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1

Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

2

Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash...

3

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of...

4

Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

5

Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

6

Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

7

Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Deparment of Environmental Quality. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Unit 4, operating alone under minimum and maximum loads will not cause or contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

8

Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Docket No. EO-05-01. Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Units 1 and 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Units 1 and 4, operating together under specific loads and during certain periods in a calendar day will not cause or contribut to excceedences of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together

9

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 1 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality. The purpose of the modeling was to demonstrate that Unit 1 operating alone under specific loads and during certain periods in a calendar day will not cause or contribute to exceedances of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS).

10

Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Docket No. EO-05-01: This report describes dispersion modeling performed for simultaneous operation of three baseload units at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station (PRGS). The units (3,4,5) would operate at maximum load (107 MW) for up to 12 hours and minimum load (35 MW) 12 hours or more in a calendar day. This mode of operation is also referred to as Option B in Mirant Potomac River LLC's December 30, 2005 letter to the U.S. Department of Energy regarding District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01. The modeling was performed according to

11

Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Docket No. EO-05-01: This report describes dispersion modeling performed for simultaneous operation of one baseload unit and two cycling units at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station (PRGS). This mode of operation is also referred to as Option A in Mirant Potomac River LLC's December 30, 2005 letter to the U.S. Department of Energy regarding District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05- 01. The modeling was performed according to the Protocol approved by the Virginia Department of

12

Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes AERMOD modeling results performed for Unit 1 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The purpose of these runs was to demonstrate that operation of Unit 1 for 24 hours a day loads from 35MW to 88 MW with the use of trona to reduce SO2 emissions will not cause or contribute to modeled excceedences of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS). Mirant proposes to use trona on an as needed basis to limit SO2 emissions to less than

13

Sodar in Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usefulness of sodar data for dispersion modeling has been highlighted. A case study of using sodar data in a simple Gaussian dispersion model to calculate ground-level concentration of particulate matter emitted from a cement plant has been ...

B. S. Gera; D. R. Pahwa; Neeraj Saxena; Gurbir Singh; Rakesh Aggarwal

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Use dispersion modeling update  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses EPA's long-awaited update to the Industrial Source Complex (ISC) dispersion models which provides computer-software to comply with National Ambient Air Quality Standards. Moreover, the ISC2 models's Fortran codes are available from EPA at no cost, in a form compatible with desktop computers. This is a plus for hydrocarbon processing industry (HPI) environmental control professionals. ISC2 will be used for all future regulatory applications where dispersion modeling is required for facilities in simple terrain. Process engineers sometimes use ISC models and are often called upon to assist in developing emissions estimates that the program uses to calculate air quality impacts. The model challenges users because it can represent a variety of configurations for emissions sources. Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments is an entirely new section dealing with air toxics such as those in the HPI. EPA is required to develop a list of maximum achievable control technologies (MACT) for these compounds.

Freiman, J.P.; Hill, J. (Bechtel Environmental, Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

Sugiharto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Abidin, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

16

Parameterizing Mesoscale Wind Uncertainty for Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parameterization of numerical weather prediction uncertainty is presented for use by atmospheric transport and dispersion models. The theoretical development applies Taylor dispersion concepts to diagnose dispersion metrics from numerical wind ...

Leonard J. Peltier; Sue Ellen Haupt; John C. Wyngaard; David R. Stauffer; Aijun Deng; Jared A. Lee; Kerrie J. Long; Andrew J. Annunzio

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Atmospheric Mesoscale Dispersion Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mesoscale dispersion modeling system (MDMS) described herein is under development as a simulation tool to investigate atmospheric flow and pollution dispersion over complex terrain for domains up to several hundred kilometers. The system ...

Marek Uliasz

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk will discuss details of the approach and present results for some example calculations performed in Manhattan in support of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) using some of the tools developed as part of this new capability.

Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

2005-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

19

Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

"Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of...

20

Modelling Heterogeneous Dispersion in Marginal Models for Longitudinal Proportional Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fitted curves for the pattern of dispersion profile over time across three different gas concentrationModelling Heterogeneous Dispersion in Marginal Models for Longitudinal Proportional Data Peter X proportional data assumes a constant dispersion para- meter. This assumption of dispersion homogeneity

Song, Peter X.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A More Extensive Investigation of the Use of Ensemble Forecasts for Dispersion Model Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ensemble forecast is used as input to a Lagrangian particle dispersion model to study the effect that analysis errors in the numerical weather prediction assimilation cycle have on dispersion modeling. The wind and temperature fields from a ...

Anne Grete Straume

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Ensemble Simulations with Coupled Atmospheric Dynamic and Dispersion Models: Illustrating Uncertainties in Dosage Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble simulations made using a coupled atmospheric dynamic model and a probabilistic Lagrangian puff dispersion model were employed in a forensic analysis of the transport and dispersion of a toxic gas that may have been released near Al ...

Thomas T. Warner; Rong-Shyang Sheu; James F. Bowers; R. Ian Sykes; Gregory C. Dodd; Douglas S. Henn

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Applications of Lagrangian Dispersion Modeling to the Analysis of Changes in the Specific Absorption of Elemental Carbon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We use a Lagrangian dispersion model driven by a mesoscale model with four-dimensional data assimilation to simulate the dispersion of elemental carbon (EC) over a region encompassing Mexico City and its surroundings, the study domain for the 2006 MAX-MEX experiment, which was a component of the MILAGRO campaign. The results are used to identify periods when biomass burning was likely to have had a significant impact on the concentrations of elemental carbon at two sites, T1 and T2, downwind of the city, and when emissions from the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA) were likely to have been more important. They are also used to estimate the median ages of EC affecting the specific absorption of light, aABS, at 870 nm as well as to identify periods when the urban plume from the MCMA was likely to have been advected over T1 and T2. Values of aABS at T1, the nearer of the two sites to Mexico City, were smaller at night and increased rapidly after mid-morning, peaking in the mid-afternoon. The behavior is attributed to the coating of aerosols with substances such as sulfate or organic carbon during daylight hours, but such coating appears to be limited or absent at night. Evidence for this is provided by scanning electron microscope images of aerosols collected at three sampling sites. During daylight hours the values of aABS did not increase with aerosol age for median ages in the range of 1-4 hours. There is some evidence for absorption increasing as aerosols were advected from T1 to T2 but the statistical significance of that result is not strong.

Doran, J. C.; Fast, Jerome D.; Barnard, James C.; Laskin, Alexander; Desyaterik, Yury; Gilles, Marry K.; Hopkins, Rebecca J.

2008-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Performance Evaluation of Dense Gas Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the results of a study to evaluate the performance of seven dense gas dispersion models using data from three field experiments. Two models (DEGADIS and SLAB) are in the public domain and the other five (AIRTOX, CHARM, FOCUS,...

Jawad S. Touma; William M. Cox; Harold Thistle; James G. Zapert

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Mathematics of Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gaussian plume model is a standard approach for studying the transport of airborne contaminants due to turbulent diffusion and advection by the wind. This paper reviews the assumptions underlying the model, its derivation from the advection-diffusion ... Keywords: Gaussian plume solution, advection-diffusion equation, atmospheric dispersion, contaminant transport, inverse problem, linear least squares

John M. Stockie

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Uncertainty propagation in puff-based dispersion models using polynomial chaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion is a complex nonlinear physical process with numerous uncertainties in model parameters, inputs, source parameters, initial and boundary conditions. Accurate propagation of these uncertainties through the dispersion models is crucial ... Keywords: Atmospheric dispersion, Non-Gaussian distributions, Polynomial chaos, Sensitivity analysis, Uncertainty propagation

Umamaheswara Konda; Tarunraj Singh; Puneet Singla; Peter Scott

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Analysis and correction of vertical dispersion in RHIC  

SciTech Connect

In the context of preserving the polarization of proton beams, the source of vertical dispersion in RHIC is analyzed. Contributions to dispersion from non-coupling sources and coupling sources are compared. Based on the analysis of sources for dispersion, the right actuator for correcting dispersion is determined and a corresponding algorithm is developed.

Liu, C.; Minty, M.

2011-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hydrogen Sulfide Dispersion Consequences Analysis in Different Wind Speeds: A CFD Based Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogen sulfide (h2s) leakage and dispersion from a sulfide recycle installation in different wind speeds are simulated by implementing a 3D Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model. H2s concentrations of monitor points which represent dispersion contours ... Keywords: CFD, hydrogen Sulfide, dispersion, concenquences analysis, different wind speeds

Bo Zhang; Guo-ming Chen

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Atmospheric Dispersion Analysis using MACCS2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.145 requires an evaluation of the offsite atmospheric dispersion coefficient, {Chi}/Q, as a part of the acceptance criteria in the accident analysis. In it, it requires in sequence computations of (1) the overall site 95th percentile {Chi}/Q, (2) the maximum of the sixteen sector 99.5th percentile {Chi}/Q, and (3) comparison and selection of the worst of the two values for reporting in the safety analysis report (SAR). In all cases, the site-specific meteorology and sector-specific site boundary distances are employed in the evaluation. There are sixteen 22.5-sectors, the nearest site boundary of which is determined within the 45-arc centered on each of the sixteen compass directions.

Glaser, R; Yang, J M

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

30

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses; GENII  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Workshop to Discuss Issues Regarding Deposition Velocity June 5-6, 2012 Jeremy Rishel Bruce Napier Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling in Safety Analyses: GENII Today's Presentation.... Will provide a high-level overview of the GENII codes. Will cover basic aspects of GENII's acute atmospheric transport model. Will review the GENII deposition model that is used to estimate the deposition velocity used in plume depletion. 2 GENII Development History 1988 - GENII V1 released ICRP-26/30/48 dosimetry 1990 - GENII V1.485 stabilized Current DOE Toolbox Version 1992 - GENII-S stochastic version 2004 - GENII V2 ICRP-72 age-dependent dosimetry Federal Guidance Report 13 risk factors

31

Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) Development and Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hybrid Plume Dispersion Model (HPDM) was developed for application to tall stack plumes dispersing over nearly flat terrain. Emphasis is on convective and high-wind conditions. The meteorological component is based on observational and ...

Steven R. Hanna; Robert J. Paine

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Dual-Doppler Lidar Measurements for Improving Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dispersion of pollutants in the urban atmosphere is a subject that is presently under much investigation. In this paper the variables used in turbulent dispersion and plume rise schemes of the Met Office Nuclear Accident Model (NAME) are ...

Chris G. Collier; Fay Davies; Karen E. Bozier; Anthony R. Holt; Doug R. Middleton; Guy N. Pearson; Stephan Siemen; Dave V. Willetts; Graham J. G. Upton; Rob I. Young

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Urban Dispersion Modeling: Comparison with Single-Building Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two models have been developed to predict airflow and dispersion in urban environments. The first model, the Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants (RUSTIC) model, is a fast-running urban airflow code that rapidly ...

Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Eric A. Hendricks; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Docket No. EO-05-01. Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc. has prepared a review of the "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" written by ENSR Corporation on behalf of the Mirant Potomac River Power Plant. This report models only Unit #1 operating under two daytime only scenarios to reduce exposures and meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM10, SO2, and NOx that were not met using normal operating procedures.

35

Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Docket No. EO-05-01. Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc. has prepared a review of the "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" written by ENSR Corporation on behalf of the Mirant Potomac River Power Plant. This report models only Unit #1 operating under two daytime only scenarios to reduce exposures and meet the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for PM10, SO2, and NOx that were not met using normal operating procedures.

36

Statistical Performance of Several Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seventeen mesoscale dispersion models were statistically evaluated with data from krypton-85 emissions from the Savannah River Plant, Aiken, SC. Widely accepted statistical parameters were used for the statistical evaluation. The models were able ...

A. H. Weber; M. R. Buckner; J. H. Weber

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Practical Model for the Dispersion of Skewed Puffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical puff model based on the Monin-Obukhov similarity theory is presented. The model uses approximate solutions for the dispersion of a cloud of passive contaminant released from instantaneous sources and where particular importance is ...

T. Tirabassi; U. Rizza

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Modification of an Operational Dispersion Model for Urban Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An operational multisource, multireceptor Gaussian dispersion model, the Danish regulatory model Operationelle Meteorologiske Luftkvalitetsmodeller (OML) has been modified for applications in urban environments. A so-called roughness sublayer has ...

Peter de Haan; Mathias W. Rotach; Maja Werfeli

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Atmospheric Dispersion Model Validation in Low Wind Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

and SCIPUFF models and under-prediction bias by the ALOHA model. The experiment parameters were for near field dispersion (less than 100 meters) in low wind speed conditions (less than 2 meters per second).

Patrick Sawyer

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

A CFD Model for Simulating Urban Flow and Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model is developed to simulate urban flow and dispersion, to understand fluid dynamical processes therein, and to provide practical solutions to some emerging problems of urban air pollution. ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Jae-Jin Kim; Harindra J. S. Fernando

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) has developed a Volcanic Ash Forecast Transport And Dispersion (VAFTAD) model for emergency response use focusing on hazards to aircraft flight operations. ...

Jerome L. Heffter; Barbara J. B. Stunder

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Horizontal Dispersion Parameters for Long-Range Transport Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer model using actual meteorological data is developed to simulate the effects of wind shear on an instantaneous pollutant puff. The effect of wind shear on dispersion is obtained by subdividing, during the nocturnal phase, the previous ...

Roland R. Draxler; Albion D. Taylor

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Bayesian Network Analysis of Radiological Dispersal Device Acquisitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It remains unlikely that a terrorist organization could produce or procure an actual nuclear weapon. However, the construction of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) from commercially produced radioactive sources and conventional explosives could inflict moderate human casualties and significant economic damage. The vast availability of radioactive sources and the nearly limitless methods of dispersing them demand an inclusive study of the acquisition pathways for an RDD. A complete network depicting the possible acquisition pathways for an RDD could be subjected to predictive modeling in order to determine the most likely pathway an adversary might take. In this work, a comprehensive network of RDD acquisition pathways was developed and analyzed utilizing the Bayesian network analysis software, Netica. The network includes variable inputs and motivations that can be adjusted to model different adversaries. Also, the inclusion of evidence nodes facilitates the integration of real-time intelligence with RDD plot predictions. A sensitivity analysis was first performed to determine which nodes had the greatest impact on successful completion of RDD acquisition. These results detail which portions of the acquisition pathways are most vulnerable to law enforcement intervention. Next, a series of case studies was analyzed that modeled specific adversarial organizations. The analysis demonstrates various features of the constructed Bayesian RDD acquisition network and provides examples of how this tool can be utilized by intelligence analysts and law enforcement agencies. Finally, extreme cases were studied in which the adversary was given the maximum and minimum amount of resources in order to determine the limitations of this model. The aggregated results show that successful RDD acquisition is mostly dependent on the adversary’s resources. Furthermore, the network suggests that securing radiological materials has the greatest effect on interdicting possible RDD plots. Limitations of this work include a heavy dependence on conditional probabilities that were derived from intuition, as opposed to actual historical data which does not exist. However, the model can be updated as attempted or successful RDD plots emerge in the future. This work presents the first probabilistic model of RDD acquisition pathways that integrates adversary motivations and resources with evidence of specific RDD threats.

Hundley, Grant Richard

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Dispersal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dispersal Dispersal Nature Bulletin No. 675-A April 15, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation SEED DISPERSAL Plants that scatter their seeds widely have a better chance to survive than those which do not. Different kinds spread their seeds in various special ways. Many seeds ride the wind. Maple seeds spin away like little helicopters with a single wing. In a strong breeze they can travel a city block. Those of the elm are small papery disks with a seed in the center. The ash seed and its wing resembles a canoe paddle. In the basswood a few seeds are suspended beneath a large flat blade that glides through the air. Ripe, dry pine cones open and release winged seeds hidden between the cone scales.

45

GIS and plume dispersion modeling for population exposure assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of Pollutant Plume Dispersion Models is widespread in the evaluation of point sources of air pollution. These models provide valuable insight into the concentration and dispersion of hazardous materials throughout the atmosphere. Traditional methods of dispersion modeling for the permitting of new sources and the monitoring of existing sources have allowed much room for error in terms of the effect of the pollutants on nearby populations (Hardikar, 1995). The capabilities of GIS technology offer an improved method of conducting air quality modeling for permitting, remediation studies, and environmental monitoring. GIS has the ability to develop and manage a comprehensive database of model output, map layers, and demographic data that can prove extremely valuable in the modeling process. This data can serve to extend the capabilities of air pollution dispersion modeling from mere estimation of concentrations to comprehensive exposure assessment of neighboring populations (Lowry, et al. 1995, Maslia, et al. 1994). A study of the Monticello power plant in northeast Texas was conducted using the SCREEN3 mathematical plume dispersion model, US Census Bureau demographic data, and a GIS to examine the effects of the plant output on the people living in the seven county area surrounding the plant.

Archer, Jeffrey Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Observations and modelling of dispersion meteorology in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuelled by offshore natural gas, industrial development is growing steadily in coastal parts of Western Australia’s Pilbara region. In this paper, we present an analysis of meteorological data from the area, with an emphasis on those aspects that are important for the dispersion of pollutants. Three distinct wind patterns are identified, corresponding basically to the warmer, cooler and transitional months. The dominant pattern for the transitional months is particularly interesting, consisting of boundary-layer winds, up to a height of about 1000 m, rotating through 360 degrees over a 24-hour period. This can occur over several consecutive days and has implications for the recirculation of pollutants. Onshore winds occur on about 70 per cent of days, suggesting that fumigation of elevated plumes to the ground in thermal internal boundary layers (TIBLs) is also likely to be an important process for dispersion in the region. Data are presented that support the existence of these two processes. The Air Pollution Model (TAPM) is used to simulate the mesoscale meteorology of the region. It is able to reproduce the diurnal behaviour of the three wind regimes, as well as the vertical structure observed in early morning and evening wind profiles. A comparison with data shows good simulation of TIBL development in onshore flow and also recirculation of emissions back onshore in early evening, giving confidence in the application of TAPM as an air quality management tool in the Pilbara region.

Pilbara Region; W. L. Physick; K. N. Rayner; P. Mountford; M. Edwards

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Lagrangian Dispersion Model for Nonneutrally Buoyant Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capability to address positive and negative buoyancy was added to the Higher-Order Turbulence Model for Atmospheric Circulation–Random Puff Transport and Diffusion (HOTMAC–RAPTAD) modeling system. The modeling system was applied to simulate ...

Tetsuji Yamada

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

VALDRIFT—A Valley Atmospheric Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VALDRIFT (valley drift) is a valley atmospheric transport, diffusion, and deposition model. The model is phenomenological—that is, the dominant meteorological processes governing the behavior of the valley atmosphere are formulated explicitly in ...

K. Jerry Allwine; Xindi Bian; C. David Whiteman; Harold W. Thistle

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Generating seamless surfaces for transport and dispersion modeling in GIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A standard use of triangulation in GIS is to model terrain surface using TIN. In many simulation models of physical phenomena, triangulation is often used to depict the entire spatial domain, which may include buildings, landmarks and other surface objects ... Keywords: CAD, Computational fluid dynamics, Computational geometry, GIS, Mesh generation, Transport and dispersion

Fernando Camelli; Jyh-Ming Lien; Dayong Shen; David W. Wong; Matthew Rice; Rainald Löhner; Chaowei Yang

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Dispersion modeling of ground-level area sources of particulate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of dispersion modeling by State Air Pollution hics. Regulatory Agencies (SAPRAS) is increasing. Dispersion modeling provides a quick and efficient means of determining the downwind impact of pollutant release from a source. The SAPRAS are charged with the task of insuring that public exposure levels of these pollutants are less than the standards set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). Estimating the concentration of pollutant at some distance downwind, in most cases the property line, allows that SAPRAS to determine whether or not a source needs to install additional means of control in order to decrease the rate of pollutant release. One set of models approved for regulatory use by the US EPA is Industrial Source Complex (ISC). ISC includes SCREEN: which is a simple screening model with imbedded meteorological data, and ST3 which is a more refined model requiring meteorological data to be provided. ISC models are based on the concept of Gaussian dispersion. The concentration determined using the ISC models are a result of determining concentrations based on a single wind speed and direction for a one hour time period. The first step in the formulation of a new model was to incorporate smaller time periods into the concentration predictions, in order to account for variation or wind speed and direction within an hour period. For ground-level sources, the vertical distribution involves mathematically dispersing the pollutant underground, then reflecting it back up. The next step taken in the new model development was the incorporation of a triangular distribution in the Medical plane. The triangular distribution is entirely above ground. Once the new model was formulated, a sample modeling procedure was performed in order to compare the behavior of the new model as compared to ISC ST3. Examination of the characteristics of the two models, the meteorological data, and the output from the modeling procedures allows the comparison and contrast of the behavioral characteristics of the two models.

Fritz, Bradley Keith

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Geophysical wavelet library: Applications of the continuous wavelet transform to the polarization and dispersion analysis of signals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper, we consider and summarize applications of the continuous wavelet transform to 2C and 3C polarization analysis and filtering, modeling the dispersed and attenuated wave propagation in the time-frequency domain, and estimation of ... Keywords: Continuous wavelet transform, Dispersion, MATLAB, Polarization, Signal processing

M. Kulesh; M. Holschneider; M. S. Diallo

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Source Characterization with a Genetic Algorithm–Coupled Dispersion–Backward Model Incorporating SCIPUFF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper extends the approach of coupling a forward-looking dispersion model with a backward model using a genetic algorithm (GA) by incorporating a more sophisticated dispersion model [the Second-Order Closure Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF) model] ...

Christopher T. Allen; Sue Ellen Haupt; George S. Young

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Use and Application of the ARCON96 Dispersion Model at the Y-12 Complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes computer code (ARCON96) was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate normalized concentrations in plumes from nuclear power plants at control room air intakes in the vicinity of hypothetical accidental releases. ARCON96 implements a straight-line Gaussian dispersion model with dispersion coefficients that are modified to account for low-wind-speed meander and building wake effects. These two modifications to the dispersion coefficients were benchmarked and justified in the ARCON96 code documentation. The code calculates {chi}/Q values (normalized concentrations) consistent with the methodology defined in NRC Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.145, position 3. Based on recent U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) acceptance of NRC RG 1.145, position 3 methodology for performing accident dispersion analyses, BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. evaluated the potential use and application for performing dispersion analyses at the Y-12 Complex. Using site specific meteorology inputs, a generic analysis (assuming ground-level releases) was performed to develop site-wide normalized concentrations for various distances to be used in consequence screening analyses. Additionally, the results were compared to other dispersion analysis models for confirmation of the results.

Walker, D.A.; Lee, D.W.; Miller, R.L.

2001-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

54

Evaluation study of building-resolved urban dispersion models  

SciTech Connect

For effective emergency response and recovery planning, it is critically important that building-resolved urban dispersion models be evaluated using field data. Several full-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and semi-empirical building-resolved (SEB) models are being advanced and applied to simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas. To obtain an estimate of the current state-of-readiness of these classes of models, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funded a study to compare five CFD models and one SEB model with tracer data from the extensive Midtown Manhattan field study (MID05) conducted during August 2005 as part of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP; Allwine and Flaherty 2007). Six days of tracer and meteorological experiments were conducted over an approximately 2-km-by-2-km area in Midtown Manhattan just south of Central Park in New York City. A subset of these data was used for model evaluations. The study was conducted such that an evaluation team, independent of the six modeling teams, provided all the input data (e.g., building data, meteorological data and tracer release rates) and run conditions for each of four experimental periods simulated. Tracer concentration data for two of the four experimental periods were provided to the modeling teams for their own evaluation of their respective models to ensure proper setup and operation. Tracer data were not provided for the second two experimental periods to provide for an independent evaluation of the models. The tracer concentrations resulting from the model simulations were provided to the evaluation team in a standard format for consistency in inter-comparing model results. An overview of the model evaluation approach will be given followed by a discussion on the qualitative comparison of the respective models with the field data. Future model developments efforts needed to address modeling gaps identified from this study will also be discussed.

Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry; Brown, Mike J.; Coirier, WIlliam J.; Ericson, Shawn C.; Hansen, Olav R.; Huber, Alan H.; Kim, Sura; Leach, Martin J.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Senocak, Inanc

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

55

Validation of a Receptor–Dispersion Model Coupled with a Genetic Algorithm Using Synthetic Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A methodology for characterizing emission sources is presented that couples a dispersion and transport model with a pollution receptor model. This coupling allows the use of the backward (receptor) model to calibrate the forward (dispersion) ...

Sue Ellen Haupt; George S. Young; Christopher T. Allen

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A lattice Boltzmann model for electromagnetic waves propagating in a one-dimensional dispersive medium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first-order extended lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with special forcing terms for one-dimensional Maxwell equations exerting on a dispersive medium, described either by the Debye or Drude model, is proposed in this study. The time dependent dispersive ... Keywords: Debye model, Dispersive medium, Drude model, Electromagnetic waves, Lattice Boltzmann method, Lorentz model

Poting Chen; Chen-Hao Wang; Jeng-Rong Ho

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion Modeling with Computational Fluid Dynamics Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Federal regulation 49 CFR 193 and standard NFPA 59A require the use of validated consequence models to determine the vapor cloud dispersion exclusion zones for accidental liquefied natural gas (LNG) releases. For modeling purposes, the physical process of dispersion of LNG release can be simply divided into two stages: source term and atmospheric dispersion. The former stage occurs immediately following the release where the behavior of fluids (LNG and its vapor) is mainly controlled by release conditions. After this initial stage, the atmosphere would increasingly dominate the vapor dispersion behavior until it completely dissipates. In this work, these two stages are modeled separately by a source term model and a dispersion model due to the different parameters used to describe the physical process at each stage. The principal focus of the source term study was on LNG underwater release, since there has been far less research conducted in developing and testing models for the source of LNG release underwater compared to that for LNG release onto land or water. An underwater LNG release test was carried out to understand the phenomena that occur when LNG is released underwater and to determine the characteristics of pool formation and the vapor cloud generated by the vaporization of LNG underwater. A mathematical model was used and validated against test data to calculate the temperature of the vapor emanating from the water surface. This work used the ANSYS CFX, a general-purpose computational fluid dynamics (CFD) package, to model LNG vapor dispersion in the atmosphere. The main advantages of CFD codes are that they have the capability of defining flow physics and allowing for the representation of complex geometry and its effects on vapor dispersion. Discussed are important parameters that are essential inputs to the ANSYS CFX simulations, including the mesh size and shape, atmospheric conditions, turbulence from the source term, ground surface roughness height, and effects of obstacles. A sensitivity analysis was conducted to illustrate the impact of key parameters on the accuracy of simulation results. In addition, a series of medium-scale LNG spill tests have been performed at the Brayton Fire Training Field (BFTF), College Station, TX. The objectives of these tests were to study key parameters of modeling the physical process of LNG vapor dispersion and collect data for validating the ANSYS CFX prediction results. A comparison of test data with simulation results demonstrated that CFX described the physical behavior of LNG vapor dispersion well, and its prediction results of distances to the half lower flammable limit were in good agreement with the test data.

Qi, Ruifeng

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Plutonium explosive dispersal modeling using the MACCS2 computer code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to derive the necessary parameters to be used to establish a defensible methodology to perform explosive dispersal modeling of respirable plutonium using Gaussian methods. A particular code, MACCS2, has been chosen for this modeling effort due to its application of sophisticated meteorological statistical sampling in accordance with the philosophy of Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.145, ``Atmospheric Dispersion Models for Potential Accident Consequence Assessments at Nuclear Power Plants``. A second advantage supporting the selection of the MACCS2 code for modeling purposes is that meteorological data sets are readily available at most Department of Energy (DOE) and NRC sites. This particular MACCS2 modeling effort focuses on the calculation of respirable doses and not ground deposition. Once the necessary parameters for the MACCS2 modeling are developed and presented, the model is benchmarked against empirical test data from the Double Tracks shot of project Roller Coaster (Shreve 1965) and applied to a hypothetical plutonium explosive dispersal scenario. Further modeling with the MACCS2 code is performed to determine a defensible method of treating the effects of building structure interaction on the respirable fraction distribution as a function of height. These results are related to the Clean Slate 2 and Clean Slate 3 bunkered shots of Project Roller Coaster. Lastly a method is presented to determine the peak 99.5% sector doses on an irregular site boundary in the manner specified in NRC Regulatory Guide 1.145 (1983). Parametric analyses are performed on the major analytic assumptions in the MACCS2 model to define the potential errors that are possible in using this methodology.

Steele, C.M.; Wald, T.L.; Chanin, D.I.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

A fractional dispersion model for overland solute transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using the kinematic-wave overland flow equation and a fractional dispersion-advection equation, a process-oriented, physically-based model is developed for overland solute transport. Two scenarios, one consisting of downslope and the other of upslope rainstorm movements, are considered for numerical computations. Under these conditions, the hydrograph displays a long-tailed distribution due to the variation in flow velocity in both time and distance. The solute transport exhibits a complex behavior. Pollutographs are characterized by a steep rising limb, with a peak, and a long, stretched receding limb; whereas the solute concentration distributions feature a rapid receding limb followed by a long stretched rising limb. Downslope moving storms cause much higher peak in both hydrographs and pollutographs than do upslope moving storms. Both hydrographs and the pollutographs predicted by the fractional dispersion model are in good agreement with the data measured experimentally using a soil flume and a moving rainfall simulator.

Deng, Zhi-Qiang; de Lima, M. Isabel P.; Singh, Vijay P.; de Lima, Jo??o L. M. P.

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

60

A Dynamically Adapting Weather and Dispersion Model: The Operational Multiscale Environment Model with Grid Adaptivity (OMEGA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Operational Multiscale Environment Model with Grid Adaptivity (OMEGA) and its embedded Atmospheric Dispersion Model is a new atmospheric simulation system for real-time hazard prediction, conceived out of a need to advance the state of the ...

David P. Bacon; Nash’at N. Ahmad; Zafer Boybeyi; Thomas J. Dunn; Mary S. Hall; Pius C. S. Lee; R. Ananthakrishna Sarma; Mark D. Turner; Kenneth T. Waight III; Steve H. Young; John W. Zack

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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61

Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Nuclear Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Atmospheric Dispersion and Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Nuclear Facilities Jim Dahl Manager, Nuclear Safety Analysis Sandia National Laboratories Office: 505-284-9067 Email: jjdahl@sandia.gov SAND2012-4478P Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Topics: * Site Characteristics * Dispersion Analysis Inputs - Meteorological Data - Stability Class - Dispersion Coefficients - Deposition Velocity

62

Back-calculating emission rates for ammonia and particulate matter from area sources using dispersion modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Engineering directly impacts current and future regulatory policy decisions. The foundation of air pollution control and air pollution dispersion modeling lies in the math, chemistry, and physics of the environment. Therefore, regulatory decision making must rely upon sound science and engineering as the core of appropriate policy making (objective analysis in lieu of subjective opinion). This research evaluated particulate matter and ammonia concentration data as well as two modeling methods, a backward Lagrangian stochastic model and a Gaussian plume dispersion model. This analysis assessed the uncertainty surrounding each sampling procedure in order to gain a better understanding of the uncertainty in the final emission rate calculation (a basis for federal regulation), and it assessed the differences between emission rates generated using two different dispersion models. First, this research evaluated the uncertainty encompassing the gravimetric sampling of particulate matter and the passive ammonia sampling technique at an animal feeding operation. Future research will be to further determine the wind velocity profile as well as determining the vertical temperature gradient during the modeling time period. This information will help quantify the uncertainty of the meteorological model inputs into the dispersion model, which will aid in understanding the propagated uncertainty in the dispersion modeling outputs. Next, an evaluation of the emission rates generated by both the Industrial Source Complex (Gaussian) model and the WindTrax (backward-Lagrangian stochastic) model revealed that the calculated emission concentrations from each model using the average emission rate generated by the model are extremely close in value. However, the average emission rates calculated by the models vary by a factor of 10. This is extremely troubling. In conclusion, current and future sources are regulated based on emission rate data from previous time periods. Emission factors are published for regulation of various sources, and these emission factors are derived based upon back-calculated model emission rates and site management practices. Thus, this factor of 10 ratio in the emission rates could prove troubling in terms of regulation if the model that the emission rate is back-calculated from is not used as the model to predict a future downwind pollutant concentration.

