National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for dispersion manifolds perforated

  1. Compressed gas manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hildebrand, Richard J.; Wozniak, John J.

    2001-01-01

    A compressed gas storage cell interconnecting manifold including a thermally activated pressure relief device, a manual safety shut-off valve, and a port for connecting the compressed gas storage cells to a motor vehicle power source and to a refueling adapter. The manifold is mechanically and pneumatically connected to a compressed gas storage cell by a bolt including a gas passage therein.

  2. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2004-12-21

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  3. Edge compression manifold apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renzi, Ronald F.

    2007-02-27

    A manifold for connecting external capillaries to the inlet and/or outlet ports of a microfluidic device for high pressure applications is provided. The fluid connector for coupling at least one fluid conduit to a corresponding port of a substrate that includes: (i) a manifold comprising one or more channels extending therethrough wherein each channel is at least partially threaded, (ii) one or more threaded ferrules each defining a bore extending therethrough with each ferrule supporting a fluid conduit wherein each ferrule is threaded into a channel of the manifold, (iii) a substrate having one or more ports on its upper surface wherein the substrate is positioned below the manifold so that the one or more ports is aligned with the one or more channels of the manifold, and (iv) device to apply an axial compressive force to the substrate to couple the one or more ports of the substrate to a corresponding proximal end of a fluid conduit.

  4. Perforation apparatus and method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E.F.

    1988-07-12

    A perforating apparatus is described for perforating earth formations traversed by a casing which is cemented in a well bore comprising: (a) an elongated tubular housing having a closed interior bore which is open at one end and adapted for coupling and for fluid communication with a string of tubing when disposed in a casing adjacent to earth formations, (b) a set of first and second shaped charge perforating devices disposed in the closed interior bore and aligned relative to one another so as to produce, when detonated, first and second perforation openings in the tubular housing.

  5. Manifold tool guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Djordjevic, A.

    1983-12-27

    A tool guide is described that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into the cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc. 3 figs.

  6. Manifold tool guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Djordjevic, Aleksandar

    1983-12-27

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  7. Manifold tool guide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Djordjevic, A.

    1982-07-08

    A tool guide that makes possible the insertion of cleaning and/or inspection tools into a manifold pipe that will dislocate and extract the accumulated sediment in such manifold pipes. The tool guide basically comprises a right angled tube (or other angled tube as required) which can be inserted in a large tube and locked into a radially extending cross pipe by adjustable spacer rods and a spring-loaded cone, whereby appropriate cleaning tools can be inserted into to cross pipe for cleaning, inspection, etc.

  8. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1994-01-04

    An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

  9. Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rawlinson, K. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01

    An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

  10. Microwave waveguide manifold and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Staehlin, John H.

    1987-01-01

    A controllably electrically coupled, physically intersecting plural waveguide manifold assembly wherein the intersecting waveguide elements are fabricated in integral unitary relationship from a single piece of metal in order to avoid the inaccuracies and difficult-to-control fabrication steps associated with uniting separate waveguide elements into a unitary structure. An X-band aluminum airborne radar manifold example is disclosed, along with a fabrication sequence for the manifold and the electrical energy communicating apertures joining the manifold elements.

  11. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  12. Fuel cell manifold sealing system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grevstad, Paul E.; Johnson, Carl K.; Mientek, Anthony P.

    1980-01-01

    A manifold-to-stack seal and sealing method for fuel cell stacks. This seal system solves the problem of maintaining a low leak rate manifold seal as the fuel cell stack undergoes compressive creep. The seal system eliminates the problem of the manifold-to-stack seal sliding against the rough stack surface as the stack becomes shorter because of cell creep, which relative motion destroys the seal. The seal system described herein utilizes a polymer seal frame firmly clamped between the manifold and the stack such that the seal frame moves with the stack. Thus, as the stack creeps, the seal frame creeps with it, and there is no sliding at the rough, tough to seal, stack-to-seal frame interface. Here the sliding is on a smooth easy to seal location between the seal frame and the manifold.

  13. Coupling for a fuel manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsworth, J.K.; Nownahal, A.; Wilson, K.

    1987-11-24

    A coupling is described for a fuel manifold defining a fuel line passageway, comprising a tube connector which extends between the ends of two manifold segments to connect the fuel line passageway. The tube connector sealingly fits within end portions of the fuel line passageway at the ends of respective manifold segments; a retractable sleeve sealingly engages over the ends of the respective manifold segments, thus enclosing the tube connector and defining a space therewith. Locking means are provided between the tube and sleeve such that any sliding movement of the sleeve will cause corresponding sliding movement of the tube. The end portions of the fuel line passageway accommodate the tube connector in axial sliding relationship and the length of the tube connector is such as to allow connecting or disconnecting of the coupling by sliding the sleeve and the tube connector without moving the manifold segments.

  14. Flexible fuel cell gas manifold system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cramer, Michael; Shah, Jagdish; Hayes, Richard P.; Kelley, Dana A.

    2005-05-03

    A fuel cell stack manifold system in which a flexible manifold body includes a pan having a central area, sidewall extending outward from the periphery of the central area, and at least one compound fold comprising a central area fold connecting adjacent portions of the central area and extending between opposite sides of the central area, and a sidewall fold connecting adjacent portions of the sidewall. The manifold system further includes a rail assembly for attachment to the manifold body and adapted to receive pins by which dielectric insulators are joined to the manifold assembly.

  15. Manifold seal structure for fuel cell stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Collins, William P.

    1988-01-01

    The seal between the sides of a fuel cell stack and the gas manifolds is improved by adding a mechanical interlock between the adhesive sealing strip and the abutting surface of the manifolds. The adhesive is a material which can flow to some extent when under compression, and the mechanical interlock is formed providing small openings in the portion of the manifold which abuts the adhesive strip. When the manifolds are pressed against the adhesive strips, the latter will flow into and through the manifold openings to form buttons or ribs which mechanically interlock with the manifolds. These buttons or ribs increase the bond between the manifolds and adhesive, which previously relied solely on the adhesive nature of the adhesive.

  16. Manifold seal for fuel cell stack assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmitten, Phillip F. (N. Huntingdon, PA); Wright, Maynard K. (Bethel Park, PA)

    1989-01-01

    An assembly for sealing a manifold to a stack of fuel cells includes a first resilient member for providing a first sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. A second resilient member provides a second sealing barrier between the manifold and the stack. The first and second resilient members are retained in such a manner as to define an area therebetween adapted for retaining a sealing composition.

  17. Apparatus for manifolding multiple passage solar panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcalister, R.E.

    1982-06-08

    A method of sealingly connecting a thermoplastic solar panel structure comprising a multiplicity of elongated thin wall sections defining a multiplicity of parallel passages extending longitudinally between the ends of said panel structure to a thermoplastic manifold tube comprising the steps of mounting an elongated mandrel having a multiplicity of transversely projecting elements corresponding in number and spacing to the panel passages to be communicated with the interior of the manifold tube, positioning a side wall portion of the manifold tube in predetermined spaced relation with the open end of the panel structure so that the projecting elements of the mandrel are generally longitudinally aligned with the open ends of a corresponding member of the passages in the panel structure, heating the spaced panel structure end and the manifold tube side wall portion to soften the thermoplastic material thereof, moving the mandrel within the manifold tube so as to position the projecting elements through the side wall portion thereof and into the open ends of said corresponding panel structure passages and the manifold tube toward the panel structure end so as to cause the manifold tube side wall portion to apply a pressure to the panel structure end sufficient to deform the thermoplastic material thereof and effect a fusing of the same into a unitary mass, and withdrawing the mandrel in the direction of extent of the projecting elements to a position within the interior of the manifold tube and then longitudinally out of the manifold tube and apparatus for carrying out the method.

  18. Method for manifolding multiple passage solar panel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcalister, R.E.

    1981-11-17

    A method of sealingly connecting a thermoplastic solar panel structure comprising a multiplicity of elongated thin wall sections defining a multiplicity of parallel passages extending longitudinally between the ends of said panel structure to a thermoplastic manifold tube is described. An elongated mandrel is mounted having a multiplicity of transversely projecting elements corresponding in number and spacing to the panel passages to be communicated with the interior of the manifold tube. A side wall portion of the manifold tube is positioned in predetermined spaced relation with the open end of the panel structure so that the projecting elements of the mandrel are generally longitudinally aligned with the open ends of a corresponding member of the passages in the panel structure. The spaced panel structure end and the manifold tube side wall portion are heated to soften the thermoplastic material thereof. The mandrel is moved within the manifold tube so as to position the projecting elements through the side wall portion thereof and into the open ends of said corresponding panel structure passages and the manifold tube toward the panel structure end so as to cause the manifold tube side wall portion to apply a pressure to the panel structure end sufficient to deform the thermoplastic material thereof and effect a fusing of the same into a unitary mass. The mandrel is then withdrawn in the direction of extent of the projecting elements to a position within the interior of the manifold tube and then longitudinally out of the manifold tube and apparatus for carrying out the method.

  19. High power laser perforating tools and systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zediker, Mark S; Rinzler, Charles C; Faircloth, Brian O; Koblick, Yeshaya; Moxley, Joel F

    2014-04-22

    ystems devices and methods for the transmission of 1 kW or more of laser energy deep into the earth and for the suppression of associated nonlinear phenomena. Systems, devices and methods for the laser perforation of a borehole in the earth. These systems can deliver high power laser energy down a deep borehole, while maintaining the high power to perforate such boreholes.

  20. Adiabatic limits on Riemannian Heisenberg manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yakovlev, A A

    2008-02-28

    An asymptotic formula is obtained for the distribution function of the spectrum of the Laplace operator, in the adiabatic limit for the foliation defined by the orbits of an invariant flow on a compact Riemannian Heisenberg manifold. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  1. Backsurging perforations can increase production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brieger, E.F.

    1991-07-01

    Subjecting formations to a large pressure differential or underbalance is a common means of surging perforations to remove damage and increase flow from oil and gas wells. Underbalanced perforating, a standard industry completion technique, is normally used to obtain the pressure differentials intended to dislodge debris from perforations and flush the surrounding compacted zone. Gradually applied pressure underbalance can be achieved by swabbing or jetting to reduce hydrostatic head. Suddenly applied underbalance is achieved by evacuating the tubing in conjunction with a rupture disc, tubing-conveyed perforating systems or by using a new wireline-set, through-tubing backsurge tool. These techniques, except for the through-tubing method, are often utilized only during later workovers due to the expense and difficulty of achieving an adequate underbalance. Many operators prefer to perforate in balanced or overbalanced pressures conditions. This typically leaves perforations completely or partially plugged with gun debris, mud solids and shattered formation material that has been recompacted. Production logging shows that wells often produce from only 10 to 20% of the total interval apparently because of ineffective, plugged perforations.

  2. Subsea manifolds become a practical matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-05-01

    Norwegian deep waters are providing a powerful incentive for using subsea manifolds. Some of the most important conceptual and practical work is being done by ACB, Nantes. ACB's ''Reliability through Simplicity'' philosophy could ultimately help to bring down subsea costs. This might be used to open up the UK's large number of marginal fields in moderate depths by tying production back to existing installations.

  3. Manifold gasket accommodating differential movement of fuel cell stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, Dana A.; Farooque, Mohammad

    2007-11-13

    A gasket for use in a fuel cell system having at least one externally manifolded fuel cell stack, for sealing the manifold edge and the stack face. In accordance with the present invention, the gasket accommodates differential movement between the stack and manifold by promoting slippage at interfaces between the gasket and the dielectric and between the gasket and the stack face.

  4. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1997-03-11

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  5. Dispersant solutions for dispersing hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L. (Clinton, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A dispersant solution includes a hydrocarbon dispersing solution derived from a bacterium from ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, or ATCC 55638.

  6. Optical manifold for light-emitting diodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaves, Julio C.; Falicoff, Waqidi; Minano, Juan C.; Benitez, Pablo; Parkyn, Jr., William A.; Alvarez, Roberto; Dross, Oliver

    2008-06-03

    An optical manifold for efficiently combining a plurality of blue LED outputs to illuminate a phosphor for a single, substantially homogeneous output, in a small, cost-effective package. Embodiments are disclosed that use a single or multiple LEDs and a remote phosphor, and an intermediate wavelength-selective filter arranged so that backscattered photoluminescence is recycled to boost the luminance and flux of the output aperture. A further aperture mask is used to boost phosphor luminance with only modest loss of luminosity. Alternative non-recycling embodiments provide blue and yellow light in collimated beams, either separately or combined into white.

  7. Global expenditure on subsea manifolds is estimated to reach...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    demand. The global subsea manifold market is growing at a high pace as several oil and gas exploration companies working in offshore locations prefer installing subsea...

  8. Engine Air Intake Manifold Having Built In Intercooler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Freese, V, Charles E.

    2000-09-12

    A turbocharged V type engine can be equipped with an exhaust gas recirculation cooler integrated into the intake manifold, so as to achieve efficiency, cost reductions and space economization improvements. The cooler can take the form of a tube-shell heat exchanger that utilizes a cylindrical chamber in the air intake manifold as the heat exchanger housing. The intake manifold depends into the central space formed by the two banks of cylinders on the V type engine, such that the central space is effectively utilized for containing the manifold and cooler.

  9. Fuel rod assembly to manifold attachment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donck, Harry A.; Veca, Anthony R.; Snyder, Jr., Harold J.

    1980-01-01

    A fuel element is formed with a plurality of fuel rod assemblies detachably connected to an overhead support with each of the fuel rod assemblies having a gas tight seal with the support to allow internal fission gaseous products to flow without leakage from the fuel rod assemblies into a vent manifold passageway system on the support. The upper ends of the fuel rod assemblies are located at vertically extending openings in the support and upper threaded members are threaded to the fuel rod assemblies to connect the latter to the support. The preferred threaded members are cap nuts having a dome wall encircling an upper threaded end on the fuel rod assembly and having an upper sealing surface for sealing contact with the support. Another and lower seal is achieved by abutting a sealing surface on each fuel rod assembly with the support. A deformable portion on the cap nut locks the latter against inadvertent turning off the fuel rod assembly. Orienting means on the fuel rod and support primarily locates the fuel rods azimuthally for reception of a deforming tool for the cap nut. A cross port in the fuel rod end plug discharges into a sealed annulus within the support, which serves as a circumferential chamber, connecting the manifold gas passageways in the support.

  10. Perforating devices for use in wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jacoby, Jerome J.; Brooks, James E.; Aseltine, Clifford L.

    2002-01-01

    The perforating device for use in completing a well includes a case, an explosive charge contained in the case, and a generally bowl-shaped liner. The liner is positioned adjacent the explosive charge and has non-uniforrn thickness along its length. The liner further includes a protruding portion near its tip. In another configuration, the liner includes a hole near its tip to expose a portion of the explosive charge.

  11. Perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cargile, J.D.; Giltrud, M.E.; Luk, V.K.

    1993-10-01

    This report discusses fourteen tests which were conducted to investigate the perforation of thin unreinforced concrete slabs. The 4340-steel projectile used in the test series is 50.8 mm in diameter, 355.6 mm in length, has a mass of 2.34 kg. and an ogive nose with caliber radius head of 3. The slabs, contained within steel culverts, are 1.52 m in diameter and consist of concrete with a nominal unconfined compressive strength of 38.2 MPa and maxima aggregate size of 9.5 mm. Slab thicknesses are 284.4, 254.0, 215.9 and 127.0 mm. Tests were conducted at impact velocities of about 313 m/s on all slab thicknesses and about 379 and 471 m/s on the 254.0-mm-thick slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. All tests were conducted at normal incidence to the slab. Information obtained from the tests used to determine the loading (deceleration) on the projectile during the perforation process, the velocity-displacement of the projectile as it perforated the slab, and the projectile position as damage occurred on the backface of the slab. The test projectile behaved essentially as a rigid body for all of the tests.

  12. Manifold to uniformly distribute a solid-liquid slurry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kern, Kenneth C.

    1983-01-01

    This invention features a manifold that divides a stream of coal particles and liquid into several smaller streams maintaining equal or nearly equal mass compositions. The manifold consists of a horizontal, variable area header having sharp-edged, right-angled take-offs which are oriented on the bottom of the header.

  13. Geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Chong; Sun, Xiaowei; Wang, Youde

    2013-12-15

    It is well-known that the LIE (Locally Induction Equation) admit soliton-type solutions and same soliton solutions arise from different and apparently irrelevant physical models. By comparing the solitons of LIE and Killing magnetic geodesics, we observe that these solitons are essentially decided by two families of isometries of the domain and the target space, respectively. With this insight, we propose the new concept of geometric solitons of Hamiltonian flows on manifolds, such as geometric Schrödinger flows and KdV flows for maps. Moreover, we give several examples of geometric solitons of the Schrödinger flow and geometric KdV flow, including magnetic curves as geometric Schrödinger solitons and explicit geometric KdV solitons on surfaces of revolution.

  14. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Bryan, William Louis; Kress, Reid

    2003-05-27

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  15. Dual manifold system and method for fluid transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Bryan, William Louis; Kress, Reid

    2003-09-30

    A dual-manifold assembly is provided for the rapid, parallel transfer of liquid reagents from a microtiter plate to a solid state microelectronic device having biological sensors integrated thereon. The assembly includes aspiration and dispense manifolds connected by a plurality of conduits. In operation, the aspiration manifold is actuated such that the aspiration manifold is seated onto an array of reagent-filled wells of the microtiter plate. The wells are pressurized to force reagent through conduits toward the dispense manifold. A pressure pulse provided by a standard ink-jet printhead ejects nanoliter-to-picoliter droplets of reagent through an array of printhead orifices and onto test sites on the surface of the microelectronic device.

  16. Method for producing a fuel cell manifold seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grevstad, Paul E.; Johnson, Carl K.; Mientek, Anthony P.

    1982-01-01

    A manifold-to-stack seal and sealing method for fuel cell stacks. This seal system solves the problem of maintaining a low leak rate manifold seal as the fuel cell stack undergoes compressive creep. The seal system eliminates the problem of the manifold-to-stack seal sliding against the rough stack surface as the stack becomes shorter because of cell creep, which relative motion destroys the seal. The seal system described herein utilizes a polymer seal frame firmly clamped between the manifold and the stack such that the seal frame moves with the stack. Thus, as the stack creeps, the seal frame creeps with it, and there is no sliding at the rough, tough to seal, stack-to-seal frame interface. Here the sliding is on a smooth easy to seal location between the seal frame and the manifold.

  17. Pressure enhanced penetration with shaped charge perforators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, Lewis A.

    2001-01-01

    A downhole tool, adapted to retain a shaped charge surrounded by a superatmospherically pressurized light gas, is employed in a method for perforating a casing and penetrating reservoir rock around a wellbore. Penetration of a shaped charge jet can be enhanced by at least 40% by imploding a liner in the high pressure, light gas atmosphere. The gas pressure helps confine the jet on the axis of penetration in the latter stages of formation. The light gas, such as helium or hydrogen, is employed to keep the gas density low enough so as not to inhibit liner collapse.

  18. Fixed points, stable manifolds, weather regimes, and their predictability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deremble, Bruno; D'Andrea, Fabio; Ghil, Michael

    2009-10-27

    In a simple, one-layer atmospheric model, we study the links between low-frequency variability and the model’s fixed points in phase space. The model dynamics is characterized by the coexistence of multiple ''weather regimes.'' To investigate the transitions from one regime to another, we focus on the identification of stable manifolds associated with fixed points. We show that these manifolds act as separatrices between regimes. We track each manifold by making use of two local predictability measures arising from the meteorological applications of nonlinear dynamics, namely, ''bred vectors'' and singular vectors. These results are then verified in the framework of ensemblemore » forecasts issued from clouds (ensembles) of initial states. The divergence of the trajectories allows us to establish the connections between zones of low predictability, the geometry of the stable manifolds, and transitions between regimes.« less

  19. Subsea manifolds optimization -- The combination of mature and new technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paulo, C.A.S.

    1996-12-31

    Subsea equipment can now be considered a mature option for offshore field developments. In Brazil, since the first oil in Campos Basin, different concepts ranging from one-atmosphere chambers to deepwater guidelineless X-mas trees, have been tested, contributing to this development. The experience acquired during these years makes it possible to combine the proven systems with new technologies being developed, for the design of subsea manifolds. The main target is more efficiency and cost reduction. When choosing a manifold concept, a usual rule is applicable: the simpler the better. The maturity, confidence and reliability obtained, allow the usage of resident hydraulically actuated valves, simplifying considerably the manifold arrangement. Other contributions come from: the reduction of piping bend radius allowed by the new pigs; the increased reliability of subsea instrumentation and chokes, allowing elimination of the gas-lift-test flowline; and the development of the direct vertical connection, that turns subsea tie-ins into very fast and easy operations. Combining all that with the new technology of a multiphase meter (to eliminate the test flowline and even the test separator on the platform), one can achieve a cost effective solution. This paper describes the possibilities of simplifying the subsea manifolds and presents a comparison of different designs. The usage of mature technology combined with the new developments, can help the industry to make deep water developments profitable, worldwide.

  20. Fuel cell stack with internal manifolds for reactant gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnacke, A.W.

    1983-10-12

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of plate-like fuel cells arranged along an axis generally parallel to cell thickness with electrically conductive separator plates between each pair of cells. A plurality of axial manifolds are provided at opposite sides of the stack in outer marginal portions beyond the edges of electrodes and electrolyte tiles. Sealing rings prevent cross-leakage of oxidant fuel gases through use of pairs of outwardly extending lips from opposite tile surfaces bonded to first and second electrode frames respectively. The frames provide transition between electrode edges and manifold perimeters. The pairs of extension lips are sealingly bonded together through an electrically insulative sealing ring with wedge shaped fastening members.

  1. Fuel cell stack with internal manifolds for reactant gases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schnacke, Arthur W. (Schenectady, NY)

    1985-01-01

    A fuel cell stack includes a plurality of plate-like fuel cells arranged along an axis generally parallel to cell thickness with electrically conductive separator plates between each pair of cells. A plurality of axial manifolds are provided at opposite sides of the stack in outer marginal portions beyond the edges of electrodes and electrolyte tiles. Sealing rings prevent cross-leakage of oxidant fuel gases through use of pairs of outwardly extending lips from opposite tile surfaces bonded to first and second electrode frames respectively. The frames provide transition between electrode edges and manifold perimeters. The pairs of extension lips are sealingly bonded together through an electrically insulative sealing ring with wedge shaped fastening members.

  2. DeepStar evaluation of subsea trees and manifold concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkland, K.G.; Richardson, E.M.; Hey, C.

    1996-12-31

    This paper reviews the results of a study performed for the DeepStar Project, CTR A802-2, Concept Study and Investigation of Key Areas of Interest for Subsea Systems in Deepwater. The report documents the results of a study of subsea manifold systems as applied to the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Of particular interest is the development of a range of system level philosophies based on recent and ongoing experience from the operators and vendors.

  3. SeaStar: Subsea cluster manifold system design and installation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, P.G.T.; Upchurch, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    The SeaStar Cluster Manifold system was engineered as a low cost alternative to larger and more expensive completion template designs. Utilizing field-proven equipment and installation techniques, it was the first of its kind to be installed in the Gulf of Mexico. The Cluster Manifold system allows the connection of flowlines from adjacent satellite wells and numerous infield flowlines consisting of export, service, and methanol lines. With new technological advances, and a variety of flowline connection systems on the market today, deep water completions are being used with increasing frequency. Subsea operations are becoming more routine and installation times are being reduced. The SeaStar system was successfully installed in Garden Banks Block 70/71 in the Gulf of Mexico during the first quarter of 1995. Currently two 4 x 2-in. 10,000 psi lay-away trees are installed and connected to the manifold. Production is being processed at a Marathon platform in Vermilion Block 386B approximately 13.5 miles away from the subsea installation.

  4. Apparatus and method for sealing perforated well casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, C.G.; Benham, R.A.; Brock, J.L.; Emerson, J.A.; Ferguson, K.R.; Scheve, D.F.; Schmidt, J.H.; Schuler, K.W.; Stanton, P.L.

    1997-03-25

    Perforations and other openings in well casings, liners and other conduits may be substantially blocked or sealed to prevent fluid flow between the casing or liner interior and an earth formation by placing a radially expansible sleeve adjacent the perforations or openings and urging the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing or inner wall using an explosive charge. An apparatus including a radially contracted sleeve formed by a coiled plate member or a tubular member having flutes defined by external and internal folds, may be deployed into a well casing or liner through a production or injection tubing string and on the end of a flexible cable or coilable tubing. An explosive charge disposed on the apparatus and within the sleeve may be detonated to urge the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing inner wall. 17 figs.

  5. Apparatus and method for sealing perforated well casing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blount, Curtis G.; Benham, Robert A.; Brock, Jerry L.; Emerson, John A.; Ferguson, Keith R.; Scheve, Donald F.; Schmidt, Joseph H.; Schuler, Karl W.; Stanton, Philip L.

    1997-01-01

    Perforations and other openings in well casings, liners and other conduits may be substantially blocked or sealed to prevent fluid flow between the casing or liner interior and an earth formation by placing a radially expansible sleeve adjacent the perforations or openings and urging the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing or inner wall using an explosive charge. An apparatus including a radially contracted sleeve formed by a coiled plate member or a tubular member having flutes defined by external and internal folds, may be deployed into a well casing or liner through a production or injection tubing string and on the end of a flexible cable or coilable tubing. An explosive charge disposed on the apparatus and within the sleeve may be detonated to urge the sleeve into forcible engagement with the casing inner wall.

  6. The Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for six-dimensional manifolds with boundary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Yong E-mail: wangy581@nenu.edu.cn

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, we define lower dimensional volumes of spin manifolds with boundary. We compute the lower dimensional volume V ol{sub 6}{sup (1,3)} for 6-dimensional spin manifolds with boundary and derive the gravity on boundary from the noncommutative residue associated with Dirac operators. For 6-dimensional manifolds with boundary, we also get a Kastler-Kalau-Walze type theorem for a general fourth order operator.

  7. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, John B. (Huntsville, AL)

    1994-01-01

    Perforated plates (10) having very small holes (14) with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a "wire drawing" process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er.sub.3 Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans (20) containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array (53) with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er.sub.3 Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations (38, 42), one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed.

  8. Perforated plates for cryogenic regenerators and method of fabrication

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, J.B.

    1994-03-29

    Perforated plates having very small holes with a uniform diameter throughout the plate thickness are prepared by a [open quotes]wire drawing[close quotes] process in which a billet of sacrificial metal is disposed in an extrusion can of the plate metal, and the can is extruded and restacked repeatedly, converting the billet to a wire of the desired hole diameter. At final size, the rod is then sliced into wafers, and the wires are removed by selective etching. This process is useful for plate metals of interest for high performance regenerator applications, in particular, copper, niobium, molybdenum, erbium, and other rare earth metals. Er[sub 3]Ni, which has uniquely favorable thermophysical properties for such applications, may be incorporated in regions of the plates by providing extrusion cans containing erbium and nickel metals in a stacked array with extrusion cans of the plate metal, which may be copper. The array is heated to convert the erbium and nickel metals to Er[sub 3]Ni. Perforated plates having two sizes of perforations, one of which is small enough for storage of helium, are also disclosed. 10 figures.

  9. Micro-mechanical modeling of perforating shock damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, R.P.; Krogh, K.E.; Behrmann, L.A.; Halleck, P.M.

    1997-11-17

    Shaped charge jet induced formation damage from perforation treatments hinders productivity. Manifestation of this damage is in the form of grain fragmentation resulting in fines that plug up pore throats along with the breakdown of inter-grain cementation. The authors use the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic (SPH) computational method as a way to explicitly model, on a grain pore scale, the dynamic interactions of grains and grain/pores to calculate the damage resulting from perforation type stress wave loading. The SPH method is a continuum Lagrangian, meshless approach that features particles. Clusters of particles are used for each grain to provide representation of a grain pore structure that is similar to x-ray synchrotron microtomography images. Numerous damage models are available to portray fracture and fragmentation. In this paper the authors present the results of well defined impact loading on a grain pore structure that illustrate how the heterogeneity affects stress wave behavior and damage evolution. The SPH approach easily accommodates the coupling of multi-materials. Calculations for multi-material conditions with the pore space treated as a void, fluid filled, and/or clay filled show diverse effects on the stress wave propagation behavior and damage. SPH comparisons made with observed damage from recovered impacted sandstone samples in gas gun experiments show qualitatively the influence of stress intensity. The modeling approach presented here offers a unique way in concert with experiments to define a better understanding of formation damage resulting from perforation completion treatments.

  10. 3D%20printed%20perforated%20metal%20box.jpg | OSTI, US Dept of Energy

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information 3D%20printed%20perforated%20metal%20box

  11. Lectures on Dispersion Theory

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Salam, A.

    1956-04-01

    Lectures with mathematical analysis are given on Dispersion Theory and Causality and Dispersion Relations for Pion-nucleon Scattering. The appendix includes the S-matrix in terms of Heisenberg Operators. (F. S.)

  12. Mechanical seal having a single-piece, perforated mating ring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khonsari, Michael M.; Somanchi, Anoop K.

    2007-08-07

    A mechanical seal (e.g., single mechanical seals, double mechanical seals, tandem mechanical seals, bellows, pusher mechanical seals, and all types of rotating and reciprocating machines) with reduced contact surface temperature, reduced contact surface wear, or increased life span. The mechanical seal comprises a rotating ring and a single-piece, perforated mating ring, which improves heat transfer by controllably channeling coolant flow through the single-piece mating ring such that the coolant is in substantially uniform thermal contact with a substantial portion of the interior surface area of the seal face, while maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanical seal and minimizing the potential for coolant flow interruptions to the seal face caused by debris or contaminants (e.g., small solids and trash) in the coolant.

  13. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

    1991-11-26

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

  14. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; Evans, Roger

    1991-01-01

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the .sup.196 Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of .+-.0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour.

  15. Powder dispersion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorenz, Heather M.; Brockmann, John E.; Lucero, Daniel A.

    2011-09-20

    A powder dispersion method and apparatus comprising an air eductor and a powder dispensing syringe inserted into a suction connection of the air eductor.

  16. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-01-09

    A composition of matter is described which is comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide. A method for making this composition of matter is also described. This invention relates to the art of powder metallurgy and, more particularly, it relates to dispersion strengthened metals.

  17. IS-321-312-001 TEP-to-HTEP manifold interface sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan J; Coons, James E; Kubic, William L

    2008-01-01

    The Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) receives hydrogen-like and air-like gas streams from the High Tritium Exhaust Processing (HTEP) manifold. Gases from the torus roughing pump are pumped into the HTEP manifold before entering TEP. This interface sheet describes the TEP-HTEP material stream interface, both the physical elements that make up the interface as well as the gas streams that will flow through the interface. The functions of this interface are to: Provide a physical connection for the transport of hydrogen-like and air-like gases from the HTEP manifold to TEP. Provide seals to prevent the unncessary release of tritium to the surrounding environment. Provide valves that can be actuated to stop or prevent the flow of gas into TEP.

  18. Natural star-products on symplectic manifolds and related quantum mechanical operators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B?aszak, Maciej Doma?ski, Ziemowit

    2014-05-15

    In this paper is considered a problem of defining natural star-products on symplectic manifolds, admissible for quantization of classical Hamiltonian systems. First, a construction of a star-product on a cotangent bundle to an Euclidean configuration space is given with the use of a sequence of pair-wise commuting vector fields. The connection with a covariant representation of such a star-product is also presented. Then, an extension of the construction to symplectic manifolds over flat and non-flat pseudo-Riemannian configuration spaces is discussed. Finally, a coordinate free construction of related quantum mechanical operators from Hilbert space over respective configuration space is presented. -- Highlights: Invariant representations of natural star-products on symplectic manifolds are considered. Star-products induced by flat and non-flat connections are investigated. Operator representations in Hilbert space of considered star-algebras are constructed.

  19. A new approach for magnetic curves in 3D Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bozkurt, Zehra Gk, Ismail Yayl?, Yusuf Ekmekci, F. Nejat

    2014-05-15

    A magnetic field is defined by the property that its divergence is zero in a three-dimensional oriented Riemannian manifold. Each magnetic field generates a magnetic flow whose trajectories are curves called as magnetic curves. In this paper, we give a new variational approach to study the magnetic flow associated with the Killing magnetic field in a three-dimensional oriented Riemann manifold, (M{sup 3}, g). And then, we investigate the trajectories of the magnetic fields called as N-magnetic and B-magnetic curves.

  20. Pompano subsea development: Template/manifold, tree and ROV intervention systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, M.M.; Byrd, M.L.; Holt, J.; Riley, J.W.; Snell, C.K.; Tyer, C.; Brewster, D.

