National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for disposal cell cover

  1. Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improvements, and Long-Term Performance | Department of Energy Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance (882.35 KB) More

  2. New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Services » New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation (178.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance

  3. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Paper presented at the Waste Management 2011 Conference. ...

  4. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

  5. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  6. Appendix K Disposal Cell Groundwater Monitoring Plan

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    K Disposal Cell Groundwater Monitoring Plan

  7. disposal_cell.cdr

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    With the April 24, 1997, ceremonial ground-breaking for disposal facility construction, ... the way for detailed design and subcontracting of many construction-related activities. ...

  8. Approaches to consider covers and liners in a low-level waste disposal facility performance assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger; Phifer, Mark; Suttora, Linda

    2015-03-17

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several USDOE sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the USEPA in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. One task completed by the working group addressed approaches for considering the performance of covers and liners/leachate collection systems in the context of a performance assessment (PA). A document has been prepared which provides recommendations for a general approach to address covers and liners/leachate collection systems in a PA and how to integrate assessments with defense-in-depth considerations such as design, operations and waste acceptance criteria to address uncertainties. Specific information and references are provided for details needed to address the evolution of individual components of cover and liner/leachate collection systems. This information is then synthesized into recommendations for best practices for cover and liner system design and examples of approaches to address the performance of covers and liners as part of a performance assessment of the disposal system.

  9. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

  10. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cheney Disposal Cell - 008

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Cheney Disposal Cell (008) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: ...

  11. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Estes Gulch Disposal Cell...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Estes Gulch Disposal Cell (010) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site ...

  12. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- 11 E (2) Disposal Cell ...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: 11 E. (2) Disposal Cell (037) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site ...

  13. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Burro Canyon Disposal Cell (007) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site ...

  14. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of...

  15. Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Kastens, M.K.; Sheader, L.R.L.; Benson, C.H.; Albright, W.H.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2008-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) collaborated on the design and monitoring of an alternative cover for the Monticello uranium mill tailings disposal cell, a Superfund site in southeastern Utah. Ground-water recharge is naturally limited at sites like Monticello where thick, fine-textured soils store precipitation until evaporation and plant transpiration seasonally return it to the atmosphere. The cover at Monticello uses local soils and a native plant community to mimic the natural soil water balance. The cover is fundamentally an evapotranspiration (ET) design with a capillary barrier. A 3-hectare drainage lysimeter was embedded in the cover during construction of the disposal cell in 2000. The lysimeter consists of a geo-membrane liner below the capillary barrier that directs percolation water to a monitoring system. Soil water storage is determined by integration of point water content measurements. Meteorological parameters are measured nearby. Plant cover, shrub density, and leaf area index (LAI) are monitored annually. The cover performed well over the 7-year monitoring period (2000-2007). The cumulative percolation was 4.2 mm (0.6 mm yr{sup -1}), satisfying an EPA goal of an average percolation of <3.0 mm yr{sup -1}. Almost all percolation can be attributed to the exceptionally wet winter and spring of 2004-2005 when soil water content slightly exceeded the water storage capacity of the cover. The diversity, percent cover, and LAI of vegetation increased over the monitoring period, although the density of native shrubs that extract water from deeper in the cover has remained less than revegetation targets. DOE and EPA are applying the monitoring results to plan for long-term surveillance and maintenance and to evaluate alternative cover designs for other waste disposal sites. (authors)

  16. Water-Balance Cover Performance

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test C.H. Benson University of ... A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate ...

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cheney Disposal Cell - 008

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Cheney Disposal Cell - 008 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Cheney Disposal Cell (008) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/Grand_Junction_DP/Disposal/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Grand Junction, CO, Disposal Site Location: Mesa County, Colorado Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal Site Disposition: Remediated under UMTRCA Title I Radioactive

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Clive Disposal Cell - 036

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Clive Disposal Cell - 036 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Clive Disposal Cell (036 ) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/Salt_Lake/Disposal/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Salt Lake City, UT, Disposal Site Location: Salt Lake City, Utah Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal Site Disposition: Remediated under UMTRCA Title I Radioactive Materials

  19. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Estes Gulch Disposal Cell - 010 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Estes Gulch Disposal Cell (010) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/Rifle/Disposal/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Rifle, CO, Disposal Site Location: Rifle, Colorado Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal Site Disposition: Remediated under UMTRCA Title I Radioactive Materials Handled:

  20. UNREVIEWED DISPOSAL QUESTION EVALUATION: CENTER SLIT TRENCHES ONE THROUGH FIVE OPERATIONAL COVERS REANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.; Swingle, R.

    2011-05-26

    Operational inventory limits for the disposal of solid low-level waste in Slit Trenches 1-7 were established by the Special Analysis (SA) performed by Collard and Hamm (2008). To determine disposal limits for the Slit Trenches, the SA followed the methodology used in the 2008 PA (WSRC, 2008) which assumed that the inventories in each trench were instantaneously placed in 12/1995, which is the date when SLIT1 began operation. The 2008 SA analyzed the impact from placing storm-water runoff covers simultaneously over Slit Trenches 1-7 at 5, 10 and 15 years after the inventory was introduced. To include a measure of conservatism in the limits, the lowest of the limits calculated for any storm-water runoff cover placement time or that calculated in the original 2008 PA was chosen as the operational limit for each radionuclide. Through the availability of funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA), storm-water runoff covers were placed over Slit Trenches 1-5 in December 2010. SRNL was requested to perform a UDQE for this accelerated action. Table 1 below lists the operational dates for Slit Trenches 1-5 and the time elapsed between when the first waste package was disposed in each Slit Trench and when the storm-water runoff covers were placed. As shown in Table 1, SLIT1 was covered 15.0 years after the date of the first waste package disposal. SLIT2 was covered 9.2 years after the date of the first waste package disposal in SLIT2 which falls within the window of {+-} 1.0 year within which the 2008 SA cover time analysis was assumed to be valid (Crowley and Butcher, 2008). Therefore, the analysis of SLIT1 and SLIT2 in the 2008 SA is considered adequate. However, the cover timings for SLIT3, SLIT4 and SLIT5 are from 2.2 to 1.6 years beyond the nearest cover time of 5 years assumed in the 2008 SA analysis and fall outside of the acceptable one-year margin. Therefore, an additional study was conducted by Collard et al. (2011) that assessed the

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Clive Disposal Cell - 036

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    All of the mill tailings and other residual radioactive materials from the South Salt Lake City mining site were disposed of in this dedicated disposal cell. The U. S. Nuclear ...

  2. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Burro Canyon Disposal Cell - 007 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Burro Canyon Disposal Cell (007) Remediated; managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/Slick_Rock/Processing/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Slick Rock, CO, Disposal Site Location: San Miguel County, Colorado Evaluation Year: Not considered for FUSRAP - in another program Site Operations: Uranium mill tailings disposal Site Disposition: Remediated under UMTRCA Title I

  3. A Water Balance Study of Four Landfill Cover Designs at Material Disposal Area B in Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David D. Breshears; Fairley J. Barnes; John W. Nyhan; Johnny A. Salazar

    1998-09-01

    The goal of disposing of low-level radioactive and hazardous waste in shallow landfills is to reduce risk to human health and the environment by isolating contaminants until they no longer pose an unacceptable hazard. In order to achieve this, the Department of Energy Environmental Restoration Program is comparing the performance of several different surface covers at Material Disposal Area (MDA) B in Los Alamos. Two conventional landfill were compared with an improved cover designed to minimize plant and animal intrusion and to minimize water infiltration into the underlying wastes. The conventional covers varied in depth and both conventional and improved designs had different combinations of vegetation (grass verses shrub) and gravel mulch (no mulch verses mulch). These treatments were applied to each of 12 plots and water balance parameters were measured from March1987 through June 1995. Adding a gravel mulch significantly influenced the plant covered field plots receiving no gravel mulch averaged 21.2% shrub cover, while plots with gravel had a 20% larger percent cover of shrubs. However, the influence of gravel mulch on the grass cover was even larger than the influence on shrub cover, average grass cover on the plots with no gravel was 16.3%, compared with a 42% increase in grass cover due to gravel mulch. These cover relationships are important to reduce runoff on the landfill cover, as shown by a regression model that predicts that as ground cover is increased from 30 to 90%,annual runoff is reduced from 8.8 to 0.98 cm-a nine-fold increase. We also found that decreasing the slope of the landfill cover from 6 to 2% reduced runoff from the landfill cover by 2.7-fold. To minimize the risk of hazardous waste from landfills to humans, runoff and seepage need to be minimized and evapotranspiration maximized on the landfill cover. This has to be accomplished for dry and wet years at MDA B. Seepage consisted of 1.9% and 6.2% of the precipitation in the average and

  4. Revegetation/rock cover for stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beedlow, P.A.; McShane, M.C.; Cadwell, L.L.

    1982-07-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing design and performance guidelines for surface stabilization of inactive uranium mill tailings. In this work, vegetation and rock covers are being evaluated for maintaining long-term integrity of impoundment systems. Methods are being developed to estimate erosion rates associated with rock and/or vegetation covers, and to determine the effects of surface treatments on soil moisture. Interactions between surface treatments and barriers (radon and biological) are being studied as well. The product will be a set of guidelines to aid in designing surface covers. This report presents the status of this program and a discussion of considerations pertinent to the application of surface covers to tailings. Test plots located in Grand Junction, Colorado and Waterflow, New Mexico are being used to study: (1) the interactions between vegetation and radon and biological barriers, (2) the effects of surface covers on soil moisture, and (3) the effects of rock covers on vegetation.

  5. Final closure cover for a Hanford radioactive mixed waste disposal facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, K.D.

    1996-02-06

    This study provides a preliminary design for a RCRA mixed waste landfill final closure cover. The cover design was developed by a senior class design team from Seattle University. The design incorporates a layered design of indigenous soils and geosynthetics in a layered system to meet final closure cover requirements for a landfill as imposed by the Washington Administrative Code WAC-173-303 implementation of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

  6. Extending facility life by combining embankments: permitting energy solutions class a combined disposal cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCandless, S.J.; Shrum, D.B.

    2007-07-01

    EnergySolutions' Class A low-level radioactive waste management operations are limited to a 540-acre section of land in Utah's west desert. In order to optimize the facility lifetime, EnergySolutions has launched an effort to improve the waste disposal utilization of this acreage. A chief component of this effort is the Class A Combined embankment. The Class A Combined embankment incorporates the footprint of both the currently licensed Class A cell and the Class A North cell, and also includes an increase in the overall embankment height. By combining the cells and raising the height of the embankment, disposal capacity is increased by 50% over the two-cell design. This equates to adding a second Class A cell, at approximately 3.8 million cubic yards capacity, without significantly increasing the footprint of disposal operations. In order to justify the design, EnergySolutions commissioned geotechnical and infiltration fate and transport evaluations, modeling, and reports. Cell liner and cover materials, specifications, waste types, and construction methods will not change. EnergySolutions estimates that the Class A Combined cell will add at least 10 years of capacity to the site, improving utilization of the permitted area without unacceptable environmental impacts. (authors)

  7. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- 11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    11 E (2) Disposal Cell - 037 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: 11 E. (2) Disposal Cell (037) Active UMTRCA Title II site; when completed site will be managed by LM Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Salt Lake City 11 e.(2), UT, Disposal Site Location: Tooele County, Utah Evaluation Year: Salt Lake City 11 e.(2), UT, Disposal Site Site Operations: Disposal site Site Disposition: Remediation under UMTRCA Title II - site not ready to transition Radioactive Materials Handled:

  8. US DOE-EM On-Site Disposal Cell Working Group - Fostering Communication On Performance Assessment Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger R.; Suttora, Linda C.; Phifer, Mark

    2014-03-01

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several U.S. Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These facilities are typically developed with regulatory oversight from States and/or the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in addition to USDOE. The facilities are developed to meet design standards for disposal of hazardous waste as well as the USDOE performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. The involvement of multiple and different regulators for facilities across separate sites has resulted in some differences in expectations for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RA) that are developed for the disposal facilities. The USDOE-EM Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to performance and risk assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement. The working group holds teleconferences, as needed, focusing on specific topics of interest. The topics addressed to date include an assessment of the assumptions used for performance assessments and risk assessments (PA/RAs) for on-site disposal cells, requirements and assumptions related to assessment of inadvertent intrusion, DOE Manual 435.1-1 requirements, and approaches for consideration of the long-term performance of liners and covers in the context of PAs. The working group has improved communication among the staff and oversight personnel responsible for onsite disposal cells and has provided a forum to identify and resolve common concerns.

  9. Deployment of an Alternative Closure Cover and Monitoring System at the Mixed Waste Disposal Unit U-3ax/bl at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levitt, D.G.; Fitzmaurice, T.M.

    2001-02-01

    In October 2000, final closure was initiated of U-3ax/bl, a mixed waste disposal unit at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The application of approximately 30 cm of topsoil, composed of compacted native alluvium onto an operational cover, seeding of the topsoil, installation of soil water content sensors within the cover, and deployment of a drainage lysimeter facility immediately adjacent to the disposal unit initiated closure. This closure is unique in that it required the involvement of several U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) groups: Waste Management (WM), Environmental Restoration (ER), and Technology Development (TD). Initial site characterization of the disposal unit was conducted by WM. Regulatory approval for closure of the disposal unit was obtained by ER, closure of the disposal unit was conducted by ER, and deployment of the drainage lysimeter facility was conducted by WM and ER, with funding provided by the Accelerated Site Technology Deployment ( ASTD) program, administered under TD. In addition, this closure is unique in that a monolayer closure cover, also known as an evapotranspiration (ET) cover, consisting of native alluvium, received regulatory approval instead of a traditional Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) multi-layered cover. Recent studies indicate that in the arid southwestern United States, monolayer covers may be more effective at isolating waste than layered covers because of the tendency of clay layers to desiccate and crack, and subsequently develop preferential pathways. The lysimeter facility deployed immediately adjacent to the closure cover consists of eight drainage lysimeters with three surface treatments: two were left bare; two were revegetated with native species; two were allowed to revegetate with invader species; and two are reserved for future studies. The lysimeters are constructed such that any drainage through the bottoms of the lysimeters can be measured. Sensors installed in the

  10. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound Hot Cell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    American Recovery and Reinvestment Act cleanup crews at the Idaho site recently disposed of a hot cell as heavy as nine fully loaded Boeing 737s.

  11. Output-increasing, protective cover for a solar cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammerbacher, Milfred D.

    1995-11-21

    A flexible cover (14) for a flexible solar cell (12) protects the cell from the ambient and increases the cell's efficiency. The cell(12)includes silicon spheres (16) held in a flexible aluminum sheet matrix (20,22). The cover (14) is a flexible, protective layer (60) of light-transparent material having a relatively flat upper, free surface (64) and an irregular opposed surface (66). The irregular surface (66) includes first portions (68) which conform to the polar regions (31R) of the spheres (16) and second convex (72) or concave (90) portions (72 or 90) which define spaces (78) in conjunction with the reflective surface (20T) of one aluminum sheet (20). Without the cover (14) light (50) falling on the surface (20T) between the spheres (16) is wasted, that is, it does not fall on a sphere (16). The surfaces of the second portions are non-parallel to the direction of the otherwise wasted light (50), which fact, together with a selected relationship between the refractive indices of the cover and the spaces, result in sufficient diffraction of the otherwise wasted light (50) so that about 25% of it is reflected from the surface (20T) onto a sphere (16).

  12. Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell--GJO-99-96-TAR, June 1999

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Performed Under DOE Contract No. DE-AC13-96GJ87335 for the U.S. Department of Energy Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. U.S. Department of Energy GJO-99-96-TAR Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell: Evaluation of Long-Term Performance and Risk June 1999 DOE Grand Junction Office June 1999 Plant Encroachment on the Burrell, Pennsylvania, Disposal Cell Page iii Contents Page Executive Summary

  13. Development and fabrication of advanced cover glass for a GaAs solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borden, P.G.; Kaminar, N.R.; Grounner, M.