Price, Jacqueline Elaine

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Linking a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model with Three-Dimensional Eulerian Wind Field Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A slightly simplified form of Thomson’s Lagrangian stochastic model (LSM) is presented for dispersion applications in three-dimensional (3D) flow fields. It is found that the Lagrangian velocity of a particle in 3D inhomogeneous Gaussian ...

Jeffrey C. Weil

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Investigations of MACCS2 for LANL Dispersion Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Investigations of MACCS2 Investigations of MACCS2 Investigations of MACCS2 Investigations of MACCS2 for LANL Dispersion Analysis p y DOE Workshop Germantown, MD Raymond F. Sartor, Ph.D. Safety Basis Technical Services June 5-6, 2012 Safety Basis - Technical Services Los Alamos National Laboratory Operated by Los Alamos National Security, LLC for NNSA U N C L A S S I F I E D Basic Equation for Ground-Level Release Basic Equation for Ground-Level Release                                                

65

Sensitivity of numerical dispersion modeling to explosive source parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calculation of downwind concentrations from non-traditional sources, such as explosions, provides unique challenges to dispersion models. The US Department of Energy has assigned the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) the task of estimating the impact of accidental radiological releases to the atmosphere anywhere in the world. Our experience includes responses to over 25 incidents in the past 16 years, and about 150 exercises a year. Examples of responses to explosive accidents include the 1980 Titan 2 missile fuel explosion near Damascus, Arkansas and the hydrogen gas explosion in the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident. Based on judgment and experience, we frequently estimate the source geometry and the amount of toxic material aerosolized as well as its particle size distribution. To expedite our real-time response, we developed some automated algorithms and default assumptions about several potential sources. It is useful to know how well these algorithms perform against real-world measurements and how sensitive our dispersion model is to the potential range of input values. In this paper we present the algorithms we use to simulate explosive events, compare these methods with limited field data measurements, and analyze their sensitivity to input parameters. 14 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

Baskett, R.L. (EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (USA)); Cederwall, R.T. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1991-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

66

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

model to model dense gas dispersion of CO 2 leakage. Themodified to simulate dense gas dispersion appropriate for CO3. Passive vs. dense gas dispersion The behavior of dense

Chow, Fotini K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The Oklahoma Dispersion Model: Using the Gaussian Plume Model as an Operational Management Tool for Determining Near-Surface Dispersion Conditions across Oklahoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Oklahoma Dispersion Model (ODM) represents a current innovative application of the classic Gaussian plume model in an operational setting. Utilizing a statewide mesoscale automated weather station network (the Oklahoma Mesonet) for current ...

J. D. Carlson; Derek S. Arndt

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Model for Flow and Dispersion Around Buildings and Its Validation Using Laboratory Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of airflow and pollutant dispersion around buildings is a challenging task due to the geometrical variations of buildings and the extremely complex flow created by such surface-mounted obstacles. The airflow around buildings inevitably involves impingement and separation regions, a multiple vortex system with building wakes, and jetting effects in street canyons. The interference from adjacent buildings further complicates the flow and dispersion patterns. Thus accurate simulations of such flow and pollutant transport require not only appropriate physics submodels but also accurate numerics and significant computing resources. We have developed an efficient, high resolution CFD model for such purposes, with a primary goal to support incident response and preparedness in emergency response planning, vulnerability analysis, and the development of mitigation techniques.

Chan, S.T.; Stevens, D.; Lee, R.

2000-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

The Development of a Non-Equilibrium Dispersed Flow Film Boiling Heat Transfer Modeling Package.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The dispersed flow film boiling (DFFB) heat transfer regime is important to several applications including cryogenics, rocket engines, steam generators, and in the safety analysis… (more)

Meholic, Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Extended macroscopic dispersion model with applications to confined packed beds and capillary column inverse gas chromatography.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Until present, many researchers relied on the conventional plug flow dispersion models to analyse the concentration profiles obtained from the tracer injection experiments to evaluate… (more)

Hamdan, Emad

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

CTDMPLUS: A Dispersion Model for Sources near Complex Topography. Part I: Technical Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDMPLUS), a point-source, steady-state model for complex-terrain applications, is described. The model simulates the flow and plume distortion near user-selected, three-dimensional terrain features, yet ...

Steven G. Perry

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Ensemble modeling of transport and dispersion simulations guided by machine learning hypotheses generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article an approach is presented where machine learning classifiers are used to drive an ensemble modeling method of multiple atmospheric transport and dispersion simulations. The goal is to achieve a higher spread of the results with a lower ... Keywords: Ensemble modeling, Machine learning, Transport and dispersion simulations

Andreas D. Lattner; Guido Cervone

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Finite volume methods for unidirectional dispersive wave models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the framework of the finite volume method to dispersive unidirectional water wave propagation in one space dimension. In particular we consider a KdV-BBM type equation. Explicit and IMEX Runge-Kutta type methods are used for time discretizations. The fully discrete schemes are validated by direct comparisons to analytic solutions. Invariants conservation properties are also studied. Main applications include important nonlinear phenomena such as dispersive shock wave formation, solitary waves and their various interactions.

Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

A Gaussian Plume Model of Atmospheric Dispersion Based on Second-Order Closure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A practical model of atmospheric dispersion of a passive tracer based on systematic reduction of the second-order closure transport equations using Gaussian shape assumptions is presented. The model is comparable with conventional Gaussian plume ...

R. I. Sykes; W. S. Lewellen; S. F. Parker

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evaluation of a Fast-Running Urban Dispersion Modeling System Using Joint Urban 2003 Field Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An urban dispersion modeling system was evaluated using the Joint Urban 2003 field data. The system consists of a fast-running urban airflow model (RUSTIC, for Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants) that is coupled with a ...

Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Donald A. Burrows; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants are estimated to contribute to approximately 46% of the total US anthropogenic mercury emissions and required to be regulated by maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standards. Dispersion modeling of mercury emissions using the AERMOD model and the industrial source complex short term (ISCST3) model was conducted for two representative coal-fired power plants at Coshocton and Manchester, Ohio. Atmospheric mercury concentrations, dry mercury deposition rates, and wet mercury deposition rates were predicted in a 5 x 5 km area surrounding the Coonesville and JM Stuart coal-fired power plants. In addition, the analysis results of meteorological parameters showed that wet mercury deposition is dependent on precipitation, but dry mercury deposition is influenced by various meteorological factors. 8 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

Lee, S.; Keener, T.C. [University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Lidar Sensing of Plume Dispersion: Analysis Methods and Product Quality for Light-Scattering Tracer Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis procedures are described for retrieving accurate plume information from lidar data on light-scattering particles during atmospheric dispersion experiments. Interactive computer graphics aided in the solution of the lidar equation for ...

W. L. Eberhard; G. T. McNice; S. W. Troxel

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hora, S.C. [Univ. of Hawaii, Hilo, HI (United States); Lui, C.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands); Paesler-Sauer, J. [Research Center, Karlsruhe (Germany); Helton, J.C. [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

AERMOD: A Dispersion Model for Industrial Source Applications. Part I: General Model Formulation and Boundary Layer Characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formulation of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model (AERMOD) Improvement Committee’s applied air dispersion model is described. This is the first of two articles describing ...

Alan J. Cimorelli; Steven G. Perry; Akula Venkatram; Jeffrey C. Weil; Robert?J. Paine; Robert B. Wilson; Russell F. Lee; Warren D. Peters; Roger W. Brode

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

AERMOD: A Dispersion Model for Industrial Source Applications. Part II: Model Performance against 17 Field Study Databases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of the American Meteorological Society (AMS) and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Regulatory Model (AERMOD) Improvement Committee’s applied air dispersion model against 17 field study databases is described. AERMOD is a ...

Steven G. Perry; Alan J. Cimorelli; Robert J. Paine; Roger W. Brode; Jeffrey C. Weil; Akula Venkatram; Robert B. Wilson; Russell F. Lee; Warren D. Peters

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

A Simple Model for Pollution Dispersion in a Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simplified model for dispersion in a convective boundary layer is presented and is used to diagnose crosswind-integrated concentrations, ground-level concentrations, and vertical plume spread over flat terrain for various release heights. The ...

Roland Stull; Bruce Ainslie

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Parameterization of Convective Transport in a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Model and Its Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the revision and evaluation of the interface between the convective parameterization by Emanuel and Živkovi?-Rothman and the Lagrangian particle dispersion model “FLEXPART” based on meteorological data from the European Centre ...

Caroline Forster; Andreas Stohl; Petra Seibert

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Evaluation of Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models with Measurements from Controlled Tracer Releases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three widely used Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models (LPDMs), HYSPLIT, STILT and FLEXPART are evaluated with measurements from the controlled tracer release experiments CAPTEX and ANATEX. The LPDMs are run forward in time driven by identical ...

Jennifer Hegarty; Roland R. Draxler; Ariel F. Stein; Jerome Brioude; Marikate Mountain; Janusz Eluszkiewicz; Thomas Nehrkorn; Fong Ngan; Arlyn Andrews

85

CTDMPLUS: A Dispersion Model for Sources near Complex Topography. Part II: Performance Characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Complex Terrain Dispersion Model (CTDMPLUS), described in Part I of this paper, was evaluated using the SO2 field-study data from the Lovett generating station in southeastern New York state. For perspective, CTDMPLUS estimates were also ...

James O. Paumier; Donna J. Burns; Steven G. Perry

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

A PDF Dispersion Model for Buoyant Plumes in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A probability density function (PDF) dispersion model is presented for buoyant plumes in the convective boundary layer (CBL), where the mean concentration field C is obtained from the PDFs py and pz of tracer particle position in the lateral y ...

J. C. Weil; L. A. Corio; R. P. Brower

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

An Indirect Estimation of Convective Boundary Layer Structure for Use in Pollution Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dispersion models of the convectively driven atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) often require as input meteorological parameters that are not routinely measured. These parameters usually include the surface fluxes of heat and momentum ?Cpw???and ?u?w?, the ...

James M. Wilczak; Mary Sue Phillips

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Modeling of the Fumigation Process Using Large-Eddy Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Lagrangian particle dispersion model (LPDM) is used to study fumigation of pollutants in and above the entrainment zone into a growing convective boundary layer. Probability density functions of particle location with height and time are ...

Si-Wan Kim; Chin-Hoh Moeng; Jeffrey C. Weil; Mary C. Barth

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the URBAN 2000 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tracer releases of the “URBAN 2000” urban tracer and meteorological field experiment conducted in Salt Lake City, Utah, in October 2000 provided a wealth of data for comparison with the predictions of transport and dispersion models. ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; James F. Heagy

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Modeling the Pathways and Mean Dynamics of River Plume Dispersal in the New York Bight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the dispersal of the Hudson River outflow across the New York Bight and the adjacent inner- through midshelf region. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) simulations were used to examine the mean momentum dynamics; the ...

Weifeng G. Zhang; John L. Wilkin; Robert J. Chant

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri and Eduardo Jose Maguino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GIS-Based Hazardous Gas Dispersion, Simulations and Analysis Debasis Karmakar, Samit Ray Chaudhuri of Plant Area Performed scenario-based simulation of hazardous gas dispersion from a continuous area source comparison to be made under other conditions such as Jet fire, explosion, dispersion of heavy dense gas

Shinozuka, Masanobu

92

Improvements to the EPA Industrial Source Complex Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air quality models are a key component in determining air pollution control requirements. The Industrial Source Complex (ISC2) model is a steady-state Gaussian plume model that is used for modeling point, area, volume, and line sources. Since its ...

Dennis G. Atkinson; Desmond T. Bailey; John S. Irwin; Jawad S. Touma

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Dispersion Modeling Using Ensemble Forecasts Compared to ETEX Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous numerical models are developed to predict long-range transport of hazardous air pollution in connection with accidental releases. When evaluating and improving such a model, it is important to detect uncertainties connected to the ...

Anne Grete Straume; Ernest N’Dri Koffi; Katrin Nodop

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian Model, a Two-Dimensional Model and a Three-Dimensional Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission uses MACCS2 (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2) for regulatory purposes such as planning for emergencies and cost-benefit analyses. MACCS2 uses a straight-line Gaussian model for atmospheric transport and dispersion. This model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, although only expected values of metrics of interest are used in the regulatory arena. To test the assumption that averaging numerous weather results adequately compensates for the loss of structure in the meteorology that occurs away from the point of release, average MACCS2 results have been compared with average results from a state-of-the-art, 3-dimensional LODI (Lagrangian Operational Dispersion Integrator)/ADAPT (Atmospheric Data Assimilation and Parameterization Technique) and a Lagrangian trajectory, Gaussian puff transport and dispersion model from RASCAL (Radiological Assessment System for consequence Analysis). The weather sample included 610 weather trials representing conditions for a hypothetical release at the Central Facility of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement site. The values compared were average ground concentrations and average surface-level air concentrations at several distances out to 100 miles (160.9 km) from the assumed release site.

Mitchell, J A; Molenkamp, C R; Bixler, N E; Morrow, C W; Ramsdell, Jr., J V

2004-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Detailed analysis of uranium silicide dispersion fuel swelling  

SciTech Connect

Swelling of U{sub 3}Si and U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} is analyzed. The growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate, fuel loading, and microstructural change taking place in the fuel compounds during irradiation. Several mechanisms are explored to explain the observations. The present work is aimed at a better understanding of the basic swelling phenomenon in order to accurately model irradiation behavior of uranium silicide disperson fuel. 5 refs., 10 figs.

Hofman, G.L.; Ryu, Woo-Seog.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ALTERNATIVES OF MACCS2 IN LANL DISPERSION ANALYSIS FOR ONSITE AND OFFSITE DOSES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In modeling atmospheric dispersion to determine accidental release of radiological material, one of the common statistical analysis tools used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2). MACCS2, however, has some limitations and shortfalls for both onsite and offsite applications. Alternative computer codes, which could provide more realistic calculations, are being investigated for use at LANL. In the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), the suitability of MACCS2 for the calculation of onsite worker doses was a concern; therefore, ARCON96 was chosen to replace MACCS2. YMP's use of ARCON96 provided results which clearly demonstrated the program's merit for onsite worker safety analyses in a wide range of complex configurations and scenarios. For offsite public exposures, the conservatism of MACCS2 on the treatment of turbulence phenomena at LANL is examined in this paper. The results show a factor of at least two conservatism in calculated public doses. The new EPA air quality model, AERMOD, which implements advanced meteorological turbulence calculations, is a good candidate for LANL applications to provide more confidence in the accuracy of offsite public dose projections.

Wang, John HC [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Assessment of methods for creating a national building statistics database for atmospheric dispersion modeling  

SciTech Connect

Mesoscale meteorological codes and transport and dispersion models are increasingly being applied in urban areas. Representing urban terrain characteristics in these models is critical for accurate predictions of air flow, heating and cooling, and airborne contaminant concentrations in cities. A key component of urban terrain characterization is the description of building morphology (e.g., height, plan area, frontal area) and derived properties (e.g., roughness length). Methods to determine building morphological statistics range from manual field surveys to automated processing of digital building databases. In order to improve the quality and consistency of mesoscale meteorological and atmospheric dispersion modeling, a national dataset of building morphological statistics is needed. Currently, due to the expense and logistics of conducting detailed field surveys, building statistics have been derived for only small sections of a few cities. In most other cities, modeling projects rely on building statistics estimated using intuition and best guesses. There has been increasing emphasis in recent years to derive building statistics using digital building data or other data sources as a proxy for those data. Although there is a current expansion in public and private sector development of digital building data, at present there is insufficient data to derive a national building statistics database using automated analysis tools. Too many cities lack digital data on building footprints and heights and many of the cities having such data do so for only small areas. Due to the lack of sufficient digital building data, other datasets are used to estimate building statistics. Land use often serves as means to provide building statistics for a model domain, but the strength and consistency of the relationship between land use and building morphology is largely uncertain. In this paper, we investigate whether building statistics can be correlated to the underlying land use. If a reasonable correlation exists, then a national building statistics database could be created since land use is available for the entire U.S. Digital datasets of building footprint and height information have been obtained, validated and analyzed for eight western U.S. cities covering areas ranging from 6 km{sup 2} to 1653 km{sup 2}. Building morphological statistics (including mean and standard deviation of building height, plan area fraction and density, rooftop area density, frontal area index and density, building-to-plan area ratio, complete aspect ratio, height-to-width ratio, roughness length, displacement height, and sky view factor) have been computed for each city at 250-m resolution and are being correlated to underlying land use type. This paper will summarize the building statistics from the eight cites focusing on the variability within each city and between cities as a function of land use.

Velugubantla, S. P. (Srinivas, P.); Burian, S. J. (Steven J.); Brown, M. J. (Michael J.); McKinnon, A. T. (Andrew T.); McPherson, T. N. (Timothy N.); Han, W. S. (Woo Suk)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Physical model studies of dispersion in fracture systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purposes of the laboratory-scale fracture network experiments are to study mechanisms controlling solute transport under conditions of known fracture parameters, to evaluate injection-backflow test procedures under conditions of known reservoir parameters, and to acquire data for validation of numerical models. Validation of computer codes against laboratory data collected under controlled conditions provides reassurance that the codes deal with important processes in a realistic manner. Preliminary simulations of the dual-permeability physical model have been made using the FRACSL reservoir code. These simulations permit locating electrodes and piezometers in the most advantageous positions to record tracer migration and pressure response. Much of the physical modeling effort this year was oriented towards validating the particle tracking algorithm used in FRACSL, and developing a better theoretical understanding of transport processes in fractures. Experiments were conducted in single fractures and single fracture junctions, and data on tracer migration collected. The Prickett, Naymik, and Lonnquist Random Walk aquifer simulation program has been modfied to simulate flow in single fractures. The particle tracking algorithm was also used to simulate infinite parallel plates under conditions where analytical solutions to the transport equation could be derived. The first case is for zero diffusion in the fracture, and transport based on a parabolic velocity profile. The second case is for diffusion homogenizing the tracer solution across the fracture. The particle tracking algorithm matched both analytical solutions quite well, with the same grid for both simulations. 48 refs., 41 figs., 2 tabs.

Hull, L.C.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

NREL: Energy Analysis - Geothermal Technology Analysis Models...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration Energy Analysis Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Geothermal Technology Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools...

100

Flow Boundaries in Random-Flight Dispersion Models: Enforcing the Well-Mixed Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian stochastic (LS) dispersion models often use trajectory reflection to limit the domain accessible to a particle. It is shown how the well-mixed condition (Thomson) can he expressed in the Chapman-Kolmogorov equation for a discrete-time ...

John D. Wilson; Thomas K. Flesch

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Numerical Simulation of Dispersal of Inert Seeding Material in Israel Using a Three-Dimensional Mesoscale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mesoscale model RAMS (the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System) was used to investigate the effectiveness of the broadcast static seeding method for dispersing particles into clouds, as it is used in Israel. The model was run using three nested ...

Zev Levin; Shimon O. Krichak; Tamir Reisin

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Evaluation of a Mesoscale Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling System with Observations from the 1980 Great Plains Mesoscale Tracer Field Experiment. Part I: Datasets and Meteorological Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Colorado State University mesoscale atmospheric dispersion (MAD) numerical modeling system, which consists of a prognostic mesoscale meteorological model coupled to a mesoscale Lagrangian particle dispersion model, has been used to simulate ...

Michael D. Moran; Roger A. Pielke

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Chemical analysis of uranium-niobium alloys by wavelength dispersive spectroscopy at the sigma complex  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium-niobium alloys play an important role in the nation's nuclear stockpile. It is possible to chemically quantify this alloy at a micron scale by using a technique know as wavelength dispersive spectroscopy. This report documents how this technique was used and how it is possible to reproduce measurements of this type. Discussion regarding the accuracy and precision of the measurements, the development of standards, and the comparison of different ways to model the matrices are all presented.

Papin, Pallas A.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

A summary of recent refinements to the WAKE dispersion model, a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original WAKE dispersion model a component of the HGSYSTEM/UF{sub 6} model suite, is based on Shell Research Ltd.`s HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 and was developed by the US Department of Energy for use in estimating downwind dispersion of materials due to accidental releases from gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) process buildings. The model is applicable to scenarios involving both ground-level and elevated releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant. Over the 2-year period since its creation, the WAKE model has been used to perform consequence analyses for Safety Analysis Reports (SARs) associated with gaseous diffusion plants in Portsmouth (PORTS), Paducah (PGDP), and Oak Ridge. These applications have identified the need for additional model capabilities (such as the treatment of complex terrain and time-variant releases) not present in the original utilities which, in turn, has resulted in numerous modifications to these codes as well as the development of additional, stand-alone postprocessing utilities. Consequently, application of the model has become increasingly complex as the number of executable, input, and output files associated with a single model run has steadily grown. In response to these problems, a streamlined version of the WAKE model has been developed which integrates all calculations that are currently performed by the existing WAKE, and the various post-processing utilities. This report summarizes the efforts involved in developing this revised version of the WAKE model.

Yambert, M.W.; Lombardi, D.A.; Goode, W.D. Jr.; Bloom, S.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Implementation and validation of a meteorological dispersion model applied on volcanic gas emission for studies of environmental impact.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Lagrangian atmospheric transport model FLEXPART-WRF was implemented to model dispersion of volcanic gas emitted from the three volcanoes Popocatépetl in Mexico (lat: 19.02, lon:… (more)

Landgren, Oskar A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

FPGA Based Real-time Network Traffic Analysis using Traffic Dispersion Patterns  

SciTech Connect

The problem of Network Traffic Classification (NTC) has attracted significant amount of interest in the research community, offering a wide range of solutions at various levels. The core challenge is in addressing high amounts of traffic diversity found in today's networks. The problem becomes more challenging if a quick detection is required as in the case of identifying malicious network behavior or new applications like peer-to-peer traffic that have potential to quickly throttle the network bandwidth or cause significant damage. Recently, Traffic Dispersion Graphs (TDGs) have been introduced as a viable candidate for NTC. The TDGs work by forming a network wide communication graphs that embed characteristic patterns of underlying network applications. However, these patterns need to be quickly evaluated for mounting real-time response against them. This paper addresses these concerns and presents a novel solution for real-time analysis of Traffic Dispersion Metrics (TDMs) in the TDGs. We evaluate the dispersion metrics of interest and present a dedicated solution on an FPGA for their analysis. We also present analytical measures and empirically evaluate operating effectiveness of our design. The mapped design on Virtex-5 device can process 7.4 million packets/second for a TDG comprising of 10k flows at very high accuracies of over 96%.

Khan, F; Gokhale, M; Chuah, C N

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

107

Computational fluid dynamics for LNG vapor dispersion modeling: a key parameters study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increased demand for liquefied natural gas (LNG) has led to the construction of several new LNG terminals in the United States (US) and around the world. To ensure the safety of the public, consequence modeling is used to estimate the exclusion distances. The purpose of having these exclusion distances is to protect the public from being reached by flammable vapors during a release. For LNG industry, the exclusion zones are determined by the half lower flammability limits (half LFL, 2.5% V/V). Since LNG vapors are heavier?than?air when released into atmosphere, it goes through stages, negative, neutral and positive buoyant effect. In this process, it may reach the half LFL. The primary objective of this dissertation is to advance the status of LNG vapor dispersion modeling, especially for complex scenarios (i.e. including obstacle effects). The most used software, box models, cannot assess these complex scenarios. Box models simulate the vapor in a free?obstacle environment. Due to the advancement in computing, this conservative approach has become questionable. New codes as computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been proven viable and more efficient than box models. The use of such advance tool in consequence modeling requires the refinement of some of the parameters. In these dissertation, these parameters were identified and refine through a series of field tests at the Brayton Firefighter Training Field (BFTF) as part of the Texas A&M University System (TAMUS). A total of five tests contributed to this dissertation, which three of them were designed and executed by the LNG team of the Mary Kay O'Connor Process Safety Center (MKOPSC) and the financial support from BP Global SPU Gas (BP). The data collected were used as calibration for a commercial CFD code called CFX from ANSYS. Once the CFD code was tuned, it was used in a sensitivity analysis to assess the effects of parameters in the LFL distance and the concentration levels. The dissertation discusses also the validity range for the key parameters.

Cormier, Benjamin Rodolphe

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

A Nano-Quantum Photonic Model for Justification of Dispersion in Single Crystal Film of NPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we present a nano-quantum photonic model for justification of normal dispersion in a thin crystal film of NPP. In this method, we assume a laser beam consists of a flow of energetic particles. By precise analyzing of photon interaction with pi-electron system of benzene ring in NPP crystal, we will attain refractive index (RI) in any wavelength and compare the results with experimental data.

Hassan Kaatuzian; AliAkbar Wahedy Zarch

2006-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

109

An intercomparison of models used to simulate the short-range atmospheric dispersion of agricultural ammonia emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ammonia emitted into the atmosphere from agricultural sources can have an impact on nearby sensitive ecosystems, either through elevated ambient concentrations or dry/wet deposition to vegetation and soil surfaces. Short-range atmospheric dispersion ... Keywords: Agriculture, Ammonia, Atmospheric dispersion model, Evaluation, Validation

Mark R. Theobald; Per LøFstrøM; John Walker; Helle V. Andersen; Poul Pedersen; Antonio Vallejo; Mark A. Sutton

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Integral transform solution of a two-dimensional model for contaminant dispersion in rivers and channels with spatially variable coefficients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generalized Integral Transform Technique (GITT) is employed to obtain numerical-analytical solutions for mathematical models that predict the dispersion of dissolved pollutants in rivers, streams and channels with either symmetric or asymmetric flow. ... Keywords: Contaminants dispersion, Environmental impact, Hybrid methods, Integral transforms, Symbolic computation

F. P. J. de Barros; W. B. Mills; R. M. Cotta

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

User-Oriented Two-Dimensional Measure of Effectiveness for the Evaluation of Transport and Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional measure of effectiveness for comparing hazardous material transport and dispersion model predictions and field observations has been developed. This measure is used for comparing predictions and observations paired in space and ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; James F. Heagy

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Importance of Using Observations of Mixing Depths in order to Avoid Large Prediction Errors by a Transport and Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing depth of the boundary layer is an input to most atmospheric transport and dispersion (ATD) models, which obtain mixing depths in one of four ways: 1) observations by radiosondes, sodars, or other devices; 2) simulations by regional or ...

J. M. White; J. F. Bowers; S. R. Hanna; J. K. Lundquist

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Models in Decision Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Any statistical analysis or decision analysis contains numerical inputs of which we are unsure. Some of our uncertainty arises from physical randomness which we can model in various ways, ideally through probability. Some relates to judgmental estimates of qualities about which we may be unsure in many different respects. There are other uncertainties involved, however: some relates to ambiguity and imprecision of meaning; some relate to lack of clarity in the objectives which the analysis seeks to meet; some relate to the numerical accuracy of calculations. Suppose, for instance, that we need to consider the probability of a conservative government being returned at the next election. The probability, a subjective probability, itself is a number that the statistician or decision maker has to judge. In some ways it may be related to 'hard' data, but there will always be an element of judgement in setting its value. But one might also ask: what is meant by a 'conservative' government; ...

Simon French

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An Axial Dispersion Model for Gas - Liquid Reactors Based on the Penetration Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An axial dispersion reactor model for gas -- liquid reaction systems is proposed in this paper based on the penetration theory. The mass transfer mechanism accompanied by a chemical irreversible first-order reaction is mathematically treated in a new way in order to use its results to develop the model conveniently. Analytical solutions can be obtained for the equation system involving linear differential equations by using of the eigenvalues of the equation system. In addition, an iteration procedure is given to solve the nonlinear differential equation system numerically. The influences of the important model parameters on the concentration profile, the mass transfer and the reactant conversion are also studied. 1997 Elsevier Science S.A.

Jinfu Wang; Shejiao Han; Fei Wei; Zhiqing Yu; Yong Jin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The Use of Global and Mesoscale Meteorological Model Data to Predict the Transport and Dispersion of Tracer Plumes over Washington, D.C.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The data from a yearlong tracer dispersion experiment over Washington, D.C., in 1984 were used to evaluate Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) dispersion model calculations using coarse global meteorological ...

Roland R. Draxler

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

ARAC dispersion modeling of the August 1998 Tracy, California tire fire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At about 4:30 pm PDT on Friday, August 7, 1998 a fire ignited the large tire disposal pit of Royster Tire Co. on Macarthur Drive about 5 km (3 miles) south of downtown Tracy, California. While providing on-scene mutual aid late Friday night, the LLNL Fire Department called and requested that the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) make a plume forecast for Saturday. The response team in the field was interested in the forecasted location as well as an estimate of potential health effects on the following day. Not having any previous experience with tire fire source terms, ARAC assessors used a constant unit source rate (1 g/s) of particulate and produced plots showing only the location of the ground-level normalized time-integrated air concentrations from the smoke plume. Very early Saturday morning the assessors faxed plots of ground-level smoke air concentrations forecasted for Saturday from 6 am through 6 pm PDT to the Tracy Fire Emergency Operations Center. (As a part of standard procedure, before delivering the plots, the assessors notified ARAC's DOE sponsor.) Fortunately due to the intense heat from the fire, the dense black smoke immediately lofted into the air preventing high ground-level concentrations close to the tire dump. Later on Saturday morning ARAC forecasted a second set of plume integrated air concentrations for Sunday. By Monday the intensity of the fire lessened, and ARAC's support was no longer requested. Following ARAC's response, we made a third calculation on a large scale of the continuous smoke dispersion for 3 days after the fire. A newspaper photograph showed the plume initially rising toward the northeast and the upper part of the smoke cloud turning counterclockwise toward the north. Winds from ARAC's mesoscale prognostic model reproduced this plume structure, while data from the Friday afternoon sounding from Oakland did not. On the 250 km scale, using gridded wind outputs from our mesoscale forecast model to initialize the dispersion model produced more realistic results than interpolating between the sparse surface and upper air wind observations available from airports. Dispersion model results showed that some of the smoke eventually mixed down to the ground to the east and south of the fire Friday night. News articles also indicated smoke extending over Manteca, Lathrop, and Modesto Friday night. More elevated smoke was brought to the ground due to the extensive daytime vertical mixing on Saturday and Sunday. The model results reflected these observations showing wide patterns of diffuse ground-level smoke extended along the San Joaquin Valley from Sacramento to Fresno on Saturday and Sunday.