    1996-12-31

    BP Exploration`s Pompano Subsea Development, in 1,865 ft of water in the Gulf of Mexico, uses a subsea production system to produce oil to a host platform 4{1/2} miles away. The 10-slot subsea template/manifold supports Through FlowLine (TFL) wells, which are controlled by means of an electrohydraulic control system. All process components of the system are retrievable with ROV intervention. This paper describes the template/manifold system, TFL tree system and ROV intervention systems.

  1. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1989-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  2. Dispersion strengthened copper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, Haskell; Meek, Thomas T.; Blake, Rodger D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition of matter comprised of copper and particles which are dispersed throughout the copper, where the particles are comprised of copper oxide and copper having a coating of copper oxide, and a method for making this composition of matter.

  3. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  4. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cushman, John H.; O’Malley, Dan

    2015-06-22

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion wemore » illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Finally, power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.« less

  5. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, Joseph E.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  6. Integral manifolding structure for fuel cell core having parallel gas flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Herceg, J.E.

    1983-10-12

    Disclosed herein are manifolding means for directing the fuel and oxidant gases to parallel flow passageways in a fuel cell core. Each core passageway is defined by electrolyte and interconnect walls. Each electrolyte and interconnect wall consists respectively of anode and cathode materials layered on the opposite sides of electrolyte material, or on the opposite sides of interconnect material. A core wall projects beyond the open ends of the defined core passageways and is disposed approximately midway between and parallel to the adjacent overlaying and underlying interconnect walls to define manifold chambers therebetween on opposite sides of the wall. Each electrolyte wall defining the flow passageways is shaped to blend into and be connected to this wall in order to redirect the corresponding fuel and oxidant passageways to the respective manifold chambers either above or below this intermediate wall. Inlet and outlet connections are made to these separate manifold chambers respectively, for carrying the fuel and oxidant gases to the core, and for carrying their reaction products away from the core.

  7. Side branch absorber for exhaust manifold of two-stroke internal combustion engine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Ralph E.; Broerman, III, Eugene L.; Bourn, Gary D.

    2011-01-11

    A method of improving scavenging operation of a two-stroke internal combustion engine. The exhaust pressure of the engine is analyzed to determine if there is a pulsation frequency. Acoustic modeling is used to design an absorber. An appropriately designed side branch absorber may be attached to the exhaust manifold.

  8. Symmetry operators for Dirac's equation on two-dimensional spin manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fatibene, Lorenzo; McLenaghan, Raymond G.; Smith, Shane N.; Rastelli, Giovanni

    2009-05-15

    It is shown that the second order symmetry operators for the Dirac equation on a general two-dimensional spin manifold may be expressed in terms of Killing vectors and valence 2 Killing tensors. The role of these operators in the theory of separation of variables for the Dirac equation is studied.

  9. Uranium Dispersion & Dosimetry Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-03-22

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) program provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility such as a uranium mine or mill. Only transport through the air is considered. Exposure results from inhalation, external irradiation from airborne and ground-deposited activity, and ingestion of foodstuffs. Individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. The program was developed for applicationmore » to uranium mining and milling; however, it may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant.« less

  10. Ensemble Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Addis, R.P.

    2002-06-24

    Prognostic atmospheric dispersion models are used to generate consequence assessments, which assist decision-makers in the event of a release from a nuclear facility. Differences in the forecast wind fields generated by various meteorological agencies, differences in the transport and diffusion models, as well as differences in the way these models treat the release source term, result in differences in the resulting plumes. Even dispersion models using the same wind fields may produce substantially different plumes. This talk will address how ensemble techniques may be used to enable atmospheric modelers to provide decision-makers with a more realistic understanding of how both the atmosphere and the models behave.

  11. Covered Biodegradable Stent: New Therapeutic Option for the Management of Esophageal Perforation or Anastomotic Leak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cerna, Marie; Koecher, Martin Valek, Vlastimil; Aujesky, Rene; Neoral, Cestmir; Andrasina, Tomas; Panek, Jiri; Mahathmakanthi, Shankari

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate our experience with the treatment of postoperative anastomotic leaks and benign esophageal perforations with covered biodegradable stents. Materials and Methods: From 2008 to 2010, we treated five men with either an anastomotic leak or benign esophageal perforation by implanting of covered biodegradable Ella-BD stents. The average age of the patients was 60 (range, 38-74) years. Postoperative anastomotic leaks were treated in four patients (1 after esophagectomy, 1 after resection of diverticulum, 2 after gastrectomy). In one patient, perforation occurred as a complication of the treatment of an esophageal rupture (which occurred during a balloon dilatation of benign stenosis) with a metallic stent. Results: Seven covered biodegradable stents were implanted in five patients. Primary technical success was 100%. Clinical success (leak sealing) was achieved in four of the five patients (80%). Stent migration occurred in three patients. In two of these patients, the leak had been sealed by the time of stent migration, therefore no reintervention was necessary. In one patient an additional stent had to be implanted. Conclusion: The use of biodegradable covered stents for the treatment of anastomotic leaks or esophageal perforations is technically feasible and safe. The initial results are promising; however, larger number of patients will be required to evaluate the capability of these biodegradable stents in the future. The use of biodegradable material for coverage of the stent is essential.

  12. Quantization of a particle on a two-dimensional manifold of constant curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bracken, Paul [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas, Edinburg, Texas 78540 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    The formulation of quantum mechanics on spaces of constant curvature is studied. It is shown how a transition from a classical system to the quantum case can be accomplished by the quantization of the Noether momenta. These can be determined by means of Lie differentiation of the metric which defines the manifold. For the metric examined here, it is found that the resulting Schrdinger equation is separable and the spectrum and eigenfunctions can be investigated in detail.

  13. An analogue of Weyl’s law for quantized irreducible generalized flag manifolds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matassa, Marco E-mail: mmatassa@math.uio.no

    2015-09-15

    We prove an analogue of Weyl’s law for quantized irreducible generalized flag manifolds. This is formulated in terms of a zeta function which, similarly to the classical setting, satisfies the following two properties: as a functional on the quantized algebra it is proportional to the Haar state and its first singularity coincides with the classical dimension. The relevant formulas are given for the more general case of compact quantum groups.

  14. Dispersion Analysis Research Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1998-11-10

    The DART thermomechanical model, for the prediction of fission-product-induced swelling in aluminum dispersion fuels, calculates irradiation-induced fission gas bubbles as a function of fuel morphology. DART calculates the behavior of a rod, tube, or plate during closure of as-fabricated porosity, during which the fuel particle swelling is accommodated by the relatively soft aluminum matrix flowing into the existing porosity. The code also determines the subsequent macroscopic changes in rod diameter or plate/tube thickness caused bymore » additional fuel deformation processes. In addition, a calculation for the effect of irradiation on the thermal conductivity of the dispersion fuel, and for fuel restructuring and swelling due to the aluminum fuel reaction, amorphization, and recrystallization is included.« less

  15. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  16. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G.; Basaran, Osman A.; Harris, Michael T.

    1995-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  17. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1998-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, Warren G.; Harris, Michael T.; Scott, Timothy C.; Basaran, Osman A.

    1996-01-01

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode.

  19. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1998-04-14

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  20. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  1. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1998-06-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  2. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sisson, W.G.; Harris, M.T.; Scott, T.C.; Basaran, O.A.

    1996-04-02

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two coaxial cylindrical bodies, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 5 figs.

  3. Perforation of Transverse Colon: A Catastrophic Complication of Uterine Artery Embolization for Fibroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acharya, Jyotsna Bancroft, Karen; Lay, James

    2012-12-15

    We report a case of a 43-year-old woman who underwent uterine artery embolization (UAE) for a symptomatic large fibroid uterus and had spontaneous perforation of the transverse colon 3 months after embolisation with near-fatal consequences. We believe this is the first reported case in the literature of this serious complication of UAE. We briefly review the literature on bowel complications after UAE and discuss lessons to be learned regarding patient selection and postprocedure follow-up.

  4. Optical manifold

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Falicoff, Waqidi; Chaves, Julio C.; Minano, Juan Carlos; Benitez, Pablo; Dross, Oliver; Parkyn, Jr., William A.

    2010-02-23

    Optical systems are described that have at least one source of a beam of blue light with divergence under 15.degree.. A phosphor emits yellow light when excited by the blue light. A collimator is disposed with the phosphor and forms a yellow beam with divergence under 15.degree.. A dichroic filter is positioned to transmit the beam of blue light to the phosphor and to reflect the beam of yellow light to an exit aperture. In different embodiments, the beams of blue and yellow light are incident upon said filter with central angles of 15.degree., 22.degree., and 45.degree.. The filter may reflect all of one polarization and part of the other polarization, and a polarization rotating retroreflector may then be provided to return the unreflected light to the filter.

  5. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O`Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-09-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  6. Turbulent natural convection between a perforated vertical cylinder and a surrounding array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEligot, D.M.; Stoots, C.M.; Christenson, W.A.; O'Brien, J.E.; Mecham, D.C.; Lussie, W.G.

    1992-01-01

    A number of situations can be hypothesized to occur in an advanced or special purpose nuclear reactor such that the core is filled with a gas but there is no forced flow to remove the thermal energy evolved. Experiments were conducted by resistively hearing a vertical circular cylinder of length-to-diameter ratio of about 160 centered inside a concentric perforated tube which was, in turn, surrounded by three larger diameter tubes cooled internally with water flow. The ratio of the test section temperature to the cooling tube temperature was varied up to 2.6; and the Rayleigh number, based on tube diameter and properties evaluated at the cooling tube temperature, ranged from 2.9 x 10{sup 4} to 9.2 x 10{sup 5}. Results indicate that the convective heat transfer parameters for the perforated tube are about fifteen per cent higher than for the smooth bare tube centered in the same position relative to the array. The Nusselt number for convective heat transfer across the annulus between the heated test section and the perforated tube corresponded to parallel laminar flow.

  7. Fuel cell system including a unit for electrical isolation of a fuel cell stack from a manifold assembly and method therefor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley; Dana A. , Farooque; Mohammad , Davis; Keith

    2007-10-02

    A fuel cell system with improved electrical isolation having a fuel cell stack with a positive potential end and a negative potential, a manifold for use in coupling gases to and from a face of the fuel cell stack, an electrical isolating assembly for electrically isolating the manifold from the stack, and a unit for adjusting an electrical potential of the manifold such as to impede the flow of electrolyte from the stack across the isolating assembly.

  8. Modeling volcanic ash dispersal

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Explosive volcanic eruptions inject into the atmosphere large amounts of volcanic material (ash, blocks and lapilli). Blocks and larger lapilli follow ballistic and non-ballistic trajectories and fall rapidly close to the volcano. In contrast, very fine ashes can remain entrapped in the atmosphere for months to years, and may affect the global climate in the case of large eruptions. Particles having sizes between these two end-members remain airborne from hours to days and can cover wide areas downwind. Such volcanic fallout entails a serious threat to aircraft safety and can create many undesirable effects to the communities located around the volcano. The assessment of volcanic fallout hazard is an important scientific, economic, and political issue, especially in densely populated areas. From a scientific point of view, considerable progress has been made during the last two decades through the use of increasingly powerful computational models and capabilities. Nowadays, models are used to quantify hazard scenarios and/or to give short-term forecasts during emergency situations. This talk will be focused on the main aspects related to modeling volcanic ash dispersal and fallout with application to the well known problem created by the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland. Moreover, a short description of the main volcanic monitoring techniques is presented.

  9. Performance characteristics of a perforated shadow band under clear sky conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Michael J.

    2010-12-15

    A perforated, non-rotating shadow band is described for separating global solar irradiance into its diffuse and direct normal components using a single pyranometer. Whereas shadow bands are normally solid so as to occult the sensor of a pyranometer throughout the day, the proposed band has apertures cut from its circumference to intermittently expose the instrument sensor at preset intervals. Under clear sky conditions the device produces a saw tooth waveform of irradiance data from which it is possible to reconstruct separate global and diffuse curves. The direct normal irradiance may then be calculated giving a complete breakdown of the irradiance curves without need of a second instrument or rotating shadow band. This paper describes the principle of operation of the band and gives a mathematical model of its shading mask based on the results of an optical ray tracing study. An algorithm for processing the data from the perforated band system is described and evaluated. In an extended trial conducted at NREL's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory, the band coupled with a thermally corrected Eppley PSP produced independent curves for diffuse, global and direct normal irradiance with low mean bias errors of 5.6 W/m{sup 2}, 0.3 W/m{sup 2} and -2.6 W/m{sup 2} respectively, relative to collocated reference instruments. Random uncertainties were 9.7 W/m{sup 2} (diffuse), 17.3 W/m{sup 2} (global) and 19.0 W/m{sup 2} (direct). When the data processing algorithm was modified to include the ray trace model of sensor exposure, uncertainties increased only marginally, confirming the effectiveness of the model. Deployment of the perforated band system can potentially increase the accuracy of data from ground stations in predominantly sunny areas where instrumentation is limited to a single pyranometer. (author)

  10. Practical experience applied to the design of injection and sample manifolds to perform in-place surveillance tests according to ANSI/ASME N-510

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, E.M.; Wikoff, W.O.; Shaffer, L.L.

    1997-08-01

    At the current level of maturity and experience in the nuclear industry, regarding testing of air treatment systems, it is now possible to design and qualify injection and sample manifolds for most applications. While the qualification of sample manifolds is still in its infancy, injection manifolds have reached a mature stage that helps to eliminate the {open_quotes}hit or miss{close_quotes} type of design. During the design phase, manifolds can be adjusted to compensate for poor airflow distribution, laminar flow conditions, and to take advantage of any system attributes. Experience has shown that knowing the system attributes before the design phase begins is an essential element to a successful manifold design. The use of a spreadsheet type program commonly found on most personal computers can afford a greater flexibility and a reduction in time spent in the design phase. The experience gained from several generations of manifold design has culminated in a set of general design guidelines. Use of these guidelines, along with a good understanding of the type of testing (theoretical and practical), can result in a good manifold design requiring little or no field modification. The requirements for manifolds came about because of the use of multiple banks of components and unconventional housing inlet configurations. Multiple banks of adsorbers and pre and post HEPA`s required that each bank be tested to insure that each one does not exceed a specific allowable leakage criterion. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, R.B.; Dusek, J.T.

    1983-10-12

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageways and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  12. Solid oxide fuel cell having monolithic cross flow core and manifolding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poeppel, Roger B.; Dusek, Joseph T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention discloses a monolithic core construction having the flow passageways for the fuel and for the oxidant gases extended transverse to one another, whereby full face core manifolding can be achieved for these gases and their reaction products. The core construction provides that only anode material surround each fuel passageway and only cathode material surround each oxidant passageway, each anode and each cathode further sandwiching at spaced opposing sides electrolyte and interconnect materials to define electrolyte and interconnect walls. Webs of the cathode and anode material hold the electrolyte and interconnect walls spaced apart to define the flow passages. The composite anode and cathode wall structures are further alternately stacked on one another (with the separating electrolyte or interconnect material typically being a single common layer) whereby the fuel passageway and the oxidant passageways are disposed transverse to one another.

  13. Manifold, bus support and coupling arrangement for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parry, G.W.

    1988-04-21

    Individual, tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are assembled into bundles called a module within a housing, with a plurality of modules arranged end-to-end in a linear, stacked configuration called a string. A common set of piping comprised of a suitable high temperature resistant material (1) provides fuel and air to each module housing, (2) serves as electrically conducting buses, and (3) provides structural support for a string of SOFC modules. Ceramic collars are used to connect fuel and air inlet piping to each of the electrodes in an SOFC module and provide (1) electrical insulation for the current carrying bus bars and gas manifolds, (2) damping for the fuel and air inlet piping, and (3) proper spacing between the fuel and air inlet piping to prevent contact between these tubes and possible damage to the SOFC. 11 figs.

  14. Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0)...

  15. Thickness effects on the plastic collapse of perforated plates with triangular penetration patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, J.L.; Jones, D.P.; Holliday, J.E.

    2000-03-01

    This paper investigates the effects of plate thickness on the accuracy of limit load solutions obtained using an elastic-perfectly plastic [EPP] equivalent solid [EQS] procedure for flat perforated plates with a triangular array of penetrations. The EQS approach for limit loads is based on an EQS collapse surface that is valid for generalized plane strain. This assumption is applicable for very thick plates but is known to be less reasonable for very thin plates where plane stress may be a better assumption. The limits of applicability of the generalized plane strain assumption are investigated by obtaining limit load solutions for perforated plates of various thicknesses that are subjected to in-plane and bending loads. Plastic limit load solutions obtained using three-dimensional EPP finite element analysis [FEA] of models which include each penetration explicitly are compared with solutions obtained using the EQS approximation. The penetration pattern chosen for this study has a ligament efficiency (ligament width-to-pitch ratio, h/P) of 0.32. For plates thicker than the pitch, the limit load calculated using the EQS method for both in-plane and bending loads is shown to be very accurate (within 4%) of the limit load calculated for the explicit model. On the other hand, for thin plates (t/P< 2), the EQS limit load is 5% greater than the explicit limit load for bending and 8% greater than the explicit limit load for in-plane loads. For thinner plates, the collapse surface is tied to the local geometry deformation and, hence, an equivalent solid plate representation of plastic collapse is a function of deformation mode and thickness.

  16. Manifold, bus support and coupling arrangement for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parry, Gareth W.

    1989-01-01

    Individual, tubular solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are assembled into bundles called a module within a housing, with a plurality of modules arranged end-to-end in a linear, stacked configuration called a string. A common set of piping comprised of a suitable high temperture resistant material (1) provides fuel and air to each module housing, (2) serves as electrically conducting buses, and (3) provides structural support for a string of SOFC modules. The piping thus forms a manfold for directing fuel and air to each module in a string and makes electrical contact with the module's anode and cathode to conduct the DC power generated by the SOFC. The piping also provides structureal support for each individual module and maintains each string of modules as a structurally integral unit for ensuring high strength in a large 3-dimensional array of SOFC modules. Ceramic collars are used to connect fuel and air inlet piping to each of the electrodes in an SOFC module and provide (1) electrical insulation for the current carrying bus bars and gas manifolds, (2) damping for the fuel and air inlet piping, and (3) proper spacing between the fuel and air inlet piping to prevent contact between these tubes and possible damage to the SOFC.

  17. TECHNOLOGIES TO ENHANCE THE OPERATION OF EXISTING NATURAL GAS COMPRESSION INFRASTRUCTURE - MANIFOLD DESIGN FOR CONTROLLING ENGINE AIR BALANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Bourn; Ford A. Phillips; Ralph E. Harris

    2005-12-01

    This document provides results and conclusions for Task 15.0--Detailed Analysis of Air Balance & Conceptual Design of Improved Air Manifolds in the ''Technologies to Enhance the Operation of Existing Natural Gas Compression Infrastructure'' project. SwRI{reg_sign} is conducting this project for DOE in conjunction with Pipeline Research Council International, Gas Machinery Research Council, El Paso Pipeline, Cooper Compression, and Southern Star, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-02NT41646. The objective of Task 15.0 was to investigate the perceived imbalance in airflow between power cylinders in two-stroke integral compressor engines and develop solutions via manifold redesign. The overall project objective is to develop and substantiate methods for operating integral engine/compressors in gas pipeline service, which reduce fuel consumption, increase capacity, and enhance mechanical integrity.

  18. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ikezi, H.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; DeGrassie, J.S.

    1991-08-27

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other. 5 figures.

  19. DISPERSION HARDENING OF URANIUM METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Arbiter, W.

    1963-01-15

    A method of hardening U metal involves the forming of a fine dispersion of UO/sub 2/. This method consists of first hydriding the U to form a finely divided powder and then exposing the powder to a very dilute O gas in an inert atmosphere under such pressure and temperature conditions as to cause a thin oxide film to coat each particle of the U hydride, The oxide skin prevents agglomeration of the particles as the remaining H is removed, thus preserving the small particle size. The oxide skin coatings remain as an oxide dispersion. The resulting product may be workhardened to improve its physical characteristics. (AEC)

  20. Dispersion-compensated Fresnel lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, K.C.

    1992-11-03

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4[times]10[sup [minus]5] inch and a profile width of at least 10[sup [minus]3] inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight. 10 figs.

  1. Printed circuit dispersive transmission line

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ikezi, Hiroyuki; Lin-Liu, Yuh-Ren; DeGrassie, John S.

    1991-01-01

    A printed circuit dispersive transmission line structure is disclosed comprising an insulator, a ground plane formed on one surface of the insulator, a first transmission line formed on a second surface of the insulator, and a second transmission line also formed on the second surface of the insulator and of longer length than the first transmission line and periodically intersecting the first transmission line. In a preferred embodiment, the transmission line structure exhibits highly dispersive characteristics by designing the length of one of the transmission line between two adjacent periodic intersections to be longer than the other.

  2. Dispersion-compensated fresnel lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Kenneth C.

    1992-01-01

    A transmission grating is used to reduce chromatic aberration in a Fresnel lens, wherein the lens chromatic dispersion is offset and substantially canceled by the grating's diffraction-induced dispersion. The grating comprises a Fresnel-type pattern of microscopic facets molded directly into the lens surface. The facets would typically have a profile height of around 4.multidot.10.sup.-5 inch and a profile width of at least 10.sup.-3 inch. In its primary intended application, the invention would function to improve the optical performance of a Fresnel lens used to concentrate direct sunlight.

  3. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-01-27

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX.« less

  4. FORMATION OF INTERMETALLIC COMPOUND DISPERSIONS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bryner, J.S.

    1959-12-01

    BS>A method is presented for preparing dispersions containing thorium bismuthide in equiaxed form and having an average particle size of about 30 microns. Thorium particles having one dimension not greater than 0.015 in. are immersed in liquid bismuth at a temperature between 500 and 600 deg C, the quantity of thorium being in excess of its solubility in the bismuth.

  5. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal

  6. Heavy Gas Dispersion Incompressible Flow

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-03

    FEM3 is a numerical model developed primarily to simulate heavy gas dispersion in the atmosphere, such as the gravitational spread and vapor dispersion that result from an accidental spill of liquefied natural gas (LNG). FEM3 solves both two and three-dimensional problems and, in addition to the generalized anelastic formulation, includes options to use either the Boussinesq approximation or an isothermal assumption, when appropriate. The FEM3 model is composed of three parts: a preprocessor PREFEM3, themore » main code FEM3, and two postprocessors TESSERA and THPLOTX. The DEC VAX11 version contains an auxiliary program, POLYREAD, which reads the polyplot file created by FEM3.« less

  7. Steady State Dense Gas Dispersion

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-03-01

    SLAB-LLNL is a steady-state one-dimensional program which calculates the atmospheric dispersion of a heavier than air gas that is continuously released at ground level. The model is based on the steady-state crosswind-averaged conservation equations of species, mass, energy, and momentum. It uses the air entrainment concept to account for the turbulent mixing of the gas cloud with the surrounding atmosphere and similarity profiles to determine the crosswind dependence.

  8. Shear dispersion in dense granular flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christov, Ivan C.; Stone, Howard A.

    2014-04-18

    We formulate and solve a model problem of dispersion of dense granular materials in rapid shear flow down an incline. The effective dispersivity of the depth-averaged concentration of the dispersing powder is shown to vary as the Péclet number squared, as in classical Taylor–Aris dispersion of molecular solutes. An extension to generic shear profiles is presented, and possible applications to industrial and geological granular flows are noted.

  9. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, Wolfgang M. H.; Tzou, Ming-Shin; Jiang, Hui-Jong

    1987-01-01

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  10. Dispersion enhanced metal/zeolite catalysts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sachtler, W.M.H.; Tzou, M.S.; Jiang, H.J.

    1987-03-31

    Dispersion stabilized zeolite supported metal catalysts are provided as bimetallic catalyst combinations. The catalyst metal is in a reduced zero valent form while the dispersion stabilizer metal is in an unreduced ionic form. Representative catalysts are prepared from platinum or nickel as the catalyst metal and iron or chromium dispersion stabilizer.

  11. Polyfunctional dispersants for controlling viscosity of phyllosilicates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2006-07-25

    This invention provides phyllosilicates and polyfunctional dispersants which can be manipulated to selectively control the viscosity of phyllosilicate slurries. The polyfunctional dispersants used in the present invention, which include at least three functional groups, increase the dispersion and exfoliation of phyllosilicates in polymers and, when used in conjunction with phyllosilicate slurries, significantly reduce the viscosity of slurries having high concentrations of phyllosilicates. The functional groups of the polyfunctional dispersants are capable of associating with multivalent metal cations and low molecular weight organic polymers, which can be manipulated to substantially increase or decrease the viscosity of the slurry in a concentration dependent manner. The polyfunctional dispersants of the present invention can also impart desirable properties on the phyllosilicate dispersions including corrosion inhibition and enhanced exfoliation of the phyllosilicate platelets.

  12. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures thereof; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution therefrom.

  13. Methods for dispersing hydrocarbons using autoclaved bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-11-26

    A method of dispersing a hydrocarbon includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 85527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution; and contacting the dispersant solution with a hydrocarbon to disperse the hydrocarbon. Moreover, a method for preparing a dispersant solution includes the following steps: providing a bacterium selected from the following group: ATCC 75527, ATCC 75529, and ATCC 55638, a mutant of any one of these bacteria possessing all the identifying characteristics of any one of these bacteria, and mixtures; and autoclaving the bacterium to derive a dispersant solution.

  14. Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Homogeneously dispersed, multimetal oxygen-evolving catalysts Citation ... Publication Date: 2016-03-24 OSTI Identifier: 1245398 Report ...

  15. Short-time asymptotics of a rigorous path integral for N = 1 supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a Riemannian manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fine, Dana S.; Sawin, Stephen

    2014-06-15

    Following Feynman's prescription for constructing a path integral representation of the propagator of a quantum theory, a short-time approximation to the propagator for imaginary-time, N = 1 supersymmetric quantum mechanics on a compact, even-dimensional Riemannian manifold is constructed. The path integral is interpreted as the limit of products, determined by a partition of a finite time interval, of this approximate propagator. The limit under refinements of the partition is shown to converge uniformly to the heat kernel for the Laplace-de Rham operator on forms. A version of the steepest descent approximation to the path integral is obtained, and shown to give the expected short-time behavior of the supertrace of the heat kernel.

  16. Faraday dispersion functions of galaxies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ideguchi, Shinsuke; Tashiro, Yuichi; Takahashi, Keitaro; Akahori, Takuya; Ryu, Dongsu E-mail: 136d8008@st.kumamoto-u.ac.jp E-mail: akahori@physics.usyd.edu.au

    2014-09-01

    The Faraday dispersion function (FDF), which can be derived from an observed polarization spectrum by Faraday rotation measure synthesis, is a profile of polarized emissions as a function of Faraday depth. We study intrinsic FDFs along sight lines through face-on Milky Way like galaxies by means of a sophisticated galactic model incorporating three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and investigate how much information the FDF intrinsically contains. Since the FDF reflects distributions of thermal and cosmic-ray electrons as well as magnetic fields, it has been expected that the FDF could be a new probe to examine internal structures of galaxies. We, however, find that an intrinsic FDF along a sight line through a galaxy is very complicated, depending significantly on actual configurations of turbulence. We perform 800 realizations of turbulence and find no universal shape of the FDF even if we fix the global parameters of the model. We calculate the probability distribution functions of the standard deviation, skewness, and kurtosis of FDFs and compare them for models with different global parameters. Our models predict that the presence of vertical magnetic fields and the large-scale height of cosmic-ray electrons tend to make the standard deviation relatively large. In contrast, the differences in skewness and kurtosis are relatively less significant.

  17. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, R.L.

    1996-09-24

    A new protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. The isolated consortia and bacteria are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. The isolated consortia, bacteria, and dispersants are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  18. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  19. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 OE-3 2015-02: Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (xQ) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the...

  20. Slow oscillations of dispersion-managed solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwig, H.; Boehm, M.; Hause, A.; Mitschke, F.

    2010-03-15

    In dispersion-managed fibers, soliton-like solutions with periodically recurring shapes exist. These so called dispersion-managed solitons are relevant for fiber-optic telecommunication. In this article we address their behavior when there is deviation from the stationary solution, which is accompanied by the excitation of a long-lived periodic oscillation. We give a possible interpretation by applying soliton radiation beat analysis, a method capable of analyzing the soliton content.

  1. Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Highly Dispersed Metal Catalyst Method for full dispersion of active metals into a high surface area of support to promote efficiency Savannah River National Laboratory Contact SRNL About This Technology Dr. X. Steve Xiao, Fellow Engineer, Savannah River National Laboratory Dr. X. Steve Xiao, Fellow Engineer, Savannah River National Laboratory Technology Marketing Summary

  2. URANIUM BISMUTHIDE DISPERSION IN MOLTEN METAL

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Teitel, R.J.

    1959-10-27

    The formation of intermetallic bismuth compounds of thorium or uranium dispersed in a liquid media containing bismuth and lead is described. A bismuthide of uranium dispersed in a liquid metal medium is formed by dissolving uranium in composition of lead and bismuth containing less than 80% lead and lowering the temperature of the composition to a temperature below the point at which the solubility of uranium is exceeded and above the melting point of the composition.

  3. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ``ventilation rate`` of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  4. Atmospheric dispersion in mountain valleys and basins

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal of the research is to further characterize and understand dispersion in valley and basin atmospheres. A secondary, and related goal, is to identify and understand the dominant physical processes governing this dispersion. This has been accomplished through a review of the current literature, and analyses of recently collected data from two field experiments. This work should contribute to an improved understanding of material transport in the atmospheric boundary layer. It was found that dispersion in a freely draining valley (Brush Creek valley, CO) atmosphere is much greater than in an enclosed basin (Roanoke, VA) atmosphere primarily because of the greater wind speeds moving past the release point and the greater turbulence levels. The development of a cold air pool in the Roanoke basin is the dominant process governing nighttime dispersion in the basin, while the nighttime dispersion in the Brush Creek valley is dominated by turbulent diffusion and plume confinement between the valley sidewalls. The interaction between valley flows and above ridgetops flows is investigated. A ventilation rate'' of material transport between the valley and above ridgetop flows is determined. This is important in regional air pollution modeling and global climate modeling. A simple model of dispersion in valleys, applicable through a diurnal cycle, is proposed.

  5. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX reg sign ) molten carbonate fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  6. Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dispersion At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Ion Dispersion At Lightning...

  7. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state Prev Next Title: Frequency dispersion of nonlinear ...

  8. Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts for ... Title: Periodic Trends in Highly Dispersed Groups IV and V Supported Metal Oxide Catalysts ...

  9. Ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, Michael V.; Aldred, Anthony T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1987-01-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRMO.sub.4, where R is a rare-earth element, B is Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  10. Objected constrained registration and manifold learning: A new patient setup approach in image guided radiation therapy of thoracic cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Ting; Jabbour, Salma K.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Yue, Ning; Qin Songbing

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: The management of thoracic malignancies with radiation therapy is complicated by continuous target motion. In this study, a real time motion analysis approach is proposed to improve the accuracy of patient setup. Methods: For 11 lung cancer patients a long training fluoroscopy was acquired before the first treatment, and multiple short testing fluoroscopies were acquired weekly at the pretreatment patient setup of image guided radiotherapy (IGRT). The data analysis consisted of three steps: first a 4D target motion model was constructed from 4DCT and projected to the training fluoroscopy through deformable registration. Then the manifold learning method was used to construct a 2D subspace based on the target motion (kinetic) and location (static) information in the training fluoroscopy. Thereafter the respiratory phase in the testing fluoroscopy was determined by finding its location in the subspace. Finally, the phase determined testing fluoroscopy was registered to the corresponding 4DCT to derive the pretreatment patient position adjustment for the IGRT. The method was tested on clinical image sets and numerical phantoms. Results: The registration successfully reconstructed the 4D motion model with over 98% volume similarity in 4DCT, and over 95% area similarity in the training fluoroscopy. The machine learning method derived the phase values in over 98% and 93% test images of the phantom and patient images, respectively, with less than 3% phase error. The setup approach achieved an average accumulated setup error less than 1.7 mm in the cranial-caudal direction and less than 1 mm in the transverse plane. All results were validated against the ground truth of manual delineations by an experienced radiation oncologist. The expected total time for the pretreatment setup analysis was less than 10 s. Conclusions: By combining the registration and machine learning, the proposed approach has the potential to improve the accuracy of pretreatment setup for

  11. Dispersion corrections to parity violating electron scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorchtein, M.; Horowitz, C. J. [Nuclear Theory Center, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN 47408 (United States); Ramsey-Musolf, M. J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2010-08-04

    We consider the dispersion correction to elastic parity violating electron-proton scattering due to {gamma}Z exchange. In a recent publication, this correction was reported to be substantially larger than the previous estimates. In this paper, we study the dispersion correction in greater detail. We confirm the size of the disperion correction to be {approx}6% for the QWEAK experiment designed to measure the proton weak charge. We enumerate parameters that have to be constrained to better than relative 30% in order to keep the theoretical uncertainty for QWEAK under control.