    1984-01-01

    This report summarizes work on improving solar cell conversion efficiencies by modifying the cell cover glass. Two approaches were investigated during the course of this work: grooved cover glasses to reduce the effect of top contact obscuration and secondary concentrators to improve concentrator solar cell performances in tracking modules. The grooved cover glass work used an array of metallized V shaped grooves in a thin cover glass (plastic) window to deflect incident light rays away from solar cell front surface regions covered by the solar cell electrical contact metallization onto unobstructed, optically active regions of the solar cell. Secondary concentrators are being considered for use on concentrator solar cells to improve overall system conversion efficiency and reduce receiver module cost. Secondary concentrators designed and fabricated during this project consist of small glass cones to attach directly to the top of the receiver solar cell. When appropriately designed, these secondary concentrator glass cones increase sunlight concentration on the solar cell, improve solar flux uniformity on the cell, improve system tolerance to tracking error, and allow for concentration ratios greater than can be ordinarily achieved with acrylic Fresnel lenses.

  14. Portsmouth Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Cleanup Portsmouth Waste Disposal Portsmouth Waste Disposal Preliminary design cross section of Planned On-site Disposal Cell Preliminary design cross section of ...

  15. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, P.; George, R.A.

    1999-07-27

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

  16. Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Singh, Prabhakar; George, Raymond A.

    1999-01-01

    A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

  17. Evaluation of Background Concentrations of Contaminants in an Unusual Desert Arroyo Near a Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Cell - 12260

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bush, Richard P.; Morrison, Stan J.

    2012-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) manages 27 sites that have groundwater containing uranium concentrations above background levels. The distal portions of the plumes merge into background groundwater that can have 50 μg/L or more uranium. Distinguishing background from site-related uranium is often problematic, but it is critical to determining if remediation is warranted, establishing appropriate remediation goals, and evaluating disposal cell performance. In particular, groundwater at disposal cells located on the upper Cretaceous Mancos Shale may have relatively high background concentrations of uranium. Elevated concentrations of nitrate, selenium, and sulfate accompany the uranium. LM used geologic analogs and uranium isotopic signatures to distinguish background groundwater from groundwater contaminated by a former uranium processing site. The same suite of contaminants is present in groundwater near former uranium processing sites and in groundwater seeps emanating from the Mancos Shale over a broad area. The concentrations of these contaminants in Many Devils Wash, located near LM's Shiprock disposal cell, are similar to those in samples collected from many Mancos seeps, including two analog sites that are 8 to 11 km from the disposal cell. Samples collected from Many Devils Wash and the analog sites have high AR values (about 2.0)-in contrast, groundwater samples collected near the tailings disposal cell have AR values near 1.0. These chemical signatures raise questions about the origin of the contamination seeping into Many Devils Wash. (authors)

  18. PORTSMOUTH ON-SITE DISPOSAL CELL HIGH DENSITY POLYETHYLENE GEOMEMBRANE LONGEVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, M.

    2012-01-31

    It is anticipated that high density polyethylene (HDPE) geomembranes will be utilized within the liner and closure cap of the proposed On-Site Disposal Cell (OSDC) at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The likely longevity (i.e. service life) of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service is evaluated within the following sections of this report: (1) Section 2.0 provides an overview of HDPE geomembranes, (2) Section 3.0 outlines potential HDPE geomembranes degradation mechanisms, (3) Section 4.0 evaluates the applicability of HDPE geomembrane degradation mechanisms to the Portsmouth OSDC, (4) Section 5.0 provides a discussion of the current state of knowledge relative to the longevity (service life) of HDPE geomembranes, including the relation of this knowledge to the Portsmouth OSDC, and (5) Section 6.0 provides summary and conclusions relative to the anticipated service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service. Based upon this evaluation it is anticipated that the service life of HDPE geomembranes in OSDC service would be significantly greater than the 200 year service life assumed for the OSDC closure cap and liner HDPE geomembranes. That is, a 200 year OSDC HDPE geomembrane service life is considered a conservative assumption.

  19. Work plan for phase 1A paleochannel studies at the Cheney disposal cell, Grand Junction, Colorado: Draft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This document will serve as a Work Plan for continuing paleochannel characterization activities at the Cheney disposal site near Grand Junction, Colorado. Elevated levels of nitrate were encountered in ground water from two monitor wells installed in alluvial paleochannels near the Cheney disposal cell in 1994. This triggered a series of investigations (Phase 1) designed to determine the source of nitrate and other chemical constituents in ground water at the site. A comprehensive summary of the Phase 1 field investigations (limited to passive monitoring and modeling studies) conducted by the Remedial Action Contractor (RAC) and Technical Assistance Contractor (TAC) to date is provided in Section 2.0 of this document. Results of Phase 1 were inconclusive regarding the potential interaction between the disposal cell and the paleochannels, so additional Phase 1A investigations are planned. Recommendations for Phase 1A tasks and possible future activities are discussed in Section 3.0. Detailed information on the implementation of the proposed Phase 1A tasks appears in Section 4.0 and will provide the basis for Statements of Work (SOW) for each of these tasks. A detailed sampling plan is provided to ensure quality and a consistency with previous data collection efforts.

  20. WIPP - Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal Cover Page and Table of Contents Closing the Circle The Long Road to WIPP - Part 1 The Long Road to WIPP - Part 2 Looking to the Future Related Reading and The WIPP Team

  1. A new design for a disposable and modifiable electrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A new design for a disposable and modifiable electrochemical cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new design for a disposable and modifiable electrochemical cell ...

  2. Changes in Vegetation at the Monticello, Utah, Disposal Site...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Cover Using Caisson...

  3. Disposable rabbit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Leroy C.; Trammell, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  4. Disposal rabbit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, L.C.; Trammell, D.R.

    1983-10-12

    A disposable rabbit for transferring radioactive samples in a pneumatic transfer system comprises aerated plastic shaped in such a manner as to hold a radioactive sample and aerated such that dissolution of the rabbit in a solvent followed by evaporation of the solid yields solid waste material having a volume significantly smaller than the original volume of the rabbit.

  5. COVER3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 3 and Chapter 5 that discusses methods of reducing the period of disposal operations for ... attainment of the NAAQS for nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulfur dioxide (SO2), and lead. ...

  6. Enhanced Cover Assessment Project:Soil Manipulation and Revegetation Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Joseph; Albright, Dr. Bill; Benson, Dr. Craig

    2014-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management is evaluating methods to enhance natural changes that are essentially converting conventional disposal cell covers for uranium mill tailings into water balance covers. Conventional covers rely on a layer of compacted clayey soil to limit exhalation of radon gas and percolation of rainwater. Water balance covers rely on a less compacted soil “sponge” to store rainwater, and on soil evaporation and plant transpiration (evapotranspiration) to remove stored water and thereby limit percolation. Over time, natural soil-forming and ecological processes are changing conventional covers by increasing hydraulic conductivity, loosening compaction, and increasing evapotranspiration. The rock armor on conventional covers creates a favorable habitat for vegetation by slowing soil evaporation, increasing soil water storage, and trapping dust and organic matter, thereby providing the water and nutrients needed for plant germination, survival, and sustainable transpiration. Goals and Objectives Our overall goal is to determine if allowing or enhancing these natural changes could improve cover performance and reduce maintenance costs over the long term. This test pad study focuses on cover soil hydrology and ecology. Companion studies are evaluating effects of natural and enhanced changes in covers on radon attenuation, erosion, and biointrusion. We constructed a test cover at the Grand Junction disposal site to evaluate soil manipulation and revegetation methods. The engineering design, construction, and properties of the test cover match the upper three layers of the nearby disposal cell cover: a 1-foot armoring of rock riprap, a 6-inch bedding layer of coarse sand and gravel, and a 2-foot protection layer of compacted fine soil. The test cover does not have a radon barrier—cover enhancement tests leave the radon barrier intact. We tested furrowing and ripping as means for creating depressions parallel to the slope

  7. Alternative Evaluation Study: Methods to Mitigate/Accommodate Subsidence for the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County Nevada, with Special Focus on Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, L.

    1997-09-01

    An Alternative Evaluation Study is a type of systematic approach to problem identification and solution. An Alternative Evaluation Study was convened August 12-15, 1997, for the purpose of making recommendations concerning closure of Disposal Cell U-3ax/bl and other disposal cells and mitigation/accommodation of waste subsidence at the Radioactive Waste Management Sites at the Nevada Test Site. This report includes results of the Alternative Evaluation Study and specific recommendations.

  8. Consideration of liners and covers in performance assessments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phifer, Mark A.; Seitz, Robert R.; Suttora, Linda C.

    2014-09-18

    On-site disposal cells are in use and being considered at several United States Department of Energy (USDOE) sites as the final disposition for large amounts of waste associated with cleanup of contaminated areas and facilities. These disposal cells are typically regulated by States and/or the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) in addition to having to comply with requirements in DOE Order 435.1, Radioactive Waste Management due to the radioactive waste. The USDOE-Environmental Management Office of Site Restoration formed a working group to foster improved communication and sharing of information for personnel associated with these CERCLA disposal cells and work towards more consistent assumptions, as appropriate, for technical and policy considerations related to CERCLA risk assessments and DOE Order 435.1 performance assessments in support of a Record of Decision and Disposal Authorization Statement, respectively. One of the issues considered by the working group, which is addressed in this report, was how to appropriately consider the performance of covers and liners/leachate collections systems in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 performance assessment (PA). This same information may be appropriate for consideration within CERCLA risk assessments for these facilities. These OSDCs are generally developed to meet hazardous waste (HW) disposal design standards under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) as well as the DOE Order 435.1 performance based standards for disposal of radioactive waste. To meet the standards for HW, the facilities typically include engineered covers and liner/leachate collection systems. Thus, when considering such facilities in the context of a DOE Order 435.1 PA, there is a need to address the evolution of performance of covers and liner/leachate collection systems in the context of meeting a performance standard considering time

  9. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    care. Also, this Medical Program does not cover services received outside the United States, unless there is an emergency. Most preauthorizations may be requested over...

  10. Journal Covers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Covers Journal Covers Ambient pressure XPS and IRRAS investigation of ethanol steam reforming on nickel-ceria catalysts Print Monday, 15 August 2016 17:11 Ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) and infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (AP-IRRAS) have been used to elucidate the active sites and mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming reaction (ESR) over Ni-CeO2(111) model catalysts. Article link. Quantitative Microstructural Imaging by

  11. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Active Employees and Their Covered Family Members and Non- Medicare Eligible Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number:

  12. A new design for a disposable and modifiable electrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and modifiable electrochemical cell Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A new design for a disposable and modifiable electrochemical cell Authors: Dattelbaum, Andrew M ...

  13. Monitoring the performance of an alternative cover using caisson lysimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W.J.; Smith, G.M.; Mushovic, P.S.

    2004-02-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) office in Grand Junction, Colorado, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Region 8, collaborated on a series of field lysimeter studies to design and monitor the performance of an alternative cover for a uranium mill tailings disposal cell at the Monticello, Utah, Superfund Site. Because groundwater recharge is naturally limited at Monticello in areas with thick loess soils, DOE and EPA chose to design a cover for Monticello using local soils and a native plant community to mimic this natural soilwater balance. Two large drainage lysimeters fabricated of corrugated steel culvert lined with high-density polyethylene were installed to evaluate the hydrological and ecological performance of an alternative cover design constructed in 2000 on the disposal cell. Unlike conventional, lowpermeability designs, this cover relies on (1) the water storage capacity of a 163-cm soil “sponge” layer overlying a sand-and-gravel capillary barrier to retain precipitation while plants are dormant and (2) native vegetation to remove precipitation during the growing season. The sponge layer consists of a clay loam subsoil compacted to 1.65 g/cm2 in one lysimeter and a loam topsoil compacted to 1.45 g/cm2 in the other lysimeter, representing the range of as-built conditions constructed in the nearby disposal cell cover. About 0.1 mm of drainage occurred in both lysimeters during an average precipitation year and before they were planted, an amount well below the EPA target of <3.0 mm/yr. However, the cover with less compacted loam topsoil sponge had a 40% greater water storage capacity than the cover with overly compacted clay loam subsoil sponge. The difference is attributable in part to higher green leaf area and water extraction by plants in the loam topsoil. The lesson learned is that seemingly subtle differences in soil types, sources, and compaction can result in salient differences in performance. Diverse, seeded communities of

  14. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Exclusive Provider Option (EPO) Medical Program For Medicare Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or

  15. front cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Medical Program For Medicare Retirees and Their Covered Family Members Administered by: N113794 01/15 CUSTOMER ASSISTANCE Customer Service: Medical/Surgical Claims and Prescription Drugs-The 24/7 Nurseline can help when you have a health problem or concern. The 24/7 Nurseline is staffed by registered nurses who are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. 24/7 Nurseline toll-free telephone number: 1-800-973-6329 When you have a non- medical benefit question or

  16. Disposal Authorization Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) is authorized to operate under this Disposal Authorization Statement (DAS) (Revision 1).  The revised DAS requirements ensure the facility does not pose a...

  17. Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... agen- cies, scientific advisory panels, and concerned citizens. * As a ... It also prohibited the disposal of high-level radioactive waste and spent nuclear fuel. In 1996, ...

  18. Design of UMTRA covers to mitigate the effect of frost penetration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banani, A.M.; Claire, R.F.

    1994-03-01

    The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, contracted by the US Department of Energy (DOE), requires construction of disposal cells for residual radioactive materials from abandoned uranium mill tailings. A disposal cell consists of contaminated material placed within a stabilized embankment with a top cover. The embankment and cover should be effective for up to 1000 years, to the extent reasonably achievable, and in any case for at least 200 years. The embankment cover usually consists of a radon/infiltration barrier, a frost barrier and erosion protection layer consisting of bedding and riprap layers. The radon/infiltration barrier and frost barrier are two important elements of the cover systems. A radon/infiltration barrier is designed to reduce the radon emissions from the contaminated materials and to limit the surface water infiltration into the contaminated material. However, a radon/infiltration barrier has to be protected from repeated freeze-thaw cycles to prevent an increase in permeability. Frost penetration depth is site specific and depends on local climatic conditions and soil properties of the cover system. However, placing a frost barrier is not only very costly but also reduces the disposal capacity of the embankment. Recent laboratory test results indicate that freeze-thaw cycles do not significantly effect the permeability of compacted sand-bentonite mixtures. Therefore, radon/infiltration barriers using sand-bentonite mixtures may not require frost barriers for protection against the effects of freeze-thaw. In this paper the design of UMTRA covers is briefly explained; the criteria to determine a 200 year freeze event, and the frost penetration depth are discussed. The results of freeze-thaw permeability tests on compacted clay and sand-bentonite mixtures are also presented.

  19. Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I processing site at Mexican Hat, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. Location of the Mexican Hat, Utah, Disposal Cell Site Location and History The Mexican Hat disposal site is located on the Navajo Reservation in southeast Utah, 1.5 miles southwest of the town of Mexican Hat and 1 mile south of the San

  20. Performance Evaluation of the Engineered Cover at the Lakeview, Oregon, Uranium Mill Tailings Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, J.; Smith, G.; Danforth, B.; Gee, G.; Kothari, V.; Pauling, T.

    2007-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) is evaluating the performance of disposal cell covers at LM sites and exploring ways to enhance their sustainability. The cover of the Lakeview, Oregon, disposal cell relies on a compacted soil layer (CSL) to limit radon escape and water percolation into underlying tailings. The design created habitat favorable for growth of woody plants that sent roots through the CSL. The mean saturated hydraulic conductivity (K{sub sat}) of the CSL, measured at 17 locations, was 3.0 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}, 300 times greater than the design target. The highest K{sub sat} values were measured near the top of the CSL at locations both with and without roots; the lowest K{sub sat} values were measured deeper in the CSL. Water flux meters (WFMs) installed in 2005 to directly measure percolation flux show significant percolation through the cover. Three WMFs began recording percolation in mid-November, 7 days after the start of a prolonged precipitation event, and continued until early June 2006. Percolation flux during this period ranged between 3.1 x 10{sup -5} and 8.5 x 10{sup -5} cm s{sup -1}. The cumulative percolation was greater than total precipitation during the period, probably because of a water-harvesting effect. The WFMs were strategically placed in down-gradient positions on the cover top slope where water likely accumulated in a sand drainage layer. Routine monitoring at Lakeview shows that the ground water remains protected. LM plans to evaluate potential effects of high percolation rates in covers to ensure that disposal cells remain protective for the long term. (authors)

  1. Radiological performance assessment for the E-Area Vaults Disposal Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.; Hunt, P.D.