Aluzzi, F J; Baskett, R L; Bowen, B M; Foster, C S; Pace, J C; Pobanz, B; Vogt, P J

1998-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

117

SDI CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Remediation (SRR) Organization requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) develop a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) method to mix and blend the miscible contents of the blend tanks to ensure the contents are properly blended before they are transferred from the blend tank; such as, Tank 50H, to the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) feed tank. The work described here consists of two modeling areas. They are the mixing modeling analysis during miscible liquid blending operation, and the flow pattern analysis during transfer operation of the blended liquid. The transient CFD governing equations consisting of three momentum equations, one mass balance, two turbulence transport equations for kinetic energy and dissipation rate, and one species transport were solved by an iterative technique until the species concentrations of tank fluid were in equilibrium. The steady-state flow solutions for the entire tank fluid were used for flow pattern analysis, for velocity scaling analysis, and the initial conditions for transient blending calculations. A series of the modeling calculations were performed to estimate the blending times for various jet flow conditions, and to investigate the impact of the cooling coils on the blending time of the tank contents. The modeling results were benchmarked against the pilot scale test results. All of the flow and mixing models were performed with the nozzles installed at the mid-elevation, and parallel to the tank wall. From the CFD modeling calculations, the main results are summarized as follows: (1) The benchmark analyses for the CFD flow velocity and blending models demonstrate their consistency with Engineering Development Laboratory (EDL) and literature test results in terms of local velocity measurements and experimental observations. Thus, an application of the established criterion to SRS full scale tank will provide a better, physically-based estimate of the required mixing time, and elevation of transfer pump for minimum sludge disturbance. (2) An empirical equation for a tank with no cooling coils agrees reasonably with the current modeling results for the dual jet. (3) From the sensitivity study of the cooling coils, it was found that the tank mixing time for the coiled tank was about two times longer than that of the tank fluid with no coils under the 1/10th scale, while the coiled tank required only 50% longer than the one without coils under the full scale Tank 50H. In addition, the time difference is reduced when the pumping U{sub o}d{sub o} value is increased for a given tank. (4) The blending time for T-shape dual jet pump is about 20% longer than that of 15{sup o} upward V-shape pump under the 1/10th pilot-scale tank, while the time difference between the two pumps is about 12% for the full-scale Tank 50H. These results are consistent with the literature information. (5) A transfer pump with a solid-plate suction screen operating at 130 gpm can be located 9.5 inches above settled sludge for 2 in screen height in a 85 ft waste tank without disturbing any sludge. Detailed results are summarized in Table 13. Final pump performance calculations were made by using the established CW pump design, and operating conditions to satisfy the two requirements of minimum sludge disturbance, and adequate blending of tank contents. The final calculation results show that the blending times for the coiled and uncoiled tanks coupled with the CW pump design are 159 and 83 minutes, respectively. All the results are provided in Table 16.

Lee, S.

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

Crustal thinning between the Ethiopian and East African Plateaus from modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The East African and Ethiopian Plateaus have long been recognized to be part of a much larger topographic anomaly on the African Plate called the African Superswell. One of the few places within the African Superswell that exhibit elevations of less than 1 km is southeastern Sudan and northern Kenya, an area containing both Mesozoic and Cenozoic rift basins. Crustal structure and uppermost mantle velocities are investigated in this area by modeling Rayleigh wave dispersion. Modeling results indicate an average crustal thickness of 25 {+-} 5 km, some 10-15 km thinner than the crust beneath the adjacent East African and Ethiopian Plateaus. The low elevations can therefore be readily attributed to an isostatic response from crustal thinning. Low Sn velocities of 4.1-4.3 km/s also characterize this region.

Benoit, M H; Nyblade, A A; Pasyanos, M E

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Triple-Pomeron Matrix Model for Dispersive Corrections to Nucleon-Nucleus Total Cross Section  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersive corrections to the total cross section for high-energy scattering from a heavy nucleus are calculated using a matrix model, based on the triple-Pomeron behavior of diffractive scattering from a single nucleon, for the cross section operator connecting different states of the projectile nucleon . Energy-dependent effects due to the decrease in longitudinal momentum transfers and the opening of more channels with increasing energy are included. The three leading terms in an expansion in the number of inelastic transitions are evaluated and compared to exact results for the model in the uniform nuclear density approximation for the the scattering of nucleons from Pb^{208} for laboratory momenta ranging from 50 to 200 GeV/c.

Harrington, D R

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Study of the Effects of Obstacles in Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion using CFD Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The evaluation of the potential hazards related with the operation of an LNG terminal includes possible release scenarios with the consequent flammable vapor dispersion within the facility; therefore, it is important to know the behavior of this phenomenon through the application of advanced simulation tools. Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) tools are often used to estimate the exclusion zones in an event of accidental LNG spill. In practice these releases are more likely to occur in the confines of complex geometries with solid obstacles such as LNG terminals, and LNG processing plants. The objective of this research is to study the effects that different obstacles have over the LNG vapor dispersion and the safety distance reduction caused by enhanced mixing. Through parametric analysis it is demonstrated that height, width and shape of the obstacles play an important role in the vapor concentration reduction. The findings of this research may be applied in the design stage of an LNG terminal, to improve the design of passive barriers, and for designing better layout configurations for storage tanks. Simulations results performed with FLACS (Flame Acceleration Simulator), a CFD solver, confirmed that these applications help to reduce safety distances.

Ruiz Vasquez, Roberto

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

ATR LEU Monothlic and Dispersed with 10B Loading Minimization Design – Neutronics Performance Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The present work investigates the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel with 10B loading minimization design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of these optimized fuel designs. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the 235U and minimize the 10B loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The fuel depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K eff versus effective full power days (EFPD) in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel cases demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPD plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and 235U enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness. The proposed LEU fuel meat varies from 0.203 mm (8.0 mil) to 0.254 mm (10.0 mil) at the inner four fuel plates (1-4) and outer four fuel plates (16-19). In addition, an optimized LEU dispersed (U7Mo) case with all the fuel meat thickness of 0.635 mm (25 mil) was also proposed. Then, for both Monolithic and dispersed cases, a burnable absorber – 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the higher to average ratio of the inner/outer heat flux more effectively. The final minimized 10B loading for LEU case studies will have 0.635 g in the LEU fuel meat at the inner 2 fuel plates (1-2) and outer 2 fuel plates (18-19), which can achieve peak to average ratios similar to those for the ATR reference HEU case study. The investigation of this paper shows the optimized LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) and Dispersed (U7Mo) cases can all meet the LEU conversion objectives.

G. S. Chang

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

A Study of the Effects of Different Urban Wind Models on Dispersion Patterns Using Joint Urban 2003 Data  

SciTech Connect

The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) Dispersion Modeling System has been developed to rapidly compute the transport and dispersion of toxic agent releases in the vicinity of buildings. It is composed of a wind solver, an 'urbanized' Lagrangian random-walk model, and a graphical user interface. QUIC has two different wind models: (a) The QUIC-URB wind solver, an empirically-based diagnostic wind model and (b) The QUIC-CFD (RANS) solver, based on the 3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this paper, we discuss the effect of different wind models on dispersion patterns in dense built-up areas. The model-computed wind from the two urban wind models- QUIC-URB and QUIC-CFD are used to drive the dispersion model. The concentration fields are then compared to measurements from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 field experiment. QUIC produces high-resolution 3-D mean wind and concentration fields around buildings, in addition to deposition on the ground and building surfaces. It has options for different release types, including point, moving point, line, area, and volumetric sources, as well as dense gas, explosive buoyant rise, multi-particle size, bioslurry, and two-phase releases. Other features include indoor infiltration, a pressure solver, outer grid simulations, vegetative canopies, and population exposure calculations. It has been used for biological agent sensor siting in cities, vulnerability assessments for heavier-than-air chemical releases at industrial facilities, and clean-up assessments for radiological dispersal device (RDD) releases in cities (e.g., see Linger et al., 2005; Brown, 2006a, b). QUIC has also been used for dust transport studies (Bowker et al., 2007a) and for the impact of highway sound barriers on the transport and dispersion of vehicle emissions (Bowker et al., 2007b).

Gowardhan, A A; Brown, M J

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

123

Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Piecewise Linear Modeling and Analysis explains in detail all possible model descriptions to efficiently store piecewise linear functions starting with the Chua descriptions. Detailed explanation on how the model parameter can be obtained ...

Domine M. W. Leenaerts; Wim M. Van Bokhoven

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment. Volume 3, Appendices C, D, E, F, and G  

SciTech Connect

The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the third of a three-volume document describing the project and contains descriptions of the probability assessment principles; the expert identification and selection process; the weighting methods used; the inverse modeling methods; case structures; and summaries of the consequence codes.

Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

(ALE) Method for Thermal and Dispersed-Phase Analysis of Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study relates to the enhancement of cooling properties of Nano fluid for various cooling system, where dispersion of Nano particles play a major character.

126

Simulation of Stability Analysis for Distribution Systems with Dispersed Generation Using Matlab/Simulink.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis is to investigate the voltage sag, transient stability and operation feasibility of power islanding with different types of dispersed generation in distribution systems.… (more)

Huang, Kun-Cyuan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hydrogen Delivery Analysis Models  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

model for delivery system component costs and performance: Components Model Delivery scenario model for Urban and Rural Interstate markets and demand levels (Mkt....

128

An Evaluation of Two NEXRAD Wind Retrieval Methodologies and Their Use in Atmospheric Dispersion Models  

SciTech Connect

Two entirely different methods for retrieving 3-D fields of horizontal winds from NEXRAD radial velocities have been evaluated using radar wind profiler measurements to determine whether routine wind retrievals would be useful for atmospheric dispersion model applications. The first method uses a physical algorithm based on four-dimensional variational data assimilation and the second simpler method uses a statistical technique based on an analytic formulation of the background error covariance. Both methods can be run in near real time, but the simpler method executed about 2.5 times faster than the four-dimensional variational method. The observed multi-day and diurnal variations in wind speed and direction were reproduced by both methods within about 1.5 km of the ground in the vicinity of Oklahoma City during July 2003. However, wind retrievals overestimated the strength of the nighttime low-level jet by as much as 65%. The wind speeds and directions obtained from both methods were usually similar when compared to profiler measurements, and neither method out-performed the other statistically. Within a dispersion model framework, the 3-D wind fields and transport patterns were often better represented when the wind retrievals were included along with operational data. Despite uncertainties in the wind speed and direction obtained from the wind retrievals that is higher than from remote sensing radar wind profilers, the inclusion of the wind retrievals are likely to produce more realistic temporal variations in the winds aloft than would be obtained by interpolation using the available radiosondes, especially during rapidly changing synoptic and mesoscale conditions.

Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Copeland, Jeffrey H.; Sun, Jenny

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Particle Dispersion and Mixing of Conservative Properties in an Eddy-Resolving Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the diffusive behavior of the flow field in an eddy-resolving, primitive equation circulation model. Analysis of fluid particle trajectories illustrates the transport mechanisms, which are leading to uniform tracer and potential ...

Claus W. Böning; Michael D. Cox

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Short-Range Atmospheric Dispersion of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

layer model for heavy gas dispersion from natural sources:data to analyze dense gas dispersion modeling issues. Atmosforum (perf) dense gas dispersion modeling project. Atmos

Cortis, Andrea; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model  

SciTech Connect

In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

Gowardhan, Akshay A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pardyjak, Eric R [UNIV OF UTAH; Senocak, Inanc [BOISE STATE UNIV

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution winds indicated agreement with fatalities in the immediate area and visible damage to vegetation.

Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Forward model calculations for determining isotopic compositions of materials used in a radiological dispersal device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the event that a radiological dispersal device (RDD) is detonated in the U.S. or near U.S. interests overseas, it will be crucial that the actors involved in the event can be identified quickly. If irradiated nuclear fuel is used as the dispersion material for the RDD, it will be beneficial for law enforcement officials to quickly identify where the irradiated nuclear fuel originated. One signature which may lead to the identification of the spent fuel origin is the isotopic composition of the RDD debris. The objective of this research was to benchmark a forward model methodology for predicting isotopic composition of spent nuclear fuel used in an RDD while at the same time optimizing the fidelity of the model to reduce computational time. The code used in this study was Monteburns-2.0. Monteburns is a Monte Carlo based neutronic code utilizing both MCNP and ORIGEN. The size of the burnup step used in Monteburns was tested and found to converge at a value of 3,000 MWd/MTU per step. To ensure a conservative answer, 2,500 MWd/MTU per step was used for the benchmarking process. The model fidelity ranged from the following: 2-dimensional pin cell, multiple radial-region pin cell, modified pin cell, 2D assembly, and 3D assembly. The results showed that while the multi-region pin cell gave the highest level of accuracy, the difference in uncertainty between it and the 2D pin cell (0.07% for 235U) did not warrant the additional computational time required. The computational time for the multiple radial-region pin cell was 7 times that of the 2D pin cell. For this reason, the 2D pin cell was used to benchmark the isotopics with data from other reactors. The reactors from which the methodology was benchmarked were Calvert Cliffs Unit #1, Takahama Unit #3, and Trino Vercelles. Calvert Cliffs is a pressurized water reactor (PWR) using Combustion Engineering 14??14 assemblies. Takahama is a PWR using Mitsubishi Heavy Industries 17??17 assemblies. Trino Vercelles is a PWR using non-standard lattice assemblies. The measured isotopic concentrations from all three of the reactors showed good agreement with the calculated values.

Burk, David Edward

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Urban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy fluxes, at averaging times from 10 min to 1 h, are needed as inputs to most state-of-the-art dispersion models. The sensible heat flux is a major priority, because it is combined with the momentum flux to estimate the stability, the ...

Steven Hanna; Edson Marciotto; Rex Britter

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Urban Energy Fluxes in Built-Up Downtown Areas and Variations across the Urban Area, for Use in Dispersion Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface energy fluxes, at averaging times from 10 min to 1 h, are needed as inputs to most state-of-the-art dispersion models. The sensible heat flux is a major priority, because it is combined with the momentum flux to ...

Hanna, Steven

137

12.141 Electron Microprobe Analysis by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry, January (IAP) 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered ...

Chatterjee, Nilanjan

138

A RECOMMENDED PASQUILL-GIFFORD STABILITY CLASSIFICATION METHOD FOR SAFETY BASIS ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION MODELING AT SRS  

SciTech Connect

Several of the most common methods for estimating Pasquill-Gifford (PG) stability (turbulence) class were evaluated for use in modeling the radiological consequences of SRS accidental releases using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Ver. 2 (MACCS2). Evaluation criteria included: (1) the ability of the method to represent diffusion characteristics above a predominantly forested landscape at SRS, (2) suitability of the method to provide data consistent with the formulation of the MACCS2 model, and (3) the availability of onsite meteorological data to support implementation of the method The evaluation resulted in a recommendation that PG stability classification for regulatory applications at SRS should be based on measurements of the standard deviation of the vertical component of wind direction fluctuations, {sigma}{sub e}, collected from the 61-m level of the SRS meteorological towers, and processed in full accordance with EPA-454/R-99-005 (EPA, 2000). This approach provides a direct measurement that is fundamental to diffusion and captures explicitly the turbulence generated by both mechanical and buoyant forces over the characteristic surface (forested) of SRS. Furthermore, due to the potentially significant enhancement of horizontal fluctuations in wind direction from the occurrence of meander at night, the use of {sigma}{sub e} will ensure a reasonably conservative estimate of PG stability class for use in dispersion models that base diffusion calculations on a single value of PG stability class. Furthermore, meteorological data bases used as input for MACCS2 calculations should contain hourly data for five consecutive annual periods from the most recent 10 years.

Hunter, C.

2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

139

Telegraph-type versus diffusion-type models of turbulent relative dispersion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of two equations describing the evolution of the probability density function (PDF) of the relative dispersion in turbulent flow are compared by investigating their solutions: the Richardson diffusion equation with the drift term and the self-similar telegraph equation derived by Ogasawara and Toh [J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 75, 083401 (2006)]. The solution of the self-similar telegraph equation vanishes at a finite point, which represents persistent separation of a particle pair, while that of the Richardson equation extends infinitely just after the initial time. Each equation has a similarity solution, which is found to be an asymptotic solution of the initial value problem. The time lag has a dominant effect on the relaxation process into the similarity solution. The approaching time to the similarity solution can be reduced by advancing the time of the similarity solution appropriately. Batchelor scaling, a scaling law relevant to initial separation, is observed only for the telegraph case. For both models, we estimate the Richardson constant, based on their similarity solutions.

Kentaro Kanatani; Takeshi Ogasawara; Sadayoshi Toh

2007-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of Fire Dynamics Simulator for Liquefied Natural Gas Vapor Dispersion Hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration (PHMSA) require vapor dispersion modeling as part of a siting analysis for liquefied… (more)

Kohout, Andrew Joseph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of fire dynamics simulator for liquefied natural gas vapor dispersion hazards.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and Pipeline and Hazardous Material Administration (PHMSA) require vapor dispersion modeling as part of a siting analysis for… (more)

Kohout, Andrew Joseph

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Atmospheric Dispersion from Elevated Sources in an Urban Area: Comparison between Tracer Experiments and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion experiments were carried out in the Copenhagen area under neutral and unstable conditions. The tracer sulphurhexafluoride was released without buoyancy from a tower at a height of 115 m and then collected at ground-level ...

Sven-Erik Gryning; Erik Lyck

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comparisons of Transport and Dispersion Model Predictions of the Joint Urban 2003 Field Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a hazardous material release in a city or densely populated area, effective mitigation requires an understanding of the transport and dispersion of these hazards in the complex urban environment. Improved characterization and understanding of ...

Steve Warner; Nathan Platt; Jeffry T. Urban; James F. Heagy

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

A Dispersion Model Evaluation Study for Real-Time Application in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A few tracer experiments were carried out in autumn 1984 and summer 1985 at the Lago Brasimone site, on the Appennini Mountains approximately 50 km south of Bologna with the purpose assessing the atmospheric dispersion of pollutants under ...

F. Desiato

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Enterprise modeling and analysis: an enterprise modeling and analysis toolkit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fully integrated modeling and analysis toolkit, which facilitates multi-perspective knowledge capturing, sharing and reusing, is necessary for today's enterprises to meet the challenges of the ever more competitive global marketplace. In this paper ...

Dursun Delen; Perakath C. Benjamin

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

SPRAYTRAN 1.0 User’s Guide: A GIS-Based Atmospheric Spray Droplet Dispersion Modeling System  

SciTech Connect

SPRAY TRANsport (SPRAYTRAN) is a comprehensive dispersion modeling system that is used to simulate the offsite drift of pesticides from spray applications. SPRAYTRAN functions as a console application within Environmental System Research Institute’s ArcMap Geographic Information System (Version 9.x) and integrates the widely-used, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-approved CALifornia PUFF (CALPUFF) dispersion model and model components to simulate longer-range transport and diffusion in variable terrain and spatially/temporally varying meteorological (e.g., wind) fields. Area sources, which are used to define spray blocks in SPRAYTRAN, are initialized using output files generated from a separate aerial-spray-application model called AGDISP (AGricultural DISPersal). The AGDISP model is used for estimating the amount of pesticide deposited to the spray block based on spraying characteristics (e.g., pesticide type, spray nozzles, and aircraft type) and then simulating the near-field (less than 300-m) drift from a single pesticide application. The fraction of pesticide remaining airborne from the AGDISP near-field simulation is then used by SPRAYTRAN for simulating longer-range (greater than 300 m) drift and deposition of the pesticide.

Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Bird, S. L.; Thistle, Harold W.

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Laboratories for the 21st Century: Best Practices Guide: Modeling Exhaust Dispersion for Specifying Acceptable Exhaust/Intake Design (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

L L a b o r a t o r i e s f o r t h e 2 1 s t C e n t u r y : B e s t P r a c t i c e s Modeling exhaust dispersion for specifying acceptable exhaust/intake designs Introduction This guide provides general information on specify- ing acceptable exhaust and intake designs. It also offers various quantitative approaches (dispersion modeling) that can be used to determine expected concentration (or dilution) levels resulting from exhaust system emissions. In addition, the guide describes methodologies that can be employed to operate laboratory exhaust systems in a safe and energy efficient manner by using variable air volume (VAV) technology. The guide, one in a series on best practices for laboratories, was produced by Laboratories for the 21st Century (Labs21), a joint pro- gram of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

148

Modeling the effects of topography and wind on atmospheric dispersion of CO2 surface leakage at geologic carbon sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the potential impacts of unexpected surface releases of CO{sub 2} is an essential part of risk assessment for geologic carbon sequestration sites. We have extended a mesoscale atmospheric model to model dense gas dispersion of CO{sub 2} leakage. The hazard from CO{sub 2} leakage is greatest in regions with topographic depressions where the dense gas can pool. Simulation of dispersion in idealized topographies shows that CO{sub 2} can persist even under high winds. Simulation of a variety of topographies, winds, and release conditions allows the generation of a catalog of simulation results that can be queried to estimate potential impacts at actual geologic carbon sequestration sites.

Chow, Fotini K.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

An analysis of uranium dispersal and health effects using a Gulf War case study.  

SciTech Connect

The study described in this report used mathematical modeling to estimate health risks from exposure to depleted uranium (DU) during the 1991 Gulf War for both U.S. troops and nearby Iraqi civilians. The analysis found that the risks of DU-induced leukemia or birth defects are far too small to result in an observable increase in these health effects among exposed veterans or Iraqi civilians. Only a few veterans in vehicles accidentally struck by U.S. DU munitions are predicted to have inhaled sufficient quantities of DU particulate to incur any significant health risk (i.e., the possibility of temporary kidney damage from the chemical toxicity of uranium and about a 1% chance of fatal lung cancer). The health risk to all downwind civilians is predicted to be extremely small. Recommendations for monitoring are made for certain exposed groups. Although the study found fairly large calculational uncertainties, the models developed and used are generally valid. The analysis was also used to assess potential uranium health hazards for workers in the weapons complex. No illnesses are projected for uranium workers following standard guidelines; nonetheless, some research suggests that more conservative guidelines should be considered.

Marshall, Albert Christian

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

ROCK PROPERTIES MODEL ANALYSIS MODEL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Analysis and Model Report (AMR) is to document Rock Properties Model (RPM) 3.1 with regard to input data, model methods, assumptions, uncertainties and limitations of model results, and qualification status of the model. The report also documents the differences between the current and previous versions and validation of the model. The rock properties models are intended principally for use as input to numerical physical-process modeling, such as of ground-water flow and/or radionuclide transport. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. This work was conducted in accordance with the following planning documents: WA-0344, ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1998'' (SNL 1997, WA-0358), ''3-D Rock Properties Modeling for FY 1999'' (SNL 1999), and the technical development plan, Rock Properties Model Version 3.1, (CRWMS M&O 1999c). The Interim Change Notice (ICNs), ICN 02 and ICN 03, of this AMR were prepared as part of activities being conducted under the Technical Work Plan, TWP-NBS-GS-000003, ''Technical Work Plan for the Integrated Site Model, Process Model Report, Revision 01'' (CRWMS M&O 2000b). The purpose of ICN 03 is to record changes in data input status due to data qualification and verification activities. These work plans describe the scope, objectives, tasks, methodology, and implementing procedures for model construction. The constraints, caveats, and limitations associated with this model are discussed in the appropriate text sections that follow. The work scope for this activity consists of the following: (1) Conversion of the input data (laboratory measured porosity data, x-ray diffraction mineralogy, petrophysical calculations of bound water, and petrophysical calculations of porosity) for each borehole into stratigraphic coordinates; (2) Re-sampling and merging of data sets; (3) Development of geostatistical simulations of porosity; (4) Generation of derivative property models via linear coregionalization with porosity; (5) Post-processing of the simulated models to impart desired secondary geologic attributes and to create summary and uncertainty models; and (6) Conversion of the models into real-world coordinates. The conversion to real world coordinates is performed as part of the integration of the RPM into the Integrated Site Model (ISM) 3.1; this activity is not part of the current analysis. The ISM provides a consistent volumetric portrayal of the rock layers, rock properties, and mineralogy of the Yucca Mountain site and consists of three components: (1) Geologic Framework Model (GFM); (2) RPM, which is the subject of this AMR; and (3) Mineralogic Model. The interrelationship of the three components of the ISM and their interface with downstream uses are illustrated in Figure 1. Figure 2 shows the geographic boundaries of the RPM and other component models of the ISM.

Clinton Lum

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

151

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of energy analysis models, tools, and software ...

152

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Most of these tools can be applied on a global, regional, local, or project basis. Energy Data for Decision Makers Crosscutting Analysis Models and Tools Technology Analysis Models...

153

An Integral Formulation for the Dispersion Parameters in a Shear–Buoyancy-Driven Planetary Boundary Layer for Use in a Gaussian Model for Tall Stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integral parameterization of the dispersion coefficients ?y and ?z in a shear–buoyancy-driven atmospheric boundary layer is developed by using a model for the frequency spectrum of eddy energy. The formulation relies on Taylor classical ...

C. Mangia; G. A. Degrazia; U. Rizza

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

DENSE MULTIPHASE FLOW SIMULATION: CONTINUUM MODEL FOR POLY-DISPERSED SYSTEMS USING KINETIC THEORY  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of the project was to verify the applicability of the FCMOM approach to the kinetic equations describing the particle flow dynamics. For monodispersed systems the fundamental equation governing the particle flow dynamics is the Boltzmann equation. During the project, the FCMOM was successfully applied to several homogeneous and in-homogeneous problems in different flow regimes, demonstrating that the FCMOM has the potential to be used to solve efficiently the Boltzmann equation. However, some relevant issues still need to be resolved, i.e. the homogeneous cooling problem (inelastic particles cases) and the transition between different regimes. In this report, the results obtained in homogeneous conditions are discussed first. Then a discussion of the validation results for in-homogeneous conditions is provided. And finally, a discussion will be provided about the transition between different regimes. Alongside the work on development of FCMOM approach studies were undertaken in order to provide insights into anisotropy or particles kinetics in riser hydrodynamics. This report includes results of studies of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures and analysis of momentum re-distribution in risers due to particle-particle and fluid-particle interactions. The study of multiphase flow with unequal granular temperatures entailed both simulation and experimental studies of two particles sizes in a riser and, a brief discussion of what was accomplished will be provided. And finally, a discussion of the analysis done on momentum re-distribution of gas-particles flow in risers will be provided. In particular a discussion of the remaining work needed in order to improve accuracy and predictability of riser hydrodynamics based on two-fluid models and how they can be used to model segregation in risers.

Moses Bogere

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

155

Final Technical Report: Development of the DUSTRAN GIS-Based Complex Terrain Model for Atmospheric Dust Dispersion  

SciTech Connect

Activities at U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) training and testing ranges can be sources of dust in local and regional airsheds governed by air-quality regulations. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory just completed a multi-year project to develop a fully tested and documented atmospheric dispersion modeling system (DUST TRANsport or DUSTRAN) to assist the DoD in addressing particulate air-quality issues at military training and testing ranges.

Allwine, K Jerry; Rutz, Frederick C.; Shaw, William J.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Fritz, Brad G.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Seiple, Timothy E.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Development of a Geographic Information System Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System for Use in the Planning Implementation of Military Training Exercises  

SciTech Connect

As residential areas continue to develop near military sites, possible impacts from military traffic and exercises become of greater concern. Of particular concern is the effect of particulate matter and atmospheric dust dispersion on air quality caused by such maneuvers. To aid this problem, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory proposed a plan to develop, document, and test a modeling system in support of dust dispersion reduction and management near government sites. To accomplish this task a model interface was developed that would be user friendly yet sophisticated enough to accommodate the varying needs of the client. One such need was for the modeling system to be capable of providing data for diverse locations and varying sites. To accomplish this task, the dust dispersion modeling system needed to be integrated with a geographic information system (GIS). Through use of the GIS application, data maps contained within the application could be used to create new sites. The GIS application would also allow the user to enter the point, area, or line source required to run the dispersion modeling system. Incorporating the GIS with the model would allow the user to view plume rise and expansion over actual data maps of the desired site. By using historical, current, and user defined data, near real-time dust dispersion models will aid in estimating and managing the effects of military exercises on the environment and nonmilitary personnel.

Crandall, D.; Rutz, F.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Modeling, Testing and Analysis to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis on AddThis.com... Goals Research & Development Testing and Analysis Workplace Charging Community and Fleet Readiness Workforce Development Plug-in Electric Vehicle Basics Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by

158

NREL: Energy Analysis - Market Analysis Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Analysis Search More Search Options Site Map Printable Version Market Analysis Models and Tools The following is a list of models and tools that are used for market...

159

Representative element modeling of fracture systems based on stochastic analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An important task associated with reservoir simulation is the development of a technique to model a large number of fractures with a single description. Representative elements must be developed before reservoir scale simulations can adequately address the effects of intersecting fracture systems on fluid migration. An effective element model will sharply reduce the cost and complexity of large scale simulations to bring these to manageable levels. Stochastic analysis is a powerful tool which can determine the hydraulic and transport characteristics of intersecting sets of statistically defined fractures. Hydraulic and transport characteristics are required to develop representative elements. Given an assumption of fully developed laminar flow, the net fracture conductivities and hence flow velocities can be determined from descriptive statistics of fracture spacing, orientation, aperture, and extent. The distribution of physical characteristics about their mean leads to a distribution of the associated conductivities. The variance of hydraulic conductivity induces dispersion into the transport process. The simplest of fracture systems, a single set of parallel fractures, is treated to demonstrate the usefulness of stochastic analysis. Explicit equations for conductivity of an element are developed and the dispersion characteristics are shown. The analysis reveals the dependence of the representative element properties on the various parameters used to describe the fracture system. 10 refs., 3 figs.

Clemo, T.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ventilation Model and Analysis Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This model and analysis report develops, validates, and implements a conceptual model for heat transfer in and around a ventilated emplacement drift. This conceptual model includes thermal radiation between the waste package and the drift wall, convection from the waste package and drift wall surfaces into the flowing air, and conduction in the surrounding host rock. These heat transfer processes are coupled and vary both temporally and spatially, so numerical and analytical methods are used to implement the mathematical equations which describe the conceptual model. These numerical and analytical methods predict the transient response of the system, at the drift scale, in terms of spatially varying temperatures and ventilation efficiencies. The ventilation efficiency describes the effectiveness of the ventilation process in removing radionuclide decay heat from the drift environment. An alternative conceptual model is also developed which evaluates the influence of water and water vapor mass transport on the ventilation efficiency. These effects are described using analytical methods which bound the contribution of latent heat to the system, quantify the effects of varying degrees of host rock saturation (and hence host rock thermal conductivity) on the ventilation efficiency, and evaluate the effects of vapor and enhanced vapor diffusion on the host rock thermal conductivity.

V. Chipman

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

MEDIA—An Eulerian Model of Atmospheric Dispersion: First Validation on the Chernobyl Release  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the time of the Chernobyl accident, only a trajectory model was available at the French Weather Service to operationally forecast the movements of such a radioactive cloud. Thus, it was decided to develop a tridimensional model of the ...

Jean Philippe Piedelievre; Lue Musson-Genon; François Bompay

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Numerical Simulation of ANATEX Tracer Data Using a Turbulence Closure Model for Long-Range Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A long-range transport model based on turbulence closure concepts is described. The model extends the description of planetary boundary layer turbulent diffusion to the larger scales and uses statistical wind information to predict contaminant ...

R. I. Sykes; S. F. Parker; D. S. Henn; W. S. Lewellen

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Comparative Evaluation of an Eulerian CFD and Gaussian Plume Models Based on Prairie Grass Dispersion Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theoretical and statistical comparison of a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with two Gaussian plume models is proposed on the Prairie Grass data field experiment for neutral conditions, using both maximum arcwise ...

E. Demael; B. Carissimo

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

Lee, S.

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

165

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

infrastructure analysis model. Biomass Scenario Model (BSM) Determine which supply chain changes would have the greatest potential to accelerate the deployment of biofuels....

166

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research ...

167

Efficient Schemes for Reducing Numerical Dispersion in Modeling Multiphase Transport through Porous and Fractured Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

within a fluid in a multiphase- porous-medium system isand radiation in a multiphase, multicomponent, porous mediumModeling Multiphase Transport through Porous and Fractured

Wu, Yu-Shu; Forsyth, Peter A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Construction of Digital Elevation Models for a Southern European City and a Comparative Morphological Analysis with Respect to Northern European and North American Cities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A morphometric analysis of a southern European city and the derivation of relevant fluid dynamical parameters for use in urban flow and dispersion models are explained in this paper. Calculated parameters are compared with building statistics ...

Silvana Di Sabatino; Laura S. Leo; Rosella Cataldo; Carlo Ratti; Rex E. Britter

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

A High-Resolution Air Pollution Model Suitable for Dispersion Studies in Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of an air pollution transport model that uses an expanding terrain-following coordinate with high resolution in analytic form near the surface and a high-order accurate transport algorithm is described. The model is designed to be ...