  12. Method of dispersing particulate aerosol tracer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Holleran, Thomas P.

    1988-01-01

    A particulate aerosol tracer which comprises a particulate carrier of sheet silicate composition having a particle size up to one micron, and a cationic dopant chemically absorbed in solid solution in the carrier. The carrier is preferably selected from the group consisting of natural mineral clays such as bentonite, and the dopant is selected from the group consisting of rare earth elements and transition elements. The tracers are dispersed by forming an aqueous salt solution with the dopant present as cations, dispersing the carriers in the solution, and then atomizing the solution under heat sufficient to superheat the solution droplets at a level sufficient to prevent reagglomeration of the carrier particles.

  13. Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATHODE CATALYST FOR DURABILITY T. D. Jarvi UTC Power Corporation This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information HIGHLY DISPERSED ALLOY CATALYST Objectives of project Characteristic DOE 2010 Target Pt group metal Total Content 0.50 g/kW rated Pt group metal Total Loading 0.30 mg PGM/cm 2 Durability with cycling <80 o C; >80 o C 5000 h; 2000 h Electrochemical Area Loss < 40 % Mass Activity at 900 mV RHE (IR-Free) 0.44 A/mg Pt

  14. Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, methods of making same and measuring wand and detector modules utilizing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Shultis, John K.; Rice, Blake B.; McNeil, Walter J.; Solomon, Clell J.; Patterson, Eric L.; Bellinger, Steven L.

    2010-12-21

    Non-streaming high-efficiency perforated semiconductor neutron detectors, method of making same and measuring wands and detector modules utilizing same are disclosed. The detectors have improved mechanical structure, flattened angular detector responses, and reduced leakage current. A plurality of such detectors can be assembled into imaging arrays, and can be used for neutron radiography, remote neutron sensing, cold neutron imaging, SNM monitoring, and various other applications.

  15. SOLVENT DISPERSION AND FLOW METER CALCULATION RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.; Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.

    2013-06-21

    Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) found that the dispersion numbers for the six combinations of CSSX:Next Generation Solvent (NGS) “blend” and pure NGS versus salt solution, caustic wash, and strip aqueous solutions are all good. The dispersion numbers are indications of processability with centrifugal contactors. A comparison of solvent physical and thermal properties shows that the Intek™ solvent flow meter in the plant has a reading biased high versus calibrated flow when NGS is used, versus the standard CSSX solvent. The flow meter, calibrated for CSSX solvent, is predicted to read 2.8 gpm of NGS in a case where the true flow of NGS is 2.16 gpm.

  16. Dispersion-free radial transmission lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Nelson, Scott D.

    2011-04-12

    A dispersion-free radial transmission line ("DFRTL") preferably for linear accelerators, having two plane conductors each with a central hole, and an electromagnetically permeable material ("EPM") between the two conductors and surrounding a channel connecting the two holes. At least one of the material parameters of relative magnetic permeability, relative dielectric permittivity, and axial width of the EPM is varied as a function of radius, so that the characteristic impedance of the DFRTL is held substantially constant, and pulse transmission therethrough is substantially dispersion-free. Preferably, the EPM is divided into concentric radial sections, with the varied material parameters held constant in each respective section but stepwise varied between sections as a step function of the radius. The radial widths of the concentric sections are selected so that pulse traversal time across each section is the same, and the varied material parameters of the concentric sections are selected to minimize traversal error.

  17. Network traffic analysis using dispersion patterns

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2010-03-15

    The Verilog code us used to map a measurement solution on FPGA to analyze network traffic. It realizes a set of Bloom filters and counters, besides associated control logic that can quickly measure statistics like InDegree, OutDegree, Depth, in the context of Traffic Dispersion Graphs. Such patterns are helpful in classification of network activity, like Peer to Peer and Port-Scanning, in the traffic.

  18. Time Dispersive Spectrometer Using Digital Switching Means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2004-09-07

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  19. Method and apparatus for time dispersive spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tarver, III, Edward E.; Siems, William F.

    2003-06-17

    Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

  20. Composite materials with improved phyllosilicate dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.

    2004-09-14

    The present invention provides phyllosilicates edge modified with anionic surfactants, composite materials made from the edge modified phyllosilicates, and methods for making the same. In various embodiments the phyllosilicates are also surface-modified with hydrophilic lipophilic balance (HLB) modifying agents, polymeric hydrotropes, and antioxidants. The invention also provides blends of edge modified phyllosilicates and semicrystalline waxes. The composite materials are made by dispersing the edge modified phyllosilicates with polymers, particularly polyolefins and elastomers.

  1. Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersal 3.2

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-06-26

    ERAD (Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersal) is a 3D numerical transport and diffusion model, used to model the consequences associated with the buoyant (or nonbuoyant) dispersal of radioactive material It incorporates an integral plume rise model to simulate the buoyant rise of heated gases following an explosive detonation. treating buoyancy effects from time zero onward, eliminating the need for the stabilized doud assumption, and enabling the penetration of inversions. Modeling of the atmospheric boundary layer usesmore » contemporary parameterization based on scaling theories derived from observational, laboratory and numerical studies. A Monte Carlo stochastic process simulates particle dispersion. Results were validated for both dose and deposition against measurements taken during Operation Roller Coaster (a joint US-UK test performed at NTS). Meteorology is defined using a single vertical sounding containing wind speed and direction and temperature as a function of height. Post processing applies 50-year CEDE DCFs (either ICRP 26 or 60) to determine the contribution of the relevant dose pathways (inhalation, submersion, and ground shine) as well as the total dose received. Dose and deposition contours are overlaid on a fully integrated worldwide GIS and tabulates hearth effects (fatalities and casualties) to resident population. The software runs on a laptop and takes less than 2 minutes to process. The Municipal version of ERAD does not include the ability to model the mitigation effects of aqueous foam.« less

  2. The Role of Solvent Heterogeneity in Determining the Dispersion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    WA (US) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: solvent structure; dispersion interaction; nanoassembly; molecular Lifshitz ...

  3. Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information ...

  4. Combined dispersion & explosion modeling in process safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fry, M.A.

    1996-08-01

    Computer modeling of explosions within process facilities is usually a multistep process. A procedure might be: First, accidental releases of gases are postulated and then modeled with a dispersion code. Flammable materials are analyzed to find the contours within the flammability limits. Next, the amount of material and physical extent is fed to a explosion code, which outputs the overpressure and impulse. Then the damage must be related to pressure and impulse through P-1 diagrams, which are empirically derived. A separate calculation for thermal output is also required to analyze damage from direct radiation and secondary fires. We present a modular computer architecture that can be used to determine the sensitivity of not only the input scenario, but the accuracy of each of the models used in the process. For example, we have combined computer models, which can assess damage from toxic only clouds and/or flammable clouds. The PCBLAST{sup {reg_sign}}methodology and DEGADIS have been combined into an integrated computer architecture that allows the user the ability to see damage levels for any scenario. This approach can be used with any set of dispersion and explosion models. Furthermore, at each step of the procedure, error bars are placed on the model output. These errors propagate and affect the final answer, the damage. In this way a probabilistic assessment of damage can be ascertained either from scenario variation or model inaccuracy. The accuracy of the models, both dispersion and explosion, is of importance. However, the uncertainties in the scenarios may diminish the need for highly accurate models. For example, the PCBLAST{sup {reg_sign}}computer module is based on first principles physics, and as a result is highly accurate. Combining the modeling process into a linked and interactive computer code allows one to quantitatively assess the source of the uncertainties; in the models and/or in the definition of scenarios.

  5. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed the statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.

  6. Atmospheric Dispersion Effects in Weak Lensing Measurements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plazas, Andrés Alejandro; Bernstein, Gary

    2012-10-01

    The wavelength dependence of atmospheric refraction causes elongation of finite-bandwidth images along the elevation vector, which produces spurious signals in weak gravitational lensing shear measurements unless this atmospheric dispersion is calibrated and removed to high precision. Because astrometric solutions and PSF characteristics are typically calibrated from stellar images, differences between the reference stars' spectra and the galaxies' spectra will leave residual errors in both the astrometric positions (dr) and in the second moment (width) of the wavelength-averaged PSF (dv) for galaxies.We estimate the level of dv that will induce spurious weak lensing signals in PSF-corrected galaxy shapes that exceed themore » statistical errors of the DES and the LSST cosmic-shear experiments. We also estimate the dr signals that will produce unacceptable spurious distortions after stacking of exposures taken at different airmasses and hour angles. We also calculate the errors in the griz bands, and find that dispersion systematics, uncorrected, are up to 6 and 2 times larger in g and r bands,respectively, than the requirements for the DES error budget, but can be safely ignored in i and z bands. For the LSST requirements, the factors are about 30, 10, and 3 in g, r, and i bands,respectively. We find that a simple correction linear in galaxy color is accurate enough to reduce dispersion shear systematics to insignificant levels in the r band for DES and i band for LSST,but still as much as 5 times than the requirements for LSST r-band observations. More complex corrections will likely be able to reduce the systematic cosmic-shear errors below statistical errors for LSST r band. But g-band effects remain large enough that it seems likely that induced systematics will dominate the statistical errors of both surveys, and cosmic-shear measurements should rely on the redder bands.« less

  7. Solid electrolytes strengthened by metal dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Morgan, C.S.

    1981-10-05

    An improvement in solid electrolytes of advanced secondary batteries of the sodium-sulfur, sodium-halogen, and like combinations is achieved by providing said battery with a cermet electrolyte containing a metal dispersion ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % of a substantially nonreactive metal selected from the group consisting essentially of Pt, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, their alloys, and their physical mixtures in the elemental or uncombined state, the remainder of said cermet being an ion-conductive ceramic material.

  8. Solid electrolytes strengthened by metal dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J.; Morgan, Chester S.

    1983-01-01

    An improvement in solid electrolytes of advanced secondary batteries of the sodium-sulfur, sodium-halogen, and like combinations is achieved by providing said battery with a cermet electrolyte containing a metal dispersion ranging from 0.1 to 10.0 vol. % of a substantially nonreactive metal selected from the group consisting essentially of Pt, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Nb, their alloys, and their physical mixtures in the elemental or uncombined state, the remainder of said cermet being an ion-conductive ceramic material.

  9. Confined zone dispersion flue gas desulfurization demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-02-27

    The confined zone dispersion (CZD) process involves flue gas post-treatment, physically located between a boiler's outlet and its particulate collector, which in the majority of cases is an electrostatic precipitator. The features that distinguish this process from other similar injection processes are: Injection of an alkaline slurry directly into the duct, instead of injection of dry solids into the duct ahead of a fabric filter. Use of an ultrafine calcium/magnesium hydroxide, type S pressure-hydrated dolomitic lime. This commercial product is made from plentiful, naturally occurring dolomite. Low residence time, made possible by the high effective surface area of the Type S lime. Localized dispersion of the reagent. Slurry droplets contact only part of the gas while the droplets are drying, to remove up to 50 percent of the S0{sub 2} and significant amounts of NO{sub x}. The process uses dual fluid rather than rotary atomizers. Improved electrostatic precipitator performance via gas conditioning from the increased water vapor content, and lower temperatures. Supplemental conditioning with S0{sub 3} is not believed necessary for satisfactory removal of particulate matter.

  10. Perforation patterned electrical interconnects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frey, Jonathan

    2014-01-28

    This disclosure describes systems and methods for increasing the usable surface area of electrical contacts within a device, such as a thin film solid state device, through the implementation of electrically conductive interconnects. Embodiments described herein include the use of a plurality of electrically conductive interconnects that penetrate through a top contact layer, through one or more multiple layers, and into a bottom contact layer. The plurality of conductive interconnects may form horizontal and vertical cross-sectional patterns. The use of lasers to form the plurality of electrically conductive interconnects from reflowed layer material further aids in the manufacturing process of a device.

  11. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  12. Dispersion compensation in chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bayramian, Andrew James; Molander, William A.

    2014-07-15

    A chirped pulse amplification system includes a laser source providing an input laser pulse along an optical path. The input laser pulse is characterized by a first temporal duration. The system also includes a multi-pass pulse stretcher disposed along the optical path. The multi-pass pulse stretcher includes a first set of mirrors operable to receive input light in a first plane and output light in a second plane parallel to the first plane and a first diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher also includes a second set of mirrors operable to receive light diffracted from the first diffraction grating and a second diffraction grating. The pulse stretcher further includes a reflective element operable to reflect light diffracted from the second diffraction grating. The system further includes an amplifier, a pulse compressor, and a passive dispersion compensator disposed along the optical path.

  13. Vlasov multi-dimensional model dispersion relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lushnikov, Pavel M.; Rose, Harvey A.; Silantyev, Denis A.; Vladimirova, Natalia

    2014-07-15

    A hybrid model of the Vlasov equation in multiple spatial dimension D?>?1 [H. A. Rose and W. Daughton, Phys. Plasmas 18, 122109 (2011)], the Vlasov multi dimensional model (VMD), consists of standard Vlasov dynamics along a preferred direction, the z direction, and N flows. At each z, these flows are in the plane perpendicular to the z axis. They satisfy Eulerian-type hydrodynamics with coupling by self-consistent electric and magnetic fields. Every solution of the VMD is an exact solution of the original Vlasov equation. We show approximate convergence of the VMD Langmuir wave dispersion relation in thermal plasma to that of Vlasov-Landau as N increases. Departure from strict rotational invariance about the z axis for small perpendicular wavenumber Langmuir fluctuations in 3D goes to zero like ?{sup N}, where ? is the polar angle and flows are arranged uniformly over the azimuthal angle.

  14. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H.; Hirth, John P.

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  15. Hyper dispersion pulse compressor for chirped pulse amplification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J.

    2011-11-29

    A grating pulse compressor configuration is introduced for increasing the optical dispersion for a given footprint and to make practical the application for chirped pulse amplification (CPA) to quasi-narrow bandwidth materials, such as Nd:YAG. The grating configurations often use cascaded pairs of gratings to increase angular dispersion an order of magnitude or more. Increased angular dispersion allows for decreased grating separation and a smaller compressor footprint.

  16. Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (x/Q) for Calculation of Co...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Nuclear facilities that are potentially affected by the situation described above should review their atmospheric dispersion assumptions and NSRD- 2015-TD01. Attachment E of...

  17. Microsoft Word - Updated Air Dispersion Modeling Table _sulfur...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DIVINE STRAKE AIR DISPERSION MODELING RESULTS for SULFUR DIOXIDE The attached table is ... within the Nevada Ambient Air Quality Standards at the boundary of the Nevada Test Site. ...

  18. Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload ...

  19. Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling ...

  20. Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 ...

  1. Wave Propagation and Dispersion in Elasto-Plastic Microstructured...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Wave Propagation and Dispersion in Elasto-Plastic Microstructured Materials. Abstract not provided. Authors: Dingreville, Remi Philippe Michel ; Robbins, Joshua ; Voth, ...

  2. Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Frequency dispersion of nonlinear response of thin superconducting films in the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless state Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Frequency ...

  3. Diesel Exhaust Dispersion in a Phospholipid Lung Surfactant ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications IN VITRO MUTAGENIC AND DNA AND CHROMOSOMAL DAMAGE ACTIVITY BY SURFACTANT DISPERSION OR SOLVENT EXTRACT OF A REFERENCE DIESEL EXHAUST PARTICULATE ...

  4. Refraction and dispersion in optical glass. (Conference) | SciTech...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Refraction and dispersion in optical glass. No abstract prepared. Authors: Smith, D. Y. ; Shiles, E. ; Inokuti, M. Publication Date: ...

  5. A generalized Cauchy dispersion formula and the refractivity...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We attribute this dispersion to free-carrier or defect-induced absorptions at energies below the range of measurements. Authors: Smith, D. Y. ; Inokuti, M. ; Physics Publication ...

  6. Viscous corrections to the resistance of nanojunctions: A dispersion...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: Viscous corrections to the resistance of nanojunctions: A dispersion relation approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: ...

  7. The scale dependence of dispersivity in multi-faces heterogeneous...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Themore scientific results from this study provide a methodology to compute the effective dispersivity using aquifer structure and statistical parameters. less Authors: Dai, ...

  8. Continuum modeling of diffusion and dispersion in dense granular...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Continuum modeling of diffusion and dispersion in dense granular flows Authors: Christov, Ivan C 1 ; Stone, Howard A 2 + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National ...

  9. Dispersion of Cloud Droplet Size Distributions, Cloud Parameterization...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Broomfield, Colorado, March 31-April 4, 2003 indicates that for a given liquid water content and droplet concentration, the effect of spectral dispersion alone can cause...

  10. Ship-borne oil dispersant procedure and apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M.A.

    1981-11-17

    A method and system are disclosed for dispersing oil in the event of an oil leak into a body of water from an oil tanker or an oil drilling platform. There is provided structure for detecting the existence of a leak from a container of oil generally surrounded by a body of water into which the oil is leaking; structure for storing an oil dispersant at the site of the leak; and structure responsive to the occurrence of the leak, for automatically causing the dispersant to be released from the containment structure into the leaking oil. In an oil tanker, the system and method may be implemented by providing structure for detecting a leak in the oil tank wall, suspending a container of dispersant inside the oil tank, and providing structure for rupturing the dispersant container in response to the detection of a leak so that dispersant is caused to mix with the oil in the tank before the oil leaks therefrom. In the case of an offshore oil drilling platform, the system and method may be implemented by leak detection devices mounted to the drill casings or on buoys in the water body, one or more dispersant containers with release chutes directed toward the water body mounted to the side of the platform, and structure responsive to the detection devices for opening the dispersant containers in response to the detection of an oil leak.

  11. On the dispersion theory of {pi}{pi} scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leutwyler, H.

    2007-02-27

    Recent developments in low energy pion physics are reviewed, emphasizing the strength of dispersion theory in this context. As an illustration of the method, I discuss some consequences of the forward dispersion relation obeyed by the isoscalar component of the scattering amplitude.

  12. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2015-11-17

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components.

  13. Modelling long-distance seed dispersal in heterogeneous landscapes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levey, Douglas, J.; Tewlsbury, Joshua, J.; Bolker, Benjamin, M.

    2008-01-01

    1. Long-distance seed dispersal is difficult to measure, yet key to understanding plant population dynamics and community composition. 2. We used a spatially explicit model to predict the distribution of seeds dispersed long distances by birds into habitat patches of different shapes. All patches were the same type of habitat and size, but varied in shape. They occurred in eight experimental landscapes, each with five patches of four different shapes, 150 m apart in a matrix of mature forest. The model was parameterized with smallscale movement data collected from field observations of birds. In a previous study we validated the model by testing its predictions against observed patterns of seed dispersal in real landscapes with the same types and spatial configuration of patches as in the model. 3. Here we apply the model more broadly, examining how patch shape influences the probability of seed deposition by birds into patches, how dispersal kernels (distributions of dispersal distances) vary with patch shape and starting location, and how movement of seeds between patches is affected by patch shape. 4. The model predicts that patches with corridors or other narrow extensions receive higher numbers of seeds than patches without corridors or extensions. This pattern is explained by edgefollowing behaviour of birds. Dispersal distances are generally shorter in heterogeneous landscapes (containing patchy habitat) than in homogeneous landscapes, suggesting that patches divert the movement of seed dispersers, holding them long enough to increase the probability of seed defecation in the patches. Dispersal kernels for seeds in homogeneous landscapes were smooth, whereas those in heterogenous landscapes were irregular. In both cases, long-distance (> 150 m) dispersal was surprisingly common, usually comprising approximately 50% of all dispersal events. 5. Synthesis . Landscape heterogeneity has a large influence on patterns of long-distance seed dispersal. Our results

  14. Development of a coal-fueled Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX{reg_sign}) molten carbonate fuel cell. Volumes 1--6, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The design of a CGMCFC electric generation plant that will provide a cost of eletricity (COE) which is lower than that of current electric generation technologies and which is competitive with other long-range electric generating systems is presented. This effort is based upon the Internal Manifold Heat Exchanger (IMHEX) technology as developed by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT). The project was executed by selecting economic and performance objectives for alternative plant arrangements while considering process constraints identified during IMHEX fuel cell development activities at ICT. The four major subsystems of a coal-based MCFC power plant are coal gasification, gas purification, fuel cell power generation and the bottoming cycle. The design and method of operation of each subsystem can be varied, and, depending upon design choices, can have major impact on both the design of other subsystems and the resulting cost of electricity. The challenge of this project was to select, from a range of design parameters, those operating conditions that result in a preferred plant design. Computer modelling was thus used to perform sensitivity analyses of as many system variables as program resources and schedules would permit. In any systems analysis, it is imperative that the evaluation methodology be verifiable and comparable. The TAG Class I develops comparable (if imprecise) data on performance and costs for the alternative cases being studied. It identifies, from a range of options, those which merit more exacting scrutiny to be undertaken at the second level, TAG class II analysis.

  15. OXIDE DISPERSION-STRENGTHENED HEAT EXCHANGER TUBING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, Mark A.

    2001-11-06

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys (e.g. the INCOLOY{reg_sign} MA956 alloy) are known for their excellent high temperature properties and are prime candidate materials for the construction of very high temperature heat exchangers that will be used in Vision 21 power plants. The main limitation of these materials is their poor weldability. Commercially available ODS tubing also tends to exhibit relatively poor circumferential creep strength due to current processing practices resulting in a fine grain size in the transverse direction. Thus far, these two characteristics of the ODS tubing have restricted its use to mostly non-pressure containing applications. The objectives of this program are to develop: (a) an MA956 tube with sufficient circumferential creep strength for long term use as heat exchanger tubing for very high temperatures; (b) a welding technique(s) for producing adequate joints between an MA956 tube and an MA956 tube, and an MA956 tube and an INCONEL 601 tube; (c) the bending strain limits, below which recrystallization will not occur in a MA956 tube during normal operation; and (d) the high temperature corrosion limits for the MA956 alloy with respect to working-fluid side and fireside environments. Also, this program seeks to generate data for use by heat exchanger designers and the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, and perform an analysis of the mechanical property, tube bending, and corrosion data in order to determine the implications on the design of a very high temperature heat exchanger (T>1093 C/2000 F). After one year, work is currently being conducted on increasing the circumferential strength of a MA956 tube, developing joining techniques for this material, determining the tube bending strain limits, and establishing the high temperature corrosion parameters for the MA956 alloy in environments expected to be present in Vision 21 power plants. Work in these areas will is continuing into the next fiscal year, with success

  16. Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Part of a 100 million fuel cell award announced by DOE Secretary Bodman on Oct. 25, 2006. PDF icon 3utc.pdf More Documents & Publications Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst ...

  17. Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads (168.95 KB) More Documents & ...

  18. Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads (185.07 KB) More Documents & ...

  19. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2013-12-17

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  20. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Song, Shuangqi

    2014-11-11

    Hair was coated with polymer-containing fluid and then hot pressed to form a composite of hair and a polymer film imprinted with a nanopattern. Polychromatic light incident on the nanopattern is diffracted into dispersed colored light.

  1. Coupled particle dispersion by three-dimensional vortex structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troutt, T.R.; Chung, J.N.; Crowe, C.T.

    1996-12-31

    The primary objective of this research program is to obtain understanding concerning the role of three-dimensional vortex structures in the dispersion of particles and droplets in free shear flows. This research program builds on previous studies which focused on the nature of particle dispersion in large scale quasi two-dimensional vortex structures. This investigation employs time dependent experimental and numerical techniques to provide information concerning the particulate dispersion produced by three dimensional vortex structures in free shear layers. The free shear flows investigated include modified plane mixing layers, and modified plane wakes. The modifications to these flows involve slight perturbations to the initiation boundary conditions such that three-dimensional vortex structures are rapidly generated by the experimental and numerical flow fields. Recent results support the importance of these vortex structures in the particle dispersion process.

  2. Imaging the Formation of High-Energy Dispersion Anomalies in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Imaging the Formation of High-Energy Dispersion Anomalies in the Actinide UCoGa5 Authors: Das, Tanmoy ; Durakiewicz, Tomasz ; Zhu, Jian-Xin ; Joyce, John J. ; Sarrao, John ...

  3. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm Over ...

  4. Strongly Dispersive Transient Bragg Grating for High Harmonics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrell, J.; Spector, L.S.; Gaarde, M.B.; McFarland, B.K.; Bucksbaum, P.H.; Guhr, Markus; /SLAC, PULSE /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2010-06-04

    We create a transient Bragg grating in a high harmonic generation medium using two counterpropagating pulses. The Bragg grating disperses the harmonics in angle and can diffract a large bandwidth with temporal resolution limited only by the source size.

  5. Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes Extended, Continuous Pt Nanostructures in Thick, Dispersed Electrodes Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 - October 1, 2009 pivovar_nrel_kickoff.pdf (1.9 MB) More Documents & Publications DOE's Fuel Cell Catalyst R&D Activities Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting PEMFC R&D at the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program

  6. [Particle dispersion by ordered motion in mixing layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Troutt, T.R.

    1993-12-31

    Study was made of two-phase particulate dispersion in free shear flows using analytical, numerical, and experimental methods. Focus was on organized vortex structures in the particle dispersion process and on effects of particles or droplets on air flow vortex structure development. Results are summarized for one-way coupled interactions and for the complex situation where particles/droplets can alter the flow development through two-way mass, momentum or energy coupling.

  7. Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability Highly Dispersed Alloy Cathode Catalyst for Durability This presentation, which focuses on alloy cathode catalysts, was given by T. D. Jarvi of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects. new_fc_jarvi_utc.pdf (576 KB) More Documents & Publications PEM Fuel Cell Technology, Key Research Needs and Approaches (Presentation) PBI-Phosphoric Acid Based Membrane Electrode Assemblies: Status Update Development of

  8. Dispersion of helically corrugated waveguides: Analytical, numerical, and experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, G.; Ronald, K.; Young, A.R.; Phelps, A.D.R.; Cross, A.W.; Konoplev, I.V.; He, W.; Thomson, J.; Whyte, C.G.; Samsonov, S.V.; Denisov, G.G.; Bratman, V.L.

    2004-10-01

    Helically corrugated waveguides have recently been studied for use in various applications such as interaction regions in gyrotron traveling-wave tubes and gyrotron backward-wave oscillators and as a dispersive medium for passive microwave pulse compression. The paper presents a summary of various methods that can be used for analysis of the wave dispersion of such waveguides. The results obtained from an analytical approach, simulations with the three-dimensional numerical code MAGIC, and cold microwave measurements are analyzed and compared.

  9. Power-law spatial dispersion from fractional Liouville equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-10-15

    A microscopic model in the framework of fractional kinetics to describe spatial dispersion of power-law type is suggested. The Liouville equation with the Caputo fractional derivatives is used to obtain the power-law dependence of the absolute permittivity on the wave vector. The fractional differential equations for electrostatic potential in the media with power-law spatial dispersion are derived. The particular solutions of these equations for the electric potential of point charge in this media are considered.

  10. Urban Dispersion Program: Urban Measurements Applied to Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Clawson, Kirk L.; Flaherty, Julia E.; Heiser, John H.; Hosker, Rayford P.; Leach, Martin J.; stockham, Leo W.

    2007-09-10

    Air motions in and around cities are highly complex, and the increasing threat of harmful releases into urban atmospheres makes advancing the state-of-science of understanding and modeling atmospheric flows and dispersion in and around cities essential. The four-year Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency has recently been completed. The program’s primary focus was to conduct tracer and meteorological field studies in Manhattan to improve our understanding of flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City, including outdoor-indoor-subway exchange mechanisms. Additionally, urban dispersion models are being validated and first-responder guidance are being refined using data collected during the two UDP field studies. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory led several government laboratories, universities and private companies in conducting the two UDP field studies. The first study was a small-scale study that investigated dispersion in the immediate vicinity of the Madison Square Garden during March 2005 (MSG05), while the second UDP study was an extensive study conducted during August 2005 in Midtown Manhattan (MID05). A brief overview of the UDP field studies will be given followed by a discussion of some limitations of current urban models in simulating dispersion in urban areas. Some first-responder guidance based on findings from recent urban field studies will also be presented.

  11. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, Shie; Dunham, Mark E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos{2.phi.(t)}. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase .phi.(t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of .phi.'(t).

  12. System and method for detection of dispersed broadband signals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Qian, S.; Dunham, M.E.

    1999-06-08

    A system and method for detecting the presence of dispersed broadband signals in real time are disclosed. The present invention utilizes a bank of matched filters for detecting the received dispersed broadband signals. Each matched filter uses a respective robust time template that has been designed to approximate the dispersed broadband signals of interest, and each time template varies across a spectrum of possible dispersed broadband signal time templates. The received dispersed broadband signal x(t) is received by each of the matched filters, and if one or more matches occurs, then the received data is determined to have signal data of interest. This signal data can then be analyzed and/or transmitted to Earth for analysis, as desired. The system and method of the present invention will prove extremely useful in many fields, including satellite communications, plasma physics, and interstellar research. The varying time templates used in the bank of matched filters are determined as follows. The robust time domain template is assumed to take the form w(t)=A(t)cos[l brace]2[phi](t)[r brace]. Since the instantaneous frequency f(t) is known to be equal to the derivative of the phase [phi](t), the trajectory of a joint time-frequency representation of x(t) is used as an approximation of [phi][prime](t). 10 figs.

  13. Method of Manufacturing Micro-Disperse Particles of Sodium Borohydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Hecht, Andrew M.; Sylwester. Alan P.; Bell, Nelson S.

    2008-09-23

    A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

  14. New ceramics containing dispersants for improved fracture toughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nevitt, M.V.; Aldred, A.T.; Chan, Sai-Kit

    1985-07-01

    The invention is a ceramic composition containing a new class of dispersant for hindering crack propagation by means of one or more energy-dissipative mechanisms. The composition is composed of a ceramic matrix with dispersed particles of a transformation-prone rare-earth niobate, tantalate or mixtures of these with each other and/or with a rare-earth vanadate. The dispersants, having a generic composition tRBO/sub 4/, where R is a rare-earth element, B if Nb or Ta and O is oxygen, are mixed in powder form with a powder of the matrix ceramic and sintered to produce a ceramic form or body. The crack-hindering mechanisms operates to provide improved performance over a wide range of temperature and operating conditions.

  15. Fractional power-law spatial dispersion in electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.; Trujillo, Juan J.

    2013-07-15

    Electric fields in non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion are discussed. Equations involving a fractional Laplacian in the Riesz form that describe the electric fields in such non-local media are studied. The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for power-law non-local media are characterized. We consider simple models with anomalous behavior of plasma-like media with power-law spatial dispersions. The suggested fractional differential models for these plasma-like media are discussed to describe non-local properties of power-law type. -- Highlights: •Plasma-like non-local media with power-law spatial dispersion. •Fractional differential equations for electric fields in the media. •The generalizations of Coulomb’s law and Debye’s screening for the media.

  16. Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dispersivity Testing of Zero-Valent Iron Treatment Cells: Monticello, Utah, November 2005 Through February 2008

  17. A model for dispersion of contaminants in the subway environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coke, L. R.; Sanchez, J. G.; Policastro, A. J.

    2000-05-03

    Although subway ventilation has been studied extensively, very little has been published on dispersion of contaminants in the subway environment. This paper presents a model that predicts dispersion of contaminants in a complex subway system. It accounts for the combined transient effects of train motion, station airflows, train car air exchange rates, and source release properties. Results are presented for a range of typical subway scenarios. The effects of train piston action and train car air exchange are discussed. The model could also be applied to analyze the environmental impact of hazardous materials releases such as chemical and biological agents.

  18. AIR DISPERSION MODELING AT THE WASTE ISOLATION PILOT PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rucker, D.F.

    2000-08-01

    One concern at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is the amount of alpha-emitting radionuclides or hazardous chemicals that can become airborne at the facility and reach the Exclusive Use Area boundary as the result of a release from the Waste Handling Building (WHB) or from the underground during waste emplacement operations. The WIPP Safety Analysis Report (SAR), WIPP RCRA Permit, and WIPP Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessments include air dispersion calculations to address this issue. Meteorological conditions at the WIPP facility will dictate direction, speed, and dilution of a contaminant plume of respirable material due to chronic releases or during an accident. Due to the paucity of meteorological information at the WIPP site prior to September 1996, the Department of Energy (DOE) reports had to rely largely on unqualified climatic data from the site and neighboring Carlsbad, which is situated approximately 40 km (26 miles) to the west of the site. This report examines the validity of the DOE air dispersion calculations using new meteorological data measured and collected at the WIPP site since September 1996. The air dispersion calculations in this report include both chronic and acute releases. Chronic release calculations were conducted with the EPA-approved code, CAP88PC and the calculations showed that in order for a violation of 40 CFR61 (NESHAPS) to occur, approximately 15 mCi/yr of 239Pu would have to be released from the exhaust stack or from the WHB. This is an extremely high value. Hence, it is unlikely that NESHAPS would be violated. A site-specific air dispersion coefficient was evaluated for comparison with that used in acute dose calculations. The calculations presented in Section 3.2 and 3.3 show that one could expect a slightly less dispersive plume (larger air dispersion coefficient) given greater confidence in the meteorological data, i.e. 95% worst case meteorological conditions. Calculations show that dispersion will decrease

  19. Oxide-dispersion strengthening of porous powder metalurgy parts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthening of porous metal articles includes the incorporation of dispersoids of metallic oxides in elemental metal powder particles. Porous metal articles, such as filters, are fabricated using conventional techniques (extrusion, casting, isostatic pressing, etc.) of forming followed by sintering and heat treatments that induce recrystallization and grain growth within powder grains and across the sintered grain contact points. The result is so-called "oxide dispersion strengthening" which imparts, especially, large increases in creep (deformation under constant load) strength to the metal articles.

