste management and underground storage tank requirements.

80

Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Long-term surveillance plan for the South Clive Disposal Site, Clive, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project South Clive disposal site in Clive, Utah. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CRF Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites will be cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. For each disposal site to be licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the South Clive disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination of completion of remedial action for the South Clive site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This LTSP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure that the South Clive disposal site performs as designed. The program`s primary activity is site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity.

NONE

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Design criteria for Si point-contact concentrator solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design criteria for concentrator solar cells are presented for the highly three-dimensional case of backside point-contact solar cells. A recent new experimental result, a 28-percent efficient cell (25/sup 0/C, 15-Wcm/sup 2/ incident power) is used as a case study of the dependences of the recombination components and the carrier density gradients on the geometrical design parameters. The optimum geometry is found to depend upon the intended design power density as well as the attainable physical parameters allowed by the fabrication techniques utilized. Modeling projections indicate that an ultimate efficiency of 30.6 percent (36 Wcm/sup 2/, 300 K) is achievable using the diffused emitters presently employed on these cells. Incorporation of results from the study pf polycrystalline emitters could improve these efficiencies toward 31.7 percent.

Sinton, R.A.; Swanson, R.M.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Status of UFD Campaign International Activities in Disposal Research Several international organizations have made significant progress in the characterization and performance evaluation of other disposal design options and host rock characteristics (clay/shale, granite), most of which were very different from those studied in the United States. The DOE recognizes that close international collaboration is a beneficial and cost effective strategy for advancing disposal science. This report describes the active collaboration opportunities available to U.S. researchers, and presents specific cooperative research activities that have been recently initiated within DOE's disposal research program.

85

Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Potential disposal options include mined disposal in a variety of geologic media (e.g., salt, shale, granite), and deep borehole disposal in basement rock. The Generic Safety Case is intended to be a source of information to provide answers to questions that may arise as the U.S. works to develop strategies to dispose of current and future inventories of UNF and HLW. DOE is examining combinations of generic geologic media and facility designs that could potentially support

86

Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) it reduces the fuel efficiency (methanol is reacted without producing electrical current). We canChapter 50 Performance modeling and cell design for high concentration methanol fuel cells C. E The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) has become a lead- ing contender to replace the lithium-ion (Li

87

Long-term surveillance plan for the Lowman, Idaho, Disposal site. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Lowman, Idaho, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Lowman disposal site, which will be referred to as the Lowman site throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. The radioactive sands at the Lowman site were stabilized on the site. This final LTSP is being submitted to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) as a requirement for issuance of a general license for custody and long-term care for the disposal site. The general license requires that the disposal cell be cared for in accordance with the provisions of this LTSP. The LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or a state, and describes, in detail, how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out through the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program. The Lowman, Idaho, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program, (DOE, 1992).

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture provides a key element for the United States: 1) to transition the country from a fossil fuel based energy economy to a renewable energy based economy, and 2) to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Developments of this program will serve as an important step toward continuing PEMFC technology and ultimately the broad-based commercial availability of this technology and its benefits.

Santurri, P.R., (Chemsultants International); Hartmann-Thompson, C.; Keinath, S.E. (Michigan Molecular Inst.)

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

89

Palmetto Fuel Cell Analysis and Design | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis and Design Analysis and Design Jump to: navigation, search Name Palmetto Fuel Cell Analysis and Design Place Columbia, South Carolina Product Analysis and design spinout of the University of South Carolina, sister to Palmetto Fuel Cell Technologies. Coordinates 37.752467°, -78.161514° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.752467,"lon":-78.161514,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

90

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

72.1 0614 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report June 2014 6319-D6320 8972.2 0614 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6322 6319D-6346 8972.3 0614 North Face Cell 1...

91

Rational Design of Competitive Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rational Design of Competitive Electrocatalysts for Hydrogen Fuel Cells ... The large-scale application of one of the most promising clean and renewable sources of energy, hydrogen fuel cells, still awaits efficient and cost-effective electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) occurring on the cathode. ... Among its most challenging and, at the same time, promising aims is the efficient electrocatalysis of reactions in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) because these devices are clean means for conversion of the chemical energy to electric power. ...

Sergey Stolbov; Marisol Alcántara Ortigoza

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

92

Tritium waste disposal technology in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium waste disposal methods in the US range from disposal of low specific activity waste along with other low-level waste in shallow land burial facilities, to disposal of kilocurie amounts in specially designed triple containers in 65' deep augered holes located in an aird region of the US. Total estimated curies disposed of are 500,000 in commercial burial sites and 10 million curies in defense related sites. At three disposal sites in humid areas, tritium has migrated into the ground water, and at one arid site tritium vapor has been detected emerging from the soil above the disposal area. Leaching tests on tritium containing waste show that tritium in the form of HTO leaches readily from most waste forms, but that leaching rates of tritiated water into polymer impregnated concrete are reduced by as much as a factor of ten. Tests on improved tritium containment are ongoing. Disposal costs for tritium waste are 7 to 10 dollars per cubic foot for shallow land burial of low specific activity tritium waste, and 10 to 20 dollars per cubic foot for disposal of high specific activity waste. The cost of packaging the high specific activity waste is 150 to 300 dollars per cubic foot. 18 references.

Albenesius, E.L.; Towler, O.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Material Disposal Areas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

94

Disposal Information - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size Disposal of Radioactive Waste at Hanford The Hanford Site operates lined, RCRA Subtitle C land...

95

Long-term surveillance plan for the Tuba City, Arizona disposal site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Tuba City, Arizona, describes the site surveillance activities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM) (10 CFR {section}40.27).

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being evaluated at Idaho National Laboratory and the facilities we’ve designed to evaluate options and support optimization.

Dirk Gombert

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

NREL Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-efficiency, thin-film solar cells require electrical contacts with high electrical conductivity, and the top contact must also have high optical transparency. This need is currently met by transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), which conduct electricity but are 90% transparent to visible light. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have derived three key design principles for selecting promising materials for TCO contacts. NREL's application of these design principles has resulted in a 10,000-fold improvement in conductivity for one TCO material.

Not Available

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection Guidelines, Borehole Seals Design, and RD&D Needs The U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating deep borehole disposal as one alternative for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and other radioactive waste forms, along with research and development for mined repositories in salt, granite, and clay, as part of the used fuel disposition (UFD) campaign. The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper part of the borehole with bentonite and concrete seals. A reference design of the

99

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternate cell designs Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective Introduction to Fuel Cell Systems Summary: in alternative energy sources. Fuel Cell Basic Design COURSE TOPICS INCLUDE The prevalent...

100

Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Municipal Sludge disposal economics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Municipal Sludge disposal economics ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ... Atmospheric emissions of elements on particles from the Parkway sewage-sludge incinerator ...

Jerry Jones; David Bomberger, Jr.; F Lewis; Joel Jacknow

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05 Maryland Disposal Site - MD 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: MARYLAND DISPOSAL SITE (MD.05 ) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Baltimore - Vicinity , Maryland MD.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1989 MD.05-1 Site Operations: Proposed disposal site - never developed. MD.05-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: None Indicated Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to MARYLAND DISPOSAL SITE MD.05-1 - Report (DOE/OR/20722-131 Revision 0); Site Plan for the Maryland Disposal Site; April 1989 Historical documents may contain links which are no longer valid or to

103

Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light trapping design for low band-gap polymer solar cells Stephen Foster1,* and Sajeev John1,2 1 demonstrate numerically a 2-D nanostructured design for light trapping in a low band-gap polymer solar cell, "Light harvesting improvement of organic solar cells with self- enhanced active layer designs," Opt

John, Sajeev

104

Hazardous Waste Disposal Sites (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These sections contain information on fees and monitoring relevant to operators of hazardous waste disposal sites.

105

Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed - Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor July 9, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Cameron Hardy, DOE, (509) 376-5365 Cameron.Hardy@rl.doe.gov Mark McKenna, WCH, (509) 372-9032 media@wch-rcc.com RICHLAND, Wash. - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996. Removing contaminated material and providing for its safe disposal prevents contaminants from reaching the groundwater and the Columbia River. ERDF receives contaminated soil, demolition debris, and solid waste from

106

Transmittal of the Calculation Package that Supports the Analysis of Performance of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Based 5-Cell Design Issued 8/14/09)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the results of an assessment of the performance of a build-out of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF configuration that was assessed includes the as-constructed Cells 1 through 4, with a groundwater underdrain that was installed beneath Cell 3 during the winter of 2003-2004, and Cell 5, whose proposed design is an Addendum to Remedial Design Report for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1873&D2/A5/R1. The total capacity of the EMWMF with 5 cells is about 1.7 million cubic yards. This assessment was conducted to determine the conditions under which the approved Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF found in the Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-Based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2001a], as revised for constituents added up to October 2008, would remain protective of public health and safety for a five-cell disposal facility. For consistency, the methods of analyses and the exposure scenario used to predict the performance of a five-cell disposal facility were identical to those used in the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) and its addendum (DOE 1998a, DOE 1998b) to develop the approved WAC. To take advantage of new information and design changes departing from the conceptual design, the modeling domain and model calibration were upaded from those used in the RI/FS and its addendum. It should be noted that this analysis is not intended to justify or propose a change in the approved WAC.

Williams M.J.

2009-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

107

Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part I: Fuel cell design and in situ water distributions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

schematically in Fig. 1, a fuel cell supplies two reactant streams, consisting of a fuel (hydrogen, H2Water management studies in PEM fuel cells, Part I: Fuel cell design and in situ water. Trabolda, * a General Motors Fuel Cell Laboratory, 10 Carriage Street, Honeoye Falls, New York, USA b

Kandlikar, Satish

108

Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) Dredged and Fill Material Disposal (North Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State North Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting This chapter provides regulations for the disposal of dredged and fill

109

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for concentrator photovoltaic cells (CPV) is 100 K – 200 Kimplementing photovoltaic and photochemical cells on largeConcentrated Photovoltaic (CPV) cells have been demonstrated

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF) will provide permanent Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted storage, treatment, and disposal for hazardous and mixed waste generated at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) that cannot be disposed of in existing or planned SRS facilities. Final design is complete for Phase I of the project, the Disposal Vaults. The Vaults will provide RCRA permitted, above-grade disposal capacity for treated hazardous and mixed waste generated at the SRS. The RCRA Part B Permit application was submitted upon approval of the Permit application, the first Disposal Vault is scheduled to be operational in mid 1994. The technical baseline has been established for Phase II, the Treatment Building, and preliminary design work has been performed. The Treatment Building will provide RCRA permitted treatment processes to handle a variety of hazardous and mixed waste generated at SRS in preparation for disposal. The processes will treat wastes for disposal in accordance with the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR). A RCRA Part B Permit application has not yet been submitted to SCDHEC for this phase of the project. The Treatment Building is currently scheduled to be operational in late 1996.

Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

photovoltaic (PV) solar cell technology. It is defined asWEIGHT SOLAR CELLS Current solar array technologies provide

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and P. Peumans, “Organic solar cells with solution-processedtypical thickness in organic solar cell application [4]. At

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Radioactive waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Waste disposal package  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

Smith, M.J.

1985-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

117

MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE Jeffrey Glandt, Sirivatch University of South Carolina Columbia, SC 29208 vanzee@engr.sc.edu Key words: PEM fuel cell, flow field or printed in its publications. #12;2 MODELING THE EFFECT OF FLOW FIELD DESIGN ON PEM FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE

Van Zee, John W.

118

Hydrogen fuel-cell cars designed and built in student competition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Hydrogen fuel-cell cars designed and built in student competition April 3, 2012 Designing and elementary school teams from around New Mexico participated in the annual Hydrogen Fuel Cell Challenge - Tommy Rockward, of LANL's Sensors and Electromechanical Devices group, demonstrated a hydrogen fuel-cell

119

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nuclear Waste Disposal Plan Drafted ... Of all the issues haunting nuclear power plants, that of disposing of the radioactive wastes and spent nuclear fuel they generate has been the most vexing. ...

1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

120

Disposable Bioreactors for Inoculum Production and Protein Expression  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Table 1 summarizes the disposable bioreactors available on the market today for animal cells and culture volumes from 2.5 mL up to 500 L. If traditional ...

Regine Eibl; Dieter Eibl

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

limit for any solar cell technology will require lightof next-generation solar cell technologies, examining thes prospects as a solar cell technology. There is a well-

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of state-of-the-art photovoltaic cells,” Progress ineffective way. Photovoltaic cells are the most promisingthe absorptivity of photovoltaic cell: the material absorp-

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Hydrogen fuel-cell cars designed and built in student competition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Students build hydrogen fuel-cell cars Hydrogen fuel-cell cars designed and built in student competition Middle and elementary school teams from around New Mexico participated in...

124

Design Considerations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

performed a study on PEM fuel cell APUs. Based upon previousConsiderations for a PEM Fuel Cell Powered Truck APU Davidsuccessfully demonstrated a PEM fuel cell APU on a Century

Grupp, David J; Forrest, Matthew E.; Mader, Pippin G.; Brodrick, Christie-Joy; Miller, Marshall; Dwyer, Harry A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Design and fabrication of photonic crystal thin film photovoltaic cells Guillaume Gomarda,b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design and fabrication of photonic crystal thin film photovoltaic cells Guillaume Gomarda,b , Ounsi of an absorbing planar photonic crystal within a thin film photovoltaic cell. The devices are based on a stack with large areas. Keywords: Photonic crystal, Photovoltaic solar cell, Thin film solar cell, Hydrogenated

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Optimal design of hybrid and non-hybrid fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal design of hybrid and non-hybrid fuel cell vehicles by Jeongwoo Han A thesis submitted cell vehicles by Jeongwoo Han Chair: Panos Y. Papalambros Fuel cells are under development technology, however, still has many issues to be addressed for market acceptance. Several fuel cell vehicle

Papalambros, Panos

127

Multi-Scale Multi-Dimensional Model for Better Cell Design and Management (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Describes NREL's R&D to develop a multi-scale model to assist in designing better, more reliable lithium-ion battery cells for advanced vehicles.

Kim, G.-H.; Smith, K.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Systems engineering programs for geologic nuclear waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design sequence and system programs presented begin with general approximate solutions that permit inexpensive analysis of a multitude of possible wastes, disposal media, and disposal process properties and configurations. It then continues through progressively more precise solutions as parts of the design become fixed, and ends with repository and waste form optimization studies. The programs cover both solid and gaseous waste forms. The analytical development, a program listing, a users guide, and examples are presented for each program. Sensitivity studies showing the effects of disposal media and waste form thermophysical properties and repository layouts are presented as examples.

Klett, R. D.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.; Ellis, M. A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

8947.1 8947.1 09/13 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report September 2013 6319-D6242 8947.2 09/13 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6208 6319D-6231 8947.3 09/13 North Face Cell 1 North Drainage (looking west) 6319D-6206 6319D-6205 8947.4 09/13 East Face Cell 2 West Face Cell 2 6319D-6230 6319D-6209 8947.5 09/13 East Face Cell 3 West Face Cell 3 6319D-6229 6319D-6210 8947.6 09/13 East Face Cell 4 West Face Cell 4 6319D-6227 6319D-62111 8947.7 09/13 East Face Cell 5 West Face Cell 5 6319D-6226 6319D-6213 8947.8 09/13 East Face Cell 6 6319D-6214 6319D-6225 West Face Cell 6 8947.9 09/13 East Face Cell 7 6319D-6215 6319D-6223 West Face Cell 7 8947.10 09/13 East Face Cell 8 6319D-6217 6319D-6220 West Face Cell 8 8947.11 09/13 South Face Cell 8 6319D-6219 6319D-6218 South Drainage (looking west) 8947.12 09/13

130

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based...

131

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

132

Radioactive waste material disposal  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

Forsberg, Charles W. (155 Newport Dr., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Beahm, Edward C. (106 Cooper Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Parker, George W. (321 Dominion Cir., Knoxville, TN 37922)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The incandescent disposal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The electrotechnology device being introduced to the low-level waste market is an Incandescent Disposal System (IDS) for volume reduction and vitrification. The process changes the composition of the waste material, usually long molecular chains, into simple molecules and elements. It renders the volume of low-level wastes to a manageable solid vitrified residue, carbon black, and a water discharge. The solid material, which has been vitrified if silica is introduced into the waste stream, is an ideal inert filler. The carbon black is non-leaching and is readily available for vitrification as it comes out of the IDS.

Smith, R.G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Converter waste disposal study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of waste management and disposal issues to the converting and print industries is demonstrated by the high response rate to a survey of US and Canadian converters and printers. The 30-item questionnaire measured the impact of reuse, recycling, source reduction, incineration, and landfilling on incoming raw-material packaging, process scrap, and waste inks, coatings, and adhesives. The results indicate that significant amounts of incoming packaging materials are reused in-house or through supplier take-back programs. However, there is very little reuse of excess raw materials and process scrap, suggesting the need for greater source reduction within these facilities as the regulatory climate becomes increasingly restrictive.

Schultz, R.B. (RBS Technologies, Inc., Skokie, IL (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Good and bad features of Ni-Cd cell designs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Processes for spacecraft Ni-Cd cells are reviewed. Mechanical impregnation is compared against chemical and thermochemical impregnation.

Gross, S.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Optimized Designs and Materials for Nanostructure Based Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy conversion efficiency of solar cells increased steadily in the last decade through enhanced photon absorption and charge carrier

Shao, Qinghui

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Mitigation action plan for remedial action at the Uranium Mill Tailing Sites and Disposal Site, Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Estes Gulch disposal site is approximately 10 kilometers (6 miles) north of the town of Rifle, off State Highway 13 on Federal land administered by the Bureau of Land Management. The Department of Energy (DOE) will transport the residual radioactive materials (RRM) by truck to the Estes Gulch disposal site via State Highway 13 and place it in a partially below-grade disposal cell. The RRM will be covered by an earthen radon barrier, frost protection layers, and a rock erosion protection layer. A toe ditch and other features will also be constructed to control erosion at the disposal site. After removal of the RRM and disposal at the Estes Gulch site, the disturbed areas at all three sites will be backfilled with clean soils, contoured to facilitate surface drainage, and revegetated. Wetlands areas destroyed at the former Rifle processing sites will be compensated for by the incorporation of now wetlands into the revegetation plan at the New Rifle site. The UMTRA Project Office, supported by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and the Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC), oversees the implementation of the MAP. The RAC executes mitigation measures in the field. The TAC provides monitoring of the mitigation actions in cases where mitigation measures are associated with design features. Site closeout and inspection compliance will be documented in the site completion report.

Not Available

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

CSE293 Computer Science & Engineering Design Laboratory PDA and/or Cell Phone Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CSE293 Computer Science & Engineering Design Laboratory PDA and/or Cell Phone Projects Two of the rapidly emerging technologies with programmatic interfaces are PDAs (e.g., Palm pilots) and cell phones of features and capabilities has dramatically increased their functionality over the past 5 years. Cell phone

Demurjian, Steven A.

139

Design of a Control Strategy for a Fuel Cell/Battery Hybrid Power Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The purpose of this thesis is to design hardware and a control strategy for a fuel cell/battery hybrid power supply. Modern fuel cell/battery hybrid power supplies can have 2 DC/DC converters: one converter for the battery and one for the fuel cell...

Smith, Richard C.

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

140

Analysis of alternatives for immobilized low activity waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a study of alternative disposal system architectures and implementation strategies to provide onsite near-surface disposal capacity to receive the immobilized low-activity waste produced by the private vendors. The analysis shows that a flexible unit strategy that provides a suite of design solutions tailored to the characteristics of the immobilized low-activity waste will provide a disposal system that best meets the program goals of reducing the environmental, health, and safety impacts; meeting the schedule milestones; and minimizing the life-cycle cost of the program.

Burbank, D.A.

1997-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the levelized cost of energy of photovoltaic systems,”an efficient and cost-effective way. Photovoltaic cells are

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Vlsi Design And Comparison Of Bank Memory With Multiport Memory Cell Versus Conventional Multiport And Multibank Sram Memory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main focus of this thesis is to determine whether designing a bank memory with multiport memory cell (hybrid design) is advantageous over conventionally used… (more)

Lakkakula, Sunil Kumar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Design of Hydrogen Fuel Cell Systems for Road Vehicles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several models of FC vehicles fuelled by H2 have been produced by many car’s industries in the past two decades, ... of 2009 the new model B class F-Cell equipped with new generations of fuel cells, Li-ion batter...

Pasquale Corbo; Fortunato Migliardini…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 18 19 T he WIPP's first waste receipt, 11 years later than originally planned, was a monumental step forward in the safe management of nuclear waste. Far from ending, however, the WIPP story has really just begun. For the next 35 years, the DOE will face many challenges as it manages a complex shipment schedule from transuranic waste sites across the United States and continues to ensure that the repository complies with all regulatory requirements. The DOE will work to maintain the highest level of safety in waste handling and trans- portation. Coordination with sites Disposal operations require coordination with sites that will ship transuranic waste to the WIPP and include periodic certification of waste characterization and handling practices at those facilities. During the WIPP's

145

Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 3 T he journey to the WIPP began nearly 60 years before the first barrels of transuranic waste arrived at the repository. The United States produced the world's first sig- nificant quantities of transuranic material during the Manhattan Project of World War II in the early 1940s. The government idled its plutonium- producing reactors and warhead manu- facturing plants at the end of the Cold War and scheduled most of them for dismantlement. However, the DOE will generate more transuranic waste as it cleans up these former nuclear weapons facilities. The WIPP is a cor- nerstone of the effort to clean up these facilities by providing a safe repository to isolate transuranic waste in disposal rooms mined out of ancient salt beds, located 2,150 feet below ground. The need for the WIPP

146

Land disposal of water treatment plant sludge -- A feasibility analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this study, the following alternative disposal methods for the Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Sludge were evaluated: landfilling, discharge into sanitary sewers, long-term lagooning, use in manufacturing, co-composting, alum recovery and land application. Land application was chosen at the best disposal alternative. Preliminary design resulted in a 1% dry alum sludge loading rate (25 tonnes/ha), requiring 35 ha over a nine-year period and a phosphorus fertilizer supplement of about 50kg/ha.

Viraraghavan, T.; Multon, L.M.; Wasylenchuk, E.J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

C Stoots; J O'Brien; T Cable

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Waste Disposal HAZARDOUS GLASS Items that could cut or puncture skin or trash- can without any treatment. Hazardous Glass and Plastic: Items that can puncture, cut or scratch if disposed of in normal trash containers. Pasteur pipettes Other pipettes and tips (glass or plastic) Slides and cover

Sheridan, Jennifer

149

Evaluation of critical materials in five additional advance design photovoltaic cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. The Critical Materials Assessment Program (CMAP) screens the designs and their supply chains and identifies potential shortages which might preclude large-scale use of the technologies. The results of the screening of five advanced PV cell designs are presented: (1) indium phosphide/cadmium sulfide, (2) zinc phosphide, (3) cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide, (4) copper indium selenium, and (5) cadmium selenide photoelectrochemical. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 Gwe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has a 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online capacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary baseline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. The CMAP methodology used to identify critical materials is described; and detailed characterizations of the advanced photovoltaic cell designs under investigation, descriptions of additional cell production processes, and the results are presented. (WHK)

Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Martin, P.; Gurwell, W.E.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Waste management strategies and disposal design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A solution to the problem of long-term radioactive waste management (RWM) comprises a technical and social dimension, i. e. it must not only be technically achievable, but also publicly acceptable. The technic...

Christian Streffer; Carl Friedrich Gethmann; Georg Kamp…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comparison between pressurized design and ambient pressure design of hybrid solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design performances of the hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)–gas turbine (GT) system have been investigated. A pressurized system and an indirectly heated ambient pressure system were analyzed and their performances were compared. In the baseline layout, the basic performance characteristics of the two system configurations were analyzed, with the cell operation temperature and the pressure ratio as the main design parameters. The pressurized system exhibits a better efficiency owing to not only the higher cell voltage but also more effective utilization of gas turbine, i.e., a larger GT power contribution due to a higher turbine inlet temperature. Independent setting of the turbine inlet temperature was simulated by using the additional fuel supply as well as the air bypass. Increasing the pressure ratio of the gas turbine hardly improves the system efficiency, but the efficiency becomes less sensitive to the turbine inlet temperature. In the ambient pressure system, the available design parameter range is much reduced due to the limit on the recuperator temperature. In particular, design of the ambient pressure hybrid system with a gas turbine of a high pressure ratio does not seem quite feasible because the system efficiency that can be achieved at the possible design conditions is even lower than the efficiency of the SOFC only system.

S.K. Park; T.S. Kim

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Speeding the transition: Designing a fuel-cell hypercar  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A rapid transformation now underway in automotive technology could accelerate the transition to transportation powered by fuel cells. Ultralight, advanced-composite, low-drag, hybrid-electric hypercars--using combustion engines--could be three- to fourfold more efficient and one or two orders of magnitude cleaner than today`s cars, yet equally safe, sporty, desirable, and (probably) affordable. Further, important manufacturing advantages--including low tooling and equipment costs, greater mechanical simplicity, autobody parts consolidation, shorter product cycles, and reduced assembly effort and space--permit a free-market commercialization strategy. This paper discusses a conceptual hypercar powered by a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It outlines the implications of platform physics and component selection for the vehicle`s mass budget and performance. The high fuel-to-traction conversion efficiency of the hypercar platform could help automakers overcome the Achilles` heel of hydrogen-powered vehicles: onboard storage. Moreover, because hypercars would require significantly less tractive power, and even less fuel-cell power, they could adopt fuel cells earlier, before fuel cells` specific cost, mass, and volume have fully matured. In the meantime, commercialization in buildings can help prepare fuel cells for hypercars. The promising performance of hydrogen-fueled PEMFC hypercars suggests important opportunities in infrastructure development for direct-hydrogen vehicles.