    1994-04-15

    The E-Area Vaults (EAVs) located on a 200 acre site immediately north of the current LLW burial site at Savannah River Site will provide a new disposal and storage site for solid, low-level, non-hazardous radioactive waste. The EAV Disposal Facility will contain several large concrete vaults divided into cells. Three types of structures will house four designated waste types. The Intermediate Level Non-Tritium Vaults will receive waste radiating greater than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container. The Intermediate Level Tritium Vaults will receive waste with at least 10 Ci of tritium per package. These two vaults share a similar design, are adjacent, share waste handling equipment, and will be closed as one facility. The second type of structure is the Low Activity Waste Vaults which will receive waste radiating less than 200 mR/h at 5 cm from the outer disposal container and containing less than 10 Ci of tritium per package. The third facility, the Long Lived Waste Storage Building, provides covered, long term storage for waste containing long lived isotopes. Two additional types of disposal are proposed: (1) trench disposal of suspect soil, (2) naval reactor component disposal. To evaluate the long-term performance of the EAVs, site-specific conceptual models were developed to consider: (1) exposure pathways and scenarios of potential importance; (2) potential releases from the facility to the environment; (3) effects of degradation of engineered features; (4) transport in the environment; (5) potential doses received from radionuclides of interest in each vault type.

  2. Liners and Covers: Field Performance & Life Expectancy | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting 11-12 December 2014 Las Vegas, Nevada, USA To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 ... an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

  3. Ultrastructural and Single-Cell-Level Characterization Reveals Metabolic Versatility in a Microbial Eukaryote Community from an Ice-Covered Antarctic Lake

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Wei; Podar, Mircea; Morgan-Kiss, Rachael M.

    2016-04-15

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys (MCM) of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, harbor numerous ice-covered bodies of water that provide year-round liquid water oases for isolated food webs dominated by the microbial loop. Single-cell microbial eukaryotes (protists) occupy major trophic positions within this truncated food web, ranging from primary producers (e.g., chlorophytes, haptophytes, and cryptophytes) to tertiary predators (e.g., ciliates, dinoflagellates, and choanoflagellates). To advance the understanding of MCM protist ecology and the roles of MCM protists in nutrient and energy cycling, we investigated potential metabolic strategies and microbial interactions of key MCM protists isolated from a well-described lake (Lake Bonney). Fluorescence-activatedmore » cell sorting (FACS) of enrichment cultures, combined with single amplified genome/amplicon sequencing and fluorescence microscopy, revealed that MCM protists possess diverse potential metabolic capabilities and interactions. Two metabolically distinct bacterial clades (FlavobacteriaandMethylobacteriaceae) were independently associated with two key MCM lake microalgae (IsochrysisandChlamydomonas, respectively). We also report on the discovery of two heterotrophic nanoflagellates belonging to the Stramenopila supergroup, one of which lives as a parasite ofChlamydomonas, a dominate primary producer in the shallow, nutrient-poor layers of the lake. Single-cell eukaryotes called protists play critical roles in the cycling of organic matter in aquatic environments. In the ice-covered lakes of Antarctica, protists play key roles in the aquatic food web, providing the majority of organic carbon to the rest of the food web (photosynthetic protists) and acting as the major consumers at the top of the food web (predatory protists). In this study, we utilized a combination of techniques (microscopy, cell sorting, and genomic analysis) to describe the trophic abilities of Antarctic lake protists and their potential

  4. Disposal Activities and the Unique Waste Streams at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arnold, P.

    2012-10-31

    This slide show documents waste disposal at the Nevada National Security Site. Topics covered include: radionuclide requirements for waste disposal; approved performance assessment (PA) for depleted uranium disposal; requirements; program approval; the Waste Acceptance Review Panel (WARP); description of the Radioactive Waste Acceptance Program (RWAP); facility evaluation; recent program accomplishments, nuclear facility safety changes; higher-activity waste stream disposal; and, large volume bulk waste streams.

  5. Cell and current collector felt arrangement for solid oxide electrochemical cell combinations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reichner, Philip

    1988-01-01

    A solid electrolyte electrochemical cell combination 1 is made, comprising an annular, axially elongated, inner electrode 2 containing at least one interior gas feed conduit 3; annular solid electrolyte segments 4 around and covering portions of the inner electrode; annular outer electrode segments 6 around and covering portions of the electrolyte segments; electronically conducting, non-porous, interconnection material 5 disposed between electrolyte segments and in contact with the inner electrode, and electronically conducting, porous, metal fiber current collector felts 7 disposed on top of the non-porous interconnect material and outer electrode segments, where both the non-porous interconnect material and the porous metal felts are disposed circumferentially about the cell, transversely to the axial length of the cell and the inner electrode is continuous for the entire axial length of the cell combination.

  6. Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal Waste Disposal Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge’s cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. Trucks transport debris from Oak Ridge's cleanup sites to the onsite CERCLA disposal area, the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility. The low-level radiological and hazardous wastes generated from Oak Ridge's cleanup projects are disposed in the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The

  7. LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LANL Demolishes First Containment Dome LANL demolishes first containment dome at disposal area It once housed thousands of drums of radioactive waste that have been shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal. September 30, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  8. On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    8947.1 09/13 On-Site Disposal Facility Inspection Report September 2013 6319-D6242 8947.2 09/13 East Face Cell 1 West Face Cell 1 6319D-6208 6319D-6231 8947.3 09/13 North Face Cell 1 North Drainage (looking west) 6319D-6206 6319D-6205 8947.4 09/13 East Face Cell 2 West Face Cell 2 6319D-6230 6319D-6209 8947.5 09/13 East Face Cell 3 West Face Cell 3 6319D-6229 6319D-6210 8947.6 09/13 East Face Cell 4 West Face Cell 4 6319D-6227 6319D-62111 8947.7 09/13 East Face Cell 5 West Face Cell 5 6319D-6226

  9. Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krummel, J.R.; Policastro, A.J.; Olshansky, S.J.; McGinnis, L.D.

    1990-10-01

    As part of the Chemical Stockpile Disposal Program mandated by Public Law 99--145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act), an independent review is presented of the US Army Phase I environmental report for the disposal program at the Umatilla Depot Activity (UMDA) in Hermiston, Oregon. The Phase I report addressed new and additional concerns not incorporated in the final programmatic environmental impact statement (FPEIS). Those concerns were addressed by examining site-specific data for the Umatilla Depot Activity and by recommending the scope and content of a more detailed site-specific study. This independent review evaluates whether the new site-specific data presented in the Phase I report would alter the decision in favor of on-site disposal that was reached in the FPEIS, and whether the recommendations for the scope and content of the site-specific study are adequate. Based on the methods and assumptions presented in the FPEIS, the inclusion of more detailed site-specific data in the Phase I report does not change the decision reached in the FPEIS (which favored on-site disposal at UMDA). It is recommended that alternative assumptions about meteorological conditions be considered and that site-specific data on water, ecological, socioeconomic, and cultural resources; seismicity; and emergency planning and preparedness be considered explicitly in the site-specific EIS decision-making process. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  10. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1986-01-01

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  11. Radioactive waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lampe, Robert F.

    1986-11-04

    A radioactive waste disposal package comprising a canister for containing vitrified radioactive waste material and a sealed outer shell encapsulating the canister. A solid block of filler material is supported in said shell and convertible into a liquid state for flow into the space between the canister and outer shell and subsequently hardened to form a solid, impervious layer occupying such space.

  12. Waste disposal package

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, M.J.

    1985-06-19

    This is a claim for a waste disposal package including an inner or primary canister for containing hazardous and/or radioactive wastes. The primary canister is encapsulated by an outer or secondary barrier formed of a porous ceramic material to control ingress of water to the canister and the release rate of wastes upon breach on the canister. 4 figs.

  13. Oil field waste disposal costs at commercial disposal facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.

    1997-10-01

    The exploration and production segment of the U.S. oil and gas industry generates millions of barrels of nonhazardous oil field wastes annually. In most cases, operators can dispose of their oil fields wastes at a lower cost on-site than off site and, thus, will choose on-site disposal. However, a significant quantity of oil field wastes are still sent to off-site commercial facilities for disposal. This paper provides information on the availability of commercial disposal companies in different states, the treatment and disposal methods they employ, and how much they charge. There appear to be two major off-site disposal trends. Numerous commercial disposal companies that handle oil field wastes exclusively are located in nine oil-and gas-producing states. They use the same disposal methods as those used for on-site disposal. In addition, the Railroad Commission of Texas has issued permits to allow several salt caverns to be used for disposal of oil field wastes. Twenty-two other oil- and gas-producing states contain few or no disposal companies dedicated to oil and gas industry waste. The only off-site commercial disposal companies available handle general industrial wastes or are sanitary landfills. In those states, operators needing to dispose of oil field wastes off-site must send them to a local landfill or out of state. The cost of off-site commercial disposal varies substantially, depending on the disposal method used, the state in which the disposal company is located, and the degree of competition in the area.

  14. Electrochemical apparatus comprising modified disposable rectangular cuvette

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M; Gupta, Gautam; Morris, David E

    2013-09-10

    Electrochemical apparatus includes a disposable rectangular cuvette modified with at least one hole through a side and/or the bottom. Apparatus may include more than one cuvette, which in practice is a disposable rectangular glass or plastic cuvette modified by drilling the hole(s) through. The apparatus include two plates and some means of fastening one plate to the other. The apparatus may be interfaced with a fiber optic or microscope objective, and a spectrometer for spectroscopic studies. The apparatus are suitable for a variety of electrochemical experiments, including surface electrochemistry, bulk electrolysis, and flow cell experiments.

  15. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  16. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Area 5 Waste Management Division, Nevada National Security Site, Final CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management; The Delphi Groupe, Inc.; J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2012-01-31

    The report is the Final Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report for the 92-Acrew Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, for the period of January 20, 2011, to January 31, 2012 The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location, waste types and regulatory requirements: (1) Pit 3 Mixed Waste Disposal Unit (MWDU); (2) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111; (3) CAU 207; (4) Low-level waste disposal units; (5) Asbestiform low-level waste disposal units; and (6) One transuranic (TRU) waste trench.

  17. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to...

  18. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 ...

  19. Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste Hanford Disposal Facility Expands Vertically to Make Room for More Waste February 11, 2016 - 12:25pm Addthis This photo illustration of the conceptual view shows the vertical expansion of the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility. The large area on the right includes the uppermost surface of the vertical expansion, which will be shaped to form a crown and will be covered with a 2 percent grade and

  20. Pioneering Nuclear Waste Disposal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PIONEERING NUCLEAR WASTE DISPOSAL U.S. Department of Energy Carlsbad Area Office February 2000 DOE/CAO-00-3124 T h e W a s t e I s o l a t i o n P i l o t P l a n t ii Table of Contents Closing the Circle on Transuranic Waste 1 The Long Road to the WIPP 3 The need for the WIPP The National Academy of Sciences Community leaders suggest Carlsbad as the site for the WIPP Construction of the WIPP The WIPP Land Withdrawal Act Certification by the EPA The National Environmental Policy Act The Resource

  1. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, Charles W.; Beahm, Edward C.; Parker, George W.

    1995-01-01

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide.

  2. Radioactive waste material disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forsberg, C.W.; Beahm, E.C.; Parker, G.W.

    1995-10-24

    The invention is a process for direct conversion of solid radioactive waste, particularly spent nuclear fuel and its cladding, if any, into a solidified waste glass. A sacrificial metal oxide, dissolved in a glass bath, is used to oxidize elemental metal and any carbon values present in the waste as they are fed to the bath. Two different modes of operation are possible, depending on the sacrificial metal oxide employed. In the first mode, a regenerable sacrificial oxide, e.g., PbO, is employed, while the second mode features use of disposable oxides such as ferric oxide. 3 figs.

  3. COMPILATION OF DISPOSABLE SOLID WASTE CASK EVALUATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.; CHASTAIN, S.A.

    2007-06-21

    The Disposable Solid Waste Cask (DSWC) is a shielded cask capable of transporting, storing, and disposing of six non-fuel core components or approximately 27 cubic feet of radioactive solid waste. Five existing DSWCs are candidates for use in storing and disposing of non-fuel core components and radioactive solid waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell, ultimately shipping them to the 200 West Area disposal site for burial. A series of inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications were performed to ensure that these casks can be used to safely ship solid waste. These inspections, studies, analyses, and modifications are summarized and attached in this report. Visual inspection of the casks interiors provided information with respect to condition of the casks inner liners. Because water was allowed to enter the casks for varying lengths of time, condition of the cask liner pipe to bottom plate weld was of concern. Based on the visual inspection and a corrosion study, it was concluded that four of the five casks can be used from a corrosion standpoint. Only DSWC S/N-004 would need additional inspection and analysis to determine its usefulness. The five remaining DSWCs underwent some modification to prepare them for use. The existing cask lifting inserts were found to be corroded and deemed unusable. New lifting anchor bolts were installed to replace the existing anchors. Alternate lift lugs were fabricated for use with the new lifting anchor bolts. The cask tiedown frame was modified to facilitate adjustment of the cask tiedowns. As a result of the above mentioned inspections, studies, analysis, and modifications, four of the five existing casks can be used to store and transport waste from the Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell to the disposal site for burial. The fifth cask, DSWC S/N-004, would require further inspections before it could be used.

  4. Shafts Temporarily Covered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2014 Shafts Temporarily Covered Today, workers continued physical preparations for the filter replacement. The Air Intake Shaft and Salt Handling Shaft openings were temporarily covered to further reduce the amount of air entering the underground. Covering these opening helps maintain ventilation balance while continuing to draw surface air down to the waste shaft, and prevents unfiltered air from exiting the underground. Workers not directly involved in the filter replacement efforts

  5. NERSC Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | png | 729 KB AGU-WRR2015Cover.png Numerical simulation of the environmental impact of hydraulic fracturing of tightshale gas reservoirs on near-surface groundwater:...

  6. ARM - Cover Competition Winners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Covers were selected based on their aesthetic appeal, ability to communicate science, and impact on ARM science. The winners of these competitions are presented below. 2009 2008 ...

  7. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Stories Journal Cover Stories Here are papers authored by NERSC users that were featured on the cover of the scientific journal in which they were published. You can sort according to any of the headings below. Sort by: Default | Name | Date (low-high) | Date (high-low) | Source | Category apl 108 14 cover Gallium vacancy complexes as a cause of Shockley-Read-Hall recombination in IIInitride light emitters April 4, 2016 | Author(s): C. E. Dreyer, A. Alkauskas, J. L. Lyons, J. S.

  8. Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental contracts awarded locally Environmental waste disposal contracts awarded locally Three small businesses with offices in Northern New Mexico awarded nuclear waste...

  9. Evapotranspiration Cover for the 92-Acre Area Retired Mixed Waste Pits:Interim CQA Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    The Delphi Groupe, Inc., and J. A. Cesare and Associates, Inc.

    2011-06-20

    This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. This Interim Construction Quality Assurance (CQA) Report is for the 92-Acre Evapotranspiration Cover, Area 5 Waste Management Division (WMD) Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada for the period of January 20, 2011 to May 12, 2011. Construction was approved by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) under the Approval of Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 111: Area 5 WMD Retired Mixed Waste Pits, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, on January 6, 2011, pursuant to Subpart XII.8a of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The project is located in Area 5 of the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site, located in southern Nevada, approximately 65 miles northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada, in Nye County. The project site, in Area 5, is located in a topographically closed basin approximately 14 additional miles north of Mercury Nevada, in the north-central part of Frenchman Flat. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste. The 92-Acre Area encompasses the southern portion of the Area 5 RWMS, which has been designated for the first final closure operations. This area contains 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) boreholes, 16 narrow trenches, and 9 broader pits. With the exception of two active pits (P03 and P06), all trenches and pits in the 92-Acre Area had operational covers approximately 2.4 meters thick, at a minimum, in most areas when this project began. The units within the 92-Acre Area are grouped into the following six informal categories based on physical location

  10. Disposal Authorization Statement

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    November 2005 Through February 2008 | Department of Energy Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008 Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through

  11. Nuke Watch New Mexico Perspective on MDA G Cap and Cover

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the February 12, 2014 Committee meeting Scott Kovac NWNM, Provided Information pertaining to the Proposed Cap and Cover of Material Disposal Area G and NWNMs perspective on it.