  20. Mass spectrometer and methods of increasing dispersion between ion beams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Appelhans, Anthony D.; Olson, John E.; Delmore, James E.

    2006-01-10

    A mass spectrometer includes a magnetic sector configured to separate a plurality of ion beams, and an electrostatic sector configured to receive the plurality of ion beams from the magnetic sector and increase separation between the ion beams, the electrostatic sector being used as a dispersive element following magnetic separation of the plurality of ion beams. Other apparatus and methods are provided.

  1. Electrical properties of dispersions of graphene in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, O. R.

    2014-02-03

    Dispersions of graphene in mineral oil have been prepared and electrical conductivity and permittivity have been measured. The direct current (DC) conductivity of the dispersions depends on the surface characteristics of the graphene platelets and followed a percolation model with a percolation threshold ranging from 0.05 to 0.1?wt. %. The difference in DC conductivities can be attributed to different states of aggregation of the graphene platelets and to the inter-particle electron transfer, which is affected by the surface radicals. The frequency-dependent conductivity (?(?)) and permittivity (?(?)) were also measured. The conductivity of dispersions with particle contents much greater than the percolation threshold remains constant and equal to the DC conductivity at low frequencies ? with and followed a power-law ?(?)???{sup s} dependence at very high frequencies with s?0.9. For dispersions with graphene concentration near the percolation threshold, a third regime was displayed at intermediate frequencies indicative of interfacial polarization consistent with Maxwell-Wagner effect typically observed in mixtures of two (or more) phases with very distinct electrical and dielectric properties.

  2. Particle dispersal in the New York Bight Apex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, T.S.; Dieterle, D.A.

    1984-01-01

    A three-dimensional baroclinic circulation model, in conjunction with a particle-in-cell dispersion model, is used to simulate the distributions of various sized particles dumped into the New York Bight Apex. The flow is forced by seasonally representative values of the wind, density, and external sea level fields. Various simulation runs are conducted that track approx. 43,000 particles over approx. 8 day time periods. The movement of the individual particles is specified in a Lagrangian sense using interpolated values of the modeled Eulerian flow. Particle size and mass distribution is simulated by assigning of sinking velocities and abundance to corresponding portions the total particles. The simulation runs are intended to answer certain waste management questions, such as the best and worst environmental conditions for dumping, the dispersal patterns for the river-borne effluent, the depositional sorting of particles, and the retention and dispersal in the pycnocline. Dispersal patterns vary markedly according to forcing conditions, but by no means result in random (optimal) geographic distributions. Depositional pathways for fine (< 3m/d sinking) and heavy particulates are very different. These and other aspects relating to the utility and relevance of this model to waste management strategy in the New York Bight are discussed. 14 references, 17 figures.

  3. Fuel dispersal modeling for aircraft-runway impact scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.

    1995-11-01

    A fuel dispersal model for C-141 transport accidents was developed for the Defense Nuclear Agency`s Fuel Fire Technology Base Program to support Weapon System Safety Assessments. The spectrum of accidents resulting from aircraft impact on a runway was divided into three fuel dispersal regimes: low, intermediate, and high-velocity impact. Sufficient data existed in the accident, crash test, and fuel-filled bomb literature to support development of a qualitative framework for dispersal models, but not quantitative models for all regimes. Therefore, a test series at intermediate scale was conducted to generate data on which to base the model for the high-velocity regime. Tests were conducted over an impact velocity range from 12 m/s to 91 m/s and angles of impact from 22.5{degrees} to 67.5{degrees}. Dependent variables were area covered by dispersed fuel, amount of mass in that area, and location of the area relative to the impact line. Test results showed that no liquid pooling occurred for impact velocities greater than 61 m/s, independent of the angle of impact. Some pooling did occur at lower velocities, but in no test was the liquid-layer thickness greater than 5.25 mm.

  4. Combined dispersive/interference spectroscopy for producing a vector spectrum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erskine, David J.

    2002-01-01

    A method of measuring the spectral properties of broadband waves that combines interferometry with a wavelength disperser having many spectral channels to produce a fringing spectrum. Spectral mapping, Doppler shifts, metrology of angles, distances and secondary effects such as temperature, pressure, and acceleration which change an interferometer cavity length can be measured accurately by a compact instrument using broadband illumination. Broadband illumination avoids the fringe skip ambiguities of monochromatic waves. The interferometer provides arbitrarily high spectral resolution, simple instrument response, compactness, low cost, high field of view and high efficiency. The inclusion of a disperser increases fringe visibility and signal to noise ratio over an interferometer used alone for broadband waves. The fringing spectrum is represented as a wavelength dependent 2-d vector, which describes the fringe amplitude and phase. Vector mathematics such as generalized dot products rapidly computes average broadband phase shifts to high accuracy. A Moire effect between the interferometer's sinusoidal transmission and the illumination heterodynes high resolution spectral detail to low spectral detail, allowing the use of a low resolution disperser. Multiple parallel interferometer cavities of fixed delay allow the instantaneous mapping of a spectrum, with an instrument more compact for the same spectral resolution than a conventional dispersive spectrometer, and not requiring a scanning delay.

  5. National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center dispersion modeling of the Full-scale Radiological Dispersal device (FSRDD) field trials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Neuscamman, Stephanie J.; Yu, Kristen L.

    2016-05-01

    The results of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) model simulations are compared to measured data from the Full-Scale Radiological Dispersal Device (FSRDD) field trials. The series of explosive radiological dispersal device (RDD) experiments was conducted in 2012 by Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) and collaborating organizations. During the trials, a wealth of data was collected, including a variety of deposition and air concentration measurements. The experiments were conducted with one of the stated goals being to provide measurements to atmospheric dispersion modelers. These measurements can be used to facilitate important model validation studies. For this study, meteorologicalmore » observations recorded during the tests are input to the diagnostic meteorological model, ADAPT, which provides 3–D, time-varying mean wind and turbulence fields to the LODI dispersion model. LODI concentration and deposition results are compared to the measured data, and the sensitivity of the model results to changes in input conditions (such as the particle activity size distribution of the source) and model physics (such as the rise of the buoyant cloud of explosive products) is explored. The NARAC simulations predicted the experimentally measured deposition results reasonably well considering the complexity of the release. Lastly, changes to the activity size distribution of the modeled particles can improve the agreement of the model results to measurement.« less

  6. Hair treatment process providing dispersed colors by light diffraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sutton, Richard Matthew Charles; Lamartine, Bruce Carvell; Orler, E. Bruce; Song, Shuangqi

    2015-12-22

    A hair treatment process for providing dispersed colors by light diffraction including (a) coating the hair with a material comprising a polymer, (b) pressing the hair with a pressing device including one or more surfaces, and (c) forming a secondary nanostructured surface pattern on the hair that is complementary to the primary nanostructured surface pattern on the one or more surfaces of the pressing device. The secondary nanostructured surface pattern diffracts light into dispersed colors that are visible on the hair. The section of the hair is pressed with the pressing device for from about 1 to 55 seconds. The polymer has a glass transition temperature from about 55.degree. C. to about 90.degree. C. The one or more surfaces include a primary nanostructured surface pattern.

  7. Development of a GIS Based Dust Dispersion Modeling System.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutz, Frederick C.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.; Crandall, Duard W.; Allwine, K Jerry

    2004-08-12

    With residential areas moving closer to military training sites, the effects upon the environment and neighboring civilians due to dust generated by training exercises has become a growing concern. Under a project supported by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) of the Department of Defense, a custom application named DUSTRAN is currently under development that integrates a system of EPA atmospheric dispersion models with the ArcGIS application environment in order to simulate the dust dispersion generated by a planned training maneuver. This integration between modeling system and GIS application allows for the use of real world geospatial data such as terrain, land-use, and domain size as input by the modeling system. Output generated by the modeling system, such as concentration and deposition plumes, can then be displayed upon accurate maps representing the training site. This paper discusses the development of this integration between modeling system and Arc GIS application.

  8. Mirror force induced wave dispersion in Alfvn waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damiano, P. A.; Johnson, J. R.

    2013-06-15

    Recent hybrid MHD-kinetic electron simulations of global scale standing shear Alfvn waves along the Earth's closed dipolar magnetic field lines show that the upward parallel current region within these waves saturates and broadens perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field and that this broadening increases with the electron temperature. Using resistive MHD simulations, with a parallel Ohm's law derived from the linear Knight relation (which expresses the current-voltage relationship along an auroral field line), we explore the nature of this broadening in the context of the increased perpendicular Poynting flux resulting from the increased parallel electric field associated with mirror force effects. This increased Poynting flux facilitates wave energy dispersion across field lines which in-turn allows for electron acceleration to carry the field aligned current on adjacent field lines. This mirror force driven dispersion can dominate over that associated with electron inertial effects for global scale waves.

  9. Hanford atmospheric dispersion data: 1960 through June 1967

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nickola, P.W.; Ramsdell, J.V.; Glantz, C.S.; Kerns, R.E.

    1983-11-01

    This volume presents dispersion and supporting meteorological data from experiments conducted over relatively flat terrain at Hanford, Washington from January 1960 through June 1967. The nature of the experiments, the sampling grids, and the tracer techniques used are described in the narrative portion of the document. Appendices contain the time-integrated concentrations for samplers within the plumes, summaries of the concentration distributions across the plumes, and wind and temperature profile data for each release period. 18 references, 7 figures, 3 tables.

  10. Estimating dispersion from a tornado vortex and mesocyclone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, A.H.; Hunter, C.H.

    1996-06-01

    Atmospheric dispersion modeling is required to ensure that a postulated breach in radionuclide storage containers at the Savannah River Site (SRS) from a tornado strike of Fujita-scale intensity F2 or higher will not result in an unacceptable dose to individuals. Fujita-scale tornado descriptions are included in Appendix A of this report. Dispersion models previously used at SRS for estimating dispersion following a tornado strike were developed by D.W. Pepper in 1975 (DP-1387, Dispersion of Small Particles) and H.R. Haynes and D.W. Taylor in 1983 (DPST-82-982, Estimating Doses from Tornado Winds). Research conducted in 1983 on the formation and evolution of tornadic thunderstorms has lead to a more complete understanding of the tornado vortex and associated persistent updraft and downdraft regions within the parent thunderstorm. To ensure that appropriate, contemporary methods are used for safety analysis, the Pepper model and the Haynes and Taylor model were evaluated with respect to current knowledge of circulations within tornadic thunderstorms. Pepper`s model is complex numerically but contains most of the desired physical parameterizations. Haynes and Taylor`s model is used with the Puff-Plume model (an emergency response model on the Weather INformation and Display System at SRS) and has provisions for radionuclide deposition and rainout. Haynes and Taylor assumed heavy rain following the tornado for a period of ten minutes, followed by a lighter rain for another ten minutes, then no rain for the period when the material is transported to 100 km downwind. However, neither model incorporates the effects of a nearby thunderstorm downdraft.

  11. Diagnostic Mass-Consistent Wind Field Monte Carlo Dispersion Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1991-01-01

    MATHEW generates a diagnostic mass-consistent, three-dimensional wind field based on point measurements of wind speed and direction. It accounts for changes in topography within its calculational domain. The modeled wind field is used by the Langrangian ADPIC dispersion model. This code is designed to predict the atmospheric boundary layer transport and diffusion of neutrally bouyant, non-reactive species as well as first-order chemical reactions and radioactive decay (including daughter products).

  12. Development of the electric utility dispersed use PAFC stack

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Kotani, Ikuo; Morotomi, Isamu

    1996-12-31

    Kansai Electric Power Co. and Mitsubishi Electric Co. have been developing the electric utility dispersed use PAFC stack operated under the ambient pressure. The new cell design have been developed, so that the large scale cell (1 m{sup 2} size) was adopted for the stack. To confirm the performance and the stability of the 1 m{sup 2} scale cell design, the short stack study had been performed.

  13. Control of Light-matter Interaction Using Dispersion Engineered Photonic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures | MIT-Harvard Center for Excitonics Control of Light-matter Interaction Using Dispersion Engineered Photonic Structures March 8, 2011 at 3pm/36-428 Vinod M. Menon Queens College of the City University of New York (CUNY) menon_000 abstract: Coherent interaction of an ensemble of dipole active atoms or excitons with vacuum electromagnetic field has been studied extensively since its initial conception by Dicke in 1954. However, when the emitters are not only periodically arranged,

  14. 1-D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van

    2014-02-18

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently, inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness of steel pipes. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pitch-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. After dispersion correction the data collapses to a short pulse, any residual dispersion indicates wall loss. The phase spectrum is used to invert for the wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. The approach is evaluated on numerically simulated and on measured data. The method is intended for rapid, semi-quantitative screening of pipes.

  15. Development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiencek, T.; Totev, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-01-01

    Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities at Argonne National Laboratory have been involved in development of LEU dispersion fuel for research and test reactors from the beginning of RERTR program. This paper presents development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication for full size plate type fuel elements. A brief description of Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities where development of the technology was carried out is given. A flow diagram of the manufacturing process is presented. U-Mo powder was manufactured by the rotating electrode process. The atomization produced a U-Mo alloy powder with a relatively uniform size distribution and a nearly spherical shape. Test plates were fabricated using tungsten and depleted U-7 wt.% Mo alloy, 4043 Al and Al-2 wt% Si matrices with Al 6061 aluminum alloy for the cladding. During the development of the technology of manufacturing of full size high density LEU dispersion fuel plates special attention was paid to meet the required homogeneity, bonding, dimensions, fuel out of zone and other mechanical characteristics of the plates.

  16. Development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiencek, Tom; Totev, Totju

    2008-07-15

    Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities at Argonne National Laboratory have been involved in development of LEU dispersion fuel for research and test reactors from the beginning of RERTR program. This paper presents development of technology of high density LEU dispersion fuel fabrication for full size plate type fuel elements. A brief description of Advanced Materials Fabrication Facilities where development of the technology was carried out is given. A flow diagram of the manufacturing process is presented. U-Mo powder was manufactured by the rotating electrode process. The atomization produced a U-Mo alloy powder with a relatively uniform size distribution and a nearly spherical shape. Test plates were fabricated using tungsten and depleted U-7 wt.% Mo alloy, 4043 Al and Al-2 wt% Si matrices with Al 6061 aluminum alloy for the cladding. During the development of the technology of manufacturing of full size high density LEU dispersion fuel plates special attention was paid to meet the required homogeneity, bonding, dimensions, fuel out of zone and other mechanical characteristics of the plates. (author)

  17. Evaluation study of building-resolved urban dispersion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Allwine, K Jerry; Brown, Mike J.; Coirier, WIlliam J.; Ericson, Shawn C.; Hansen, Olav R.; Huber, Alan H.; Kim, Sura; Leach, Martin J.; Mirocha, Jeff D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Patnaik, Gopal; Senocak, Inanc

    2007-09-10

    For effective emergency response and recovery planning, it is critically important that building-resolved urban dispersion models be evaluated using field data. Several full-physics computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and semi-empirical building-resolved (SEB) models are being advanced and applied to simulating flow and dispersion in urban areas. To obtain an estimate of the current state-of-readiness of these classes of models, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) funded a study to compare five CFD models and one SEB model with tracer data from the extensive Midtown Manhattan field study (MID05) conducted during August 2005 as part of the DHS Urban Dispersion Program (UDP; Allwine and Flaherty 2007). Six days of tracer and meteorological experiments were conducted over an approximately 2-km-by-2-km area in Midtown Manhattan just south of Central Park in New York City. A subset of these data was used for model evaluations. The study was conducted such that an evaluation team, independent of the six modeling teams, provided all the input data (e.g., building data, meteorological data and tracer release rates) and run conditions for each of four experimental periods simulated. Tracer concentration data for two of the four experimental periods were provided to the modeling teams for their own evaluation of their respective models to ensure proper setup and operation. Tracer data were not provided for the second two experimental periods to provide for an independent evaluation of the models. The tracer concentrations resulting from the model simulations were provided to the evaluation team in a standard format for consistency in inter-comparing model results. An overview of the model evaluation approach will be given followed by a discussion on the qualitative comparison of the respective models with the field data. Future model developments efforts needed to address modeling gaps identified from this study will also be discussed.

  18. Achromatic phase matching at third orders of dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richman, Bruce

    2003-10-21

    Achromatic phase-matching (APM) is used for efficiently multiplying the frequency of broad bandwidth light by using a nonlinear optical medium comprising a second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystal and stationary optical elements whose configuration, properties, and arrangement have been optimized to match the angular dispersion characteristics of the SHG crystal to at least the third order. These elements include prisms and diffraction gratings for directing an input light beam onto the SHG crystal such that each ray wavelength is aligned to match the phase-matching angle for the crystal at each wavelength of light to at least the third order and such that every ray wavelength overlap within the crystal.

  19. LMFBR fuel assembly design for HCDA fuel dispersal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lacko, Robert E.; Tilbrook, Roger W.

    1984-01-01

    A fuel assembly for a liquid metal fast breeder reactor having an upper axial blanket region disposed in a plurality of zones within the fuel assembly. The characterization of a zone is dependent on the height of the axial blanket region with respect to the active fuel region. The net effect of having a plurality of zones is to establish a dispersal flow path for the molten materials resulting during a core meltdown accident. Upward flowing molten material can escape from the core region and/or fuel assembly without solidifying on the surface of fuel rods due to the heat sink represented by blanket region pellets.

  20. Structure of graphene oxide dispersed with ZnO nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Rishikesh Pandey, Devendra K.; Khare, P. S.

    2014-10-15

    Graphene has been proposed as a promising two-dimensional nanomaterial with outstanding electronic, optical, thermal and mechanical properties for many applications. In present work a process of dispersion of graphene oxide with ZnO nanoparticles in ethanol solution with different pH values, have been studied. Samples have been characterized by XRD, SEM, PL, UV-visible spectroscopy and particles size measurement. The results analysis indicates overall improved emission spectrum. It has been observed that the average diameter of RGO (Reduced Graphene Oxide) decreases in presence of ZnO nanoparticles from 3.8?m to 0.41?m.

  1. Air Dispersion Modeling for Building 3026C/D Demolition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Richard C; Sjoreen, Andrea L; Eckerman, Keith F

    2010-06-01

    This report presents estimates of dispersion coefficients and effective dose for potential air dispersion scenarios of uncontrolled releases from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) buildings 3026C, 3026D, and 3140 prior to or during the demolition of the 3026 Complex. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) AERMOD system1-6 was used to compute these estimates. AERMOD stands for AERMIC Model, where AERMIC is the American Meteorological Society-EPA Regulatory Model Improvement Committee. Five source locations (three in building 3026D and one each in building 3026C and the filter house 3140) and associated source characteristics were determined with the customer. In addition, the area of study was determined and building footprints and intake locations of air-handling systems were obtained. In addition to the air intakes, receptor sites consisting of ground level locations on four polar grids (50 m, 100 m, 200 m, and 500 m) and two intersecting lines of points (50 m separation), corresponding to sidewalks along Central Avenue and Fifth Street. Three years of meteorological data (2006 2008) were used each consisting of three datasets: 1) National Weather Service data; 2) upper air data for the Knoxville-Oak Ridge area; and 3) local weather data from Tower C (10 m, 30 m and 100 m) on the ORNL reservation. Annual average air concentration, highest 1 h average and highest 3 h average air concentrations were computed using AERMOD for the five source locations for the three years of meteorological data. The highest 1 h average air concentrations were converted to dispersion coefficients to characterize the atmospheric dispersion as the customer was interested in the most significant response and the highest 1 h average data reflects the best time-averaged values available from the AERMOD code. Results are presented in tabular and graphical form. The results for dose were obtained using radionuclide activities for each of the buildings provided by the customer.7

  2. Dispersion toughened ceramic composites and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, D.P.; Lackey, W.J.; Lauf, R.J.

    1984-09-28

    Ceramic composites exhibiting increased fracture toughness are produced by the simultaneous codeposition of silicon carbide and titanium disilicide by chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of hydrogen, methyltrichlorosilane and titanium tetrachloride is introduced into a furnace containing a substrate such as graphite or silicon carbide. The thermal decomposition of the methyltrichlorosilane provides a silicon carbide matrix phase and the decomposition of the titanium tetrachloride provides a uniformly dispersed second phase of the intermetallic titanium disilicide within the matrix phase. The fracture toughness of the ceramic composite is in the range of about 6.5 to 7.0 MPa..sqrt..m which represents a significant increase over that of silicon carbide.

  3. Dispersion toughened ceramic composites and method for making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinton, David P.; Lackey, Walter J.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    Ceramic composites exhibiting increased fracture toughness are produced by the simultaneous codeposition of silicon carbide and titanium disilicide by chemical vapor deposition. A mixture of hydrogen, methyltrichlorosilane and titanium tetrachloride is introduced into a furnace containing a substrate such as graphite or silicon carbide. The thermal decomposition of the methyltrichlorosilane provides a silicon carbide matrix phase and the decomposition of the titanium tetrachloride provides a uniformly dispersed second phase of the intermetallic titanium disilicide within the matrix phase. The fracture toughness of the ceramic composite is in the range of about 6.5 to 7.0 MPa.sqroot.m which represents a significant increase over that of silicon carbide.

  4. Dispersion relations of externally and thermally excited dust lattice modes in 2D complex plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xuefeng; Cui Jian; Zhang Yuan [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu Yue [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    The dispersion relations of the externally and thermally (naturally) excited dust lattice modes (both longitudinal and transverse) in two-dimensional Debye-Yukawa complex plasma crystals are investigated. The dispersion relations are calculated numerically by taking the neutral gas damping effects into account and the numerical results are in agreement with the experimental data given by Nunomura et al.[Phys. Rev. E 65, 066402 (2002)]. It is found that for the mode excited by an external disturbance with a real frequency, the dispersion properties are changed at a critical frequency near where the group velocity of the mode goes to zero. Therefore, the high frequency branch with negative dispersion cannot be reached. In contrast, for the thermally excited mode, the dispersion curve can extend all the way to the negative dispersion region, while a 'cut-off' wave number exists at the long wavelength end of the dispersion in the transverse mode.

  5. Synthesis of mono-dispersed nanofluids using solution plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heo, Yong Kang; Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Ueno, Tomonaga; Saito, Nagahiro

    2014-07-14

    Small-sized and well-dispersed gold nanoparticles (NPs) for nanofluidics have been synthesized by electrical discharge in liquid environment using termed solution plasma processing (SPP). Electrons and the hydrogen radicals are reducing the gold ions to the neutral form in plasma gas phase and liquid phase, respectively. The gold NPs have the smallest diameter of 4.9?nm when the solution temperature was kept at 20?C. Nucleation and growth theory describe the evolution of the NP diameter right after the reduction reaction in function of the system temperature, NP surface energy, dispersion energy barrier, and nucleation rate. Negative charges on the NPs surface during and after SPP generate repulsive forces among the NPs avoiding their agglomeration in solution. Increasing the average energy in the SPP determines a decrease of the zeta potential and an increase of the NPs diameter. An important enhancement of the thermal conductivity of 9.4% was measured for the synthesized nanofluids containing NPs with the smallest size.

  6. Vertical dispersion of inertial waves in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenstein, D.M.

    1983-05-20

    A linear model of the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves is developed. A porosity distribution near the bottom of the computational domain minimizes bottom reflections and simulates an ocean of the infinite depth. The model is used to show that the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves in the upper ocean may, under certain conditions, contribute significanlty to the observed rapid decay of inertial oscillations in the surface layer. The kinetic energy of inertial oscillations at mid-latitudes decays with an e folding time scale of 10 days or less, when the parameter lambda(km)/N(cph)d(m) is less than or of the order of unity, where lambda is the wavelength of the wind-generated near-inertial waves, N is the Vaeisaelae frequency in the upper pycnocline, and d is the surface layer thickness. At the top of the pycnocline the model predicts a velocity maximum, which develops as energy propagates downward, out of the surface layer. However, when the upper pycnocline is sufficiently peaked, a resonant frequency interference effect is predicted. This effect modulates the dissipation of surface layer inertial oscillations, and their magnitude after a storm need not decay monotonically. We also make qualitative comparisons with deep-ocean current meter observations taken during the Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE) and with shallow water (105 m) observations taken in the Baltic Sea.

  7. Gas phase dispersion in a small rotary kiln

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, B.B.

    1981-07-01

    A study was made of nonideal flow of gas in a rotary kiln reactor. A rotating tube 0.165 m in diameter by 2.17 m long, with internal lifting flights, was operated at room temperature. Rotational speeds from 2.0 to 7.0 rpm, air flow rates from 0.351 to 4.178 m/sup 3//h, and solid contents of 0.0, 5.1, and 15.3% of tube volume were studied. Residence time distribution of the gas was measured by means of the pulse injection technique using a helium tracer. A model was developed based on dispersive flow that exchanges with a deadwater region. Two parameters, a dispersion number describing bulk gas flow and an interchange factor describing exchange between the flow region and the gas trapped in the solids bed, were sufficient to correlate the data, but these parameters are sensitive to experimental error. The model is applicable to analysis of other flow systems, such as packed beds.

  8. Short-duration radio bursts with apparent extragalactic dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Benz, A. O.; Monstein, C.

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of the longest yet undertaken search for apparently extragalactic radio bursts at the Bleien Radio Observatory covering 21,000 hr (898 days). The data were searched for events of less than 50 ms FWHM duration showing a ?{sup 2} drift in the spectrogram characteristic of the delay of radio waves in plasma. We have found five cases suggesting dispersion measures between 350 and 400 cm{sup 3} pc while searching in the range of 75-2000 cm{sup 3} pc. Four of the five events occurred between 10:27 and 11:24 a.m. local civil time. The only exception occurred at night with the full Moon in the beam. It was an event that poorly fits plasma dispersion, but had the characteristics of a solar Type III burst. However, we were not able to confirm that it was a lunar reflection. All events were observed with a log-periodic dipole within 6800 hr, but none with a more directional horn antenna observing the rest of the time. These properties suggest a terrestrial origin of the 'peryton' type reported before. However, the cause of these events remains ambiguous.

  9. Subcarrier multiplexing with dispersion reduction and direct detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargis, P.D.; Haigh, R.E.; McCammon, K.G.

    1997-01-21

    An SCM system is disclosed for simultaneously reducing the concomitant problems of receiver complexity and dispersion penalty and without requiring the use of an expensive, high-bandwidth optical detector. The system provides both a dispersion reduction and a direct detection to the receiver, with microwave mixers and lithium niobate external modulators that produce sidebands that are only separated by a few gigahertz from a principal laser optical carrier. Digital data streams are independently impressed upon these sidebands for transmission over an ordinary single-mode fiber. Independent high-speed data streams are upconverted to microwave frequencies. These subcarriers are then combined with a microwave power combiner and amplified with a microwave amplifier. A solid-state 1550-nm laser carrier is modulated by the microwave subcarriers. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is used just prior to long-distance transmission over ordinary single-mode fiber. The transmitted optical signal may then traverse multiple EDFAs to compensate for long-haul optical fiber losses prior to detection. At a receiving end, the optical signal is split into multiple paths. The subcarrier channels are optically pre-selected using a narrowband optical filter, such as a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) filter. An optical detector converts the selected optical signal into a baseband electrical data stream. 2 figs.

  10. Subcarrier multiplexing with dispersion reduction and direct detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sargis, Paul D.; Haigh, Ronald E.; McCammon, Kent G.

    1997-01-01

    An SCM system for simultaneously reducing the concomitant problems of receiver complexity and dispersion penalty and without requiring the use of an expensive, high-bandwidth optical detector. The system provides both a dispersion reduction and a direct detection to the receiver, with microwave mixers and lithium niobate external modulators that produce sidebands that are only separated by a few gigahertz from a principal laser optical carrier. Digital data streams are independently impressed upon these sidebands for transmission over an ordinary single-mode fiber. Independent high-speed data streams are upconverted to microwave frequencies. These subcarriers are then combined with a microwave power combiner and amplified with a microwave amplifier. A solid-state 1550-nm laser carrier is modulated by the microwave subcarriers. An erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) is used just prior to long-distance transmission over ordinary single-mode fiber. The transmitted optical signal may then traverse multiple EDFAs to compensate for long-haul optical fiber losses prior to detection. At a receiving end, the optical signal is split into multiple paths. The subcarrier channels are optically pre-selected using a narrowband optical filter, such as a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP) filter. An optical detector converts the selected optical signal into a baseband electrical data stream.

  11. Representation of integral dispersion relations by local forms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Erasmo; Sesma, Javier

    2008-03-15

    The representation of the usual integral dispersion relations (IDRs) of scattering theory through series of derivatives of the amplitudes is discussed, extended, simplified, and confirmed as mathematical identities. Forms of derivative dispersion relations (DDRs) valid for the whole energy interval, recently obtained and presented as double infinite series, are simplified through the use of new sum rules of the incomplete {gamma} functions, being reduced to single summations, where the usual convergence criteria are easily applied. For the forms of the imaginary amplitude used in phenomenology of hadronic scattering at high energies, we show that expressions for the DDR can represent, with absolute accuracy, the IDR of scattering theory, as true mathematical identities. Besides the fact that the algebraic manipulation can be easily understood, numerical examples show the accuracy of these representations up to the maximum available machine precision. As consequence of our work, it is concluded that the standard forms, sDDR, originally intended for high energy limits are an inconvenient and incomplete separation of terms of the full expression, leading to wrong evaluations. Since the correspondence between IDR and the DDR expansions is linear, our results have wide applicability, covering more general functions, built as combinations of well studied basic forms.

  12. Critical review of studies on atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shearer, D.L.; Kaleel, R.J.

    1982-09-01

    This study effort was required as a preliminary step prior to initiation of field measurements of atmospheric dispersion in coastal regions. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is in the process of planning an extensive field measurement program to generate data which will serve as improved data bases for licensing decisions, confirmation of regulations, standards, and guides, and for site characterizations. The study being reported here is an effort directed to obtaining as much information as is possible from existing studies that is relevant toward NRC's objectives. For this study, reports covering research and meteorological measurements conducted for industrial purposes, utility needs, military objectives, and academic studies were obtained and critically reviewed in light of NRC's current data needs. This report provides an interpretation of the extent of existing usable information, an indication of the potential for tailoring existing research toward current NRC information needs, and recommendations for several follow-on studies which could provide valuable additional information through reanalysis of the data. Recommendations are also offered regarding new measurement programs. Emphasis is placed on the identification and acquisition of data from atmospheric tracer studies conducted in coastal regions. A total of 225 references were identified which deal with the coastal atmosphere, including meteorological and tracer measurement programs, theoretical descriptions of the relevant processes, and dispersion models.

  13. The boundary effects of the shock wave dispersion in discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markhotok, A.; Popovic, S.; Vuskovic, L.

    2008-03-15

    Interaction of shock waves with a weakly ionized gas generated by discharges has been studied. An additional thermal mechanism of the shock wave dispersion on the boundary between a neutral gas and discharge has been proposed [A. Markhotok, S. Popovic, and L. Vuskovic, Proceedings of the 15th International Conference on Atomic Processes in Plasmas, March 19-22, 2007 (NIST, Gaitersburg, MD, 2007)]. This mechanism can explain a whole set of thermal features of the shock wave-plasma interaction, including acceleration of the shock wave, broadening or splitting of the deflection signals and its consecutive restoration. Application has been made in the case of a shock wave interacting with a laser induced plasma. The experimental observations support well the results of calculation based on this model.

  14. Method for dispersing catalyst onto particulate material and product thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Utz, Bruce R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Cugini, Anthony V. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1992-01-01

    A method for dispersing finely divided catalyst precursors onto the surface of coal or other particulate material includes the steps of forming a wet paste mixture of the particulate material and a liquid solution containing a dissolved transition metal salt, for instance a solution of ferric nitrate. The wet paste mixture is in a state of incipient wetness with all of this solution adsorbed onto the surfaces of the particulate material without the presence of free moisture. On adding a precipitating agent such as ammonia, a catalyst precursor such as hydrated iron oxide is deposited on the surfaces of the coal. The catalyst is activated by converting it to the sulfide form for the hydrogenation or direct liquefaction of the coal.