Williams, B.D.; Moore, T.C.; Lovins, A.B. [Rocky Mountain Inst., Snowmass, CO (United States). Hypercar Center

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Method and design for externally applied laser welding of internal connections in a high power electrochemical cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrochemical cell includes components that are welded from an external source after the components are assembled in a cell canister. The cell canister houses electrode tabs and a core insert. An end cap insert is disposed opposite the core insert. An external weld source, such as a laser beam, is applied to the end cap insert, such that the end cap insert, the electrode tabs, and the core insert are electrically coupled by a weld which extends from the end cap insert to the core insert.

Martin, Charles E; Fontaine, Lucien; Gardner, William H

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

154

A parameterized functional cell design methodology for analog integrated circuits  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAD system to analog IC design GPFC simulation macromodels used for continuous-time equivalent SPICE simulations Example of the use of the continuous-time equivalent simulation macromodels GPFC simulation macromodels used for transmission line... CAD system to analog IC design GPFC simulation macromodels used for continuous-time equivalent SPICE simulations Example of the use of the continuous-time equivalent simulation macromodels GPFC simulation macromodels used for transmission line...

Bily, Stephen Frank

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of next-generation solar technologies. Part II approachesfor next-generation solar technologies. Conclusions Thislimit for any solar cell technology will require light

Miller, Owen Dennis

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Safer Transportation and Disposal of Remote Handled Transuranic Waste - 12033  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since disposal of remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) began in 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) has had difficulty meeting the plans and schedule for disposing this waste. PECOS Management Services, Inc. (PECOS) assessed the feasibility of proposed alternate RH-TRU mixed waste containerisation concepts that would enhance the transportation rate of RH-TRU waste to WIPP and increase the utilization of available WIPP space capacity for RH-TRU waste disposal by either replacing or augmenting current and proposed disposal methods. In addition engineering and operational analyses were conducted that addressed concerns regarding criticality, heat release, and worker exposure to radiation. The results of the analyses showed that the concept, development, and use of a concrete pipe based design for an RH-TRU waste shipping and disposal container could be potentially advantageous for disposing a substantial quantity of RHTRU waste at WIPP in the same manner as contact-handled RH waste. Additionally, this new disposal method would eliminate the hazard associated with repackaging this waste in other containers without the requirement for NRC approval for a new shipping container. (authors)

Rojas, Vicente; Timm, Christopher M.; Fox, Jerry V. [PECOS Management Services, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Design of Nanostructured Solar Cells Using Coupled Optical and Electrical Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of Nanostructured Solar Cells Using Coupled Optical and Electrical Modeling Michael G of Applied Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, United States Materials Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, United States

Atwater, Harry

158

Design of a microfluidic device for the analysis of biofilm behavior in a microbial fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents design, manufacturing, testing, and modeling of a laminar-flow microbial fuel cell. Novel means were developed to use graphite and other bulk-scale materials in a microscale device without loosing any ...

Jones, A-Andrew D., III (Akhenaton-Andrew Dhafir)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Design and Synthesis of Alternating Regioregular Oligothiophenes/Benzothiadiazole Copolymers for Organic Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Design and Synthesis of Alternating Regioregular Oligothiophenes/Benzothiadiazole Copolymers for Organic Solar Cells ... National Research Council of Canada (NRC), 1200 Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON K1A 0R6, Canada ...

Fushun Liang; Jianping Lu; Jianfu Ding; Raluca Movileanu; Ye Tao

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

160

Yield estimates and comparisons for full custom, standard cell, and gate array design methodologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

YIELD ESTIMATES AND COMPARISONS FOR FULL CUSTOM, STANDARD CELL, AND GATE ARRAY DESIGN METHODOLOGIES A Thesis by MARCELLA EVELYN NORTE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering YIELD ESTIMATES AND COMPARISONS FOR FULL CUSTOM, STANDARD CELL, AND GATE ARRAY DESIGN METHODOLOGIES A Thesis by MARCELLA EVELYN NORTE Approved...

Norte, Marcella Evelyn

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Molten salt bath circulation design for an electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electrolytic cell for reduction of a metal oxide to a metal and oxygen has an inert anode and an upwardly angled roof covering the inert mode. The angled roof diverts oxygen bubbles into an upcomer channel, thereby agitating a molten salt bath in the upcomer channel and improving dissolution of a metal oxide in the molten salt bath. The molten salt bath has a lower velocity adjacent the inert anode in order to minimize corrosion by substances in the bath. A particularly preferred cell produces aluminum by electrolysis of alumina in a molten salt bath containing aluminum fluoride and sodium fluoride. 4 figs.

Dawless, R.K.; LaCamera, A.F.; Troup, R.L.; Ray, S.P.; Hosler, R.B.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

162

Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

163

Transmittal Memo for Disposal Authorization Statement | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) has conducted a review of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) 2009 performance assessment (PA) in...

164

ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and...

165

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the Government PROPERTY...

166

Cathode porous transport irreversibility model for PEM fuel cell design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence is studied of slip-irreversibility at the interface between the gas diffusion layer, also referred to here as the porous transport layer, and the catalyst layer of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). A two-dimensional cathode ... Keywords: catalyst layer, exergy, gas diffusion layer, slip flow irreversibility

E. O. B. Ogedengbe; M. A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System (EBS) Evaluation The engineered barrier system (EBS) plays a key role in the long-term isolation of nuclear waste in geological repository environments. This report focuses on the progress made in the evaluation of EBS design concepts, assessment of clay phase stability at repository-relevant conditions, thermodynamic database development for cement and clay phases, and THMC coupled phenomena along with the development of tools and methods to examine these processes. This report also documents the advancements of the Disposal System Evaluation Framework (DSEF) for the development of

168

Design and development of a DC-DC converter for a fuel cell inverter system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis outlines the design and development of a DC-DC converter for a fuel cell inverter application. The proposed DC-DC converter was designed and tested at Texas A&M to meet the specifications laid down for the '2001 Future Energy Challenge...

Gopinath, Rajesh

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Single-Objective and Multiobjective Designs for Hydrogen Networks with Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Single-Objective and Multiobjective Designs for Hydrogen Networks with Fuel Cells ... Zhao et al.(3) then extended this design strategy to optimize a multicomponent hydrogen management system, while Ding et al.(4) further introduced pressure considerations so as to ensure feasibility in practice. ... Kumar et al.(8) suggested several different models and compared the optimization results. ...

Yen-Cheng Chiang; Chuei-Tin Chang

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

170

Design for the fabrication of high efficiency solar cells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for a photo-active region for generation of free carriers when a first surface is exposed to optical radiation. The photo-active region includes a conducting transparent matrix and clusters of semiconductor materials embedded within the conducting transparent matrix. The clusters are arranged in the matrix material so as to define at least a first distribution of cluster sizes ranging from those with the highest bandgap energy near a light incident surface of the photo-active region to those with the smallest bandgap energy near an opposite second surface of the photo-active region. Also disclosed is a method and apparatus for a solar cell. The solar cell includes a photo-active region containing a plurality of semiconductor clusters of varying sizes as described.

Simmons, Joseph H. (Gainesville, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Degradation Of Cementitious Materials Associated With Saltstone Disposal Units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Saltstone facilities at the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) stabilize and dispose of low-level radioactive salt solution originating from liquid waste storage tanks at the site. The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) receives treated salt solution and mixes the aqueous waste with dry cement, blast furnace slag, and fly ash to form a grout slurry which is mechanically pumped into concrete disposal cells that compose the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The solidified grout is termed “saltstone”. Cementitious materials play a prominent role in the design and long-term performance of the SDF. The saltstone grout exhibits low permeability and diffusivity, and thus represents a physical barrier to waste release. The waste form is also reducing, which creates a chemical barrier to waste release for certain key radionuclides, notably Tc-99. Similarly, the concrete shell of an SDF disposal unit (SDU) represents an additional physical and chemical barrier to radionuclide release to the environment. Together the waste form and the SDU compose a robust containment structure at the time of facility closure. However, the physical and chemical state of cementitious materials will evolve over time through a variety of phenomena, leading to degraded barrier performance over Performance Assessment (PA) timescales of thousands to tens of thousands of years. Previous studies of cementitious material degradation in the context of low-level waste disposal have identified sulfate attack, carbonation influenced steel corrosion, and decalcification (primary constituent leaching) as the primary chemical degradation phenomena of most relevance to SRS exposure conditions. In this study, degradation time scales for each of these three degradation phenomena are estimated for saltstone and concrete associated with each SDU type under conservative, nominal, and best estimate assumptions. The nominal value (NV) is an intermediate result that is more probable than the conservative estimate (CE) and more defensible than the best estimate (BE). The combined effects of multiple phenomena are then considered to determine the most limiting degradation time scale for each cementitious material. Degradation times are estimated using a combination of analytic solutions from literature and numerical simulation codes provided through the DOE Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) Software Toolbox (http://cementbarriers.org). For the SDU 2 design, the roof, wall, and floor components are projected to become fully degraded under Nominal conditions at 3866, 923, and 1413 years, respectively. For SDU 4 the roof and floor are estimated to be fully degraded under Nominal conditions after 1137 and 1407 years, respectively; the wall is assumed to be fully degraded at time zero in the most recent PA simulations. Degradation of these concrete barriers generally occurs from combined sulfate attack and corrosion of embedded steel following carbonation. Saltstone is projected to degrade very slowly by decalcification, with complete degradation occurring in excess of 200,000 years for any SDU type. Complete results are provided.

Flach, G. P; Smith, F. G. III

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

172

Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The Texas Solution to the Nation's Disposal Needs for Irradiated Hardware - 13337  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The closure of the disposal facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, to out-of-compact states in 2008 left commercial nuclear power plants without a disposal option for Class B and C irradiated hardware. In 2012, Waste Control Specialists LLC (WCS) opened a highly engineered facility specifically designed and built for the disposal of Class B and C waste. The WCS facility is the first Interstate Compact low-level radioactive waste disposal facility to be licensed and operated under the Low-level Waste Policy Act of 1980, as amended in 1985. Due to design requirements of a modern Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) facility, traditional methods for disposal were not achievable at the WCS site. Earlier methods primarily utilized the As Low as Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) concept of distance to accomplish worker safety. The WCS method required the use of all three ALARA concepts of time, distance, and shielding to ensure the safe disposal of this highly hazardous waste stream. (authors)

Britten, Jay M. [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Andrews, TX 79714 (United States)] [Waste Control Specialists LLC, Andrews, TX 79714 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project Code of Record  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste (LLW) Disposal Project addresses an anticipated shortfall in remote-handled LLW disposal capability following cessation of operations at the existing facility, which will continue until it is full or until it must be closed in preparation for final remediation of the Subsurface Disposal Area (approximately at the end of Fiscal Year 2017). Development of a new onsite disposal facility will provide necessary remote-handled LLW disposal capability and will ensure continuity of operations that generate remote-handled LLW. This report documents the Code of Record for design of a new LLW disposal capability. The report is owned by the Design Authority, who can authorize revisions and exceptions. This report will be retained for the lifetime of the facility.

S.L. Austad, P.E.; L.E. Guillen, P.E.; C. W. McKnight, P.E.; D. S. Ferguson, P.E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Long-term surveillance plan for the Falls City Disposal Site, Falls City, Texas. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The need for ground water monitoring at the Falls City disposal site was evaluated in accordance with NRC regulations and guidelines established by the DOE in Guidance for Implementing the Long-term Surveillance Program for UMTRA Project Title 1 Disposal Sites (DOE, 1996). Based on evaluation of site characterization data, it has been determined that a program to monitor ground water for demonstration of disposal cell performance based on a set of concentration limits is not appropriate because ground water in the uppermost aquifer is of limited use, and a narrative supplemental standard has been applied to the site that does not include numerical concentration limits or a point of compliance. The limited use designation is based on the fact that ground water in the uppermost aquifer is not currently or potentially a source of drinking water in the area because it contains widespread ambient contamination that cannot be cleaned up using methods reasonably employed by public water supply systems. Background ground water quality varies by orders of magnitude since the aquifer is in an area of redistribution of uranium mineralization derived from ore bodies. The DOE plans to perform post-closure ground water monitoring in the uppermost aquifer as a best management practice (BMP) as requested by the state of Texas.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, May--July 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Mineral Research Center (EMRC) to design, construct and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. The specific objectives for the reporting period were as follows: review fourth site candidates; obtain site access for the Freeman United site; select an ash supplier for the Illinois site and initiate subcontracts for on-site work; commence construction of the Freeman United test cell; and obtain waste for the Colorado Ute test site. Accomplishments under each task are discussed.

NONE

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Salt disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of salt repository science, reviews many of the technical issues pertaining to disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in salt, and proposes several avenues for future science-based activities to further the technical basis for disposal in salt. There are extensive salt formations in the forty-eight contiguous states, and many of them may be worthy of consideration for nuclear waste disposal. The United States has extensive experience in salt repository sciences, including an operating facility for disposal of transuranic wastes. The scientific background for salt disposal including laboratory and field tests at ambient and elevated temperature, principles of salt behavior, potential for fracture damage and its mitigation, seal systems, chemical conditions, advanced modeling capabilities and near-future developments, performance assessment processes, and international collaboration are all discussed. The discussion of salt disposal issues is brought current, including a summary of recent international workshops dedicated to high-level waste disposal in salt. Lessons learned from Sandia National Laboratories' experience on the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant and the Yucca Mountain Project as well as related salt experience with the Strategic Petroleum Reserve are applied in this assessment. Disposal of heat-generating nuclear waste in a suitable salt formation is attractive because the material is essentially impermeable, self-sealing, and thermally conductive. Conditions are chemically beneficial, and a significant experience base exists in understanding this environment. Within the period of institutional control, overburden pressure will seal fractures and provide a repository setting that limits radionuclide movement. A salt repository could potentially achieve total containment, with no releases to the environment in undisturbed scenarios for as long as the region is geologically stable. Much of the experience gained from United States repository development, such as seal system design, coupled process simulation, and application of performance assessment methodology, helps define a clear strategy for a heat-generating nuclear waste repository in salt.

Leigh, Christi D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Carlsbad, NM); Hansen, Francis D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Optimal Design of a PV/Fuel Cell Hybrid Power System for the City of Brest in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source. The produced hydrogen feeds then a fuel cell (FC) system, which will supply the city of BrestOptimal Design of a PV/Fuel Cell Hybrid Power System for the City of Brest in France Omar Hazem with the optimal design of a stand-alone hybrid photovoltaic and fuel cell power system without battery storage

Brest, Université de

180

Advanced coal technology by-products: Long-term results from landfill test cells and their implications for reuse or disposal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New air pollution regulations under the 1991 Clean Air Act and other legislation are motivating continued development and implementation, of cleaner, more efficient processes for converting coal to electrical power. These clean coal processes produce solid by-products which differ in important respects from conventional pulverized coal combustion ash. Clean coal by-products` contain both residual sorbent and captured SO{sub 2} control products, as well as the mineral component of the coal. The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center has contracted Radian Corporation to construct and monitor landfill test cells with a several different advanced coal combustion by-products at three locations around the US; data from these sites provide a unique picture of the long-term field behavior of clean coal combustion by-products. The field testing sites were located in western Colorado, northern Ohio, and central Illinois. Fluidized bed combustion and lime injection residues are characterized by high lime and calcium sulfate contents` contributed by reacted and unreacted sorbent materials, and produce an leachate, when wetted. Compared with conventional coal fly ash, the clean coal technology ashes have been noted for potential difficulties when wetted, including corrosivity, heat generation, cementation, and swelling on hydration. On the other hand, the high lime content and chemical reactivity of clean coal residues offer potential benefits in reuse as a cementitious material.The results of three years of data collection suggest a fairly consistent pattern of behavior for the calcium-based dry sorbent systems involved in the project, despite differences in the initial of the by-products, differences in the methods of placement, and differences in climate at the test sites.

Weinberg, A. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States); Harness, J.L. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Final Report, Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm2. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year).

Swartz, Dr Scott L.; Thrun, Dr Lora B.; Arkenberg, Mr Gene B.; Chenault, Ms Kellie M.

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

183

Validation of Novel Planar Cell Design for MW-Scale SOFC Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed by NexTech Materials, Ltd. during a three-year project to validate an electrolyte-supported planar solid oxide fuel cell design, termed the FlexCell, for coal-based, megawatt-scale power generation systems. This project was focused on the fabrication and testing of electrolyte-supported FlexCells with yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the electrolyte material. YSZ based FlexCells were made with sizes ranging from 100 to 500 cm{sup 2}. Single-cell testing was performed to confirm high electrochemical performance, both with diluted hydrogen and simulated coal gas as fuels. Finite element analysis modeling was performed at The Ohio State University was performed to establish FlexCell architectures with optimum mechanical robustness. A manufacturing cost analysis was completed, which confirmed that manufacturing costs of less than $50/kW are achievable at high volumes (500 MW/year). DISCLAIMER

Scott Swartz; Lora Thrun; Gene Arkenberg; Kellie Chenault

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RSSC RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL 08/2011 7-1 CHAPTER 7 RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL PAGE I. Radioactive Waste Disposal ............................................................................................ 7-2 II. Radiation Control Technique #2 Instructions for Preparation of Radioactive Waste

Slatton, Clint

185

Disposable telemetry cable deployment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

Holcomb, David Joseph (Sandia Park, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Submergible barge retrievable storage and permanent disposal system for radioactive waste  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A submergible barge and process for submerging and storing radioactive waste material along a seabed. A submergible barge receives individual packages of radwaste within segregated cells. The cells are formed integrally within the barge, preferably surrounded by reinforced concrete. The cells are individually sealed by a concrete decking and by concrete hatch covers. Seawater may be vented into the cells for cooling, through an integral vent arrangement. The vent ducts may be attached to pumps when the barge is bouyant. The ducts are also arranged to promote passive ventilation of the cells when the barge is submerged. Packages of the radwaste are loaded into individual cells within the barge. The cells are then sealed and the barge is towed to the designated disposal-storage site. There, the individual cells are flooded and the barge will begin descent controlled by a powered submarine control device to the seabed storage site. The submerged barge will rest on the seabed permanently or until recovered by a submarine control device.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX); Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Uncanistered Spent Nuclear fuel Disposal Container System Description Document  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Disposal Container System supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). Disposal containers are loaded with intact uncanistered assemblies and/or individually canistered SNF assemblies and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access drifts, and emplaced in the emplacement drifts. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container provides long-term confinement of the commercial SNF placed inside, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System provides containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limits radionuclide release. The disposal container maintains the waste in a designated configuration, withstands maximum handling and rockfall loads, limits the individual SNF assembly temperatures after emplacement, limits the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resists corrosion in the expected handling and repository environments, and provides containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) disposal container designs are needed to accommodate the expected range of spent fuel assemblies and provide long-term confinement of the commercial SNF. The disposal container will include outer and inner cylinder walls, outer cylinder lids (two on the top, one on the bottom), inner cylinder lids (one on the top, one on the bottom), and an internal metallic basket structure. Exterior labels will provide a means by which to identify the disposal container and its contents. The two metal cylinders, in combination with the cladding, Emplacement Drift System, drip shield, and natural barrier, will support the design philosophy of defense-in-depth. The use of materials with different properties prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The inner cylinder and inner cylinder lids will be constructed of stainless steel and the outer cylinder and outer cylinder lid will be made of high-nickel alloy. The basket will assist criticality control, provide structural support, and improve heat transfer. The Uncanistered SNF Disposal Container System interfaces with the emplacement drift environment and internal waste by transferring heat from the SNF to the external environment and by protecting the SFN assemblies and their contents from damage/degradation by the external environment. The system also interfaces with the SFN by limiting access of moderator and oxidizing agents of the SFN. The waste package interfaces with the Emplacement Drift System's emplacement drift pallets upon which the wasted packages are placed. The disposal container interfaces with the Assembly Transfer System, Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System, Disposal Container Handling System, and Waste Package Remediation System during loading, handling, transfer, emplacement and retrieval of the disposal container/waste package.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Webinar: 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, 2011-2012 Hydrogen Student Design Contest Winners: On-Campus Tri-Generation Fuel Cell Systems, originally presented on September 4, 2012.

189

Overview of Low-Level Waste Disposal Operations at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is charged with the responsibility to carry out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site. Core elements of this mission are ensuring that disposal take place in a manner that is safe and cost-effective while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on giving an overview of the Nevada Test Site facilities regarding currant design of disposal. In addition, technical attributes of the facilities established through the site characterization process will be further described. An update on current waste disposal volumes and capabilities will also be provided. This discussion leads to anticipated volume projections and disposal site requirements as the Nevada Test Site disposal operations look towards the future.

DOE /Navarro

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

ENI Renewable and Non-conventional Energy Prize 2012 High-efficiency solar cells based on nanophotonic design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the earth's crust. Their nano-solar cell technology is scalable to ultra-high volumes and may help speed up to solar cell design are applicable to other solar cell technologies as well, including thin-film CuInSe2ENI Renewable and Non-conventional Energy Prize 2012 High-efficiency solar cells based

Polman, Albert

191

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, administration facility, weigh scale, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facility for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams.

Simonds, J.

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

192

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Disposal Facility (ICDF) has been designed to accept CERCLA waste generated within the Idaho National Laboratory. Hazardous, mixed, low-level, and Toxic Substance Control Act waste will be accepted for disposal at the ICDF. The purpose of this document is to provide criteria for the quantities of radioactive and/or hazardous constituents allowable in waste streams designated for disposal at ICDF. This ICDF Complex Waste Acceptance Criteria is divided into four section: (1) ICDF Complex; (2) Landfill; (3) Evaporation Pond: and (4) Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility (SSSTF). The ICDF Complex section contains the compliance details, which are the same for all areas of the ICDF. Corresponding sections contain details specific to the landfill, evaporation pond, and the SSSTF. This document specifies chemical and radiological constituent acceptance criteria for waste that will be disposed of at ICDF. Compliance with the requirements of this document ensures protection of human health and the environment, including the Snake River Plain Aquifer. Waste placed in the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond must not cause groundwater in the Snake River Plain Aquifer to exceed maximum contaminant levels, a hazard index of 1, or 10-4 cumulative risk levels. The defined waste acceptance criteria concentrations are compared to the design inventory concentrations. The purpose of this comparison is to show that there is an acceptable uncertainty margin based on the actual constituent concentrations anticipated for disposal at the ICDF. Implementation of this Waste Acceptance Criteria document will ensure compliance with the Final Report of Decision for the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13. For waste to be received, it must meet the waste acceptance criteria for the specific disposal/treatment unit (on-Site or off-Site) for which it is destined.

W. Mahlon Heileson

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Towards the rational design of synthetic cells with prescribed population dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...a set of chemical reactions...Numerical simulations of the cell...the design process, by considering...representation and a Matlab function...rates of the chemicals and can be...using the Matlab ode45 routine...we ran the simulation over a period...1997 The MATLAB ODE suite...Material Adobe PDF - rsif20120280supp1...strategies, simulation across temporal...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Design and formulation of functional pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac microtissues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...atmosphere. Media were replaced every 8 d onward. Microfabrication. Masks for master patterning were designed using AutoCAD (Autodesk) and printed at a resolution of 20,000 dots per inch (CAD/Art Services). Microfluidic cell-culture devices were fabricated...

Nimalan Thavandiran; Nicole Dubois; Alexander Mikryukov; Stéphane Massé; Bogdan Beca; Craig A. Simmons; Vikram S. Deshpande; J. Patrick McGarry; Christopher S. Chen; Kumaraswamy Nanthakumar; Gordon M. Keller; Milica Radisic; Peter W. Zandstra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Light Trapping Textures Designed by Electromagnetic Optimization for Sub-Wavelength Thick Solar Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory July 23, 2013 Abstract Light trapping in solar the surface of the solar cell, where n is the material refractive index. This ray-optics absorption

California at Irvine, University of

196

Holistic Cell Design by Berkeley Lab Scientists Leads to High-Performance,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Holistic Cell Design by Berkeley Lab Scientists Leads to High-Performance, Holistic Cell Design by Berkeley Lab Scientists Leads to High-Performance, Long Cycle-Life Lithium-Sulfur Battery Battery schematic with Silicon-Graphene oxide Long-term cycling results of the lithium-sulfur cell. Sulfur-graphene oxide SEM photo November 2013 Battery could find use in mobile applications, and eventually, electric vehicles with 300-mile range Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have demonstrated in the laboratory a lithium-sulfur (Li/S) battery that has more than twice the specific energy of lithium-ion batteries, and that lasts for more than 1,500 cycles of charge-discharge with minimal decay of the battery's capacity. This is longest cycle life reported so far for any lithium-sulfur battery.

197

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Disposal Practices at...

198

Disposal of soluble salt waste from coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses pollutants in the form of soluble salts and resource recovery in the form of water and land. A design for disposal of soluble salts has been produced. The interactions of its parameters have been shown by a process design study. The design will enable harmonious compliance with United States Public Laws 92-500 and 94-580, relating to water pollution and resource recovery. In the disposal of waste salt solutions, natural water resources need not be contaminated, because an encapsulation technique is available which will immobilize the salts. At the same time it will make useful landforms available, and water as a resource can be recovered. There is a cost minimum when electrodialysis and evaporation are combined, which is not realizable with evaporation alone, unless very low-cost thermal energy is available or unless very high-cost pretreatment for electrodialysis is required. All the processes making up the proposed disposal process are commercially available, although they are nowhere operating commercially as one process. Because of the commercial availability of the processes, the proposed process may be a candidate 'best commercially available treatment' for soluble salt disposal.