  12. Integrated Disposal Facility Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F. M.

    2003-06-03

    An environmental risk assessment associated with the disposal of projected Immobilized Low-Activity Waste, solid wastes and failed or decommissioned melters in an Integrated Disposal Facility was performed. Based on the analyses all performance objectives associated with the groundwater, air, and intruder pathways were met.

  13. Melter Disposal Strategic Planning Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BURBANK, D.A.

    2000-09-25

    This document describes the proposed strategy for disposal of spent and failed melters from the tank waste treatment plant to be built by the Office of River Protection at the Hanford site in Washington. It describes program management activities, disposal and transportation systems, leachate management, permitting, and safety authorization basis approvals needed to execute the strategy.

  14. Submergible barge retrievable storage and permanent disposal system for radioactive waste

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldsberry, Fred L.; Cawley, William E.

    1981-01-01

    A submergible barge and process for submerging and storing radioactive waste material along a seabed. A submergible barge receives individual packages of radwaste within segregated cells. The cells are formed integrally within the barge, preferably surrounded by reinforced concrete. The cells are individually sealed by a concrete decking and by concrete hatch covers. Seawater may be vented into the cells for cooling, through an integral vent arrangement. The vent ducts may be attached to pumps when the barge is bouyant. The ducts are also arranged to promote passive ventilation of the cells when the barge is submerged. Packages of the radwaste are loaded into individual cells within the barge. The cells are then sealed and the barge is towed to the designated disposal-storage site. There, the individual cells are flooded and the barge will begin descent controlled by a powered submarine control device to the seabed storage site. The submerged barge will rest on the seabed permanently or until recovered by a submarine control device.

  15. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NatureCoverLarge.png High-quality electron beams from a laser wakefield accelerator using plasma-channel guiding September 30, 2004 | Author(s): C. G. R. Geddes, Cs. Toth, J. van Tilborg, E. Esarey, C. B. Schroeder, D. Bruhwiler, C. Nieter, J. Cary & W. P. Leemans | Source: Nature | Category: Fusion Energy | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature02900 Download Image: NatureCoverLarge.png | png | 2.7 MB 30 September 2004, Vol. 431, pp. 541-544 PhysTodayCoverLarge.png Integrated Simulation of

  16. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CEN-Cover.png Graphene Moves Toward Applications November 21, 2011 | Author(s): Donghai Mei, et al. | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/nl203332e Download Image: CEN-Cover.png | png | 986 KB Hierarchically Porous Graphene as a Lithium-Air Battery Electrode. See also http://pubs.acs.org/NanoLett (2011) 11, 5071-5078 SotirisCoverJPCBLarge.jpg Computational Investigation of the First Solvation Shell Structure of Interfacial and Bulk Aqueous Chloride and Iodide Ions November 14,

  17. Unnumbered in cover letter

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    A John McCray, Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission Unnumbered in cover letter The DOE report demonstrates a high level of technical competence; the modeling work and ...

  18. Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation: Waste Disposal In Engineered Trench #3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamm, L. L.; Smith, F. G. III; Flach, G. P.; Hiergesell, R. A.; Butcher, B. T.

    2013-07-29

    Because Engineered Trench #3 (ET#3) will be placed in the location previously designated for Slit Trench #12 (ST#12), Solid Waste Management (SWM) requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) determine if the ST#12 limits could be employed as surrogate disposal limits for ET#3 operations. SRNL documented in this Unreviewed Disposal Question Evaluation (UDQE) that the use of ST#12 limits as surrogates for the new ET#3 disposal unit will provide reasonable assurance that Department of Energy (DOE) 435.1 performance objectives and measures (USDOE, 1999) will be protected. Therefore new ET#3 inventory limits as determined by a Special Analysis (SA) are not required.

  19. Paducah Waste Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remediation Paducah Waste Disposal Paducah Waste Disposal The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is looking at options to dispose of waste that will be generated from further ...

  20. Application of Generic Disposal System Models

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Two of the high priorities for UFDC disposal R&D are design concept development and disposal system modeling; these are directly addressed in the Generic Disposal Systems Analysis (GDSA) work. ...

  1. Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4 Performance Assessment and Composit Analysis Material Disposal Area G Revision 4 Los Alamos...

  2. Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    2: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options Recommendation 212: Evaluate additional storage and disposal options The ORSSAB encourages DOE to evaluate additional storage...

  3. Optimization of Waste Disposal - 13338

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shephard, E.; Walter, N.; Downey, H.; Collopy, P.; Conant, J.

    2013-07-01

    From 2009 through 2011, remediation of areas of a former fuel cycle facility used for government contract work was conducted. Remediation efforts were focused on building demolition, underground pipeline removal, contaminated soil removal and removal of contaminated sediments from portions of an on-site stream. Prior to conducting the remediation field effort, planning and preparation for remediation (including strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal) was conducted during the design phase. During the remediation field effort, waste characterization and disposal practices were continuously reviewed and refined to optimize waste disposal practices. This paper discusses strategic planning for waste characterization and disposal that was employed in the design phase, and continuously reviewed and refined to optimize efficiency. (authors)

  4. The Solar Way covers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    h o t o v o l t a i c s o n I n d i a n L a n d s ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Cover Photo Rock formation, Narbona Pass, Chuska Mountain Range, Navajo Nation, New Mexico. Since childhood, Paul Denetclaw of the Navajo Nation has wondered when the small rock cradled at the top of the red bluff might fall. Now his children watch. The cover photo was chosen to symbolize what endures: the sun, power from the sun, the earth, and things on it. (Photo courtesy Roger Hill, Sandia National Laboratories) SAND

  5. Reusable pipe flange covers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holden, James Elliott; Perez, Julieta

    2001-01-01

    A molded, flexible pipe flange cover for temporarily covering a pipe flange and a pipe opening includes a substantially round center portion having a peripheral skirt portion depending from the center portion, the center portion adapted to engage a front side of the pipe flange and to seal the pipe opening. The peripheral skirt portion is formed to include a plurality of circumferentially spaced tabs, wherein free ends of the flexible tabs are formed with respective through passages adapted to receive a drawstring for pulling the tabs together on a back side of the pipe flange.

  6. Disposal phase experimental program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-31

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) facility comprises surface and subsurface facilities, including a repository mined in a bedded salt formation at a depth of 2,150 feet. It has been developed to safely and permanently isolate transuranic (TRU) radioactive wastes in a deep geological disposal site. On April 12, 1996, the DOE submitted a revised Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Part B permit application to the New Mexico Environment Department (NMED). The DOE anticipates receiving an operating permit from the NMED; this permit is required prior to the start of disposal operations. On October 29, 1996, the DOE submitted a Compliance Certification Application (CCA) to the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in accordance with the WIPP land Withdrawal Act (LWA) of 1992 (Public Law 102-579) as amended, and the requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations (40 CFR) Parts 191 and 194. The DOE plans to begin disposal operations at the WIPP in November 1997 following receipt of certification by the EPA. The disposal phase is expected to last for 35 years, and will include recertification activities no less than once every five years. This Disposal Phase Experimental Program (DPEP) Plan outlines the experimental program to be conducted during the first 5-year recertification period. It also forms the basis for longer-term activities to be carried out throughout the 35-year disposal phase. Once the WIPP has been shown to be in compliance with regulatory requirements, the disposal phase gives an opportunity to affirm the compliance status of the WIPP, enhance the operations of the WIPP and the national TRU system, and contribute to the resolution of national and international nuclear waste management technical needs. The WIPP is the first facility of its kind in the world. As such, it provides a unique opportunity to advance the technical state of the art for permanent disposal of long-lived radioactive wastes.

  7. Characterization ReportOperational Closure Covers for the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada Geotechnical Sciences

    2005-06-01

    Bechtel Nevada (BN) manages two low-level Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The Area 3 RWMS is located in south-central Yucca Flat and the Area 5 RWMS is located about 15 miles south, in north-central Frenchman Flat. Though located in two separate topographically closed basins, they are similar in climate and hydrogeologic setting. The Area 5 RWMS uses engineered shallow-land burial cells to dispose of packaged waste, while the Area 3 RWMS uses subsidence craters formed from underground testing of nuclear weapons for the disposal of packaged and unpackaged bulk waste. Over the next several decades, most waste disposal units at both the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are anticipated to be closed. Closure of the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs will proceed through three phases: operational closure, final closure, and institutional control. Many waste disposal units at the Area 5RWMS are operationally closed and final closure has been placed on one unit at the Area 3 RWMS (U-3ax/bl). Because of the similarities between the two sites (e.g., type of wastes, environmental factors, operational closure cover designs, etc.), many characterization studies and data collected at the Area 3 RWMS are relevant and applicable to the Area 5 RWMS. For this reason, data and closure strategies from the Area 3 RWMS are referred to as applicable. This document is an interim Characterization Report – Operational Closure Covers, for the Area 5 RWMS. The report briefly describes the Area 5 RWMS and the physical environment where it is located, identifies the regulatory requirements, reviews the approach and schedule for closing, summarizes the monitoring programs, summarizes characterization studies and results, and then presents conclusions and recommendations.

  8. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specification: Revision 1 | Department of Energy Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 This document provides specifications for selected system components of the Transportation, Aging and Disposal (TAD) canister-based system. Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister System Performance Specification: Revision 1 (6.49 MB) More Documents &

  9. PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the Government PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (21.21 KB) More Documents & Publications ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 12: COMMUNICATIONS RECORDS

  10. cover_booked.indd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE/ME-0060 Editors Notes: This Real Property Asset Management Plan covers the Department of Energy including the National Nuclear Security Administration, the Energy Information Administration, and the Power Marketing Administrations. As an independent regulatory agency, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) prepares separate documents. This document is also available on the Department of Energy's web site: http://www.energy.gov. This plan was produced by the Office of Engineering and

  11. PAGE Cover: Top Photo

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PAGE Cover: Top Photo Energy Sciences Building. Elevation of the recently completed Energy Sciences Building (ESB) project at Argonne National Laboratory in Lemont, Illinois. The ESB was a capital line-item project funded by the Science Laboratories Infrastructure program at a total cost of $96 million and was completed on August 6, 2014. The ESB project provided 173,000 gross square feet of interdisciplinary research and collaborative space to accommodate a range of physical sciences research

  12. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Darmon Chem Science 2015 cover page Increasing the rate of hydrogen oxidation without increasing the overpotential: a bio-inspired iron molecular electrocatalyst with an outer coordination sphere proton relay March 5, 2015 | Author(s): Jonathan M. Darmon, Neeraj Kumar, Elliott B. Hulley, Charles J. Weiss, Simone Raugei, R. Morris Bullocka and Monte L. Helm* Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, Physical Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, P.O. Box 999, K2-57, Richland, USA

  13. Enhanced cover methods for surface coal refuse reclamation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile, L.F.; Cargill, K.W.; McGarvie, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    Controlling acid rock drainage (ARD) can be a major component of surface mining reclamation. An enhanced reclamation cover system is being constructed to control infiltration of rain water and generation of ARD from coal-refuse disposal areas at a closed mine in southern Illinois. Development of the mine reclamation plan required consideration of ARD generation in coal refuse disposal areas located adjacent to an alluvial aquifer used for public water supply. An integrated site characterization was performed at the mine to provide information to develop and support the enhanced reclamation plan. The enhanced cover system is similar to covers required for municipal solid waste landfills by the Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA), Subtitle D regulations. The system comprises a graded and compacted gob layer, overlain by a compacted clay liner, and a protective soil cover. The results of infiltration modeling and analyses showed that the standard reclamation cover is effective in reducing infiltration by about 18 percent compared to an unreclaimed coal-refuse surface. The modeling results showed that the inhanced cover system should reduce infiltration by about 84 percent. The geochemical modeling results showed that the reduction in infiltration would help minimize ARD generation and contribute to an earlier reclamation of the mine site.

  14. Tank Waste Disposal Program redefinition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grygiel, M.L.; Augustine, C.A.; Cahill, M.A.; Garfield, J.S.; Johnson, M.E.; Kupfer, M.J.; Meyer, G.A.; Roecker, J.H.; Holton, L.K.; Hunter, V.L.; Triplett, M.B.

    1991-10-01

    The record of decision (ROD) (DOE 1988) on the Final Environmental Impact Statement, Hanford Defense High-Level, Transuranic and Tank Wastes, Hanford Site, Richland Washington identifies the method for disposal of double-shell tank waste and cesium and strontium capsules at the Hanford Site. The ROD also identifies the need for additional evaluations before a final decision is made on the disposal of single-shell tank waste. This document presents the results of systematic evaluation of the present technical circumstances, alternatives, and regulatory requirements in light of the values of the leaders and constitutents of the program. It recommends a three-phased approach for disposing of tank wastes. This approach allows mature technologies to be applied to the treatment of well-understood waste forms in the near term, while providing time for the development and deployment of successively more advanced pretreatment technologies. The advanced technologies will accelerate disposal by reducing the volume of waste to be vitrified. This document also recommends integration of the double-and single-shell tank waste disposal programs, provides a target schedule for implementation of the selected approach, and describes the essential elements of a program to be baselined in 1992.

  15. The Current Status of Radioactive Waste Management and Planning for Near Surface Disposal in Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purnomo, A. S.

    2003-02-24

    Near surface disposal has been practiced for some decades, with a wide variation in sites, types and amounts of wastes, and facility designs employed. Experience has shown that the effective and safe isolation of waste depends on the performance of the overall disposal system, which is formed by three major components or barriers: the site, the disposal facility and the waste form. Near surface disposal also rely on active institutional controls, such as monitoring and maintenance. The objective of radioactive waste disposal is to isolate waste so that it does not result in undue radiation exposure to humans and the environment. The required degree of isolation can be obtained by implementing various disposal methods, of which near surface disposal represents an option commonly used and demonstrated in several countries. In near surface disposal, the disposal facility is located on or below the ground surface, where the protective covering is generally a few meters thick. The se facilities are intended to contain low and intermediate level waste without appreciable quantities of long-lived radionuclides.

  16. SPECIAL ANALYSIS OF OPERATIONAL STORMWATER RUNOFF COVERS OVER SLIT TRENCHES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collard, L; Luther Hamm, L

    2008-12-18

    Solid Waste Management (SWM) commissioned this Special Analysis (SA) to determine the effects of placing operational stormwater runoff covers (referred to as covers in the remainder of this document) over slit trench (ST) disposal units ST1 through ST7 (the center set of slit trenches). Previously the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entered into an agreement with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) to place covers over Slit Trenches 1 and 2 to be able to continue disposing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) solid waste (see USDOE 2008). Because the covers changed the operating conditions, DOE Order 435.1 (DOE 1999) required that an SA be performed to assess the impact. This Special Analysis has been prepared to determine the effects of placing covers over slit trenches at about years 5, 10 and 15 of the 30-year operational period. Because some slit trenches have already been operational for about 15 years, results from analyzing covers at 5 years and 10 years provide trend analysis information only. This SA also examined alternatives of covering Slit Trenches 1 and 2 with one cover and Slit Trenches 3 and 4 with a second cover versus covering them all with a single cover. Based on modeling results, minimal differences exist between covering Slit Trench groups 1-2 and 3-4 with two covers or one large cover. This SA demonstrates that placement of covers over slit trenches will slow the subsequent release and transport of radionuclides in the vadose zone in the early time periods (from time of placement until about 100 years). Release and transport of some radionuclides in the vadose zone beyond 100 years were somewhat higher than for the case without covers. The sums-of-fractions (SOFs) were examined for the current waste inventory in ST1 and ST2 and for estimated inventories at closure for ST3 through ST7. In all

  17. Depleted uranium disposal options evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hertzler, T.J.; Nishimoto, D.D.; Otis, M.D.