Ming Liu; John J. Carroll

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Vertical Dispersion from Surface and Elevated Releases: An Investigation of a Non-Gaussian Plume Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical diffusion of a passive tracer released from surface and elevated sources in a neutrally stratified boundary layer has been studied by comparing field and laboratory experiments with a non-Gaussian K-theory model that assumes power-...

Michael J. Brown; S. Pal Arya; William H. Snyder

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Backward-Time Lagrangian Stochastic Dispersion Models and Their Application to Estimate Gaseous Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

“Backward” Lagrangian stochastic models calculate an ensemble of fluid element (particle) trajectories that are distinguished by each passing through an observation point. As shown, they can be faster and more flexible in calculating short-range ...

Thomas K. Flesch; John D. Wilson; Eugene Yee

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

An Eulerian Model of Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer Using Explicit Periodic Advections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed a relatively simple, first-order closure, Eulerian diffusion model, in which turbulent coherent structures of the convective boundary layer are explicitly included as periodic velocities imposed on a stationary and ...

John J. Carroll; Ming Liu

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Predicting Tephra Dispersion with a Mesoscale Atmospheric Model and a Particle Fall Model: Application to Cerro Negro Volcano  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of volcanic ash (tephra) fallout are increasingly used to assess volcanic hazards in advance of eruptions and in near–real time. These models often approximate the wind field using simplistic assumptions of the atmosphere that do not ...

Marc A. Byrne; Arlene G. Laing; Charles Connor

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

CLEERS Aftertreatment Modeling and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE FY 2011 Advanced Combustion Technologies Annual Report. CLEERS is a research and development focus project of the Diesel Cross-Cut Team. The overall objective is to promote the development of improved computational tools for simulating realistic full-system performance of lean-burn engines and the associated emissions control systems. Three fundamental research projects are sponsored at PNNL through CLEERS: DPF, SCR, and LNT. Resources are shared between the three efforts in order to actively respond to current industrial needs. In FY 2011, more emphasis was placed on the SCR and LNT activities because of urgent application issues associated with these technologies. Objectives of this project are to lead and contribute to the Cross-Cut Lean Exhaust Emissions Reduction Simulations (CLEERS) activities - (a) Provide project updates to the industry sub-team, solicit feedback, and adjust work scope accordingly; and (b) Lead technical discussions, invite distinguished speakers, and maintain an open dialogue on selective catalytic reduction (SCR), lean-NOx trap (LNT), and diesel particulate filter (DPF) modeling issues. Fiscal Year (FY) 2011 Objectives are to: (1) Develop improved modeling capabilities for SCR and DPFs through fundamental experiments; and (2) Develop a fundamental understanding of SCR and LNT catalysts with primary focus on reaction mechanisms and material characterization. Some accomplishments are: (1) Participated in monthly CLEERS teleconferences and coordinated the calls focused on SCR, LNT and DPF technologies; (2) Updated PNNL's SCR model for the state-of-the-art commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst to extract kinetic parameters and to quantitatively describe the effects of hydrothermal aging; (3) Examined the effects of hydrothermal aging on the physicochemical properties and SCR reactions using the commercial Cu catalyst in collaboration with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); (4) Investigated the nature of Cu species and obtained kinetic parameters for small-pore zeolite-based Cu SCR catalyst. (5) Examined the effects of support materials for Ba-based LNT catalysts, and found magnesium aluminate may improve the oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) reduction performance at high temperatures; (6) Investigated soot oxidation mechanisms for relevant oxidants (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 2}) through reactor experiments and transmission electron spectroscopy (TEM) analysis; (7) Seven publications and 21 public presentations (eight invited) during the past FY; and (8) Co-organized sessions on emission control and modeling for the SAE World Congress and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Internal Combustion Engine Conference.

Devarakonda, Maruthi N.; Herling, Darrell R.; Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Stewart, Mark L.; Strzelec, Andrea; Szanyi, Janos; Tran, Diana N.; Lee, Jong H.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

175

Air Dispersion Modeling of Radioactive Releases During Proposed PFP Complex Demolition Activities  

SciTech Connect

This report is part of the planning process for the demolition of the 234-5Z, 236-Z, 242-Z, and 291-Z-1 structures at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) on the Hanford Site. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) demolition planning effort by making engineering estimates of potential releases for various potential demolition alternatives. This report documents an analysis considering open-air demolition using standard techniques. It does not document any decisions about the decommissioning approaches; it is expected that this report will be revisited as the final details of the demolition are developed.

Napier, Bruce A.; Droppo, James G.; Rishel, Jeremy P.

2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

176

Short-range atmospheric dispersion of carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

important. We model dense gas dispersion using the steady-eld data to analyze dense gas dispersion mod- eling issues.element modeling of gas dispersion in the atmosphere. In:

Cortis, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation Analysis, Modeling, and Simulation (TAMS) Application Center for Transportation Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies T he Center for Transportation Analysis (CTA) TAMS application is a web-based tool that supports

178

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy laboratories and participating research institutions have ...

179

Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis (EIMA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Infrastructure Modeling and Analysis (EIMA) Division is focused on ensuring the reliability and resiliency of the U.S. electric grid through robust analytical, modeling, and assessment...

180

Seed Dispersal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Seed Dispersal Seed Dispersal Nature Bulletin No. 35 October 6, 1945 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Clayton F, Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation SEED DISPERSAL Plants have various ways of spreading their seeds. Some have "fly-away" seeds. Included are the dandelion, thistle, tumbleweed, cattail, clematis, and many trees. The cottonwood, sycamore, aspen, linden, ailanthus, maple, box elder, birch and the pines are all trees having seeds with wings or with "down", that are carried by winds. Certain aquatic plants have seeds that sink to bury themselves in.the mud beneath the water. Others have seeds that float and are distributed by the winds and currents that carry them away. Many plants "shoot" their seeds, the seed pods popping open with sufficient force to throw the seeds many feet away, Notable in this group are knotgrass, lady slippers, violets, vetches, jewel weed, witch- hazel, and Heavea, the Para rubber tree, The witch-hazel may shoot its seeds 30 or 40 feet.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Modeling Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling Projects Modeling Projects Below are models grouped by topic. These models are used to analyze hydrogen technology, infrastructure, and other areas related to the development and use of hydrogen. Cross-Cutting Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM) Renewable Energy Power System Modular Simulator (RPM-Sim) Stranded Biogas Decision Tool for Fuel Cell Co-Production Energy Infrastructure All Modular Industry Growth Assessment (AMIGA) Model Building Energy Optimization (BEopt) Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER_CAM) Hydrogen Deployment System (HyDS) Model and Analysis Hydrogen Technology Assessment and Selection Model (HyTASM)

182

Dispersion of Particles Released into a Neutral Planetary Boundary Layer Using a Markov Chain–Monte Carlo Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dispersion and concentration of particles (fluid elements) that are continuously released into a neutral planetary boundary layer is presented. The velocity fluctuations of the particles are generated using a Markov chain–Monte Carlo (MCMC) ...

R. Avila; S. S. Raza

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Bifurcation Analysis of Various Power System Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bifurcation Analysis of Various Power System Models William D. Rosehart Claudio A. Ca This paper presents the bifurcation analysis of a detailed power system model composed of an aggregated induction motor and impedance load supplied by an under-load tap-changer transformer and an equivalent

Cañizares, Claudio A.

184

Dispersion Modeling Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Development and Concurrence * Plan Execution * Potential Impacts Executing the Plan * HSS Bulletin regarding specification of "Deposition Velocity" * Solicited external review...

185

Dispersion Rheology Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The essential nature of the polymer composite problem – non-Newtonian rheology and heterogenous microstructure over ... Facilities/Tools Used: ...

2013-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

186

SQLSAM: SQL for statistical analysis and modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical modeling and analysis is extensively used in businesses for various purposes including graphic visualization of data, measurement of central tendencies and other statistics, and inferences on populations based on samples. Data is the fundamental ... Keywords: SQL, SQLSAM, business, business data processing, business decision making, continuous probability distributions, data visualisation, decision support systems, discrete probability distributions, graphic visualization, inferences, inferential statistics, organization databases, probability, query languages, regression analysis, standard database language, statistical analysis, statistical databases, statistical modeling, statistics

J. Choobineh; A. Kini

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Analysis of nuclear materials by energy dispersive x-ray fluorescence and spectral effects of alpha decay  

SciTech Connect

Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectra collected from alpha emitters are complicated by artifacts inherent to the alpha decay process, particularly when using portable instruments. For example, {sup 239}Pu EDXRF spectra exhibit a prominent uranium L X-ray emission peak series due to sample alpha decay rather than source-induced X-ray fluorescence. A portable EDXRF instrument was used to collect spectra from plutonium, americium, and a Pu-contaminated steel sample. The plutonium sample was also analyzed by wavelength dispersive XRF to demonstrate spectral differences observed when using these very different instruments.

Worley, Christopher G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Modeling and Analysis Session: Market, Value, and Policy Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Primary objectives: to provide a broad range of analytical support to the Solar Program; and to anticipate and respond to the rapidly evolving analytical needs of the Solar Program. Three broad types of analysis are being carried out under this project including: (1) Market analysis: Developing a PV market penetration model--the SolarDS model--and other tools, in order to gain insight into the factors influencing market penetration of PV technology in U.S. markets. (2) Value analysis: Providing inputs to, support for, and review of the annual GPRA benefits analysis. Also developing methods and tools for improving the quantification of the benefits and cost of solar technologies. (3) Policy analysis: Defining and carrying out analysis that meets the needs of the Solar Energy Technologies Program in a timely fashion, for example evaluating the potential role of solar in the energy economy in the long-term.

Margolis, R. M.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Hydrogen Transition Model ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report ArticleAbstract Title: VII.11 Development of HyTrans Model and Integrated Scenario Analysis Page number(s): 1307 Publisher: U.S. Department of Energy Author...

190

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: GREET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GREET Model GREET Model Project Summary Full Title: Greenhouse gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy use in Transportation (GREET) Model Project ID: 84 Principal Investigator: Michael Wang Keywords: Well-to-wheels (WTW); emissions; greenhouse gases (GHG); fuel cell vehicles (FCV) Purpose GREET supports Milestone 24 of the Systems Analysis activity of the DOE Hydrogen Program: Complete baseline economic, energy efficiency, and environmental targets for fossil, nuclear and renewable hydrogen production and delivery technologies. GREET also supports the 3rd objective listed in the DOE Hydrogen Program's Systems Analysis Plan: Well-to-Wheels Analysis: Conduct on-going, integrated well-to-wheels analysis of hydrogen pathways for introducing hydrogen as a transportation fuel. The analysis

191

Numerical Dispersion of Gravity Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When atmospheric gravity waves are simulated in numerical models, they are not only dispersive for physical but also for numerical reasons. Their wave properties (e.g., damping or propagation speed and direction) can depend on grid spacing as ...

Guido Schroeder; K. Heinke Schlünzen

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Numerical Modeling of the Effects of a Thermal Fence on Pollutant Dispersion in the Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical studies were conducted to evaluate the effects of a line of heating-that is, a thermal fence-on the short-range (less than 1 km from the pollutant source) dispersion of pollutants under various stable nighttime conditions. The thermal ...

Youn-Seo Koo; Danny D. Reible

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Vehicle Technologies Office: Modeling, Testing and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Testing and Analysis Modeling, Testing and Analysis The Vehicle Technologies Office's robust portfolio is supported by modeling, testing, and analysis. This work complements the research on batteries, power electronics, and materials, helping researchers integrate these components and ensure the whole vehicle meets consumer and commercial needs. Modeling allows researchers to build "virtual vehicles" that simulate fuel economy, emissions and performance of a potential vehicle. The Office has supported the development of several software-based analytic tools that researchers can use or license. Integration and Validation allows researchers to test physical component and subsystem prototypes as if they are in a real vehicle. Laboratory and Fleet Testing provides data on PEVs through both dynamometer and on-the-road testing. Researchers use the data to benchmark current vehicles, as well as validate the accuracy of software models.

194

Combustion instability modeling and analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It is well known that the two key elements for achieving low emissions and high performance in a gas turbine combustor are to simultaneously establish (1) a lean combustion zone for maintaining low NO{sub x} emissions and (2) rapid mixing for good ignition and flame stability. However, these requirements, when coupled with the short combustor lengths used to limit the residence time for NO formation typical of advanced gas turbine combustors, can lead to problems regarding unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions, as well as the occurrence of combustion instabilities. The concurrent development of suitable analytical and numerical models that are validated with experimental studies is important for achieving this objective. A major benefit of the present research will be to provide for the first time an experimentally verified model of emissions and performance of gas turbine combustors. The present study represents a coordinated effort between industry, government and academia to investigate gas turbine combustion dynamics. Specific study areas include development of advanced diagnostics, definition of controlling phenomena, advancement of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities, and assessment of the current status of our ability to apply these tools to practical gas turbine combustors. The present work involves four tasks which address, respectively, (1) the development of a fiber-optic probe for fuel-air ratio measurements, (2) the study of combustion instability using laser-based diagnostics in a high pressure, high temperature flow reactor, (3) the development of analytical and numerical modeling capabilities for describing combustion instability which will be validated against experimental data, and (4) the preparation of a literature survey and establishment of a data base on practical experience with combustion instability.

Santoro, R.J.; Yang, V.; Santavicca, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sheppard, E.J. [Tuskeggee Univ., Tuskegee, AL (United States). Dept. of Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Building energy analysis is often time-intensive, error-prone, and non-reproducible. Entire energy analyses can be scripted end-to-end using the OpenStudio Ruby API. Common tasks within an analysis can be automated using OpenStudio Measures. Graphical user interfaces (GUI's) and component libraries reduce time, decrease errors, and improve repeatability in energy modeling.

Macumber, D.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Arabic texts analysis for topic modeling evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in information retrieval covering text semantic indexing and multilingual analysis. However, developments in Arabic information retrieval did not follow the extraordinary growth of Arabic usage in the Web during the ... Keywords: Arabic stemming, Classification, Linguistic analysis, Test collections, Topic model

Abderrezak Brahmi; Ahmed Ech-Cherif; Abdelkader Benyettou

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Speech Under Stress: Analysis, Modeling and Recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this chapter, we consider a range of issues associated with analysis, modeling, and recognition of speech under stress. We start by defining stress, what could be perceived as stress, and how it affects the speech production system. In the discussion ... Keywords: Lombard effect, Teager energy operator, hidden Markov models, pitch contours, robustness in speech recognition, speech technology, stress classification

John H. Hansen; Sanjay Patil

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Automated analysis of security-design models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have previously proposed SecureUML, an expressive UML-based language for constructing security-design models, which are models that combine design specifications for distributed systems with specifications of their security policies. Here, we show ... Keywords: Formal analysis, Metamodels, OCL, SecureUML, Security policies, UML

David Basin; Manuel Clavel; Jürgen Doser; Marina Egea

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

PRICE LEVELS AND DISPERSION WITH ASYMMETRIC INFORMATION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the extensive literature on price dispersions that exists to date, there is a gap in the analysis of how market structure affects prices as… (more)

Bhattacharya, Tanmoy

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Modeling window optics for building energy analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses modeling the optics of windows for the purposes of simulating building energy requirements or daylighting availability. The theory for calculating the optical performance of conventional windows is reviewed. The simplifications that might commonly be made in creating computational models are analyzed. Some of the possibilities for more complex windows are analyzed, and the type of model and data that would be necessary to simulate such windows in a building energy analysis program are determined. It is shown that the optical performance of different window types can be simulated with models which require varying amounts of memory or computing time. It is recommended that a building energy analysis program have all models available and use the most efficient for any given window.

Walton, G.N.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technologies - Energy ...  

Energy Analysis Models, Tools and Software Technology Marketing Summaries Here you’ll find marketing summaries of energy analysis models, tools, and software ...

202

The Dispersal of Protoplanetary Disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Protoplanetary disks are the sites of planet formation, and the evolution and eventual dispersal of these disks strongly influences the formation of planetary systems. Disk evolution during the planet-forming epoch is driven by accretion and mass-loss due to winds, and in typical environments photoevaporation by high-energy radiation from the central star is likely to dominate final gas disk dispersal. We present a critical review of current theoretical models, and discuss the observations that are used to test these models and inform our understanding of the underlying physics. We also discuss the role disk dispersal plays in shaping planetary systems, considering its influence on both the process(es) of planet formation and the architectures of planetary systems. We conclude by presenting a schematic picture of protoplanetary disk evolution and dispersal, and discussing prospects for future work.

Alexander, Richard; Andrews, Sean; Armitage, Philip; Cieza, Lucas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection i...

Donald Greer Research; Donald Greer

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Event Model Interfaces for Heterogeneous System Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complex embedded systems consist of hardware and software components from different domains, such as control and signal processing, many of them supplied by different IP vendors. The embedded system designer faces the challenge to integrate, optimize and verify the resulting heterogeneous systems. While formal verification is available for some subproblems, the analysis of the whole system is currently limited to simulation or emulation. In this paper, we tackle the analysis of global resource sharing, scheduling, and buffer sizing in heterogeneous embedded systems. For many practically used preemptive and non-preemptive hardware and software scheduling algorithms of processors and busses, semi-formal analysis techniques are known. However, they cannot be used in system level analysis due to incompatibilities of their underlying event models. This paper presents a technique to couple the analysis of local scheduling strategies via an event interface model. We derive transformation rules between the most important event models and provide proofs where necessary. We use expressive examples to illustrate their application.

Kai Richter; Rolf Ernst

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Improved Meteorological Input for Atmospheric Release Decision support Systems and an Integrated LES Modeling System for Atmospheric Dispersion of Toxic Agents: Homeland Security Applications  

SciTech Connect

When hazardous material is accidently or intentionally released into the atmosphere, emergency response organizations look to decision support systems (DSSs) to translate contaminant information provided by atmospheric models into effective decisions to protect the public and emergency responders and to mitigate subsequent consequences. The Department of Homeland Security (DHS)-led Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC) is one of the primary DSSs utilized by emergency management organizations. IMAAC is responsible for providing 'a single piont for the coordination and dissemination of Federal dispersion modeling and hazard prediction products that represent the Federal position' during actual or potential incidents under the National Response Plan. The Department of Energy's (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC), locatec at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), serves as the primary operations center of the IMAAC. A key component of atmospheric release decision support systems is meteorological information - models and data of winds, turbulence, and other atmospheric boundary-layer parameters. The accuracy of contaminant predictions is strongly dependent on the quality of this information. Therefore, the effectiveness of DSSs can be enhanced by improving the meteorological options available to drive atmospheric transport and fate models. The overall goal of this project was to develop and evaluate new meteorological modeling capabilities for DSSs based on the use of NASA Earth-science data sets in order to enhance the atmospheric-hazard information provided to emergency managers and responders. The final report describes the LLNL contributions to this multi-institutional effort. LLNL developed an approach to utilize NCAR meteorological predictions using NASA MODIS data for the New York City (NYC) region and demonstrated the potential impact of the use of different data sources and data parameterizations on IMAAC/NARAC fate and transport predictions. A case study involving coastal sea breeze circulation patterns in the NYC region was used to investigate the sensitivity of atmospheric dispersion results on the source of three-dimensional wind field data.

Arnold, E; Simpson, M; Larsen, S; Gash, J; Aluzzi, F; Lundquist, J; Sugiyama, G

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

206

Phonon dispersion in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taking into account the constraints imposed by the lattice symmetry, the phonon dispersion is calculated for graphene with interactions between the first and second nearest neighbors in the framework of the Born-von Karman model. Analytical expressions are obtained for the out-of-plane (bending) modes determined only by two force constants as well as for the in-plane modes with four force constants. Values of the force constants are found in fitting to elastic constants and Raman frequencies observed in graphite.

L. A. Falkovsky

2007-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

207

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Models and Tools Archive Models and Tools Archive Through the years, NREL has developed and supported several models and tools to assess, analyze, and optimize renewable energy and energy efficiency technologies. Some of these have been transferred to the private market. This page lists tools we have supported, but that are no longer active. See current models and tools here. ADVISOR (ADvanced VehIcle SimulatOR) Simulate and analyze conventional, advanced, light, and heavy vehicles, including hybrid electric and fuel cell vehicles. In 2003, ADVISOR was commercialized by AVL Powertrain Engineering, Inc. Hybrid2 Conduct detailed long-term performance and economic analysis on a wide variety of hybrid power systems. RET Finance Calculate the cost of energy of renewable electricity generation

208

Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion: Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

209

Scripted Building Energy Modeling and Analysis: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Building energy modeling and analysis is currently a time-intensive, error-prone, and nonreproducible process. This paper describes the scripting platform of the OpenStudio tool suite (http://openstudio.nrel.gov) and demonstrates its use in several contexts. Two classes of scripts are described and demonstrated: measures and free-form scripts. Measures are small, single-purpose scripts that conform to a predefined interface. Because measures are fairly simple, they can be written or modified by inexperienced programmers.

Hale, E.; Macumber, D.; Benne, K.; Goldwasser, D.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pollutant dispersion in a large indoor space: Part 2 -Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) predictions and comparison with ascale model experiment for isothermal flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on an investigation of the adequacy of Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), using a standard Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) model, for predicting dispersion of neutrally buoyant gas in a large indoor space. We used CFD to predict pollutant (dye) concentration profiles in a water filled scale model of an atrium with a continuous pollutant source. Predictions from the RANS formulation are comparable to an ensemble average of independent identical experiments. Model results were compared to pollutant concentration data in a horizontal plane from experiments in a scale model atrium. Predictions were made for steady-state (fully developed) and transient (developing) pollutant concentrations. Agreement between CFD predictions and ensemble averaged experimental measurements is quantified using the ratios of CFD-predicted and experimentally measured dye concentration at a large number of points in the measurement plane. Agreement is considered good if these ratios fall between 0.5 and 2.0 at all points in the plane. The standard k-epsilon two equation turbulence model obtains this level of agreement and predicts pollutant arrival time to the measurement plane within a few seconds. These results suggest that this modeling approach is adequate for predicting isothermal pollutant transport in a large room with simple geometry.

Finlayson, Elizabeth U.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Thatcher, Tracy L.; Sextro, Richard G.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Bayesian Analysis of Errors-in-Variables Growth Curve Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixture Models. In Robust Bayesian Analysis. Lecture NotesA. (2004). Nonparametric Bayesian Data Analysis. Statistical95-110. West, M. (1990). Bayesian Kernel Density Estimation.

Huang, Hung-Jen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermodynamic modeling of transcription: sensitivity analysis differentiates biological mechanism from mathematical model-induced effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as: Dresch et al. : Thermodynamic modeling of transcription:ARTICLE Open Access Thermodynamic modeling of transcription:on the analysis of thermodynamic models, which have been

Dresch, Jacqueline M; Liu, Xiaozhou; Arnosti, David N; Ay, Ahmet

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Uncertainties in Air Toxics Calculated by the Dispersion Models AERMOD and ISCST3 in the Houston Ship Channel Area  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The uncertainties in simulations of annually averaged concentrations of two air toxics (benzene and 1,3-butadiene) are estimated for two widely used U.S. air quality models, the Industrial Source Complex Short-Term, version 3, (ISCST3) model and ...

Steven R. Hanna; Robert Paine; David Heinold; Elizabeth Kintigh; Dan Baker

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Adaptive time-frequency analysis based on autoregressive modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new adaptive method for discrete time-frequency analysis based on autoregressive (AR) modeling is introduced. The performance of AR modeling often depends upon a good selection of the model order. The predictive least squares (PLS) principle of Rissanen ... Keywords: Adaptive filters, Autoregressive modeling, Least squares methods, Model order, Time-frequency analysis

Antonio H. Costa; Stephan Hengstler

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2A Production Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Production Model Project Summary Full Title: H2A Hydrogen Production Cost Analysis Model Project ID: 219 Principal Investigator: Todd Ramsden Brief Description: The H2A Production...

216

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: FLOW Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOW Model FLOW Model Project Summary Full Title: Chemical Engineering Process Simulation Platform - FLOW Project ID: 131 Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Brief Description: FLOW is a steady-state chemical process simulator. Modules have been developed for supply chain calculations, micro-economic calculations, and other calculations. Purpose Simulate steady-state chemical processes to support hydrogen infrastructure and transition analysis. Performer Principal Investigator: Juan Ferrada Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Address: Bethel Valley 1, Bldg 5700, N217 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6166 Telephone: 865-574-4998 Email: ferradajj@ornl.gov Sponsor(s) Name: Fred Joseck Organization: DOE Hydrogen Program Telephone: 202-586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov

217

Analysis of boiling experiment using inverse modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical predictions of geothermal reservoir behavior strongly depend on the assumed steam-water relative permeabilities, which are difficult and time-consuming to measure in the laboratory. This paper describes the esti- mation of the parameters of the relative per- meability and capillary pressure functions by automatically matching simulation results to data from a transient boiling experiment performed on a Berea sandstone. A sensitivity analysis reveals the strong dependence of the observed system behavior on effects such as heat transfer from the heater to the core, as well as heat losses through the insulation. Parameters of three conceptual models were estimated by inverse modeling. Each calibra- tion yields consistent effective steam perme- abilities, but the shape of the liquid relative permeability remains ambiguous.

Finsterle, S.; Guerrero, M.; Satik, C.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Evaluation of Various Approximations in Atmosphere and Ocean Modeling based on an Exact Treatment of Gravity Wave Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various approximations of the governing equations of compressible fluid dynamics are commonly used in both atmospheric and ocean modeling. Their main purpose is to eliminate the acoustic waves that are potentially responsible for inefficiency in ...

John K. Dukowicz

219

Detailed Simulations of Atmospheric Flow and Dispersion in Downtown Manhattan: An Application of Five Computational Fluid Dynamics Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model simulations of urban boundary layers have improved in speed and accuracy so that they are useful in assisting in planning emergency response activities related to releases of chemical or biological agents ...

Steven R. Hanna; Michael J. Brown; Fernando E. Camelli; Stevens T. Chan; William J. Coirier; Sura Kim; Olav R. Hansen; Alan H. Huber; R. Michael Reynolds

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Estimating Plume Dispersion-A Comparison of Several Sigma Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lateral and vertical Gaussian plume dispersion parameters are estimated and compared with fieldtracer data collected at II sites. The dispersion parameter schemes used in this analysis include Cramer'sscheme, suggested for tall stack ...

John S. Irwin

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MODELING ANALYSIS FOR GROUT HOPPER WASTE TANK  

SciTech Connect

The Saltstone facility at Savannah River Site (SRS) has a grout hopper tank to provide agitator stirring of the Saltstone feed materials. The tank has about 300 gallon capacity to provide a larger working volume for the grout nuclear waste slurry to be held in case of a process upset, and it is equipped with a mechanical agitator, which is intended to keep the grout in motion and agitated so that it won't start to set up. The primary objective of the work was to evaluate the flow performance for mechanical agitators to prevent vortex pull-through for an adequate stirring of the feed materials and to estimate an agitator speed which provides acceptable flow performance with a 45{sup o} pitched four-blade agitator. In addition, the power consumption required for the agitator operation was estimated. The modeling calculations were performed by taking two steps of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach. As a first step, a simple single-stage agitator model with 45{sup o} pitched propeller blades was developed for the initial scoping analysis of the flow pattern behaviors for a range of different operating conditions. Based on the initial phase-1 results, the phase-2 model with a two-stage agitator was developed for the final performance evaluations. A series of sensitivity calculations for different designs of agitators and operating conditions have been performed to investigate the impact of key parameters on the grout hydraulic performance in a 300-gallon hopper tank. For the analysis, viscous shear was modeled by using the Bingham plastic approximation. Steady state analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed. All analyses were based on three-dimensional results. Recommended operational guidance was developed by using the basic concept that local shear rate profiles and flow patterns can be used as a measure of hydraulic performance and spatial stirring. Flow patterns were estimated by a Lagrangian integration technique along the flow paths from the material feed inlet.

Lee, S.

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

222

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations Ignasi in forthcoming publications. Keywords-grounding analysis; earthing analysis, underground substations; I to a river (at substations next to hydroelectric dams), or the grounding system of a buried electrical

Colominas, Ignasi

223

The Dispersion of Tracer Plumes in Mountainous Regions in Central Arizona: Comparisons between Observations and Modeling Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, time-dependent, nested-grid model is used to calculate the targeting of tracer or Seeding material over complex terrain in northern Arizona. Good agreement with measurements of SF6 tracer is reported in three case studies. ...

Roelof T. Bruintjes; Terry L. Clark; William D. Hall

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Dryout droplet distribution and dispersed flow film boiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dispersed flow film boiling is characterized by liquid-phase droplets entrained in a continuous vapor-phase flow. In a previous work at MIT, a model of dispersed flow heat transfer was developed, called the Local Conditions ...

Hill, Wayne S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Kernel principal component analysis for stochastic input model generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media provides useful information only if realistic input models of the material property variations are used. These input models are often constructed from a set of experimental samples of the underlying random ... Keywords: Data-driven models, Flow in random porous media, Kernel principal component analysis, Non-linear model reduction, Stochastic partial differential equations

Xiang Ma; Nicholas Zabaras

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis of early exposure results with the MACCS Reactor Accident Consequence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis techniques based on Latin hypercube sampling, partial correlation analysis and stepwise regression analysis are used in an investigation with the MACCS model of the early health effects associated with a severe accident at a nuclear power station. The primary purpose of this study is to provide guidance on the variables to be considered in future review work to reduce the uncertainty in the important variables used in the calculation of reactor accident consequences. The effects of 34 imprecisely known input variables on the following reactor accident consequences are studied: number of early fatalities, number of cases of prodromal vomiting, population dose within 10 mi of the reactor, population dose within 1000 mi of the reactor, individual early fatality probability within 1 mi of the reactor, and maximum early fatality distance. When the predicted variables are considered collectively, the following input variables were found to be the dominant contributors to uncertainty: scaling factor for horizontal dispersion, dry deposition velocity, inhalation protection factor for nonevacuees, groundshine shielding factor for nonevacuees, early fatality hazard function alpha value for bone marrow exposure, and scaling factor for vertical dispersion.

Helton, J.C. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); McKay, M.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Shiver, A.W.; Sprung, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, Market analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Screenshot References: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model[1]

228

Dispersion of Heavy Particles by Turbulent Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of heavy particle dispersion in turbulent flows requires a simultaneous consideration of particle's inertia and particle's drift velocity. A mathematically simple and physically comprehensive analysis was developed to solve ...

Lian-Ping Wang; Davd E. Stock

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Studies on Mathematical Models for Characterizing Plume and Drift Behavior from Cooling Towers, Volume 2: Mathematical Model for Sin gle Source (Single Tower) Cooling Tower Plume Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presents an improved model for plumes from single natural-draft cooling towers. This model is expanded to treat multiple tower plumes in Volume 4.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

A hierarchical analysis of terrestrial ecosystem model Biome-BGC: Equilibrium analysis and model calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increasing complexity of ecosystem models represents a major difficulty in tuning model parameters and analyzing simulated results. To address this problem, this study develops a hierarchical scheme that simplifies the Biome-BGC model into three functionally cascaded tiers and analyzes them sequentially. The first-tier model focuses on leaf-level ecophysiological processes; it simulates evapotranspiration and photosynthesis with prescribed leaf area index (LAI). The restriction on LAI is then lifted in the following two model tiers, which analyze how carbon and nitrogen is cycled at the whole-plant level (the second tier) and in all litter/soil pools (the third tier) to dynamically support the prescribed canopy. In particular, this study analyzes the steady state of these two model tiers by a set of equilibrium equations that are derived from Biome-BGC algorithms and are based on the principle of mass balance. Instead of spinning-up the model for thousands of climate years, these equations are able to estimate carbon/nitrogen stocks and fluxes of the target (steady-state) ecosystem directly from the results obtained by the first-tier model. The model hierarchy is examined with model experiments at four AmeriFlux sites. The results indicate that the proposed scheme can effectively calibrate Biome-BGC to simulate observed fluxes of evapotranspiration and photosynthesis; and the carbon/nitrogen stocks estimated by the equilibrium analysis approach are highly consistent with the results of model simulations. Therefore, the scheme developed in this study may serve as a practical guide to calibrate/analyze Biome-BGC; it also provides an efficient way to solve the problem of model spin-up, especially for applications over large regions. The same methodology may help analyze other similar ecosystem models as well.

Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Wang, Weile [ORNL; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Nemani, Ramakrishna R [NASA Ames Research Center

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Nanostructured Electrodes For Organic Bulk Heterojunction Solar Cells: Model Study Using Carbon Nanotube Dispersed Polythiophene-fullerene Blend Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We test the feasibility of using nanostructured electrodes in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells to improve their photovoltaic performance by enhancing their charge collection efficiency and thereby increasing the optimal active blend layer thickness. As a model system, small concentrations of single wall carbon nanotubes are added to blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester in order to create networks of efficient hole conduction pathways in the device active layer without affecting the light absorption. The nanotube addition leads to a 22% increase in the optimal blend layer thickness from 90 nm to 110 nm, enhancing the short circuit current density and photovoltaic device efficiency by as much as {approx}10%. The associated incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency for the given thickness also increases by {approx}10% uniformly across the device optical absorption spectrum, corroborating the enhanced charge carrier collection by nanostructured electrodes.

Nam, C.Y.; Wu, Q.; Su, D.; Chiu, C.-y; Tremblay, N.J.; Nuckolls, C,; Black, C.T.

2011-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

232

Powder dispersion system  

SciTech Connect

A powder dispersion method and apparatus comprising an air eductor and a powder dispensing syringe inserted into a suction connection of the air eductor.

Gorenz, Heather M. (Albuquerque, NM); Brockmann, John E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lucero, Daniel A. (Albuquerque, NM)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

233

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) (Redirected from Policy Analysis Modeling System) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

234

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Global Trade and Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Global Trade Analysis Project (GTAP) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Purdue University Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Baseline projection, - Macroeconomic, Market analysis, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Moderate Website: www.gtap.agecon.purdue.edu/models/current.asp Cost: Free References: GTAP[1] Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste ICCT Roadmap Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model

235

Modular analysis and modelling of risk scenarios with dependencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The risk analysis of critical infrastructures such as the electric power supply or telecommunications is complicated by the fact that such infrastructures are mutually dependent. We propose a modular approach to the modelling and analysis of risk scenarios ... Keywords: Critical infrastructure, Dependency, Modular risk analysis, Risk scenario, Threat modelling

Gyrd Brændeland; Atle Refsdal; Ketil Stølen

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

DISPERSION AND DISSIPATION ERRORS OF TWO FULLY DISCRETE DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional Euler equations in gas dynamics. There has been abundant study on the dispersion analysis of many nuDISPERSION AND DISSIPATION ERRORS OF TWO FULLY DISCRETE DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS HE YANG, FENGYAN LI, AND JIANXIAN QIU Abstract. The dispersion and dissipation properties of numerical meth- ods

Li, Fengyan

237

Improving SCIPUFF Dispersion Forecasts with NWP Ensembles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationships between atmospheric transport and dispersion (AT&D) plume uncertainty and uncertainties in the transporting wind fields are investigated using the Second-Order Closure, Integrated Puff (SCIPUFF) AT&D model driven by numerical ...

Jared A. Lee; L. Joel Peltier; Sue Ellen Haupt; John C. Wyngaard; David R. Stauffer; Aijun Deng

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Bayesian models for DNA microarray data analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Selection of signi?cant genes via expression patterns is important in a microarray problem. Owing to small sample size and large number of variables (genes), the selection process can be unstable. This research proposes a hierarchical Bayesian model for gene (variable) selection. We employ latent variables in a regression setting and use a Bayesian mixture prior to perform the variable selection. Due to the binary nature of the data, the posterior distributions of the parameters are not in explicit form, and we need to use a combination of truncated sampling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based computation techniques to simulate the posterior distributions. The Bayesian model is ?exible enough to identify the signi?cant genes as well as to perform future predictions. The method is applied to cancer classi?cation via cDNA microarrays. In particular, the genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are associated with a hereditary disposition to breast cancer, and the method is used to identify the set of signi?cant genes to classify BRCA1 and others. Microarray data can also be applied to survival models. We address the issue of how to reduce the dimension in building model by selecting signi?cant genes as well as assessing the estimated survival curves. Additionally, we consider the wellknown Weibull regression and semiparametric proportional hazards (PH) models for survival analysis. With microarray data, we need to consider the case where the number of covariates p exceeds the number of samples n. Speci?cally, for a given vector of response values, which are times to event (death or censored times) and p gene expressions (covariates), we address the issue of how to reduce the dimension by selecting the responsible genes, which are controlling the survival time. This approach enables us to estimate the survival curve when n << p. In our approach, rather than ?xing the number of selected genes, we will assign a prior distribution to this number. The approach creates additional ?exibility by allowing the imposition of constraints, such as bounding the dimension via a prior, which in e?ect works as a penalty. To implement our methodology, we use a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method. We demonstrate the use of the methodology with (a) di?use large B??cell lymphoma (DLBCL) complementary DNA (cDNA) data and (b) Breast Carcinoma data. Lastly, we propose a mixture of Dirichlet process models using discrete wavelet transform for a curve clustering. In order to characterize these time??course gene expresssions, we consider them as trajectory functions of time and gene??speci?c parameters and obtain their wavelet coe?cients by a discrete wavelet transform. We then build cluster curves using a mixture of Dirichlet process priors.

Lee, Kyeong Eun

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

1990-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

Modeling and Simulation - Center for Transportation Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and route airlift (CAMPS), and key components for the Department of Energy's National Energy Modeling System. We have designed and developed models for personal computers,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Joint Meeting on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis Meeting...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on Hydrogen Delivery Modeling and Analysis FreedomCAR and Fuels Partnership Hydrogen Delivery, Storage and Fuel Pathway Integration Tech Teams May 8-9, 2007 Energetics...

242

System Design, Analysis, Modeling, and Media Engineering Properties...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

modeling and simulations of * various storage systems configurations. Lead the storage system energy analysis and provide * results. Compile and obtain media engineering...

243

ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts Media Contacts ME EET Seminar: MODELING, SIMULATION AND ANALYSIS OF INTEGRATED BUILDING ENERGY AND CONTROL SYSTEMS Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: October 21, 2009 -...

244

Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Modeling, Simulation and Analysis of Integrated Building Energy and Control Systems Speaker(s): Michael Wetter Date: August 10, 2009 -...

245

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting...

246

Analysis of Timescales of Response of a Simple Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed analysis is made of various analytic solutions to a 0D climate model coupled to an upwelling diffusion ocean model. In particular, the responses to impulse, step-function, exponential, and linear forcings are addressed. The coupled ...

Robert E. Dickinson; Kimberly J. Schaudt

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

TIPPtool: Compositional Specification and Analysis of Markovian Performance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this short paper we briefly describe a tool which is based on a Markovian stochastic process algebra. The tool offers both model specification and quantitative model analysis in a compositional fashion, wrapped in a userfriendly graphical front-end.

Holger Hermanns; Vassilis Mertsiotakis; Markus Siegle

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Modeling and Hazard Analysis Using Stpa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A joint research project between MIT and JAXA/JAMSS is investigating the application of a new hazard analysis to the system and software in the HTV. Traditional hazard analysis focuses on component failures but software ...

Ishimatsu, Takuto

249

A framework for formal modeling and analysis of organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new, formal, role-based, framework for modeling and analyzing both real world and artificial organizations is introduced. It exploits static and dynamic properties of the organizational model and includes the (frequently ignored) environment. The transition ... Keywords: Analysis, Computational, Logic-based, Modeling, Organization model, Simulation, Verification

Catholijn M. Jonker; Alexei Sharpanskykh; Jan Treur; Pinar Yolum

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Policy Analysis Modeling System (PAMS) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Policy Analysis Modeling System Agency/Company /Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: clasponline.org/ResourcesTools/Tools/PolicyAnalysisModelingSystem Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/policy-analysis-modeling-system-pams Regulations: "Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling,Net Metering & Interconnection" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

251

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Topics: Analysis Tools Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/29790 Cost: Free Related Tools IGES GHG Calculator For Solid Waste Energy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) Regional Economic Models, Inc. (REMI) Model ... further results The part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents human systems; a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model

252

Ecological Modelling 187 (2005) 281296 Estimating estuarine gross production, community respiration and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that gas invasion and longitudinal dispersion account for up to 21 and 14% of local O2 accumulation advection­dispersion model to account for spatial vari- ability in DO concentration, gas exchange, and river) The analysis shows that the two dominant terms are gas invasion and dispersion, accounting for approximately 21

Vallino, Joseph J.

253

Bayesian Analysis of MTD/BMTD Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Chinese Restaurant Process . . . . . . . . . . . . 107107 Posteriors Chinese Restaurant Partition Rules . . . . .Model with DP Chinese Restaurant Representation ix Determine

Song, Huiming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

NREL: Energy Analysis - Models and Tools  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

wind resource data in 13 developing countries. Contact Dan Getman for more information. Scenario Evaluation, Regionalization and Analysis (SERA) Determine optimal production and...

255

Genome Analysis and Systems Modeling Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Microbial Genomes) Pipeline, Comprehensive Genome Analysis Pipeline Genome Channel, Java applet for the comprehensive sequence-based view of genomes. Grail, a tool for the...

256

Bayesian Analysis of MTD/BMTD Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

105 Bayesian Analysis and Chinese RestaurantFunction . . . . . . . . . . . 3.2.3 Bayesian Method and ItsPros . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3.3 Bayesian Method with EM

Song, Huiming

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

MARCIE: model checking and reachability analysis done efficiently  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MARCIE is a tool for the analysis of generalized stochastic Petri nets which can be augmented by rewards. The supported analysis methods range from qualitative and quantitative standard properties to model checking of established temporal logics. MARCIE's ... Keywords: generalized stochastic petri nets, model checking, simulation

Monika Heiner, Christian Rohr, Martin Schwarick

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Dispersion strengthened copper  

SciTech Connect

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, Haskell (Los Alamos, NM); Meek, Thomas T. (Knoxville, TN); Blake, Rodger D. (Santa Fe, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Dispersion strengthened copper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

1988-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar Advisor Model; Session: Modeling and Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project supports the Solar America Initiative by: (1) providing a consistent framework for analyzing and comparing power system costs and performance across the range of solar technologies and markets, PV, solar heat systems, CSP, residential, commercial and utility markets; (2) developing and validating performance models to enable accurate calculation of levelized cost of energy (LCOE); (3) providing a consistent modeling platform for all TPP's; and (4) supporting implementation and usage of cost models.

Blair, N.

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Analysis of market penetration scenarios of clean coal technologies in China using the LLNL China Energy Model  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of an analysis of the market penetration of Clean Coal Technologies in the electric utility market in China. The analysis is based on a model of the Chinese energy system developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Under this model, the market penetration of a technology depends on the relative prices of all technologies in a market. The model assumes that for each technology there is a distribution of effective prices to the consumers in the market place. The prices for each technology computed in the model are assumed to be the means of these distributions: sometime the effective price is greater than this and sometimes it is less. Thus even a relatively expensive technology may cost less than its competitors in a fraction of the transactions. Using several scenarios about the possible dispersion of prices, we estimate the market share of CCTs over the next 50 years. We find that some CCTs penetrate under all scenarios, but the more expensive ones only show significant penetration when larger values of price dispersion are assumed. Generally the penetration of the CCTs is 15% or less of the market by 2020. However, advanced pulverized coal does exceed 15% in some cases.

Lamont, A

1998-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

263

Linking Bayesian networks and PLS path modeling for causal analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Causal knowledge based on causal analysis can advance the quality of decision-making and thereby facilitate a process of transforming strategic objectives into effective actions. Several creditable studies have emphasized the usefulness of causal analysis ... Keywords: Bayesian network, Causal analysis, PLS path modeling

Wei Wen Wu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Grounding Analysis in Heterogeneous Soil Models: Application to Underground Substations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most of the research and development work done until now in earthing analysis is devoted to cases where the soil can be modelled in terms of an homogeneous and isotropic semi-infinite continuous medium, being the soil resistivity an order of magnitude ... Keywords: grounding analysis, earthing analysis, underground substations

Ignasi Colominas; Jose Paris; Xesus Nogueira; Fermin Navarrina; Manuel Casteleiro

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Anomalous magnetic moment of an electron near a dispersive surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Changes in the magnetic moment of an electron near a dielectric or conducting surface due to boundary-dependent radiative corrections are investigated. The electromagnetic field is quantized by normal mode expansion for a non-dispersive dielectric and an undamped plasma, but the electron is described by the Dirac equation without matter-field quantization. Perturbation theory in the Dirac equation leads to a general formula for the magnetic moment shift in terms of integrals over products of electromagnetic mode functions. In each of the models investigated contour integration techniques over a complex wave vector can be used to derive a general formula featuring just integrals over transverse electric and transverse magnetic reflection coefficients of the surface. Analysis of the magnetic moment shift for several classes of materials yields markedly different results from the previously considered simplistic 'perfect reflector' model, due to the inclusion of physically important features of the electromagnetic response of the surface such as evanescent field modes and dispersion in the material. For a general dispersive dielectric surface, the magnetic moment shift of a nearby electron can exceed the previous prediction of the perfect-reflector model by several orders of magnitude.

Robert Bennett; Claudia Eberlein

2013-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

266

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Partnership for Economic Policy Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Modeling and Policy Impact Analysis (MPIA) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Partnership for Economic Policy Sector: Climate, Energy Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.pep-net.org/programs/mpia/ Cost: Free Related Tools Asia-Pacific Integrated Model (AIM) SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Poverty Social Impact Analysis ... further results A computable general equilibrium model that accounts for the interactions among sectors and institutions, and their links with the global economy. A

267

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Sciences Technology Analysis Models...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of system flexibility. It can also evaluate the role of enabling technologies such as demand response and energy storage. It is an updated version of the PVFlex model described in...

268

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: VISION Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VISION Model VISION Model Project Summary Full Title: VISION Model Project ID: 77 Principal Investigator: Margaret Singh Brief Description: Estimates the potential energy use, oil use and carbon emission impacts of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicles and alternative fuels through 2050. Keywords: Alternative fueled vehicles (AFV); hybrid electric vehicles (HEV); fuel cell vehicles (FCV); emissions; greenhouse gases (GHG) Purpose The VISION model has been developed by US DOE to provide estimates of the potential energy use, oil use and carbon emission impacts to 2050 of advanced light- and heavy-duty highway vehicles and alternative fuels. It is an Excel spreadsheet model which is particularly useful in responding to quick-turnaround requests for such estimates. It is updated annually to be

269

Mathematical Models in Landscape Ecology: Stability Analysis and Numerical Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present paper a review of some mathematical models for the ecological evaluation of environmental systems is considered. Moreover a new model, capable to furnish more detailed information at the level of landscape units, is proposed. Numerical ... Keywords: 34D05, 92F05, Landscape ecology, Mathematical models, Stability analysis

Federica Gobattoni; Giuliana Lauro; Roberto Monaco; Raffaele Pelorosso

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Settlement Prediction, Gas Modeling and Slope Stability Analysis in Coll Cardús Landfill Li Yu using mechanical models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1 models Simulation of gas generation, transport and extraction in MSW landfill 1) Analytical solution

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

271

Global sensitivity analysis of stochastic computer models with joint metamodels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global sensitivity analysis method used to quantify the influence of uncertain input variables on the variability in numerical model responses has already been applied to deterministic computer codes; deterministic means here that the same set of ... Keywords: Computer experiment, Gaussian process, Generalized additive model, Joint modeling, Sobol indices, Uncertainty

Amandine Marrel; Bertrand Iooss; Sébastien Veiga; Mathieu Ribatet

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Analysis of Markov Reward Models using Zerosuppressed Multiterminal BDDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Performance variables (PV) enable the modeler to define complex per­ formance and dependabilityAnalysis of Markov Reward Models using Zero­suppressed Multi­terminal BDDs K. Lampka and M. Siegle of systems and quantitative measures of in­ terest. The underlying Markov reward models (MRMs) of­ ten

Lampka, Kai

273

Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Systems Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis CAPABILITIES Overview Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Nuclear Systems Technologies Risk and Safety Assessments Nonproliferation and National Security Materials Testing Engineering Computation & Design Engineering Experimentation Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Capabilities Nuclear Systems Modeling and Design Analysis Bookmark and Share Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis Reactor Physics and Fuel Cycle Analysis We have played a major role in the design and analysis of most existing and past reactor types and of many

274

Dispersion of Marked Fluid Elements in a Turbulent Ekman Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model is derived for studying shear-dispersion in a horizontally homogeneous, turbulent Ekman layer that is evolving in time. It is based on a one-dimensional model including an advanced turbulence closure (k = ?) model, which yields ...

Lars-Arne Rahm; Urban Svensson

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Air–Sea Transport, Dispersion, and Fate Modeling in the Vicinity of the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant: A Special Conference Session Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The March 2011 tragedy at the coastal Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant created a contaminant release that was transported and dispersed in both the air and the sea. Two months after the event, the authors began planning for a special July 2011 conference ...

Julie Pullen; Joseph Chang; Steven Hanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Trajectory Analysis and Semantic Region Modeling Using A Nonparametric Bayesian Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a novel nonparametric Bayesian model, Dual Hierarchical Dirichlet Processes (Dual-HDP), for trajectory analysis and semantic region modeling in surveillance settings, in an unsupervised way. In our approach, ...

Grimson, Eric

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

277

ParaText : scalable text modeling and analysis.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text (news documents, web content, journal articles, etc.) is a key task in many data analysis and decision making applications. As data sizes grow, scalability is essential for deep analysis. In many cases, documents are modeled as term or feature vectors and latent semantic analysis (LSA) is used to model latent, or hidden, relationships between documents and terms appearing in those documents. LSA supplies conceptual organization and analysis of document collections by modeling high-dimension feature vectors in many fewer dimensions. While past work on the scalability of LSA modeling has focused on the SVD, the goal of our work is to investigate the use of distributed memory architectures for the entire text analysis process, from data ingestion to semantic modeling and analysis. ParaText is a set of software components for distributed processing, modeling, and analysis of unstructured text. The ParaText source code is available under a BSD license, as an integral part of the Titan toolkit. ParaText components are chained-together into data-parallel pipelines that are replicated across processes on distributed-memory architectures. Individual components can be replaced or rewired to explore different computational strategies and implement new functionality. ParaText functionality can be embedded in applications on any platform using the native C++ API, Python, or Java. The ParaText MPI Process provides a 'generic' text analysis pipeline in a command-line executable that can be used for many serial and parallel analysis tasks. ParaText can also be deployed as a web service accessible via a RESTful (HTTP) API. In the web service configuration, any client can access the functionality provided by ParaText using commodity protocols ... from standard web browsers to custom clients written in any language.

Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Dispersion Morphology of Poly(methyl acrylate)/Silica Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect

Nearly monodisperse poly(methyl acrylate) (PMA) and spherical SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NP, d = 14 {+-} 4 nm) were co-cast from 2-butanone, a mutually good solvent and a displacer of adsorbed PMA from silica. The effects of NP content and post-casting sample history on the dispersion morphology were found by small-angle X-ray scattering supplemented by transmission electron microscopy. Analysis of the X-ray results show that cast and thermally annealed samples exhibited a nearly random particle dispersion. That the same samples, prior to annealing, were not well-dispersed is indicative of thermodynamic miscibility during thermal annealing over the range of NP loadings studied. A simple mean-field thermodynamic model suggests that miscibility results primarily from favorable polymer segment/NP surface interactions. The model also indicates, and experiments confirm, that subsequent exposure of the composites to the likely displacer ethyl acetate results in entropic destabilization and demixing into NP-rich and NP-lean phases.

D Janes; J Moll; S Harton; C Durning

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Sila...

280

A Hybrid Model for Hydroturbine Generating Unit Trend Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the nonlinear and nonstationary characteristics of hydroelectricity systems, an hybrid prediction model based on wavelet transform and support vector machines is proposed in this paper for the trend analysis of hydroturbine generating unit ...

Min Zou; Jianzhong Zhou; Zhong Liu; Liangliang Zhan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Macro-System Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macro-System Model Macro-System Model Project Summary Full Title: Macro-System Model (MSM) Project ID: 66 Principal Investigator: Mark Ruth Brief Description: Federated object model framework is used to link other models to perform rapid cross-cutting analysis. Keywords: Transition; well-to-wheels (WTW); renewable; hydrogen production; emissions; cost Purpose Perform rapid cross-cutting analysis by utilizing and linking other models. This work will also improve consistency between models. Analyses that require the MSM will be used to support decisions regarding programmatic investments and focus of funding and to estimate program outputs and outcomes. Performer Principal Investigator: Mark Ruth Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Address: 1617 Cole Blvd.

282

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste The document describes the initial work on designing and developing requirements for a total system performance assessment (TSPA) model that can support preliminary safety assessments for a mined geologic repository for high-level waste (HLW) and spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in salt host rock at a generic site. A preliminary generic salt TSPA model for HLW/SNF disposal has been developed and tested for an isothermal repository in salt, for emplaced waste that is assumed to have no decay heat; for salt

283

On guided model-based analysis for ear biometrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ears are a new biometric with a major advantage in that they appear to maintain their structure with increasing age. Current approaches have exploited 2D and 3D images of the ear in human identification. Contending that the ear is mainly a planar shape ... Keywords: Biometrics, Ear biometrics, Ear embryology, Model-based analysis, Occlusion analysis

Banafshe Arbab-Zavar; Mark S. Nixon

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Gera, Dinesh (Fluent, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

An Empirical Analysis of Bulk Cn2 Models over Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article examines some of the difficulties associated with the determination of C2n over water in a coastal region using a bulk model. The analysis shows the need to supplement bulk models with elements that do not belong to traditional Monin–...

Guy Potvin; Denis Dion; Jacques Claverie; Paul A. Frederickson; Kenneth L. Davidson; J. Luc Forand

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Semiparametric Bayesian Analysis of Selection Models Jaeyong Lee National Institute of Statistical Science James O. Berger Duke University Abstract Selection models are appropriate when a datum x enters it to be of some particular functional form. By introducing latent variables related to the selection mechanism

Berger, Jim

287

Modeling Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Tools for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Design and Analysis Moe A Khaleel BJ Koeppel, W Liu, K Lai, KP Recknagle, EM Ryan, EV Stephens, X Sun Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99352 11 th Annual SECA Workshop Pittsburgh, PA July 27-29, 2009 1 PNNL SOFC Modeling Tools SOFC-MP Stack level model for fast analysis of co/counter-flow SOFC stack performance Detailed electrochemistry model Cell level model for the investigation of secondary reactions (degradation/contamination) mechanisms within the tri-layer Component-based design and performance modeling Contact material Interconnect Glass seal 2 SOFC-MP Stack Simulation Code Recent Accomplishments Major memory improvements of 3D model to accommodate 50-cell stacks on LINUX platform. Previously, developed a 2D (or stacked

288

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Policy Office Electricity Modeling System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Project Summary Full Title: Policy Office Electricity Modeling System (POEMS) Project ID: 93 Principal Investigator: Lessly Goudarzi Purpose Designed and built by OnLocation specifically to address electricity industry restructuring issues Performer Principal Investigator: Lessly Goudarzi Organization: OnLocation, Inc. Address: Suite 300, 501 Church Street Vienna, VA 22180 Telephone: 703-938-5151 Email: goudarzi@onlocationinc.com Project Description Type of Project: Model Category: Energy Infrastructure Products/Deliverables Description: National Transmission Grid Study - Appendix A Publication Title: Policy Office Electricty Modeling System (POEMS) and Documentation for Transmission Analysis (PDF 461 KB) Download Adobe Reader.

289

MMA, A Computer Code for Multi-Model Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the Multi-Model Analysis (MMA) computer code. MMA can be used to evaluate results from alternative models of a single system using the same set of observations for all models. As long as the observations, the observation weighting, and system being represented are the same, the models can differ in nearly any way imaginable. For example, they may include different processes, different simulation software, different temporal definitions (for example, steady-state and transient models could be considered), and so on. The multiple models need to be calibrated by nonlinear regression. Calibration of the individual models needs to be completed before application of MMA. MMA can be used to rank models and calculate posterior model probabilities. These can be used to (1) determine the relative importance of the characteristics embodied in the alternative models, (2) calculate model-averaged parameter estimates and predictions, and (3) quantify the uncertainty of parameter estimates and predictions in a way that integrates the variations represented by the alternative models. There is a lack of consensus on what model analysis methods are best, so MMA provides four default methods. Two are based on Kullback-Leibler information, and use the AIC (Akaike Information Criterion) or AICc (second-order-bias-corrected AIC) model discrimination criteria. The other two default methods are the BIC (Bayesian Information Criterion) and the KIC (Kashyap Information Criterion) model discrimination criteria. Use of the KIC criterion is equivalent to using the maximum-likelihood Bayesian model averaging (MLBMA) method. AIC, AICc, and BIC can be derived from Frequentist or Bayesian arguments. The default methods based on Kullback-Leibler information have a number of theoretical advantages, including that they tend to favor more complicated models as more data become available than do the other methods, which makes sense in many situations.

Eileen P. Poeter and Mary C. Hill

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

290

QuantUM: Quantitative Safety Analysis of UML Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

When developing a safety-critical system it is essential to obtain an assessment of different design alternatives. In particular, an early safety assessment of the architectural design of a system is desirable. In spite of the plethora of available formal quantitative analysis methods it is still difficult for software and system architects to integrate these techniques into their every day work. This is mainly due to the lack of methods that can be directly applied to architecture level models, for instance given as UML diagrams. Also, it is necessary that the description methods used do not require a profound knowledge of formal methods. Our approach bridges this gap and improves the integration of quantitative safety analysis methods into the development process. All inputs of the analysis are specified at the level of a UML model. This model is then automatically translated into the analysis model, and the results of the analysis are consequently represented on the level of the UML model. Thus the analysi...

Leitner-Fischer, Florian; 10.4204/EPTCS.57.2

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Modeling and analysis of energy conversion systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to assess the need for and the feasibility of developing a computer code that could model thermodynamic systems and predict the performance of energy conversion systems. To assess the market need for this code, representatives of a few industrial organizations were contacted, including manufacturers, system and component designers, and research personnel. Researchers and small manufacturers, designers, and installers were very interested in the possibility of using the proposed code. However, large companies were satisfied with the existing codes that they have developed for their own use. Also, a survey was conduced of available codes that could be used or possibly modified for the desired purpose. The codes were evaluated with respect to a list of desirable features, which was prepared as a result of the survey. A few publicly available codes were found that might be suitable. The development, verification, and maintenance of such a code would require a substantial, ongoing effort. 21 refs.

Den Braven, K.R. (Idaho Univ., Moscow, ID (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Stanger, S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Agent-Based Modeling and Simulation for Hydrogen Transition Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agent Agent Agent - - Based Modeling Based Modeling and Simulation (ABMS) and Simulation (ABMS) for Hydrogen Transition for Hydrogen Transition Analysis Analysis Marianne Mintz Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop US Department of Energy January 26, 2006 Objectives and Scope for Phase 1 2 Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure development as a complex adaptive system using an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) approach Develop an ABMS model to simulate the evolution of that system, spanning the entire H2 supply chain from production to consumption Identify key factors that either promote or inhibit the growth of H2 infrastructure Apply ABMS to get new insights into transition, particularly early transition phase - Dynamic interplay between supply and demand

293

FIREMAN: a toolkit for FIREwall Modeling and ANalysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Security concerns are becoming increasingly critical in networked systems. Firewalls provide important defense for network security. However, misconfigurations in firewalls are very common and significantly weaken the desired security. This paper introduces FIREMAN, a static analysis toolkit for firewall modeling and analysis. By treating firewall configurations as specialized programs, FIREMAN applies static analysis techniques to check misconfigurations, such as policy violations, inconsistencies, and inefficiencies, in individual firewalls as well as among distributed firewalls. FIREMAN performs symbolic model checking of the firewall configurations for all possible IP packets and along all possible data paths. It is both sound and complete because of the finite state nature of firewall configurations. FIREMAN is implemented by modeling firewall rules using binary decision diagrams (BDDs), which have been used successfully in hardware verification and model checking. We have experimented with FIREMAN and used it to uncover several real misconfigurations in enterprise networks, some of which have been subsequently confirmed and corrected by the administrators of these networks. 1.

Lihua Yuan; Hao Chen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Lagrangian drifter dispersion in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the framework of Monitoring by Ocean Drifters (MONDO) Project, a set of Lagrangian drifters were released in proximity of the Brazil Current, the western branch of the Subtropical Gyre in the South Atlantic Ocean. The experimental strategy of deploying part of the buoys in clusters offers the opportunity to examine relative dispersion on a wide range of scales. Adopting a dynamical systems approach, we focus our attention on scale-dependent indicators, like the finite-scale Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) and the finite-scale (mean square) relative velocity (FSRV) between two drifters as function of their separation, and compare them with classic time-dependent statistical quantities like the mean square relative displacement between two drifters and the effective diffusivity as functions of the time lag from the release. We find that, dependently on the given observable, the quasigeostrophic turbulence scenario is overall compatible with our data analysis, with discrepancies from the expected behavior of 2D turbulent trajectories likely to be ascribed to the non stationary and non homogeneous characteristics of the flow, as well as to possible ageostrophic effects. Submesoscale features of O(1) km are considered to play a role, to some extent, in determining the properties of relative dispersion as well as the shape of the energy spectrum. We present, also, numerical simulations of an OGCM of the South Atlantic, and discuss the comparison between experimental and model data about mesoscale dispersion.

Stefano Berti; Francisco Alves Dos Santos; Guglielmo Lacorata; Angelo Vulpiani

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

295

Finite volume schemes for dispersive wave propagation and runup  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite volume schemes are commonly used to construct approximate solutions to conservation laws. In this study we extend the framework of the finite volume methods to dispersive water wave models, in particular to Boussinesq type systems. We focus mainly on the application of the method to bidirectional nonlinear, dispersive wave propagation in one space dimension. Special emphasis is given to important nonlinear phenomena such as solitary waves interactions, dispersive shock wave formation and the runup of breaking and non-breaking long waves.

Dutykh, Denys; Mitsotakis, Dimitrios

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermorheological properties of nanostructured dispersions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanostructured dispersions, which consist of nanometer-sized particles, tubes, sheets, or droplets that are dispersed in liquids, have exhibited substantially higher thermal conductivities over those of the liquids alone. ...

Gordon, Jeremy B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Disabling Radiological Dispersal Terror  

SciTech Connect

Terror resulting from the use of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) relies upon an individual's lack of knowledge and understanding regarding its significance. Disabling this terror will depend upon realistic reviews of the current conservative radiation protection regulatory standards. It will also depend upon individuals being able to make their own informed decisions merging perceived risks with reality. Preparation in these areas will reduce the effectiveness of the RDD and may even reduce the possibility of its use.