McKnight, C.E.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Compact disposal of high-energy electron beams using passive or laser-driven plasma decelerating stage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plasma decelerating stage is investigated as a compact alternative for the disposal of high-energy beams (beam dumps). This could benefit the design of laser-driven plasma accelerator (LPA) applications that require transportability and or high-repetition-rate operation regimes. Passive and laser-driven (active) plasma-based beam dumps are studied analytically and with particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations in a 1D geometry. Analytical estimates for the beam energy loss are compared to and extended by the PIC simulations, showing that with the proposed schemes a beam can be efficiently decelerated in a centimeter-scale distance.

Bonatto, A.; Schroeder, C.B.; Vay, J.-L.; Geddes, C.R.; Benedetti, C.; Esarey and, E.; Leemans, W.P.

2014-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

200

Spent Fuel Disposal Trust Fund (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any licensee operating a nuclear power plant in this State shall establish a segregated Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Trust Fund in accordance with this subchapter for the eventual disposal of spent...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Reactor Pressure Vessel Head Packaging & Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Head replacements have come to the forefront due to erosion/corrosion and wastage problems resulting from the susceptibility of the RPV Head alloy steel material to water/boric acid corrosion from reactor coolant leakage through the various RPV Head penetrations. A case in point is the recent Davis-Besse RPV Head project, where detailed inspections in early 2002 revealed significant wastage of head material adjacent to one of the Control Rod Drive Mechanism (CRDM) nozzles. In lieu of making ASME weld repairs to the damaged head, Davis-Besse made the decision to replace the RPV Head. The decision was made on the basis that the required weld repair would be too extensive and almost impractical. This paper presents the packaging, transport, and disposal considerations for the damaged Davis-Besse RPV Head. It addresses the requirements necessary to meet Davis Besse needs, as well as the regulatory criteria, for shipping and burial of the head. It focuses on the radiological characterization, shipping/disposal package design, site preparation and packaging, and the transportation and emergency response plans that were developed for the Davis-Besse RPV Head project.

Wheeler, D. M.; Posivak, E.; Freitag, A.; Geddes, B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of eastern Devonian gas shale: Society of PetroleumShale Disposal Reference Case August 2014 Borehole activity: Oil and gas

Zheng, Liange

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

205

Successful Opening and Disposal to-Date of Mixed CERCLA Waste at the ORR-EMWMF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On May 28, 2002, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) opened for operations on the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). The EMWMF is the centerpiece in the DOE's strategy for ORR environmental cleanup. The 8+ year planned project is an on-site engineered landfill, which is accepting for disposal radioactive, hazardous, toxic and mixed wastes generated by remedial action subcontractors. The opening of the EMWMF on May 28, 2002 marked the culmination of a long development process that began in mid-1980. In late 1999 the Record of Decision was signed and a full year of design for the initial 400, 000-yd3 disposal cell began. In early 2000 Duratek Federal Services, Inc. (Federal Services) began construction. Since then, Federal Services and Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC (BJC) have worked cooperatively to complete a required DOE readiness evaluation, develop all the Safety Authorization Basis Documentation (ASA's, SER, and UCD's) and prepare procedures and work controlling documents required to safely accept waste. This paper explains the intricacies and economics of designing and constructing the facility.

Corpstein, P.; Hopper, P.; McNutt, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

206

Creep analysis of solid oxide fuel cell with bonded compliant seal design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) requires good sealant because it works in harsh conditions (high temperature, thermal cycle, oxidative and reducing gas environments). Bonded compliant seal (BCS) is a new sealing method for planar SOFC. It uses a thin foil metal to bond the window frame and cell, achieving the seal between window frame and cell. At high temperature, a comprehensive evaluation of its creep strength is essential for the adoption of BCS design. In order to characterize the creep behavior, the creep induced by thermal stresses in SOFC with BCS design is simulated by finite element method. The results show that the foil is compressed and large thermal stresses are generated. The initial peak thermal stress is located in the thin foil because the foil acts as a spring stores the thermal stresses by elastic and plastic deformation in itself. Serving at high temperature, initial thermal displacement is partially recovered because of the creep relaxation, which becomes a new discovered advantage for BCS design. It predicts that the failures are likely to happen in the middle of the cell edge and BNi-2 filler metal, because the maximum residual displacement and creep strain are located.

Wenchun Jiang; Yucai Zhang; Yun Luo; J.M. Gong; S.T. Tu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Design of cascaded low cost solar cell with CuO substrate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many years the main focus of R and D in solar cells was the development of high-efficiency solar convertors. However with solar technology beginning to be a part of national grids and stand-alone power supplies for variety of individual customers, the emphasis has changed, namely, the cost per kilowatt- hour (kW-hr) started to be an important figure of merit. Although Si does dominate the market of solar convertors, this material has total cost of kilowatt-hour much higher than what the power grid is providing presently to customers. It is well known that the cost of raw semiconductor material is a major factor in formulation of the final cost of a solar cell. That motivated us to search and design a novel solar cell using cheap materials. The new p-i-n solar cell consists of hetero-structure cascade of materials with step by step decreasing energy gap. Since the lattice constant of these three materials do differ not more than 2%, the more expensive epitaxial fabrication methods can be used as well. It should be emphasized that designed solar cell is not a cascade of three solar cells connected in series. Our market study shows that Si solar panel which costs $250–400 / m{sup 2} leads to a cost of $0.12–0.30 / kW-hr. To the contrary, CuO based solar cells with Cadmium compounds on top, would cost $100 / m{sup 2}. This will allow the novel solar cell to produce electricity at a cost of $0.06–0.08 / kW-hr.

Samson, Mil'shtein; Anup, Pillai; Shiv, Sharma; Garo, Yessayan [Advanced Electronic Technology Center, ECE Dept., University of Massachusetts, Lowell, MA-01851 (United States)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste clean-up contracts. April 3, 2012 Worker moves drums of transuranic (TRU) waste at a staging area A worker stages drums of transuranic waste at Los Alamos National Laboratory's Technical Area 54. the Lap ships such drums to the U.S. Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Southern New Mexico. The Lab annually averages about 120 shipments of TRU waste to WIPP. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email "They will be valuable partners in the Lab's ability to dispose of the waste safely and efficiently." Small businesses selected for environmental work at LANL

209

PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex`s Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States); Schafer, J.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Low-level and transuranic waste transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning cost sensitivity analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Systems Design Study (SDS) identified technologies available for the remediation of low-level and transuranic waste stored at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex's Subsurface Disposal Area at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SDS study intentionally omitted the costs of transportation and disposal of the processed waste and the cost of decommissioning the processing facility. This report provides a follow-on analysis of the SDS to explore the basis for life-cycle cost segments of transportation, disposal, and facility decommissioning; to determine the sensitivity of the cost segments; and to quantify the life-cycle costs of the 10 ex situ concepts of the Systems Design Study.

Schlueter, R. (Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)); Schafer, J.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program Fact Sheet, July 2001  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Grand Junction Disposal Site Grand Junction Disposal Site Uranium ore was processed at the Climax millsite at Grand Junction, Colorado, between 1951 and 1970. The milling operations created process-related waste and tailings, a sandlike material containing radioactive materials and other contaminants. The tailings were an ideal and inexpensive construction material suitable for concrete, mortar, and fill. Accordingly, the tailings were widely used in the Grand Junction area for these purposes. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) encapsulated the tailings and other contaminated materials from the millsite and more than 4,000 vicinity properties in the Grand Junction area in an engineered disposal cell. Part of the disposal cell was completed in 1994; the remainder of the cell remains open until it is

213

Numerical heat transfer analysis for the design of the engineering-scale electrowinning cell in pyroprocessing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A heat transfer analysis of the electrowinning cell was conducted to develop a basic tool for designing of the engineering-scale electrowinner. For calculating the heat transfer properties of argon gas and LiCl–KCl eutectic salt in the electrowinning cell, the ANSYS CFX commercial code was adapted. The simulation model was prepared, and the temperature profiles of the argon gas and the salt were compared with those in the lab-scale electrowinning cell. Using the simulation model, temperature distributions of the engineering-scale electrowinning cell were analyzed. When the heating zone length was 2.5 times longer than the height of the LiCl–KCl salt, the salt temperature was maintained at about 500 °C and its temperature gradient became less than 5 °C. The cooling zone length had an influence on both temperatures of the argon gas under the cell cover as well as the salt. When the cooling zone length was about 0.16–0.19 of the heating zone length, the temperature of the salt was maintained at 500 °C and the argon gas temperature under the cover decreased below 200 °C. The number of the heat shield plates and size mainly affected the temperature gradient of the salt and argon gas under the cover. More than 3 heat shield plates had to be placed in the cooling zone and their diameters should be extended over 410 mm that is over 0.95 of the cell diameter.

D. Yoon; S. Paek; S.H. Kim; K.R. Kim; D.H. Ahn

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Water Transport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

in PEM Fuel Cells: in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing, and Design Optimization J. Vernon Cole and Ashok Gidwani CFDRC Prepared for: DOE Hydrogen Fuel Cell Kickoff Meeting February 13, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. Background Water Management Issues Arise From: ƒ Generation of water by cathodic reaction ƒ Membrane humidification requirements ƒ Capillary pressure driven transport through porous MEA and GDL materials ƒ Scaling bipolar plate channel dimensions J.H. Nam and M. Kaviany, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 46, pp. 4595-4611 (2003) Relevant Barriers and Targets ƒ Improved Gas Diffusion Layer, Flow Fields, Membrane Electrode Assemblies Needed to Improve Water Management: * Flooding blocks reactant transport

215

Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Nuclear  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for R and D for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste The Used Fuel Disposition campaign (UFD) is selecting a set of geologic media for further study that spans a suite of behavior characteristics that impose a broad range of potential conditions on the design of the repository, the engineered barrier, and the waste. Salt, clay/shale, and granitic rocks represent a reasonable cross-section of behavior. Granitic rocks are also the primary basement rock to consider for deep borehole disposal. UFD is developing generic system analysis capability and general experimental data related to mined geologic disposal in the three

216

Fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid system design part II: Dynamics and control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fuel cell gas turbine hybrid systems have achieved ultra-high efficiency and ultra-low emissions at small scales, but have yet to demonstrate effective dynamic responsiveness or base-load cost savings. Fuel cell systems and hybrid prototypes have not utilized controls to address thermal cycling during load following operation, and have thus been relegated to the less valuable base-load and peak shaving power market. Additionally, pressurized hybrid topping cycles have exhibited increased stall/surge characteristics particularly during off-design operation. This paper evaluates additional control actuators with simple control methods capable of mitigating spatial temperature variation and stall/surge risk during load following operation of hybrid fuel cell systems. The novel use of detailed, spatially resolved, physical fuel cell and turbine models in an integrated system simulation enables the development and evaluation of these additional control methods. It is shown that the hybrid system can achieve greater dynamic response over a larger operating envelope than either individual sub-system; the fuel cell or gas turbine. Results indicate that a combined feed-forward, P–I and cascade control strategy is capable of handling moderate perturbations and achieving a 2:1 (MCFC) or 4:1 (SOFC) turndown ratio while retaining >65% fuel-to-electricity efficiency, while maintaining an acceptable stack temperature profile and stall/surge margin.

Dustin McLarty; Jack Brouwer; Scott Samuelsen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

10 CFR Ch. X (1-1-12 Edition) Pt. 1022 D11 WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITIES FOR TRANSURANIC WASTE Siting, construction or expansion, and op- eration of disposal facilities for transuranic (TRU) waste and TRU mixed waste (TRU waste also containing hazardous waste as designated in 40 CFR part 261). D12 INCINERATORS Siting, construction, and operation of in- cinerators, other than research and develop- ment incinerators or incinerators for non- hazardous solid waste (as designated in 40 CFR 261.4(b)). PART 1022-COMPLIANCE WITH FLOODPLAIN AND WETLAND EN- VIRONMENTAL REVIEW REQUIRE- MENTS Subpart A-General Sec. 1022.1 Background. 1022.2 Purpose and scope. 1022.3 Policy. 1022.4 Definitions. 1022.5 Applicability. 1022.6 Public inquiries. Subpart B-Procedures for Floodplain and

218

Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings Proceedings of the Workshop on Long-Term Performance Monitoring of Metals and Radionuclides in the Subsurface: Strategies, Tools, and Case Studies. U.S. Geological Survey. April 21 and 22, 2004, Reston, Virginia. W.J. Waugh Design, Performance, and Sustainability of Engineered Covers for Uranium Mill Tailings More Documents & Publications Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson Lysimeters Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

219

Design consideration of micro thin film solid-oxide fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Miniaturized planar solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and stacks can be fabricated by thin film deposition and micromachining. Serious thermal stresses, originating in fabrication and during operation, cause thermal–mechanical instability of the constituent thin films. In this paper, the effect of thin film geometry on thermal stress and mechanical stability is evaluated to optimize the structure of a thin film. A novel design of thin circular electrolyte films for SOFCs is presented by using corrugated structures, with which small thermal stresses and a broad design range of structure parameters can be obtained. Thermal transfer analysis shows that heat loss by solid conduction is serious in thin films with a small radius. But thermal convection and radiation dominate heat loss in large thin films with a radius of several millimetres. Scale-dependent thermal characteristics show the importance of film size and packaging in optimization of thermal isolation for micro SOFCs. A novel flip-flop stack configuration for micro SOFCs is presented. This configuration allows multiple cells to share one reaction chamber, helps to obtain uniform flow fields, and simplifies the flow field network for micro fuel cell stacks.

Yanghua Tang; Kevin Stanley; Jonathan Wu; Dave Ghosh; Jiujun Zhang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Inhibition of ICAM-1/LFA-1-mediated Heterotypic T-cell Adhesion to Epithelial Cells: Design of ICAM-1 Cyclic Peptides  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work, we have designed cyclic peptides (cIBL, cIBR, cIBC, CH4 and CH7) derived from the parent IB peptide (ICAM-11–21) that are inhibitors of ICAM-1/LFA-1-mediated T-cell adhesion to Caco-2 cell monolayers. Cyclic ...

Anderson, Meagan E.; Yakovleva, Tatyana; Yongbo, Hu; Siahaan, Teruna J.

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Novel cell design for combined in situ acoustic emission and x-ray diffraction study during electrochemical cycling of batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and x-ray diffraction cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been designed and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk, which acts as both an x-ray window and a current collector. In this manner, the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazards is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles, which were previously studied by the AE technique, were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells, while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin; Meisner, Roberta; Daniel, Claus [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States); Materials Science and Engineering Department, University of Tennessee, 434 Dougherty Hall, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996-2200 (United States); Kirkham, Melanie; Parish, Chad M.; Dudney, Nancy [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Rd., MS 6083, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37931-6083 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Enhancements to Generic Disposal System Modeling Capabilities...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

disposal system modeling and analysis capability that takes advantage of high-performance computing (HPC) environments to simulate the important multi-physics phenomena and...

223

Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Receiving and Processing Facility Waste Sampling and Characterization Facility Waste Treatment Plant Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility Email Email Page | Print Print...

224

Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Briefing: Summary and Recommendations of EM Landfill Workshop...

225

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat disposal site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSPC documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Long-term surveillance plan for the South Clive disposal site Clive, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project South Clive disposal site in Clive, Utah. This LSTP describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the South Clive disposal site performs as designed and is cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed for custody and long-term care, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) requires the DOE to submit such a site-specific LTSP.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated costs and weight of blowers and pumps to force air and hydrogen gas through the fuel cell. Promising improvements to materials structure and surface treatments that can potentially aid in managing the distribution and removal of liquid water were developed; and improved steady-state and freeze-thaw performance was demonstrated for a fuel cell stack under the self-humidified operating conditions that are promising for stationary power generation with reduced operating costs.

J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

228

Design of gasifiers to optimize fuel cell systems. Final report, September 1990--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pursuing the key national goal of clean and efficient utilization of the abundant domestic coal resources for power generation, this study was conducted to evaluate the potential of optimizing the integrated catalytic gasification/carbonate fuel cell power generation system. ERC in close collaboration with Fluor Daniel (providing engineering design and costing), conducted a detailed system configuration study to evaluate various catalytic gasification/carbonate fuel cell power plant configurations and compare them to present day, as well as emerging, alternate coal-based power plant technologies to assess their competitive position. A Topical Report (1992) was submitted documenting this effort, and the three catalytic gasification case studies are summarized in Appendix A. Results of this study indicate that system efficiencies approaching 55% (HHV) can be achieved by integrating low temperature catalytic gasification with high efficiency carbonate fuel cells. Thermal balance in the gasifier is achieved without oxygen by recycling hydrogen from the fuel cell anode exhaust. A small amount of air is added to the gasifier to minimize hydrogen recycle. In order to validate the assumptions made in the case configurations, experimental studies were performed to determine the reactivity of Illinois No. 6 coal with the gasification catalysts. The reactivity of the catalyzed coal has significant bearing on gasifier sizing and hence system cost and efficiency.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Interim radiological safety standards and evaluation procedures for subseabed high-level waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Seabed Disposal Project (SDP) was evaluating the technical feasibility of high-level nuclear waste disposal in deep ocean sediments. Working standards were needed for risk assessments, evaluation of alternative designs, sensitivity studies, and conceptual design guidelines. This report completes a three part program to develop radiological standards for the feasibility phase of the SDP. The characteristics of subseabed disposal and how they affect the selection of standards are discussed. General radiological protection standards are reviewed, along with some new methods, and a systematic approach to developing standards is presented. The selected interim radiological standards for the SDP and the reasons for their selection are given. These standards have no legal or regulatory status and will be replaced or modified by regulatory agencies if subseabed disposal is implemented. 56 refs., 29 figs., 15 tabs.

Klett, R.D.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign September 2012 FCR&D-USED-2011-000065 REV 1 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the U.S. Government. Neither the U.S. Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, expressed or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness, of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. References herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trade mark, manufacturer, or

231

14 - Lubricant use and disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: Criteria are defined for optimum machine-specific selection of conventional, high-performance and specialty lubricants. Lubrication consolidation is indicated as a means of rationalisation of inventories. Intended use of lubricants may be compromised by oxidation, water and air contamination, additive depletion and accumulation of contaminants, including wear debris, and biological degradation. Strategic oil analysis is described from simple in-shop sensory inspections to primary on-site standard testing and more comprehensive secondary testing methods as an operational maintenance tool for machine and lubricant condition monitoring to estimate remaining lubricant life time and prevent premature machine failure. The disposal of spent lubricants, including waste oil legislation and management, and re-refining technologies, are discussed.

Jan C.J. Bart; Emanuele Gucciardi; Stefano Cavallaro

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WASTE DISPOSAL WORKSHOPS: ANTHRAX CONTAMINATED WASTE January 2010 Prepared for the Interagency left intentionally blank.] #12;Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy PNNL-SA-69994 under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Waste Disposal Workshops: Anthrax-Contaminated Waste AM Lesperance JF Upton SL

233

Asset Management Equipment Disposal Form -Refrigerant Recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

enters the waste stream with the charge intact (e.g., motor vehicle air conditioners, refrigeratorsAsset Management Equipment Disposal Form - Refrigerant Recovery Safe Disposal Requirements Under refrigeration, cold storage warehouse refrigeration, chillers, and industrial process refrigeration) has to have

Sin, Peter

234

Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the DOE Office of Legacy Management in 2013 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

235

Modified design of radioisotope thermophotovoltaic generator to mitigate adverse effect of measured cell voltage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preceding OSC paper described a number of changes in the data base and in the methods--considerably more rigorous than those employed in the past--for analyzing the performance of Radioisotope Thermophotovoltaic (RTPV) converters. As shown, some of those changes were beneficial, but others--particularly the use of EDTEK`s experimentally measured open-circuit voltages and fill factors instead of previously used theoretical equations--had a substantial adverse effect on the predicted converter performance. EDTEK is continuing work on improved PV cells to more closely approach theoretical voltage predictions. In parallel with that effort, OSC has been investigating a number of generator design modifications to achieve additional improvements in system performance. Specifically, OSC found that the converter`s performance could be significantly improved by increasing the heat flux incident on the PV cells. As will be explained, OSC`s preferred design, which entails placing the TPV converters on the housing`s end covers instead of its side walls, not only improves the generator`s performance but also offers important programmatic, fabrication, and processing advantages.

Schock, A.; Or, C.T.; Kumar, V. [Orbital Sciences Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

Land Management and Disposal | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal Land Management and Disposal 42 USC 2201(g), Section 161(g), of the AEA 42 USC Section 2224, Section 174 DOE, July 2004, Real Property Desk Guide Requirements: Document Title P.L. 83-703 (68 Stat. 919), Section 161g Grants Special Authority as Required in the Act to Acquire, Sell, Dispose, etc., of Real Property in Furtherance of the Department's Mission (Under the Atomic Energy Act of 1954) P.L. 95-91, 91 Stat. 578 (Sections 302 and 347) Department of Energy Organizational Act of 1977, Delegated Authority for Real Property P.L. 106-580 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended P.L. 105-85 Federal Property and Administrative Services Act of 1949, As Amended 10 CFR 770 Transfer of Real Property at Defense Nuclear Facilities for Economic Development

237

Designing and characterizing artificial transcription factors targeting critical embryonic stem cell self- renewal and pluripotency genes in somatic cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regardless of cells type and GFP-DRP fusion construct (the DRP-GFP fusion protein in the mouse cell types that werefusion protein in all successfully transfected cell types.

Yang, Steven

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Design  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Design Design of a Multithreaded Barnes-Hut Algorithm for Multicore Clusters Technical Report Junchao Zhang and Babak Behzad Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign {jczhang, bbehza2}@illinois.edu Marc Snir Department of Computer Science, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and MCS Division, Argonne National Laboratory snir@anl.gov Abstract We describe in this paper an implementation of the Barnes-Hut al- gorithm on multicore clusters. Based on a partitioned global ad- dress space (PGAS) library, the design integrates intranode mul- tithreading and internode one-sided communication, exemplifying a PGAS + X programming style. Within a node, the computation is decomposed into tasks (subtasks), and multitasking is used to hide network latency. We study the tradeoffs between locality in private caches and locality in shared caches

239

Disposal demonstration of a high integrity container (HIC) containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from Three Mile Island  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high integrity container (HIC) was developed, tested, and certified for use in disposing of unusual low-level radioactive waste from Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2). The work was coordinated by EG and G Idaho, Inc. and funded by the US Department of Energy. A disposal demonstration using an HIC containing an EPICOR-II prefilter from TMI-2 was completed at the commercial disposal facility in the State of Washington. A Certification of Compliance was issued by the Department of Social and Health Services of the State of Washington to use the HIC in disposing of up to 50 EPICOR-II prefilters. That Certification of Compliance was issued after rigorous review of the HIC design and test program by the State and by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This report describes the processes of loading, transporting, and disposing of the demonstration HIC and briefly describes the design, testing, and approval effort leading up to the demonstration.

McConnell, J.W. Jr.; Tyacke, M.J.; Schmitt, R.C.; Reno, H.W.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Disposal configuration options for future uses of greater confinement disposal at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for disposing of a variety of radioactive and mixed wastes, some of which are considered special-case waste because they do not currently have a clear disposal option. The DOE`s Nevada Field Office contracted with Sandia National Laboratories to investigate the possibility of disposing of some of this special-case waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). As part of this investigation, a review of a near-surface and subsurface disposal options that was performed to develop alternative disposal configurations for special-case waste disposal at the NTS. The criteria for the review included (1) configurations appropriate for disposal at the NTS; (2) configurations for disposal of waste at least 100 ft below the ground surface; (3) configurations for which equipment and technology currently exist; and (4) configurations that meet the special requirements imposed by the nature of special-case waste. Four options for subsurface disposal of special-case waste are proposed: mined consolidated rock, mined alluvium, deep pits or trenches, and deep boreholes. Six different methods for near-surface disposal are also presented: earth-covered tumuli, above-grade concrete structures, trenches, below-grade concrete structures, shallow boreholes, and hydrofracture. Greater confinement disposal (GCD) in boreholes at least 100 ft deep, similar to that currently practiced at the GCD facility at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the NTS, was retained as the option that met the criteria for the review. Four borehole disposal configurations are proposed with engineered barriers that range from the native alluvium to a combination of gravel and concrete. The configurations identified will be used for system analysis that will be performed to determine the disposal configurations and wastes that may be suitable candidates for disposal of special-case wastes at the NTS.

Price, L. [Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual This Revision 3 of the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility...

242

Accounting for Localized Defects in the Optoelectronic Design of Thin-Film Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin-film silicon solar cell technology," Progress insolar cells: modeling, materials and device technology.technologies competitive with traditional wafer based solar cells,

Deceglie, Michael G.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Achieving High Performance Polymer Tandem Solar Cells via Novel Materials Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymers for organic solar cell applications. Chem. Rev.Hummelen, J. C. , Plastic solar cells. Adv. Funct. Mater.Efficient inverted polymer solar cells. Appl. Phys. Lett.

Dou, Letian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Achieving High Performance Polymer Tandem Solar Cells via Novel Materials Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of conjugated polymers for organic solar cell applications.characterization of organic solar cells. Adv. Funct. Mater.techniques for the organic solar cell are employed to

Dou, Letian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Salt caverns for oil field waste disposal.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns used for oil field waste disposal are created in salt formations by solution mining. When created, caverns are filled with brine. Wastes are introduced into the cavern by pumping them under low pressure. Each barrel of waste injected to the cavern displaces a barrel of brine to the surface. The brine is either used for drilling mud or is disposed of in an injection well. Figure 8 shows an injection pump used at disposal cavern facilities in west Texas. Several types of oil field waste may be pumped into caverns for disposal. These include drilling muds, drill cuttings, produced sands, tank bottoms, contaminated soil, and completion and stimulation wastes. Waste blending facilities are constructed at the site of cavern disposal to mix the waste into a brine solution prior to injection. Overall advantages of salt cavern disposal include a medium price range for disposal cost, large capacity and availability of salt caverns, limited surface land requirement, increased safety, and ease of establishment of individual state regulations.