    1994-05-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management, has chartered a study to evaluate alternative management strategies for depleted uranium (DU) currently stored throughout the DOE complex. Historically, DU has been maintained as a strategic resource because of uses for DU metal and potential uses for further enrichment or for uranium oxide as breeder reactor blanket fuel. This study has focused on evaluating the disposal options for DU if it were considered a waste. This report is in no way declaring these DU reserves a ``waste,`` but is intended to provide baseline data for comparison with other management options for use of DU. To PICS considered in this report include: Retrievable disposal; permanent disposal; health hazards; radiation toxicity and chemical toxicity.

  18. CoverSheet

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    rockets for space exploration (Project ROVER) Alternative energy projects (hydrogen fuel cells, geothermal and solar energy, etc.) The development of nuclear verification...

  19. Closure Strategy for a Waste Disposal Facility with Multiple Waste Types and Regulatory Drivers at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Wieland, V. Yucel, L. Desotell, G. Shott, J. Wrapp

    2008-04-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) plans to close the waste and classified material storage cells in the southeast quadrant of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS), informally known as the '92-Acre Area', by 2011. The 25 shallow trenches and pits and the 13 Greater Confinement Disposal (GCD) borings contain various waste streams including low-level waste (LLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), transuranic (TRU), mixed transuranic (MTRU), and high specific activity LLW. The cells are managed under several regulatory and permit programs by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP). Although the specific closure requirements for each cell vary, 37 closely spaced cells will be closed under a single integrated monolayer evapotranspirative (ET) final cover. One cell will be closed under a separate cover concurrently. The site setting and climate constrain transport pathways and are factors in the technical approach to closure and performance assessment. Successful implementation of the integrated closure plan requires excellent communication and coordination between NNSA/NSO and the regulators.

  20. Disposable telemetry cable deployment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Holcomb, David Joseph

    2000-01-01

    A disposable telemetry cable deployment system for facilitating information retrieval while drilling a well includes a cable spool adapted for insertion into a drill string and an unarmored fiber optic cable spooled onto the spool cable and having a downhole end and a stinger end. Connected to the cable spool is a rigid stinger which extends through a kelly of the drilling apparatus. A data transmission device for transmitting data to a data acquisition system is disposed either within or on the upper end of the rigid stinger.

  1. Journal Cover Stories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Liu2010.jpg Methanol Synthesis from H2 and CO2 on a Mo6S8 Cluster: A Density Functional Study October 30, 2009 | Author(s): Ping Liu, YongMan Choi, Y. Yang and M. G. White | Source: J. Phys. Chem. A | Category: Chemistry | URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/jp906780a Download Image: Liu2010.jpg | jpg | 2.1 MB J. Phys. Chem. A, 2010, 114 (11), pp 3888-3895 ChingCoverPaper.png A Genomic Approach to the Stability, Elastic, and Electronic Properties of the MAX Phases June 24, 2014 | Author(s): S. Aryal,

  2. Solar module having reflector between cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kardauskas, Michael J.

    1999-01-01

    A photovoltaic module comprising an array of electrically interconnected photovoltaic cells disposed in a planar and mutually spaced relationship between a light-transparent front cover member in sheet form and a back sheet structure is provided with a novel light-reflecting means disposed between adjacent cells for reflecting light falling in the areas between cells back toward said transparent cover member for further internal reflection onto the solar cells. The light-reflecting comprises a flexible plastic film that has been embossed so as to have a plurality of small V-shaped grooves in its front surface, and a thin light-reflecting coating on said front surface, the portions of said coating along the sides of said grooves forming light-reflecting facets, said grooves being formed so that said facets will reflect light impinging thereon back into said transparent cover sheet with an angle of incidence greater than the critical angle, whereby substantially all of the reflected light will be internally reflected from said cover sheet back to said solar modules, thereby increasing the current output of the module.

  3. Optimizing High Level Waste Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dirk Gombert

    2005-09-01

    If society is ever to reap the potential benefits of nuclear energy, technologists must close the fuel-cycle completely. A closed cycle equates to a continued supply of fuel and safe reactors, but also reliable and comprehensive closure of waste issues. High level waste (HLW) disposal in borosilicate glass (BSG) is based on 1970s era evaluations. This host matrix is very adaptable to sequestering a wide variety of radionuclides found in raffinates from spent fuel reprocessing. However, it is now known that the current system is far from optimal for disposal of the diverse HLW streams, and proven alternatives are available to reduce costs by billions of dollars. The basis for HLW disposal should be reassessed to consider extensive waste form and process technology research and development efforts, which have been conducted by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), international agencies and the private sector. Matching the waste form to the waste chemistry and using currently available technology could increase the waste content in waste forms to 50% or more and double processing rates. Optimization of the HLW disposal system would accelerate HLW disposition and increase repository capacity. This does not necessarily require developing new waste forms, the emphasis should be on qualifying existing matrices to demonstrate protection equal to or better than the baseline glass performance. Also, this proposed effort does not necessarily require developing new technology concepts. The emphasis is on demonstrating existing technology that is clearly better (reliability, productivity, cost) than current technology, and justifying its use in future facilities or retrofitted facilities. Higher waste processing and disposal efficiency can be realized by performing the engineering analyses and trade-studies necessary to select the most efficient methods for processing the full spectrum of wastes across the nuclear complex. This paper will describe technologies being

  4. Disposal of NORM waste in salt caverns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J.A.; Smith, K.P.; Tomasko, D.; Elcock, D.; Blunt, D.; Williams, G.P.

    1998-07-01

    Some types of oil and gas production and processing wastes contain naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM). If NORM is present at concentrations above regulatory levels in oil field waste, the waste requires special disposal practices. The existing disposal options for wastes containing NORM are limited and costly. This paper evaluates the legality, technical feasibility, economics, and human health risk of disposing of NORM-contaminated oil field wastes in salt caverns. Cavern disposal of NORM waste is technically feasible and poses a very low human health risk. From a legal perspective, there are no fatal flaws that would prevent a state regulatory agency from approving cavern disposal of NORM. On the basis of the costs charged by caverns currently used for disposal of nonhazardous oil field waste (NOW), NORM waste disposal caverns could be cost competitive with existing NORM waste disposal methods when regulatory agencies approve the practice.

  5. Transmittal Memo for Disposal Authorization Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group (LFRG) has conducted a review of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF) 2009 performance assessment (PA) in...

  6. Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal Tritium Programs Engineering Louis Boone Josh Segura ... detailed explanation of the plan to capture and dispose of Z-Bed Recovery (ZR) water. ...

  7. Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Disposal Practices at the Nevada Test Site 2008 Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Disposal Practices at ...

  8. Electrochemical Apparatus with Disposable and Modifiable Parts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    research Benefits: Incorporates disposable, commercially available cuvettes Modifiable design Allows multiple experiments using a single solution Designed for interface with...

  9. Disposal Systems Evaluations and Tool Development - Engineered...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    conditions, thermodynamic database development for cement and clay phases, ... and potential variants according to waste form and disposal environment characteristics. ...

  10. A sensitivity analysis of hazardous waste disposal site climatic and soil design parameters using HELP3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adelman, D.D.; Stansbury, J.

    1997-12-31

    The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Subtitle C, Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, And Liability Act (CERCLA), and subsequent amendments have formed a comprehensive framework to deal with hazardous wastes on the national level. Key to this waste management is guidance on design (e.g., cover and bottom leachate control systems) of hazardous waste landfills. The objective of this research was to investigate the sensitivity of leachate volume at hazardous waste disposal sites to climatic, soil cover, and vegetative cover (Leaf Area Index) conditions. The computer model HELP3 which has the capability to simulate double bottom liner systems as called for in hazardous waste disposal sites was used in the analysis. HELP3 was used to model 54 combinations of climatic conditions, disposal site soil surface curve numbers, and leaf area index values to investigate how sensitive disposal site leachate volume was to these three variables. Results showed that leachate volume from the bottom double liner system was not sensitive to these parameters. However, the cover liner system leachate volume was quite sensitive to climatic conditions and less sensitive to Leaf Area Index and curve number values. Since humid locations had considerably more cover liner system leachate volume than and locations, different design standards may be appropriate for humid conditions than for and conditions.

  11. Disposable remote zero headspace extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hand, Julie J.; Roberts, Mark P.

    2006-03-21

    The remote zero headspace extractor uses a sampling container inside a stainless steel vessel to perform toxicity characteristics leaching procedure to analyze volatile organic compounds. The system uses an in line filter for ease of replacement. This eliminates cleaning and disassembly of the extractor. All connections are made with quick connect fittings which can be easily replaced. After use, the bag can be removed and disposed of, and a new sampling container is inserted for the next extraction.

  12. Idaho Crews Overcome Challenges to Safely Dispose 1-Million-Pound...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Extensive work preceded disposal of the largest cell. A massive gantry crane was erected to hoist the one-piece structure on the trailer. Premier Technology, a small business ...

  13. DISPOSAL CONTAINER HANDLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. F. Loros

    2000-06-30

    The Disposal Container Handling System receives and prepares new disposal containers (DCs) and transfers them to the Assembly Transfer System (ATS) or Canister Transfer System (CTS) for loading. The system receives the loaded DCs from ATS or CTS and welds the lids. When the welds are accepted the DCs are termed waste packages (WPs). The system may stage the WP for later transfer or transfer the WP directly to the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. The system can also transfer DCs/WPs to/from the Waste Package Remediation System. The Disposal Container Handling System begins with new DC preparation, which includes installing collars, tilting the DC upright, and outfitting the container for the specific fuel it is to receive. DCs and their lids are staged in the receipt area for transfer to the needed location. When called for, a DC is put on a cart and sent through an airlock into a hot cell. From this point on, all processes are done remotely. The DC transfer operation moves the DC to the ATS or CTS for loading and then receives the DC for welding. The DC welding operation receives loaded DCs directly from the waste handling lines or from interim lag storage for welding of the lids. The welding operation includes mounting the DC on a turntable, removing lid seals, and installing and welding the inner and outer lids. After the weld process and non-destructive examination are successfully completed, the WP is either staged or transferred to a tilting station. At the tilting station, the WP is tilted horizontally onto a cart and the collars removed. The cart is taken through an air lock where the WP is lifted, surveyed, decontaminated if required, and then moved into the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System. DCs that do not meet the welding non-destructive examination criteria are transferred to the Waste Package Remediation System for weld preparation or removal of the lids. The Disposal Container Handling System is contained within the Waste Handling Building System

  14. The Future Through the Past: The Use of Analog Sites for Design Criteria and Long Term Performance Assessment of Evapotranspiration Landfill Covers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafer, D. S.; Miller, J. J.; Young, M. H.; Edwards, S. C.; Rawlinson, S. E.

    2002-02-26

    There is growing support for using evapotranspiration (ET) covers for closure of low-level waste (LLW) and other types of waste disposal sites, particularly in the lower latitude arid regions of the western United States. At the Nevada Test Site (NTS), monolayer ET covers are the baseline technology for closure of LLW and mixed LLW cells. To better predict the long-term performance of monolayer ET covers, as well as to identify design criteria that will potentially improve their performance, the properties of, and processes occurring on, analog sites for ET covers on the NTS are being studied. The project is funded through the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area of the U.S. Department of Energy. Four analog sites on the NTS have been selected to predict performance of ET covers over a 1,000-year compliance period. Two sites are relatively recently disturbed (within the last 50 years) and have been selected to evaluate processes and changes on ET covers for the early period after active cover maintenance is discontinued. Two other sites, late to mid-Holocene in age, are intended as analogs for the end of the compliance period (1,000 years or more); both surfaces are abandoned alluvial/colluvial deposits. The history of the early post-institutional control analog sites are being evaluated by an archaeologist to help determine when the sites were last disturbed or modified, and the mode of disturbance to help set baseline conditions. Similar to other ''landforms,'' ET covers will evolve over time because of pedogenic, biotic, and climatic processes. Properties of analog sites that could affect ET water balance performance will be evaluated to help understand ET cover performance over time.

  15. Recommended Procedures for Measuring Radon Fluxes from Disposal Sites of Residual Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young,, J. A.; Thomas, V. W.; Jackson, P. 0.

    1983-03-01

    This report recornmenrls instrumentation and methods suitable for measuring radon fluxes emanating from covered disposal sites of residual radioactive materials such as uranium mill tailings. Problems of spatial and temporal variations in radon flux are discussed and the advantages and disadvantages of several instruments are examined. A year-long measurement program and a two rnonth measurement rnethodology are then presented based on the inherent difficulties of measuring average radon flux over a cover using the recommended instrumentation.

  16. Overview of Nevada Test Site Radioactive and Mixed Waste Disposal Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.T. Carilli; S.K. Krenzien; R.G. Geisinger; S.J. Gordon; B. Quinn

    2009-03-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office Environmental Management Program is responsible for carrying out the disposal of on-site and off-site generated low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and low-level radioactive mixed waste (MW) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Core elements of this mission are ensuring safe and cost-effective disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. This paper focuses on the impacts of new policies, processes, and opportunities at the NTS related to LLW and MW. Covered topics include: the first year of direct funding for NTS waste disposal operations; zero tolerance policy for non-compliant packages; the suspension of mixed waste disposal; waste acceptance changes; DOE Consolidated Audit Program (DOECAP) auditing; the 92-Acre Area closure plan; new eligibility requirements for generators; and operational successes with unusual waste streams.

  17. Taiwan industrial cooperation program technology transfer for low-level radioactive waste final disposal - phase I.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knowlton, Robert G.; Cochran, John Russell; Arnold, Bill Walter; Jow, Hong-Nian; Mattie, Patrick D.; Schelling, Frank Joseph Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Institute of Nuclear Energy Research, Taiwan have collaborated in a technology transfer program related to low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal in Taiwan. Phase I of this program included regulatory analysis of LLW final disposal, development of LLW disposal performance assessment capabilities, and preliminary performance assessments of two potential disposal sites. Performance objectives were based on regulations in Taiwan and comparisons to those in the United States. Probabilistic performance assessment models were constructed based on limited site data using software including GoldSim, BLT-MS, FEHM, and HELP. These software codes provided the probabilistic framework, container degradation, waste-form leaching, groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and cover infiltration simulation capabilities in the performance assessment. Preliminary performance assessment analyses were conducted for a near-surface disposal system and a mined cavern disposal system at two representative sites in Taiwan. Results of example calculations indicate peak simulated concentrations to a receptor within a few hundred years of LLW disposal, primarily from highly soluble, non-sorbing radionuclides.

  18. 1999 Report on Hanford Site land disposal restriction for mixed waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLACK, D.G.

    1999-03-25

    This report was submitted to meet the requirements of Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-26-011. This milestone requires the preparation of an annual report that covers characterization, treatment, storage, minimization, and other aspects of managing land-disposal-restricted mixed waste at the Hanford Facility.

  19. WIPP - Shipment & Disposal Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shipment & Disposal Information Shipments Received As of February 11, 2014 Site Shipments Loaded Miles Argonne National Laboratory 193 331,333 Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory 5 10,955 GE Vallecitos Nuclear Center 32 44,800 Idaho National Laboratory 5,844 8,132,064 Los Alamos National Laboratory 1,344 459,648 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 18 24,804 Nevada Test Site 48 57,312 Oak Ridge National Laboratory 131 175,933 Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site 2,045 1,446,444 Hanford

  20. DOE SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL DISPOSAL CONTAINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Habashi

    1998-06-26

    The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (SNF DC) supports the confinement and isolation of waste within the Engineered Barrier System of the Mined Geologic Disposal System (MGDS). Disposal containers are loaded and sealed in the surface waste handling facilities, transferred to the underground through the access mains, and emplaced in emplacement drifts. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container provides long term confinement of DOE SNF waste, and withstands the loading, transfer, emplacement, and retrieval loads and environments. The DOE SNF Disposal Containers provide containment of waste for a designated period of time, and limit radionuclide release thereafter. The disposal containers maintain the waste in a designated configuration, withstand maximum handling and rockfall loads, limit the individual waste canister temperatures after emplacement. The disposal containers also limit the introduction of moderator into the disposal container during the criticality control period, resist corrosion in the expected repository environment, and provide complete or limited containment of waste in the event of an accident. Multiple disposal container designs may be needed to accommodate the expected range of DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel. The disposal container will include outer and inner barrier walls and outer and inner barrier lids. Exterior labels will identify the disposal container and contents. Differing metal barriers will support the design philosophy of defense in depth. The use of materials with different failure mechanisms prevents a single mode failure from breaching the waste package. The corrosion-resistant inner barrier and inner barrier lid will be constructed of a high-nickel alloy and the corrosion-allowance outer barrier and outer barrier lid will be made of carbon steel. The DOE Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Containers interface with the emplacement drift environment by transferring heat from the waste to the external environment and by protecting

  1. Covered Product Category: Commercial Griddles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial griddles, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program

  2. Covered Product Category: Commercial Fryers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for commercial fryers, which is a product category covered by the ENERGY STAR program.