  15. Methods and apparatus for controlling dispersions of nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lavrentovich, Oleg D; Golovin, Andrii B

    2014-10-21

    Electrically reconfigurable metamaterial with spatially varied refractive index is proposed for applications such as optical devices and lenses. The apparatus and method comprises a metamaterial in which the refractive indices are modified in space and time by applying one or more electric fields. The metamaterials are electrically controllable and reconfigurable, and consist of metal (gold, silver, etc.) particles of different shapes, such as rods, with dimension much smaller than the wavelength of light, dispersed in a dielectric medium. The metamaterial is controlled by applying a non-uniform electric field that causes two effects: (1) It aligns the metallic anisometric particles with respect to the direction of the applied electric field and (2) It redistributes particles in space, making their local concentration position dependent.

  16. Vaporization, dispersion, and radiant fluxes from LPG spills. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01

    Both burning and non-burning spills of LPG (primarily propane) were studied. Vaporization rates for propane spills on soil, concrete, insulating concrete, asphalt, sod, wood, and polymer foams were measured. Thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and steady state vaporization rates were determined. Vapor concentrations were measured downwind of open propane pools 25, 100, 400, and 1600 ft/sup 2/ in area. A Gaussian dispersion model modified for area sources provided a good correlation of measured concentrations. Emitted and incident radiant fluxes from propane fires were measured. Simplified flame radiation models were adequate for predicting radiant fluxes; the maximum effective flux emitted at the flame surface was about 50,000 Btu/h-ft/sup 2/. A few tests in which propane was sprayed into the air showed that at moderately high spray rates all the propane flashed to vapor or atomized; no liquid collected on the ground.

  17. Urban Dispersion Program Overview and MID05 Field Study Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2007-07-31

    The Urban Dispersion Program (UDP) was a 4-year project (2004–2007) funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security with additional support from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) also contributed to UDP through funding a human-exposure component of the New York City (NYC) field studies in addition to supporting an EPA scientist in conducting modeling studies of NYC. The primary goal of UDP was to improve the scientific understanding of the flow and diffusion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of NYC. The overall UDP project manager and lead scientist was Dr. Jerry Allwine of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. UDP had several accomplishments that included conducting two tracer and meteorological field studies in Midtown Manhattan.

  18. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  19. Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode | Department of Energy 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions in a Cycling Mode Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 1 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating

  20. Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads | Department of Energy 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 4 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 4 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Unit 4 at

  1. Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit | Department of Energy 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Update 5 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant: Modeling Cycling Units 1, 2 plus One Baseload Unit Docket No. EO-05-01: This report describes dispersion modeling performed for simultaneous operation of one

  2. NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at Onsite Locations for DOE Nuclear Facilities | Department of Energy NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for DOE Nuclear Facilities NSRD-2015-TD01, Technical Report for Calculations of Atmospheric Dispersion at Onsite Locations for DOE Nuclear Facilities The Department of Energy (DOE) has performed an evaluation of the technical bases for the default value for the atmospheric dispersion parameter χ/Q. This parameter appears in the

  3. All-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed dissipative soliton nanotube mode-locked laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Z.; Popa, D. Wittwer, V. J.; Milana, S.; Hasan, T.; Jiang, Z.; Ferrari, A. C.; Ilday, F. Ö.

    2015-12-14

    We report dissipative soliton generation from an Yb-doped all-fiber nonlinearity- and dispersion-managed nanotube mode-locked laser. A simple all-fiber ring cavity exploits a photonic crystal fiber for both nonlinearity enhancement and dispersion compensation. The laser generates stable dissipative solitons with large linear chirp in the net normal dispersion regime. Pulses that are 8.7 ps long are externally compressed to 118 fs, outperforming current nanotube-based Yb-doped fiber laser designs.

  4. Flow Intermittency, Dispersion, and Correlated Continuous Time Random Walks in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Anna, Pietro; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Dentz, Marco; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bolster, Diogo; Davy, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    We study the intermittency of fluid velocities in porous media and its relation to anomalous dispersion. Lagrangian velocities measured at equidistant points along streamlines are shown to form a spatial Markov process. As a consequence of this remarkable property, the dispersion of fluid particles can be described by a continuous time random walk with correlated temporal increments. This new dynamical picture of intermittency provides a direct link between the microscale flow, its intermittent properties, and non-Fickian dispersion.

  5. Dispersive calculation of complex Regge trajectories for the lightest f2 resonances and the K*(892)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carrasco, J. A.; Nebreda, J.; Pelaez, Jose R.; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-08-11

    A recently developed dispersive formalism is applied to calculate the Regge trajectories of the f2(1270), f2(1525) and K*(892) mesons.

  6. Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Docket No. ...

  7. Symbolic computation of solitons in the normal dispersion regime of inhomogeneous optical fibres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wenjun; Tain Bo; Li Min; Jiang Yan; Qu Qixing; Wang Pan; Sun Kun

    2011-06-30

    A nonlinear Schroedinger equation with varying dispersion, nonlinearity and gain (or absorption) is studied for ultrashort optical pulses propagating in inhomogeneous optical fibres in the case of normal dispersion. Using the modified Hirota method and symbolic computation, the bilinear form and analytic soliton solution are derived. Stable bright and dark solitons are observed in the normal dispersion regime. A periodically varying soliton and compressed soliton without any fluctuation are obtained. Combined and kink-shaped solitons are observed. Possibly applicable soliton control techniques, which are used to design dispersion-managed systems, are proposed. The proposed techniques may find applications in soliton management communication links, soliton compression and soliton control. (solitons)

  8. Particle dispersing system and method for testing semiconductor manufacturing equipment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chandrachood, Madhavi; Ghanayem, Steve G.; Cantwell, Nancy; Rader, Daniel J.; Geller, Anthony S.

    1998-01-01

    The system and method prepare a gas stream comprising particles at a known concentration using a particle disperser for moving particles from a reservoir of particles into a stream of flowing carrier gas. The electrostatic charges on the particles entrained in the carrier gas are then neutralized or otherwise altered, and the resulting particle-laden gas stream is then diluted to provide an acceptable particle concentration. The diluted gas stream is then split into a calibration stream and the desired output stream. The particles in the calibration stream are detected to provide an indication of the actual size distribution and concentration of particles in the output stream that is supplied to a process chamber being analyzed. Particles flowing out of the process chamber within a vacuum pumping system are detected, and the output particle size distribution and concentration are compared with the particle size distribution and concentration of the calibration stream in order to determine the particle transport characteristics of a process chamber, or to determine the number of particles lodged in the process chamber as a function of manufacturing process parameters such as pressure, flowrate, temperature, process chamber geometry, particle size, particle charge, and gas composition.

  9. Viscosity index improver-dispersant additive useful in oil compositions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, J.B.; Dick, M.N.

    1988-10-25

    A process comprising grafting in the substantial absence of solvent a hydrocarbon polymer of C/sub 2/ to C/sub 28/ olefin, the polymer having a number average molecular weight in the range of about 5,000 to 500,000 with an unsaturated material selected from the group consisting of: (A) ethylenically unsaturated C/sub 3/ to C/sub 10/ carboxylic acid having 1 to 2 carboxylic acid groups or an anhydride group, and (B) nitrogen-containing ethylenically unsaturated monomers containing 6 to 30 carbon atoms and 1 to 4 nitrogen atoms, in the presence of a free radical initiator and a chain stopping agent comprising at least one member selected from the group consisting of alphatic mercaptans having 4 to 24 carbon atoms, deithyl hydroxyl amine cumene and phenols, the grafting being conducted in a manner and under conditions sufficient to form a substantially oil soluble graft copolymer useful as a viscosity index improver-dispersant additive for lubricating oil compositions.

  10. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Iron Aluminide by CVD Coated Powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asit Biswas Andrew J. Sherman

    2006-09-25

    This I &I Category2 program developed chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of iron, aluminum and aluminum oxide coated iron powders and the availability of high temperature oxidation, corrosion and erosion resistant coating for future power generation equipment and can be used for retrofitting existing fossil-fired power plant equipment. This coating will provide enhanced life and performance of Coal-Fired Boilers components such as fire side corrosion on the outer diameter (OD) of the water wall and superheater tubing as well as on the inner diameter (ID) and OD of larger diameter headers. The program also developed a manufacturing route for readily available thermal spray powders for iron aluminide coating and fabrication of net shape component by powder metallurgy route using this CVD coated powders. This coating can also be applid on jet engine compressor blade and housing, industrial heat treating furnace fixtures, magnetic electronic parts, heating element, piping and tubing for fossil energy application and automotive application, chemical processing equipment , heat exchanger, and structural member of aircraft. The program also resulted in developing a new fabrication route of thermal spray coating and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) iron aluminide composites enabling more precise control over material microstructures.

  11. Dispersion of radioactive pollutant in a tornadic storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1981-05-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at a plutonium fabrication facility in Pennsylvania. Plutonium particles less than 10 ..mu..m in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The quasi-Lagrangian method of moments is used to model the transport of concentration within a grid cell volume. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 20 to 45 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm.

  12. Cryogenic properties of dispersion strengthened copper for high magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toplosky, V. J.; Han, K.; Walsh, R. P.; Swenson, C. A.

    2014-01-27

    Cold deformed copper matrix composite conductors, developed for use in the 100 tesla multi-shot pulsed magnet at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL), have been characterized. The conductors are alumina strengthened copper which is fabricated by cold drawing that introduces high dislocation densities and high internal stresses. Both alumina particles and high density of dislocations provide us with high tensile strength and fatigue endurance. The conductors also have high electrical conductivities because alumina has limited solubility in Cu and dislocations have little scattering effect on conduction electrons. Such a combination of high strength and high conductivity makes it an excellent candidate over other resistive magnet materials. Thus, characterization is carried out by tensile testing and fully reversible fatigue testing. In tensile tests, the material exceeds the design criteria parameters. In the fatigue tests, both the load and displacement were measured and used to control the amplitude of the tests to simulate the various loading conditions in the pulsed magnet which is operated at 77 K in a non-destructive mode. In order to properly simulate the pulsed magnet operation, strain-controlled tests were more suitable than load controlled tests. For the dispersion strengthened coppers, the strengthening mechanism of the aluminum oxide provided better tensile and fatigue properties over convention copper.

  13. 1D profiling using highly dispersive guided waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker, Arno; Zon, Tim van; Enthoven, Daniel; Verburg, Wesley

    2015-03-31

    Corrosion is one of the industries major issues regarding the integrity of assets. Currently inspections are conducted at regular intervals to ensure a sufficient integrity level of these assets. Cost reduction while maintaining a high level of reliability and safety of installations is a major challenge. There are many situations where the actual defect location is not accessible, e.g., a pipe support or a partially buried pipe. Guided wave tomography has been developed to reconstruct the wall thickness. In case of bottom of the line corrosion, i.e., a single corrosion pit, a simpler approach may be followed. Data is collected in a pit-catch configuration at the 12 o'clock position using highly dispersive guided waves. The phase spectrum is used to invert for a wall thickness profile in the circumferential direction, assuming a Gaussian defect profile. An EMAT sensor design has been made to measure at the 12 o'clock position of a pipe. The concept is evaluated on measured data, showing good sizing capabilities on a variety simple defect profiles.

  14. Lithospheric Thickness Modeled from Long Period Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pasyanos, M E

    2008-05-15

    The behavior of surface waves at long periods is indicative of subcrustal velocity structure. Using recently published dispersion models, we invert surface wave group velocities for lithospheric structure, including lithospheric thickness, over much of the Eastern Hemisphere, encompassing Eurasia, Africa, and the Indian Ocean. Thicker lithosphere under Precambrian shields and platforms are clearly observed, not only under the large cratons (West Africa, Congo, Baltic, Russia, Siberia, India), but also under smaller blocks like the Tarim Basin and Yangtze craton. In contrast, it is found that remobilized Precambrian structures like the Saharan Shield and Sino-Korean Paraplatform do not have well-established lithospheric keels. The thinnest lithospheric thickness is found under oceanic and continental rifts, as well as along convergence zones. We compare our results to thermal models of continental lithosphere, lithospheric cooling models of oceanic lithosphere, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB) estimates from S-wave receiver functions, and velocity variations of global tomography models. In addition to comparing results for the broad region, we examine in detail the regions of Central Africa, Siberia, and Tibet. While there are clear differences in the various estimates, overall the results are generally consistent. Inconsistencies between the estimates may be due to a variety of reasons including lateral and depth resolution differences and the comparison of what may be different lithospheric features.

  15. NARAC Dispersion Model Product Integration With RadResponder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aluzzi, Fernando

    2015-09-30

    Work on enhanced cooperation and interoperability of Nuclear Incident Response Teams (NIRT) is a joint effort between DHS/FEMA, DOE/NNSA and EPA. One such effort was the integration between the RadResponder Network, a resource sponsored by FEMA for the management of radiological data during an emergency, and the National Atmospheric Advisory Center (NARAC), a DOE/NNSA modeling resource whose predictions are used to aid radiological emergency preparedness and response. Working together under a FEMA-sponsored project these two radiological response assets developed a capability to read and display plume model prediction results from the NARAC computer system in the RadResponder software tool. As a result of this effort, RadResponder users have been provided with NARAC modeling predictions of contamination areas, radiological dose levels, and protective action areas (e.g., areas warranting worker protection or sheltering/evacuation) to help guide protective action decisions and field monitoring surveys, and gain key situation awareness following a radiological/nuclear accident or incident (e.g., nuclear power plant accident, radiological dispersal device incident, or improvised nuclear detonation incident). This document describes the details of this integration effort.

  16. TOWARD UNBIASED GALAXY CLUSTER MASSES FROM LINE-OF-SIGHT VELOCITY DISPERSIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saro, Alex; Mohr, Joseph J.; Bazin, Gurvan; Dolag, Klaus

    2013-07-20

    We study the use of red-sequence-selected galaxy spectroscopy for unbiased estimation of galaxy cluster masses by using a publicly available simulated galaxy catalog. We explore the impact of selection using galaxy color, projected separation from the cluster center, galaxy luminosity, and spectroscopic redshift. We identify and characterize each of the following sources of bias and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed mass: the intrinsic properties of halos in the form of halo triaxiality, sampling noise, the presence of multiple kinematic populations within the cluster, and the effect of interlopers. We show that even in red-sequence and spectroscopically selected galaxy samples, the interloper fraction is significant, and that the variations in the interloper population from cluster to cluster provide the dominant contribution to the velocity dispersion scatter at fixed mass. We present measurements of the total scatter in dispersion at fixed mass as a function of the number of redshifts. Results indicate that improvements in scatter are modest beyond samples of {approx}30 redshifts per cluster. Our results show that while cluster velocity dispersions extracted from a few dozen red-sequence-selected galaxies do not provide precise masses on a single cluster basis, an ensemble of cluster velocity dispersions can be combined to produce a precise calibration of a cluster survey-mass-observable relation. Currently, disagreements in the literature on simulated subhalo velocity dispersion-mass relations place a systematic floor on velocity dispersion mass calibration at the 5% level in dispersion.

  17. Federal Response Assets for a Radioactive Dispersal Device Incident

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan,T.

    2009-06-30

    If a large scale RDD event where to occur in New York City, the magnitude of the problem would likely exceed the capabilities of City and State to effectively respond to the event. New York State could request Federal Assistance if the United States President has not already made the decision to provide it. The United States Federal Government has a well developed protocol to respond to emergencies. The National Response Framework (NRF) describes the process for responding to all types of emergencies including RDD incidents. Depending on the location and type of event, the NRF involves appropriate Federal Agencies, e.g., Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), United States Coast Guard (USCG), Department of Defense (DOD), Department of Justice (DOJ), Department of Agriculture (USDA), and Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The Federal response to emergencies has been refined and improved over the last thirty years and has been tested on natural disasters (e.g. hurricanes and floods), man-made disasters (oil spills), and terrorist events (9/11). However, the system has never been tested under an actual RDD event. Drills have been conducted with Federal, State, and local agencies to examine the initial (early) phases of such an event (TopOff 2 and TopOff 4). The Planning Guidance for Protection and Recovery Following Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) and Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) incidents issued by the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) in August 2008 has never been fully tested in an interagency exercise. Recently, another exercise called Empire 09 that was situated in Albany, New York was conducted. Empire 09 consists of 3 different exercises be held in May and June, 2009. The first exercise, May 2009, involved a table top exercise for phase 1 (0-48 hours) of the response to an RDD incident. In early June, a full-scale 3- day exercise was conducted for the mid-phase response (48

  18. Impact of anomalous dispersion on the interferometer measurements of plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Johnson, W R; Iglesias, C A; Scofield, J H

    2004-12-16

    For many decades optical interferometers have been used to measure the electron density of plasmas. During the last ten years X-ray lasers in the wavelength range 14 to 47 nm have enabled researchers to use interferometers to probe even higher density plasmas. The data analysis assumes that the index of refraction is due only to the free electrons, which makes the index of refraction less than one and the electron density proportional to the number of fringe shifts. Recent experiments in Al plasmas observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one and made us question the validity of the usual formula for calculating the index of refraction. Recent calculations showed how the anomalous dispersion from the bound electrons can dominate the index of refraction in many types of plasma and make the index greater than one or enhance the index such that one would greatly overestimate the electron density of the plasma using interferometers. In this work we calculate the index of refraction of C, Al, Ti, and Pd plasmas for photon energies from 0 to 100 eV (12.4 nm) using a new average-atom code. The results show large variations from the free electron approximation under many different plasma conditions. We validate the average-atom code against the more detailed OPAL code for carbon and aluminum plasmas. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential.

  19. Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 | Department of Energy 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Update 6 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant Modeling Baseload Units 3,4,5 Docket No. EO-05-01: This report describes dispersion modeling performed for simultaneous operation of three baseload units at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station

  20. Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" | Department of Energy Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Review of the ENSR Report Titled "Update 1 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant" Docket No. EO-05-01. Sullivan Environmental Consulting, Inc. has prepared a review of the "Update 1 to: A Dispersion

  1. Exact Time-Dependent Nonlinear Dispersive Wave Solutions in Compressible Magnetized Plasmas Exhibiting Collapse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakrabarti, Nikhil; Maity, Chandan; Schamel, Hans

    2011-04-08

    Compressional waves in a magnetized plasma of arbitrary resistivity are treated with the Lagrangian fluid approach. An exact nonlinear solution with a nontrivial space and time dependence is obtained with boundary conditions as in Harris' current sheet. The solution shows competition among hydrodynamic convection, magnetic field diffusion, and dispersion. This results in a collapse of density and the magnetic field in the absence of dispersion. The dispersion effects arrest the collapse of density but not of the magnetic field. A possible application is in the early stage of magnetic star formation.

  2. Cancellation of dispersion and temporal modulation with nonentangled frequency-correlated photons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres-Company, Victor; Valencia, Alejandra; Hendrych, Martin; Torres, Juan P.

    2011-02-15

    The observation of the so-called dispersion cancellation of paired photons is generally attributed to the presence of frequency entanglement between two frequency anticorrelated photons. In this paper, it is shown that by introducing the appropriate amount of chromatic dispersion or phase modulation between nonentangled photons, it is also possible to observe these effects. Indeed, it is found that the relevant characteristic required for the observation of dispersion cancellation or the cancellation of temporal phase modulation is the presence of certain frequency correlations between the photons and not necessarily the presence of entanglement.

  3. Methods and optical fibers that decrease pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chertkov, Michael; Gabitov, Ildar

    2004-03-02

    The present invention provides methods and optical fibers for periodically pinning an actual (random) accumulated chromatic dispersion of an optical fiber to a predicted accumulated dispersion of the fiber through relatively simple modifications of fiber-optic manufacturing methods or retrofitting of existing fibers. If the pinning occurs with sufficient frequency (at a distance less than or are equal to a correlation scale), pulse degradation resulting from random chromatic dispersion is minimized. Alternatively, pinning may occur quasi-periodically, i.e., the pinning distance is distributed between approximately zero and approximately two to three times the correlation scale.

  4. Dispersion engineering of high-Q silicon microresonators via thermal oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Wei C.; Zhang, Jidong; Usechak, Nicholas G.; Lin, Qiang

    2014-07-21

    We propose and demonstrate a convenient and sensitive technique for precise engineering of group-velocity dispersion in high-Q silicon microresonators. By accurately controlling the surface-oxidation thickness of silicon microdisk resonators, we are able to precisely manage the zero-dispersion wavelength, while simultaneously further improving the high optical quality of our devices, with the optical Q close to a million. The demonstrated dispersion management allows us to achieve parametric generation with precisely engineerable emission wavelengths, which shows great potential for application in integrated silicon nonlinear and quantum photonics.

  5. Highly dispersed buckybowls as model carbocatalysts for C–H bond activation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Soykal, I. Ilgaz; Wang, Hui; Park, Jewook; Li, An-Ping; Liang, Chengdu; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-03-19

    Buckybowl fractions dispersed on mesoporous silica constitute an ideal model for studying the catalysis of graphitic forms of carbon since the dispersed carbon nanostructures contain a high ratio of edge defects and curvature induced by non-six-membered rings. Dispersion of the active centers on an easily accessible high surface area material allowed for high density of surface active sites associated with oxygenated structures. This report illustrates a facile method of creating model polycyclic aromatic nano-structures that are not only active for alkane C-H bond activation and oxidative dehydrogenation but also can be practical catalysts to be eventually used in industry.

  6. Vertical dispersion methods in x-ray spectroscopy of high temperature plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renner, O.; Missalla, T.; Foerster, E.

    1995-12-31

    General formulae for the applying the vertical dispersion principle in x-ray spectroscopy of multiple charged ions are summarized, the characteristics of the experimental schemes based on flat and bent crystals are discussed. The unique properties of the novel spectroscopic methods, i.e., their extremely high dispersion, high spectral and 1-D spatial resolution and good collection efficiency, make them very attractive for ultrahigh-resolution spectroscopy. The examples of successful use of the vertical dispersion modifications of the double-crystal and the Johann spectrometer in diagnostics of several types of laser-generated plasma are presented.

  7. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P.; Ermak, Donald

    2006-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  8. Method And Apparatus For Reducing Sample Dispersion In Turns And Junctions Of Micro-Channel Systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K. , Nilson, Robert H.

    2004-05-11

    What is disclosed pertains to improvement in the performance of microchannel devices by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersion of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. The low dispersion features are particularly suited for microfluidic devices and systems using either electromotive force, pressure, or combinations thereof as the principle of fluid transport. Such microfluidic devices and systems are useful for separation of components, sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis, or combinations thereof.

  9. Decoupling of epitaxial graphene via gold intercalation probed by dispersive Raman spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pillai, P. B. E-mail: m.desouza@sheffield.ac.uk; DeSouza, M. E-mail: m.desouza@sheffield.ac.uk; Narula, R.; Reich, S.; Wong, L. Y.; Batten, T.; Pokorny, J.

    2015-05-14

    Signatures of a superlattice structure composed of a quasi periodic arrangement of atomic gold clusters below an epitaxied graphene (EG) layer are examined using dispersive Raman spectroscopy. The gold-graphene system exhibits a laser excitation energy dependant red shift of the 2D mode as compared to pristine epitaxial graphene. The phonon dispersions in both the systems are mapped using the experimentally observed Raman signatures and a third-nearest neighbour tight binding electronic band structure model. Our results reveal that the observed excitation dependent Raman red shift in gold EG primarily arise from the modifications of the phonon dispersion in gold-graphene and shows that the extent of decoupling of graphene from the underlying SiC substrate can be monitored from the dispersive nature of the Raman 2D modes. The intercalated gold atoms restore the phonon band structure of epitaxial graphene towards free standing graphene.

  10. Emission Properties from ZnO Quantum Dots Dispersed in SiO{sub 2} Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panigrahi, Shrabani; Basak, Durga

    2011-07-15

    Dispersion of ZnO quantum dots in SiO{sub 2} matrix has been achieved in two techniques based on StOeber method to form ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} nanocomposites. Sample A is formed with random dispersion by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to an ethanolic solution of ZnO nanoparticles and sample B is formed with a chain-like ordered dispersion by adding ZnO nanoparticles to an already hydrolyzed ethanolic TEOS solution. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-grown nanocomposites show strong emission in the ultraviolet region. When annealed at higher temperature, depending on the sample type, these show strong red or white emission. Interestingly, when the excitation is removed, the orderly dispersed ZnO QDs-SiO{sub 2} composite shows a very bright blue fluorescence visible by naked eyes for few seconds indicating their promise for display applications.

  11. Role of dispersion in pulse emission from a sliding-frequency fiber laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romagnoli, M.; Wabnitz, S.; Franco, P.; Midrio, M.

    1995-05-01

    We present an experimental and theoretical investigation of the role of group-velocity dispersion in the generation of picosecond pulses from a sliding-frequency fiber loop laser.

  12. Theoretical analysis of the self-frequency shift near zero-dispersion points: Soliton spectral tunneling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoy, Eduard N.; Sterke, C. Martijn de

    2007-10-15

    Soliton dynamics under the action of higher-order dispersion and the Raman effect is analyzed. Though we consider a wide variety of parameters, a particularly interesting phenomenon occurs when the presence of cubic and quartic dispersion results in two regions of anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD) separated by a region of normal dispersion. In this case a sharp switching of the soliton frequency from one anomalous GVD region to the other may exist. During such a transformation, the center of the soliton spectrum passes through the normal GVD region. We show that this switching occurs due to the phase matching between the soliton and the resonance frequency in the two anomalous GVD regions.

  13. Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads | Department of Energy 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Update 2 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Unit 1 Emissions at Maximum and Minimum Loads Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes AERMOD modeling results performed for Unit 1 at

  14. Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

    2008-09-30

    Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

  15. Effects of Acclimation on Poststocking Dispersal and Physiological Condition of Age-1 Pallid Sturgeon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, Eric W.; Guy, Christopher S.; Cureton, Eli S.; Webb, Molly H.; Gardner, William M.

    2011-03-28

    A propagation program for pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus in the upper Missouri River was implemented by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service in 1997. Preliminary research indicated that many hatchery-reared pallid sturgeon were experiencing significant downstream poststocking dispersal, negatively affecting their recruitment. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of acclimation to flow and site-specific physicochemical water conditions on poststocking dispersal and physiological condition of age-1 pallid sturgeon. Fish from three acclimation treatments were radio-tagged, released at two locations (Missouri River and Marias River), and monitored using passive telemetry stations. Marias treatment was acclimated to flow and site-specific physicochemical conditions, Bozeman treatment was acclimated to flow only, and traditional treatment had no acclimation (reared under traditional protocol). During both years fish released in the Missouri River dispersed less than fish released in the Marias River. In 2005, Marias treatment dispersed less and nearly twice as many fish remained in the Missouri River reach than traditional treatment. In 2006, pallid sturgeon dispersed similarly among treatments and fish remaining in the Missouri River reach were similar among all treatments. Differences in poststocking dispersal between years may be related to fin curl. Fin curl was present in all fish in 2005 and 27% of the fish in 2006. Pallid sturgeon from all treatments in both years had a greater affinity for the lower reaches of the Missouri River than the upper reaches. Thus, habitat at release site influenced poststocking dispersal more than acclimation treatment. No difference was observed in relative growth rate among treatments in 2006. However, acclimation to flow (i.e., exercise conditioning) may reduce liver fat content. Acclimation conditions used in this study may not benefit pallid sturgeon unless physiological maladies are present

  16. Degree of dispersion of latex particles in cement paste, as assessed by electrical resistivity measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, X.; Chung, D.D.L.

    1996-12-31

    The degree of dispersion of latex particles in latex-modified cement paste was assessed by measurement of the volume electrical resistivity and modeling this resistivity in terms of latex and cement phases that are partly in series and partly in parallel. The assessment was best at low values of the latex-cement ratio; it underestimated the degree of latex dispersion when the latex/cement ratio was high, especially > 0.2.

  17. Process for the synthesis of nanophase dispersion-strengthened aluminum alloy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barbour, John C.; Knapp, James Arthur; Follstaedt, David Martin; Myers, Samuel Maxwell

    1998-12-15

    A process for fabricating dispersion-strengthened ceramic-metal composites is claimed. The process comprises in-situ interaction and chemical reaction of a metal in gaseous form with a ceramic producer in plasma form. Such composites can be fabricated with macroscopic dimensions. Special emphasis is placed on fabrication of dispersion-strengthened aluminum oxide-aluminum composites, which can exhibit flow stresses more characteristic of high strength steel.

  18. Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Nuclear Facilities

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Atmospheric Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Nuclear Facilities Jim Dahl Manager, Nuclear Safety Analysis Sandia National Laboratories Office: 505-284-9067 Email: jjdahl@sandia.gov SAND2012-4478P Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. 2 Dispersion and Consequence Analysis at Sandia's TA-V Topics: * Site

  19. Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, E.N.

    1995-03-07

    A method is described for the in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase. 2 figs.

  20. Method for in situ characterization of a medium of dispersed matter in a continuous phase

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaufman, Eric N.

    1995-01-01

    A method for in situ characterization of a medium of a dispersed phase in a continuous phase, including the steps of adding a fluorescent dye to one phase capable of producing fluorescence therein when the fluorescent dye is optically excited, optically exciting the fluorescent dye at a wavelength to produce fluorescence in the one phase, and monitoring the fluorescence to distinguish the continuous phase from the dispersed phase.

  1. Photoluminescence analysis of self induced planer alignment in azo dye dispersed nematic liquid crystal complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Rishi Sood, Srishti Raina, K. K.

    2014-04-24

    We have developed azo dye doped nematic liquid crystal complex for advanced photonic liquid crystal display technology aspects. Disperse orange azo dye self introduced planer alignment in the nematic liquid crystal without any surface anchoring treatment. Planer alignment was characterized by optical polarizing microscopy. The electro-optical switching response of dye disperse planer aligned nematic cell was investigated as a function of applied voltage with the help of photoluminescence spectrophotometer for the tuning of photoluminescence contrast.

  2. Method and apparatus for reducing sample dispersion in turns and junctions of microchannel systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Stewart K.; Nilson, Robert H.

    2001-01-01

    The performance of microchannel devices is improved by providing turns, wyes, tees, and other junctions that produce little dispersions of a sample as it traverses the turn or junction. The reduced dispersion results from contraction and expansion regions that reduce the cross-sectional area over some portion of the turn or junction. By carefully designing the geometries of these regions, sample dispersion in turns and junctions is reduced to levels comparable to the effects of ordinary diffusion. A numerical algorithm was employed to evolve low-dispersion geometries by computing the electric or pressure field within candidate configurations, sample transport through the turn or junction, and the overall effective dispersion. These devices should greatly increase flexibility in the design of microchannel devices by permitting the use of turns and junctions that do not induce large sample dispersion. In particular, the ability to fold electrophoretic and electrochrornatographic separation columns will allow dramatic improvements in the miniaturization of these devices. The low-lispersion devices are particularly suited to electrochromatographic and electrophoretic separations, as well as pressure-driven chromatographic separation. They are further applicable to microfluidic systems employing either electroosrnotic or pressure-driven flows for sample transport, reaction, mixing, dilution or synthesis.

  3. Use and Application of the ARCON96 Dispersion Model at the Y-12 Complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.A.; Lee, D.W.; Miller, R.L.

    2001-06-04

    The Atmospheric Relative Concentrations in Building Wakes computer code (ARCON96) was developed for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to calculate normalized concentrations in plumes from nuclear power plants at control room air intakes in the vicinity of hypothetical accidental releases. ARCON96 implements a straight-line Gaussian dispersion model with dispersion coefficients that are modified to account for low-wind-speed meander and building wake effects. These two modifications to the dispersion coefficients were benchmarked and justified in the ARCON96 code documentation. The code calculates {chi}/Q values (normalized concentrations) consistent with the methodology defined in NRC Regulatory Guide (RG) 1.145, position 3. Based on recent U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) acceptance of NRC RG 1.145, position 3 methodology for performing accident dispersion analyses, BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. evaluated the potential use and application for performing dispersion analyses at the Y-12 Complex. Using site specific meteorology inputs, a generic analysis (assuming ground-level releases) was performed to develop site-wide normalized concentrations for various distances to be used in consequence screening analyses. Additionally, the results were compared to other dispersion analysis models for confirmation of the results.

  4. Modular manifold for integrated fluidics and electronics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Adkins, Douglas Ray

    2010-03-30

    An airtight preconcentrator housing and/or a sensor housing for chemical testing, the housing(s) comprising internal dimensions such that a pre-manufactured preconcentrator and/or sensor can be disposed therein. The housings can also comprise electrical contacts disposed therein which align with and thus provide electrical connection to the preconcentrator and/or sensor. The preconcentrator and/or sensor can be easily and quickly replaced.