Veil, J.; Ford, J.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.; Environmental Assessment; RMC, Consultants, Inc.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Prototype pushing robot for emplacing vitrified waste canisters into horizontal disposal drifts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the French Underground Disposal concept, as described in ANDRA's (Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs) Dossier 2005, the Pushing Robot is an application envisaged for the emplacement (and the potential retrieval) of 'Vitrified waste packages', also called 'C type packages'. ANDRA has developed a Prototype Pushing Robot within the framework of the ESDRED Project (Engineering Studies and Demonstration of Repository Design) which is co-funded by the European Commission as part of the sixth EURATOM Research and Training Framework Programme (FP6) on nuclear energy (2002 - 2006). The Rationale of the Pushing Robot technology comes from various considerations, including the need for (1) a simple and robust system, capable of moving (and potentially retrieving) on up to 40 metres (m), a 2 tonne C type package (mounted on ceramic sliding runners) inside the carbon steel sleeve constituting the liner (and rock support) of a horizontal disposal cell, (2) small annular clearances between the package and the liner, (3) compactness of the device to be transferred from surface to underground, jointly with the package, inside a shielding cask, and (4) remote controlled operations for the sake of radioprotection. The initial design, based on gripping supports, has been replaced by a 'technical variant' based on inflatable toric jacks. It was then possible, using a test bench, to check that the Pushing Robot worked properly. Steps as high as 7 mm were successfully cleared by a dummy package pushed by the Prototype.. Based on the lessons learned by ANDRA's regarding the Prototype Pushing Robot, a new Scope of Work is being written for the Contract concerning an Industrial Scale Demonstrator. The Industrial Scale Demonstration should be completed by the end of the second Quarter of 2008. (authors)

Londe, L.; Seidler, W.K.; Bosgiraud, J.M.; Guenin, J.J. [Agence Nationale pour la Gestion des Dechets Radioactifs (ANDRA), 92 - Chatenay Malabry (France); Devaux, P. [CREATIV ALLIANCE, 78 - Viroflay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely Moab Mill Tailings Removal Project Reaches 5 Million Tons Disposed: Project Accomplishes Milestone While Doing it Safely February 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler, Moab Federal Project Director, (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan, S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager, (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reached another milestone today for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project, having shipped 5 million tons of tailings from the massive pile located in Moab, Utah, to the engineered disposal cell near Crescent Junction, Utah. The pile comprised an estimated 16 million tons total when DOE's Remedial

248

International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

249

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of...

250

A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical immunosensor for diagnosis of exposure to toxic organophosphorus agents. A novel nanoparticle-based disposable electrochemical...

251

EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This...

252

A Fresh Look at Greater Confinement Boreholes for Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Federal government has responsibility for disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLW) with concentrations of radionuclides that exceed limits established by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for Class C LLW. Since Greater-Than-Class-C (GTCC) LLW is from activities licensed by NRC or NRC Agreement States, a disposal facility by law must be licensed by NRC. The United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) has the responsibility to site, design, construct, operate, decommission, and provide long-term care for GTCC LLW disposal facilities. On May 11, 2005, DOE issued an advance notice of intent to begin preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for GTCC LLW disposal. Since the initiation of the EIS, analysis has focused on compiling the inventory of commercial GTCC LLW and DOE GTCC-like wastes, reviewing disposal technologies, and other preliminary studies. One of the promising disposal technologies being considered is intermediate depth greater confinement boreholes. Greater confinement boreholes have been used effectively to safely dispose of long-lived radioactive waste at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The DOE took a fresh look at global experiences with the use of greater confinement borehole disposal, including current considerations being given for future applications in the U.S., and concluded that the U.S. is positioned to benefit from international collaboration on borehole disposal technology, and could ultimately become a pilot project, if the technology is selected. (authors)

Tonkay, D.W.; Joyce, J.L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Disposal Operations, Washington, DC (United States); Cochran, J.R. [Sandia National Laboratories1, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Achieving High Performance Polymer Tandem Solar Cells via Novel Materials Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polymer solar cell could be a viable technology for spacetechnology must utilize the uniqueness of polymer solar cells.

Dou, Letian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Evaluation of critical materials for five advanced design photovoltaic cells with an assessment of indium and gallium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. This report presents the results of the screening of the five following advanced PV cell designs: polycrystalline silicon, amorphous silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide frontwall, polycrystalline gallium arsenide MIS, and advanced concentrator-500X. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 GWe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online cpacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary basline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. Earlier DOE sponsored work on the assessment of critical materials in PV cells conclusively identtified indium and gallium as warranting further investigation as to their availability. Therefore, this report includes a discussion of the future availability of gallium and indium. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Jamieson, W.M.; Long, L.W.; Pawlewicz, W.T.; Smith, S.A.; Teeter, R.R.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Generic Argillite/Shale Disposal Reference Case  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive waste disposal in a deep subsurface repository hosted in clay/shale/argillite is a subject of widespread interest given the desirable isolation properties, geochemically reduced conditions, and widespread geologic occurrence of this rock type (Hansen 2010; Bianchi et al. 2013). Bianchi et al. (2013) provides a description of diffusion in a clay-hosted repository based on single-phase flow and full saturation using parametric data from documented studies in Europe (e.g., ANDRA 2005). The predominance of diffusive transport and sorption phenomena in this clay media are key attributes to impede radionuclide mobility making clay rock formations target sites for disposal of high-level radioactive waste. The reports by Hansen et al. (2010) and those from numerous studies in clay-hosted underground research laboratories (URLs) in Belgium, France and Switzerland outline the extensive scientific knowledge obtained to assess long-term clay/shale/argillite repository isolation performance of nuclear waste. In the past several years under the UFDC, various kinds of models have been developed for argillite repository to demonstrate the model capability, understand the spatial and temporal alteration of the repository, and evaluate different scenarios. These models include the coupled Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical (THM) and Thermal-Hydrological-Mechanical-Chemical (THMC) models (e.g. Liu et al. 2013; Rutqvist et al. 2014a, Zheng et al. 2014a) that focus on THMC processes in the Engineered Barrier System (EBS) bentonite and argillite host hock, the large scale hydrogeologic model (Bianchi et al. 2014) that investigates the hydraulic connection between an emplacement drift and surrounding hydrogeological units, and Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) models (Greenberg et al. 2013) that evaluate thermal evolution in the host rock approximated as a thermal conduction process to facilitate the analysis of design options. However, the assumptions and the properties (parameters) used in these models are different, which not only make inter-model comparisons difficult, but also compromise the applicability of the lessons learned from one model to another model. The establishment of a reference case would therefore be helpful to set up a baseline for model development. A generic salt repository reference case was developed in Freeze et al. (2013) and the generic argillite repository reference case is presented in this report. The definition of a reference case requires the characterization of the waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, EBS backfill, host rock, and biosphere. This report mainly documents the processes in EBS bentonite and host rock that are potentially important for performance assessment and properties that are needed to describe these processes, with brief description other components such as waste inventory, waste form, waste package, repository layout, aquifer, and biosphere. A thorough description of the generic argillite repository reference case will be given in Jové Colon et al. (2014).

Zheng, Liange; Jov& #233; Colon, Carlos; Bianchi, Marco; Birkholzer, Jens

2014-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

256

Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 authorizes the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, to reclassify certain waste from reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from high-level waste to low-level waste if it meets the criteria set forth in Section 3116. Currently, DOE SRS has prepared one final (salt waste) and is working on two additional waste determinations: F Tank Farm and H Tank Farm. The Salt Waste Determination has been finalized and the Secretary of Energy issued that determination on January 17, 2006. In 2007, it was decided that due to a new Saltstone disposal vault design,

257

Long-term surveillance plan for the Bodo Canyon Disposal Site, Durango, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Durango, Colorado, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Durango (Bodo Canyon) disposal site, which will be referred to as the disposal site throughout this document. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM). RRMs include tailings and other uranium ore processing wastes still at the site, which the DOE determines to be radioactive. This LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992).

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI) will utilize a newly mined Underground Research Lab (URL) in WIPP to perform a cost effective, proof-of-principle field test of the emplacement of heat-generating radioactive waste and validate modeling efforts. The goals of the SDDI Thermal Test are to: * Demonstrate a proof-of-principle concept for in-drift disposal in salt. * Investigate, in a specific emplacement concept, the response of the salt to heat. * Develop a full-scale response for run-of- mine (ROM) salt. * Develop a validated coupled process model for disposal of heat-generating wastes in salt. * Evaluate the environmental conditions of the

259

Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) 1 Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate References DEAR 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate DOE Directives DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, or current version DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, or current version Overview This section provides internal Departmental information and DOE and NNSA points of contact for issues dealing with real estate acquisition, use, and disposal for cost reimbursement and fixed price contracts when in performance of the contract, the contractor will acquire or proposes to acquire use of real property. Background DEAR Subpart 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate provides the policy and

260

Policy Issues in Nuclear Waste Disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Congressional Research Service, in an issue brief on nuclear waste disposal, compactly described a common assessment when it noted that “nuclear waste has sometimes been called the Achilles’ heel of the nu...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A disposable, self-administered electrolyte test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis demonstrates the novel concept that it is possible to make a disposable, self-administered electrolyte test to be introduced to the general consumer market. Although ion specific electrodes have been used to ...

Prince, Ryan, 1977-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Available Options for Waste Disposal [and Discussion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vitrified high-activity waste in properly selected deep...alternatives to present projects of waste disposal, but rather as...benefits will be different. Long-term storage of either spent fuel or vitrified waste, although not an alternative...

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

US nuclear waste: Widespread problem of disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... individual states in the United States to develop facilities for disposal of low-level radioactive waste produced by ... produced by nuclear reactors, industry and biomdical research and treatment. The federal Low-Level ...

Christopher Earl

1984-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

264

Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

CSMRI Bagged Soil Disposal Summary Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.......................................................................................................................... 1 4. Landfill Acceptance and Equipment Appendix G Daily GPS Coordinants of Disposal Location at BFI Foothills Landfill Appendix H Ambient Landfill (Stoller 2005a). After review of the dose assessment report, the CDPHE approved shipment

266

Disposable Bioreactors: Maturation into Pharmaceutical Glycoprotein Manufacturing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To summarise: the range of disposable bioreactors available on the market offers flexible, cost efficient and time-saving solutions from early process development to large-scale production. Table 1 gives an overv...

René Brecht

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

1/12/14 EDACafe.com -Video Roundup -Smitha Rao and J.C. Chiao Design Micro-Windmills to Charge Cell Phones www10.edacafe.com/blogs/videoroundup/2014/01/11/smitha-rao-and-j-c-chiao-design-micro-windmills-to-charge-cell-phones/ 1/5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell Phones www10.edacafe.com/blogs/videoroundup/2014/01/11/smitha-rao-and-j-c-chiao-design-micro-windmills-to-charge-cell-phones Smitha Rao and J.C. Chiao Design Micro-Windmills to Charge Cell Phones Article source: University a micro- windmill that generates wind energy and may become an innovative solution to cell phone batteries

Chiao, Jung-Chih

268

Pesticide fate in an aboveground disposal system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A 8 M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 'l988... Major Subject: Soil Science PESTICIDE FATE IN AN ABOVEGROUND DISPOSAL SYSTEM A Thesis by BRIAN RICHARD VANDERGLAS Approved as to style and content by: K. W. Brown (Chair of Committee) John M. Sweeten (Member) Jack D. Price (Member) E. C. A...

Vanderglas, Brian Richard

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This report presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) in 2013 at 19 uranium mill tailings disposal sites established under Title I of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title I disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

270

The Design of Organic Polymers and Small Molecules to Improve the Efficiency of Excitonic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, blends of a p-typecells, including organic solar cells and dye-sensitizedin a bilayer organic solar cell. At top is a cross section

Armstrong, Paul Barber

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

The Design of Organic Polymers and Small Molecules to Improve the Efficiency of Excitonic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. The physics of solar cells; Imperial College Press,for organic polymer solar cells investigated to date. TheHarvesting in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Through the Use of

Armstrong, Paul Barber

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microsoft Word - S08254_CellConditions  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Cell Internal Water Balance and Cell Conditions February 2012 LMS/SHP/S08254 This page intentionally left blank LMS/SHP/S08254 Shiprock, New Mexico, Disposal Cell Internal Water Balance and Cell Conditions February 2012 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Shiprock Disposal Cell Internal Water Balance and Cell Conditions February 2012 Doc. No.S08254 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1

273

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

Impact of Honeycomb Ceramics Geometrical Cell Design on Urea SCR System  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Honeycomb ceramic substrates with 3 cell geometries were performance tested for Nox conversion. Results provide suggestions for the best cell structure for SCR systems.

275

Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Advanced Advanced Disposal Services to someone by E-mail Share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Facebook Tweet about Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Twitter Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Google Bookmark Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Delicious Rank Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on Digg Find More places to share Clean Cities: National Clean Fleets Partner: Advanced Disposal Services on AddThis.com... Goals & Accomplishments Partnerships National Clean Fleets Partnership National Parks Initiative Electric Vehicle Infrastructure Training Program Advanced Vehicle Technology Competitions

276

System Design of a Natural Gas PEM Fuel Cell Power Plant for Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following conclusions are made based on this analysis effort: (1) High-temperature PEM data are not available; (2) Stack development effort for Phase II is required; (3) System results are by definition preliminary, mostly due to the immaturity of the high-temperature stack; other components of the system are relatively well defined; (4) The Grotthuss conduction mechanism yields the preferred system characteristics; the Grotthuss conduction mechanism is also much less technically mature than the vehicle mechanism; (5) Fuel processor technology is available today and can be procured for Phase II (steam or ATR); (6) The immaturity of high-temperature membrane technology requires that a robust system design be developed in Phase II that is capable of operating over a wide temperature and pressure range - (a) Unpressurized or Pressurized PEM (Grotthuss mechanism) at 140 C, Highest temperature most favorable, Lowest water requirement most favorable, Pressurized recommended for base loaded operation, Unpressurized may be preferred for load following; (b) Pressurized PEM (vehicle mechanism) at about 100 C, Pressure required for saturation, Fuel cell technology currently available, stack development required. The system analysis and screening evaluation resulted in the identification of the following components for the most promising system: (1) Steam reforming fuel processor; (2) Grotthuss mechanism fuel cell stack operating at 140 C; (3) Means to deliver system waste heat to a cogeneration unit; (4) Pressurized system utilizing a turbocompressor for a base-load power application. If duty cycling is anticipated, the benefits of compression may be offset due to complexity of control. In this case (and even in the base loaded case), the turbocompressor can be replaced with a blower for low-pressure operation.

Joe Ferrall, Tim Rehg, Vesna Stanic

2000-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

277

Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments. GenericDisposalSystModelFY11.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting

278

Rational design of hybrid dye-sensitized solar cells composed of double-layered photoanodes with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tandem solar cells, leading to higher power conversion efficiency. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs based solar cells.2�12 Different methods have been adopted to realize better power conversion efficiency energy, leading to low efficiency. Yamaguchi et al. fabricated tandem dye-sensitized solar cells

Lin, Zhiqun

279

Design of Nanostructured Solar Cells Using Coupled Optical and Electrical Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar   cells:   modeling,   materials  and  device  technology.  Kluwer  Academic  Publishers:  Norwell,  Massachusetts  

Deceglie, Michael G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Microsoft Word - SRSSaltWasteDisposal.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Salt Waste Disposal - References - §3116 Determination (RWR NDAA of 2005) Doc. No. Filename Title Main Document References 1. 2005 RWR DAA §3116 NDAA.pdf "Ronald W. Regan National Defense Authorization Act for FY 2005," Section 3116, 2004. 2. CBU-PIT-2004-00024 CBU-PIT-2004-00024.pdf Ledbetter, L. S., CBU-PIT-2004-00024, 12/01/04 - December Monthly WCS Curie and Volume Inventory Report," Revision 0, December 9, 2004. 3. CBU-PIT-2005-00031 CBU-PIT-2005-00031.pdf Rios-Armstrong, M. A., CBU-PIT-2005-00031, "Decontaminated Salt Solution Volume to be transferred to the Saltstone Disposal Facility from Salt Treatment and Disposition Activities," Revision 0, February 13, 2005.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Qualifying radioactive waste forms for geologic disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a phased strategy that defines specific program-management activities and critical documentation for producing radioactive waste forms, from pyrochemical processing of spent nuclear fuel, that will be acceptable for geologic disposal by the US Department of Energy. The documentation of these waste forms begins with the decision to develop the pyroprocessing technology for spent fuel conditioning and ends with production of the last waste form for disposal. The need for this strategy is underscored by the fact that existing written guidance for establishing the acceptability for disposal of radioactive waste is largely limited to borosilicate glass forms generated from the treatment of aqueous reprocessing wastes. The existing guidance documents do not provide specific requirements and criteria for nonstandard waste forms such as those generated from pyrochemical processing operations.

Jardine, L.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Laidler, J.J.; McPheeters, C.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility Complex Compliance Demonstration for DOE Order 435.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This compliance demonstration document provides an analysis of the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) Complex compliance with DOE Order 435.1. The ICDF Complex includes the disposal facility (landfill), evaporation pond, admin facility, weigh scale, decon building, treatment systems, and various staging/storage areas. These facilities were designed and are being constructed to be compliant with DOE Order 435.1, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Subtitle C, and Toxic Substances Control Act polychlorinated biphenyl design and construction standards. The ICDF Complex is designated as the central Idaho National Laboratory (INL) facilityyy for the receipt, staging/storage, treatment, and disposal of INL Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) waste streams. This compliance demonstration document discusses the conceptual site model for the ICDF Complex area. Within this conceptual site model, the selection of the area for the ICDF Complex is discussed. Also, the subsurface stratigraphy in the ICDF Complex area is discussed along with the existing contamination beneath the ICDF Complex area. The designs for the various ICDF Complex facilities are also included in this compliance demonstration document. These design discussions are a summary of the design as presented in the Remedial Design/Construction Work Plans for the ICDF landfill and evaporation pond and the Staging, Storage, Sizing, and Treatment Facility. Each of the major facilities or systems is described including the design criteria.

J. Simonds

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Plasmonic Back Structures Designed for Efficiency Enhancement of Thin Film Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic back structures with one-dimensional periodic nanoridges attached to thin-film amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cell are proposed to enhance the cell efficiency in a wide...

Bai, Wenli; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Bartoli, Filbert; Song, Guofeng

284

Technology and Design of Classical and Heterojunction Back Contacted Silicon Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ever since the first proposal of Interdigitated Back Contact (IBC) silicon solar cells in 1975, this type of cell has been under development as a means to reach high energy conversion efficiencies. Since no me...

Niels E. Posthuma; Barry J. O’Sullivan…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Design of Zinc Oxide Based Solid-State Excitonic Solar Cell with Improved Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Excitonic photovoltaic devices, including organic, hybrid organic/inorganic, and dye-sensitized solar cells, are attractive alternatives to conventional inorganic solar cells due to their potential for low cost and low temperature solution...

Lee, Tao Hua

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

286

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Innovative Cell Materials and Design for 300 Mile Range EVs  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given by OneD Material, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about innovative cell materials...

287

Design improvements of micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cells for unmanned aircraft applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This work contributes to the development of a micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell (mSOFC) stack for use in a small unmanned aerial vehicle. Fuel cells… (more)

Howe, Katie Sarah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Design considerations for DC-DC converters in fuel cell systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rapidly rising fossil fuel costs along with increased environmental awareness has encouraged the development of alternative energy sources. Such sources include fuel cells, wind, solar and ocean tide power. Among them, fuel cells have received...

Palma Fanjul, Leonardo Manuel

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Design of a cluster analysis heuristic for the configuration and capacity management of manufacturing cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This dissertation presents the configuration and capacity management of manufacturing cells using cluster analysis. A heuristic based on cluster analysis is developed to solve cell formation in cellular manufacturing systems (CMS). The clustering...

Shim, Young Hak

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

290

Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Design of Safer High-Energy Density Materials for Lithium-Ion Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

292

Design and application of hybrid fuel cell engine powertrain test platform  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A test platform for hybrid fuel cell engine powertrain is developed, and the principle and the structure for hardware, software and data acquisition system of the platform are presented in this paper. The platform for hybrid fuel cell engine powertrain consists of hybrid power system, load system, data acquisition system and control system. An experiment for a fuel cell engine is done. The test results indicate that the platform can satisfy the requirement for measuring the performances of fuel cell.

Zhang Bingli; Zhu Yi; Zhang Bingzhan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The disposal of orphan wastes using the greater confinement disposal concept  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the United States, radioactive wastes are conventionally classified as high-level wastes, transuranic wastes, or low-level wastes. Each of these types of wastes, by law, has a ``home`` for their final disposal; i.e., high-level wastes are destined for disposal at the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, transuranic waste for the proposed Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, and low-level waste for shallow-land disposal sites. However, there are some radioactive wastes within the United States Department of Energy (DOE) complex that do not meet the criteria established for disposal of either high-level waste, transuranic waste, or low-level waste. The former are called ``special-case`` or ``orphan`` wastes. This paper describes an ongoing project sponsored by the DOE`s Nevada Operations Office for the disposal of orphan wastes at the Radioactive Waste Management Site at Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site using the greater confinement disposal (GCD) concept. The objectives of the GCD project are to evaluate the safety of the site for disposal of orphan wastes by assessing compliance with pertinent regulations through performance assessment, and to examine the feasibility of this disposal concept as a cost-effective, safe alternative for management of orphan wastes within the DOE complex. Decisions on the use of GCD or other alternate disposal concepts for orphan wastes can be expected to be addressed in a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement being prepared by DOE. The ultimate decision to use GCD will require a Record of Decision through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Bonano, E.J.; Chu, M.S.Y.; Price, L.L.; Conrad, S.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA); Dickman, P.T. [Department of Energy, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Nevada Operations Office

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Low-level-waste-disposal methodologies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the followng: (1) history of low level waste disposal; (2) current practice at the five major DOE burial sites and six commercial sites with dominant features of these sites and radionuclide content of major waste types summarized in tables; (3) site performance with performance record on burial sites tabulated; and (4) proposed solutions. Shallow burial of low level waste is a continuously evolving practice, and each site has developed its own solutions to the handling and disposal of unusual waste forms. There are no existing national standards for such disposal. However, improvements in the methodology for low level waste disposal are occurring on several fronts. Standardized criteria are being developed by both the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and by DOE. Improved techniques for shallow burial are evolving at both commercial and DOE facilities, as well as through research sponsored by NRC, DOE, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Alternatives to shallow burial, such as deeper burial or the use of mined cavities is also being investigated by DOE.

Wheeler, M.L.; Dragonette, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COUEB N T ED Safe Disposal of Household Chemicals: Protect Yourself and Your Community see inside Minutes The 2010 census asks 10 questions that most households can answer in 10 minutes! You will be asked the name, age, gender, race, ethnic group (if Hispanic), and relationship of all persons living at your

Liskiewicz, Maciej

296

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling 2014 Hydrogen Student Design Contest to Design Drop-In Hydrogen Fueling Station Dec 16, 2013 The 10th annual Hydrogen Student Design Contest will challenge student teams to design a transportable, containerized hydrogen fueling station solution. Registration for the contest, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, is open until January 15, 2014. Through the contest, multidisciplinary student teams will demonstrate their talents in engineering, public planning, architecture, marketing, and entrepreneurship. In previous years, teams have designed fueling stations, airport systems, and green buildings-all using hydrogen. The Grand Prize winning team will receive an expenses-paid trip to present their winning entry to hundreds of industry professionals in a session at

297

Energy Efficient Design of Cognitive Small Cells Matthias Wildemeersch, Tony Q. S. Quek, Alberto Rabbachin, Cornelis H. Slump, and Aiping Huang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Efficient Design of Cognitive Small Cells Matthias Wildemeersch§, Tony Q. S. Quek, Alberto environmental awareness and the high price of energy, the design of energy efficient wireless systems for both, and the aggregate network interference. The proposed framework yields design guidelines for energy efficient small

Vellekoop, Michel

298

Environmental Assessment Photovoltaic Solar Project at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management DOE/EA 1770 FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Photovoltaic Solar Project at the Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site, La Plata County AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Legacy Management (LM) ACTION: Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI) SUMMARY: LM prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) (DOE/EA-1770) that evaluated two action alternatives related to the installation, operation, and removal of a photovoltaic (PV) solar energy system on the Durango, Colorado, Disposal Site and the No Action Alternative. Alternative 1 evaluated the use of the 18-acre (ac) vegetated surface of the disposal cell for the installation of a PV system. The second action alternative (Alternative 2, the Preferred Action) considered the use of the surface of the

299

Long-term surveillance plan for the Mexican Hat Disposal Site, Mexican Hat, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plan describes the long-term surveillance activities for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Mexican Hat, Utah. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal site continues to function as designed. This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive material (RRM). This LTSP (based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program), documents the land ownership interests and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be accomplished.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Solid oxide fuel cell with multi-unit construction and prismatic design  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single cell unit of a solid oxide fuel cell is described that is individually fabricated and sintered prior to being connected to adjacent cells to form a solid oxide fuel cell. The single cell unit is comprised of a shaped anode sheet positioned between a flat anode sheet and an anode-electrolyte-cathode (A/E/C) sheet, and a shaped cathode sheet positioned between the A/E/C sheet and a cathode-interconnect-anode (C/I/A) sheet. An alternate embodiment comprises a shaped cathode sheet positioned between an A/E/C sheet and a C/I/A sheet. The shaped sheets form channels for conducting reactant gases. Each single cell unit is individually sintered to form a finished sub-assembly. The finished sub-assemblies are connected in electrical series by interposing connective material between the end surfaces of adjacent cells, whereby individual cells may be inspected for defects and interchanged with non-defective single cell units. 7 figs.