  3. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Michael D.; Klapperick, Robert L.; Bell, Chris

    1993-01-01

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The ice punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container.

  4. Aerosol can waste disposal device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, M.D.; Klapperick, R.L.; Bell, C.

    1993-12-21

    Disclosed is a device for removing gases and liquid from containers. The device punctures the bottom of a container for purposes of exhausting gases and liquid from the container without their escaping into the atmosphere. The device includes an inner cup or cylinder having a top portion with an open end for receiving a container and a bottom portion which may be fastened to a disposal or waste container in a substantially leak-proof manner. A piercing device is mounted in the lower portion of the inner cylinder for puncturing the can bottom placed in the inner cylinder. An outer cylinder having an open end and a closed end fits over the top portion of the inner cylinder in telescoping engagement. A force exerted on the closed end of the outer cylinder urges the bottom of a can in the inner cylinder into engagement with the piercing device in the bottom of the inner cylinder to form an opening in the can bottom, thereby permitting the contents of the can to enter the disposal container. 7 figures.

  5. Coupled Environmental Processes and Long-term Performance of Landfill Covers in the northern Mojave Desert

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shafer; Michael Young; Stephen Zitzer; Eric McDonald; Todd Caldwell

    2004-05-12

    Evapotransiration (ET) covers have gained widespread acceptance as a closure feature for waste disposal sites, particularly in the arid and semi-arid regions of the southwestern U.S. But as landforms, ET covers are subject to change over time because of processes such as pedogenesis, hydrologic processes, vegetation establishment and change, and biological processes. To better understand the effects of coupled process changes to ET covers, a series of four primary analog sites in Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site, along with measurements and observations from other locations in the Mojave Desert, were selected to evaluate changes in ET covers over time. The analog sites, of varying ages, were selected to address changes in the early post-institutional control period, the 1,000-year compliance period for disposal of low-level and mixed low-level waste, and the 10,000-year compliance period for transuranic waste sites.

  6. Disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, A.; Motyka, T.

    1991-01-01

    A plan has been established for disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides used in Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium production or Materials Test Facility (MTF) R D operations. The recommended plan assumes that the first tritium-exposed metal hydrides will be disposed of after startup of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) Expansion Project in 1992, and thus the plan is consistent with the new disposal requiremkents that will be in effect for the SWDF Expansion Project. Process beds containing tritium-exposed metal hydride powder will be disposed of without removal of the powder from the bed; however, disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydride powder that has been removed from its process vessel is also addressed.

  7. Disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nobile, A.; Motyka, T.

    1991-12-31

    A plan has been established for disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydrides used in Savannah River Site (SRS) tritium production or Materials Test Facility (MTF) R&D operations. The recommended plan assumes that the first tritium-exposed metal hydrides will be disposed of after startup of the Solid Waste Disposal Facility (SWDF) Expansion Project in 1992, and thus the plan is consistent with the new disposal requiremkents that will be in effect for the SWDF Expansion Project. Process beds containing tritium-exposed metal hydride powder will be disposed of without removal of the powder from the bed; however, disposal of tritium-exposed metal hydride powder that has been removed from its process vessel is also addressed.

  8. Power plant waste disposals in open-cast mines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herstus, J.; Stastny, J.

    1995-12-01

    High population density in Czech Republic has led, as well as in other countries, to strong NIMBY syndrome influencing the waste disposal location. The largest thermal power plants are situated in neighborhood of extensive open-cast brown coal mines with huge area covered by tipped clayey spoil. Such spoil areas, technically almost useless, are potential space for power giant waste disposal position. There are several limitations, based on specific structural features of tipped clayey spoil, influencing decision to use such area as site for waste disposal. Low shear strength and extremely high compressibility belong to the geotechnical limitations. High permeability of upper ten or more meters of tipped spoil and its changes with applied stress level belongs to transitional features between geotechnical and environmental limitations. The problems of ash and FGD products stabilized interaction with such subgrade represent environmental limitation. The paper reports about the testing procedure developed for thickness and permeability estimation of upper soil layer and gives brief review of laboratory and site investigation results on potential sites from point of view of above mentioned limitations. Also gives an outline how to eliminate the influence of unfavorable conditions.

  9. WPCF Underground Injection Control Disposal Permit Evaluation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WPCF Underground Injection Control Disposal Permit Evaluation and Fact Sheet Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: WPCF Underground Injection...

  10. Lowman, Idaho, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Site Description and History The Lowman disposal site is the location of a former mechanical concentrator for sands containing rare-earth elements, uranium, and thorium. The site ...

  11. DOE Applauds Opening of Historic Disposal Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ANDREWS, Texas – DOE officials participated in an event today to celebrate the opening of the first commercial disposal facility of its kind.

  12. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the ...

  13. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 139: Waste Disposal Sites, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2009-07-31

    Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 139 is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) as 'Waste Disposal Sites' and consists of the following seven Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the Nevada Test Site: CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit; CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site; CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris; CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit; CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches; CAS 09-23-01, Area 9 Gravel Gertie; and CAS 09-34-01, Underground Detection Station. Closure activities were conducted from December 2008 to April 2009 according to the FFACO (1996, as amended February 2008) and the Corrective Action Plan for CAU 139 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, 2007b). The corrective action alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. Closure activities are summarized. CAU 139, 'Waste Disposal Sites,' consists of seven CASs in Areas 3, 4, 6, and 9 of the NTS. The closure alternatives included No Further Action, Clean Closure, and Closure in Place with Administrative Controls. This CR provides a summary of completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and confirmation that remediation goals were met. The following site closure activities were performed at CAU 139 as documented in this CR: (1) At CAS 03-35-01, Burn Pit, soil and debris were removed and disposed as LLW, and debris was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (2) At CAS 04-08-02, Waste Disposal Site, an administrative UR was implemented. No postings or post-closure monitoring are required. (3) At CAS 04-99-01, Contaminated Surface Debris, soil and debris were removed and disposed as LLW, and debris was removed and disposed as sanitary waste. (4) At CAS 06-19-02, Waste Disposal Site/Burn Pit, no work was performed. (5) At CAS 06-19-03, Waste Disposal Trenches, a native soil cover was installed, and a UR was

  14. Hanford Landfill Reaches 15 Million Tons Disposed- Waste Disposal Mark Shows Success Cleaning Up River Corridor

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors have disposed of 15 million tons of contaminated material at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) since the facility began operations in 1996.

  15. Long-term surveillance plan for the Green River, Utah, disposal site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Green River, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Green River disposal cell. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM). This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. The Green River, Utah, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  16. Long-term surveillance plan for the Green River, Utah disposal site. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    The long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Green River, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site describes the surveillance activities for the Green River disposal cell. The US Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure that the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM). This LTSP documents whether the land and interests are owned by the United States or an Indian tribe and details how the long-term care of the disposal site will be carried out. The Green River, Utah, LTSP is based on the DOE`s Guidance for Implementing the UMTRA Project Long-term Surveillance Program (DOE, 1992a).

  17. Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Generic Deep Geologic Disposal Safety Case presents generic information that is of use in understanding potential deep geologic disposal options (e.g., salt, shale, granite, deep borehole) in the U.S. for used nuclear fuel (UNF) from reactors and high-level radioactive waste (HLW).

  18. Crystalline and Crystalline International Disposal Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Hari S.; Chu, Shaoping; Reimus, Paul William; Makedonska, Nataliia; Hyman, Jeffrey De'Haven; Karra, Satish; Dittrich, Timothy M.

    2015-12-21

    This report presents the results of work conducted between September 2014 and July 2015 at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the crystalline disposal and crystalline international disposal work packages of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) for DOE-NE’s Fuel Cycle Research and Development program.

  19. Cover

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    available and to reimburse uranium and thorium licensees for the costs of ... (EM-43) is responsible for managing the Title X UraniumThorium Reimbursement Program. ...

  20. cover

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    counterproliferation Tilden appointed as Associate Administrator of Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation We are delighted to announce two key personnel changes. Mr. Jay Tilden has officially been appointed as the Associate Administrator for Counterterrorism and Counterproliferation. Jay has been the Acting Associate Administrator since Steve Aoki's departure at the end of last year. ... NNSA announces retirement of Dr. Steve Aoki, after 33 years of service NNSA Administrator Frank Klotz,

  1. COVER

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fact S heet: Collaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) The C ollaboration o f O ak R idge, A rgonne, a nd L ivermore ( CORAL) i s a j oint p rocurement activity a mong t hree o f t he D epartment o f E nergy's N ational L aboratories launched i n 2 014 to b uild s tate---of---the---art h igh---performance c omputing t echnologies t hat a re e ssential f or supporting U.S. national nuclear security a nd a re k ey t ools u sed f or t echnology advancement a nd s cientific

  2. Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Financial Statement Audit OAS-FS-15-02 November 2014 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 November 19, 2014 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION FROM: Daniel M. Weeber Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Western Federal Power System's Fiscal Year 2013 Financial Statement

  3. Cover

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Year 2015 Financial Statement Audit OAI-FS-16-07 April 2016 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 6, 2016 MEMORANDUM FOR THE ADMINISTRATOR, WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION FROM: Sarah B. Nelson Assistant Inspector General for Audits and Administration SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Western Federal Power System's Fiscal Year 2015 Financial Statement Audit" The attached report

  4. Evaluation of soil manipulation to prepare engineered earthen waste covers for revegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waugh, W. Joseph; Benson, Craig H.; Albright, William H.; Smith, Gregory M.; Bush, Richard P.

    2015-10-21

    Seven ripping treatments designed to improve soil physical conditions for revegetation were compared on a test pad simulating an earthen cover for a waste disposal cell. The field test was part of study of methods to convert compacted-soil waste covers into evapotranspiration covers. The test pad consisted of a compacted layer of fine-textured soil simulating a barrier protection layer overlain by a gravelly sand bedding layer and a cobble armor layer. Treatments included combinations of soil-ripping implements (conventional shank [CS], wing-tipped shank [WTS], and parabolic oscillating shank with wings [POS]), ripping depths, and number of passes. Dimensions, dry density, moisture content, and particle size distribution of disturbance zones were determined in two trenches excavated across rip rows. The goal was to create a root-zone dry density between 1.2 and 1.6 Mg m-3 and a seedbed soil texture ranging from clay loam to sandy loam with low rock content. All treatments created V-shaped disturbance zones as measured on trench faces. Disturbance zone size was most influenced by ripping depth. Winged implements created larger disturbance zones. All treatments lifted fines into the bedding layer, moved gravel and cobble down into the fine-textured protection layer, and thereby disrupted the capillary barrier at the interface. Changes in dry density within disturbance zones were comparable for the CS and WTS treatments but were highly variable among POS treatments. Water content increased in the bedding layer and decreased in the protection layer after ripping. The POS at 1.2-m depth and two passes created the largest zone with a low dry density (1.24 Mg m-3) and the most favorable seedbed soil texture (gravely silt loam). Furthermore, ripping also created large soil aggregates and voids in the protection layer that may produce preferential flow paths and reduce water storage capacity.

  5. Evaluation of soil manipulation to prepare engineered earthen waste covers for revegetation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Waugh, W. Joseph; Benson, Craig H.; Albright, William H.; Smith, Gregory M.; Bush, Richard P.

    2015-10-21

    Seven ripping treatments designed to improve soil physical conditions for revegetation were compared on a test pad simulating an earthen cover for a waste disposal cell. The field test was part of study of methods to convert compacted-soil waste covers into evapotranspiration covers. The test pad consisted of a compacted layer of fine-textured soil simulating a barrier protection layer overlain by a gravelly sand bedding layer and a cobble armor layer. Treatments included combinations of soil-ripping implements (conventional shank [CS], wing-tipped shank [WTS], and parabolic oscillating shank with wings [POS]), ripping depths, and number of passes. Dimensions, dry density, moisturemore » content, and particle size distribution of disturbance zones were determined in two trenches excavated across rip rows. The goal was to create a root-zone dry density between 1.2 and 1.6 Mg m-3 and a seedbed soil texture ranging from clay loam to sandy loam with low rock content. All treatments created V-shaped disturbance zones as measured on trench faces. Disturbance zone size was most influenced by ripping depth. Winged implements created larger disturbance zones. All treatments lifted fines into the bedding layer, moved gravel and cobble down into the fine-textured protection layer, and thereby disrupted the capillary barrier at the interface. Changes in dry density within disturbance zones were comparable for the CS and WTS treatments but were highly variable among POS treatments. Water content increased in the bedding layer and decreased in the protection layer after ripping. The POS at 1.2-m depth and two passes created the largest zone with a low dry density (1.24 Mg m-3) and the most favorable seedbed soil texture (gravely silt loam). Furthermore, ripping also created large soil aggregates and voids in the protection layer that may produce preferential flow paths and reduce water storage capacity.« less

  6. VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

    2012-01-17

    Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

  7. Cover Stories | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In Situ Characterization of Li-ion Battery Electrochemistry via Scanning Ion Conductance Microscopy," Adv. Mater., 23, 5613-5617 (2011). Click to view cover V. G. Pol and...

  8. Journal Cover Gallery | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Journal Cover Gallery Image Image ACS Victor SunJALA2011_cover Image Image Image Image Image Image

  9. Large Component Removal/Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D. M.

    2002-02-27

    This paper describes the removal and disposal of the large components from Maine Yankee Atomic Power Plant. The large components discussed include the three steam generators, pressurizer, and reactor pressure vessel. Two separate Exemption Requests, which included radiological characterizations, shielding evaluations, structural evaluations and transportation plans, were prepared and issued to the DOT for approval to ship these components; the first was for the three steam generators and one pressurizer, the second was for the reactor pressure vessel. Both Exemption Requests were submitted to the DOT in November 1999. The DOT approved the Exemption Requests in May and July of 2000, respectively. The steam generators and pressurizer have been removed from Maine Yankee and shipped to the processing facility. They were removed from Maine Yankee's Containment Building, loaded onto specially designed skid assemblies, transported onto two separate barges, tied down to the barges, th en shipped 2750 miles to Memphis, Tennessee for processing. The Reactor Pressure Vessel Removal Project is currently under way and scheduled to be completed by Fall of 2002. The planning, preparation and removal of these large components has required extensive efforts in planning and implementation on the part of all parties involved.

  10. New Funding Boosts Carbon Capture, Solar Energy, and High Gas Mileage Cars

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Services » New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation New Facility Will Test Disposal Cell Cover Renovation (178.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test Sustainable Disposal Cell Covers: Legacy Management Practices, Improvements, and Long-Term Performance Long-Term Surveillance Operations and Maintenance

  11. FACT SHEET: The Path Forward on Nuclear Waste Disposal | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FACT SHEET: The Path Forward on Nuclear Waste Disposal FACT SHEET: The Path Forward on Nuclear Waste Disposal FACT SHEET: The Path Forward on Nuclear Waste Disposal More Documents...

  12. Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual This Revision 3 of the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...