Hart, M

2002-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

298

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Forecasting and Modeling Staff  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Forecasting and Modeling Energy Forecasting and Modeling The following includes summary bios of staff expertise and interests in analysis relating to energy economics, energy system planning, risk and uncertainty modeling, and energy infrastructure planning. Team Lead: Nate Blair Administrative Support: Geraly Amador Clayton Barrows Greg Brinkman Brian W Bush Stuart Cohen Carolyn Davidson Paul Denholm Victor Diakov Aron Dobos Easan Drury Kelly Eurek Janine Freeman Marissa Hummon Jennie Jorganson Jordan Macknick Trieu Mai David Mulcahy David Palchak Ben Sigrin Daniel Steinberg Patrick Sullivan Aaron Townsend Laura Vimmerstedt Andrew Weekley Owen Zinaman Photo of Clayton Barrows. Clayton Barrows Postdoctoral Researcher Areas of expertise Power system modeling Primary research interests Power and energy systems

299

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN); Scott, Timothy C. (Knoxville, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

Sisson, Warren G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Basaran, Osman A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Harris, Michael T. (Knoxville, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Model documentation of the Short-Term Coal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The short-term coal analysis system (SCOAL) is used by the Data Analysis and Forecasting Branch (DAFB) as an analytic aid to support preparation of short-term projections of bituminous coal and lignite production at the state level, and anthracite production, domestic imports of coal, and domestic and export demand for US coal at the national level. A description of SCOAL is presented which includes a general overview of the model and its analytical capabilities. (DMC)

Not Available

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Analysis of price diffusion in financial markets using PUCK model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the new type of random walk process called the Potentials of Unbalanced Complex Kinetics (PUCK) model, we theoretically show that the price diffusion in large scales is amplified 2/(2 + b) times, where b is the coefficient of quadratic term of the potential. In short time scales the price diffusion depends on the size M of the super moving average. Both numerical simulations and real data analysis of Yen-Dollar rates are consistent with theoretical analysis.

Mizuno, T; Takayasu, M; Mizuno, Takayuki; Takayasu, Hideki; Takayasu, Misako

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Perez, Danielle [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Stochastic modelling of landfill leachate and biogas production incorporating waste heterogeneity. Model formulation and uncertainty analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mathematical model simulating the hydrological and biochemical processes occurring in landfilled waste is presented and demonstrated. The model combines biochemical and hydrological models into an integrated representation of the landfill environment. Waste decomposition is modelled using traditional biochemical waste decomposition pathways combined with a simplified methodology for representing the rate of decomposition. Water flow through the waste is represented using a statistical velocity model capable of representing the effects of waste heterogeneity on leachate flow through the waste. Given the limitations in data capture from landfill sites, significant emphasis is placed on improving parameter identification and reducing parameter requirements. A sensitivity analysis is performed, highlighting the model's response to changes in input variables. A model test run is also presented, demonstrating the model capabilities. A parameter perturbation model sensitivity analysis was also performed. This has been able to show that although the model is sensitive to certain key parameters, its overall intuitive response provides a good basis for making reasonable predictions of the future state of the landfill system. Finally, due to the high uncertainty associated with landfill data, a tool for handling input data uncertainty is incorporated in the model's structure. It is concluded that the model can be used as a reasonable tool for modelling landfill processes and that further work should be undertaken to assess the model's performance.

Zacharof, A.I.; Butler, A.P

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources Speaker(s): Johanna Mathieu Date: April 27, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote While the traditional goal of an electric power system has been to control supply to fulfill demand, the demand-side can play an active role in power systems via Demand Response (DR). Recent DR programs have focused on peak load reduction in commercial buildings and industrial facilities (C&I facilities). We present a regression-based baseline model, which allows us to quantify DR performance. We use this baseline model to understand the performance of C&I facilities participating in an automated dynamic pricing DR program in California. In this program, facilities are

308

Sensitivity analysis techniques for models of human behavior.  

SciTech Connect

Human and social modeling has emerged as an important research area at Sandia National Laboratories due to its potential to improve national defense-related decision-making in the presence of uncertainty. To learn about which sensitivity analysis techniques are most suitable for models of human behavior, different promising methods were applied to an example model, tested, and compared. The example model simulates cognitive, behavioral, and social processes and interactions, and involves substantial nonlinearity, uncertainty, and variability. Results showed that some sensitivity analysis methods create similar results, and can thus be considered redundant. However, other methods, such as global methods that consider interactions between inputs, can generate insight not gained from traditional methods.

Bier, Asmeret Brooke

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Analysis and Application of Sheppard’s Airflow Model to Predict Mechanical Orographic Lifting and the Occurrence of Mountain Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mechanically driven orographic lifting is important for air pollution dispersion and weather prediction, but the small dimensions of mountain peaks often prevent numerical weather models from producing detailed forecasts. Mechanical lifting in ...

Jan Kleissl; Richard E. Honrath; Diamantino V. Henriques

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Dispersion of a Passive Tracer in Buoyancy- and Shear-Driven Boundary Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By means of finescale modeling [large-eddy simulation (LES)], the combined effect of thermal and mechanical forcing on the dispersion of a plume in a convective boundary layer is investigated. Dispersion of a passive tracer is studied in various ...

Alessandro Dosio; Jordi Vilà-Guerau de Arellano; Albert A. M. Holtslag; Peter J. H. Builtjes

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Multi-State Load Models for Distribution System Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent work in the field of distribution system analysis has shown that the traditional method of peak load analysis is not adequate for the analysis of emerging distribution system technologies. Voltage optimization, demand response, electric vehicle charging, and energy storage are examples of technologies with characteristics having daily, seasonal, and/or annual variations. In addition to the seasonal variations, emerging technologies such as demand response and plug in electric vehicle charging have the potential to send control signals to the end use loads which will affect how they consume energy. In order to support time-series analysis over different time frames and to incorporate potential control signal inputs it is necessary to develop detailed end use load models which accurately represent the load under various conditions, and not just during the peak load period. This paper will build on previous work on detail end use load modeling in order to outline the method of general multi-state load models for distribution system analysis.

Schneider, Kevin P.; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

State space modelling and data analysis exercises in LISA Pathfinder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionalities required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

M Nofrarias; F Antonucci; M Armano; H Audley; G Auger; M Benedetti; P Binetruy; J Bogenstahl; D Bortoluzzi; N Brandt; M Caleno; A Cavalleri; G Congedo; M Cruise; K Danzmann; F De Marchi; M Diaz-Aguilo; I Diepholz; G Dixon; R Dolesi; N Dunbar; J Fauste; L Ferraioli; V Ferroni W Fichter; E Fitzsimons; M Freschi; C García Marirrodriga; R Gerndt; L Gesa; F Gibert; D Giardini; C Grimani; A Grynagier; F Guzmán; I Harrison; G Heinzel; M Hewitson; D Hollington; D Hoyland; M Hueller; J Huesler; O Jennrich; P Jetzer; B Johlander; N Karnesis; N Korsakova; C Killow; X Llamas; I Lloro; A Lobo; R Maarschalkerweerd; S Madden; D Mance; I Mateos; P W McNamara; J Mendes; E Mitchell; D Nicolini; D Nicolodi; M Perreur-Lloyd; E Plagnol; P Prat; J Ramos-Castro; J Reiche; J A Romera Perez; D Robertson; H Rozemeijer; G Russano; A Schleicher; D Shaul; CF Sopuerta; T J Sumner; A Taylor; D Texier; C Trenkel; H-B Tu; S Vitale; G Wanner; H Ward; S Waschke; P Wass; D Wealthy; S Wen; W J Weber; T Ziegler; P Zweifel

2013-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

313

Infiltration modeling guidelines for commercial building energy analysis  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a methodology for modeling air infiltration in EnergyPlus to account for envelope air barrier characteristics. Based on a review of various infiltration modeling options available in EnergyPlus and sensitivity analysis, the linear wind velocity coefficient based on DOE-2 infiltration model is recommended. The methodology described in this report can be used to calculate the EnergyPlus infiltration input for any given building level infiltration rate specified at known pressure difference. The sensitivity analysis shows that EnergyPlus calculates the wind speed based on zone altitude, and the linear wind velocity coefficient represents the variation in infiltration heat loss consistent with building location and weather data.

Gowri, Krishnan; Winiarski, David W.; Jarnagin, Ronald E.

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

314

Fuel Cell Power Model for CHP and CHHP Economics and Performance Analysis (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the fuel cell power model for CHP and CHHP economics and performance analysis.

Steward, D.; Penev, M.

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

316

Analysis of Attic Radiant Barrier Systems Using Mathematical Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the past six years, the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) has conducted extensive experimental research on radiant barrier systems (RBS). This paper presents recent research on the development of mathematical attic models. Two levels of modeling capability have been developed. A very simplified model based on ASHRAE procedures in used to study the sensitivity of RBS performance parameters, and a very detailed finite element model is used to study highly complex phenomena, including moisture adsorption and desorption in attics. The speed of the simple model allows a large range of attic parameters to be studies quickly, and the finite element model provides a detailed understanding of combined heat and moisture transport in attics. This paper concentrates on a parametric analysis of attic RBS using the simplified model. The development of the model is described, and results of the parametric analyses are presented and discussed. Preliminary results from the finite element model are also compared with measurements from a test attic to illustrate the effects of moisture adsorption and desorption in common attics.

Fairey, P.; Swami, M.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Measurements of Lagrangian Atmospheric Dispersion Statistics over Open Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric dispersion statistics in the Lagrangian frame have been evaluated over open water by using a double-theodolite system to track neutrally buoyant balloons released a few kilometers off-shore during onshore winds. Analysis of the ...

C. M. Sheih; P. Frenzen; R. L. Hart

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Integration of Facility Modeling Capabilities for Nuclear Nonproliferation Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Humberto E. Garcia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

INTEGRATION OF FACILITY MODELING CAPABILITIES FOR NUCLEAR NONPROLIFERATION ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Gorensek, M.; Hamm, L.; Garcia, H.; Burr, T.; Coles, G.; Edmunds, T.; Garrett, A.; Krebs, J.; Kress, R.; Lamberti, V.; Schoenwald, D.; Tzanos, C.; Ward, R.

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclear nonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facility modeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facility modeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facility modeling capabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferation analysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facility modeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facility modeling capabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Garcia, Humberto [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Coles, Garill A [ORNL; Edmunds, Thomas A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Garrett, Alfred [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Gorensek, Maximilian [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Hamm, Luther [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Krebs, John [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kress, Reid L [ORNL; Lamberti, Vincent [Y-12 National Security Complex; Schoenwald, David [ORNL; Tzanos, Constantine P [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP): An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy system modeling can be intentionally or unintentionally misused by decision-makers. This report describes how both can be minimized through careful use of models and thorough understanding of their underlying approaches and assumptions. The analysis summarized here assesses the impact that model and data choices have on forecasting energy systems by comparing seven different electric-sector models. This analysis was coordinated by the Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership (REMAP), a collaboration among governmental, academic, and nongovernmental participants.

Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K. R.; Venkatesh, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Peer Review of NRC Standardized Plant Analysis Risk Models  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Standardized Plant Analysis Risk (SPAR) Models underwent a Peer Review using ASME PRA standard (Addendum C) as endorsed by NRC in Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.200. The review was performed by a mix of industry probabilistic risk analysis (PRA) experts and NRC PRA experts. Representative SPAR models, one PWR and one BWR, were reviewed against Capability Category I of the ASME PRA standard. Capability Category I was selected as the basis for review due to the specific uses/applications of the SPAR models. The BWR SPAR model was reviewed against 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements; however, based on the Capability Category I level of review and the absence of internal flooding and containment performance (LERF) logic only 216 requirements were determined to be applicable. Based on the review, the BWR SPAR model met 139 of the 216 supporting requirements. The review also generated 200 findings or suggestions. Of these 200 findings and suggestions 142 were findings and 58 were suggestions. The PWR SPAR model was also evaluated against the same 331 ASME PRA Standard Supporting Requirements. Of these requirements only 215 were deemed appropriate for the review (for the same reason as noted for the BWR). The PWR review determined that 125 of the 215 supporting requirements met Capability Category I or greater. The review identified 101 findings or suggestions (76 findings and 25 suggestions). These findings or suggestions were developed to identify areas where SPAR models could be enhanced. A process to prioritize and incorporate the findings/suggestions supporting requirements into the SPAR models is being developed. The prioritization process focuses on those findings that will enhance the accuracy, completeness and usability of the SPAR models.

Anthony Koonce; James Knudsen; Robert Buell

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Anaerobic digestion analysis model: User`s manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Anaerobic Digestion Analysis Model (ADAM) has been developed to assist investigators in performing preliminary economic analyses of anaerobic digestion processes. The model, which runs under Microsoft Excel{trademark}, is capable of estimating the economic performance of several different waste digestion process configurations that are defined by the user through a series of option selections. The model can be used to predict required feedstock tipping fees, product selling prices, utility rates, and raw material unit costs. The model is intended to be used as a tool to perform preliminary economic estimates that could be used to carry out simple screening analyses. The model`s current parameters are based on engineering judgments and are not reflective of any existing process; therefore, they should be carefully evaluated and modified if necessary to reflect the process under consideration. The accuracy and level of uncertainty of the estimated capital investment and operating costs are dependent on the accuracy and level of uncertainty of the model`s input parameters. The underlying methodology is capable of producing results accurate to within {+-} 30% of actual costs.

Ruth, M.; Landucci, R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Vehicle Transient Air Conditioning Analysis: Model Development& System Optimization Investigations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a transient air conditioning (A/C) system model using SINDA/FLUINT analysis software. It captures all the relevant physics of transient A/C system performance, including two-phase flow effects in the evaporator and condenser, system mass effects, air side heat transfer on the condenser/evaporator, vehicle speed effects, temperature-dependent properties, and integration with a simplified cabin thermal model. It has demonstrated robust and powerful system design optimization capabilities. Single-variable and multiple variable design optimizations have been performed and are presented. Various system performance parameters can be optimized, including system COP, cabin cool-down time, and system heat load capacity. This work presents this new transient A/C system analysis and optimization tool and shows some high-level system design conclusions reached to date. The work focuses on R-134a A/C systems, but future efforts will modify the model to investigate the transient performance of alternative refrigerant systems such as carbon dioxide systems. NREL is integrating its transient air conditioning model into NRELs ADVISOR vehicle system analysis software, with the objective of simultaneously optimizing A/C system designs within the overall vehicle design optimization.

Hendricks, T. J.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Water Rights Analysis Package (WRAP) Modeling System Reference Manual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Water Resources Institute (TWRI), and many other agencies and organizations, have worked with Ralph Wurbs over the years to develop WRAP (the Water Rights Analysis Package). The WRAP model simulates management of the water resources of a river basin, or multiple-basin region, under a priority-based water allocation system. The model facilitates assessment of hydrologic and institutional water availability/reliability for existing and proposed requirements for water use and management. Basin-wide impacts of water resources development projects and management strategies may be evaluated. The software package is generalized for application to any river/reservoir/use system, with input files being developed for the particular river basin of concern. The model is documented by reference and users manuals that may be downloaded from this site along with the software. WRAP is incorporated in the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Water Availability Modeling (WAM) System.

Wurbs, R.

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Radiolysis Model Sensitivity Analysis for a Used Fuel Storage Canister  

SciTech Connect

This report fulfills the M3 milestone (M3FT-13PN0810027) to report on a radiolysis computer model analysis that estimates the generation of radiolytic products for a storage canister. The analysis considers radiolysis outside storage canister walls and within the canister fill gas over a possible 300-year lifetime. Previous work relied on estimates based directly on a water radiolysis G-value. This work also includes that effect with the addition of coupled kinetics for 111 reactions for 40 gas species to account for radiolytic-induced chemistry, which includes water recombination and reactions with air.

Wittman, Richard S.

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solid waste integrated cost analysis model: 1991 project year report  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the City of Houston's 1991 Solid Waste Integrated Cost Analysis Model (SWICAM) project was to continue the development of a computerized cost analysis model. This model is to provide solid waste managers with tool to evaluate the dollar cost of real or hypothetical solid waste management choices. Those choices have become complicated by the implementation of Subtitle D of the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the EPA's Integrated Approach to managing municipal solid waste;. that is, minimize generation, maximize recycling, reduce volume (incinerate), and then bury (landfill) only the remainder. Implementation of an integrated solid waste management system involving all or some of the options of recycling, waste to energy, composting, and landfilling is extremely complicated. Factors such as hauling distances, markets, and prices for recyclable, costs and benefits of transfer stations, and material recovery facilities must all be considered. A jurisdiction must determine the cost impacts of implementing a number of various possibilities for managing, handling, processing, and disposing of waste. SWICAM employs a single Lotus 123 spreadsheet to enable a jurisdiction to predict or assess the costs of its waste management system. It allows the user to select his own process flow for waste material and to manipulate the model to include as few or as many options as he or she chooses. The model will calculate the estimated cost for those choices selected. The user can then change the model to include or exclude waste stream components, until the mix of choices suits the user. Graphs can be produced as a visual communication aid in presenting the results of the cost analysis. SWICAM also allows future cost projections to be made.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Demand Uncertainty and Price Dispersion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Demand uncertainty has been recognized as one factor that may cause price dispersion in perfectly competitive markets with costly and perishable capacity. With the persistence… (more)

Li, Suxi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Energy conserving Anisotropic Anhysteretic Magnetic Modelling for Finite Element Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To model ferromagnetic material in finite element analysis a correct description of the constitutive relationship (BH-law) must be found from measured data. This article proposes to use the energy density function as a centrepiece. Using this function, which turns out to be a convex function of the flux density, guarantees energy conservative modelling. The magnetic field strength can be seen as a derivative with respect to the flux density. Especially for anisotropic materials (from lamination and/or grain orientation) this method has advantages. Strictly speaking this method is only valid for anhysteretic and thermodynamically stable material.

Jens Krause

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

330

Scaling properties of sea ice deformation from buoy dispersion P. Rampal,1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in a gas or two people in a crowd, two nearby pieces of sea ice gradually move apart and disperse [MartinScaling properties of sea ice deformation from buoy dispersion analysis P. Rampal,1,2 J. Weiss,1 D. The deformation is derived from the dispersion of pairs of drifting buoys, using the IABP (International Arctic

Lindsay, Ron

331

Foam computer model helps in analysis of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new mechanistic model attempts to overcome many of the problems associated with existing foam flow analyses. The model calculates varying Fanning friction factors, rather than assumed constant factors, along the flow path. Foam generated by mixing gas and liquid for underbalanced drilling has unique rheological characteristics, making it very difficult to accurately predict the pressure profile. A user-friendly personal-computer program was developed to solve the mechanical energy balance equation for compressible foam flow. The program takes into account influxes of gas, liquid, and oil from formations. The pressure profile, foam quality, density, and cuttings transport are predicted by the model. A sensitivity analysis window allows the user to quickly optimize the hydraulics program by selecting the best combination of injection pressure, back pressure, and gas/liquid injection rates. This new model handles inclined and horizontal well bores and provides handy engineering and design tools for underbalanced drilling, well bore cleanout, and other foam operations. The paper describes rheological models, foam flow equations, equations of state, mechanical energy equations, pressure drop across nozzles, influx modeling, program operation, comparison to other models, to lab data, and to field data, and results.

Liu, G.; Medley, G.H. Jr. [Maurer Engineering Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Modeling and analysis of unsymmetrical transformer banks serving unbalanced loads  

SciTech Connect

It is a common practice to serve combination three-phase and single-phase loads from an unsymmetrical three-phase transformer bank and a four-wire secondary. Depending upon the loads and company standards, nine different transformer connections can be considered along with either an open four wire or a quadraplex secondary. The selection of the proper connection and transformer ratings can be achieved by the correct modeling and analysis of a system consisting of an equivalent source, transformer bank, secondary, and loads. This paper develops the models for the nine transformer connections, the secondary, and the loads. A computer program has been written that allows the analysis of the system for loading and short-circuit studies. The paper includes several examples of different normal and abnormal operating conditions on some of the transformer connections.

Kersting, W.H. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States). Coll. of Engineering; Phillips, W.H. [WH Power Consultants, Las Cruces, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Application of Bayesian Hierarchical Models in Genetic Data Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Genetic data analysis has been capturing a lot of attentions for understanding the mechanism of the development and progressing of diseases like cancers, and is crucial in discovering genetic markers and treatment targets in medical research. This dissertation focuses on several important issues in genetic data analysis, graphical network modeling, feature selection, and covariance estimation. First, we develop a gene network modeling method for discrete gene expression data, produced by technologies such as serial analysis of gene expression and RNA sequencing experiment, which generate counts of mRNA transcripts in cell samples. We propose a generalized linear model to fit the discrete gene expression data and assume that the log ratios of the mean expression levels follow a Gaussian distribution. We derive the gene network structures by selecting covariance matrices of the Gaussian distribution with a hyper-inverse Wishart prior. We incorporate prior network models based on Gene Ontology information, which avails existing biological information on the genes of interest. Next, we consider a variable selection problem, where the variables have natural grouping structures, with application to analysis of chromosomal copy number data. The chromosomal copy number data are produced by molecular inversion probes experiments which measure probe-specific copy number changes. We propose a novel Bayesian variable selection method, the hierarchical structured variable se- lection (HSVS) method, which accounts for the natural gene and probe-within-gene architecture to identify important genes and probes associated with clinically relevant outcomes. We propose the HSVS model for grouped variable selection, where simultaneous selection of both groups and within-group variables is of interest. The HSVS model utilizes a discrete mixture prior distribution for group selection and group-specific Bayesian lasso hierarchies for variable selection within groups. We further provide methods for accounting for serial correlations within groups that incorporate Bayesian fused lasso methods for within-group selection. Finally, we propose a Bayesian method of estimating high-dimensional covariance matrices that can be decomposed into a low rank and sparse component. This covariance structure has a wide range of applications including factor analytical model and random effects model. We model the covariance matrices with the decomposition structure by representing the covariance model in the form of a factor analytic model where the number of latent factors is unknown. We introduce binary indicators for estimating the rank of the low rank component combined with a Bayesian graphical lasso method for estimating the sparse component. We further extend our method to a graphical factor analytic model where the graphical model of the residuals is of interest. We achieve sparse estimation of the inverse covariance of the residuals in the graphical factor model by employing a hyper-inverse Wishart prior method for a decomposable graph and a Bayesian graphical lasso method for an unrestricted graph.

Zhang, Lin

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Back analysis of microplane model parameters using soft computing methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new procedure based on layered feed-forward neural networks for the microplane material model parameters identification is proposed in the present paper. Novelties are usage of the Latin Hypercube Sampling method for the generation of training sets, a systematic employment of stochastic sensitivity analysis and a genetic algorithm-based training of a neural network by an evolutionary algorithm. Advantages and disadvantages of this approach together with possible extensions are thoroughly discussed and analyzed.

Kucerova, A; Zeman, J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Model Electric Restaurant: Volume 3: Analysis and Design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Electric Restaurant Project was initiated in 1987 to study energy use in restaurants and other types of foodservice facilities. This report describes the second phase of the project, which ultimately involved testing a number of energy-efficient electric concepts in several restaurants in Los Angeles, California, as well as Phoenix and Mesa, Arizona. Field auditing, computer analysis, design, and testing activities revealed the best combination of electric equipment for minimizing site and sour...

1996-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Security Analysis and Improvement Model for Web-based Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Today the web has become a major conduit for information. As the World Wide Web?s popularity continues to increase, information security on the web has become an increasing concern. Web information security is related to availability, confidentiality, and data integrity. According to the reports from http://www.securityfocus.com in May 2006, operating systems account for 9% vulnerability, web-based software systems account for 61% vulnerability, and other applications account for 30% vulnerability. In this dissertation, I present a security analysis model using the Markov Process Model. Risk analysis is conducted using fuzzy logic method and information entropy theory. In a web-based application system, security risk is most related to the current states in software systems and hardware systems, and independent of web application system states in the past. Therefore, the web-based applications can be approximately modeled by the Markov Process Model. The web-based applications can be conceptually expressed in the discrete states of (web_client_good; web_server_good, web_server_vulnerable, web_server_attacked, web_server_security_failed; database_server_good, database_server_vulnerable, database_server_attacked, database_server_security_failed) as state space in the Markov Chain. The vulnerable behavior and system response in the web-based applications are analyzed in this dissertation. The analyses focus on functional availability-related aspects: the probability of reaching a particular security failed state and the mean time to the security failure of a system. Vulnerability risk index is classified in three levels as an indicator of the level of security (low level, high level, and failed level). An illustrative application example is provided. As the second objective of this dissertation, I propose a security improvement model for the web-based applications using the GeoIP services in the formal methods. In the security improvement model, web access is authenticated in role-based access control using user logins, remote IP addresses, and physical locations as subject credentials to combine with the requested objects and privilege modes. Access control algorithms are developed for subjects, objects, and access privileges. A secure implementation architecture is presented. In summary, the dissertation has developed security analysis and improvement model for the web-based application. Future work will address Markov Process Model validation when security data collection becomes easy. Security improvement model will be evaluated in performance aspect.

Wang, Yong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Polymeric Dispersants: A Review of the Literature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a compilation of experimental work on the use of dispersants for preventing or ameliorating the fouling of high temperature surfaces in boilers or steam generators by corrosion products. Four types of experiments are discussed in this literature survey: thermal stability investigations, precipitant characterization, settling rate experiments, and plant, pilot-plant or boiler studies. The compilation was prepared as background material for completing the 50.59 analysis for the experim...

1999-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

338

Bayesian analysis of inflation: Parameter estimation for single field models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Future astrophysical data sets promise to strengthen constraints on models of inflation, and extracting these constraints requires methods and tools commensurate with the quality of the data. In this paper we describe ModeCode, a new, publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single-field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. ModeCode is easily extendable to additional models of inflation, and future updates will include Bayesian model comparison. Errors from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments. We constrain representative single-field models ({phi}{sup n} with n=2/3, 1, 2, and 4, natural inflation, and 'hilltop' inflation) using current data, and provide forecasts for Planck. From current data, we obtain weak but nontrivial limits on the post-inflationary physics, which is a significant source of uncertainty in the predictions of inflationary models, while we find that Planck will dramatically improve these constraints. In particular, Planck will link the inflationary dynamics with the post-inflationary growth of the horizon, and thus begin to probe the ''primordial dark ages'' between TeV and grand unified theory scale energies.

Mortonson, Michael J. [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Peiris, Hiranya V. [Institute of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Easther, Richard [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Crashworthiness analysis using advanced material models in DYNA3D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of an electric vehicle consortium, LLNL and Kaiser Aluminum are conducting experimental and numerical studies on crashworthy aluminum spaceframe designs. They have jointly explored the effect of heat treat on crush behavior and duplicated the experimental behavior with finite-element simulations. The major technical contributions to the state of the art in numerical simulation arise from the development and use of advanced material model descriptions for LLNL`s DYNA3D code. Constitutive model enhancements in both flow and failure have been employed for conventional materials such as low-carbon steels, and also for lighter weight materials such as aluminum and fiber composites being considered for future vehicles. The constitutive model enhancements are developed as extensions from LLNL`s work in anisotropic flow and multiaxial failure modeling. Analysis quality as a function of level of simplification of material behavior and mesh is explored, as well as the penalty in computation cost that must be paid for using more complex models and meshes. The lightweight material modeling technology is being used at the vehicle component level to explore the safety implications of small neighborhood electric vehicles manufactured almost exclusively from these materials.

Logan, R.W.; Burger, M.J.; McMichael, L.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Parkinson, R.D. [Kaiser Aluminum & Chemical Corp., Pleasanton, CA (United States). Center for Technology

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

340

Bayesian Analysis of Inflation: Parameter Estimation for Single Field Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future astrophysical datasets promise to strengthen constraints on models of inflation, and extracting these constraints requires methods and tools commensurate with the quality of the data. In this paper we describe ModeCode, a new, publicly available code that computes the primordial scalar and tensor power spectra for single field inflationary models. ModeCode solves the inflationary mode equations numerically, avoiding the slow roll approximation. It is interfaced with CAMB and CosmoMC to compute cosmic microwave background angular power spectra and perform likelihood analysis and parameter estimation. ModeCode is easily extendable to additional models of inflation, and future updates will include Bayesian model comparison. Errors from ModeCode contribute negligibly to the error budget for analyses of data from Planck or other next generation experiments. We constrain representative single field models (phi^n with n=2/3, 1, 2, and 4, natural inflation, and "hilltop" inflation) using current data, and provide forecasts for Planck. From current data, we obtain weak but nontrivial limits on the post-inflationary physics, which is a significant source of uncertainty in the predictions of inflationary models, while we find that Planck will dramatically improve these constraints. In particular, Planck will link the inflationary dynamics with the post-inflationary growth of the horizon, and thus begin to probe the "primordial dark ages" between TeV and GUT scale energies.

Michael J. Mortonson; Hiranya V. Peiris; Richard Easther

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Research Note---Online Price Dispersion: A Game-Theoretic Perspective and Empirical Evidence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The existence and persistence of price dispersion for identical products in online markets have been well-documented in the literature. Possible explanations of this price dispersion, derived mainly using hedonic price models, have seen only modest success. ... Keywords: brand recognition, competitive strategy, e-service, online price dispersion, service quality, vertical differentiation

Sulin Ba; Jan Stallaert; Zhongju Zhang

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Mathematical modelling, analysis and computation of some complex and nonlinear flow problems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

???This thesis consists of two parts: (I) modelling, analysis and computation of sweat transport in textile media; (II) unconditional convergence and optimal error analysis of… (more)

Li, Buyang (???)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Design Considerations, Modeling and Analysis for the Multispectral Thermal Imager  

SciTech Connect

The design of remote sensing systems is driven by the need to provide cost-effective, substantive answers to questions posed by our customers. This is especially important for space-based systems, which tend to be expensive, and which generally cannot be changed after they are launched. We report here on the approach we employed in developing the desired attributes of a satellite mission, namely the Multispectral Thermal Imager. After an initial scoping study, we applied a procedure which we call: "End-to-end modeling and analysis (EEM)." We began with target attributes, translated to observable signatures and then propagated the signatures through the atmosphere to the sensor location. We modeled the sensor attributes to yield a simulated data stream, which was then analyzed to retrieve information about the original target. The retrieved signature was then compared to the original to obtain a figure of merit: hence the term "end-to-end modeling and analysis." We base the EEM in physics to ensure high fidelity and to permit scaling. As the actual design of the payload evolves, and as real hardware is tested, we can update the EEM to facilitate trade studies, and to judge, for example, whether components that deviate from specifications are acceptable.

Borel, C.C.; Clodius, W.B.; Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Weber, P.G.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Decline curve analysis in unconventional resource plays using logistic growth models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current models used to forecast production in unconventional oil and gas formations are often not producing valid results. When traditional decline curve analysis models are… (more)

Clark, Aaron James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Evaluation of machining dispersions for turning process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article we propose to extend the model of simulation of dispersions in turning based on the geometrical specifications. Our study is articulated around two trends of development: the first trend relates to the geometrical model. The geometrical model suggested must allow a follow-up of the geometry of the part during the simulation of machining. It is thus a question of carrying out a systematic treatment of the whole dimensioning and tolerancing process while being based on the principles of the \\DeltaL method. We also planned to integrate this type of specification in the model of simulation of machining suggested. It is more generally a question of extending the traditional model for better taking into account the multi axis specification of coaxiality and perpendicularity on the turned workpieces. The second trend of our study relates to the widening of the field of application of the model. We propose to extend the field of application of the model by taking into account the modifications of several parameters of the manufacturing process plans, likely to involve variations of dispersions.

Arnaud Lefebvre; Valery Wolff

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

346

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genome Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon The International Brachypodium Initiative* Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its

347

Modeling and Analysis of Time-Varying Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We live in a world increasingly dominated by networks -- communications, social, information, biological etc. A central attribute of many of these networks is that they are dynamic, that is, they exhibit structural changes over time. While the practice of dynamic networks has proliferated, we lag behind in the fundamental, mathematical understanding of network dynamism. Existing research on time-varying graphs ranges from preliminary algorithmic studies (e.g., Ferreira's work on evolving graphs) to analysis of specific properties such as flooding time in dynamic random graphs. A popular model for studying dynamic graphs is a sequence of graphs arranged by increasing snapshots of time. In this paper, we study the fundamental property of reachability in a time-varying graph over time and characterize the latency with respect to two metrics, namely store-or-advance latency and cut-through latency. Instead of expected value analysis, we concentrate on characterizing the exact probability distribution of routing l...

Basu, Prithwish; Ramanathan, Ram; Johnson, Matthew P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based Repository Model Development and Analysis of the Fate and Transport of Water in a Salt Based...