McPheeters, C.C.; Dees, D.W.; Myles, K.M.

1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Solid oxide fuel cell with multi-unit construction and prismatic design  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A single cell unit of a solid oxide fuel cell that is individually fabricated and sintered prior to being connected to adjacent cells to form a solid oxide fuel cell. The single cell unit is comprised of a shaped anode sheet positioned between a flat anode sheet and an anode-electrolyte-cathode (A/E/C) sheet, and a shaped cathode sheet positioned between the A/E/C sheet and a cathode-interconnect-anode (C/I/A) sheet. An alternate embodiment comprises a shaped cathode sheet positioned between an A/E/C sheet and a C/I/A sheet. The shaped sheets form channels for conducting reactant gases. Each single cell unit is individually sintered to form a finished sub-assembly. The finished sub-assemblies are connected in electrical series by interposing connective material between the end surfaces of adjacent cells, whereby individual cells may be inspected for defects and interchanged with non-defective single cell units.

McPheeters, Charles C. (Naperville, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL); Myles, Kevin M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Design of light-trapping microscale-textured surfaces for efficient organic solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells suffer from low charge carrier mobilities of polymers, which renders it important to achieve complete optical absorption in active layers thinner...

Nalwa, Kanwar S; Chaudhary, Sumit

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Design and development in the field of alkaline fuel cell technology.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This thesis is about the research on alkaline fuel cell (AFC) technology to investigate the long term operation with air. The aim was to… (more)

Schudt, Steffen, (Thesis)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Microstructure-based solid oxide fuel cell seal design using statistical mechanics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) in a flat-plate configuration require a hermetic seal between the fuel and air sides of the electrodes, and this seal… (more)

Milhans, Jacqueline Linda

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

ANSER Center Chemists Design a First-of-its-Kind Solar Cell Experiment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

where students get to fabricate cells from scratch, from raw materials to a functioning solar panel," says Patwardhan. And from there, he says, the possibilities are endless....

306

INNOVATIVE DISPOSAL PRACTICES AT THE NEVADA TEST SITE TO MEET...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Innovative Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site to Meet Its Low-Level Waste Generators' Future Disposal Needs E.F. Di Sanza, J.T. Carilli U.S. Department of Energy National...

307

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Radioactive Waste Strategy for the Management and Disposal of Used Nuclear Fuel and High-Level...

308

Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses...

309

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Can the Geologist Guarantee Isolation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...to check whether waste disposal really does need an almost...been reported recently at Maxey Flats (Kentucky) (26...radioactive waste burial site, inside a fractured rock...effect of the geological disposal is to con-centrate 3530...

G. de Marsily; E. Ledoux; A. Barbreau; J. Margat

1977-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

310

Design of a Lunar Rover Utilizing Hydrogen-Oxygen Fuel Cell Technologies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Future exploration of the solar system will depend on new designs and technologies that are efficient and versatile. Roving systems have explored the Moon and… (more)

Snyder, Michael Phillip

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Low-level radioactive waste disposal facility closure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Part I of this report describes and evaluates potential impacts associated with changes in environmental conditions on a low-level radioactive waste disposal site over a long period of time. Ecological processes are discussed and baselines are established consistent with their potential for causing a significant impact to low-level radioactive waste facility. A variety of factors that might disrupt or act on long-term predictions are evaluated including biological, chemical, and physical phenomena of both natural and anthropogenic origin. These factors are then applied to six existing, yet very different, low-level radioactive waste sites. A summary and recommendations for future site characterization and monitoring activities is given for application to potential and existing sites. Part II of this report contains guidance on the design and implementation of a performance monitoring program for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities. A monitoring programs is described that will assess whether engineered barriers surrounding the waste are effectively isolating the waste and will continue to isolate the waste by remaining structurally stable. Monitoring techniques and instruments are discussed relative to their ability to measure (a) parameters directly related to water movement though engineered barriers, (b) parameters directly related to the structural stability of engineered barriers, and (c) parameters that characterize external or internal conditions that may cause physical changes leading to enhanced water movement or compromises in stability. Data interpretation leading to decisions concerning facility closure is discussed. 120 refs., 12 figs., 17 tabs.

White, G.J.; Ferns, T.W.; Otis, M.D.; Marts, S.T.; DeHaan, M.S.; Schwaller, R.G.; White, G.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Acceptance of Classified Excess Components for Disposal at Area 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show discusses weapons dismantlement and disposal, issues related to classified waste and their solutions.

Poling, Jeanne [National Security Technologies, LLC (United States); Saad, Max [Sandia National Lab., NM (United States)

2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

313

Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system.

314

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed in underground salt formations incidentally as a result of mining or intentionally to create underground chambers for product storage or waste disposal. For more than 50 years, salt caverns have been used to store hydrocarbon products. Recently, concerns over the costs and environmental effects of land disposal and incineration have sparked interest in using salt caverns for waste disposal. Countries using or considering using salt caverns for waste disposal include Canada (oil-production wastes), Mexico (purged sulfates from salt evaporators), Germany (contaminated soils and ashes), the United Kingdom (organic residues), and the Netherlands (brine purification wastes). In the US, industry and the regulatory community are pursuing the use of salt caverns for disposal of oil-field wastes. In 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a regulatory determination exempting wastes generated during oil and gas exploration and production (oil-field wastes) from federal hazardous waste regulations--even though such wastes may contain hazardous constituents. At the same time, EPA urged states to tighten their oil-field waste management regulations. The resulting restrictions have generated industry interest in the use of salt caverns for potentially economical and environmentally safe oil-field waste disposal. Before the practice can be implemented commercially, however, regulators need assurance that disposing of oil-field wastes in salt caverns is technically and legally feasible and that potential health effects associated with the practice are acceptable. In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. It investigated regulatory issues; the types of oil-field wastes suitable for cavern disposal; cavern design and location considerations; and disposal operations, closure and remediation issues. It determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could, from technical and legal perspectives, be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, ANL subsequently conducted a preliminary risk assessment on the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in salt caverns. The methodology for the risk assessment included the following steps: identifying potential contaminants of concern; determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants; assessing contaminant toxicities; estimating contaminant intakes; and estimating human cancer and noncancer risks. To estimate exposure routes and pathways, four postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (for noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the EPA target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results lead to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

315

Disposability Assessment: Aluminum-Based Spent Nuclear Fuel Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a technical assessment of the Melt-Dilute and Direct Al-SNF forms in disposable canisters with respect to meeting the requirements for disposal in the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS) and for interim dry storage in the Treatment and Storage Facility (TSF) at SRS.

Vinson, D.W.

1998-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Landfill Disposal of CCA-Treated Wood with Construction and Demolition (C&D) Debris: Arsenic phased out of many residential uses in the United States, the disposal of CCA-treated wood remains. Catastrophic events have also led to the concentrated disposal of CCA-treated wood, often in unlined landfills

Florida, University of

317

Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a condition to the Disposal Authorization Statement issued to Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) on March 17, 2010, a comprehensive performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program must be implemented for the Technical Area 54, Area G disposal facility. Annual determinations of the adequacy of the performance assessment and composite analysis are to be conducted under the maintenance program to ensure that the conclusions reached by those analyses continue to be valid. This report summarizes the results of the fiscal year 2011 annual review for Area G. Revision 4 of the Area G performance assessment and composite analysis was issued in 2008 and formally approved in 2009. These analyses are expected to provide reasonable estimates of the long-term performance of Area G and, hence, the disposal facility's ability to comply with Department of Energy (DOE) performance objectives. Annual disposal receipt reviews indicate that smaller volumes of waste will require disposal in the pits and shafts at Area G relative to what was projected for the performance assessment and composite analysis. The future inventories are projected to decrease modestly for the pits but increase substantially for the shafts due to an increase in the amount of tritium that is projected to require disposal. Overall, however, changes in the projected future inventories of waste are not expected to compromise the ability of Area G to satisfy DOE performance objectives. The Area G composite analysis addresses potential impacts from all waste disposed of at the facility, as well as other sources of radioactive material that may interact with releases from Area G. The level of knowledge about the other sources included in the composite analysis has not changed sufficiently to call into question the validity of that analysis. Ongoing environmental surveillance activities are conducted at, and in the vicinity of, Area G. However, the information generated by many of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a final cover design different than that adopted for the performance assessment and composite analy

French, Sean B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shuman, Rob [WPS: WASTE PROJECTS AND SERVICES

2012-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

318

Chapter 8 - Coal Combustion Residue Disposal Options  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal combustion residues (CCRs) are presently regulated as solid waste (Subtitle D) under the Resource Conservation Recovery Act. Such classification promotes beneficial use by end-users i.e. mitigating excessive liability. According to the US Environmental Protection agency (USEPA), about 131 million tons of coal combustion residuals—including 71 million tons of fly ash, 20 million tons of bottom ash and boiler slag, and 40 million tons of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) material—were generated in the US in 2007. Of this, approximately 36% was disposed of in landfills, 21% was disposed of in surface impoundments, 38% was beneficially reused, and 5% was used as minefill. Stringent regulation, as Subtitle C (hazardous waste), would impose a perceived liability upon end-users; greatly reducing beneficial use opportunities. Mandatory use of synthetic liners—would not have prevented dike wall failure and fails to consider inherent engineering characteristics of CCRs.

Richard W. Goodwin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Di sposai . Geological aspects Physical aspects Chemical aspects Biological aspects CHAPTER II. TECHNICAL ASPECTS OF OCEAN DISPOSAL Types of Waste Materials. Dredged materiais. Industrial wastes, DomestIc sewage wa tes Solid wastes Radloact..., can reduce the passage of light through the water column and cause damaging effects to the marine ecosystem. Each of five major oceans has pronounced gyral, or circular current motion (Fiaure 1. 1). The North Atlantic current system is comprised...

Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Recharge Data Package for the 2005 Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assisted CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., (CHG) by providing estimates of recharge rates for current conditions and long-term scenarios involving disposal in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). The IDF will be located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site and will receive several types of waste including immobilized low-activity waste. The recharge estimates for each scenario were derived from lysimeter and tracer data collected by the IDF PA Project and from modeling studies conducted for the project. Recharge estimates were provided for three specific site features (the surface barrier; possible barrier side slopes; and the surrounding soil) and four specific time periods (pre-Hanford; Hanford operations; surface barrier design life; post-barrier design life). CHG plans to conduct a performance assessment of the latest IDF design and call it the IDF 2005 PA; this recharge data package supports the upcoming IDF 2005 PA.

Fayer, Michael J.; Szecsody, Jim E.

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Design of plasmonic back structures for efficiency enhancement of thin-film amorphous Si solar cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metallic back structures with one-dimensional periodic nanoridges attached to a thin-film amorphous Si (a-Si) solar cell are numerically studied. At the interfaces between a-Si and...

Bai, Wenli; Gan, Qiaoqiang; Bartoli, Filbert; Zhang, Jing; Cai, Likang; Huang, Yidong; Song, Guofeng

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

37-cell hollow-core-fiber designs with improved single-modedness  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations show that the PRISM strategy for suppression of higher-order modes can be applied broadly, to cores larger than 19-cell and core thicknesses larger than half the lattice...

Fini, John M; Mangan, Brian; Meng, Linli; Monberg, Eric M; Nicholson, Jeffrey W; Windeler, Robert S

323

Analysis and design of high frequency link power conversion systems for fuel cell power conditioning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this dissertation, new high frequency link power conversion systems for the fuel cell power conditioning are proposed to improve the performance and optimize the cost, size, and weight of the power conversion systems. The first study proposes a...

Song, Yu Jin

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Fuel Cell Engineering: Toward the Design of Efficient Electrochemical Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

However, because of the fact that, similar to that observed with hydrogen, all these substances are not readily available as pure species in today’s fuel distribution networks, many research activities were started for converting conventional fuels (natural gas, gasoline, diesel, kerosene, coal) into hydrogen-rich gas mixtures for the operation of fuel cells. ... As illustrated in Figure 5, apart from the more exotic field of implantable devices, fuel cells can be used as electrical energy sources for portable systems in consumer electronics and military applications (with power outputs of 1?50 Wel), as auxiliary power units, e.g., for onboard electricity generation in cars, trucks, or aircrafts (with power outputs of 1?10 kWel), for traction of vehicles, buses, and submarines (with power outputs of cell units with a multi-stacked structure successfully operate a radio-controlled car (16.5 g), which demonstrates the potential of biofuel cells in practical applications. ...

Kai Sundmacher

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

325

The Design of Organic Polymers and Small Molecules to Improve the Efficiency of Excitonic Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1044. [13] Rajaram, S. ; Armstrong, P. B. ; Kim, B. J. ;7. [8] (a) Scully, S. R. ; Armstrong, P. B. ; Edder, C. ;Cells by Paul Barber Armstrong A dissertation submitted in

Armstrong, Paul Barber

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Rational Design and Preparation of Organic Semiconductors for use in Field Effect Transistors and Photovoltaic Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power conversion efficiency (PCE) of a cell is determined bypoint (J m V m ) allows calculation of PCE (equation 3). PJ V (eq. 3) PCE = out = m m P in (eq. 4) (eq. 5) PCE = FF FF

Mauldin, Clayton Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Novel Organic Solar Cell Design To Enhance The Efficiency Using An Optical Cavity Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We fabricated an organic solar cell where the electrodes are metallic layers that form an optical cavity. To be able to optically enhance the efficiency, we used a high fluorescence...

Betancur Lopera, Rafael A; Elias, Xavier; Vuong, Luat T; Martorell, Jordi

328

Novel Organic Solar Cell Design towards an Optical Control of the Exciton Diffusion Length  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The exciton diffusion could be increased if highly fluorescent materials were used. We developed a kind of such material and studied the performance of solar cells where the electrodes...

Martorell, Jordi; Elias, Xavier; Pasini, Saverio; Betancur, Rafael; Vuong, Luat T; Macovez, Roberto

329

Numerical simulation: Toward the design of high-efficiency planar perovskite solar cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Organo-metal halide perovskite solar cells based on planar architecture have been reported to achieve remarkably high power conversion efficiency (PCE, >16%), rendering them highly competitive to the conventional silicon based solar cells. A thorough understanding of the role of each component in solar cells and their effects as a whole is still required for further improvement in PCE. In this work, the planar heterojunction-based perovskite solar cells were simulated with the program AMPS (analysis of microelectronic and photonic structures)-1D. Simulation results revealed a great dependence of PCE on the thickness and defect density of the perovskite layer. Meanwhile, parameters including the work function of the back contact as well as the hole mobility and acceptor density in hole transport materials were identified to significantly influence the performance of the device. Strikingly, an efficiency over 20% was obtained under the moderate simulation conditions.

Liu, Feng; Zhu, Jun, E-mail: zhujzhu@gmail.com, E-mail: sydai@ipp.ac.cn; Wei, Junfeng; Li, Yi; Lv, Mei [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Yang, Shangfeng [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhang, Bing; Yao, Jianxi [State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China); Dai, Songyuan, E-mail: zhujzhu@gmail.com, E-mail: sydai@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Novel Thin Film Solar Cells, Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); State Key Laboratory of Alternate Electrical Power System with Renewable Energy Sources, North China Electric Power University, Beijing 102206 (China)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

330

Design of a numerical model for simulation of blood microcirculation and study of sickle cell disease  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sickle cell disease is nowadays one of the most challenging blood diseases, where patients suffer from both chronic and acute episodes of painful medical conditions. In particular, unpredictable crises due to blood vessel ...

Le Floch-Yin, François T. (François Thomas)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

High efficiency thin film silicon solar cells with novel light trapping : principle, design and processing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One major efficiency limiting factor in thin film solar cells is weak absorption of long wavelength photons due to the limited optical path length imposed by the thin film thickness. This is especially severe in Si because ...

Zeng, Lirong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Reducing biosolids disposal costs using land application in forested areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Switching biosolids land application from a reclamation site to a forested site significantly reduced the cost of biosolids disposal at the Savannah River Site. Previous beneficial reuse programs focused on reclamation of existing borrow pits. While extremely beneficial, this program became very costly due to the regulatory requirements for groundwater monitoring, soil monitoring and frequent biosolids analyses. A new program was developed to reuse biosolids in forested areas where the biosolids could be used as a soil conditioner and fertilizer to enhance timber yield. The forested land application site was designed so that groundwater monitoring and soil monitoring could be eliminated while biosolids monitoring and site maintenance were minimized. Monitoring costs alone were reduced by 80%. Capital costs for site preparation were also significantly reduced since there was no longer a need for expensive groundwater monitoring wells.

Huffines, R.L.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Optimization-based design of surface textures for thin-film Si solar cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We numerically investigate the light-absorption behavior of thin-film silicon for normal-incident light, using surface textures to enhance absorption. We consider a variety of texture designs, such as simple periodic ...

Sheng, Xing

336

The IMM solar cell's advanced ultra-light, highly flexible design earned it a 2008 R&D 100 Award and a 2009 Award for Excellence in Technology Transfer by the Federal Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

innovati n The IMM solar cell's advanced ultra-light, highly flexible design earned it a 2008 R. The cell's inventors pioneered a new class of solar cells with marked advantages in performance--particularly for complex multijunction cells. These cells convert solar energy more efficiently than single- junction cells

337

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

338

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

339

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site May 15, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. A product drum of mixed low-level waste is lowered into a high-density polyethylene macro-pack. Macro-packs from the Idaho site are shown here safely and compliantly disposed. IDAHO FALLS, Idaho - An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for

340

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility June 6, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. The Waste Control Specialists Federal Waste Disposal Facility in Andrews, Texas. ANDREWS, Texas - DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind. EM Senior Advisor Dave Huizenga and several other federal, state and local officials attended the event at Waste Control Specialists (WCS) in Andrews and witnessed the first container being placed in the new state-of-the-art facility. WCS is a waste processing and disposal company. "I am proud to be here today to celebrate this historic event. We

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Performance assessment methodology and preliminary results for low-level radioactive waste disposal in Taiwan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Taiwan's Institute for Nuclear Energy Research (INER) have teamed together to evaluate several candidate sites for Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Taiwan currently has three nuclear power plants, with another under construction. Taiwan also has a research reactor, as well as medical and industrial wastes to contend with. Eventually the reactors will be decomissioned. Operational and decommissioning wastes will need to be disposed in a licensed disposal facility starting in 2014. Taiwan has adopted regulations similar to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) low-level radioactive waste rules (10 CFR 61) to govern the disposal of LLW. Taiwan has proposed several potential sites for the final disposal of LLW that is now in temporary storage on Lanyu Island and on-site at operating nuclear power plants, and for waste generated in the future through 2045. The planned final disposal facility will have a capacity of approximately 966,000 55-gallon drums. Taiwan is in the process of evaluating the best candidate site to pursue for licensing. Among these proposed sites there are basically two disposal concepts: shallow land burial and cavern disposal. A representative potential site for shallow land burial is located on a small island in the Taiwan Strait with basalt bedrock and interbedded sedimentary rocks. An engineered cover system would be constructed to limit infiltration for shallow land burial. A representative potential site for cavern disposal is located along the southeastern coast of Taiwan in a tunnel system that would be about 500 to 800 m below the surface. Bedrock at this site consists of argillite and meta-sedimentary rocks. Performance assessment analyses will be performed to evaluate future performance of the facility and the potential dose/risk to exposed populations. Preliminary performance assessment analyses will be used in the site-selection process and to aid in design of the disposal system. Final performance assessment analyses will be used in the regulatory process of licensing a site. The SNL/INER team has developed a performance assessment methodology that is used to simulate processes associated with the potential release of radionuclides to evaluate these sites. The following software codes are utilized in the performance assessment methodology: GoldSim (to implement a probabilistic analysis that will explicitly address uncertainties); the NRC's Breach, Leach, and Transport - Multiple Species (BLT-MS) code (to simulate waste-container degradation, waste-form leaching, and transport through the host rock); the Finite Element Heat and Mass Transfer code (FEHM) (to simulate groundwater flow and estimate flow velocities); the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill performance Model (HELP) code (to evaluate infiltration through the disposal cover); the AMBER code (to evaluate human health exposures); and the NRC's Disposal Unit Source Term -- Multiple Species (DUST-MS) code (to screen applicable radionuclides). Preliminary results of the evaluations of the two disposal concept sites are presented.

Arnold, Bill Walter; Chang, Fu-lin (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Mattie, Patrick D.; Knowlton, Robert G.; Chuang, W-S (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Chi, L-M (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Jow, Hong-Nian; Tien, Norman C. (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan); Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optimization of Solar Cell Design for Use with GreenVolts CPV System: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-00281  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GreenVolts, a Bay area start-up, was developing a CPV system that was based on a unique reflective optical design. They were interested in adapting the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell structure designed at NREL for use in their system. The purpose of this project was to optimize the inverted GaInP/GaAs/GaInAs cell for operation in the GreenVolts optical system.

Ward, S.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Effects of mesh and interconnector design on solid oxide fuel cell performance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this study, three different nickel based meshes are investigated as an anode side current collector and flow-field for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) to reduce the fabrication cost. The same meshes are also tested on the conventional interconnectors with machined gas channels for comparison. Eight different short stacks are installed for this purpose. The characterizations of the short stacks are achieved via performance tests together with electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analyses. The experimental results reveal that the woven nickel mesh provides the required current collection and can act as an anode flow-field. It is also found that the spot welding of this mesh significantly improves the cell performance due to the enhanced contact between the mesh and the interconnector. Therefore, the spot welded nickel mesh can be directly employed on the anode interconnector as an effective anode current collector and flow-field without machining gas channels to reduce the SOFC cell/stack fabrication cost.

Murat Canavar; Yuksel Kaplan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Microsoft Word - DisposalInSaltDifferentThanDisposalInWIPP.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over DOE Issues Statement Concerning Debates Over Waste Disposal in Salt CARLSBAD, N.M., July 24, 2009 - The U.S. Department of Energy and its Carlsbad Field Office recognize and respect the long history that led to the current regulations that govern operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP is authorized to ship and dispose of transuranic (TRU) waste that was created by U.S. defense programs. TRU waste is a category of waste strictly defined by legislation and legal agreements. The WIPP mission includes the safe disposal of two types of defense-related TRU waste, contact-handled (CH) and remote-handled (RH). Both consist of tools, rags, protective clothing, sludges, soil and other materials contaminated with radioactive

345

Design and development of a cooling device for solid polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tic d. qas ilry gas elec; electrical eu . evaporation f . Faradic fg: phase change from liquid to vapor f ri c . friction g: gas 1: liquid m e c jt: mechanical s f: steady flow tl; v Lpol' tll: 'iva, tel' Superscripts c cell d: dry f...

Nandi, Asis

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

DESIGN APPROACHES AND MATERIALS PROCESSES FOR ULTRAHIGH EFFICIENCY LATTICE MISMATCHED MULTI-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS Melissa J. Griggs 1 , Daniel C. Law 2 , Richard R. King 2 , Arthur C. Ackerman 3 , James M. Zahler 3 , Harry A. Atwater 1 1 California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, California 91125, USA 2 Spectrolab Engineering Inc., 12500 Gladstone Avenue, Sylmar, California

Atwater, Harry

347

Strain Design of Ashbya gossypii for Single-Cell Oil Production  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Single-Cell Oil Production Rodrigo Ledesma-Amaro Maria A. Santos Alberto Jimenez Jose Luis Revuelta...s002530051649 . 17. Jimenez, A , MA Santos, M Pompejus and JL Revuelta...2005 . 18. Jimenez, A , MA Santos and JL Revuelta. 2008. Phosphoribosyl...

Rodrigo Ledesma-Amaro; María A. Santos; Alberto Jiménez; José Luis Revuelta

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

348

Rational HIV Immunogen Design to Target Specific Germline B Cell Receptors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...multimerized on nanoparticles, this immunogen (eOD-GT6) activates germline and mature VRC01-class B cells. Thus, eOD-GT6 nanoparticles have promise as a vaccine...and mature (Mat) antibodies to gp120 and eOD variants. Values represent KD s in nM measured...

Joseph Jardine; Jean-Philippe Julien; Sergey Menis; Takayuki Ota; Oleksandr Kalyuzhniy; Andrew McGuire; Devin Sok; Po-Ssu Huang; Skye MacPherson; Meaghan Jones; Travis Nieusma; John Mathison; David Baker; Andrew B. Ward; Dennis R. Burton; Leonidas Stamatatos; David Nemazee; Ian A. Wilson; William R. Schief

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

349

A design approach to a risk review for fuel cell-based distributed cogeneration systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A risk review of a fuel cell-based distributed co-generation (FC-Based DCG) system was conducted to identify and quantify the major technological system risks in a worst-case scenario. A risk review entails both a risk assessment and a risk...