  13. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  14. Long-term surveillance plan for the Maybell, Colorado Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-09-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) long-term care program for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project Maybell disposal site in Moffat County, Colorado. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has developed regulations for the issuance of a general license for the custody and long-term care of UMTRA Project disposal sites in 10 CFR Part 40. The purpose of this general license is to ensure that the UMTRA Project disposal sites are cared for in a manner that protects the public health and safety and the environment. Before each disposal site is licensed, the NRC requires the DOE to submit a site-specific LTSP. The DOE prepared this LTSP to meet this requirement for the Maybell disposal site. The general license becomes effective when the NRC concurs with the DOE`s determination that remedial action is complete for the Maybell site and the NRC formally accepts this LTSP. This document describes the long-term surveillance program the DOE will implement to ensure the Maybell disposal site performs as designed. The program is based on site inspections to identify threats to disposal cell integrity. The LTSP is based on the UMTRA Project long-term surveillance program guidance document and meets the requirements of 10 CFR {section}40.27(b) and 40 CFR {section}192.03.

  15. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site Maxey Flats Disposal Site - KY 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Commercial (Burial) Disposal Site, Maxey Flats Disposal Site (KY.02) Remediated by EPA; a portion of the records are managed by DOE LM. More information at http://www.lm.doe.gov/maxey_flats/Sites.aspx Designated Name: Not Designated under FUSRAP Alternate Name: Maxey Flats, KY, Disposal Site Location: Fleming County, Kentucky Evaluation Year: Not considered for

  16. Method and apparatus for extracting tritium and preparing radioactive waste for disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, L.K.

    1994-03-29

    Apparatus is described for heating an object such as a nuclear target bundle to release and recover hydrogen and contain the disposable residue for disposal. The apparatus comprises an inverted furnace, a sleeve/crucible assembly for holding and enclosing the bundle, conveying equipment for placing the sleeve onto the crucible and loading the bundle into the sleeve/crucible, a lift for raising the enclosed bundle into the furnace, and hydrogen recovery equipment including a trap and strippers, all housed in a containment having negative internal pressure. The crucible/sleeve assembly has an internal volume that is sufficient to enclose and hold the bundle before heating; the crucible's internal volume is sufficient by itself to hold and enclose the bundle's volume after heating. The crucible can then be covered and disposed of; the sleeve, on the other hand, can be reused. 4 figures.

  17. Method and apparatus for extracting tritium and preparing radioactive waste for disposal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    Apparatus for heating an object such as a nuclear target bundle to release and recover hydrogen and contain the disposable residue for disposal. The apparatus comprises an inverted furnace, a sleeve/crucible assembly for holding and enclosing the bundle, conveying equipment for placing the sleeve onto the crucible and loading the bundle into the sleeve/crucible, a lift for raising the enclosed bundle into the furnace, and hydrogen recovery equipment including a trap and strippers, all housed in a containment having negative internal pressure. The crucible/sleeve assembly has an internal volume that is sufficient to enclose and hold the bundle before heating; the crucible's internal volume is sufficient by itself to hold and enclose the bundle's volume after heating. The crucible can then be covered and disposed of; the sleeve, on the other hand, can be reused.

  18. Repository Reference Disposal Concepts and Thermal Load Management...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    enclosed and open mode disposal concepts, thermal analysis of open modes, a range of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) burnup, additional disposal system description, and cost estimation. ...

  19. Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management for larger waste packages. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Generic disposal concepts and thermal load management...

  20. Title 40 CFR 268 Land Disposal Restrictions | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    disposal and defines those limited circumstances under which an otherwise prohibited waste may continue to be land disposed. Except as specifically provided otherwise in this...

  1. Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste: Science Needs. (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste: Science Needs. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste: Science Needs. Abstract not provided. ...

  2. Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site Permit Application Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Nevada Industrial Solid Waste Disposal Site...

  3. Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Disposal Research and Development Roadmap Rev. 01 The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear...

  4. Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site, Lowman, Idaho Erosion Control and Revegetation at DOE's Lowman Disposal Site, Lowman, Idaho Erosion Control and ...

  5. A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal A Critical Step Toward Sustainable Nuclear Fuel Disposal January 26, 2012 - 2:30pm Addthis Secretary Chu Secretary Chu...

  6. Deep Borehole Disposal of Spent Fuel. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Borehole Disposal of Spent Fuel. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal of Spent Fuel. Abstract not provided. Authors: Brady, Patrick V. Publication...

  7. Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practices at the Savannah River Site Disposal Practices at the Savannah River Site Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download PDF icon Disposal Practices at the ...

  8. Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal of Nuclear Waste. Abstract not provided. Authors: Arnold, Bill Walter ;...

  9. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternativ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Geological Data Evaluation Alternative Waste Forms and Borehole Seals Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Deep Borehole Disposal Research:...

  10. LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP EXECUTION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LOW-LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP EXECUTION PLAN Los Alamos National ... Safety and Security LFRG Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group LLW ...

  11. Innovative Technique Accelerates Waste Disposal at Idaho Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – An innovative treatment and disposal technique is enabling the Idaho site to accelerate shipments of legacy nuclear waste for permanent disposal.

  12. Final Environmental Impact Statement Brings DOE Closer to Disposing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Final Environmental Impact Statement Brings DOE Closer to Disposing Unique Waste Final Environmental Impact Statement Brings DOE Closer to Disposing Unique Waste March 16, 2016 - ...

  13. Method of Disposing of Corrosive Gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burford, W.B. III; Anderson, H.C.

    1950-07-11

    Waste gas containing elemental fluorine is disposed of in the disclosed method by introducing the gas near the top of a vertical chamber under a downward spray of caustic soda solution which contains a small amount of sodium sulfide.

  14. Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Community Information

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site Tuba City Site Background 1954-1955 Tuba City mill is built. 1956-1966 Rare Metals Corporation and El Paso Natural Gas Company operate the ...

  15. Supplement Analysis for Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal of Polychlorinated Biphenyl-Commingled Transuranic Waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (DOEEIS-0026-SA02) 1.0 Purpose and Need for Action Transuranic (TRU) waste is...

  16. Assessment of Preferred Depleted Uranium Disposal Forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croff, A.G.; Hightower, J.R.; Lee, D.W.; Michaels, G.E.; Ranek, N.L.; Trabalka, J.R.

    2000-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of converting about 700,000 metric tons (MT) of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) containing 475,000 MT of depleted uranium (DU) to a stable form more suitable for long-term storage or disposal. Potential conversion forms include the tetrafluoride (DUF4), oxide (DUO2 or DU3O8), or metal. If worthwhile beneficial uses cannot be found for the DU product form, it will be sent to an appropriate site for disposal. The DU products are considered to be low-level waste (LLW) under both DOE orders and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations. The objective of this study was to assess the acceptability of the potential DU conversion products at potential LLW disposal sites to provide a basis for DOE decisions on the preferred DU product form and a path forward that will ensure reliable and efficient disposal.

  17. Special Analysis: Naval Reactor Waste Disposal Pad

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, J.R.

    2003-03-31

    This report presents the results of a special study of the Naval Reactor Waste Disposal Pad located within the boundary of the E-Area Low-Level Waste Facility at the Savannah River Site.

  18. Deep Borehole Disposal Research: Demonstration Site Selection...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    The deep borehole disposal concept consists of drilling a borehole on the order of 5,000 m deep, emplacing waste canisters in the lower part of the borehole, and sealing the upper ...

  19. Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Fact Sheet

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978 Title I disposal site near Green River, Utah. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. ...

  20. Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chapter 17.3 (March 2011) 1 Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate References DEAR 917.74 - Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate DOE Directives DOE Order 413.3B, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, or current version DOE Order 430.1B, Real Property Asset Management, or current version Overview This section provides internal Departmental information and DOE and NNSA points of contact for issues dealing with real estate acquisition, use, and

  1. Title II Disposal Sites Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report, in fulfillment of a license requirement, presents the results of long-term surveillance and maintenance activities conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management in 2015 at six uranium mill tailings disposal sites reclaimed under Title II of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) of 1978. These activities verified that the UMTRCA Title II disposal sites remain in compliance with license requirements.

  2. COVERING A CORE BY EXTRUSION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karnie, A.J.

    1963-07-16

    A method of covering a cylindrical fuel core with a cladding metal ms described. The metal is forced between dies around the core from both ends in two opposing skirts, and as these meet the ends turn outward into an annular recess in the dics. By cutting off the raised portion formed by the recess, oxide impurities are eliminated. (AEC)

  3. Corrugated cover plate for flat plate collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hollands, K. G. Terry; Sibbitt, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    A flat plate radiant energy collector is providing having a transparent cover. The cover has a V-corrugated shape which reduces the amount of energy reflected by the cover away from the flat plate absorber of the collector.

  4. Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate (76.66 KB) More Documents & Publications OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Chapter 17 - Special Contracting Methods Acquisition Guide Chapter 17.3, Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate

  5. Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate More Documents & Publications Acquisition Guide Chapter 17.3, Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate OPAM Policy Acquisition Guides Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate

  6. Microsoft Word - Cover Sheet - 020711

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    II: Comment Response Document COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) TITLE: Final Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement for the Y-12 National Security Complex (DOE/EIS-0387) (Final Y-12 SWEIS) CONTACT: For further information on this SWEIS, For general information on the DOE contact: National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process, contact: Pam Gorman Carol Borgstrom, Director Y-12 SWEIS Document

  7. Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Use Cover Page Glossary Home > Households, Buildings & Industry >Transportation Surveys > Household Vehicles Energy Use Cover Page Contact Us * Feedback * PrivacySecurity *...

  8. Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    I Disposal Sites Annual Report Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites (March 2016) 2015 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites (March 2016) (35.26 MB) More Documents & Publications Guidance for Developing and Implementing Long-Term Surveillance Plans for UMTRCA Title I and Title II Disposal Sites

  9. Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: FY'15 Progress Report The objective of the Crystalline Disposal R&D Work Package is to advance our understanding of long-term disposal of used fuel in crystalline rocks and to develop necessary experimental and computational capabilities to evaluate various disposal concepts in such media. The major accomplishments are summarized in the report: 1) Development of Fuel Matrix Degradation Model

  10. Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    INL, Idaho EM Project: Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility ETR Report Date: December 2007 ETR-10 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) At Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) is a land disposal facility that is used to dispose of LLW and MLW generated from remedial activities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Components of

  11. Generic Disposal System Modeling, Fiscal Year 2011 Progress Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The UFD Campaign is developing generic disposal system models (GDSM) of different disposal environments and waste form options. Currently, the GDSM team is investigating four main disposal environment options: mined repositories in three geologic media (salt, clay, and granite) and the deep borehole concept in crystalline rock (DOE 2010d). Further developed the individual generic disposal system (GDS) models for salt, granite, clay, and deep borehole disposal environments.

  12. Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (822.35 KB) Summary - Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) at Idaho National Laboratory (49.03 KB) More Documents & Publications Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) at Oak Ridge Proposed On-Site Waste Disposal Facility

  13. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirpich, A.S.

    1983-12-08

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  14. Liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirpich, Aaron S.

    1985-01-01

    Separate structures for electrical insulation and thermal conduction are established within a liquid cooled, linear focus solar cell receiver for use with parabolic or Fresnel optical concentrators. The receiver includes a V-shaped aluminum extrusion having a pair of outer faces each formed with a channel receiving a string of solar cells in thermal contact with the extrusion. Each cell string is attached to a continuous glass cover secured within the channel with spring clips to isolate the string from the external environment. Repair or replacement of solar cells is effected simply by detaching the spring clips to remove the cover/cell assembly without interrupting circulation of coolant fluid through the receiver. The lower surface of the channel in thermal contact with the cells of the string is anodized to establish a suitable standoff voltage capability between the cells and the extrusion. Primary electrical insulation is provided by a dielectric tape disposed between the coolant tube and extrusion. Adjacent solar cells are soldered to interconnect members designed to accommodate thermal expansion and mismatches. The coolant tube is clamped into the extrusion channel with a releasably attachable clamping strip to facilitate easy removal of the receiver from the coolant circuit.

  15. Annual Report for Los Alamos National Laboratory Technical Area 54, Area G Disposal Facility - Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, Sean B.; Shuman, Rob

    2012-05-22

    of these activities cannot be used to evaluate the validity of the performance assessment and composite analysis models because the monitoring data collected are specific to operational releases or address receptors that are outside the domain of the performance assessment and composite analysis. In general, applicable monitoring data are supportive of some aspects of the performance assessment and composite analysis. Several research and development (R and D) efforts have been initiated under the performance assessment and composite analysis maintenance program. These investigations are designed to improve the current understanding of the disposal facility and site, thereby reducing the uncertainty associated with the projections of the long-term performance of Area G. The status and results of R and D activities that were undertaken in fiscal year 2011 are discussed in this report. Special analyses have been conducted to determine the feasibility of disposing of specific waste streams, to address proposed changes in disposal operations, and to consider the impacts of changes to the models used to conduct the performance assessment and composite analysis. These analyses are described and the results of the evaluations are summarized in this report. The Area G disposal facility consists of Material Disposal Area (MDA) G and the Zone 4 expansion area. To date, all disposal operations at Area G have been confined to MDA G. Material Disposal Area G is scheduled to undergo final closure in 2015; disposal of waste in the pits and shafts is scheduled to end in 2013. In anticipation of the closure of MDA G, plans are being made to ship the majority of the waste generated at LANL to off-site locations for disposal. It is not clear at this time if waste that will be disposed of at LANL will be placed in Zone 4 or if disposal operations will move to a new location at the Laboratory. Separately, efforts to optimize the final cover used in the closure of MDA G are underway; a

  16. Probabilistic Modeling of Settlement Risk at Land Disposal Facilities - 12304

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foye, Kevin C.; Soong, Te-Yang

    2012-07-01

    The long-term reliability of land disposal facility final cover systems - and therefore the overall waste containment - depends on the distortions imposed on these systems by differential settlement/subsidence. The evaluation of differential settlement is challenging because of the heterogeneity of the waste mass (caused by inconsistent compaction, void space distribution, debris-soil mix ratio, waste material stiffness, time-dependent primary compression of the fine-grained soil matrix, long-term creep settlement of the soil matrix and the debris, etc.) at most land disposal facilities. Deterministic approaches to long-term final cover settlement prediction are not able to capture the spatial variability in the waste mass and sub-grade properties which control differential settlement. An alternative, probabilistic solution is to use random fields to model the waste and sub-grade properties. The modeling effort informs the design, construction, operation, and maintenance of land disposal facilities. A probabilistic method to establish design criteria for waste placement and compaction is introduced using the model. Random fields are ideally suited to problems of differential settlement modeling of highly heterogeneous foundations, such as waste. Random fields model the seemingly random spatial distribution of a design parameter, such as compressibility. When used for design, the use of these models prompts the need for probabilistic design criteria. It also allows for a statistical approach to waste placement acceptance criteria. An example design evaluation was performed, illustrating the use of the probabilistic differential settlement simulation methodology to assemble a design guidance chart. The purpose of this design evaluation is to enable the designer to select optimal initial combinations of design slopes and quality control acceptance criteria that yield an acceptable proportion of post-settlement slopes meeting some design minimum. For this specific

  17. NEVADA NATIONAL SECURITY SITE WASTE DISPOSAL OPERATIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SITE WASTE DISPOSAL OPERATIONS FY 2016 - QUARTER TWO DISPOSAL VOLUME REPORT DOE/NV/25946--2779 Data is a snapshot for the stated fiscal year and quarter and is considered preliminary until internal quality checks are completed. Report Run Date and Time: 6/8/2016 9:21 AM FY16 - Quarter 2 FY16 Cumulative FY16 - Quarter 2 FY16 Cumulative DOE APPROVED Waste Volume Volume DOE APPROVED Waste Volume Volume GENERATORS Type (Ft 3 ) (Ft 3 ) GENERATORS Type (Ft 3 ) (Ft 3 ) ABERDEEN PROVING GROUNDS (MD) LLW

  18. Disposal of bead ion exchange resin wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, R.L.; Granthan, L.F.

    1985-12-17

    Bead ion exchange resin wastes are disposed of by a process which involves spray-drying a bead ion exchange resin waste in order to remove substantially all of the water present in such waste, including the water on the surface of the ion exchange resin beads and the water inside the ion exchange resin beads. The resulting dried ion exchange resin beads can then be solidified in a suitable solid matrix-forming material, such as a polymer, which solidifies to contain the dried ion exchange resin beads in a solid monolith suitable for disposal by burial or other conventional means.