349

Modeling and Analysis using SAINT: A combined discrete/continuous network simulation language  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SAINT, Systems Analysis of Integrated Networks of Tasks, is a network modeling and simulation technique developed to assist in the design and analysis of complex man-machine systems.* SAINT provides the concepts necessary to model systems that consist ...

David B. Wortman; Steven D. Duket; Deborah J. Seifert

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET-A COMBUSTION of Technology August 2008 #12;MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF CHEMILUMINESCENCE SENSING FOR SYNGAS, METHANE AND JET

Seitzman, Jerry M.

351

Perfromance analysis of the Parallel Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient execution of parallel applications requires insight into how the parallel system features impact the performance of the application. Significant experimental analysis and the development of performance models enhance the understanding of such an impact. Deep understanding of an application’s major kernels and their design leads to a better understanding of the application’s performance, and hence, leads to development of better performance models. The Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) is the latest in a series of global atmospheric models developed at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) as a community tool for NCAR and the university research community. This work focuses on analyzing CAM and understanding the impact of different architectures on this application. In the analysis of CAM, kernel coupling, which quantifies the interaction between adjacent and chains of kernels in an application, is used. All experiments are conducted on four parallel platforms: NERSC (National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center) Seaborg, SDSC (San Diego Supercomputer Center) DataStar P655, DataStar P690 and PSC (Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center) Lemieux. Experimental results indicate that kernel coupling gave an insight into many of the application characteristics. One important characteristic of CAM is that its performance is heavily dependent on a parallel platform memory hierarchy; different cache sizes and different cache policies had the major effect on CAM’s performance. Also, coupling values showed that although CAM’s kernels share many data structures, most of the coupling values are still destructive (i.e., interfering with each other so as to adversely affect performance). The kernel coupling results helps developers in pointing out the bottlenecks in memory usage in CAM. The results obtained from processor partitioning are significant in helping CAM users in choosing the right platform to run CAM.

Shawky Sharkawi, Sameh Sherif

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

An LES Study of the Impacts of Land Surface Heterogeneity on Dispersion in the Convective Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A systematic analysis of the impacts of heat patches and topographical features on the dispersion of passive materials in a shear-free convective boundary layer (CBL) was performed. Large eddy simulations and a Lagrangian particle dispersion ...

S. G. Gopalakrishnan; Roni Avissar

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

An efficient integrated approach for global sensitivity analysis of hydrological model parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient sensitivity analysis, particularly for the global sensitivity analysis (GSA) to identify the most important or sensitive parameters, is crucial for understanding complex hydrological models, e.g., distributed hydrological models. In this paper, ... Keywords: DTVGM, Global sensitivity analysis, RSMSobol' method, Response surface model, Statistical emulator

Che-Sheng Zhan; Xiao-Meng Song; Jun Xia; Charles Tong

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Model and Seismic Analysis of Large-scale Wind Turbine Tower Structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The working condition of wind turbine tower structure with a massive engine room and revolving wind wheels is very complex. The paper simplify the wind turbine tower model with finite element analysis software --ANSYS, completed modal analysis firstly, ... Keywords: wind turbine tower, model analysis, resonance, time-history analysis, dynamic

Xiang Liu; Jiangtao Kong

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model Comparison of Average Transport and Dispersion Among a Gaussian, a Two-Dimensional, and a Three-Dimensional Model The Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC's) code for predicting off-site consequences, MACCS2 (Chanin, et al. 1998) (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2), uses a simplified model for atmospheric transport and d ispersion (ATD), that is, a straight-line Gaussian model. The MACCS2 calculations are used by the NRC for planning purposes, for cost-benefit analyses, and in level-3 probabilistic risk analyses (PRAs). The MACCS2 ATD model has been criticized as being overly simplistic, even for its purposes. The justification for its use has been

356

CFD MODELING ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL DRAFT COOLING TOWER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industrial processes use mechanical draft cooling towers (MDCT's) to dissipate waste heat by transferring heat from water to air via evaporative cooling, which causes air humidification. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has a MDCT consisting of four independent compartments called cells. Each cell has its own fan to help maximize heat transfer between ambient air and circulated water. The primary objective of the work is to conduct a parametric study for cooling tower performance under different fan speeds and ambient air conditions. The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to achieve the objective. The model uses three-dimensional steady-state momentum, continuity equations, air-vapor species balance equation, and two-equation turbulence as the basic governing equations. It was assumed that vapor phase is always transported by the continuous air phase with no slip velocity. In this case, water droplet component was considered as discrete phase for the interfacial heat and mass transfer via Lagrangian approach. Thus, the air-vapor mixture model with discrete water droplet phase is used for the analysis. A series of the modeling calculations was performed to investigate the impact of ambient and operating conditions on the thermal performance of the cooling tower when fans were operating and when they were turned off. The model was benchmarked against the literature data and the SRS test results for key parameters such as air temperature and humidity at the tower exit and water temperature for given ambient conditions. Detailed results will be presented here.

Lee, S; Alfred Garrett, A; James02 Bollinger, J; Larry Koffman, L

2008-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

357

Power-law Spatial Dispersion from Fractional Liouville Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

Vasily E. Tarasov

2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

358

Integrating Comprehensive Air Quality Modeling with Policy Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.10: Gaussian dispersion plume for PM2.5 in g/m3 for an emission factor of 1.35 g/kWh for a diesel ICE at a wind in concentration for PM2.5 in µg/m3 for an uncontrolled coal plant [top] and for RFO boiler-steam turbine plant investigate using installed backup generators instead of a more expensive peaking turbine for meeting peak

359

Selection of a Tritium Dose Model: Defensibility and Reasonableness for DOE Authorization Basis Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper highlights the logic used to select a dispersion/consequence methodology, describes the collection of tritium models contained in the suite of analysis options (the `tool kit`), and provides application examples.

Blanchard, A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); O`Kula, K.R.; East, J.M.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Sodium fast reactor gaps analysis of computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of an expert-opinion elicitation activity designed to qualitatively assess the status and capabilities of currently available computer codes and models for accident analysis and reactor safety calculations of advanced sodium fast reactors, and identify important gaps. The twelve-member panel consisted of representatives from five U.S. National Laboratories (SNL, ANL, INL, ORNL, and BNL), the University of Wisconsin, the KAERI, the JAEA, and the CEA. The major portion of this elicitation activity occurred during a two-day meeting held on Aug. 10-11, 2010 at Argonne National Laboratory. There were two primary objectives of this work: (1) Identify computer codes currently available for SFR accident analysis and reactor safety calculations; and (2) Assess the status and capability of current US computer codes to adequately model the required accident scenarios and associated phenomena, and identify important gaps. During the review, panel members identified over 60 computer codes that are currently available in the international community to perform different aspects of SFR safety analysis for various event scenarios and accident categories. A brief description of each of these codes together with references (when available) is provided. An adaptation of the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) for computational modeling and simulation is described for use in this work. The panel's assessment of the available US codes is presented in the form of nine tables, organized into groups of three for each of three risk categories considered: anticipated operational occurrences (AOOs), design basis accidents (DBA), and beyond design basis accidents (BDBA). A set of summary conclusions are drawn from the results obtained. At the highest level, the panel judged that current US code capabilities are adequate for licensing given reasonable margins, but expressed concern that US code development activities had stagnated and that the experienced user-base and the experimental validation base was decaying away quickly.

Carbajo, Juan (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Jeong, Hae-Yong (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon, Korea); Wigeland, Roald (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID); Corradini, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Thomas, Justin (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Wei, Tom (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Sofu, Tanju (Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL); Ludewig, Hans (Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY); Tobita, Yoshiharu (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Ohshima, Hiroyuki (Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); Serre, Frederic (Centre d'%C3%94etudes nucl%C3%94eaires de Cadarache %3CU%2B2013%3E CEA, France)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Unified Technique for Dynamic Modeling and Stability Analysis of Microgrid Systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents a unified method for dynamic modeling and stability analysis of microgrid power systems. Using the automated state-model generation algorithm, a state-space model… (more)

Johnson, Brian B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model: Version 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model is the part of the MIT Integrated Global Systems Model (IGSM) that represents the human systems. EPPA is a recursive-dynamic multi-regional general equilibrium model ...

Paltsev, Sergey.

363

A Forward Looking Version of the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper documents a forward looking multi-regional general equilibrium model developed from the latest version of the recursive-dynamic MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model. The model represents ...

Babiker, Mustafa M.H.

364

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Bottom Heating Effects on Scalar Dispersion in and above a Cubical Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on scalar dispersion in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated, and scalar dispersion ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Young-Hee Ryu

365

Orientational relaxation in a dispersive dynamic medium : Generalization of the Kubo-Ivanov-Anderson jump diffusion model to include fractional environmental dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ivanov-Anderson (IA) model (and an earlier treatment by Kubo) envisages a decay of the orientational correlation by random but large amplitude molecular jumps, as opposed to infinitesimal small jumps assumed in Brownian diffusion. Recent computer simulation studies on water and supercooled liquids have shown that large amplitude motions may indeed be more of a rule than exception. Existing theoretical studies on jump diffusion mostly assume an exponential (Poissonian) waiting time distribution for jumps, thereby again leading to an exponential decay. Here we extend the existing formalism of Ivanov and Anderson to include an algebraic waiting time distribution between two jumps. As a result, the first and second rank orientational time correlation functions show the same long time power law, but their short time decay behavior is quite different. The predicted Cole-Cole plot of dielectric relaxation reproduces various features of non-Debye behaviour observed experimentally. We also developed a theory where both unrestricted small jumps and large angular jumps coexist simultaneously. The small jumps are shown to have a large effect on the long time decay, particularly in mitigating the effects of algebraic waiting time distribution, and in giving rise to an exponential-like decay, with a time constant, surprisingly, less than the time constant that arises from small amplitude decay alone.

K. Seki; B. Bagchi; M. Tachiya

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

366

Analysis of WACSIS data using a directional hybrid wave model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study focuses on the analysis of measured directional seas using a nonlinear model, named Directional Hybrid Wave Model (DHWM). The model has the capability of decomposing the directional wave field into its free wave components with different frequency, amplitude, direction and initial phase based on three or more time series of measured wave properties. With the information of free waves, the DHWM can predict wave properties accurately up to the second order in wave steepness. In this study, the DHWM is applied to the analyses of the data of Wave Crest Sensor Inter-comparison Study (WACSIS). The consistency between the measurements collected by different sensors in the WACSIS project was examined to ensure the data quality. The wave characteristics at the locations of selected sensors were predicted in time domain and were compared with those recorded at the same location. The degree of agreement between the predictions and the related measurements is an indicator of the consistency among different sensors. To analyze the directional seas in the presence of strong current, the original DHWM was extended to consider the Doppler effects of steady and uniform currents on the directional wave field. The advantage of extended DHWM originates from the use of the intrinsic frequency instead of the apparent frequency to determine the corresponding wavenumber and transfer functions relating wave pressure and velocities to elevation. Furthermore, a new approach is proposed to render the accurate and consistent estimates of the energy spreading parameter and mean wave direction of directional seas based on a cosine-2s model. In this approach, a Maximum Likelihood Method (MLM) is employed. Because it is more tolerant of errors in the estimated cross spectrum than a Directional Fourier Transfer (DFT) used in the conventional approach, the proposed approach is able to estimate the directional spreading parameters more accurately and consistently, which is confirmed by applying the proposed and conventional approach, respectively, to the time series generated by numerical simulation and recorded during the WACSIS project.

Zhang, Shaosong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Converting Boundary Representation Solid Models to Half-Space Representation Models for Monte Carlo Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Solid modeling computer software systems provide for the design of three-dimensional solid models used in the design and analysis of physical components. The current state-of-the-art in solid modeling representation uses a boundary representation format in which geometry and topology are used to form three-dimensional boundaries of the solid. The geometry representation used in these systems is cubic B-spline curves and surfaces--a network of cubic B-spline functions in three-dimensional Cartesian coordinate space. Many Monte Carlo codes, however, use a geometry representation in which geometry units are specified by intersections and unions of half-spaces. This paper describes an algorithm for converting from a boundary representation to a half-space representation.

Davis JE, Eddy MJ, Sutton TM, Altomari TJ

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Modeling Gas Transport in the Shallow Subsurface During the ZERT CO2 Release Test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Research Forum (PERF) Dense Gas Dispersion Modeling Project,Atmospheric dispersion of dense gases, Ann. Rev. Fluidgas (LNG) terminals and transport, and emphasize atmospheric dispersion

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Experimental Determination of Tracer Dispersivity in Fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reinjection of waste hot water is commonly practiced in most geothermal fields, primarily as a means of disposal. Surface discharge of these waste waters is usually unacceptable due to the resulting thermal and chemical pollution. Although reinjection can help to main reservoir pressure and fluid volume, in some cases a decrease in reservoir productivity has been observed. This is caused by rapid flow of the reinjected water through fractures connecting the injector and producers. As a result, the water is not sufficiently heated by the reservoir rock, and a reduction in enthalpy of the produced fluids is seen. Tracer tests have proven to be valuable to reservoir engineers for the design of a successful reinjection program. By injecting a slug of tracer and studying the discharge of surrounding producing wells, an understanding of the fracture network within a reservoir can be provided. In order to quantify the results of a tracer test, a model that accurately describes the mechanisms of tracer transport is necessary. One such mechanism, dispersion, is like a smearing out of a tracer concentration due to the velocity gradients over the cross section of flow. If a dispersion coefficient can be determined from tracer test data, the fracture width can be estimated. The purpose of this project was to design and construct an apparatus to study the dispersion of a chemical tracer in flow through a fracture.

Gilardi, J.; Horns, R.N.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

370

Iterated Function System Models in Data Analysis: Detection and Separation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the use of iterated function system (IFS) models for data analysis. An IFS is a discrete dynamical system in which each time step corresponds to the application of one of a finite collection of maps. The maps, which represent distinct dynamical regimes, may act in some pre-determined sequence or may be applied in random order. An algorithm is developed to detect the sequence of regime switches under the assumption of continuity. This method is tested on a simple IFS and applied to an experimental computer performance data set. This methodology has a wide range of potential uses: from change-point detection in time-series data to the field of digital communications.

Zachary Alexander; Elizabeth Bradley; Joshua Garland; James D. Meiss

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

371

Improvements to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Hydrogen to Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) and Results May 8, 2007 Amgad Elgowainy Argonne National Laboratory Comparison of Delivery Pathways- V1.0 vs. V2.0 2 1 3 i delivery by a Loading, the plant Version 1.0 character zed components for 3 pathways with single mode. conditioning and storage are at or adjacent to Liquid Hydrogen (LH) Truck H2 Production 100 or 1500 kg/d Compressed H2 (CH) Truck H2 Production 3 or 7 kpsi 100 or 1500 kg/d H2 Production Gaseous H2 Pipeline 100 or 1500 kg/d HDSAM V1.0 Estimates Delivery Cost for 3 Pathways 4 H2 H2 1 2 3 H2 Distribution and Ci I. Liquid H2 Distribution: HDSAM V2.0 Simulates Nine Pathways Production Production LH Terminal LH Terminal Production LH Terminal Transmission Transmission Distribution

372

MDM Project: Analysis of the Micromechanics Damage Model Suite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report extends a previous study of core algorithms and portability considerations associated with the Micromechanics Damage Model computer software developed by the AFRL Materials Directorate at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. 1 The MDM analysis suite is comprised of four fracture mechanics codes used to establish design criteria for newly developed composite materials, particularly for brittle, heat-resistant composites associated with the fabrication of turbine blades. The MDM codes are based on a semi-analytical approach in which single coated fibers and the surrounding composite material are represented as a nested set of concentric shells (Fig. 1). Stresses and displacements at prescribed points along the length of the cylinder are determined by evaluation of a polynomial function. Numerically challenging conditions arise during the construction of this function. The calculation of matrix exponentials in terms of the full spectrum of eigenvalues associated with the pri...

D. C. O' neal; R. Luczak; N. J. Pagano; H. W. Brown Iii; G. P. Tandon

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Neutron scattering analysis with microscopic optical model potentials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review of microscopic optical model potentials used in the analysis of neutron scattering and analyzing power data below 100 MeV (5 {le}E{sub n}{le}100 MeV) is presented. The quality of the fits to the data over a wide massd ({sup 6}Li-{sup 239}Pu) and energy range is discussed. It is shown that reasonably good agreement with the data is obtained with only three parameters, {lambda}{sub V}, {lambda}{sub W}, and {lambda}{sub SO}, which show a smooth mass and energy dependence. These parameters are normalizing constants to the real (V), and imaginary (W) central potentials and the real spin-orbit (V{sub SO}) potential. 14 refs., 7 figs.

Hansen, L.F.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

374

Genome sequencing and analysis of the model grass Brachypodium distachyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three subfamilies of grasses, the Ehrhartoideae, Panicoideae and Pooideae, provide the bulk of human nutrition and are poised to become major sources of renewable energy. Here we describe the genome sequence of the wild grass Brachypodium distachyon (Brachypodium), which is, to our knowledge, the first member of the Pooideae subfamily to be sequenced. Comparison of the Brachypodium, rice and sorghum genomes shows a precise history of genome evolution across a broad diversity of the grasses, and establishes a template for analysis of the large genomes of economically important pooid grasses such as wheat. The high-quality genome sequence, coupled with ease of cultivation and transformation, small size and rapid life cycle, will help Brachypodium reach its potential as an important model system for developing new energy and food crops.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Kalluri, Udaya C [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Dispersion effects on membrane reactor performance  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical model has been developed that predicts the effects of design parameters, operating variables and physical properties on the performance of a membrane reactor with a permselective wall. The model consists of the full set of partial differential equations that describe the conservation of mass, momentum and chemical species, coupled with chemical kinetics and appropriate boundary conditions for the physical problem. The solution of this system is obtained by a finite-volume technique. The model was applied to study the dehydrogenation of cyclohexane. Two membrane types in tubular form were studied: a selective porous glass with low gas permeabilities and a porous alumina with very high gas permeabilities. It is concluded that gas separation and reactor performance are strongly influenced by dispersion effects only in the latter membrane reactor, while in both cases radial concentration profiles do not correspond to those obtained with plug flow. Therefore, simulations of this type of problem should be based on complex dispersion models rather than the existing ideal plug-flow ones.

Koukou, M.K.; Papayannakos, N.; Markatos, N.C. [National Technical Univ. of Athens (Greece). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

2H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results - Interim Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and H2A Hydrogen Delivery Infrastructure Analysis Models and Conventional Pathway Options Analysis Results DE-FG36-05GO15032 Interim Report Nexant, Inc., Air Liquide, Argonne National Laboratory, Chevron Technology Venture, Gas Technology Institute, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, and TIAX LLC May 2008 Contents Section Page Executive Summary ................................................................................................................... 1-9 Delivery Options ...................................................................................................................... 1-9 Evaluation of Options 2 and 3 ................................................................................................. 1-9

377

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : installation manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

378

Integrated dynamic landscape analysis and modeling system (IDLAMS) : programmer's manual.  

SciTech Connect

The Integrated Dynamic Landscape Analysis and Modeling System (IDLAMS) is a prototype, integrated land management technology developed through a joint effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the US Army Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (USACERL). Dr. Ronald C. Sundell, Ms. Pamela J. Sydelko, and Ms. Kimberly A. Majerus were the principal investigators (PIs) for this project. Dr. Zhian Li was the primary software developer. Dr. Jeffrey M. Keisler, Mr. Christopher M. Klaus, and Mr. Michael C. Vogt developed the decision analysis component of this project. It was developed with funding support from the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), a land/environmental stewardship research program with participation from the US Department of Defense (DoD), the US Department of Energy (DOE), and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). IDLAMS predicts land conditions (e.g., vegetation, wildlife habitats, and erosion status) by simulating changes in military land ecosystems for given training intensities and land management practices. It can be used by military land managers to help predict the future ecological condition for a given land use based on land management scenarios of various levels of training intensity. It also can be used as a tool to help land managers compare different land management practices and further determine a set of land management activities and prescriptions that best suit the needs of a specific military installation.

Klaus, C. M.; Li, Z.; Majerus, K. A.; Sundell, R. C.; Sydelko, P. J.; Vogt, M. C.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

Advances in the identification of electrochemical transfer function models using Prony analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of power system electromechanical oscillation models. These linear models are developed by analyzing power system ring-down data. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (KARMA) modeling, which has also been proposed for analysis of system oscillations. Under the conditions investigated, the Prony algorithm performed more accurate identification.

Trudnowski, D.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Donnelly, M.K. (Control Tech., Inc., Bozeman, MT (United States)); Hauer, J.F. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States))

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Analysis of real-time reservoir monitoring : reservoirs, strategies, & modeling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project objective was to detail better ways to assess and exploit intelligent oil and gas field information through improved modeling, sensor technology, and process control to increase ultimate recovery of domestic hydrocarbons. To meet this objective we investigated the use of permanent downhole sensors systems (Smart Wells) whose data is fed real-time into computational reservoir models that are integrated with optimized production control systems. The project utilized a three-pronged approach (1) a value of information analysis to address the economic advantages, (2) reservoir simulation modeling and control optimization to prove the capability, and (3) evaluation of new generation sensor packaging to survive the borehole environment for long periods of time. The Value of Information (VOI) decision tree method was developed and used to assess the economic advantage of using the proposed technology; the VOI demonstrated the increased subsurface resolution through additional sensor data. Our findings show that the VOI studies are a practical means of ascertaining the value associated with a technology, in this case application of sensors to production. The procedure acknowledges the uncertainty in predictions but nevertheless assigns monetary value to the predictions. The best aspect of the procedure is that it builds consensus within interdisciplinary teams The reservoir simulation and modeling aspect of the project was developed to show the capability of exploiting sensor information both for reservoir characterization and to optimize control of the production system. Our findings indicate history matching is improved as more information is added to the objective function, clearly indicating that sensor information can help in reducing the uncertainty associated with reservoir characterization. Additional findings and approaches used are described in detail within the report. The next generation sensors aspect of the project evaluated sensors and packaging survivability issues. Our findings indicate that packaging represents the most significant technical challenge associated with application of sensors in the downhole environment for long periods (5+ years) of time. These issues are described in detail within the report. The impact of successful reservoir monitoring programs and coincident improved reservoir management is measured by the production of additional oil and gas volumes from existing reservoirs, revitalization of nearly depleted reservoirs, possible re-establishment of already abandoned reservoirs, and improved economics for all cases. Smart Well monitoring provides the means to understand how a reservoir process is developing and to provide active reservoir management. At the same time it also provides data for developing high-fidelity simulation models. This work has been a joint effort with Sandia National Laboratories and UT-Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology, Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering, and the Institute of Computational and Engineering Mathematics.

Mani, Seethambal S.; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Jakaboski, Blake Elaine; Normann, Randy Allen; Jennings, Jim (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Gilbert, Bob (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Lake, Larry W. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Weiss, Chester Joseph; Lorenz, John Clay; Elbring, Gregory Jay; Wheeler, Mary Fanett (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Thomas, Sunil G. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Rightley, Michael J.; Rodriguez, Adolfo (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Klie, Hector (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Banchs, Rafael (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Nunez, Emilio J. (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX); Jablonowski, Chris (University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Printed circuit dispersive transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

382

Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

Johnson, K.C.

1992-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

383

Printed circuit dispersive transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

Ikezi, Hiroyuki (Rancho Santa Fe, CA); Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren (San Diego, CA); DeGrassie, John S. (Encinitas, CA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Printed circuit dispersive transmission line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission lines between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figs.

Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; deGrassie, J.S.

1990-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

385

DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

Arbiter, W.

1963-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Bio-PEPA: A framework for the modelling and analysis of biological systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we present Bio-PEPA, a process algebra for the modelling and the analysis of biochemical networks. It is a modification of PEPA, originally defined for the performance analysis of computer systems, in order to handle some features of biological ... Keywords: Analysis, Biochemical networks, Modelling, Process algebras

Federica Ciocchetta; Jane Hillston

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Multidimensional Data Model Research for Data Mart Based Analysis System of Drilling Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the sake of complex analysis requirements of drilling fluid analysis system, this paper proposes a multidimensional data model and implement the solution of data mart due to the analyzing weaknesses of conventional information system. Since the database ... Keywords: drilling fluid, Data Mart, Multidimensional Data Model, Multi-Analysis, Fact Tables, Dimension Tables

Li Jian; Wang Bing; Xu Bihua; Liang Dachun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Non-markovian analysis for model driven engineering of real-time software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantitative evaluation of models with stochastic timings can decisively support schedulability analysis and performance engineering of real-time concurrent systems. These tasks require modeling formalisms and solution techniques that can encompass stochastic ... Keywords: model driven development, non-markovian stochastic analysis, real-time systems, software performance engineering

Laura Carnevali; Marco Paolieri; Alessandro Santoni; Enrico Vicario

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

TTP 289A Syllabus: Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis TTP 289A-002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTP 289A Syllabus: Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis 1 TTP 289A-002 (CRN81927) Energy Modeling for Policy Analysis Quarter: Winter 2014 When: T/Th: 2:10-4 pm and Policy, will also provide a portion of the lectures, specifically on modeling energy infrastructure

California at Davis, University of

390

Comparative analysis of models integrating synoptic forecast data into potato late blight risk estimate systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Determinacy analysis, logistic regression, discriminant analysis and neural network models were compared for their accuracy in 5-day (120h) forecasts of daily potato late blight risk according to a modified-Wallin disease severity model. For 12 locations ... Keywords: Expert systems, Forecasting, Neural network models, Risk mitigation

Kathleen M. Baker; William W. Kirk

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

A fresh look at cost estimation, process models and risk analysis”, EDSER-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliable cost estimation is indispensable for industrial software development. A detailed analysis shows why the existing cost models are unreliable. Cost estimation should integrate software process modelling and risk analysis. A novel approach based on probability theory is proposed. A probabilistic cost model could provide a solid basis for cost-benefit analyses. 1

Frank Padberg

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Advances in the identification of transfer function models using Prony analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper further advances the usefulness and understanding of Prony analysis as a tool for identification of models. The presented results allow more generality in the assumed model formulation. In addition, a comparison is made between Prony analysis and autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) modeling. Special attention is given to system conditions often encountered with power system electromechanical dynamics.

Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (US)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A dispersion relation in bidust acoustic wave in non uniform stratified plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low frequencies waves are studied in plasma with two kind of dusty grains. Also considered are stratified plasma with layers of different densities to that of the main plasma. In this analysis each dust species is treated with a simplified model of fluid equations, and electrons and ions are determined by a Boltzmann factor. Relative velocities between each species and the non uniform plasma is considered in order to study instabilities. In cases in which the speed or the density of current of the charged dust grains is zero, the dispersion equation is recovered.

Valdeblanquez, E. [Ciclo Basico, Departamento de Fisica, Apartado 4011- A 526, Universidad del Zulia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Maracaibo, Edo. Zulia (Venezuela); Centro de Investigacion de Matematicas Aplicadas, CIMA, Apartado 10486, Universidad del Zulia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Maracaibo, Edo. Zulia (Venezuela)

2006-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

394

Dense gas dispersion modeling for aqueous releases.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Production, transportation, and storage of hazardous chemicals represent potential risks to the environment, the public, and the producers themselves. The release to the atmosphere of… (more)

Lara, Armando

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Dispersal and fallout simulations for urban consequences management (u)  

SciTech Connect

Hazardous chemical, biological, or radioactive releases from leaks, spills, fires, or blasts, may occur (intentionally or accidentally) in urban environments during warfare or as part of terrorist attacks on military bases or other facilities. The associated contaminant dispersion is complex and semi-chaotic. Urban predictive simulation capabilities can have direct impact in many threat-reduction areas of interest, including, urban sensor placement and threat analysis, contaminant transport (CT) effects on surrounding civilian population (dosages, evacuation, shelter-in-place), education and training of rescue teams and services. Detailed simulations for the various processes involved are in principle possible, but generally not fast. Predicting urban airflow accompanied by CT presents extremely challenging requirements. Crucial technical issues include, simulating turbulent fluid and particulate transport, initial and boundary condition modeling incorporating a consistent stratified urban boundary layer with realistic wind fluctuations, and post-processing of the simulation results for practical consequences management. Relevant fluid dynamic processes to be simulated include, detailed energetic and contaminant sources, complex building vortex shedding and flows in recirculation zones, and modeling of particle distributions, including particulate fallout, as well as deposition, re-suspension and evaporation. Other issues include, modeling building damage effects due to eventual blasts, addressing appropriate regional and atmospheric data reduction.

Grinstein, Fernando F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wachtor, Adam J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nelson, Matt [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bos, Randy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patnik, Gopal [US NAVAL RESEARCH LAB.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

Bryner, J.S.

1959-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Analysis of inverter models and harmonic propagation. Part III. Transient processes in inverter models  

SciTech Connect

Part III of a three part study presents the theoretical analysis and the experimental verification of transient processes that arise in the photovoltaic power system during its normal commutational operations. A general description of the transient processes problem and the method of analysis is presented. The transient processes in the inverter model with an inductive filter are analyzed for both the discontinuous and the continuous currents on the dc side of the inverter, and the problem of transient processes due to the change in illumination level is discussed. Transient processes in the inverter model with capacitive filter are analyzed with special emphasis on the process that arises in the photovoltaic power system immediately after the first ignition of the thyristors. The influence of the operating point of the solar cell array on the transient process is discussed. A sequence for optimal operations is recommended. Part I of the study (SAND 7040/1) contains a detailed description of the microcomputer based simulator that represents the output characteristics of the five commercially available types of solar cell arrays under different environmental conditions, and Part II (SAND 7040/2) describes the harmonics in the photovoltaic power system.

Slonim, M.A.; Stanek, E.K.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Dynamic social network analysis using latent space models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores two aspects of social network modeling. First, we generalize a successful static model of relationships into a dynamic model that accounts for friendships drifting over time. Second, we show how to make it tractable to learn such ...

Purnamrita Sarkar; Andrew W. Moore

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Jump to: navigation, search LEDSGP green logo.png FIND MORE DIA TOOLS This tool is part of the Development Impacts Assessment (DIA) Toolkit from the LEDS Global Partnership. Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Agency/Company /Organization: Research Triangle Institute Sector: Climate, Energy Topics: Co-benefits assessment, - Macroeconomic, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Complexity/Ease of Use: Advanced Website: www.rti.org/page.cfm?objectid=DDC06637-7973-4B0F-AC46B3C69E09ADA9 RelatedTo: Electricity Markets Analysis (EMA) Model Cost: Paid Applied Dynamic Analysis of the Global Economy (ADAGE) Model Screenshot

400

Sensitivity Analysis Using an Adjoint of the PSU-NCAR Mesoseale Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adjoint of the Pennsylvania State University-National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU-NCAR) Mesoscale Model has been developed for use in sensitivity analysis following Cacuci. Sensitivity analysis is defined as the determination of the ...

Ronald M. Errico; Tomislava Vukicevic

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Risk analysis of nuclear safeguards regulations. [Aggregated Systems Model (ASM)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aggregated Systems Model (ASM), a probabilisitic risk analysis tool for nuclear safeguards, was applied to determine benefits and costs of proposed amendments to NRC regulations governing nuclear material control and accounting systems. The objective of the amendments was to improve the ability to detect insiders attempting to steal large quantities of special nuclear material (SNM). Insider threats range from likely events with minor consequences to unlikely events with catastrophic consequences. Moreover, establishing safeguards regulations is complicated by uncertainties in threats, safeguards performance, and consequences, and by the subjective judgments and difficult trade-offs between risks and safeguards costs. The ASM systematically incorporates these factors in a comprehensive, analytical framework. The ASM was used to evaluate the effectiveness of current safeguards and to quantify the risk of SNM theft. Various modifications designed to meet the objectives of the proposed amendments to reduce that risk were analyzed. Safeguards effectiveness was judged in terms of the probability of detecting and preventing theft, the expected time to detection, and the expected quantity of SNM diverted in a year. Data were gathered in tours and interviews at NRC-licensed facilities. The assessment at each facility was begun by carefully selecting scenarios representing the range of potential insider threats. A team of analysts and facility managers assigned probabilities for detection and prevention events in each scenario. Using the ASM we computed the measures of system effectiveness and identified cost-effective safeguards modifications that met the objectives of the proposed amendments.