Luthringer, Kristin Lyn

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Design of Radial pin Si Nanowires for High Performance Solar Cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The quantum efficiency of solar cells, like of any photon detector, is dictated by the ability to absorb photons to create conducting carriers, and the efficiency to drive such carriers to electrodes for collection. Having a medium that enables full photon absorption in a short length, together with a long carrier lifetime that allows photo-generated carriers to reach electrodes before recombining are ideal, but are not always realistic. For example, silicon photovoltaics, despite being a major player in the solar cell market, suffer from the low absorption coefficient, thus requiring a thick absorbing layer which impairs the efficiency with which photogenerated carriers are collected. Radial silicon nanowires have been proposed as a candidate for reducing the optical absorption length and required processing purity in Si based solar cells without compromising their quantum efficiency and yet reducing the overall cell cost. On the one hand, incident light propagates along the axial dimension of the wires, and thus has a greater chance of being absorbed when the wire length extends beyond 10m due to inter-array light scattering effects. On the other hand, the core/shell p-i-n structure leads electrical current flow along sub-micron radii, which enables rapid collection of most photogenerated carriers as the transport length is typically less than the diffusion lengths of minority carriers. In this work, we perform Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation to investigate the absorption process in arrayed radial nanowires.

Nguyen, Binh-Minh [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Jinkyoung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dayeh, Shadi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Picraux, Samuel Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

351

Effect of tab design on large-format Li-ion cell performance , Gang Luo b  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model a b s t r a c t Large-format Li-ion batteries are essential for vehicle and grid energy storage. Today, scale-up of Li-ion cells has not maximized the potential of available battery materials, leading a sustainable energy future. How to unlock the potential of existing Li battery materials and scale up Li-ion

352

Optimal Design of a Stand-Alone Hybrid PV/Fuel Cell Power System for the City of Brest in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

= Photovoltaic; FC = Fuel Cell; COE = cost of energy; CC = Capital Costs; NPC = Net Present Cost; TNPC = Total. Elbaset4 Abstract ­ This paper deals with the optimal design of a stand-alone hybrid photovoltaic and fuel reserved. Keywords: Hybrid power system, renewable energy, photovoltaic, fuel cell, generation unit sizing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Computational Fluid Dynamics-Based Design of a Microfabricated Cell Capture Device  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......physical characteristics as water at 293.15 K with constant...CFD-based MCCD design, where water was applied as flowing...Outlet boundary was set to atmospheric pressure using the pressure...DWL 66fs laser pattern generator (Heidelberg Inst...rehydrated in double deionized water resulting in 5 million......

Gabor Jarvas; Marton Szigeti; Laszlo Hajba; Peter Furjes; Andras Guttman

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL] [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Radiological assessment of the consequences of the disposal of high-level radioactive waste in subseabed sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological assessment of the seabed option consists in estimating the detriment to man and to the environment that could result from the disposal of high-level waste (HLW) within the seabed sediments in deep oceans. The assessment is made for the high-level waste (vitrified glass) produced by the reprocessing of 10/sup 5/ tons of heavy metal from spent fuel, which represents the amount of waste generated by 3333 reactor-yr of 900-MW(electric) reactors, i.e., 3000 GW(electric) x yr. The disposal option considered is to use 14,667 steel penetrators, each of them containing five canisters of HLW glass (0.15 m/sup 3/ each). These penetrators would reach a depth of 50 m in the sediments and would be placed at an average distance of 180 m from each other, requiring a disposal area on the order of 22 x 22 km. Two such potential disposal areas in the Atlantic Ocean were studied, Great Meteor East (GME) and South Nares Abyssal Plains (SNAP). A special ship design is proposed to minimize transportation accidents. Approximately 100 shipments would be necessary to dispose of the proposed amount of waste. The results of this radiological assessment seem to show that the disposal of HLW in subseabed sediments is radiologically a very acceptable option.

de Marsily, G.; Behrendt, V.; Ensminger, D.A.; Flebus, C.; Hutchinson, B.L.; Kane, P.; Karpf, A.; Klett, R.D.; Mobbs, S.; Poulin, M.; Stanners, D.A.; Wuschke, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Cell design modifications to harden a N-channel power IGBT against single event latchup  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Device simulator is used to analyze the heavy ion induced failure mechanism in Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistors (IGBTs) and to investigate hardening solutions. Single Event Latchup was already identified as the failure mechanism. Lateral and vertical modifications of the P{sup +} plug are proposed to reduce the efficiency of the parasitic thyristor, responsible for the latchup, and validated by 2D-simulations on a N-channel IGBT cell structure.

Lorfevre, E.; Sagnes, B.; Bruguier, G.; Palau, J.M.; Gasiot, J.; Calvet, M.C.; Ecoffet, R.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Natural hazards phenomena mitigation with respect to seismic hazards at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information on the seismic hazard for design of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF), a facility designed for the disposal of wastes generated during the cleanup of Hanford Site aggregate areas. The preferred ERDF site is located south and east of 200 East and 200 West Areas. The Washington State Groundwater Protection Program (WAC 173-303-806 (4)(a)(xxi)) requires that the characteristics of local and regional hydrogeology be defined. A plan for that work has been developed (Weekes and Borghese 1993). In addition, WAC 173-303-282 provides regulatory guidance on siting a dangerous waste facility, and US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.28 requires consideration of natural phenomena hazards mitigation for DOE sites and facilities. This report provides information to evaluate the ERDF site with respect to seismic hazard. The ERDF will be a Corrective Action Management Unit (CAMU) as defined by 40 CFR 260.10.

Reidel, S.P.

1994-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

358

Analysis of heat and mass transfer in sub-seabed disposal of nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A mathematical basis is developed for the prediction of thermal and radionuclide transport in marine sediments. The theory is applied to the study of radioactive waste disposal by emplacement, in specially designed containers, well below the sediment/water interface. Numerical results are obtained for a specified model problem through use of two computer programs designed primarily for the analysis of waste disposal problems. One program (MARIAH) provides descriptions of the temperature and velocity fields induced by the presence of a container of thermally active nuclear waste. A second program (IONMIG), which utilizes the results of the thermal analysis, is used to provide predictions for the migration of four representative radionuclides: /sup 239/Pu, /sup 137/Cs, /sup 129/I, and /sup 99/Tc.

Hickox, C. E.; Gartling, D. K.; McVey, D. F.; Russo, A. J.; Nuttall, H. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

High power vented nickel-cadmium cells designed for ultra low maintenance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Initially the SAFT program to develop maintenance-free battery technology was in response to a U.S. Air Force commitment to eliminate the need for battery maintenance shops at the line level. The U.S. Navy, through its Crane, Indiana Battery Test Facility, added further demands. They wanted new nickel cadmium battery designs that were lighter, had greater power, more capacity, required much less maintenance, and still met standard Military Specification size requirements. Crane personnel recognized that the major savings in the maintenance costs were achievable in 3- to 5-fold increases of the maintenance period and that non-maintainability was not necessarily a design requisite. In response, SAFT established an internally funded program whose objective was the development of a battery technology that would provide military aircraft batteries meeting these demands.

Scardaville, P.A. (SAFT America, Inc., Valdosta, GA (United States)); Newman, B.C. (Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane, IN (United States))

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nevada Test Site, NV Nevada Test Site, NV EM Project: Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal ETR Report Date: July 2008 ETR-14 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Radioactively contaminated materials from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), other DOE facilities and other federal agencies are disposed of at NTS at two low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management sites: Areas 3 and 5. Disposal operations at Area 3 have been discontinued, but the facility is available for future disposal. The anticipated closure date for Area 3 is 2027. Area 5 is operating and will be expanded to accept future wastes. LLRW and mixed low-level radioactive waste (MLLW) are disposed of in Area 5 in shallow

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361

Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INL, Idaho INL, Idaho EM Project: Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: December 2007 ETR-10 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) At Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility that is used to dispose of LLW and MLW generated from remedial activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Components of the ICDF include a landfill that is used for disposal of solid waste, an evaporation pond that is used to manage leachate from the landfill and other aqueous wastes (8.3 million L capacity), and a staging and treatment facility. The ICDF is located near the southwest

362

LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation LANL completes excavation of 1940s waste disposal site The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. September 22, 2011 Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation. Contact Colleen Curran Communicatons Office (505) 664-0344 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 22, 2011-Los Alamos National Laboratory has completed excavation of its oldest waste disposal site, Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B). The excavation removed about 43,000 cubic yards of contaminated debris and soil from the six-acre site. MDA-B was used from 1944-48 as a waste disposal site for Manhattan Project and Cold War-era research and

363

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

364

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Transportation Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection This act provides a comprehensive strategy for the siting of commercial low-level waste compactors and other waste management facilities, and to ensure the proper transportation, disposal and storage of low-level radioactive waste. Commercial incineration of radioactive wastes is prohibited. Licenses are required for low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities not licensed to accept low-level radioactive waste. Disposal at

365

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW). The Mission of the UFDC is To identify alternatives and conduct scientific research and technology development to enable storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel and wastes generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The U.S. has, for the past twenty-plus years, focused efforts on disposing

366

Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal Area 5 LLRW & MLLW Disposal ETR Report Date: July 2008 ETR-14 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Radioactively contaminated materials from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), other DOE facilities and other federal agencies are disposed of at NTS at two low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) management sites: Areas 3 and 5. Disposal operations at Area 3 have been discontinued, but the facility is available for future disposal. The anticipated closure date for Area 3 is 2027. Area 5 is operating and will be expanded to accept future wastes. LLRW and mixed low-level radioactive

367

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE's Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site's waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mixed waste disposal facilities at the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a key installation of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The site is managed by DOE`s Savannah River Field Office and operated under contract by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). The Site`s waste management policies reflect a continuing commitment to the environment. Waste minimization, recycling, use of effective pre-disposal treatments, and repository monitoring are high priorities at the site. One primary objective is to safely treat and dispose of process wastes from operations at the site. To meet this objective, several new projects are currently being developed, including the M-Area Waste Disposal Project (Y-Area) which will treat and dispose of mixed liquid wastes, and the Hazardous Waste/Mixed Waste Disposal Facility (HW/MWDF), which will store, treat, and dispose of solid mixed and hazardous wastes. This document provides a description of this facility and its mission.

Wells, M.N.; Bailey, L.L.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Regional Facility Act (Pennsylvania) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Program Info State Pennsylvania Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees This act establishes a low-level radioactive waste disposal regional facility siting fund that requires nuclear power reactor constructors and operators to pay to the Department of Environmental Resources funds to be utilized for disposal facilities. This act ensures that nuclear facilities and the Department comply with the Low-Level Radioactive Disposal Act. The regional facility siting fund is used for reimbursement of expenses

370

Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered Barrier System Evaluation (Work Package LL1015080425)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Disposal Systems Evaluation Framework (DSEF) will use a logical process for developing one or more disposal system concepts (also referred to as repository system in this report) for any given waste form and geologic setting combination. In the Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs) group of work packages, there are seven categories of waste forms and eight categories of geologic setting being studied. The DSEF will also establish a Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) knowledge management system to organize high-level information, data, and assumptions, thereby facilitating consistency in high-level system simulation and economic analyses. This system likely will be housed with the INL-based documentation system. Attention is given to lessons oearned from the systems used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Where reference material from other programs (e.g., international) is used or cited, the knowledge-management system imports the reference material directly or refer to it in bibliography form. Alternative data sets (e.g., from other programs) will also be utilized to evaluate their influence on DSEF analyses for given waste form and disposal-system combinations. The knowledge-management system can also be used to maintain the results of DSEF realizations, enabling the comparison and ranking of various waste-form/disposal-system-environment/disposal-system-design options. Finally, the UFDC knowledge-management system will be able to provide a compendium of 'templates' that can be utilized, in a labor-efficient fashion, to build parallel DSEF analyses (e.g., 'one offs'). The DSEF will not be a stand-alone, push-the-button and wait for the results, item of software. it will use osftware (probably EXCEL, initially), to guide the team members through a logical process of evaluating combinations of waste-form, disposal-syste-environment, and disposal-system design. In later stages, it will utilize software developed in the field of knowledge engineering and knowledge-management systems (Umeki et al. 2009). At certain points in the logical process, the DSEF software will point the evaluate to other software tools to do analyses needed to move the process forward. In the development of the DSEF, they will be mindful to make it no more complex than necessary to evaluate the system being considered. The DSEF will organize and document the work such that multiple realizations for different combinations can be compared and contrasted.

Blink, J A; Buscheck, T A; Halsey, W G; Wolery, T

2010-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

371

Rock mechanics issues and research needs in the disposal of wastes in hydraulic fractures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The proposed rock mechanics studies outlined in this document are designed to answer the basic questions concerning hydraulic fracturing for waste disposal. These questions are: (1) how can containment be assured for Oak Ridge or other sites; and (2) what is the capacity of a site. The suggested rock mechanics program consists of four major tasks: (1) numerical modeling, (2) laboratory testing, (3) field testing, and (4) monitoring. These tasks are described.

Doe, T.W.; McClain, W.C.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

NREL Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), Innovation: The Spectrum of Clean Energy Innovation, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Designs Promising New Oxides Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells High-efficiency, thin-film solar cells require electrical contacts with high electrical conductivity, and the top contact must also have high optical transparency. This need is currently met by transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), which conduct electricity but are 90% transparent to visible light. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have derived three key design principles for selecting promising materials for TCO contacts. NREL's application of these design principles has resulted in a 10,000-fold improvement in conductivity for one TCO material. The upper TCO contact in a solar cell allows light to reach the absorber material below, which is the layer that generates free electrons via the photovoltaic effect.

373

New information on disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build-up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build-up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Can nonhazardous oil field wastes be disposed of in salt caverns?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. This paper summarizes an Argonne National Laboratory report that reviews the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicated that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal -of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied. There is no actual field experience on the long-term impacts that might arise following closure of waste disposal caverns. Although research has found that pressures will build up in a closed cavern, none has specifically addressed caverns filled with oil field wastes. More field research on pressure build up in closed caverns is needed. On the basis of preliminary investigations, we believe that disposal of oil field wastes in salt caverns is legal and feasible. The technical suitability of the practice depends on whether the caverns are well-sited and well-designed, carefully operated, properly closed, and routinely monitored.

Veil, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Economic Decision Making Model for Geothermal Sludge Disposal alternatives (EDM-GSD): Version 1. 0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Economic Decision Making Model for Geothermal Sludge Disposal Alternatives-Version 1.0'' (EDM-GSD 1.0) is a microcomputer-based dynamic model developed to assist in determining the benefits and costs of various geothermal solid waste treatment procedures. It is intended for use by geothermal managers in dealing with geothermal waste and treatment process issues as a means to assist in overcoming the technical and economic barriers to expanded geothermal energy utilization. The model is based on a 50MW flash plant. However, it is designed to provide the user with sufficient flexibility when inputing data to analyze all types of geothermal plants. Default values for economic and technical parameters can be overridden by the user through the input of specific data. In addition, data can be changed for any year of an analysis to account for desired changes in input parameters such as costs and distance to disposal sites. The results of the model will allow the user to: Determine current geothermal plant disposal costs; Evaluate the cost-effectiveness of alternative treatment techniques; and Evaluate the economic effects of changes in disposal regulations.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB`S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

377

Waste component recycle, treatment, and disposal integrated demonstration (WeDID) nuclear weapon dismantlement activities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the drivers in the dismantlement and disposal of nuclear weapon components is Envirorunental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines. The primary regulatory driver for these components is the Resource Conservation Recovery Act (RCRA). Nuclear weapon components are heterogeneous and contain a number of hazardous materials including heavy metals, PCB'S, selfcontained explosives, radioactive materials, gas-filled tubes, etc. The Waste Component Recycle, Treatment, Disposal and Integrated Demonstration (WeDID) is a Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ERWM) sponsored program. It also supports DOE Defense Program (DP) dismantlement activities. The goal of WeDID is to demonstrate the end-to-end disposal process for Sandia National Laboratories designed nuclear weapon components. One of the primary objectives of WeDID is to develop and demonstrate advanced system treatment technologies that will allow DOE to continue dismantlement and disposal unhindered even as environmental regulations become more stringent. WeDID is also demonstrating waste minimization techniques by recycling a significant weight percentage of the bulk/precious metals found in weapon components and by destroying the organic materials typically found in these components. WeDID is concentrating on demonstrating technologies that are regulatory compliant, are cost effective, technologically robust, and are near-term to ensure the support of DOE dismantlement time lines. The waste minimization technologies being demonstrated by WeDID are cross cutting and should be able to support a number of ERWM programs.

Wheelis, W.T.

1993-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

378

Long-term surveillance plan for the Bodo Canyon Disposal Site, Durango, Colorado. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Act on (UMTRA) Project Bodo Canyon disposal site at Durango, Colorado, describes the surveillance activities for the disposal site. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal call continues to function as designed This LTSP was prepared as a requirement for DOE acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM) from processing uranium ore. This LTSP documents that the land and interests are owned by the United States and details how long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. It is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a). Following the introduction, contents of this report include the following: site final condition; site drawings and photographs; permanent site surveillance features; ground water monitoring; annual site inspections; unscheduled inspections; custodial maintenance; corrective action; record keeping and reporting requirements; emergency notification and reporting; quality assurance; personal health and safety; list of contributions; and references.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Municipal solid waste disposal in Portugal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal has been one of the most important environmental problems for all of the Portuguese regions. The basic principles of MSW management in Portugal are: (1) prevention or reduction, (2) reuse, (3) recovery (e.g., recycling, incineration with heat recovery), and (4) polluter-pay principle. A brief history of legislative trends in waste management is provided herein as background for current waste management and recycling activities. The paper also presents and discusses the municipal solid waste management in Portugal and is based primarily on a national inquiry carried out in 2003 and directed to the MSW management entities. Additionally, the MSW responsibility and management structure in Portugal is presented, together with the present situation of production, collection, recycling, treatment and elimination of MSW. Results showed that 96% of MSW was collected mixed (4% was separately collected) and that 68% was disposed of in landfill, 21% was incinerated at waste-to-energy plants, 8% was treated at organic waste recovery plants and 3% was delivered to sorting. The average generation rate of MSW was 1.32 kg/capita/day.

Magrinho, Alexandre [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Didelet, Filipe [Mechanical Engineering Department, Escola Superior de Tecnologia de Setubal, Campus IPS, Estefanilha, Setubal (Portugal); Semiao, Viriato [Mechanical Engineering Department, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: ViriatoSemiao@ist.utl.pt

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Iraq nuclear facility dismantlement and disposal project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Al Tuwaitha nuclear complex near Baghdad contains a significant number of nuclear facilities from Saddam Hussein's dictatorship. Because of past military operations, lack of upkeep and looting there is now an enormous radioactive waste problem at Al Tuwaitha. Al Tuwaitha contains uncharacterised radioactive wastes, yellow cake, sealed radioactive sources, and contaminated metals. The current security situation in Iraq hampers all aspects of radioactive waste management. Further, Iraq has never had a radioactive waste disposal facility, which means that ever increasing quantities of radioactive waste and material must be held in guarded storage. The Iraq Nuclear Facility Dismantlement and Disposal Program (the NDs Program) has been initiated by the U.S. Department of State (DOS) to assist the Government of Iraq (GOI) in eliminating the threats from poorly controlled radioactive materials, while building human capacities so that the GOI can manage other environmental cleanups in their country. The DOS has funded the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to provide technical assistance to the GOI via a Technical Cooperation Project. Program coordination will be provided by the DOS, consistent with U.S. and GOI policies, and Sandia National Laboratories will be responsible for coordination of participants and for providing waste management support. Texas Tech University will continue to provide in-country assistance, including radioactive waste characterization and the stand-up of the Iraq Nuclear Services Company. The GOI owns the problems in Iraq and will be responsible for the vast majority of the implementation of the NDs Program. (authors)

Cochran, J.R.; Danneels, J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kenagy, W.D. [U.S. Department of State, Bureau of International Security and Nonproliferation, Office of Nuclear Energy, Safety and Security, Washington, DC (United States); Phillips, C.J.; Chesser, R.K. [Center for Environmental Radiation Studies, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Optimal design and control strategies for novel combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems. Part I of II, datum design conditions and approach.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy network optimization (ENO) models identify new strategies for designing, installing, and controlling stationary combined heat and power (CHP) fuel cell systems (FCSs) with the goals of (1) minimizing electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) reducing emissions of the primary greenhouse gas (GHG) - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). A goal of this work is to employ relatively inexpensive simulation studies to discover more financially and environmentally effective approaches for installing CHP FCSs. ENO models quantify the impact of different choices made by power generation operators, FCS manufacturers, building owners, and governments with respect to two primary goals - energy cost savings for building owners and CO{sub 2} emission reductions. These types of models are crucial for identifying cost and CO{sub 2} optima for particular installations. Optimal strategies change with varying economic and environmental conditions, FCS performance, the characteristics of building demand for electricity and heat, and many other factors. ENO models evaluate both 'business-as-usual' and novel FCS operating strategies. For the scenarios examined here, relative to a base case of no FCSs installed, model results indicate that novel strategies could reduce building energy costs by 25% and CO{sub 2} emissions by 80%. Part I of II articles discusses model assumptions and methodology. Part II of II articles illustrates model results for a university campus town and generalizes these results for diverse communities.

Colella, Whitney G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Will new disposal regulations undo decades of progress?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1980, the Belville Amendments to RCRA instructed EPA to 'conduct a detailed and comprehensive study and submit a report' to Congress on the 'adverse effects on human health and the environment, if any, of the disposal and utilization' of coal ash. In both 1988 and 1999, EPA submitted reports to Congress and recommended coal ash should not be regulated as hazardous waste. After the failure of a Tennesse power plant's coal ash disposal facility, EPA will be proposing new disposal regulations.

Ward, J. [John Ward Inc. (United States)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Remedial Action and Waste Disposal Conduct of OperationsMatrix  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Conduct of Operations (CONOPS) matrix incorporates the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) CONOPS matrix (BHI-00746, Rev. 0). The ERDF CONOPS matrix has been expanded to cover all aspects of the RAWD project. All remedial action and waste disposal (RAWD) operations, including waste remediation, transportation, and disposal at the ERDF consist of construction-type activities as opposed to nuclear power plant-like operations. In keeping with this distinction, the graded approach has been applied to the developmentof this matrix.

M. A. Casbon.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal in the US  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Why are 11 states attempting to develop new low-level radioactive waste disposal facilities? Why is only on disposal facility accepting waste nationally? What is the future of waste disposal? These questions are representative of those being asked throughout the country. This paper attempts to answer these questions in terms of where we are, how we got there, and where we might be going.

Smith, P.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Selected biological investigations on deep sea disposal of industrial wastes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

found at an actual disposal site with respect to waste dilution with time. This technique was incorporated into the standard 96-hour bioassay test to afford a means of obtaining preliminary information regarding the bioaccumulation of each waste... with time from the 16 ocean dispose 1 study by Ball (1973) Laboratory dilution setup used to simulate conditions found at an actual disposal site with regard to waste dilution. 18 20 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Until recently man haS considered...

Page, Sandra Lea

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

386

Molecular Design and Performance of Hydroxylpyridium Sensitizers for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

DSSCs have attracted more and more attention as an economical solar energy conversion device since O’Regan and Grätzel reported them in 1991. ... In this work, comparisons of four dyes with the di(3-hexylthiophene), dihexyldithienosilole, dihexylcyclopentadithiophene and N-hexyldithienopyrrole linkers have revealed some general influences of ?-linker rigidification on the optoelectronic features of titania solar cells employing a cobalt(II/III) redox electrolyte, in terms of energetic and kinetic viewpoints. ... Even small structural changes of dyes result in significant changes in redox energies and adsorption manner of the dyes on TiO2 surface, affecting dramatically the performance of DSSCs based on these dyes. ...

Jianghua Zhao; Xichuan Yang; Ming Cheng; Shifeng Li; Licheng Sun

2013-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities (TSDF) Guidance Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - GuideHandbook:...

388

South Carolina Radioactive Waste Transportation and Disposal Act (South Carolina)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health and Environmental Control is responsible for regulating the transportation of radioactive waste, with some exceptions, into or within the state for storage, disposal, or...

389

Depleted uranium storage and disposal trade study: Summary report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this study were to: identify the most desirable forms for conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) for extended storage, identify the most desirable forms for conversion of DUF6 for disposal, evaluate the comparative costs for extended storage or disposal of the various forms, review benefits of the proposed plasma conversion process, estimate simplified life-cycle costs (LCCs) for five scenarios that entail either disposal or beneficial reuse, and determine whether an overall optimal form for conversion of DUF6 can be selected given current uncertainty about the endpoints (specific disposal site/technology or reuse options).

Hightower, J.R.; Trabalka, J.R.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Fees For Disposal Of Hazardous Waste Or Substances (Alabama)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The article lists annual payments to be made to counties, restrictions on disposal of hazardous waste, additional fees collected by counties and penalties.

391

Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site, Lowman, Idaho More Documents & Publications Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Program 2003 Report Revegetation of the Rocky Flats...

392

Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site | Department of...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Site More Documents & Publications Compilation of ETR Summaries Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Briefing: DOE EM ITR Landfill Assessment Project Lessons Learned...

393

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) Solid Waste Disposal Facilities (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection These sections articulate rules for the maintenance and operation of solid waste disposal facilities, as well as site assignment procedures. Applications for site assignment will be reviewed by the Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection as well as the Department of Public

394

Microsoft Word - Appendix C_DisposalCellContents.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and entombed in soil. Total occupied volume is below 50 cy. Use 50 cy. 50.00 Brine tanks from SWTP Mixed with soil. Est. conversion factor is 0.430. 25.80 Contaminated Jersey...

395

EIS-0110: Central Waste Disposal Facility for Low-Level Radioactive Waste, Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS assesses the environmental impacts of alternatives for the disposal of low-level waste and by-product materials generated by the three major plants on the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). In addition to the no-action alternative, two classes of alternatives are evaluated: facility design alternatives and siting alternatives.