  5. Trace anomaly on a quantum spacetime manifold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spallucci, Euro; Smailagic, Anais; Nicolini, Piero

    2006-04-15

    In this paper we investigate the trace anomaly in a space-time where single events are delocalized as a consequence of short distance quantum coordinate fluctuations. We obtain a modified form of heat kernel asymptotic expansion which does not suffer from short distance divergences. Calculation of the trace anomaly is performed using an IR regulator in order to circumvent the absence of UV infinities. The explicit form of the trace anomaly is presented and the corresponding 2D Polyakov effective action and energy-momentum tensor are obtained. The vacuum expectation value of the energy-momentum tensor in the Boulware, Hartle-Hawking and Unruh vacua is explicitly calculated in a rt section of a recently found, noncommutative inspired, Schwarzschild-like solution of the Einstein equations. The standard short distance divergences in the vacuum expectation values are regularized in agreement with the absence of UV infinities removed by quantum coordinate fluctuations.

  6. Manifold free multiple sheet superplastic forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Bridges, Robert L.

    2004-01-13

    Fluid-forming compositions in a container attached to enclosed adjacent sheets are heated to relatively high temperatures to generate fluids (gases) that effect inflation of the sheets. Fluid rates to the enclosed space between the sheets can be regulated by the canal from the container. Inflated articles can be produced by a continuous, rather than batch-type, process.

  7. Manifold free multiple sheet superplastic forming

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Bridges, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    Fluid-forming compositions in a container attached to enclosed adjacent sheets are heated to relatively high temperatures to generate fluids (gases) that effect inflation of the sheets. Fluid rates to the enclosed space between the sheets can be regulated by the canal from the container. Inflated articles can be produced by a continuous, rather than batch-type, process.

  8. Session 70 - Panel: Consequence Management of a Radiological Dispersion Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demmer, Rick; Lenox, Dave; Wilson, Pete; Schumann, Jean; Honerlah, Hans; Chen, S.Y.; Gwiazdowski, Gene

    2006-07-01

    This was an unusual panel session in that the panelists did not give presentations but responded to a tabletop exercise where they postulated decisions necessary after radiological dispersal device detonation event (dirty bomb). Articles in the daily WM'06 newsletter sought to prepare the participants for a simulated exercise involving the sighting of a known terrorist and the theft of radiological materials. During the slide presentation (in the form of a developing television news broadcast) the audience played decision makers and their 'votes' were tallied for multiple choice decisions and questions. After that was completed, the expert panel was asked to give their best responses for those decisions. The audience was allowed to ask questions and to give opinions as the panel responded. During the exercise the session co-chairs alternated announcing the events as they unfolded in the exercise and polled the audience using multiple-choice options for decisions to be made during the event. The answers to those questions were recorded and compared to the panelists' answers. The event chronology and decisions (audience questions) are shown in this report. - An explosion was reported at the Tucson International Airport (9:35 am). 1. Who is in charge? - Witnesses report 10-20 fatalities, 50 injured and massive damage to the airport, no cause determined yet (9:55 am). 2. IC's Next Action Should Be? - KRAD (local television station) Investigative News Reporters interviewed witnesses that observed a 25 foot U-Haul truck pull up onto the departure ramp just moments before the explosion (10:02 am). Terrorism has not been ruled out. 3. When is the incident declared a potential crime scene? - City of Tucson IC has ordered an evacuation of the airport to a holding area at a nearby long term parking area (10:10 am). No information has been given as to why the evacuation took place. The explosion is suspected to contain chemical, biological or radiological agents. County and

  9. Temperature, humidity and air flow in the emplacement drifts using convection and dispersion transport models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, G.; Birkholzer, J.T.; Bahrami, D.; Halecky, N.

    2009-10-01

    A coupled thermal-hydrologic-airflow model is developed, solving for the transport processes within a waste emplacement drift and the surrounding rockmass together at the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Natural, convective air flow as well as heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during post-closure are explicitly simulated, using the MULTIFLUX model. The conjugate, thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the rockmass are solved with the TOUGH2 porous-media simulator in a coupled way to the in-drift processes. The new simulation results show that large-eddy turbulent flow, as opposed to small-eddy flow, dominate the drift air space for at least 5000 years following waste emplacement. The size of the largest, longitudinal eddy is equal to half of the drift length, providing a strong axial heat and moisture transport mechanism from the hot to the cold drift sections. The in-drift results are compared to those from simplified models using a surrogate, dispersive model with an equivalent dispersion coefficient for heat and moisture transport. Results from the explicit, convective velocity simulation model provide higher axial heat and moisture fluxes than those estimated from the previously published, simpler, equivalent-dispersion models, in addition to showing differences in temperature, humidity and condensation rate distributions along the drift length. A new dispersive model is also formulated, giving a time- and location-variable function that runs generally about ten times higher in value than the highest dispersion coefficient currently used in the Yucca Mountain Project as an estimate for the equivalent dispersion coefficient in the emplacement drift. The new dispersion coefficient variation, back-calculated from the convective model, can adequately describe the heat and mass transport processes in the emplacement drift example.

  10. A laboratory approach for determining the effect of oils and dispersants on mangroves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baca, B.J.

    1982-10-01

    An experimental approach was developed and applied to testing the effects of oil and dispersant combinations on the growth of mangrove seedlings (trees of the intertidal tropics). A controlled growth chamber was employed to test the effects of different oils and dispersed oils in an array of dosages applied to different parts of the plants. Preliminary test results are reported for two species of mangroves collected from five localities, including both oiled and unoiled estuaries. Differences occurred between species, substances, dosages, the part of the plant dosed, and the presence of chronic oil pollution at localities from which the stocks were collected. Avicennia germinans (L.) L. (black mangrove) was more sensitive than Rhizophora mangle L. (red mangrove) when exposed to almost all substances tested. Light Arabian crude oil (LA) and light Arabian crude oil dispersed (LAD) were the most toxic substances tested. No. 2 fuel oil (N2) and No. 2 fuel oil dispersed (N2D) were as toxic as LA and LAD, except for an increase (an enhancement effect) in foliage and stem growth in Avicennia at lower dosages. Bunker C oil (BC) was the least toxic of the oils tested, resulting in the reduction of foliage and stem growth only at the highest dosage tested in Avicennia. Bunker C oil dispersed (BCD) failed to show effects in either species at any dosage tested. The leaves of Rhizophora were the most sensitive part of the plant tested.

  11. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tavlarides, L.L.; Bae, J.H.

    1991-12-24

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes. 17 figures.

  12. Laser capillary spectrophotometric acquisition of bivariate drop size and concentration data for liquid-liquid dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tavlarides, Lawrence L. (Fayetteville, NY); Bae, Jae-Heum (Daejeon, KR)

    1991-01-01

    A laser capillary spectrophotometric technique measures real time or near real time bivariate drop size and concentration distribution for a reactive liquid-liquid dispersion system. The dispersion is drawn into a precision-bore glass capillary and an appropriate light source is used to distinguish the aqueous phase from slugs of the organic phase at two points along the capillary whose separation is precisely known. The suction velocity is measured, as is the length of each slug from which the drop free diameter is calculated. For each drop, the absorptivity at a given wavelength is related to the molar concentration of a solute of interest, and the concentration of given drops of the organic phase is derived from pulse heights of the detected light. This technique permits on-line monitoring and control of liquid-liquid dispersion processes.

  13. Attempt to estimate measurement uncertainty in the Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zettlemoyer, M.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Air Force Toxic Chemical Dispersion (AFTOX) model is a Gaussian puff dispersion model that predicts plumes, concentrations, and hazard distances of toxic chemical spills. A measurement uncertainty propagation formula derived by Freeman et al. (1986) is used within AFTOX to estimate resulting concentration uncertainties due to the effects of data input uncertainties in wind speed, spill height, emission rate, and the horizontal and vertical Gaussian dispersion parameters, and the results are compared to true uncertainties as estimated by standard deviations computed by Monte Carlo simulations. The measurement uncertainty uncertainty propagation formula was found to overestimate measurement uncertainty in AFTOX-calculated concentrations by at least 350 percent, with overestimates worsening with increasing stability and/or increasing measurement uncertainty.

  14. Methods to control phase inversions and enhance mass transfer in liquid-liquid dispersions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsouris, Constantinos; Dong, Junhang

    2002-01-01

    The present invention is directed to the effects of applied electric fields on liquid-liquid dispersions. In general, the present invention is directed to the control of phase inversions in liquid-liquid dispersions. Because of polarization and deformation effects, coalescence of aqueous drops is facilitated by the application of electric fields. As a result, with an increase in the applied voltage, the ambivalence region is narrowed and shifted toward higher volume fractions of the dispersed phase. This permits the invention to be used to ensure that the aqueous phase remains continuous, even at a high volume fraction of the organic phase. Additionally, the volume fraction of the organic phase may be increased without causing phase inversion, and may be used to correct a phase inversion which has already occurred. Finally, the invention may be used to enhance mass transfer rates from one phase to another through the use of phase inversions.

  15. Dispersion and interaction of waveguide modes in a relativistic electron beam with ion-channel guiding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maraghechi, Borna; Maraghechi, Behrouz

    2008-07-15

    A theory for the high-frequency eigenmodes of a cylindrical metallic waveguide partially filled with a relativistic electron beam and guided by an ion channel is presented. Equations that permit calculation of dispersion curves for five families of wave modes are derived. The dependence of the frequencies and the dispersion curves of azimuthally asymmetric modes on the ratio of the beam radius a to the waveguide radius R are studied in detail. The coupling of the dispersion curves of different modes is studied and illustrated for the partially filled waveguide. It was found that, in their course of interaction, HE modes cannot displace the betatron modes in a completely filled waveguide, which is different from the case of a magnetized electron beam. Physical and analytical explanations are presented for this difference.

  16. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introduces a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  17. Method of producing an oxide dispersion strengthened coating and micro-channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kang, Bruce S; Chyu, Minking K; Alvin, Mary Anne; Gleeson, Brian M

    2013-12-17

    The disclosure provides a method for the production of composite particles utilizing a mechano chemical bonding process following by high energy ball milling on a powder mixture comprised of coating particles, first host particles, and second host particles. The composite particles formed have a grain size of less than one micron with grains generally characterized by a uniformly dispersed coating material and a mix of first material and second material intermetallics. The method disclosed is particularly useful for the fabrication of oxide dispersion strengthened coatings, for example using a powder mixture comprised of Y.sub.2O.sub.3, Cr, Ni, and Al. This particular powder mixture may be subjected to the MCB process for a period generally less than one hour following by high energy ball milling for a period as short as 2 hours. After application by cold spraying, the composite particles may be heat treated to generate an oxide-dispersion strengthened coating.

  18. The general dispersion relation of induced streaming instabilities in quantum outflow systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehdian, H. Hajisharifi, K.; Hasanbeigi, A.

    2015-11-15

    In this manuscript the dispersion relations of streaming instabilities, by using the unique property (neutralized in charge and current by default) of plasma shells colliding, have been generalized and studied. This interesting property for interpenetrating beams enables one to find the general dispersion relations without any restrictions used in the previous works in this area. In our previous work [H. Mehdian et al., ApJ. 801, 89 (2015)], employing the plasma shell concept and boost frame method, the general dispersion relation for filamentation instability has been derived in the relativistic classical regime. But in this paper, using the above mentioned concepts, the general dispersion relations (for each of streaming instabilities, filamentation, two-stream and multi-stream) in the non-relativistic quantum regime have been derived by employing the quantum fluid equations together with Maxwell equations. The derived dispersion relations enable to describe any arbitrary system of interacting two and three beams, justified neutralization condition, by choosing the inertial reference frame embedded on the one of the beams. Furthermore, by the numerical and analytical study of these dispersion relations, many new features of streaming instabilities (E.g. their cut-off wave numbers and growth rates) in terms of all involved parameters have been illustrated. The obtained results in this paper can be used to describe many astrophysical systems and laboratory astrophysics setting, such as collision of non-parallel plasma shells over a background plasma or the collision of three neutralized plasma slabs, and justifying the many plasma phenomena such as particle accelerations and induced fields.

  19. Analyses of High Pressure Molten Debris Dispersion for a Typical PWR Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osamu KAawabata; Mitsuhiro Kajimoto [Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (Japan)

    2006-07-01

    In such severe core damage accident, as small LOCAs with no ECCS injection or station blackout, in which the primary reactor system remains pressurized during core melt down, certain modes of vessel failure would lead to a high pressure ejection of molten core material. In case of a local failure of the lower head, the molten materials would initially be ejected into the cavity beneath the pressure vessel may subsequently be swept out from the cavity to the containment atmosphere and it might cause the early containment failure by direct contact of containment steel liner with core debris. When the contribution of a high-pressure scenario in a core damage frequency increases, early conditional containment failure probability may become large. In the present study, the verification analysis of PHOENICS code and the combining analysis with MELCOR and PHOENICS codes were performed to examine the debris dispersion behavior during high pressure melt ejection. The PHOENICS code which can treat thermal hydraulic phenomena, was applied to the verification analysis for melt dispersion experiments conducted by the Purdue university in the United States. A low pressure melt dispersion experiment at initial pressure 1.4 MPas used metal woods as a molten material was simulated. The analytical results with molten debris dispersion mostly from the model reactor cavity compartment showed an agreement with the experimental result, but the analysis result of a volumetric median diameter of the airborne debris droplets was estimated about 1.5 times of the experimental result. The injection rates of molten debris and steam after reactor vessel failure for a typical PWR plant were analyzed using the MELCOR code. In addition, PHOENICS was applied to a 3D analysis for debris dispersion with low primary pressure at the reactor vessel failure. The analysis result showed that almost all the molten debris were dispersed from the reactor vessel cavity compartment by about 45 seconds after the

  20. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01

    Dispersion in porous media flows has been the subject of much experimental, theoretical and numerical study. Here we consider a wavy-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media, where constrictions represent pore throats and expansions pore bodies. A theoretical model for effective (macroscopic) longitudinal dispersion in this system has been developed by volume averaging the microscale velocity field. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re = 449 for which unsteady flow was observed. Dispersion values were computed using both the volume averaging solution and a random walk particle tracking method, and results of the two methods were shown to be consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for the low-Re, Stokes flow regime. In the steady inertial regime we observe an power-law increase in effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re, consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). For the unsteady case (Re = 449), the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion.

  1. On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Spectroscopy | Department of Energy board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV) Spectroscopy On-board Measurement of NO and NO2 using Non-dispersive Ultraviolet (NDUV) Spectroscopy Analyzer allows simultaneous and separate measurement of NO and NO2 for on-road and non-raod applications p-11_ensfield.pdf (194.58 KB) More Documents & Publications On-Board Measurement of Ammonia and Nitrous Oxide Using Feedback Absorption Laser Spectroscopy Combined with

  2. Observation of spin-wave dispersion in Nd-Fe-B magnets using neutron Brillouin scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, K. Inami, N.; Saito, K.; Takeichi, Y.; Kawana, D.; Yokoo, T.; Itoh, S.; Yano, M.; Shoji, T.; Manabe, A.; Kato, A.; Kaneko, Y.

    2014-05-07

    The low-energy spin-wave dispersion in polycrystalline Nd-Fe-B magnets was observed using neutron Brillouin scattering (NBS). Low-energy spin-wave excitations for the lowest acoustic spin-wave mode were clearly observed. From the spin-wave dispersion, we were able to determine the spin-wave stiffness constant D{sub sw} (100.0??4.9?meV.{sup 2}) and the exchange stiffness constant A (6.6 0.3 pJ/m)

  3. MnO spin-wave dispersion curves from neutron powder diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, Andrew L.; Dove, Martin T.; Tucker, Matthew G.; Keen, David A.

    2007-02-15

    We describe a model-independent approach for the extraction of spin-wave dispersion curves from powder neutron total scattering data. Our approach is based on a statistical analysis of real-space spin configurations to calculate spin-dynamical quantities. The RMCPROFILE implementation of the reverse Monte Carlo refinement process is used to generate a large ensemble of supercell spin configurations from MnO powder diffraction data collected at 100 K. Our analysis of these configurations gives spin-wave dispersion curves for MnO that agree well with those determined independently using neutron triple-axis spectroscopic techniques.

  4. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.; Hendricks, Troy R.

    2012-06-19

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  5. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

    2013-06-11

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  6. DISPERSION ELEMENT CONSISTING OF CHROMIUM COATED UO$sup 2$ PARTICLES UNIFORMLY DISTRIBUTED IN A ZIRCALOY MATRIX

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cain, F.M. Jr.; Eck, J.E.

    1963-05-01

    A nuclear fuel element consisting of metal coated UO/sub 2/ particles dispersed in a matrix of Zircalloy and having a cladding of Zircalloy is presented. (AEC)

  7. A REDUCED-BOUNDARY-FUNCTION METHOD FOR LONGITUDINAL SOLUTION DISPERSION IN SYMMETRIC CONFINED FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhijie

    2013-07-01

    We present a reduced-boundary-function method for longitudinal solute transport in symmetric laminar flows. Flow is confined by two flat plates separated by a distance of 2a or by a tube with a radius of a (Figure 1). The standard advection-diffusion equation is mapped onto the boundary (r = a and r = 0, where r is the distance from the centerline shown in Figure 1). The original problem of solving c(x,r,t) is reduced to solve the solutions of c at the boundary, and the problem dimensionality is reduced from 3 to 2. Final results show that the boundary concentration ca(x,t) = c(x, r = a,t) is advected at the mean velocity with a dispersion equal to the molecular diffusion. The centerline concentration c0(x,t) = c(x,r = 0,t) is also advected at the mean velocity, but with a dispersion much larger than the Taylor dispersion. The cross-sectional average concentration is in agreement with the classical Taylor dispersion by neglecting higher order contributions. This study is relevant to the upscaling of solute transport.

  8. Method to estimate the vertical dispersion parameter in a 10 Km range

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaoen, L.; Xinyuan, J.; Jinte, Y.

    1983-12-01

    Based on the Monin-Batchelor Similarity Theory and the concept of effective roughness length, this paper presented an empirical vertical dispersion model in a 10 kilometer range. It could be used under a flat and homogeneous, as well as complex, topographical condition.

  9. Assessment of cavity dispersal correlations for possible implementation in the CONTAIN code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, D.C.; Griffith, R.O.

    1996-02-01

    Candidate models and correlations describing entrainment and dispersal of core debris from reactor cavities in direct containment heating (DCH) event, are assessed against a data base of approximately 600 experiments performed previously at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories reactor cavities was studied. Cavity geometries studied are those of the Surry and Zion nuclear power plants and scale factors of 1/42 and 1/10 were studied for both geometries. Other parameters varied in the experiments include gas pressure driving the dispersal, identities of the driving gas and of the simulant fluid, orifice diameter in the pressure vessel, and volume of the gas pressure vessel. Correlations were assessed in terms of their ability to reproduce the observed trends in the fractions dispersed as the experimental parameters were varied. For the fraction of the debris dispersed, the correlations recommended for inclusion in the CONTAIN code are the Tutu-Ginsberg correlations, the integral form of the correlation proposed by Levy and a modified form of the Whalley-Hewitt correlation. For entrainment rates, the recommended correlations are the time-dependent forms of the Levy correlation, a correlation suggested by Tutu, and the modified Whalley-Hewitt correlation.

  10. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSION COEFFICIENTS AND RADIOLOGICAL AND TOXICOLOGICAL EXPOSURE METHODOLOGY FOR USE IN TANK FARMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GRIGSBY KM

    2011-04-07

    This report presents the atmospheric dispersion coefficients used in Tank Farms safety analysis. The basis equations for calculating radiological and toxicological exposures are also included. In this revision, the time averaging for toxicological consequence evaluations is clarified based on a review of DOE complex guidance and a review of tank farm chemicals.

  11. Novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for temperature-programmed coal liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chunshan Song; Schobert, H.H.; Parfitt, D.P.

    1997-11-01

    Development of new catalysts is a promising approach to more efficient coal liquefaction. It has been recognized that dispersed catalysts are superior to supported catalysts for primary liquefaction of coals, because the control of initial coal dissolution or depolymerization requires intimate contact between the catalyst and coal. This research is a fundamental and exploratory study on catalytic coal liquefaction, with the emphasis on exploring novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction and the effectiveness of temperature-programmed liquefaction using dispersed catalysts. The primary objective of this research was to explore novel bimetallic dispersed catalysts from organometallic molecular precursors, that could be used in low concentrations but exhibit relatively high activity for efficient hydroliquefaction of coals under temperature-programmed conditions. We have synthesized and tested various catalyst precursors in liquefaction of subbituminous and bituminous coals and in model compound studies to examine how do the composition and structure of the catalytic precursors affect their effectiveness for coal liquefaction under different reaction conditions, and how do these factors affect their catalytic functions for hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons, for cleavage of C-C bonds in polycyclic systems such as 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl, for hydrogenolysis of C-O bond such as that in dinaphthylether, for hydrodeoxygenation of phenolic compounds and other oxygen-containing compounds such as xanthene, and for hydrodesulfurization of polycyclic sulfur compounds such as dibenzothiophene. The novel bimetallic and monometallic precursors synthesized and tested in this project include various Mo- and Fe-based compounds.

  12. Controlling Non-Covalent Interactions to Modulate the Dispersion of Fullerenes in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linton, Dias; Dadmun, Mark D; Sumpter, Bobby G; Teh, Say-Lee

    2011-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) are materials based on a class of filled plastics that contain relatively small amounts of nanoparticles, which can impart improved structural, mechanical, and thermal properties relative to the neat polymer. However, the homogeneous dispersion of the nanoparticles into a polymer matrix is critical and an impeding factor for the controlled enhancement of PNC properties. In this work, we provide new insight into the importance of polymer chain connectivity and nanoparticle shape and curvature on the formation of noncovalent electron donoracceptor (EDA) interactions between polymers and nanoparticles. This is accomplished by experimentally monitoring the dispersion of nanoparticles in copolymers containing varying amounts of functional moieties that can form noncovalent interactions with carbon nanoparticles with corroboration through density functional calculations. The results show that the presence of a minority of interacting functional groups within a polymer chain leads to an optimum interaction between the polymer and fullerene. Density functional theory calculations that identify the binding energy and geometry of the interaction between the functional monomers and fullerenes correspond very well with the experimental results. Moreover, comparison of these results to similar studies with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) indicate a distinct difference in the ability of EDA interactions to improve the dispersion of fullerenes relative to their impact on SWNT. Thus, the polymer chain connectivity, the polymer chain conformation, and size and shape of the nanoparticle modulate the formation of intermolecular interactions and directly impact the dispersion of the resultant nanocomposite.

  13. Controlling Non-Covalent Interactions to Modulate the Dispersion of Fullerenes in Polymer Nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sumpter, Bobby G

    2011-01-01

    Polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) are materials based on a class of filled plastics that contain relatively small amounts of nanoparticles, which can impart improved structural, mechanical, and thermal properties relative to the neat polymer. However, the homogeneous dispersion of the nanoparticles into a polymer matrix is critical and an impeding factor for the controlled enhancement of PNC properties. In this work, we provide new insight into the importance of polymer chain connectivity and nanoparticle shape and curvature on the formation of noncovalent electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interactions between polymers and nanoparticles. This is accomplished by experimentally monitoring the dispersion of nanoparticles in copolymers containing varying amounts of functional moieties that can form noncovalent interactions with carbon nanoparticles with corroboration through density functional calculations. The results show that the presence of a minority of interacting functional groups within a polymer chain leads to an optimum interaction between the polymer and fullerene. Density functional theory calculations that identify the binding energy and geometry of the interaction between the functional monomers and fullerenes correspond very well with the experimental results. Moreover, comparison of these results to similar studies with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) indicate a distinct difference in the ability of EDA interactions to improve the dispersion of fullerenes relative to their impact on SWNT. Thus, the polymer chain connectivity, the polymer chain conformation, and size and shape of the nanoparticle modulate the formation of intermolecular interactions and directly impact the dispersion of the resultant nanocomposite.

  14. On the Numerical Dispersion of Electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell Code : Finite Grid Instability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyers, Michael David; Huang, Chengkun; Zeng, Yong; Yi, Sunghwan; Albright, Brian James

    2014-07-15

    The Particle-In-Cell (PIC) method is widely used in relativistic particle beam and laser plasma modeling. However, the PIC method exhibits numerical instabilities that can render unphysical simulation results or even destroy the simulation. For electromagnetic relativistic beam and plasma modeling, the most relevant numerical instabilities are the finite grid instability and the numerical Cherenkov instability. We review the numerical dispersion relation of the electromagnetic PIC algorithm to analyze the origin of these instabilities. We rigorously derive the faithful 3D numerical dispersion of the PIC algorithm, and then specialize to the Yee FDTD scheme. In particular, we account for the manner in which the PIC algorithm updates and samples the fields and distribution function. Temporal and spatial phase factors from solving Maxwell's equations on the Yee grid with the leapfrog scheme are also explicitly accounted for. Numerical solutions to the electrostatic-like modes in the 1D dispersion relation for a cold drifting plasma are obtained for parameters of interest. In the succeeding analysis, we investigate how the finite grid instability arises from the interaction of the numerical 1D modes admitted in the system and their aliases. The most significant interaction is due critically to the correct representation of the operators in the dispersion relation. We obtain a simple analytic expression for the peak growth rate due to this interaction.

  15. Modeling Dispersion of Chemical-Biological Agents in Three Dimensional Living Space

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William S. Winters

    2002-02-01

    This report documents a series of calculations designed to demonstrate Sandia's capability in modeling the dispersal of chemical and biological agents in complex three-dimensional spaces. The transport of particles representing biological agents is modeled in a single room and in several connected rooms. The influence of particle size, particle weight and injection method are studied.

  16. Dynamics of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in a longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibre amplifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zolotovskii, Igor' O; Korobko, D A; Okhotnikov, Oleg G; Sysolyatin, A A; Fotiadi, A A

    2012-09-30

    We examine conditions for the formation and amplification of frequency-modulated soliton-like pulses in longitudinally inhomogeneous, anomalous group velocity dispersion fibres. The group velocity dispersion profiles necessary for the existence and amplification of such pulses in active fibres are identified and the pulse duration and chirp are determined as functions of propagation distance. (optical fibres, lasers and amplifiers. properties and applications)

  17. Bright and dark solitons in the normal dispersion regime of inhomogeneous optical fibers: Soliton interaction and soliton control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wenjun; Tian Bo; Xu Tao; Sun Kun; Jiang Yan

    2010-08-15

    Symbolically investigated in this paper is a nonlinear Schroedinger equation with the varying dispersion and nonlinearity for the propagation of optical pulses in the normal dispersion regime of inhomogeneous optical fibers. With the aid of the Hirota method, analytic one- and two-soliton solutions are obtained. Relevant properties of physical and optical interest are illustrated. Different from the previous results, both the bright and dark solitons are hereby derived in the normal dispersion regime of the inhomogeneous optical fibers. Moreover, different dispersion profiles of the dispersion-decreasing fibers can be used to realize the soliton control. Finally, soliton interaction is discussed with the soliton control confirmed to have no influence on the interaction. The results might be of certain value for the study of the signal generator and soliton control.

  18. Measurement of average density and relative volumes in a dispersed two-phase fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sreepada, Sastry R.; Rippel, Robert R.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and a method are disclosed for measuring the average density and relative volumes in an essentially transparent, dispersed two-phase fluid. A laser beam with a diameter no greater than 1% of the diameter of the bubbles, droplets, or particles of the dispersed phase is directed onto a diffraction grating. A single-order component of the diffracted beam is directed through the two-phase fluid and its refraction is measured. Preferably, the refracted beam exiting the fluid is incident upon a optical filter with linearly varing optical density and the intensity of the filtered beam is measured. The invention can be combined with other laser-based measurement systems, e.g., laser doppler anemometry.

  19. Mid-infrared intersubband polaritons in dispersive metal-insulator-metal resonators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manceau, J.-M. Ongarello, T.; Colombelli, R.; Zanotto, S.; Sorba, L.; Tredicucci, A.; Biasiol, G.

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate room-temperature strong coupling between a mid-infrared (λ = 9.9 μm) intersubband transition and the fundamental cavity mode of a metal-insulator-metal resonator. Patterning of the resonator surface enables surface-coupling of the radiation and introduces an energy dispersion which can be probed with angle-resolved reflectivity. In particular, the polaritonic dispersion presents an accessible energy minimum at k = 0 where—potentially—polaritons can accumulate. We also show that it is possible to maximize the coupling of photons into the polaritonic states and—simultaneously—to engineer the position of the minimum Rabi splitting at a desired value of the in-plane wavevector. This can be precisely accomplished via a simple post-processing technique. The results are confirmed using the temporal coupled mode theory formalism and their significance in the context of the strong critical coupling concept is highlighted.

  20. Tuning of the electro-mechanical behavior of the cellular carbon nanotube structures with nanoparticle dispersions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowda, Prarthana; Misra, Abha; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589

    2014-03-10

    The mechanical and electrical characteristics of cellular network of the carbon nanotubes (CNT) impregnated with metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles were examined simultaneously by employing the nanoindentation technique. Experimental results show that the nanoparticle dispersion not only enhances the mechanical strength of the cellular CNT by two orders of magnitude but also imparts variable nonlinear electrical characteristics; the latter depends on the contact resistance between nanoparticles and CNT, which is shown to depend on the applied load while indentation. Impregnation with silver nanoparticles enhances the electrical conductance, the dispersion with copper oxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles reduces the conductance of CNT network. In all cases, a power law behavior with suppression in the differential conductivity at zero bias was noted, indicating electron tunneling through the channels formed at the CNT-nanoparticle interfaces. These results open avenues for designing cellular CNT foams with desired electro-mechanical properties and coupling.

  1. On the Sensitivity of Neutrino Telescopes to a Modified Dispersion Relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bustamante, M.; Gago, A. M.; Bazo, J. L.; Miranda, O. G.

    2008-07-02

    We consider a modified dispersion relation and its effect on the flavour ratios of high-energy neutrinos originated at distant astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei. This dispersion relation arise naturally in different new physics (NP) effects such as violation of CPT invariance, of the equivalence principle and of Lorentz invariance. It is a common notion in the literature that by using the flux of high-energy neutrinos expected from distant astrophysical sources, the sensitivity to possible NP effects may be improved beyond the current bounds. However, performing a realistic analysis that takes into account the expected number of events in future neutrino telescopes, we find that the average detected flavour ratios with and without the inclusion of new physics have essentially the same value, making difficult to obtain an improved bound for this type of new physics.

  2. The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART-WRF VERSION 3.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brioude, J.; Arnold, D.; Stohl, A.; Cassiani, M.; Morton, Don; Seibert, P.; Angevine, W. M.; Evan, S.; Dingwell, A.; Fast, Jerome D.; Easter, Richard C.; Pisso, I.; Bukhart, J.; Wotawa, G.

    2013-11-01

    The Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART was originally designed for cal- culating long-range and mesoscale dispersion of air pollutants from point sources, such as after an accident in a nuclear power plant. In the meantime FLEXPART has evolved into a comprehensive tool for atmospheric transport modeling and analysis at different scales. This multiscale need from the modeler community has encouraged new developments in FLEXPART. In this document, we present a version that works with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale meteoro- logical model. Simple procedures on how to run FLEXPART-WRF are presented along with special options and features that differ from its predecessor versions. In addition, test case data, the source code and visualization tools are provided to the reader as supplementary material.

  3. Upgraging heavy crude oils to lighter products with a dispersed zeolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollmann, L. D.

    1985-08-20

    This invention provides a process for upgrading a variety of hydrocarbon oils including low-grade crudes and fractions thereof. In this process, a hydrocarbon oil having an ASTM 50% temperature not higher than 550/sup 0/ F. is converted at low temperature and pressure to more volatile products by a dispersion of crystalline zeolite catalysts having a silica: aluminia ratio of at least 12 and a C.I. within 1-12. Initially, 0.02-10 wt % of the catalyst is dispersed in the feed until the catalyst inventory in the reactor stage accumulates. Thereafter, catalyst is added and removed to maintain a total catalyst content not greater than about 35 wt % of the feed in the reactor.

  4. Soliton formation and evolution in passively-mode-locked lasers with ultralong anomalous-dispersion fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Xueming

    2011-08-15

    The soliton formation and evolution are numerically and experimentally investigated in passively-mode-locked lasers where pulses encounter ultralong anomalous-dispersion fibers. The pulse formation and evolution in lasers are determined by two balances, namely, nonlinearity and anomalous-dispersion balance and intracavity filtering and self-amplitude modulation balance. It is numerically found that a higher-energy soliton can be split into identical lower-energy multisolitons with exactly the same physical properties. Simulation results show that the separation of neighboring solitons is variational in the temporal domain. The temporal and spectral characteristics of solitons have large variations throughout the laser cavity, qualitatively distinct from the steady state of conventional solitons. The experimental observations confirm the theoretical predictions.