Al-Ayat, R.A.; Altman, W.D.; Judd, B.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Integration of facility modeling capabilities for nuclear nonproliferation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Developing automated methods for data collection and analysis that can facilitate nuclearnonproliferation assessment is an important research area with significant consequences for the effective global deployment of nuclear energy. Facilitymodeling that can integrate and interpret observations collected from monitored facilities in order to ascertain their functional details will be a critical element of these methods. Although improvements are continually sought, existing facilitymodeling tools can characterize all aspects of reactor operations and the majority of nuclear fuel cycle processing steps, and include algorithms for data processing and interpretation. Assessing nonproliferation status is challenging because observations can come from many sources, including local and remote sensors that monitor facility operations, as well as open sources that provide specific business information about the monitored facilities, and can be of many different types. Although many current facility models are capable of analyzing large amounts of information, they have not been integrated in an analyst-friendly manner. This paper addresses some of these facilitymodelingcapabilities and illustrates how they could be integrated and utilized for nonproliferationanalysis. The inverse problem of inferring facility conditions based on collected observations is described, along with a proposed architecture and computer framework for utilizing facilitymodeling tools. After considering a representative sampling of key facilitymodelingcapabilities, the proposed integration framework is illustrated with several examples.

Burr, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Krebs, John [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kress, Reid L [ORNL; Lamberti, Vincent [Y-12 National Security Complex; Schoenwald, David [ORNL; Ward, Richard C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Automotive System Cost Model...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project Summary Full Title: Automotive System Cost Model (ASCM) Project ID: 118 Principal Investigator: Sujit Das Purpose Estimate current and...

404

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: MetaNET Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of demands, resources, and market modules that has primarily been used for long term electricity market equilibrium modeling. METANET is a perfect foresight model and assumes...

405

Modeling and Analysis of CSP Systems (Fact Sheet), Thermal Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The models can also help analysts assess the potential market penetration and economic impact of CSP under different policy and deployment scenarios. The Solar Advisor Model (SAM)...

406

Int. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around urban-canopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Meroney, 1983: Gas dispersion near a cubical model building. Part I. Mean concentration measurements. JInt. J. Environment and Pollution, Vol. 8, Nos. 3-6, 1997 727 Gaseous pollutant dispersion around numerical predictions of atmospheric dispersion in the urban environment on sub-meso scales. Wind

Fedorovich, Evgeni

407

NISTIR 7097 Particle Size Analysis by Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kind (solid, liquid, gas) are dispersed in a continuous phase of a different composition or state; more into a continuous medium. dispersion medium A continuous liquid or gas phase into which a powder is dispersed prior that powders be dispersed prior to analysis by LDS; dispersion efficiency will depend on factors such as solids

408

Methodology for fault detection and diagnostics in an ocean turbine using vibration analysis and modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis describes a methodology for mechanical fault detection and diagnostics in an ocean turbine using vibration analysis and modeling. This methodology relies on the… (more)

Mjit, Mustapha.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Modeling and Analysis for Control of Reactant and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conditions due to the inclusion of compressibility, we employ the simplifying evaporation/condensation model

Stefanopoulou, Anna

410

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for agricultural production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the paper a multidimensional data model called CULTEH is built. In the model are defined the dimensions, the hierarchies and the facts. Based on this model an OLAP cube called CUBECTH is built. The OLAP cube accepts queries on several dimensions and ... Keywords: OLAP operations, agricultural production, data cube, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP)

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Adrian Turek Rahoveanu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

A Linear Stochastic Dynamical Model of ENSO. Part II: Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the behavior of a linear, intermediate model of ENSO is examined under stochastic forcing. The model was developed in a companion paper (Part I) and is derived from the Zebiak–Cane ENSO model. Four variants of the model are used ...

C. J. Thompson; D. S. Battisti

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

Wood, David O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes details, validation, and sensitivity analysis of a new atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and radiation schemes for the ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Status Report on Modeling and Analysis of Small Modular Reactor Economics  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the work performed to generate the model for SMR economic analysis. The model is based on the G4-ECONS calculation tool developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF).

Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Hale, Richard Edward [ORNL; Moses, Rebecca J [ORNL

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Historical analysis of legal opinions with a sparse mixed-effects latent variable model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a latent variable model to enhance historical analysis of large corpora. This work extends prior work in topic modelling by incorporating metadata, and the interactions between the components in metadata, in a general way. To test this, we ...

William Yang Wang; Elijah Mayfield; Suresh Naidu; Jeremiah Dittmar

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: COMFAR III: Computer Model for Feasibility Analysis and Reporting Agency/Company /Organization: United Nations Industrial Development Organization Focus Area: Industry Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.unido.org/index.php?id=o3470 Language: "Arabic, Chinese, English, French, German, Japanese, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Castilian" is not in the list of possible values (Abkhazian, Achinese, Acoli, Adangme, Adyghe; Adygei, Afar, Afrihili, Afrikaans, Afro-Asiatic languages, Ainu, Akan, Akkadian, Albanian, Aleut, Algonquian languages, Altaic languages, Amharic, Angika, Apache languages, Arabic, Aragonese, Arapaho, Arawak, Armenian, Aromanian; Arumanian; Macedo-Romanian, Artificial languages, Assamese, Asturian; Bable; Leonese; Asturleonese, Athapascan languages, Australian languages, Austronesian languages, Avaric, Avestan, Awadhi, Aymara, Azerbaijani, Balinese, Baltic languages, Baluchi, Bambara, Bamileke languages, Banda languages, Bantu (Other), Basa, Bashkir, Basque, Batak languages, Beja; Bedawiyet, Belarusian, Bemba, Bengali, Berber languages, Bhojpuri, Bihari languages, Bikol, Bini; Edo, Bislama, Blin; Bilin, Blissymbols; Blissymbolics; Bliss, Bosnian, Braj, Breton, Buginese, Bulgarian, Buriat, Burmese, Caddo, Catalan; Valencian, Caucasian languages, Cebuano, Celtic languages, Central American Indian languages, Central Khmer, Chagatai, Chamic languages, Chamorro, Chechen, Cherokee, Cheyenne, Chibcha, Chichewa; Chewa; Nyanja, Chinese, Chinook jargon, Chipewyan; Dene Suline, Choctaw, Chuukese, Chuvash, Classical Newari; Old Newari; Classical Nepal Bhasa, Classical Syriac, Coptic, Cornish, Corsican, Cree, Creek, Creoles and pidgins , Crimean Tatar; Crimean Turkish, Croatian, Cushitic languages, Czech, Dakota, Danish, Dargwa, Delaware, Dinka, Divehi; Dhivehi; Maldivian, Dogri, Dogrib, Dravidian languages, Duala, Dutch; Flemish, Dyula, Dzongkha, Eastern Frisian, Efik, Egyptian (Ancient), Ekajuk, Elamite, English, Erzya, Esperanto, Estonian, Ewe, Ewondo, Fang, Fanti, Faroese, Fijian, Filipino; Pilipino, Finnish, Finno-Ugrian languages, Fon, French, Friulian, Fulah, Ga, Gaelic; Scottish Gaelic, Galibi Carib, Galician, Ganda, Gayo, Gbaya, Geez, Georgian, German, Germanic languages, Gilbertese, Gondi, Gorontalo, Gothic, Grebo, Greek, Modern, Guarani, Gujarati, Gwich'in, Haida, Haitian; Haitian Creole, Hausa, Hawaiian, Hebrew, Herero, Hiligaynon, Himachali languages; Western Pahari languages, Hindi, Hiri Motu, Hittite, Hmong; Mong, Hungarian, Hupa, Iban, Icelandic, Ido, Igbo, Ijo languages, Iloko, Inari Sami, Indic languages, Indo-European languages, Indonesian, Ingush, Interlingue; Occidental, Inuktitut, Inupiaq, Iranian languages, Irish, Iroquoian languages, Italian, Japanese, Javanese, Judeo-Arabic, Judeo-Persian, Kabardian, Kabyle, Kachin; Jingpho, Kalaallisut; Greenlandic, Kalmyk; Oirat, Kamba, Kannada, Kanuri, Kara-Kalpak, Karachay-Balkar, Karelian, Karen languages, Kashmiri, Kashubian, Kawi, Kazakh, Khasi, Khoisan languages, Khotanese; Sakan, Kikuyu; Gikuyu, Kimbundu, Kinyarwanda, Kirghiz; Kyrgyz, Klingon; tlhIngan-Hol, Komi, Kongo, Konkani, Korean, Kosraean, Kpelle, Kru languages, Kuanyama; Kwanyama, Kumyk, Kurdish, Kurukh, Kutenai, Ladino, Lahnda, Lamba, Land Dayak languages, Lao, Latin, Latvian, Lezghian, Limburgan; Limburger; Limburgish, Lingala, Lithuanian, Lojban, Lower Sorbian, Lozi, Luba-Katanga, Luba-Lulua, Luiseno, Lule Sami, Lunda, Luo (Kenya and Tanzania), Lushai, Luxembourgish; Letzeburgesch, Macedonian, Madurese, Magahi, Maithili, Makasar, Malagasy, Malay, Malayalam, Maltese, Manchu, Mandar, Mandingo, Manipuri, Manobo languages, Manx, Maori, Mapudungun; Mapuche, Marathi, Mari, Marshallese, Marwari, Masai, Mayan languages, Mende, Mi'kmaq; Micmac, Minangkabau, Mirandese, Mohawk, Moksha, Mon-Khmer languages, Mongo, Mongolian, Mossi, Multiple languages, Munda languages, N'Ko, Nahuatl languages, Nauru, Navajo; Navaho, Ndebele, North; North Ndebele, Ndebele, South; South Ndebele, Ndonga, Neapolitan, Nepal Bhasa; Newari, Nepali, Nias, Niger-Kordofanian languages, Nilo-Saharan languages, Niuean, North American Indian languages, Northern Frisian, Northern Sami, Norwegian, Nubian languages, Nyamwezi, Nyankole, Nyoro, Nzima, Occitan (post 1500); Provençal, Ojibwa, Oriya, Oromo, Osage, Ossetian; Ossetic, Otomian languages, Pahlavi, Palauan, Pali, Pampanga; Kapampangan, Pangasinan, Panjabi; Punjabi, Papiamento, Papuan languages, Pedi; Sepedi; Northern Sotho, Persian, Philippine languages, Phoenician, Pohnpeian, Polish, Portuguese, Prakrit languages, Pushto; Pashto, Quechua, Rajasthani, Rapanui, Rarotongan; Cook Islands Maori, Romance languages, Romanian; Moldavian; Moldovan, Romansh, Romany, Rundi, Russian, Salishan languages, Samaritan Aramaic, Sami languages, Samoan, Sandawe, Sango, Sanskrit, Santali, Sardinian, Sasak, Scots, Selkup, Semitic languages, Serbian, Serer, Shan, Shona, Sichuan Yi; Nuosu, Sicilian, Sidamo, Sign Languages, Siksika, Sindhi, Sinhala; Sinhalese, Sino-Tibetan languages, Siouan languages, Skolt Sami, Slave (Athapascan), Slavic languages, Slovak, Slovenian, Sogdian, Somali, Songhai languages, Soninke, Sorbian languages, Sotho, Southern, South American Indian (Other), Southern Altai, Southern Sami, Spanish; Castilian, Sranan Tongo, Sukuma, Sumerian, Sundanese, Susu, Swahili, Swati, Swedish, Swiss German; Alemannic; Alsatian, Syriac, Tagalog, Tahitian, Tai languages, Tajik, Tamashek, Tamil, Tatar, Telugu, Tereno, Tetum, Thai, Tibetan, Tigre, Tigrinya, Timne, Tiv, Tlingit, Tok Pisin, Tokelau, Tonga (Nyasa), Tonga (Tonga Islands), Tsimshian, Tsonga, Tswana, Tumbuka, Tupi languages, Turkish, Turkmen, Tuvalu, Tuvinian, Twi, Udmurt, Ugaritic, Uighur; Uyghur, Ukrainian, Umbundu, Uncoded languages, Undetermined, Upper Sorbian, Urdu, Uzbek, Vai, Venda, Vietnamese, Volapük, Votic, Wakashan languages, Walamo, Walloon, Waray, Washo, Welsh, Western Frisian, Wolof, Xhosa, Yakut, Yao, Yapese, Yiddish, Yoruba, Yupik languages, Zande languages, Zapotec, Zaza; Dimili; Dimli; Kirdki; Kirmanjki; Zazaki, Zenaga, Zhuang; Chuang, Zulu, Zuni) for this property.

418

Underground Test Area Subproject Phase I Data Analysis Task. Volume VII - Tritium Transport Model Documentation Package  

SciTech Connect

Volume VII of the documentation for the Phase I Data Analysis Task performed in support of the current Regional Flow Model, Transport Model, and Risk Assessment for the Nevada Test Site Underground Test Area Subproject contains the tritium transport model documentation. Because of the size and complexity of the model area, a considerable quantity of data was collected and analyzed in support of the modeling efforts. The data analysis task was consequently broken into eight subtasks, and descriptions of each subtask's activities are contained in one of the eight volumes that comprise the Phase I Data Analysis Documentation.

None

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

A multidimensional data model and OLAP analysis for soil physical characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the construction of a multidimensional data model intended for the analysis of soil physical properties. The data from the model are provided by two agricultural soil/land databases. Based on the multidimensional data model we build ... Keywords: OLAP operations, data cube, land use, multidimensional data model, on-line analytical processing (OLAP), soil physical properties

Constanta Zoie Radulescu; Marius Radulescu; Virgil Vlad; Dumitru Marian Motelica

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Empirical Models of End-User Network Behavior from NETI@home Data Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The simulation of computer networks requires accurate models of user behavior. To this end, we present empirical models of end-user network traffic derived from the analysis of NETI@home (NETwork Intelligence at home) data. There are two forms of models ... Keywords: internet measurement, network traffic models, simulation

Charles R Simpson, Jr; Dheeraj Reddy; George F Riley

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The Roles of Langmuir Circulations in the Dispersion of Surface Tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hierarchy of theoretical and numerical models for the dispersion of discrete floating tracers on lakes and oceans is presented. Central to these models is the role of Langmuir circulations, which concentrate tracers into narrow windrows this ...

Alan J. Faller; Stephen J. Auer

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Computational Fluid Dynamic Simulations of Plume Dispersion in Urban Oklahoma City  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D computational fluid dynamics study using Reynolds-averaged Navier–Stokes modeling was conducted and validated with field data from the Joint Urban 2003 dispersion study in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. The modeled flow field indicated that the ...

Julia E. Flaherty; David Stock; Brian Lamb

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

An Approach for Estimating Dispersion in Variable Intensity: An Example of Estimating a Real Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gaussian models are the important tools in the development of successful emergency response strategies of air pollutants or hazardous materials. As numerical dispersion models via predicting the influencing area affected by the passage of hazardous gas

Maolei Zhang; Rui Yang; Hongyong Yuan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Software Development, Modeling, and Analysis: We're Developing Advanced Design Tools to Support the Wind Industry with "State-of-the-Art" Analysis Capability (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides an overview of the software development, modeling, and analysis for wind turbine performance, loads, and stabiluty analysis.

Not Available

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Dispersive waves generated by an underwater landslide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we study the generation of water waves by an underwater sliding mass. The wave dynamics are assumed to fell into the shallow water regime. However, the characteristic wavelength of the free surface motion is generally smaller than in geophysically generated tsunamis. Thus, dispersive effects need to be taken into account. In the present study the fluid layer is modeled by the Peregrine system modified appropriately and written in conservative variables. The landslide is assumed to be a quasi-deformable body of mass whose trajectory is completely determined by its barycenter motion. A differential equation modeling the landslide motion along a curvilinear bottom is obtained by projecting all the forces acting on the submerged body onto a local moving coordinate system. One of the main novelties of our approach consists in taking into account curvature effects of the sea bed.

Dutykh, Denys; Beysel, Sonya; Shokina, Nina; Khakimzyanov, Gayaz

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Powdered coal air dispersion nozzle  

SciTech Connect

An improved coal/air dispersion nozzle introduces fuel into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine engine as a finely atomized, dispersed spray for a uniform combustion. The nozzle has an inlet that receives finely powdered coal from a coal transport or coal/air fluidizer system and a scroll swirl generator is included within the nozzle to swirl a fluidized coal/air mixture supplied to the inlet of the nozzle. The scroll is in the form of a thin, flat metal sheet insert, twisted along its length, and configured to prevent build-up of coal particles within the nozzle prior to ejection from its outlet. Airblast air jets are included along the length of the nozzle body to assist in the discharge of the fluidized coal from the nozzle outlet and an angular pintle tip overlies the outlet to redirect coal/air mixture through a desired fluidized coal spray angle.

Kosek, T.P.; Steinhilper, E.A.

1981-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

Tracer dispersion in the turbulent convective layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experimental results for passive tracer dispersion in the turbulent surface layer under convective conditions are presented. In this case, the dispersion of tracer particles is determined by the interplay of two mechanisms: buoyancy and advection. ...

Alex Skvortsov; Milan Jamriska; Timothy C. DuBois

429

Dispersion into Severe Coastal Complex Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field study of dispersion using tracer gases from offshore sources into severe coastal complex terrain was conducted in central California. Data were collected on dispersion, surface concentrations trajectories, and stability. An examination of ...

Timothy C. Spangler; James W. Keating

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Modeling aviation's global emissions, uncertainty analysis, and applications to policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) fuel burn results below 3000 ft. For emissions, the emissions indices were the most influential uncertainties for the variance in model outputs. By employing the model, this thesis examined three policy options for ...

Lee, Joosung Joseph, 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Drought Analysis Based on a Marked Cluster Poisson Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an operational definition of drought events based on an “excess over threshold” approach applied on rainfall series and develops a stochastic model for describing droughts defined in that way. The model consists of a Poisson ...

Ana C. Cebrián; Jesús Abaurrea

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

An Error Analysis of Atlantic Tropical Cyclone Track Guidance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean track forecast errors over the 6-yr period 1983–88 are compared for four tropical cyclone-track forecast models in use at the National Hurricane Center (NHC). The model types represented are statistical, statistical-dynamical, barctropic-...

Mark Demaria; Miles B. Lawrence; James T. Kroll

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

An Interpretable Stroke Prediction Model using Rules and Bayesian Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to produce predictive models that are not only accurate, but are also interpretable to human experts. Our models are decision lists, which consist of a series of if...then... statements (for example, if high blood ...

Letham, Benjamin

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Simulation of spray dispersion in a simplified heavy vehicle wake  

SciTech Connect

Simulations of spray dispersion in a simplified tractor-trailer wake have been completed with the goal of obtaining a better understanding of how to mitigate this safety hazard. The Generic Conventional Model (GCM) for the tractor-trailer was used. The impact of aerodynamic drag reduction devices, specifically trailer-mounted base flaps, on the transport of spray in the vehicle wake was considered using the GCM. This analysis demonstrated that base flaps including a bottom plate may actually worsen motorist visibility because of the interaction of fine spray with large vortex flows in the wake. This work suggests that to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to design and evaluate spray mitigation strategies the jet or sheet breakup processes can be modeled using an array of injectors of small (< 0.1 mm) water droplets; however the choice of size distribution, injection locations, directions and velocities is largely unknown and requires further study. Possible containment strategies would include using flow structures to 'focus' particles into regions away from passing cars or surface treatments to capture small drops.

Paschkewitz, J S

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

435

Optioned Portfolio Selection: Models and Analysis Jianfeng LIANG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Oldenkamp [8] proposed a linear programming model with a given level of guaranteed return. The so

Zhang, Shuzhong

436

Analysis Model for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermal model was developed to estimate the energy losses from prototypical domestic hot water (DHW) distribution systems for homes. The developed model, using the TRNSYS simulation software, allows researchers and designers to better evaluate the performance of hot water distribution systems in homes. Modeling results were compared with past experimental study results and showed good agreement.

Maguire, J.; Krarti, M.; Fang, X.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Spatial Dispersion and Performance Evaluation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Channel capacity of a MIMO system is dependent not only on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) but also on spatial correlation among antenna elements. Therefore, the system design must rely on good propagation predictions. By using a ray tracing simulator, which considers reflections, penetrations and diffractions in 3-D space, we predict channel properties and evaluate capacity of 4 4 indoor MIMO channels for both line-of-sight (LOS) and non-line-of-sight (NLOS) cases. Before extensive simulations, the predictions of the simulator are verified by comparing results of wideband channel measurement and simulation. The comparison shows that path loss and RMS delay spread can be well predicted by simulation. Based on simulated results, we investigate the spatial dispersion of the channel and its impact on channel capacity. Data analysis shows that spatial dispersion can be better characterized by using both the azimuth spread and elevation spread than by only one of them. Moreover, the reduced capacity in the NLOS region due to lower signalto -noise can be partially compensated by an increase in capacity due to lower signal correlation.

Indoor Mimo Channels; Haibing Yang; Matti H. A. J. Herben

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Resonant radiation shed by dispersive shock waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that dispersive shock waves resulting from the nonlinearity overbalancing a weak leading-order dispersion can emit resonant radiation owing to higher-order dispersive contributions. We analyze such phenomenon for the defocusing nonlinear Schroedinger equation, giving criteria for calculating the radiated frequency based on the estimate of the shock velocity, revealing also a diversity of possible scenarios depending on the order and magnitude of the dispersive corrections.

Conforti, Matteo; Trillo, Stefano

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hydrogen Technology Analysis: H2A Production Model Update (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation by Todd Ramsden at the 2007 DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Merit Review Meeting provides information about NREL's hydrogen technology analysis activities.

Ramsden, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Analysis & Projections - Models & Documentation - U.S. Energy...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

H2A Delivery Components Model and Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

- Replacement capital includes for some components H2A Delivery Component Economic Analysis * The economic results presented assume specific scenario - Scenario refers to...

442

Bayesian Analysis in Applications of Hierarchical Models: Issues and Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. S. Smith (Eds. ), Bayesian statistics 4 (pp. 336-338).Smith, A. F. (1993). Bayesian inference for generalizedat UCLA on May 23, 2011 Bayesian Analysis for Hierarchical

Michael Seltzer; Wing H. Wong; Anthony S. Bryk

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Enhanced oil recovery data base analysis by simplified predictive models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), has been developing computerized data bases and simplified predictive models to be used to predict enhanced oil recovery (EOR) potential in the U.S. The development phase of this work is nearing completion whereupon the models and data bases will be made available to the public. This paper describes the overall development phase for the models and data bases with analyses of selected EOR projects using the predictive models. Examples of model outputs are discussed and brief descriptions of the predictive algorithms are given.

Ray, R.M.; Wesson, T.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H. (Evanston, IL); Tzou, Ming-Shin (Evanston, IL); Jiang, Hui-Jong (Evanston, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Determination of Longitudinal Dispersion Coefficient and Net  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, New York, New York 10027 Physical processes such as advection, dispersion, and air-water gas exchange of the gas tracer, u is the average cross-sectional current velocity, Kx is the longitudinal dispersion in the Hudson River. Similar to the difference in longitudinal dispersion coefficients, the difference in gas

Ho, David

446

Study of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-17 June, University of Osnabruck, Germany. 9. Simonite, T., 2005, Anti-terror study tracks gas dispersalStudy of Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Environments Razvan Corneliu Carbunescu Center head: Study of pollutant dispersion in urban environments #12;Abstract Computational simulations can

Allen, Gabrielle

447

Evaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. It is shown that modeling and analysis provide information useful for setting a maintenance policy. 1 of the energy market, which has forced the producers to be more competitive by reacting promptly and reliablyEvaluating maintenance policies by quantitative modeling and analysis Enrico Zio1,2,* , Michele

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

448

Original article: Overview of analytical models of permanent magnet electrical machines for analysis and design purposes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generally, accurate modelling of electrical machines requires the use of finite-element method. However, FE analysis is too time consuming, especially at firsts design stages, from the point of view of engineers working in R&D departments in the electrical ... Keywords: Analytical modelling, Electromagnetic analysis, Permanent magnet machines

Huguette Tiegna, Yacine Amara, Georges Barakat

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Upper bound limit analysis model for FRP-reinforced masonry curved structures. Part II: Structural analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A homogenized full 3D limit analysis model for the evaluation of collapse loads of FRP-reinforced masonry vaults is presented. Six-noded rigid infinitely resistant wedges are used to model masonry. Three-noded rigid infinitely resistant triangles are ... Keywords: FRP-reinforcement, Homogenization, Kinematic approach, Limit analysis, Masonry, Vaults

Gabriele Milani; Enrico Milani; Antonio Tralli

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The diversity and molecular modelling analysis of B12-dependent and B12-independent glycerol dehydratases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To broaden our knowledge on the diversity of glycerol dehydratases, comprehensive sequence and molecular modelling analyses of these enzymes were performed. Our sequence analysis showed that B12-dependent and Bmodelling, sequence analysis, structure

Yuemin Liu; August A. Gallo; Rakesh K. Bajpai; Andrei Chistoserdov; Andrew T. Nelson; Leah N. Segura; Wu Xu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Macro-System Model for Hydrogen Energy Systems Analysis in Transportation: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hydrogen Macro System Model (MSM) is a simulation tool that links existing and emerging hydrogen-related models to perform rapid, cross-cutting analysis. It allows analysis of the economics, primary energy-source requirements, and emissions of hydrogen production and delivery pathways.

Diakov, V.; Ruth, M.; Sa, T. J.; Goldsby, M. E.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Computer analysis of the sensitivity of the integrated assessment model MERGE-5I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on an application of a large-scale non-linear optimization model to the analysis of environmental problems. The authors present first results of the initial stage of the study, a sensitivity analysis of the model's input parameters. ...

Vyacheslav Maksimov; Leo Schrattenholzer; Yaroslav Minullin

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Fault Modeling and Analysis for Resistive Bridging Defects in a Synchronizer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents fault modeling and analysis for bridging defects in a synchronizer that is implemented by two D flip-flops. Bridging defects are injected into any two nodes of the synchronizer, and HSPICE is used to perform circuit analysis. The ... Keywords: Bridging defect, Fault modeling, Synchronizer

Hyoung-Kook Kim; Wen-Ben Jone; Laung-Terng Wang

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT): Model description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE MODEL.................................................................................................................................7 I. Basic Methodology on Food............................................................................................. 7

Mark W. Rosegrant; Claudia Ringler; Siwa Msangi; Timothy B. Sulser; Tingju Zhu; Sarah A. Cline

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Analysis and reduction of chemical models under uncertainty.  

SciTech Connect

While models of combustion processes have been successful in developing engines with improved fuel economy, more costly simulations are required to accurately model pollution chemistry. These simulations will also involve significant parametric uncertainties. Computational singular perturbation (CSP) and polynomial chaos-uncertainty quantification (PC-UQ) can be used to mitigate the additional computational cost of modeling combustion with uncertain parameters. PC-UQ was used to interrogate and analyze the Davis-Skodje model, where the deterministic parameter in the model was replaced with an uncertain parameter. In addition, PC-UQ was combined with CSP to explore how model reduction could be combined with uncertainty quantification to understand how reduced models are affected by parametric uncertainty.

Oxberry, Geoff; Debusschere, Bert J.; Najm, Habib N.

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Stability Analysis of a Simplified Yet Complete Model for Chronic Myelegenous Leukemia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the asymptotic behavior of a partial differential equation (PDE) model for hematopoiesis. This PDE model is derived from the original agent-based model formulated by (Roeder et al., Nat. Med., 2006), and it describes the progression of blood cell development from the stem cell to the terminally differentiated state. To conduct our analysis, we start with the PDE model of (Kim et al, JTB, 2007), which coincides very well with the simulation results obtained by Roeder et al. We simplify the PDE model to make it amenable to analysis and justify our approximations using numerical simulations. An analysis of the simplified PDE model proves to exhibit very similar properties to those of the original agent-based model, even if for slightly different parameters. Hence, the simplified model is of value in understanding the dynamics of hematopoiesis and of chronic myelogenous leukemia, and it presents the advantage of having fewer parameters, which makes comparison with both experimental data and alternative...

Jauffret, Marie Doumic; Perthame, Benoît

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Competitive Clustering in a Bi-disperse Granular Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A bi-disperse granular gas in a compartmentalized system is experimentally found to cluster competitively: Depending on the shaking strength, the clustering can be directed either towards the compartment initially containing mainly small particles, or to the one containing mainly large particles. The experimental observations are quantitatively explained within a flux model.

René Mikkelsen; Devaraj van der Meer; Ko van der Weele; Detlef Lohse

2002-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evaluation of fluid-modeling techniques in the seismic analysis of LMFBR reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid modeling is of great importance in the seismic analysis of the LMFBR primary system. If the fluid model used in the analysis is too simplified, the results could be very uncertain. On the other hand, if the model is too detailed, considerable difficulty might be encountered in the analysis. The objectives of this study are to examine the validity of the two commonly used fluid modeling techniques. i.e. simplified added mass method and lumped mass method and to provide some useful information on the treatment of fluid in seismic analysis. The validity of these two methods of analysis is examined by comparing the calculated seismic responses of a fluid-structure system based on these two methods with that calculated from a coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis in which the fluid is treated by continuum fluid elements.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Global horizontal irradiance clear sky models : implementation and analysis.  

SciTech Connect

Clear sky models estimate the terrestrial solar radiation under a cloudless sky as a function of the solar elevation angle, site altitude, aerosol concentration, water vapor, and various atmospheric conditions. This report provides an overview of a number of global horizontal irradiance (GHI) clear sky models from very simple to complex. Validation of clear-sky models requires comparison of model results to measured irradiance during clear-sky periods. To facilitate validation, we present a new algorithm for automatically identifying clear-sky periods in a time series of GHI measurements. We evaluate the performance of selected clear-sky models using measured data from 30 different sites, totaling about 300 site-years of data. We analyze the variation of these errors across time and location. In terms of error averaged over all locations and times, we found that complex models that correctly account for all the atmospheric parameters are slightly more accurate than other models, but, primarily at low elevations, comparable accuracy can be obtained from some simpler models. However, simpler models often exhibit errors that vary with time of day and season, whereas the errors for complex models vary less over time.

Stein, Joshua S.; Hansen, Clifford W.; Reno, Matthew J.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A long-term sensitivity analysis of the denitrification and decomposition model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although sensitivity analysis (SA) was conducted on the DeNitrification-DeComposition (DNDC) model, a global SA over a long period of time is lacking. We used a method of Bayesian analysis of computer code outputs (BACCO) with the Gaussian emulation ... Keywords: BACCO, BACCO GEM-SA, DNDC, GEM-SA, GSA, Global sensitivity analysis, Long-term, SA

Xiaobo Qin; Hong Wang; Yu'E Li; Yong Li; Brian Mcconkey; Reynald Lemke; Changsheng Li; Kelsey Brandt; Qingzhu Gao; Yunfan Wan; Shuo Liu; Yuntong Liu; Chao Xu

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dispersion modeling analysis" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Polarimetric remote sensing system analysis: Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation (DIRSIG) model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Polarimetric remote sensing system analysis: Digital Imaging and Remote Sensing Image Generation CENTER FOR IMAGING SCIENCE Title of Dissertation: Polarimetric remote sensing system analysis: DIRSIG____________________________________________________________ Date #12;vi #12;vii Polarimetric remote sensing system analysis: DIRSIG model validation and impact

Salvaggio, Carl

462