396

Sludge utilization and disposal in Virginia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This state-of-the-art study was initiated to determine the problem issues, present knowledge about the issues, and additional research needs in the area of land disposal of municipal sewage sludge. Three questionnaires were developed to survey technically oriented professional, county extension agents, and Virginia NPDES permit holders to obtain these groups' views on problems and deficiencies needing further investigation. Another phase of the study was to conduct an extensive review of the literature on the subject of land application of sewage sludge. Listings of pertinent literature relating to land application with specific interest toward potentially toxic metals, pathogens, nitrogen, and phosphorus were obtained and reviewed. Additional research is needed in the following areas: a method that accurately estimates metal availability within the soil; a method to determine the potential for a disease outbreak from controlled application of treated municipal sewage sludge; a more precise method of N-balancing; the impact of P loading on water quality.

Martens, D.C.; McCart, G.D.; Reneau, R.B. Jr; Simpson, T.W.; Ban-Kiat, T.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Synthesis and characterisation of new designed protoporphyrin-stabilised gold nanoparticles for cancer cells nanotechnology-based targeting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanotechnology has entered the field of medicine in recent dacades and especially, in drug delivery systems, nanoparticles have shown an ability to improve pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of associated drugs. In this study, we have designed a new protoporphyrin-conjugated gold nanoparticle to selectively target and photo- or sonodynamic therapy of tumoural cells. In order to improve the cell uptake effect of protoporphyrin and their derivatives, gold nanoparticle was chosen as carrier. For this purpose, we used 6-mercapto-1-hexanol, as a bifunctional linker to react with protoporphyrin with an ester-linkage formation. Then, we conjugated the thiol-terminated protoporphyrin to the gold nanoparticles through a fast and single-phase system reaction with HAuCl4 in the presence of sodium borohydride. Finally, we evaluated the specific interaction between the protoporphyrin and gold nanoparticles by the elemental analysis, atomic absorption and UV-vis spectrum. Transmission electron microscopic images reveal the spherical gold nanoparticles formation with the average size about 7 nm. Therefore, we have synthesised gold nanoparticle conjugates with protoporphyrin which could be used as a biocompatible drug delivery system.

Hossein Eshghi; Neda Attaran; Ameneh Sazgarnia; Narges Mirzaie; Ahmad Shanei

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory Radioactive waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorting and disposal of hazardous laboratory waste Radioactive waste Solid radioactive waste or in a Perspex box. Liquid radioactive waste collect in a screw-cap plastic bottle, ½ or 1 L size. Place bottles in a tray to avoid spill Final disposal of both solid and radioactive waste into the yellow barrel

Maoz, Shahar

399

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 INSTRODUCTION In the concept of geological radioactive waste disposal, argillite is being of the radioactive waste disposal, the host rock will be subjected to various thermo-hydro-mechanical loadings, thermal solicitation comes from the heat emitting from the radioactive waste packages. On one hand

Boyer, Edmond

400

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A model approach to radioactive waste disposal at Sellafield R. 5. Haszeldine* and C. Mc of the great environmentalproblems of our age is the safe disposal of radioactive waste for geological time periods. Britain is currently investigating a potential site for underground burial of waste, near

Haszeldine, Stuart

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

User Guide for Disposal of Unwanted Items and Electronic Waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is the Recycle department at 502-6808 o For more information on the UCSF Sustainability program visit: http://sustainability.ucsf.edu/stay_informed/recycling_resources consulting support Ensuring proper reuse, recycle, or disposal Maintaining regulatory and policy compliance metal and wood o Waste/trash management o Recycle, reuse or disposal of materials D&S does not process o

Mullins, Dyche

402

Feasibility study of solid oxide fuel cell engines integrated with sprinter gas turbines: Modeling, design and control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Conventional recuperating solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)/gas turbine (GT) system suffers from its poor dynamic capability and load following performance. To meet the fast, safe and efficient load following requirements for mobile applications, a sprinter SOFC/GT system concept is proposed in this paper. In the proposed system, an SOFC stack operating at fairly constant temperature provides the baseline power with high efficiency while the fast dynamic capability of the GT-generator is fully explored for fast dynamic load following. System design and control studies have been conducted by using an SOFC/GT system model consisting of experimentally-verified component models. In particular, through analysis of the steady-state simulation results, an SOFC operation strategy is proposed to maintain fairly constant SOFC power (less than 2% power variation) and temperature (less than 2 K temperature variation) over the entire load range. A system design procedure well-suited to the proposed system has also been developed to help determining component sizes and the reference steady-state operation line. In addition, control analysis has been studied for both steady-state and transient operations. Simulation results suggest that the proposed system holds the promise to achieve fast and safe transient operations by taking full advantage of the fast dynamics of the GT-generator.

Zhenzhong Jia; Jing Sun; Herb Dobbs; Joel King

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Solid waste disposal options: an optimum disposal model for the management of municipal solid waste  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and compostable material was generally burned in backyards. In 1970, the Clean Air Act was passed restricting the burning of leaves and other yard waste. ' These wastes were then disposed in landfills. As landfills reached capacity, commu- nities composted... separation pro- grams because of their "throw-away" mentality. " ~ln in r ttgtt Incineration is the controlled burning of the combustible fraction of solid waste. The first electrical generating station in the United States that was fueled by solid waste...

Haney, Brenda Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

404

2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility 2009 Performance Assessment for the Saltstone Disposal Facility This Performance Assessment (PA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS) was prepared to support the operation and eventual closure of the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). This PA was prepared to demonstrate compliance with the pertinent requirements of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, Change 1, Radioactive Waste Management, Chapter IV, and Title 10, of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Licensing Requirements for Land Disposal of Radioactive Waste, Subpart C as required by the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2005, Section 3116. [DOE O 435.1-1, 10 CFR 61, NDAA_3116]

405

Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal Research and Development Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (OFCT) has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development (R&D) activities related to storage, transportation and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high level nuclear waste (HLW) generated by existing and future nuclear fuel cycles. The disposal of SNF and HLW in a range of geologic media has been investigated internationally. Considerable progress has been made in the U.S and other nations, but gaps in knowledge still exist. This document provides an evaluation and prioritization of R&D opportunities

406

Summary - Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ETR-19 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Why DOE-EM Did This Review Disposal operations have been ongoing at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for over 50 years. Active disposal in E-Area, is near the center of the site. Although a wide range of wastes are being managed at the SRS, only low level radioactive wastes (LLRW) are disposed of on site. Wastes are disposed of in unlined slit and engineered trenches, and in low activity waste and intermediate level vaults. Some wastes are isolated in place with grout and all wastes will be covered with a cap that includes a hydraulic barrier to limit precipitation infiltration. The objective of this review was to

407

Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page intentionally left blank) Low-Level JVllsfe Disposal Fllcili~l' Federal Review Group il1allUlli Revision 3, June 200S Concurrence The Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual, Revision 3, is approved for use as of the most recent date below. Date Chair, Low-Level Waste Disposal Federal Review Group Andrew WalJo, 1II Deputy Director, Otlice of Nuclear Safety, Quality Assurance, and Environment Department of Energy OHlce of Health, Safety, and Security e C. WilJiams Associate Administrator for Infrastructure and Environment National Nuclear Security Administration Low-Level 'Vaste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group J1aJll/ai

408

NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone November 08, 2004 Aiken, SC NNSA Reaches LEU Disposal Milestone The National Nuclear Security Administration's reached an important

409

OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis OAK RIDGE CERCLA DISPOSAL FACILITY ACHIEVES SAFETY MILESTONE Oak Ridge, TN - The Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) provides the onsite disposal capability for the majority of cleanup-generated wastes on the Oak Ridge Reservation. EMWMF has continued a long-standing pattern of safe, complaint operations with 3,000 days without a lost workday case since operations commenced on May 28, 2002. The EMWMF has placed 1.5 million tons of waste and fill in the facility. The EMWMF receives waste from many Oak Ridge cleanup projects, including American Recovery and Reinvestment Act-funded projects, multiple

410

Drilling Waste Management Fact Sheet: Offsite Disposal at Commercial  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Commercial Disposal Facilities Commercial Disposal Facilities Fact Sheet - Commercial Disposal Facilities Although drilling wastes from many onshore wells are managed at the well site, some wastes cannot be managed onsite. Likewise, some types of offshore drilling wastes cannot be discharged, so they are either injected underground at the platform (not yet common in the United States) or are hauled back to shore for disposal. According to an American Petroleum Institute waste survey, the exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generated more than 360 million barrels (bbl) of drilling wastes in 1985. The report estimates that 28% of drilling wastes are sent to offsite commercial facilities for disposal (Wakim 1987). A similar American Petroleum Institute study conducted ten years later found that the volume of drilling waste had declined substantially to about 150 million bbl.

411

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal This roadmap is intended to advance deep borehole disposal (DBD) from its current conceptual status to potential future deployment as a disposal system for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW). The objectives of the DBD RD&D roadmap include providing the technical basis for fielding a DBD demonstration project, defining the scientific research activities associated with site characterization and postclosure safety, as well as defining the engineering demonstration activities associated with deep borehole drilling, completion, and surrogate waste canister emplacement. Research, Development, and Demonstration Roadmap for Deep Borehole Disposal

412

Hydraulic fracturing: A proven N.O.R.M. disposal method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the discovery that many drill cuttings, scales, sludges, and platings contain elevated amounts of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), many companies and regulating authorities have discussed the merits of various disposal methods. This paper covers a process that disposes of NORM and provides isolation of the material from the environment. Disposal of NORM slurry through fracturing an existing depleted sandstone requires careful analysis to optimize a safe and effective design. A radioactivity assay was performed on the NORM before and after slurrification to determine activity concentrations. Tests were conducted on the NORM to proved parameters for the fracture design. The process consists of slurrying the material and keeping the particles suspended in solution until time for well injection. Well injection takes the form of hydraulic fracturing with the material into a deplete zone in the reservoir. Fracturing with the NORM was preceded with a Mini-Frac as a safety precaution to confirm downhole parameters. In conclusion, the philosophy of the process is to take the NORM generated through the exploration and production of oil and gas and place it back into the reservoir from which it came through hydraulic fracturing. This technique is one that helps protect the environment from the possible hazards associated with mismanaged NORM.

Young, S.C. [Halliburton Energy Services, New Orleans, LA (United States); Chambers, D.G. [Halliburton Energy Services, Lafayette, LA (United States); Woods, S.E.; Abernathy, S.E. [Halliburton Energy Services, Duncan, OK (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ERDF ERDF ETR Report Date: June 2007 ETR-6 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. It contains double-lined cells with a RCRA Subtitle C- type liner and leachate collection system. By 2007, 6.8 million tons of waste with 39,000 Curies of radioactivity had been placed in the ERDF. In 2006, events occurred that affected the operation of the automatic leachate transfer pumps and a technician confessed to having not performed compaction tests and to falsification of the data.

414

Description and selection of soils at two oil shale disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents geologic soil descriptions of two oil shale areas selected for soil sampling. Soil samples are to be collected specifically from areas designated for spent shale disposal. One shale disposal site is the Colorado Rio Blanco lease tract C-a, 84 Mesa. The other area is adjacent to the Clegg Creek Member of the New Albany shale in southeast Indiana. Site descriptions are considered to be fundamental before sampling in order to collect samples that are representative of the major parent material. The dominant parent materials found near Rio Blanco are basalt, sandstone, and marlstone. The dominant parent material in southeast Indiana is glacial till. The soils weathered from these materials have different physical and chemical characteristics. Collected samples will be representative of these characteristics. 6 refs., 3 figs.

McGowan, L.J.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Examination of eastern oil shale disposal problems - the Hope Creek field study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field-based study of problems associated with the disposal of processed Eastern oil shale was initiated in mid-1983 at a private research site in Montgomery County, Kentucky. The study (known as the Hope Creek Spent Oil Shale Disposal Project) is designed to provide information on the geotechnical, revegetation/reclamation, and leachate generation and composition characteristics of processed Kentucky oil shales. The study utilizes processed oil shale materials (retorted oil shale and reject raw oil shale fines) obtained from a pilot plant run of Kentucky oil shale using the travelling grate retort technology. Approximately 1000 tons of processed oil shale were returned to Kentucky for the purpose of the study. The study, composed of three components, is described. The effort to date has concentrated on site preparation and the construction and implementation of the field study research facilities. These endeavors are described and the project direction in the future years is defined.

Koppenaal, D.W.; Kruspe, R.R.; Robl, T.L.; Cisler, K.; Allen, D.L.

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Modeling and optimization of operating parameters for a test-cell option of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II tandem mirror design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Models of tandem mirror devices operated with a test-cell insert have been used to calculate operating parameters for FPD-II+T, an upgrade of the Fusion Power Demonstration-II device. Two test-cell configurations were considered, one accommodating two 1.5 m blanket test modules and the other having four. To minimize the cost of the upgrade, FPD-II+T utilizes the same coil arrangement and machine dimensions outside of the test cell as FPD-II, and the requirements on the end cell systems have been held near or below those for FPD-II. The maximum achievable test cell wall loading found for the short test-cell was 3.5 MW/m/sup 2/ while 6.0 MW/m/sup 2/ was obtainable in the long test-cell configuration. The most severe limitation on the achievable wall loading is the upper limit on test-cell beta set by MHD stability calculations. Modification of the shape of the magnetic field in the test-cell by improving the magnet design could raise this beta limit and lead to improved test-cell performance.

Haney, S.W.; Fenstermacher, M.E.

1985-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

417

Disposal of TRU Waste from the PFP in pipe overpack containers to WIPP Including New Security Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is responsible for the safe management and cleanup of the DOE complex. As part of the cleanup and closure of the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) located on the Hanford site, the nuclear material inventory was reviewed to determine the appropriate disposition path. Based on the nuclear material characteristics, the material was designated for stabilization and packaging for long term storage and transfer to the Savannah River Site, or a decision for discard was made. The discarded material was designated as waste material and slated for disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Prior to preparing any residue wastes for disposal at the WIPP, several major activities need to be completed. As detailed a processing history as possible of the material including origin of the waste must be researched and documented. A technical basis for termination of safeguards on the material must be prepared and approved. Utilizing process knowledge and processing history, the material must be characterized, sampling requirements determined, acceptable knowledge package and waste designation completed prior to disposal. All of these activities involve several organizations including the contractor, DOE, state representatives and other regulators such as EPA. At PFP, a process has been developed for meeting the many, varied requirements and successfully used to prepare several residue waste streams including Rocky Flats incinerator ash, hanford incinerator ash and Sand, Slag and Crucible (SS and C) material for disposal. These waste residues are packed into Pipe Overpack Containers for shipment to the WIPP.

HOPKINS, A.M.

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Characterization of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Hybrid System Based on a Factorial Design of Experiments Using Hardware Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A full factorial experimental design and a replicated fractional factorial design were carried out using the Hybrid Performance (HyPer) project facility installed at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy to simulate gasifer/fuel cell/turbine hybrid power systems. The HyPer facility uses hardware in the loop (HIL) technology that couples a modified recuperated gas turbine cycle with hardware driven by a solid oxide fuel cell model. A 34 full factorial design (FFD) was selected to study the effects of four factors: cold-air, hot-air, bleed-air bypass valves, and the electric load on different parameters such as cathode and turbine inlet temperatures, pressure and mass flow. The results obtained, compared with former results where the experiments were made using one-factor-at-a-time (OFAT), show that no strong interactions between the factors are present in the different parameters of the system. This work also presents a fractional factorial design (ffd) 34-2 in order to analyze replication of the experiments. In addition, a new envelope is described based on the results of the design of experiments (DoE), compared with OFAT experiments, and analyzed in an off-design integrated fuel cell/gas turbine framework. This paper describes the methodology, strategy, and results of these experiments that bring new knowledge concerning the operating state space for this kind of power generation system.

Restrepo, Bernardo; Banta, Larry E.; Tucker, David

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiological assessment of the consequences of the disposal of high level radioactive waste in sub-seabed sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological assessment of the Seabed option consists of estimating the detriment to man and to the environment that could result from the disposal of high-level nuclear waste within the seabed sediments in the deep oceans. The assessment is made for the high-level waste (vitrified glass) produced by the reprocessing of 10/sup 5/ tons of heavy metal from spent fuel, which represents the amount of waste generated by 3333 reactor-years of 900 MW(e) reactors, i.e., 3000 GW(E).a. The disposal option considered is to use 14,667 steel penetrators, each of them containing five canisters of HLW glass (0,15 m/sup 3/ each). These penetrators would reach a depth of 50 m in the sediments and would be placed at an average distance of 180 m from each other, requiring a disposal area on the order of 22 x 22 km. Two such potential disposal areas in the Atlantic ocean were studied, Great Meteor East (GME) and South Nares Abyssal Plains (SNAP). A special ship design is proposed to minimize transportation accidents. Approximately 100 shipments would be necessary to dispose of the proposed amount of waste. 1 ref.

de Marsily, G.; Behrendt, V.; Ensminger, D.A.; Flebus, C.; Hutchinson, B.L.; Kane, P.; Karpf, A.; Klett, R.D.; Mobbs, S.; Poulin, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Cellcube: A new system for large scale growth of adherent cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new disposable cell culture unit for adherent cell lines, the CellCube, was used to grow a variety of...2 growth surface area generated up to 4·109 cells. The disposable system consists of a series of polystyre...

Horst D. Blasey; Cedric Isch; Alain R. Bernard

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Exciton Generation and Diffusion in Multilayered Organic Solar Cells Designed by Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Poly(p-phenylenevinylene)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exciton Generation and Diffusion in Multilayered Organic Solar Cells Designed by Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Poly(p-phenylenevinylene) ... exciton generation; exciton diffusion; poly(p-phenylenevinylene); layer-by-layer assembly; organic solar cell ... The former solar cells are typically fabricated by solution processes such as spin coating of a blend solution of a conjugated polymer and a fullerene derivative (6) and therefore have attracted much attention because of their suitability for high-throughput production based on the printing and coating techniques (7). ...

Kohji Masuda; Yoshifumi Ikeda; Michihiro Ogawa; Hiroaki Benten; Hideo Ohkita; Shinzaburo Ito

2010-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

422

Selection of a method for disposing of leachate grout  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major component of the selected remedy for the remediation of the Maxey Flats Disposal Site (MFDS) is the removal, solidification, and on-site disposal of an estimated 3000000 gal of trench leachate. The Record of Decision (ROD) and its predecessor, the Maxey Flats Feasibility Study Report, proposed as a representative process option that the trench leachate be solidified in the form of large (8 x 8 x 4 ft) concrete blocks and disposed of in trenches. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had recent experience with this method when solidifying and disposing of {approximately}300000 gal of leachate that was stored in above-ground tanks at the MFDS. The EPA experience proved the capability of a U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-approved grout mix to satisfy the requirements of 10CFR61.55-56 for the Class-A liquid waste at the site, i.e., the leachate. However, a technical evaluation of the overall solidification/disposal process implemented by the EPA identified some steps that should be improved if this method is to be implemented safely and efficiently for the solidification and disposal of trench leachate as part of the remedial action. In the light of the EPA experience, the present study modified the option proposed in the ROD to make it more workable. This study also evaluated other methods, including three methods for above grade disposal.

Cockrell, R.G.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

423

Fluorescent ballast and lamp disposal issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All around the world, governments, utility companies, and private businesses are attempting to reduce the amount of energy consumed. In the US alone, new economic strategies and programs are being created to facilitate this process. For instance, the recent enactment of the National Energy Policy Act, the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Green Lights Program, and a surge of utility involvement in Demand Side Management (DSM) Commercial/Industrial Direct Install and Rebate Programs. Many of these problems target commercial/industrial lighting system retrofits as one of the most cost effective avenues for reducing the consumption of energy. Due to this trend, hundreds of millions of lighting ballasts and lamps are being discarded. The benefits of these programs result in enormous reductions in fossil fuels (and subsequent carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and nitrogen oxide emissions) required to generate the displaced electricity. Throughout the US, however, there is an increasing concern for the environmental impacts surrounding the accelerated disposal of both lighting ballasts and lamps. Regulations initially established were for a one by one, retirement (failure) process rather than promoted obsolescence and forced retirement of lamp groups or entire systems (truckloads of old technologies). Recognizing this trend and the potential negative environmental effects, federal, state, and local regulators are reevaluating the impacts and are being asked to promulgate policies to specifically address this situation.

Leishman, D.L. [Alta Resource Management Services, Inc., Springfield, MA (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. [EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant; Rivera, M.A. [Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Disposal of Rocky Flats residues as waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work is underway at the Rocky Flats Plant to evaluate alternatives for the removal of a large inventory of plutonium-contaminated residues from the plant. One alternative under consideration is to package the residues as transuranic wastes for ultimate shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Current waste acceptance criteria and transportation regulations require that approximately 1000 cubic yards of residues be repackaged to produce over 20,000 cubic yards of WIPP certified waste. The major regulatory drivers leading to this increase in waste volume are the fissile gram equivalent, surface radiation dose rate, and thermal power limits. In the interest of waste minimization, analyses have been conducted to determine, for each residue type, the controlling criterion leading to the volume increase, the impact of relaxing that criterion on subsequent waste volume, and the means by which rules changes may be implemented. The results of this study have identified the most appropriate changes to be proposed in regulatory requirements in order to minimize the costs of disposing of Rocky Flats residues as transuranic wastes.

Dustin, D.F.; Sendelweck, V.S. (EG and G Rocky Flats, Inc., Golden, CO (United States). Rocky Flats Plant); Rivera, M.A. (Lamb Associates, Inc., Rockville, MD (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

CHARACTERIZATION OF CORE SAMPLE COLLECTED FROM THE SALTSTONE DISPOSAL FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the month of September 2008, grout core samples were collected from the Saltstone Disposal Facility, Vault 4, cell E. This grout was placed during processing campaigns in December 2007 from Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjustment Batch 2 salt solution. The 4QCY07 Waste Acceptance Criteria sample collected on 11/16/07 represents the salt solution in the core samples. Core samples were retrieved to initiate the historical database of properties of emplaced Saltstone and to demonstrate the correlation between field collected and laboratory prepared samples. Three samples were collected from three different locations. Samples were collected using a two-inch diameter concrete coring bit. In April 2009, the core samples were removed from the evacuated sample container, inspected, transferred to PVC containers, and backfilled with nitrogen. Samples furthest from the wall were the most intact cylindrically shaped cored samples. The shade of the core samples darkened as the depth of coring increased. Based on the visual inspection, sample 3-3 was selected for all subsequent analysis. The density and porosity of the Vault 4 core sample, 1.90 g/cm{sup 3} and 59.90% respectively, were comparable to values achieved for laboratory prepared samples. X-ray diffraction analysis identified phases consistent with the expectations for hydrated Saltstone. Microscopic analysis revealed morphology features characteristic of cementitious materials with fly ash and calcium silicate hydrate gel. When taken together, the results of the density, porosity, x-ray diffraction analysis and microscopic analysis support the conclusion that the Vault 4, Cell E core sample is representative of the expected waste form.

Cozzi, A.; Duncan, A.

2010-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Rules and Regulations for the Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality, contain provisions pertaining to the disposal of low-level radioactive waste, disposal facilities, and applicable fees.

428

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Introduction to DOE Order 435.1 Low Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Requirements Christine...

429

Demilitarization and disposal technologies for conventional munitions and energetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for the demilitarization and disposal of conventional munitions and energetic materials are presented. A hazard separation system has been developed to remove hazardous subcomponents before processing. Electronic component materials separation processes have been developed that provide for demilitarization as well as the efficient recycling of materials. Energetic materials demilitarization and disposal using plasma arc and molten metal technologies are currently being investigated. These regulatory compliant technologies will allow the recycling of materials and will also provide a waste form suitable for final disposal.

Lemieux, A.A.; Wheelis, W.T.; Blankenship, D.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Design Principles for Oxygen-Reduction Activity on Perovskite Oxide Catalysts for Fuel Cells and Metal-air Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The prohibitive cost and scarcity of the noble-metal catalysts needed for catalysing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in fuel cells and metal-air batteries limit the commercialization of these clean-energy technologies. Identifying a catalyst design principle that links material properties to the catalytic activity can accelerate the search for highly active and abundant transition-metal-oxide catalysts to replace platinum. Here, we demonstrate that the ORR activity for oxide catalysts primarily correlates to {sigma}*-orbital (e{sub g}) occupation and the extent of B-site transition-metal-oxygen covalency, which serves as a secondary activity descriptor. Our findings reflect the critical influences of the {sigma}* orbital and metal-oxygen covalency on the competition between O{sub 2}{sup 2-}/OH{sup -} displacement and OH{sup -} regeneration on surface transition-metal ions as the rate-limiting steps of the ORR, and thus highlight the importance of electronic structure in controlling oxide catalytic activity.

J Suntivich; H Gasteiger; N Yabuuchi; H Nakanishi; J Goodenough; Y Shao-Horn

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

Assessment of radioactive wastes from a DCLL fusion reactor: Disposal in El Cabril facility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Under the Spanish Breeding Blanket Technology Programme TECNO_FUS a conceptual design of a DCLL (Dual-Coolant Lithium–Lead) blanket-based reactor is being revised. The dually cooled breeding zone is composed of He/LiPb and SiC as material of the liquid metal flow channel inserts. Structural materials are ferritic-martensitic steel (Eurofer) for the blanket and austenitic steel (SS316LN) for the vacuum vessel (VV) and the cryostat. In this work, radioactive wastes are assessed in order to determine if they can be disposed as low and intermediate level radioactive waste (LILW) in the Spanish near surface disposal facility of El Cabril. Also, unconditional clearance and recycling waste management options are studied. The neutron transport calculations have been performed with MCNPX code, while the ACAB code is used for calculations of the inventory of activation products and for activation analysis, in terms of waste management ratings for the options considered. Results show that the total amount of the cryostat can be disposed in El Cabril joined to the outer layer of both VV and channel inserts, whereas only concrete-made biological shield can be managed through clearance and none of the steels can be recycled. Those results are compared with those corresponding to French regulation, showing similar conclusions.