  5. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buck, R.F.

    1994-05-10

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05--0.1 C, 8--12 Cr, 1--5 Co, 0.5--2.0 Ni, 0.41--1.0 Mo, 0.1--0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels. 2 figures.

  6. Creep resistant, precipitation-dispersion-strengthened, martensitic stainless steel and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buck, Robert F.

    1994-01-01

    An iron-based, corrosion-resistant, precipitation strengthened, martensitic steel essentially free of delta ferrite for use at high temperatures has a nominal composition of 0.05-0.1 C, 8-12 Cr, 1-5 Co, 0.5-2.0 Ni, 0.41-1.0 Mo, 0.1-0.5 Ti, and the balance iron. This steel is different from other corrosion-resistant martensitic steels because its microstructure consists of a uniform dispersion of fine particles, which are very closely spaced, and which do not coarsen at high temperatures. Thus at high temperatures this steel combines the excellent creep strength of dispersion-strengthened steels, with the ease of fabricability afforded by precipitation hardenable steels.

  7. Dispersive representation and shape of the K{sub l3} form factors: Robustness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernard, Veronique; Stern, Jan; Passemar, Emilie

    2009-08-01

    An accurate low-energy dispersive parametrization of the scalar K{pi} form factor was constructed some time ago in terms of a single parameter guided by the Callan-Treiman low-energy theorem. A similar twice-subtracted dispersive parametrization for the vector K{pi} form factor will be investigated here. The robustness of the parametrization of these two form factors will be studied in great detail. In particular the cutoff dependence, the isospin breaking effects, and the possible, though not highly probable, presence of zeros in the form factors will be discussed. Interesting constraints in the latter case will be obtained from the soft-kaon analog of the Callan-Treiman theorem and a comparison with the recent {tau}{yields}K{pi}{nu}{sub {tau}} data.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of Irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si Dispersion to High Fission Density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Gan; B. D. Miller; D. D. Keiser, Jr.; A. B. Robinson; J. W. Madden; P. G. Medvedev; D. M. Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The fuel development program for research and test reactors calls for improved knowledge on the effect of microstructure on fuel performance in reactors. This work summarizes the recent TEM microstructural characterization of an irradiated U-7Mo/Al-5Si dispersion fuel plate (R3R050) irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory to 5.21021 fissions/cm3. While a large fraction of the fuel grains is decorated with large bubbles, there is no evidence showing interlinking of these large bubbles at the specified fission density. The attachment of solid fission product precipitates to the bubbles is likely the result of fission product diffusion into these bubbles. The process of fission gas bubble superlattice collapse appears through bubble coalescence. The results are compared with the previous TEM work of the dispersion fuels irradiated to lower fission density from the same fuel plate.

  9. Water soluble/dispersible and easy removable cationic adhesives and coating for paper recycling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Yulin; Yan, Zegui

    2005-11-29

    The present invention is an adhesive or coating composition that is dispersible or dissolvable in water, making it useful in as a coating or adhesive in paper intended for recycling. The composition of the present invention is cationically charged thereby binding with the fibers of the paper slurry and thus, resulting in reduced deposition of adhesives on equipment during the recycling process. The presence of the composition of the present invention results in stronger interfiber bonding in products produced from the recycled fibers.

  10. Dispersion curves from short-time molecular dynamics simulation. 1. Diatomic chain results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noid, D.W.; Broocks, B.T.; Gray, S.K.; Marple, S.L.

    1988-06-16

    The multiple signal classification method (MUSIC) for frequency estimation is used to compute the frequency dispersion curves of a diatomic chain from the time-dependent structure factor. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that MUSIC can accurately determine the frequencies from very short time trajectories. MUSIC is also used to show how the frequencies can vary in time, i.e., along a trajectory. The method is ideally suited for analyzing molecular dynamics simulations of large systems.

  11. Method of preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Yu-Min; Wang, Jih-Wen; Liue, Chun-Ying; Yeh, Shinn-Horng

    1994-01-01

    A method for preparing silicon carbide particles dispersed in an electrolytic bath for composite electroplating of metals includes the steps of washing the silicon carbide particles with an organic solvent; washing the silicon carbide particles with an inorganic acid; grinding the silicon carbide particles; and heating the silicon carbide particles in a nickel-containing solution at a boiling temperature for a predetermined period of time.

  12. FIREPLUME model for plume dispersion from fires: Application to uranium hexafluoride cylinder fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.F.; Dunn, W.E.; Policastro, A.J.; Maloney, D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides basic documentation of the FIREPLUME model and discusses its application to the prediction of health impacts resulting from releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) in fires. The model application outlined in this report was conducted for the Draft Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Alternative Strategies for the Long-Term Management and Use of Depleted UF{sub 6}. The FIREPLUME model is an advanced stochastic model for atmospheric plume dispersion that predicts the downwind consequences of a release of toxic materials from an explosion or a fire. The model is based on the nonbuoyant atmospheric dispersion model MCLDM (Monte Carlo Lagrangian Dispersion Model), which has been shown to be consistent with available laboratory and field data. The inclusion of buoyancy and the addition of a postprocessor to evaluate time-varying concentrations lead to the current model. The FIREPLUME model, as applied to fire-related UF{sub 6} cylinder releases, accounts for three phases of release and dispersion. The first phase of release involves the hydraulic rupture of the cylinder due to heating of the UF{sub 6} in the fire. The second phase involves the emission of material into the burning fire, and the third phase involves the emission of material after the fire has died during the cool-down period. The model predicts the downwind concentration of the material as a function of time at any point downwind at or above the ground. All together, five fire-related release scenarios are examined in this report. For each scenario, downwind concentrations of the UF{sub 6} reaction products, uranyl fluoride and hydrogen fluoride, are provided for two meteorological conditions: (1) D stability with a 4-m/s wind speed, and (2) F stability with a 1-m/s wind speed.

  13. Dispersive x-ray synchrotron studies of Pt-C multilayers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smither, R.K.; Rodricks, B.; Lamelas, F.; Medjahed, D.; Dos Passos, W.; Clarke, R.; Ziegler, E.; Fontaine, A.

    1989-02-01

    We demonstrate the simultaneous acquisition of high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra and scattering data, using a combination of energy-dispersive optics and a two-dimensional CCD detector. Results are presented on the optical constants of Pt and on the reflectivity of a platinum-carbon multilayer at the L/sub III/ absorption edge of Pt. 12 refs., 5 figs.

  14. Evaluation of options for disposition of dispersible material in B-Cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokarz, R.D.; Defferding, L.J.; Adickes, M.D.; Keene, K.E.; Pilger, J.P.; Alzheimer, J.M.; Paxton, M.M.

    1993-10-01

    The radioactive contaminants in the dispersible material in B-cell of the 324 Building Radiochemical Energy (RE) hot-cell complex at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington exceed the allowable level. In 1986, there was a spill of 1.3 million curies of concentrated cesium and strontium in B-cell. Cleanup is required, and candidate technologies for cleaning up or otherwise addressing problems associated with the dispersible material are being evaluated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The RE hot-cell complex in 324 Building was constructed in the late 1950s. From the early 1960s until today the complex has been the site of numerous research, development, and demonstration programs using radioactive and hazardous materials. In mid-FY 1988, a program to clean B-cell was initiated. At present, dispersible material has been collected from 45% of the cell floor area, and 64% of the equipment and support racks have been removed from the cell. The evaluation of decontamination procedures are described.

  15. Modeling the Influence of Interaction Layer Formation on Thermal Conductivity of UMo Dispersion Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkes, Douglas; Casella, Andrew M.; Huber, Tanja K.

    2015-01-01

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative Program continues to develop existing and new plate- and rod-type research and test reactor fuels with maximum attainable uranium loadings capable of potentially converting a number of the worlds remaining high-enriched uranium fueled reactors to low-enriched uranium fuel. Currently, the program is focused on assisting with the development and qualification of an even higher density fuel type consisting of a uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) alloy dispersed in an aluminum matrix. Thermal conductivity is an important consideration in determining the operational temperature of the fuel plate and can be influenced by interaction layer formation between the fuel and matrix, porosity that forms during fabrication of the fuel plates, and upon the concentration of the dispersed phase within the matrix. This paper develops and validates a simple model to study the influence of interaction layer formation and conductivity, fuel particle size, and volume fraction of fuel dispersed in the matrix on the effective conductivity of the composite. The model shows excellent agreement with results previously presented in the literature. In particular, the thermal conductivity of the interaction layer does not appear to be important in determining the overall conductivity of the composite, while formation of the interaction layer and subsequent consumption of the matrix reveals a rather significant effect. The effective thermal conductivity of the composite can be influenced by the fuel particle distribution by minimizing interaction layer formation and preserving the higher thermal conductivity matrix.

  16. A dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colangelo, Gilberto; Passemar, Emilie; Stoffer, Peter

    2015-04-28

    Kl4 decays offer several reasons of interest: they allow an accurate measurement of ππ-scattering lengths; they provide the best source for the determination of some low-energy constants of xPT; one form factor is directly related to the chiral anomaly, which can be measured here. We present a dispersive treatment of Kl4 decays that provides a resummation of ππ- and Kπ-rescattering effects. In addition, the free parameters of the dispersion relation are fitted to the data of the high-statistics experiments E865 and NA48/2. The matching toxPT at NLO and NNLO enables us to determine the LECs Lr1, Lr2 and Lr3. With recently published data from NA48/2, the LEC Lr9 can be determined as well. In contrast to a pure chiral treatment, the dispersion relation describes the observed curvature of one of the form factors, which we understand as a rescattering effect beyond NNLO.

  17. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, Guangyuan; Lignell, David O.; Hewson, John C.; Gin, Craig R.

    2014-10-09

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. We present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. Moreover, the particle implementation introducesmore » a single model parameter β p , and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. Our results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.« less

  18. Distribution system stability, reliability and protective relaying due to incorporation of dispersed energy sources. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    This thesis discusses impacts and issues brought about by the enactment of the Public Utilities Regulatory Policies Act of 1978. The United States power grid has a history of safe, economical, reliable service that, some feel, is threatened by the encroachment of small Dispersed Energy Sources, with possible inexperienced developers. The quality of electrical power from such sources is in question, as is power grid stability and reliability. Safety is another factor where methodry is subject to the incentives of the party whose viewpoint is sought. Much controversy is caused by the Act leaving methods of implementation to the individual States. The settlement, in one State, of some question in dispute forms no basis for extrapolation into other States. This leaves a potential developer with some uncertainty as to his options and advantages in assessing the incentives for investing in a Dispersed Energy Source. And such incentives form the thrust of the Act. This thesis brings these issues to the force and examines them for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook for significance and possible resolution. It evaluates the outlook of the Utility, the Dispersed Energy Source, and the Public for motivation and attempts to strike a balance between their opinions in reaching conclusions. Gray areas are addressed and possible remedies are offered.

  19. Broadband terahertz time-domain spectroscopy of ferroelectric LiTaO{sub 3}: Phonon-polariton dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Seiji Mori, Tatsuya

    2014-11-05

    The lowest frequency IR active A{sub 1}(z) and E(x) modes of a ferroelectric congruent lithium tantalate crystal were studied by the broadband polarized Terahertz Time-Domain Spectroscopy using the coherent THz radiation from 0.2 to 6.5 THz. The dispersion relations of the real and imaginary parts of a polariton wave vector were determined from the complex extraordinary and ordinary refractive indices for the A{sub 1}(z) and E(x) symmetry phonon-polaritons, respectively. The observed complex dispersion relations of two symmetries are in agreement within the experimental uncertainty with the calculated dispersion curves by the damped harmonic oscillator model.

  20. Derivation and generalization of the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Di-Fu; Qian, Bao-Liang; Wang, Hong-Gang; Li, Wei

    2013-12-15

    Field analysis method is used to derive the dispersion relation of rising-sun magnetron with sectorial and rectangular cavities. This dispersion relation is then extended to the general case in which the rising-sun magnetron can be with multi-group cavities of different shapes and sizes, and from which the dispersion relations of conventional magnetron, rising-sun magnetron, and magnetron-like device can be obtained directly. The results show that the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the dispersion relation are less than 3%, the relative errors between the theoretical and simulation values of the cutoff frequencies of ? mode are less than 2%. In addition, the influences of each structure parameter of the magnetron on the cutoff frequency of ? mode and on the mode separation are investigated qualitatively and quantitatively, which may be of great interest to designing a frequency tuning magnetron.

  1. Tunable effective nonlinear refractive index of graphene dispersions during the distortion of spatial self-phase modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Gaozhong; Zhang, Saifeng E-mail: jwang@siom.ac.cn; Cheng, Xin; Dong, Ningning; Zhang, Long; Wang, Jun E-mail: jwang@siom.ac.cn; Umran, Fadhil A.; Coghlan, Darragh; Blau, Werner J.; Cheng, Ya

    2014-04-07

    Spatial self-phase modulation (SSPM) was observed directly when a focused He-Ne laser beam at 633 nm went through liquid-phase-exfoliated graphene dispersions. The diffraction pattern of SSPM was found to be distorted rapidly right after the incident beam horizontally passing through the dispersions, while no distortion for the vertically incident geometry. We show that the distortion is originated mainly from the non-axis-symmetrical thermal convections of the graphene nanosheets induced by laser heating, and the relative change of nonlinear refractive index can be determined by the ratio of the distortion angle to the half-cone angle. Therefore, the effective nonlinear refractive index of graphene dispersions can be tuned by changing the incident intensity and the temperature of the dispersions.

  2. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Short, Robert W.; Craxton, Stephen; Letzring, Samuel A.; Soures, John

    1991-01-01

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies ("colors") cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers.

  3. A process for evaluation and state approval of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    This document contains copies of the vugraphs used by C. R. Hodgin for the November 6, 1991 presentation summarizing the process to be used for evaluation of the Emergency Response Dispersion Model. (MHB)

  4. Operating Experience Level 3, Atmospheric Dispersion Parameter (x/Q) for Calculation of Co-located Worker Dose

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document informs the complex of the issuance of a technical document on the basis for the default atmospheric dispersion parameter (x/Q) used to determine co¬-located worker dose in accident analysis calculations. It also provides recommendations for ensuring an appropriate x/Q is used where the default x/Q may not result in a conservative estimate of dispersion.

  5. Ordered Mesoporous CMK-5 Carbon with Ultra-Thin Pore Walls and Highly Dispersed Nickel Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fulvio, Pawquale F; Liang, Chengdu; Dai, Sheng; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2009-01-01

    Ordered mesoporous CMK-5 carbons with ultra-thin carbon pore walls and highly dispersed Ni nanoparticles have been successfully prepared by using two different SBA-15 silicas as hard templates and 2, 3-di-hydroxynaphtalene (DHN) as a carbon precursor. The nickel precursor was a concentrated nickel nitrate hexahydrate [Ni(NO3)2.6H2O] solution in isopropanol added to the carbon-silica nanocomposites prior to thermal treatments. The samples studied were analyzed by thermogravimetry (TG), nitrogen adsorption at -196 C, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and in situ electron diffraction X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). While TG revealed carbon contents lower than 30 wt%, nitrogen adsorption provided information about homogeneity of carbon thin film deposited onto mesopore walls of ordered silica templates, SBA-15. The templates, carbon-silica nanocomposites and carbon inverse replicas with nickel nanoparticles exhibited uniform pores, high surface areas and large pore volumes. Graphitic carbon was identified by the presence of a characteristic G band on Raman spectra, whereas the diffraction peak attributed to the stacking of graphene planes was not observed by powder XRD.The presence of ordered domains in the carbon materials studied was confirmed by small angle XRD and STEM imaging. In addition, the STEM images revealed that the nickel nanoparticles were uniform in size, ~3nm, and were homogeneously dispersed within ordered tubular carbon walls. A few larger clusters of nickel, ~60nm, present on the external surface, were identified by powder XRD as metallic Ni. The in situ EDX revealed that the small nanoparticles were largely composed of Ni with traces of NiO. Similar nanoparticles dispersions have been reported only for Ni-containing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs), whereas previously reported ordered mesoporous carbons possessed larger Ni/NiO nanoparticles within CMK-3 nanostructure.

  6. A novel structure and photochromism of heteropolyoxometalates dispersed in polymer networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bao Xinjian [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130023 (China); Optoelectronic Technology Institute, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China); Feng Wei, E-mail: weifeng@dlmu.edu.cn [Optoelectronic Technology Institute, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China); Chen Jie [Optoelectronic Technology Institute, Dalian Maritime University, Linghai Road 1, Dalian 116026 (China); Liu Xiaoyang, E-mail: Liuxy@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Inorganic Synthesis and Preparative Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, 2699 Qianjin Street, Changchun 130023 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Nanocomposites based on Keggin structure tungstophosphate acid (PWA) with 'branch-like' nanometer well dispersed in poly(acrylamide-co-vinylamine) (PAM-co-PVAm) were fabricated. The microstructure and photochromic properties were studied via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis) and electron resonance spectra (ESR). FT-IR results showed that the Keggin geometry of polyoxometalates was still preserved inside the composites and hydrogen bonding and salt formation were built between PWA and polymer matrix. SEM and TEM images showed that PWA nanoparticles were finely dispersed in polymer matrix with 'branch-like' shape. Under UV irradiation, the film was reduced photochemically to yield a glaucous species. After UV light turned off, the color of film became green. Two photo-reduction processes (one was between acylamino and heteropoly acid, another was between amidocyanogen and heteropoly acid) occurred at the same time in PWA/PAM-co-PVAm system, which resulted in the formation of heteropolygreen. - Graphical abstract: Two absorption bands appeared after UV irradiated. In bleaching process, the peaks at 620-820 nm disappeared and those at 420 nm still presented. Due to synergies happened between heteropolyacid and PAM-co-PVAm, heteropolygreen was formed. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Branch-like' composites were fabricated by dispersed PWA into PAM-co-PVAm system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photo-reduction processes occurred simultaneously in PWA/PAM-co-PVAm system. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Heteropolygreen was formed by synergies of hydrogen bonding and salt formation.

  7. Coupled-oscillator theory of dispersion and Casimir-Polder interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berman, P. R.; Ford, G. W.; Milonni, P. W.

    2014-10-28

    We address the question of the applicability of the argument theorem (of complex variable theory) to the calculation of two distinct energies: (i) the first-order dispersion interaction energy of two separated oscillators, when one of the oscillators is excited initially and (ii) the Casimir-Polder interaction of a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting plane. We show that the argument theorem can be used to obtain the generally accepted equation for the first-order dispersion interaction energy, which is oscillatory and varies as the inverse power of the separation r of the oscillators for separations much greater than an optical wavelength. However, for such separations, the interaction energy cannot be transformed into an integral over the positive imaginary axis. If the argument theorem is used incorrectly to relate the interaction energy to an integral over the positive imaginary axis, the interaction energy is non-oscillatory and varies as r{sup ?4}, a result found by several authors. Rather remarkably, this incorrect expression for the dispersion energy actually corresponds to the nonperturbative Casimir-Polder energy for a ground-state quantum oscillator near a perfectly conducting wall, as we show using the so-called remarkable formula for the free energy of an oscillator coupled to a heat bath [G. W. Ford, J. T. Lewis, and R. F. OConnell, Phys. Rev. Lett. 55, 2273 (1985)]. A derivation of that formula from basic results of statistical mechanics and the independent oscillator model of a heat bath is presented.

  8. LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Rak-Hyun; Shin, Dong Ryul; Dokiya, Masayuki

    1996-12-31

    In the planar SOFC, the interconnect materials plays two roles as an electrical connection and as a gas separation plate in a cell stack. The interconnect materials must be chemically stable in reducing and oxidizing environments, and have high electronic conductivity, high thermal conductivity, matching thermal expansion with an electrolyte, high mechanical strength, good fabricability, and gas tightness. Lanthanum chromite so far has been mainly used as interconnect materials in planar SOFC. However, the ceramic materials are very weak in mechanical strength and have poor machining property as compared with metal. Also the metallic materials have high electronic conductivity and high thermal conductivity. Recently some researchers have studied metallic interconnects such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Inconel 600 cermet, Ni-20Cr coated with (LaSr)CoO{sub 3}, and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3-} or La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-dispersed Cr alloy. These alloys have still some problems because Ni-based alloys have high thermal expansion, the added Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} to metals have no electronic conductivity, and the oxide formed on the surface of Cr alloy has high volatility. To solve these problems, in this study, LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr for metallic interconnect of planar SOFC was investigated. The LaCrO{sub 3}-dispersed Cr can be one candidate of metallic interconnect because LaCrO{sub 3} possesses electronic conductivity and Cr metal has relatively low thermal expansion. The content of 25 vol.% LaCrO{sub 3} Was selected on the basis of a theoretically calculated thermal expansion. The thermal expansion, electrical and oxidation properties were examined and the results were discussed as related to SOFC requirements.

  9. Phonon dispersion curves determination in (delta)-phase Pu-Ga alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, J; Clatterbuck, D; Occelli, F; Farber, D; Schwartz, A; Wall, M; Boro, C; Krisch, M; Beraud, A; Chiang, T; Xu, R; Hong, H; Zschack, P; Tamura, N

    2006-02-07

    We have designed and successfully employed a novel microbeam on large grain sample concept to conduct high resolution inelastic x-ray scattering (HRIXS) experiments to map the full phonon dispersion curves of an fcc {delta}-phase Pu-Ga alloy. This approach obviates experimental difficulties with conventional inelastic neutron scattering due to the high absorption cross section of the common {sup 239}Pu isotope and the non-availability of large (mm size) single crystal materials for Pu and its alloys. A classical Born von-Karman force constant model was used to model the experimental results, and no less than 4th nearest neighbor interactions had to be included to account for the observation. Several unusual features including, a large elastic anisotropy, a small shear elastic modulus, (C{sub 11}-C{sub 12})/2, a Kohn-like anomaly in the T{sub 1}[011] branch, and a pronounced softening of the T[111] branch towards the L point in the Brillouin are found. These features may be related to the phase transitions of plutonium and to strong coupling between the crystal structure and the 5f valence instabilities. Our results represent the first full phonon dispersions ever obtained for any Pu-bearing material, thus ending a 40-year quest for this fundamental data. The phonon data also provide a critical test for theoretical treatments of highly correlated 5f electron systems as exemplified by recent dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) calculations for {delta}-plutonium. We also conducted thermal diffuse scattering experiments to study the T(111) dispersion at low temperatures with an attempt to gain insight into bending of the T(111) branch in relationship to the {delta} {yields} {alpha}{prime} transformation.

  10. Apparatus and methods for using achromatic phase matching at high orders of dispersion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Richman, Bruce; Trebino, Rick; Bisson, Scott; Sidick, Erkin

    2001-01-01

    Achromatic phase-matching (APM) is used for efficiently multiplying the frequency of broad bandwidth light by using a nonlinear optical medium comprising a second-harmonic generation (SHG) crystal. Stationary optical elements whose configuration, properties, and arrangement have been optimized to match the dispersion characteristics of the SHG crystal to at least the second order. These elements include a plurality of prismatic elements for directing an input light beam onto the SHG crystal such that each ray wavelength is aligned to match the phase-matching angle for the crystal at each wavelength of light to at least the second order and such that every ray wavelength overlap within the crystal.

  11. Method and apparatus for controlled size distribution of gel microspheres formed from aqueous dispersions. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ryon, A.D.; Haas, P.A.; Vavruska, J.S.

    1982-01-19

    The present invention is directed to a method and apparatus for making a population of dense, closely size-controlled microspheres by sol-gel procedures wherein said microspheres are characterized by a significant percentage of said population being within a predetermined, relatively narrow size range. This is accomplished by subjecting aqueous dispersions of a sol, within a water-immiscible organic liquid to a turbulent flow. Microsphere populations thus provided are useful in vibratory-packed processes for nuclear fuels to be irradiated in LWR- and FBR-type nuclear reactors.

  12. On a hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive generalized Korteweg - de Vries evolution equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christov, Ivan C.

    2015-08-20

    We propose a hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive generalized Kortewegde Vries (KdV) evolution equations based on a modification of the Lagrangian density whose induced action functional the KdV equation extremizes. Two recent nonlinear evolution equations describing wave propagation in certain generalized continua with an inherent material length scale are members of the proposed hierarchy. Like KdV, the equations from the proposed hierarchy possess Hamiltonian structure. Unlike KdV, the solutions to these equations can be compact (i.e., they vanish outside of some open interval) and, in addition, peaked. Implicit solutions for these peaked, compact traveling waves (peakompactons) are presented.

  13. Soliton generation and multiple phases in dispersive shock and rarefaction wave interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ablowitz, M. J.; Baldwin, D. E.; Hoefer, M. A.

    2009-07-15

    Interactions of dispersive shock waves (DSWs) and rarefaction waves (RWs) associated with the Korteweg-de Vries equation are shown to exhibit multiphase dynamics and isolated solitons. There are six canonical cases: one is the interaction of two DSWs that exhibit a transient two-phase solution but evolve to a single-phase DSW for large time; two tend to a DSW with either a small amplitude wave train or a finite number of solitons, which can be determined analytically; two tend to a RW with either a small wave train or a finite number of solitons; finally, one tends to a pure RW.

  14. Dispersive analysis of ω/Φ → 3π, πγ*

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Danilkin, Igor V.; Fernandez Ramirez, Cesar; Guo, Peng; Mathieu, Vincent; Schott, Diane M.; Shi, Meng; Szczepaniak, Adam P.

    2015-05-01

    The decays ω/Φ → 3π are considered in the dispersive framework that is based on the isobar decomposition and subenergy unitarity. The inelastic contributions are parametrized by the power series in a suitably chosen conformal variable that properly accounts for the analytic properties of the amplitude. The Dalitz plot distributions and integrated decay widths are presented. Our results indicate that the final- state interactions may be sizable. As a further application of the formalism we also compute the electromagnetic transition form factors of ω/Φ → π⁰γ*.

  15. Femtosecond laser pulse filamentation under anomalous dispersion in fused silica. Part 1. Numerical investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smetanina, E O; Kompanets, V O; Chekalin, Sergei V; Kandidov, V P

    2012-10-31

    We report the results of investigation of femtosecond laser pulse filamentation in fused silica by varying the wavelength in the range from 800 to 2300 nm. It is shown that in the case of the anomalous group-velocity dispersion, a sequence of 'light bullets' with a high spatial and temporal localisation of the light field is formed along the filament. The relation of the formation and propagation of light bullets with the formation of an isolated anti-Stokes wing of the supercontinuum spectrum is established. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  16. On a hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive generalized Korteweg - de Vries evolution equations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christov, Ivan C.

    2015-08-20

    We propose a hierarchy of nonlinearly dispersive generalized Korteweg–de Vries (KdV) evolution equations based on a modification of the Lagrangian density whose induced action functional the KdV equation extremizes. Two recent nonlinear evolution equations describing wave propagation in certain generalized continua with an inherent material length scale are members of the proposed hierarchy. Like KdV, the equations from the proposed hierarchy possess Hamiltonian structure. Unlike KdV, the solutions to these equations can be compact (i.e., they vanish outside of some open interval) and, in addition, peaked. Implicit solutions for these peaked, compact traveling waves (“peakompactons”) are presented.

  17. First principles electronic band structure and phonon dispersion curves for zinc blend beryllium chalcogenide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabhi, Shweta Mankad, Venu Jha, Prafulla K.

    2014-04-24

    A detailed theoretical study of structural, electronic and Vibrational properties of BeX compound is presented by performing ab-initio calculations based on density-functional theory using the Espresso package. The calculated value of lattice constant and bulk modulus are compared with the available experimental and other theoretical data and agree reasonably well. BeX (X = S,Se,Te) compounds in the ZB phase are indirect wide band gap semiconductors with an ionic contribution. The phonon dispersion curves are represented which shows that these compounds are dynamically stable in ZB phase.

  18. Surface relief gratings on polymer dispersed liquid crystals by polarization holography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazzulla, A.; Pagliusi, P.; Provenzano, C.; Russo, G.; Carbone, G.; Cipparrone, G.

    2004-09-27

    We report the observation of surface relief gratings (SRGs) on polymer dispersed liquid crystal films after polarization holographic recording, demonstrating the formation of SRGs in systems without azo compounds, where photoisomerization and chromophore reorientation processes do not occur. Permanent SRGs, several hundred nanometers deep, are recorded on the surface of a polymeric material containing oriented liquid crystal droplets. The results suggest that SRG growth under uniform intensity irradiation is not exclusively related to the photoisomerization, but is a more general phenomenon which can involve different photoinduced chemical and physical mechanisms sensitive to the light polarization state. These effects contribute to the formation of anisotropic structures during the recording process.

  19. Simulation of Turbulent Combustion Fields of Shock-Dispersed Aluminum Using the AMR Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhl, A L; Bell, J B; Beckner, V E; Khasainov, B

    2006-11-02

    We present a Model for simulating experiments of combustion in Shock-Dispersed-Fuel (SDF) explosions. The SDF charge consisted of a 0.5-g spherical PETN booster, surrounded by 1-g of fuel powder (flake Aluminum). Detonation of the booster charge creates a high-temperature, high-pressure source (PETN detonation products gases) that both disperses the fuel and heats it. Combustion ensues when the fuel mixes with air. The gas phase is governed by the gas-dynamic conservation laws, while the particle phase obeys the continuum mechanics laws for heterogeneous media. The two phases exchange mass, momentum and energy according to inter-phase interaction terms. The kinetics model used an empirical particle burn relation. The thermodynamic model considers the air, fuel and booster products to be of frozen composition, while the Al combustion products are assumed to be in equilibrium. The thermodynamic states were calculated by the Cheetah code; resulting state points were fit with analytic functions suitable for numerical simulations. Numerical simulations of combustion of an Aluminum SDF charge in a 6.4-liter chamber were performed. Computed pressure histories agree with measurements.

  20. How important is self-consistency for the dDsC density dependent dispersion correction?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brémond, Éric; Corminboeuf, Clémence; Golubev, Nikolay; Department of Chemistry, M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Steinmann, Stephan N.

    2014-05-14

    The treatment of dispersion interactions is ubiquitous but computationally demanding for seamless ab initio approaches. A highly popular and simple remedy consists in correcting for the missing interactions a posteriori by adding an attractive energy term summed over all atom pairs to standard density functional approximations. These corrections were originally based on atom pairwise parameters and, hence, had a strong touch of empiricism. To overcome such limitations, we recently proposed a robust system-dependent dispersion correction, dDsC, that is computed from the electron density and that provides a balanced description of both weak inter- and intramolecular interactions. From the theoretical point of view and for the sake of increasing reliability, we here verify if the self-consistent implementation of dDsC impacts ground-state properties such as interaction energies, electron density, dipole moments, geometries, and harmonic frequencies. In addition, we investigate the suitability of the a posteriori scheme for molecular dynamics simulations, for which the analysis of the energy conservation constitutes a challenging tests. Our study demonstrates that the post-SCF approach in an excellent approximation.

  1. Using handheld plastic scintillator detectors to triage individuals exposed to a radiological dispersal device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manger, Ryan P; Hertel, Nolan; Burgett, E.; Ansari, A.

    2011-01-01

    After a radiological dispersal device (RDD) event, people could become internally contaminated by inhaling dispersed radioactive particles. A rapid method to screen individuals who are internally contaminated is desirable. Such initial screening can help in prompt identification of those who are highly contaminated and in prioritizing individuals for further and more definitive evaluation such as laboratory testing. The use of handheld plastic scintillators to rapidly screen those exposed to an RDD with gamma-emitting radionuclides was investigated in this study. The Monte Carlo N-Particle transport code was used to model two commercially available plastic scintillation detectors in conjunction with anthropomorphic phantom models to determine the detector response to inhaled radionuclides. Biokinetic models were used to simulate an inhaled radionuclide and its progression through the anthropomorphic phantoms up to 30 d after intake. The objective of the study was to see if internal contamination levels equivalent to 250 mSv committed effective dose equivalent could be detected using these instruments. Five radionuclides were examined: {sup 60}Co, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 192}Ir, {sup 131}I and {sup 241}Am. The results demonstrate that all of the radionuclides except {sup 241}Am could be detected when placing either one of the two plastic scintillator detector systems on the posterior right torso of the contaminated individuals.