  19. Application for Permit to Operate a Class II Solid Waste Disposal Site at the Nevada Test Site - U10c Disposal Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Programs

    2010-03-31

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is located approximately 105 km (65 mi) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) is the federal lands management authority for the NTS and National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) is the Management and Operations contractor. Access on and off the NTS is tightly controlled, restricted, and guarded on a 24-hour basis. The NTS is posted with signs along its entire perimeter. NSTec is the operator of all solid waste disposal sites on the NTS. The site will be used for the disposal of refuse, rubbish, garbage, sewage sludge, pathological waste, Asbestos-Containing Material (ACM), industrial solid waste, hydrocarbon-burdened soil, hydrocarbon-burdened demolition and construction waste, and other inert waste (hereafter called permissible waste). Waste containing free liquids or regulated under Subtitle C of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. Waste regulated under the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA), excluding Polychlorinated Biphenyl [PCB], Bulk Product Waste (see Section 6.2.5) and ACM (see Section 6.2.2.2) will not be accepted for disposal at the site. The disposal site will be used as the sole depository of permissible waste which is: (1) Generated by entities covered under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (2) Generated at sites identified in the Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO); (3) Sensitive records and media, including documents, vugraphs, computer disks, typewriter ribbons, magnetic tapes, etc., generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors; (4) ACM generated by NNSA/NSO or its contractors according to Section 6.2.2.2, as necessary; (5) Hydrocarbon-burdened soil and solid waste from areas covered under the EPA Hazardous Waste Generator Identification Number for the NTS; (6) Other waste on a case-by-case concurrence by

  20. Solving the problems of infectious waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, S.L.; Cabral, N.J. )

    1989-06-01

    Lawmakers are increasing pressures to ensure safe, appropriate disposal of infectious waste. This article discusses the problems, the regulatory climate, innovative approaches, and how to pay for them. The paper discusses the regulatory definition of infectious waste, federal and state regulations, and project finance.

  1. Duluth co-disposal: Lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Law, I.J. )

    1988-10-01

    The Western Lake Superior Sanitary District (WLSSD) was formed to combat water pollution, not handle waste disposal. In 1971, the newly formed district hired an engineering firm to design a wastewater treatment facility, which resulted in the design of a 44 million gallon per day treatment plant in Duluth, home of about 70% of the districts residents. Sewage sludge from the wastewater process would be dried and burned in multiple hearth incinerators fired with No. 2 fuel oil. Design work was well underway when the 1973 oil embargo occurred, causing oil prices to quadruple, and oil or natural gas fuel to become non-existant for this type of usage. The engineers considered such fuels as coal, wood chips, and solid waste, and recommended solid waste in the form of refuse-derived fuel (RDF). The district obtained legislative authority in 1974 to control the solid waste stream in the area. All of this delayed design and construction of the sludge disposal portion of the project, but the rest of the treatment plant remained on schedule and was completed in 1978. The co-disposal portion was designed in 1975 and construction was essentially completed by November 1979. The total co-disposal project cost was about $20 million. This paper discusses special features of this system, operating problems, initial modifications, explosion hazards, and later modifications.

  2. Process for the disposal of alkali metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Leroy C.

    1977-01-01

    Large quantities of alkali metals may be safely reacted for ultimate disposal by contact with a hot concentrated caustic solution. The alkali metals react with water in the caustic solution in a controlled reaction while steam dilutes the hydrogen formed by the reaction to a safe level.

  3. Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    The Hazardous and Solid Waste Amendments (HSWA) to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) enacted in 1984 required the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to evaluate all listed and characteristic hazardous wastes according to a strict schedule and to develop requirements by which disposal of these wastes would be protective of human health and the environment. The implementing regulations for accomplishing this statutory requirement are established within the Land Disposal Restrictions (LDR) program. The LDR regulations (40 CFR Part 268) impose significant requirements on waste management operations and environmental restoration activities at DOE sites. For hazardous wastes restricted by statute from land disposal, EPA is required to set levels or methods of treatment that substantially reduce the waste`s toxicity or the likelihood that the waste`s hazardous constituents will migrate. Upon the specified LDR effective dates, restricted wastes that do not meet treatment standards are prohibited from land disposal unless they qualify for certain variances or exemptions. This document provides an overview of the LDR Program.

  4. Treatment and Disposal of Unanticipated 'Scavenger' Wastewater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Payne, W.L.

    2003-09-15

    The Savannah River Site often generates wastewater for disposal that is not included as a source to one of the site's wastewater treatment facilities that are permitted by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control. The techniques used by the SRS contract operator (Westinghouse Savannah River Company) to evaluate and treat this unanticipated 'scavenger' wastewater may benefit industries and municipalities who experience similar needs. Regulations require that scavenger wastewater be treated and not just diluted. Each of the pollutants that are present must meet effluent permit limitations and/or receiving stream water quality standards. if a scavenger wastewater is classified as 'hazardous' under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) its disposal must comply with RCRA regulations. Westinghouse Savannah River Company obtained approval from SCDHEC to dispose of scavenger wastewater under specific conditions that are included within the SRS National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit. Scavenger wastewater is analyzed in a laboratory to determine its constituency. Pollutant values are entered into spreadsheets that calculate treatment plant removal capabilities and instream concentrations. Disposal rates are computed, ensuring compliance with regulatory requirements and protection of treatment system operating units. Appropriate records are maintained in the event of an audit.

  5. Low level tank waste disposal study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullally, J.A.

    1994-09-29

    Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted a team consisting of Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA), British Nuclear Fuel Laboratories (BNFL), Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), and TRW through the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Technical Support Contract to conduct a study on several areas concerning vitrification and disposal of low-level-waste (LLW). The purpose of the study was to investigate how several parameters could be specified to achieve full compliance with regulations. The most restrictive regulation governing this disposal activity is the National Primary Drinking Water Act which sets the limits of exposure to 4 mrem per year for a person drinking two liters of ground water daily. To fully comply, this constraint would be met independently of the passage of time. In addition, another key factor in the investigation was the capability to retrieve the disposed waste during the first 50 years as specified in Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A. The objective of the project was to develop a strategy for effective long-term disposal of the low-level waste at the Hanford site.

  6. Russian low-level waste disposal program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, L.

    1993-03-01

    The strategy for disposal of low-level radioactive waste in Russia differs from that employed in the US. In Russia, there are separate authorities and facilities for wastes generated by nuclear power plants, defense wastes, and hospital/small generator/research wastes. The reactor wastes and the defense wastes are generally processed onsite and disposed of either onsite, or nearby. Treating these waste streams utilizes such volume reduction techniques as compaction and incineration. The Russians also employ methods such as bitumenization, cementation, and vitrification for waste treatment before burial. Shallow land trench burial is the most commonly used technique. Hospital and research waste is centrally regulated by the Moscow Council of Deputies. Plans are made in cooperation with the Ministry of Atomic Energy. Currently the former Soviet Union has a network of low-level disposal sites located near large cities. Fifteen disposal sites are located in the Federal Republic of Russia, six are in the Ukraine, and one is located in each of the remaining 13 republics. Like the US, each republic is in charge of management of the facilities within their borders. The sites are all similarly designed, being modeled after the RADON site near Moscow.

  7. Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ERDF ETR Report Date: June 2007 ETR-6 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility(ERDF) at Hanford Why DOE-EM Did This Review The ERDF is a large- scale disposal facility authorized to receive waste from Hanford cleanup activities. It contains double-lined cells with a RCRA Subtitle C- type liner and leachate collection system. By 2007, 6.8 million tons of

  8. Long-term surveillance plan for the Tuba City, Arizona disposal site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    This long-term surveillance plan (LTSP) for the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal site at Tuba City, Arizona, describes the site surveillance activities. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) will carry out these activities to ensure the disposal cell continues to function as designed. This final LTSP was prepared as a requirement for acceptance under the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) general license for custody and long-term care of residual radioactive materials (RRM) (10 CFR {section}40.27).

  9. A data base for low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daum, M.L.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1989-07-01

    A computerized database was developed to assist the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in evaluating methods and data for characterizing health hazards associated with land and ocean disposal options for low-level radioactive wastes. The data cover 1984 to 1987. The types of sites considered include Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) licensed commercial disposal sites, EPA National Priority List (NPL) sites, US Department of Energy (DOE) Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Project (FUSRAP) and DOE Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP) sites, inactive US ocean disposal sites, and DOE/Department of Defense facilities. Sources of information include reports from EPA, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as well as direct communication with individuals associated with specific programs. The data include site descriptions, waste volumes and activity levels, and physical and radiological characterization of low-level wastes. Additional information on mixed waste, packaging forms, and disposal methods were compiled, but are not yet included in the database. 55 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. Conceptual waste packaging options for deep borehole disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Jiann -Cherng; Hardin, Ernest L.

    2015-07-01

    This report presents four concepts for packaging of radioactive waste for disposal in deep boreholes. Two of these are reference-size packages (11 inch outer diameter) and two are smaller (5 inch) for disposal of Cs/Sr capsules. All four have an assumed length of approximately 18.5 feet, which allows the internal length of the waste volume to be 16.4 feet. However, package length and volume can be scaled by changing the length of the middle, tubular section. The materials proposed for use are low-alloy steels, commonly used in the oil-and-gas industry. Threaded connections between packages, and internal threads used to seal the waste cavity, are common oilfield types. Two types of fill ports are proposed: flask-type and internal-flush. All four package design concepts would withstand hydrostatic pressure of 9,600 psi, with factor safety 2.0. The combined loading condition includes axial tension and compression from the weight of a string or stack of packages in the disposal borehole, either during lower and emplacement of a string, or after stacking of multiple packages emplaced singly. Combined loading also includes bending that may occur during emplacement, particularly for a string of packages threaded together. Flask-type packages would be fabricated and heat-treated, if necessary, before loading waste. The fill port would be narrower than the waste cavity inner diameter, so the flask type is suitable for directly loading bulk granular waste, or loading slim waste canisters (e.g., containing Cs/Sr capsules) that fit through the port. The fill port would be sealed with a tapered, threaded plug, with a welded cover plate (welded after loading). Threaded connections between packages and between packages and a drill string, would be standard drill pipe threads. The internal flush packaging concepts would use semi-flush oilfield tubing, which is internally flush but has a slight external upset at the joints. This type of tubing can be obtained with premium, low

  11. Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments and Composite Analyses Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal ...

  12. Grout treatment facility land disposal restriction management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendrickson, D.W.

    1991-04-04

    This document establishes management plans directed to result in the land disposal of grouted wastes at the Hanford Grout Facilities in compliance with Federal, State of Washington, and Department of Energy land disposal restrictions. 9 refs., 1 fig.

  13. Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal Z-Bed Recovery Water Disposal Presentation from the 33rd Tritium Focus Group Meeting held in Aiken, South Carolina on April 22-24, 2014. Z-Bed ...

  14. Maintenance Guide for DOE Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maintenance Guide for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility ... for U.S. Department of Energy Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Performance Assessments ...

  15. Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group Manual

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    LEVEL WASTE DISPOSAL FACILITY FEDERAL REVIEW GROUP MANUAL REVISION 3 JUNE 2008 (This page ... 3, June 200S Concurrence The Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility Federal Review Group ...

  16. NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex NNSS Waste Disposal Proves Vital Resource for DOE Complex March 20, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The Area 5 Radioactive Waste ...

  17. Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Section 3116 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal ...

  18. International Collaboration Activities in Different Geologic Disposal Environments

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This report describes the current status of international collaboration regarding geologic disposal research in the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign.  To date, UFD’s International Disposal R...

  19. DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste February 25, ...

  20. DOE Selects Two Contractors for Multiple-Award Waste Disposal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Selects Two Contractors for Multiple-Award Waste Disposal Contract DOE Selects Two Contractors for Multiple-Award Waste Disposal Contract April 12, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Media ...

  1. Acceptance of Classified Excess Components for Disposal at Area 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poling, Jeanne; Saad, Max

    2012-04-09

    This slide-show discusses weapons dismantlement and disposal, issues related to classified waste and their solutions.

  2. Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy 3: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity Recommendation 223: Recommendations on Additional Waste Disposal Capacity ORSSAB's recommendations encourage DOE to continue planning for an additional on-site disposal facility for low-level waste and that a second facility be placed in an area already used for similar waste disposal. Recommendation 223 (51.59 KB) Response to Recommendation 223 (779.96 KB) More Documents & Publications ORSSAB Meeting -

  3. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) These records pertain to the sales by agencies of real and personal property surplus to the needs of the Government. ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 4: PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS (Revision 2) (13.24 KB) More Documents & Publications PROPERTY DISPOSAL RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS: PROCUREMENT, SUPPLY, AND GRANT RECORDS ADMINISTRATIVE RECORDS SCHEDULE 3:

  4. Crushing leads to waste disposal savings for FUSRAP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darby, J.

    1997-02-01

    In this article the author discusses the application of a rock crusher as a means of implementing cost savings in the remediation of FUSRAP sites. Transportation and offsite disposal costs are at present the biggest cost items in the remediation of FUSRAP sites. If these debris disposal problems can be handled in different manners, then remediation savings are available. Crushing can result in the ability to handle some wastes as soil disposal problems, which have different disposal regulations, thereby permitting cost savings.

  5. January 28, 2016 Webinar - Borehole Disposal of Spent Radioactive Sources |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy January 28, 2016 Webinar - Borehole Disposal of Spent Radioactive Sources January 28, 2016 Webinar - Borehole Disposal of Spent Radioactive Sources Performance & RIsk Assessment (P&RA) Community of Practice (CoP) Webinar - January 28, 2016 - Borehole Disposal of Spent Radioactive Sources (Dr. Matt Kozak, INTERA). Webinar Recording Agenda & Webinar Instructions - January 28, 2016 - P&RA CoP Webinar (117.24 KB) Borehole Disposal of Spent Sources (BOSS)

  6. Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hanford | Department of Energy Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford Full Document and Summary Versions are available for download Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility at Hanford (238.34 KB) Summary - Operational Issues at the Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF) at Hanford (56.27 KB) More Documents & Publications Idaho

  7. cover_booked.indd | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    cover_booked.indd cover_booked.indd cover_booked.indd (1.76 MB) More Documents & Publications Three Year Rolling Timeline Order Module--DOE O 430.1B, REAL PROPERTY ASSET MANAGEMENT The Department of Energy Asset Management Plan (2015

  8. Application of Generic Disposal System Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mariner, Paul; Hammond, Glenn Edward; Sevougian, S. David; Stein, Emily

    2015-11-01

    This report describes specific GDSA activities in fiscal year 2015 (FY2015) toward the development of the enhanced disposal system modeling and analysis capability for geologic disposal of nuclear waste. The GDSA framework employs the PFLOTRAN thermal-hydrologic-chemical multi-physics code (Hammond et al., 2011) and the Dakota uncertainty sampling and propagation code (Adams et al., 2013). Each code is designed for massively-parallel processing in a high-performance computing (HPC) environment. Multi-physics representations in PFLOTRAN are used to simulate various coupled processes including heat flow, fluid flow, waste dissolution, radionuclide release, radionuclide decay and ingrowth, precipitation and dissolution of secondary phases, and radionuclide transport through the engineered barriers and natural geologic barriers to a well location in an overlying or underlying aquifer. Dakota is used to generate sets of representative realizations and to analyze parameter sensitivity.

  9. Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility About Us About Hanford Cleanup Hanford History Hanford Site Wide Programs Contact Us 100 Area 118-K-1 Burial Ground 200 Area 222-S Laboratory 242-A Evaporator 300 Area 324 Building 325 Building 400 Area/Fast Flux Test Facility 618-10 and 618-11 Burial Grounds 700 Area B Plant B Reactor C Reactor Canister Storage Building and Interim Storage Area Canyon Facilities Cold Test Facility D and DR Reactors Effluent Treatment Facility Environmental Restoration

  10. Public attitudes toward garbage disposal. Special report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1990-05-03

    This document is meant to inform the reader about the results of the National Solid Waste Management Association`s opinion research which focused on public attitudes toward recycling, garbage disposal, waste-to-energy, and other waste management concerns. The general public and opinion leaders were asked a wide range of questions about managing our nation`s solid waste and their responses are listed in percentages.