Raquel García; Juan Pablo Catalán; Javier Sanz

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Integrated process for coalbed brine disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brine disposal process is described that converts the brine stream of a coalbed gas producing site into clean water for agricultural use, combustion products and water vapor that can be released into the atmosphere and dry solids that can be recycled for industrial consumption. The process uses a reverse osmosis unit, a submerged combustion evaporator and a pulse combustion dryer. Pretreatment of the brine feedstream is necessary to prevent fouling of the membranes of the reverse osmosis unit and to separate from the brine stream hazardous metal and other constituents that may make the permeate from the reverse osmosis unit unsuitable for agricultural or other use. A chemical modeling code is used to calculate the saturation states of solids that may precipitate and foul the reverse osmosis membranes. Sodium carbonate is added to the brine to precipitate carbonates of Ba, Ca, Mg and Sr prior to filtration, acidification, and passage into the reverse osmosis unit. Optimization of the process in terms of types and amounts of additives is possible with analysis using the modeling code. The minimum amounts of additives to prevent scaling are calculated. In a typical operation, a brine feedstream of 1,000 m{sup 3}/day (6,290 bpd) that may have a total dissolved salt concentration (TDS) of 7,000 ppm will be separated into a permeate stream of 750 m{sup 3}/day (4,718 bpd) with a TDS of 400 ppm and a concentrated brine stream of 250 m{sup 3}/day (1,573 bpd) with a TDS of 26,800 ppm. The submerged combustion evaporator will concentrate this latter stream to a concentration of 268,000 ppm and reduce the volume to 25 m{sup 3}/day (158 bpd). The pulse combustion dryer can dry the concentrated brine mixture to a low moisture salt. Energy costs to operate the reverse osmosis unit are primarily the pumping costs.

Brandt, H. [AQUATECH Services, Inc., Fair Oaks, CA (United States)]|[California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Bourcier, W.L.; Jackson, K.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Bypass diode for a solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

Rim, Seung Bum (Palo Alto, CA); Kim, Taeseok (San Jose, CA); Smith, David D. (Campbell, CA); Cousins, Peter J. (Menlo Park, CA)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal January 26, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu Former Secretary of Energy The Blue Ribbon Commission on America's Nuclear Future was formed at the direction of the President to conduct a comprehensive review of polices for managing the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. If we are going to ensure that the United States remains at the forefront of nuclear safety and security, non-proliferation, and nuclear energy technology we must develop an effective strategy and workable plan for the safe and secure management and disposal of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste. That is why I asked General Scowcroft and Representative Hamilton to draw on their

435

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

436

Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) Solid Waste Disposal, Hazardous Waste Management Act, Underground Storage Act (Tennessee) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Tennessee Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Tennessee Department Of Environment and Conservation The Solid Waste Disposal Laws and Regulations are found in Tenn. Code 68-211. These rules are enforced and subject to change by the Public Waste Board (PWB), which is established by the Division of Solid and Hazardous

437

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed 1663 Los Alamos science and technology magazine Latest Issue:November 2013 All Issues » submit Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Decades' worth of transuranic waste from Los Alamos is being laid to rest at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico March 25, 2013 Disposing of nuclear waste in a salt bed Depending on the impurities embedded within it, the salt from WIPP can be anything from a reddish, relatively opaque rock to a clear crystal like the one shown here. Ordinary salt effectively seals transuranic waste in a long-term repository Transuranic waste, made of items such as lab coats and equipment that have been contaminated by radioactive elements heavier than uranium, is being shipped from the Los Alamos National Laboratory to a long-term storage

438

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management Analysis A disposal concept consists of three parts: waste inventory (7 waste types examined), geologic setting (e.g., clay/shale, salt, crystalline, other sedimentary), and the engineering concept of operations (range of generic operational concepts examined). Two major categories for waste package emplacement modes are identified: 1) "open" where extended ventilation can remove heat for many years following waste emplacement underground; and 2) "enclosed" modes for clay/shale and salt media where waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials which may have temperature limits that constrain thermal

439

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

440

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models Integration of EBS Models with Generic Disposal System Models This report summarizes research activities on engineered barrier system (EBS) model integration with the generic disposal system model (GDSM), and used fuel degradation and radionuclide mobilization (RM) in support of the EBS evaluation and tool development within the Used Fuel Disposition campaign. This report addresses: predictive model capability for used nuclear fuel degradation based on electrochemical and thermodynamic principles, radiolysis model to evaluate the U(VI)-H2O-CO2 system, steps towards the evaluation of uranium alteration products, discussion of instant release fraction (IRF) of radionuclides from the nuclear fuel, and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact (South Dakota) < Back Eligibility Utility Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Fuel Distributor Program Info State South Dakota Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Commission This legislation authorizes the state's entrance into the Southwestern Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Compact, which provides for the cooperative management of low-level radioactive waste. The Compact is administered by a commission, which can regulate and impose fees on in-state radioactive waste generators. The states of Arizona, California,

442

Shell keeps its options open for disposing of Brent Spar  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Brent Spar, may lead to similar disposal of 50 deep-water oil installations in UK offshore waters that are next in line for decommissioning, Johnston says. "No one knows ... this would have on the marine environment."

Ehsan Masood

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

443

Waste Disposal Site and Radioactive Waste Management (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes the considerations of the Commission in determining whether to approve the establishment and operation of a disposal site for nuclear waste. If a permit is issued, the...

444

Proof of Proper Solid Waste Disposal (West Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This rule provides guidance to persons occupying a residence or operating a business establishment in this state regarding the approved method of providing proof of proper solid waste disposal to...

445

Burning Chemical Waste Disposal Site: Investigation, Assessment and Rehabilitation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of underground fires on a site previously used for disposal of chemical wastes from the nylon industry was causing a nuisance and restricting the commercial development of the site and adjacent areas....

D. L. Barry; J. M. Campbell; E. H. Jones

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ES2 Figure ES2. Annual Indices of Real Disposable Income, Vehicle-Miles Traveled, Consumer Price Index (CPI-U), and Real Average Retail Gasoline Price, 1978-2004, 1985100...

447

Nuclear Waste Disposal: Yucca Blowup Theory Bombs, Says Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...leaked into the storage area, the depleted uranium would quickly saturate it, making...disposing of the 400,000 tons of depleted uranium left over from the arms race...andotherbranches ofthe Public Health Service must demonstrate that...

Gary Taubes

1996-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

448

Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Friday, February 18, 2011 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste WASHINGTON The...

449

Novel Cell Design for Combined In Situ Acoustic Emission and X-ray Diffraction of Cycling Lithium Ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An in situ acoustic emission (AE) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) cell for use in the study of battery electrode materials has been devised and tested. This cell uses commercially available coin cell hardware retrofitted with a metalized polyethylene terephthalate (PET) disk which acts as both an X-ray window and a current collector. In this manner the use of beryllium and its associated cost and hazard is avoided. An AE sensor may be affixed to the cell face opposite the PET window in order to monitor degradation effects, such as particle fracture, during cell cycling. Silicon particles which were previously studied by the AE technique were tested in this cell as a model material. The performance of these cells compared well with unmodified coin cells while providing information about structural changes in the active material as the cell is repeatedly charged and discharged.

Rhodes, Kevin J [ORNL; Kirkham, Melanie J [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta Ann [ORNL; Parish, Chad M [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Daniel, Claus [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Shallow Land Disposal Area Public Meeting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RemedialSite Designation Preliminary Assessment Site Inspection Remedial Investigation Feasibility Study Proposed Plan Record of Decision Project We are here RemedialRemedial A removal action may be initiated

US Army Corps of Engineers

451

Risk assessment of nonhazardous oil-field waste disposal in salt caverns.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1996, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a preliminary technical and legal evaluation of disposing of nonhazardous oil-field wastes (NOW) into salt caverns. Argonne determined that if caverns are sited and designed well, operated carefully, closed properly, and monitored routinely, they could be suitable for disposing of oil-field wastes. On the basis of these findings, Argonne subsequently conducted a preliminary evaluation of the possibility that adverse human health effects (carcinogenic and noncarcinogenic) could result from exposure to contaminants released from the NOW disposed of in domal salt caverns. Steps used in this evaluation included the following: identifying potential contaminants of concern, determining how humans could be exposed to these contaminants, assessing contaminant toxicities, estimating contaminant intakes, and calculating human cancer and noncancer risk estimates. Five postclosure cavern release scenarios were assessed. These were inadvertent cavern intrusion, failure of the cavern seal, failure of the cavern through cracks, failure of the cavern through leaky interbeds, and a partial collapse of the cavern roof. Assuming a single, generic, salt cavern and generic oil-field wastes, potential human health effects associated with constituent hazardous substances (arsenic, benzene, cadmium, and chromium) were assessed under each of these scenarios. Preliminary results provided excess cancer risk and hazard index (referring to noncancer health effects) estimates that were well within the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) target range for acceptable exposure risk levels. These results led to the preliminary conclusion that from a human health perspective, salt caverns can provide an acceptable disposal method for nonhazardous oil-field wastes.

Elcock, D.

1998-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

452

Program Plan for Revision of the Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Saltstone Project, are embarking on the next revision to the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) performance assessment (PA). This program plan has been prepared to outline the general approach, scope, schedule and resources for the PA revision. The plan briefly describes the task elements of the PA process. It discusses critical PA considerations in the development of conceptual models and interpretation of results. Applicable quality assurance (QA) requirements are identified and the methods for implementing QA for both software and documentation are described. The plan identifies project resources supporting the core team and providing project oversight. Program issues and risks are identified as well as mitigation of those risks. Finally, a preliminary program schedule has been developed and key deliverables identified. A number of significant changes have been implemented since the last PA revision resulting in a new design for future SDF disposal units. This revision will encompass the existing and planned disposal units, PA critical radionuclides and exposure pathways important to SDF performance. An integrated analysis of the overall facility layout, including all disposal units, will be performed to assess the impact of plume overlap on PA results. Finally, a rigorous treatment of uncertainty will be undertaken using probabilistic simulations. This analysis will be reviewed and approved by DOE-SR, DOE-HQ and potentially the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). This revision will be completed and ready for the start of the DOE review at the end of December 2006. This work supports a Saltstone Vault 2 fee-bearing milestone. This milestone includes completion of the Vault 2 module of the PA revision by the end of FY06.

Cook, James R.

2005-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

453

Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Geological Disposal Concept Selection Aligned with a Voluntarism Process - 13538  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The UK's Radioactive Waste Management Directorate (RWMD) is currently at a generic stage in its implementation programme. The UK site selection process is a voluntarist process and, as yet, no communities have decided to participate. RWMD has set out a process to describe how a geological disposal concept would be selected for the range of higher activity wastes in the UK inventory, including major steps and decision making points, aligned with the stages of the UK site selection process. A platform of information is being developed on geological disposal concepts at various stages of implementation internationally and, in order to build on international experience, RWMD is developing its approach to technology transfer. The UK has a range of different types of higher activity wastes with different characteristics; therefore a range of geological disposal concepts may be needed. In addition to identifying key aspects for considering the compatibility of different engineered barrier systems for different types of waste, RWMD is developing a methodology to determine minimum separation distances between disposal modules in a co-located geological disposal facility. RWMD's approach to geological disposal concept selection is intended to be flexible, recognising the long term nature of the project. RWMD is also committed to keeping alternative radioactive waste management options under review; an approach has been developed and periodic reviews of alternative options will be published. (authors)

Crockett, Glenda; King, Samantha [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)] [Nuclear Decommissioning Authority, Building 587, Curie Avenue, Harwell Oxford, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0RH (United Kingdom)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

Kirpich, Aaron S. (Broomall, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

Kirpich, A.S.

1983-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

University of Delaware Laboratory Chemical Waste Disposal Guide ALL CHEMICAL WASTE MUST BE DISPOSED OF THROUGH THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments and procedures Non-Returnable gas cylinders Batteries Spent solvents, Stains, Strippers, Thinners, Fertilizers Formaldehyde and Formalin Solutions Mercury containing items (other heavy metals) Liquid OR SMALL CONTAINERS IMPORTANT: DO NOT DISPOSE OF REACTIVE, AIR SENSITIVE, OR OXIDIZER SAMPLES

Firestone, Jeremy

458

EC MoDeRn Project: In-situ Demonstration of Innovative Monitoring Technologies for Geological Disposal - 12053  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring to provide information on the evolution of geological disposal presents several challenges. The 4-year, euros M 5, EC MoDeRn Project (http://www.modern-fp7.eu/), which commenced in 2009, addresses monitoring processes, state-of-the-art technology and innovative research and development of monitoring techniques. This paper discusses some of the key drivers for the development of innovative monitoring techniques and provides outlines of the demonstration programmes being conducted within MoDeRn. The aim is to develop these innovative monitoring techniques and to demonstrate them under realistic conditions present in underground laboratories. These demonstration projects, applying a range of different monitoring techniques, are being carried out at underground research facilities in different geological environments at HADES URL in Belgium (plastic clay), Bure in France (indurated clay) and at Grimsel Test Site (granite) in Switzerland. These are either built upon existing infrastructure (EC ESDRED Low pH shotcrete and TEM experiments at Grimsel; and PRACLAY experiment and underground galleries in HADES) or will be attached to infrastructure that is being developed and financed by resources outside of this project (mock-up disposal cell in Bure). At Grimsel Test Site, cross-hole and hole-to-tunnel seismic methods are being employed as a means to monitor induced changes in an artificially saturated bentonite wall confined behind a shotcrete plug. Recognising the limitations for travel-time tomography for monitoring a disposal cell, full waveform inversion techniques are being employed to enhance the capacity to monitor remote from the excavation. At the same Grimsel location, an investigation will be conducted of the potential for using a high frequency wireless (HFW) sensor network embedded within the barrier system; this will include the possibility of providing energy remotely to isolated sensors. At the HADES URL, the monitoring programme will utilise the PRACLAY gallery equipped to simulate a disposal gallery for heat-generating high-level waste evaluating fibre-optic based sensing techniques, including distributed sensing for thermal distribution and long-term reliability in harsh conditions. It also includes the potential to improve the treatment of signals from micro-seismic monitoring to enable enhanced understanding of the evolution around the gallery following its excavation due to ventilation, saturation and heating, and to image a water-bearing concretion layer. HADES URL will also be used to test wireless techniques to transmit monitoring data from the underground to the surface. The main focus of this contribution is to evaluate magneto-inductive data transmission; and to optimise energy usage. At the Bure underground facility in France, monitoring systems have been developed and will be embedded into the steel liner for the mock-up high-level waste disposal tunnel. The aim of this programme is to establish the capacity to conduct integrated monitoring activities inside the disposal cell, on the cell liner and in the near-field and to assess the capability of the monitoring to withstand construction and liner emplacement procedures. These projects, which are supported by focused development and testing of the monitoring systems, will allow the testing of both the effectiveness of these techniques applied to disposal situations and to understand the limits of these monitoring technologies. This approach should also enhance the confidence of key stakeholders in the ability to understand/confirm the changes occurring within a disposal cell. In addition, remote or 'non-intrusive' monitoring technologies are evaluated to provide a means of enhancing understanding of what is occurring in an isolated disposal cell. The projects also test solutions for embedded monitoring systems in challenging (risk of damage) situations. The outputs from this work will lead to improved understanding of these state-of-the-art techniques and allow focused development of those techniques beneficial to future monitoring progr

Breen, B.J. [NDA, Herdus House, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3HU (United Kingdom); Garcia-Sineriz, J.L. [AITEMIN, c/Margarita Salas 14-Parque Leganes Tecnologico-Leganes, ES-28918, Madrid (Spain); Maurer, H. [ETH Zurich, ETH Honggerberg, CH-8093, Zurich (Switzerland); Mayer, S. [ANDRA, 1-7 rue Jean-Monnet, F-92298 Chatenay-Malabry cedex (France); Schroeder, T.J. [NRG, P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Verstricht, J. [EURIDICE EIG, c/o SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400 Mol (Belgium)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Analysis of environmental regulations governing the disposal of geothermal wastes in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Federal and California regulations governing the disposal of sludges and liquid wastes associated with the production of electricity from geothermal resources were evaluated. Current disposal practices, near/far term disposal requirements, and the potential for alternate disposal methods or beneficial uses for these materials were determined. 36 refs., 3 figs., 15 tabs. (ACR)

Royce, B.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Waste disposal technology transfer matching requirement clusters for waste disposal facilities in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We outline the differences of Chinese MSW characteristics from Western MSW. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model the requirements of four clusters of plant owner/operators in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We examine the best technology fit for these requirements via a matrix. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Variance in waste input affects result more than training and costs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer For China technology adaptation and localisation could become push, not pull factors. - Abstract: Even though technology transfer has been part of development aid programmes for many decades, it has more often than not failed to come to fruition. One reason is the absence of simple guidelines or decision making tools that help operators or plant owners to decide on the most suitable technology to adopt. Practical suggestions for choosing the most suitable technology to combat a specific problem are hard to get and technology drawbacks are not sufficiently highlighted. Western counterparts in technology transfer or development projects often underestimate or don't sufficiently account for the high investment costs for the imported incineration plant; the differing nature of Chinese MSW; the need for trained manpower; and the need to treat flue gas, bunker leakage water, and ash, all of which contain highly toxic elements. This article sets out requirements for municipal solid waste disposal plant owner/operators in China as well as giving an attribute assessment for the prevalent waste disposal plant types in order to assist individual decision makers in their evaluation process for what plant type might be most suitable in a given situation. There is no 'best' plant for all needs and purposes, and requirement constellations rely on generalisations meaning they cannot be blindly applied, but an alignment of a type of plant to a type of owner or operator can realistically be achieved. To this end, a four-step approach is suggested and a technology matrix is set out to ease the choice of technology to transfer and avoid past errors. The four steps are (1) Identification of plant owner/operator requirement clusters; (2) Determination of different municipal solid waste (MSW) treatment plant attributes; (3) Development of a matrix matching requirement clusters to plant attributes; (4) Application of Quality Function Deployment Method to aid in technology localisation. The technology transfer matrices thus derived show significant performance differences between the various technologies available. It is hoped that the resulting research can build a bridge between technology transfer research and waste disposal research in order to enhance the exchange of more sustainable solutions in future.

Dorn, Thomas, E-mail: thomas.dorn@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Nelles, Michael, E-mail: michael.nelles@uni-rostock.de [University of Rostock, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences, Department Waste Management, Justus-v.-Liebig-Weg 6, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Flamme, Sabine, E-mail: flamme@fh-muenster.de [University of Applied Sciences Muenster, Corrensstrasse 25, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Jinming, Cai [Hefei University of Technology, 193 Tunxi Road, 230009 Hefei (China)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disposal cell design" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop engineering evaluations of technologies for the capture, use, and disposal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). This project emphasizes CO{sub 2}-capture technologies combined with integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power systems. Complementary evaluations address CO{sub 2} transportation, CO{sub 2} use, and options for the long-term sequestering of unused CO{sub 2}. Commercially available CO{sub 2}-capture technology is providing a performance and economic baseline against which to compare innovative technologies. The intent is to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps, in addition to process design capital and operating costs. The value used for the {open_quotes}equivalent CO{sub 2}{close_quotes} budget is 1 kg of CO{sub 2} per kilowatt-hour (electric). The base case is a 458-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal feed, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, feed preparation, and conversion result in a net electric power production of 454 MW, with a CO{sub 2} release rate of 0.835 kg/kWhe. Two additional life-cycle energy balances for emerging technologies were considered: (1) high-temperature CO{sub 2} separation with calcium- or magnesium-based sorbents, and (2) ambient-temperature facilitated-transport polymer membranes for acid-gas removal.

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.R.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns: Feasibility, legality, risk, and costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Salt caverns can be formed through solution mining in the bedded or domal salt formations that are found in many states. Salt caverns have traditionally been used for hydrocarbon storage, but caverns have also been used to dispose of some types of wastes. This paper provides an overview of several years of research by Argonne National Laboratory on the feasibility and legality of using salt caverns for disposing of oil field wastes, the risks to human populations from this disposal method, and the cost of cavern disposal. Costs are compared between the four operating US disposal caverns and other commercial disposal options located in the same geographic area as the caverns. Argonne`s research indicates that disposal of oil field wastes into salt caverns is feasible and legal. The risk from cavern disposal of oil field wastes appears to be below accepted safe risk thresholds. Disposal caverns are economically competitive with other disposal options.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Water Policy Program

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solid oxide fuel cell with single material for electrodes and interconnect  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell having a plurality of individual cells. A solid oxide fuel cell has an anode and a cathode with electrolyte disposed therebetween, and the anode, cathode and interconnect elements are comprised of substantially one material.

McPheeters, Charles C. (Naperville, IL); Nelson, Paul A. (Wheaton, IL); Dees, Dennis W. (Downers Grove, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Heterojunction solar cell  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high-efficiency single heterojunction solar cell is described wherein a thin emitter layer (preferably Ga[sub 0.52]In[sub 0.48]P) forms a heterojunction with a GaAs absorber layer. The conversion efficiency of the solar cell is at least 25.7%. The solar cell preferably includes a passivating layer between the substrate and the absorber layer. An anti-reflection coating is preferably disposed over the emitter layer. 1 fig.

Olson, J.M.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

465

Proceedings of the tenth annual DOE low-level waste management conference: Session 3: Disposal technology and facility development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains ten papers on various aspects of low-level radioactive waste management. Topics include: design and construction of a facility; alternatives to shallow land burial; the fate of tritium and carbon 14 released to the environment; defense waste management; engineered sorbent barriers; remedial action status report; and the disposal of mixed waste in Texas. Individual papers were processed separately for the data base. (TEM)

Not Available

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Unique method of ash disposal can benefit marine life  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As more communities turn to waste-to-energy facilities to help solve their solid waste disposal problems, the amount of ash created by these facilities increases. Incineration of solid waste produces particulate residues which are often rich in lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc because of the concentration which occurs as a result of reduction. It has been shown that such metals can sometimes be leached from ash residues, giving rise to special concerns that incineration ashes be disposed of in an environmentally acceptable manner. In urban coastal areas where landfills are few and increasingly distant, ocean disposal of stabilized incineration residues (SIR) may provide an acceptable alternative to current landfill practices. In May 1985, a research program was initiated at the Marine Sciences Research Center to examine the feasibility of utilizing SIR for artificial reef construction in the ocean. Results of these studies showed that particulate incineration residues could be combined with cement to form a solid block possessing physical properties necessary for ocean disposal. The stabilized residues were subjected to regulatory extraction protocols, and in no instance did the metal concentrations in the leachates exceed the regulatory limits for toxicity. Bioassays revealed no adverse effects on the phytoplankton communities exposed to elutriate concentrations higher than could be encountered under normal disposal conditions. The success of the laboratory studies resulted in securing the necessary permits for the placement of an artificial habitat constructed using SIR in coastal wasters. Results from this program are described.

Roethel, F.J.; Breslin, V.T. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook (USA))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile.

Jacobs, Stephen D. (Pittsford, NY); Cerqua, Kathleen A. (Rochester, NY)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile. 11 figs.

Jacobs, S.D.; Cerqua, K.A.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

469

Design of a high-level waste repository system for the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This report presents a conceptual design for a High Level Waste disposal system for fuel discharged by U.S. commercial power reactors, using the Yucca Mountain repository site recently designated by federal legislation. ...

Driscoll, Michael J.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent Nuclear Fuel Handling, Storage, Transportation, and Disposal in the U.S. The Impacts of Dry-Storage Canister Designs on Spent...

471

Design, fabrication, RF test at 2 K of 1050MHz, ?=0.49 single cell large and fine grain niobium cavity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BARC is developing a technology for the accelerator driven subcritical system (ADSS) that will be mainly utilized for the transmutation of nuclear waste and enrichment of U233. Design and prototyping of a superconducting medium velocity cavity has been taken up as a part of the ADSS project. The cavity design for {beta} = 0.49, f = 1050 MHz has been optimized to minimize the peak electric and magnetic fields, with a goal of 5 MV/m of accelerating gradient at a Q > 5 x 10{sup 9} at 2 K. After the design optimization, two single cell cavities were fabricated from polycrystalline (RRR > 200) and large grain (RRR > 96) Niobium material. The cavities have been tested at 2 K in a vertical cryostat at Jefferson Lab and both achieved the performance specifications.

Jayanta Mondal, Gianluigi Ciovati, Peter Kneisel, Kailash Mittal, Ganapati Rao Myneni

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars EM Plan Accelerates Uranium-233 Disposal, Saves Taxpayers Half Billion Dollars August 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation’s few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials dating back to the Manhattan Project. For more than 50 years, the uranium-233 (U-233) supply has been stored at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Building 3019. The facility, located near the center of the ORNL campus, is owned by EM and one of the nation's few repositories for U-233 and other special nuclear materials

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Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Excavation Enclosures At MDA B Laboratory to demolish excavation enclosures at Material Disposal Area B near DP Road Pre-demolition activities are beginning this week and the work should be completed by the end of March 2013. November 1, 2012 The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. The Laboratory plans to demolish the enclosures used to safely excavate and clean up the Lab's oldest waste disposal site near DP Road in Los Alamos. Contact Communications Office (505) 667-7000 "We look forward to the day we officially turn the property over for the benefit of our community." Work is beginning this week LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 1, 2012-Los Alamos National Laboratory

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EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive 00: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste EIS-0200: Managing Treatment, Storage, and Disposal of Radioactive and Hazardous Waste SUMMARY This EIS evaluates the potential environmental and cost impacts of stra