  2. Nonlinear coupling of left and right handed circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P. Sharma, Swati Gaur, Nidhi

    2014-07-15

    The nonlinear phenomena are of prominent interests in understanding the particle acceleration and transportation in the interplanetary space. The ponderomotive nonlinearity causing the filamentation of the parallel propagating circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave having a finite frequency may be one of the mechanisms that contribute to the heating of the plasmas. The contribution will be different of the left (L) handed mode, the right (R) handed mode, and the mix mode. The contribution also depends upon the finite frequency of the circularly polarized waves. In the present paper, we have investigated the effect of the nonlinear coupling of the L and R circularly polarized dispersive Alfvén wave on the localized structures formation and the respective power spectra. The dynamical equations are derived in the presence of the ponderomotive nonlinearity of the L and R pumps and then studied semi-analytically as well as numerically. The ponderomotive nonlinearity accounts for the nonlinear coupling between both the modes. In the presence of the adiabatic response of the density fluctuations, the nonlinear dynamical equations satisfy the modified nonlinear Schrödinger equation. The equations thus obtained are solved in solar wind regime to study the coupling effect on localization and the power spectra. The effect of coupling is also studied on Faraday rotation and ellipticity of the wave caused due to the difference in the localization of the left and the right modes with the distance of propagation.

  3. Experimental study of stack plume rise and dispersion at the power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-10

    This paper describes the primary results of stack plume rise and dispersion experiment at Xu Zhou power station during November-December, 1978. (1) Under neutral and near-neutral stratification conditions, the 2/3 power law is the optimizing formula up to date, because of its calculated values in coincidence with observed. (2) Vertical of the buoyant plume from the tall stack is obviously stronger than that of non buoyant plume from the low stack. It is shown that the concept sof Pasquill(1976) model are acceptable, but formula should be modified. (3) From reliable monitoring data of SO/sub 2/ ground concentration, it is found that the effects of topography and stack height should be comprehensively taken into account in estimating dispersion by gaussian model. (4) It is suggested that in analyzing the stereophoto grammetric data of fluctuating plume, the square deviation of plume distribution should be considered as the sum of two parts--the distribution square deviation of the plume particulates relative to the instantaneous center line of the plume, and the distriubtion square deviaton of the instantaneous center line relative to the average center line of the plume. (5) Lidar is shown to be as effective as steroegraphic method in studying behavior of chimney plumes.

  4. Influence of surface modification adopting thermal treatments on dispersion of detonation nanodiamond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Xiangyang . E-mail: xiangyang.xu@sohu.com; Yu Zhiming; Zhu Yongwei; Wang Baichun

    2005-03-15

    In order to improve the dispersion of detonation nanodiamonds (ND) in aqueous and non-aqueous media, a series of thermal treatments have been conducted in air ambient to modify ND surface. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) technique and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) were introduced to observe the primary size of ND. Differential thermal analysis (DTA), X-ray diffraction (XRD) methodology, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were adopted to analyze the structure, bonds at surfaces of the treated ND. Malvern instrument Zetasizer3000HS was used for measuring the surface electric potential and the size distribution of ND. As thermal treatments can cause graphitization and oxidization of functional groups at the surface, ND treated at high temperature is correspondingly more negatively charged in an aqueous medium, and the increased absolute value of zeta potential ensures the electrostatic stability of ND particles. Specially, after being treated at a temperature more than 850K, ND can be well dispersed in various media.

  5. Atmospheric Dispersal and Dispostion of Tephra From a Potential Volcanic Eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Keating; W.Statham

    2004-02-12

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (ASHPLUME) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. The ASHPLUME conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The ASHPLUME mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report will improve and clarify the previous documentation of the ASHPLUME mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model.

  6. THE NEW YORK MIDTOWN DISPERSION STUDY (MID-05) METEOROLOGICAL DATA REPORT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; SULLIVAN, T.M.; SMITH, S.; CASSELLA, V.

    2007-01-01

    The New York City midtown dispersion program, MID05, examined atmospheric transport in the deep urban canyons near Rockefeller Center. Little is known about air flow and hazardous gas dispersion under such conditions, since previous urban field experiments have focused on small to medium sized cities with much smaller street canyons and examined response over a much larger area. During August, 2005, a series of six gas tracer tests were conducted and sampling was conducted over a 2 km grid. A critical component of understanding gas movement in these studies is detailed wind and meteorological information in the study zone. To support data interpretation and modeling, several meteorological stations were installed at street level and on roof tops in Manhattan. In addition, meteorological data from airports and other weather instrumentation around New York City were collected. This document describes the meteorological component of the project and provides an outline of data file formats for the different instruments. These data provide enough detail to support highly-resolved computational simulations of gas transport in the study zone.

  7. Broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements: Instrumental setup, alignment, and pitfalls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farhang, A.; Abasahl, B.; Dutta-Gupta, S.; Lovera, A.; Martin, O. J. F.; Mandracci, P.; Descrovi, E.

    2013-03-15

    The construction, alignment, and performance of a setup for broadband wide-angle dispersion measurements, with emphasis on surface plasmon resonance (SPR) measurements, are presented in comprehensive detail. In contrast with most SPR instruments working with a monochromatic source, this setup takes advantage of a broadband/white light source and has full capability for automated angle vs. wavelength dispersion measurements for any arbitrary nanostructure array. A cylindrical prism is used rather than a triangular one in order to mitigate refraction induced effects and allow for such measurements. Although seemingly simple, this instrument requires use of many non-trivial methods in order to achieve proper alignment over all angles of incidence. Here we describe the alignment procedure for such a setup, the pitfalls introduced from the finite beam width incident onto the cylindrical prism, and deviations in the reflected/transmitted beam resulting from the finite thickness of the sample substrate. We address every one of these issues and provide experimental evidences on the success of this instrument and the alignment procedure used.

  8. Dynamics of dispersive photon-number QND measurements in a micromaser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozlovskii, A. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kozlovsk@sci.lebedev.ru

    2007-04-15

    A numerical analysis of dispersive quantum nondemolition measurement of the photon number of a microwave cavity field is presented. Simulations show that a key property of the dispersive atom-field interaction used in Ramsey interferometry is the extremely high sensitivity of the dynamics of atomic and field states to basic parameters of the system. When a monokinetic atomic beam is sent through a microwave cavity, a qualitative change in the field state can be caused by an uncontrollably small deviation of parameters (such as atom path length through the cavity, atom velocity, cavity mode frequency detuning, or atom-field coupling constants). The resulting cavity field can be either in a Fock state or in a super-Poissonian state (characterized by a large photon-number variance). When the atoms have a random velocity spread, the field is squeezed to a Fock state for arbitrary values of the system's parameters. However, this makes detection of Ramsey fringes impossible, because the probability of detecting an atom in the upper or lower electronic state becomes a random quantity almost uniformly distributed over the interval between zero and unity, irrespective of the cavity photon number.

  9. The crossing statistic: dealing with unknown errors in the dispersion of Type Ia supernovae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shafieloo, Arman; Clifton, Timothy; Ferreira, Pedro E-mail: tclifton@astro.ox.ac.uk

    2011-08-01

    We propose a new statistic that has been designed to be used in situations where the intrinsic dispersion of a data set is not well known: The Crossing Statistic. This statistic is in general less sensitive than χ{sup 2} to the intrinsic dispersion of the data, and hence allows us to make progress in distinguishing between different models using goodness of fit to the data even when the errors involved are poorly understood. The proposed statistic makes use of the shape and trends of a model's predictions in a quantifiable manner. It is applicable to a variety of circumstances, although we consider it to be especially well suited to the task of distinguishing between different cosmological models using type Ia supernovae. We show that this statistic can easily distinguish between different models in cases where the χ{sup 2} statistic fails. We also show that the last mode of the Crossing Statistic is identical to χ{sup 2}, so that it can be considered as a generalization of χ{sup 2}.

  10. Crustal Structure of Iraq from Receiver Functions and Surface Wave Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gok, R; Mahdi, H; Al-Shukri, H; Rodgers, A J

    2006-08-31

    We report the crustal structure of Iraq, located in the northeastern Arabian plate, estimated by joint inversion of P-wave receiver functions and surface wave group velocity dispersion. Receiver functions were computed from teleseismic recordings at two temporary broadband seismic stations in Mosul (MSL) and Baghdad (BHD), separated by approximately 360 km. Group velocity dispersion curves at the sites were derived from continental-scale tomography of Pasyanos (2006). The inversion results show that the crustal thicknesses are 39 km at MSL and 43 km at BHD. Both sites reveal low velocity surface layers consistent with sedimentary thickness of about 3 km at station MSL and 7 km at BHD, agreeing well with the existing models. Ignoring the sediments, the crustal velocities and thicknesses are remarkably similar between the two stations, suggesting that the crustal structure of the proto-Arabian Platform in northern Iraq was uniform before subsidence and deposition of the sediments in the Cenozoic. Deeper low velocity sediments at BHD are expected to result in higher ground motions for earthquakes.

  11. Zirconium doped nano-dispersed oxides of Fe, Al and Zn for destruction of warfare agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stengl, Vaclav; Houskova, Vendula; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Murafa, Nataliya; Marikova, Monika; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2010-11-15

    Zirconium doped nano dispersive oxides of Fe, Al and Zn were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of the respective sulfate salts with urea in aqueous solutions. Synthesized metal oxide hydroxides were characterized using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDX). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulfur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulfide), soman (GD or (3,3'-Dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate) and VX agent (S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl]-O-ethyl-methylphosphonothionate). The presence of Zr{sup 4+} dopant can increase both the surface area and the surface hydroxylation of the resulting doped oxides, decreases their crystallites' sizes thereby it may contribute in enabling the substrate adsorption at the oxide surface thus it can accelerate the rate of degradation of warfare agents. Addition of Zr{sup 4+} converts the product of the reaction of ferric sulphate with urea from ferrihydrite to goethite. We found out that doped oxo-hydroxides Zr-FeO(OH) - being prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of ferric and zirconium oxo-sulfates mixture in aqueous solutions - exhibit a comparatively higher degradation activity towards chemical warfare agents (CWAs). Degradation of soman or VX agent on Zr-doped FeO(OH) containing ca. 8.3 wt.% of zirconium proceeded to completion within 30 min.

  12. Urban Dispersion Program MSG05 Field Study: Summary of Tracer and Meteorological Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allwine, K Jerry; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2006-08-09

    The Urban Dispersion Program is a multi-year project, funded by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, to better understand the flow and dispersion of airborne contaminants through and around the deep street canyons of New York City. The first tracer and meteorological field study was a limited study conducted during March 2005 near the Madison Square Garden in midtown Manhattan. Six safe, inert, gaseous perfluorocarbon tracers were released simultaneously at five street-level locations during two experimental days. In addition to collecting tracer data, meteorological data were also collected. Brookhaven National Laboratory conducted the bulk of the tracer and meteorological field efforts with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Stevens Institute of Technology assisting by measuring the vertical profile of winds. The Environmental Protection Agency worked with Brookhaven National Laboratory in accomplishing the personal exposure component of the study. This report presents some results from this analysis. In general, different release locations showed vastly different plume footprints for tracer materials, and the situation was made very complex with upwind and/or crosswind transport of tracer near street-level for the different release locations. Overall wind speeds and directions upwind and over the city were generally constant throughout each of the two experimental periods.

  13. Strain induced modification in phonon dispersion curves of monolayer boron pnictides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jha, Prafulla K. E-mail: prafullaj@yahoo.com; Soni, Himadri R.

    2014-01-14

    In the frame work of density functional theory, the biaxial strain induced phonon dispersion curves of monolayer boron pnictides (BX, X = N, P, As, and Sb) have been investigated. The electron-ion interactions have been modelled using ultrasoft pseudopotentials while exchange-correlation energies have been approximated by the method of local density approximation in the parameterization of Perdew-Zunger. The longitudinal and transverse acoustic phonon modes of boron pnictide sheets show linear dependency on wave vector k{sup →} while out of plane mode varies as k{sup 2}. The in-plane longitudinal and out of plane transverse optical modes in boron nitride displaying significant dispersion similar to graphene. We have analyzed the biaxial strain dependent behaviour of out of plane acoustic phonon mode which is linked to ripple for four BX sheets using a model equation with shell elasticity theory. The strain induces the hardening of this mode with tendency to become more linear with increase in strain percentage. The strain induced hardening of out of plane acoustic phonon mode indicates the absence of rippling in these compounds. Our band structure calculations for both unstrained and strained 2D h-BX are consistent with previous calculations.

  14. Propagation and dispersion of transverse wave trains in magnetic flux tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, R.; Terradas, J.; Ruderman, M. S.

    2014-07-01

    The dispersion of small-amplitude, impulsively excited wave trains propagating along a magnetic flux tube is investigated. The initial disturbance is a localized transverse displacement of the tube that excites a fast kink wave packet. The spatial and temporal evolution of the perturbed variables (density, plasma displacement, velocity, ...) is given by an analytical expression containing an integral that is computed numerically. We find that the dispersion of fast kink wave trains is more important for shorter initial disturbances (i.e., more concentrated in the longitudinal direction) and for larger density ratios (i.e., for larger contrasts of the tube density with respect to the environment density). This type of excitation generates a wave train whose signature at a fixed position along a coronal loop is a short event (duration ≅ 20 s) in which the velocity and density oscillate very rapidly with typical periods of the order of a few seconds. The oscillatory period is not constant but gradually declines during the course of this event. Peak values of the velocity are of the order of 10 km s{sup –1} and are accompanied by maximum density variations of the order of 10%-15% the unperturbed loop density.

  15. Asymptotic geometric phase and purity for phase qubit dispersively coupled to lossy LC circuit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohamed, A.-B.A.; Obada, A.-S.F.

    2011-09-15

    Analytical descriptions of the geometric phases (GPs) for the total system and subsystems are studied for a current biased Josephson phase qubit strongly coupled to a lossy LC circuit in the dispersive limit. It is found that, the GP and purity depend on the damping parameter which leads to the phenomenon of GP death. Coherence parameter delays the phenomenon of a regular sequence of deaths and births of the GP. The asymptotic behavior of the GP and the purity for the qubit-LC resonator state closely follow that for the qubit state, but however, for the LC circuit these asymptotic values are equal to zero. - Highlights: > The model of a current biased Josephson phase qubit, strongly coupled to loss LC circuit, is considered. > Analytical descriptions of the geometric phase (GP) of this model, in the dispersive limit, are studied. > The GP and purity depend on the dissipation which leads to the GP death phenomenon. > Coherence parameter delays the phenomenon of a regular sequence of deaths and births of the GP.

  16. Dispersion of Radionuclides and Exposure Assessment in Urban Environments: A Joint CEA and LLNL Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, Lee; Gowardhan, Akshay; Lennox, Kristin; Simpson, Matthew; Yu, Kristen; Armand, Patrick; Duchenne, Christophe; Mariotte, Frederic; Pectorin, Xavier

    2014-12-19

    In the interest of promoting the international exchange of technical expertise, the US Department of Energy’s Office of Emergency Operations (NA-40) and the French Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA) requested that the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California host a joint table top exercise with experts in emergency management and atmospheric transport modeling. In this table top exercise, LLNL and CEA compared each other’s flow and dispersion models. The goal of the comparison is to facilitate the exchange of knowledge, capabilities, and practices, and to demonstrate the utility of modeling dispersal at different levels of computational fidelity. Two modeling approaches were examined, a regional scale modeling approach, appropriate for simple terrain and/or very large releases, and an urban scale modeling approach, appropriate for small releases in a city environment. This report is a summary of LLNL and CEA modeling efforts from this exercise. Two different types of LLNL and CEA models were employed in the analysis: urban-scale models (Aeolus CFD at LLNL/NARAC and Parallel- Micro-SWIFT-SPRAY, PMSS, at CEA) for analysis of a 5,000 Ci radiological release and Lagrangian Particle Dispersion Models (LODI at LLNL/NARAC and PSPRAY at CEA) for analysis of a much larger (500,000 Ci) regional radiological release. Two densely-populated urban locations were chosen: Chicago with its high-rise skyline and gridded street network and Paris with its more consistent, lower building height and complex unaligned street network. Each location was considered under early summer daytime and nighttime conditions. Different levels of fidelity were chosen for each scale: (1) lower fidelity mass-consistent diagnostic, intermediate fidelity Navier-Stokes RANS models, and higher fidelity Navier-Stokes LES for urban-scale analysis, and (2) lower-fidelity single

  17. ATMOSPHERIC DISPERSAL AND DEPOSITION OF TEPHRA FROM A POTENTIAL VOLCANIC ERUPTION AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Harrington

    2004-10-25

    The purpose of this model report is to provide documentation of the conceptual and mathematical model (Ashplume) for atmospheric dispersal and subsequent deposition of ash on the land surface from a potential volcanic eruption at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This report also documents the ash (tephra) redistribution conceptual model. These aspects of volcanism-related dose calculation are described in the context of the entire igneous disruptive events conceptual model in ''Characterize Framework for Igneous Activity'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169989], Section 6.1.1). The Ashplume conceptual model accounts for incorporation and entrainment of waste fuel particles associated with a hypothetical volcanic eruption through the Yucca Mountain repository and downwind transport of contaminated tephra. The Ashplume mathematical model describes the conceptual model in mathematical terms to allow for prediction of radioactive waste/ash deposition on the ground surface given that the hypothetical eruptive event occurs. This model report also describes the conceptual model for tephra redistribution from a basaltic cinder cone. Sensitivity analyses and model validation activities for the ash dispersal and redistribution models are also presented. Analyses documented in this model report update the previous documentation of the Ashplume mathematical model and its application to the Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) for the License Application (TSPA-LA) igneous scenarios. This model report also documents the redistribution model product outputs based on analyses to support the conceptual model. In this report, ''Ashplume'' is used when referring to the atmospheric dispersal model and ''ASHPLUME'' is used when referencing the code of that model. Two analysis and model reports provide direct inputs to this model report, namely ''Characterize Eruptive Processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada and Number of Waste Packages Hit by Igneous Intrusion''. This model report provides direct inputs to

  18. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-04-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends whenmore » comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. Here, the results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.« less

  19. Highly dispersed catalysts for coal liquefaction. Phase 1 final report, August 23--November 22, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschon, A.S.; Wilson, R.B.; Ghaly, O.

    1995-03-22

    The ultimate goal of this project is to develop novel processes for making the conversion of coal into distillable liquids competitive to that of petroleum products in the range of $25/bbl. The objectives of Phase 1 were to determine the utility of new precursors to highly dispersed catalysts for use of syngas atmospheres in coal liquefaction, and to estimate the effect of such implementation on the cost of the final product. The project is divided into three technical tasks. Tasks 1 and 2 are the analyses and liquefaction experiments, respectively, and Task 3 deals with the economic effects of using these methods during coal liquefaction. Results are presented on the following: Analytical Support--screening tests and second-stage conversions; Laboratory-Scale Operations--catalysts, coal conversion in synthetic solvents, Black Thunder screening studies, and two-stage liquefaction experiments; and Technical and economic Assessment--commercial liquefaction plant description, liquefaction plant cost; and economic analysis.

  20. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275[degrees]C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  1. Catalyst dispersion and activity under conditions of temperature-staged liquefaction. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A.; Schobert, H.H.; Mitchell, G.D.; Artok, L.

    1993-02-01

    This research program involves the investigation of the use of highly dispersed catalyst precursors for the pretreatment of coals by mild hydrogenation. During the course of this effort solvent preswelling of the coal was evaluated as a means of deeply impregnating catalysts into coal, active phases of catalysts under reaction conditions were studied and the impact of these techniques were evaluated during pretreatment and temperature-staged liquefaction. Two coals, a Texas subbituminous and a Utah high volatile A bituminous, were used to examine the effects of solvent swelling pretreatment and catalyst impregnation on conversion behavior at 275{degrees}C, representative of the first, low-temperature stage in a temperature-staged liquefaction reaction. Ferrous sulfate, iron pentacarbonyl, ammonium tetrathiomolybdate, and molybdenum hexacarbonyl were used as catalyst precursors. Without swelling pretreatment, impregnation of both coals increased conversion, mainly through increased yields of preasphaltenes.

  2. Microgas dispersion for fine-coal cleaning. Technical progress report, September 1, 1980-February 28, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, R.H.; Sebba, F.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop a method of cleaning fine coal by flotation using very small microbubbles now known as Colloidal Gas Aphrons (CGA) and previously known as Microgas Dispersions (MGD). It was thought that MGD was not sufficiently descriptive of the nature of the small bubbles, and hence, the change was made. The objectives of the past six months of investigation were as follows: (1) a fundamental study of the properties of CGA, which involved (i) a study of the stability of the bubbles generated with several frothers that are currently used in the mineral industry, (ii) a study of the charge on the bubbles, and (iii) a microscopic inspection of the bubbles during flotation; (2) a preliminary investigation of the flotation characteristics of coal; and (3) construction of an automatic batch flotation machine, similar to the one described by Miller (1980).

  3. Symmetries of the triple degenerate DNLS equations for weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, G. M.; Brio, M.; Zank, G. P.

    1996-07-20

    A formulation of Hamiltonian and Lagrangian variational principles, Lie point symmetries and conservation laws for the triple degenerate DNLS equations describing the propagation of weakly nonlinear dispersive MHD waves along the ambient magnetic field, in {beta}{approx}1 plasmas is given. The equations describe the interaction of the Alfven and magnetoacoustic modes near the triple umbilic point, where the fast magnetosonic, slow magnetosonic and Alfven speeds coincide and a{sub g}{sup 2}=V{sub A}{sup 2} where a{sub g} is the gas sound speed and V{sub A} is the Alfven speed. A discussion is given of the travelling wave similarity solutions of the equations, which include solitary wave and periodic traveling waves. Strongly compressible solutions indicate the necessity for the insertion of shocks in the flow, whereas weakly compressible, near Alfvenic solutions resemble similar, shock free travelling wave solutions of the DNLS equation.

  4. Analytic studies of dispersive properties of shear Alfvn and acoustic wave spectra in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chavdarovski, Ilija; Zonca, Fulvio; Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, C.R. Frascati, C.P. 65-00044 Frascati

    2014-05-15

    The properties of the low frequency shear Alfvn and acoustic wave spectra in toroidal geometry are examined analytically and numerically considering wave particle interactions with magnetically trapped and circulating particles, using the theoretical model described in [I. Chavdarovski and F. Zonca, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 115001 (2009)] and following the framework of the generalized fishbone-like dispersion relation. Effects of trapped particles as well as diamagnetic effects on the frequencies and damping rates of the beta-induced Alfvn eigenmodes, kinetic ballooning modes and beta-induced Alfvn-acoustic eigenmodes are discussed and shown to be crucial to give a proper assessment of mode structure and stability conditions. Present results also demonstrate the mutual coupling of these various branches and suggest that frequency as well as mode polarization are crucial for their identification on the basis of experimental evidence.

  5. Dispersion relation of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi-component magneto-plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khaira, Vibhooti Ahirwar, G.

    2015-07-31

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in multi component plasma composed of electrons (denoted by e{sup −}), hydrogen ions (denoted by H{sup +}), helium ions (denoted by He{sup +}) and positively charged oxygen ions (denoted by O{sup +})in magnetized cold plasma. The wave is assumed to propagate perpendicular to the static magnetic field. It is found that the addition of heavy ions in the plasma dispersion modified the lower hybrid mode and also allowed an ion-ion mode. The frequencies of the lower hybrid and ion- ion hybrid modes are derived using cold plasma theory. It is observed that the effect of multi-ionfor different plasma densities on electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is to enhance the wave frequencies. The results are interpreted for the magnetosphere has been applied parameters by auroral acceleration region.

  6. Innovative Powder Processing of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened ODS Ferritic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieken, Joel; Anderson, Iver; Kramer, Matthew

    2011-04-01

    An innovative gas atomization reaction synthesis technique was employed as a viable method to dramatically lower the processing cost for precursor oxide dispersion forming ferritic stainless steel powders (i.e., Fe-Cr-(Hf,Ti)-Y). During this rapid solidification process the atomized powders were enveloped by a nano-metric Cr-enriched metastable oxide film. Elevated temperature heat treatment was used to dissociate this metastable oxide phase through oxygen exchange reactions with Y-(Hf,Ti) enriched intermetallic compound precipitates. These solid state reactions resulted in the formation of highly stable nano-metric mixed oxide dispersoids (i.e., Y-Ti-O or Y-Hf-O) throughout the alloy microstructure. Subsequent high temperature (1200 C) heat treatments were used to elucidate the thermal stability of each nano-metric oxide dispersoid phase. Transmission electron microscopy coupled with X-ray diffraction was used to evaluate phase evolution within the alloy microstructure.

  7. Dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser: Finite axial magnetic field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kheiri, Golshad; Esmaeilzadeh, Mahdi

    2013-12-15

    A theoretical analysis is presented for dispersion relation and growth rate in a Cherenkov free electron laser with finite axial magnetic field. It is shown that the growth rate and the resonance frequency of Cherenkov free electron laser increase with increasing axial magnetic field for low axial magnetic fields, while for high axial magnetic fields, they go to a saturation value. The growth rate and resonance frequency saturation values are exactly the same as those for infinite axial magnetic field approximation. The effects of electron beam self-fields on growth rate are investigated, and it is shown that the growth rate decreases in the presence of self-fields. It is found that there is an optimum value for electron beam density and Lorentz relativistic factor at which the maximum growth rate can take place. Also, the effects of velocity spread of electron beam are studied and it is found that the growth rate decreases due to the electron velocity spread.

  8. Dispersion relations for a plasma-filled helix-loaded-waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowski, M.A.; Hooper, E.B.; Stallard, B.W.

    1994-01-01

    The propagation of waves on bounded, magnetized plasma columns arises in connection with a variety of applications. To this end dispersion relations axe developed for a variety of multi-region circularly symmetric configurations. These include, a sheath helix in free space, a plasma column in free space, a plasma filled conducting tube, a plasma filled sheath-helix in free space, a sheath helix within a conducting cylinder, a plasma filled sheath-helix within a conducting cylinder, and a plasma column within a sheath-helix contained within a conducting cylinder. The latter configuration is of the most interest for whistler wave excitation for plasma thruster applications, since it includes the effect of a vacuum region separating the plasma column from the helical excitation structure.

  9. Vaporization, dispersion, and radiant fluxes from LPG spills. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    Both burning and non-burning spills of LPG (primarily propane) were studied. Vaporization rates for propane spills on soil, concrete, insulating concrete, asphalt, sod, wood, and polymer foams were measured. Thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and steady state vaporization rates were determined. Vapor concentrations were measured downwind of open propane pools and a Gaussian dispersion model modified for area sources provided a good correlation of measured concentrations. Emitted and incident radiant fluxes from propane fires were measured. Simplified flame radiation models were adequate for predicting radiant fluxes. Tests in which propane was sprayed into the air showed that at moderately high spray rates all the propane flashed to vapor or atomized; no liquid collected on the ground.

  10. Note: Design and development of wireless controlled aerosol sampling network for large scale aerosol dispersion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gopalakrishnan, V.; Subramanian, V.; Baskaran, R.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-07-15

    Wireless based custom built aerosol sampling network is designed, developed, and implemented for environmental aerosol sampling. These aerosol sampling systems are used in field measurement campaign, in which sodium aerosol dispersion experiments have been conducted as a part of environmental impact studies related to sodium cooled fast reactor. The sampling network contains 40 aerosol sampling units and each contains custom built sampling head and the wireless control networking designed with Programmable System on Chip (PSoC™) and Xbee Pro RF modules. The base station control is designed using graphical programming language LabView. The sampling network is programmed to operate in a preset time and the running status of the samplers in the network is visualized from the base station. The system is developed in such a way that it can be used for any other environment sampling system deployed in wide area and uneven terrain where manual operation is difficult due to the requirement of simultaneous operation and status logging.

  11. Exploring the interaction between lithium ion and defective graphene surface using dispersion corrected DFT studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayakumar, M.; Hu, Jian Z.

    2013-10-15

    To analyze the lithium ion interaction with realistic graphene surfaces, we carried out dispersion corrected DFT-D3 studies on graphene with common point defects and chemisorbed oxygen containing functional groups along with defect free graphene surface. Our study reveals that, the interaction between lithium ion (Li+) and graphene is mainly through the delocalized π electron of pure graphene layer. However, the oxygen containing functional groups pose high adsorption energy for lithium ion due to the Li-O ionic bond formation. Similarly, the point defect groups interact with lithium ion through possible carbon dangling bonds and/or cation-π type interactions. Overall these defect sites render a preferential site for lithium ions compared with pure graphene layer. Based on these findings, the role of graphene surface defects in lithium battery performance were discussed.

  12. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum: effects of irradiation on material microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranwal, R. and Burke, M.G.

    2003-03-03

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the effects of irradiation on material microstructure. This work describes the results-to-date from TEM characterization of unirradiated and irradiated ODS molybdenum. The general microstructure of the unirradiated material consists of fine molybdenum grains (< 5 {micro}m average grain size) with numerous low angle boundaries and isolated dislocation networks. 'Ribbon'-like lanthanum oxides are aligned along the working direction of the product form and are frequently associated with grain boundaries, serving to inhibit grain boundary and dislocation movement. In addition to the 'ribbons', discrete lanthanum oxide particles have also been detected. After irradiation, the material is characterized by the presence of nonuniformly distributed large ({approx} 20 to 100 nm in diameter), multi-faceted voids, while the molybdenum grain size and oxide morphology appear to be unaffected by irradiation.

  13. Cermet anode with continuously dispersed alloy phase and process for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marschman, Steven C.; Davis, Norman C.

    1989-01-01

    Cermet electrode compositions and methods for making are disclosed which comprise NiO--NiFe.sub.2 O.sub.4 --Cu--Ni. Addition of an effective amount of a metallic catalyst/reactant to a composition of a nickel/iron/oxide, NiO, copper, and nickel produces a stable electrode having significantly increased electrical conductivity. The metallic catalyst functions to disperse the copper and nickel as an alloy continuously throughout the oxide phase of the cermet to render the electrode compositon more highly electrically conductive than were the third metal not present in the base composition. The third metal is preferably added to the base composition as elemental metal and includes aluminum, magnesium, sodium and gallium. The elemental metal is converted to a metal oxide during the sintering process.

  14. Improved performance of U-Mo dispersion fuel by Si addition in Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y S; Hofman, G L

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to collect in one publication and fit together work fragments presented in many conferences in the multi-year time span starting 2002 to the present dealing with the problem of large pore formation in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel plates first observed in 2002. Hence, this report summarizes the excerpts from papers and reports on how we interpreted the relevant results from out-of-pile and in-pile tests and how this problem was dealt with. This report also provides a refined view to explain in detail and in a quantitative manner the underlying mechanism of the role of silicon in improving the irradiation performance of U-Mo/Al.

  15. Effect of CNTs dispersion on the thermal and mechanical properties of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muhsan, Ali Samer E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Faiz E-mail: faizahmad@petronas.com.my; Yusoff, Puteri Sri Melor Megat Bt; Mohamed, Norani M.; Raza, M. Rafi

    2014-10-24

    Modified technique of metal injection molding (MIM) was used to fabricate multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced Cu nanocomposites. The effect of adding different amount of CNTs (0-10 vol.%) on the thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fabricated nanocomposites is presented. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed homogenous dispersion of CNTs in Cu matrices at different CNTs contents. The experimentally measured thermal conductivities of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites showed extraordinary increase (76% higher than pure sintered Cu) with addition of 10 vol.% CNTs. As compared to the pure sintered Cu, increase in modulus of elasticity (Young's modulus) of Cu/CNTs nanocomposites sintered at 1050°C for 2.5 h was measured to be 48%. However, in case of 7.5 vol.% CNTs, Young's modulus was increased significantly about 51% compared to that of pure sintered Cu.

  16. Effects of vegetative canopies on atmospheric dispersion. Master`s thesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindell, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    This research was conducted to improve our understanding of the effects of vegetative canopy-induced turbulence on the dispersion of air pollution. By comparing the Pasquill-Gifford method to the Modified Mitchell method using sigma theta, the standard deviation of the horizontal wind fluctuations, the relative precision of each method is determined and their effects on a Gaussian model can be seen. Contrasting three sites with varying levels of vertical obstructions, the most effective method of measuring the turbulence level was determined to be the sigma theta method. In addition, the resulting output of the Gaussian model showed the forested site having a 3.5 times greater concentration than the open field, showing the effects of the increased turbulence and channeling of wind flow introduced by the forest canopy.

  17. Dispersible Exfoliated Zeolite Nanosheets and Their Application as a Selective Membrane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varoon, Kumar; Zhang, Xueyi; Elyassi, Bahman; Brewer, Damien D.; Gettel, Melissa; Kumar, Sandeep; Lee, J. Alex; Maheshwari, Sundeep; Mittal, Anudha; Sung, Chun-Yi; Cococcioni, Matteo; Francis, Lorraine F.; McCormick, Alon V.; Mkhoyan, K. Andre; Tsapatsis, Michael

    2011-10-06

    Thin zeolite films are attractive for a wide range of applications, including molecular sieve membranes, catalytic membrane reactors, permeation barriers, and low-dielectric-constant materials. Synthesis of thin zeolite films using high-aspect-ratio zeolite nanosheets is desirable because of the packing and processing advantages of the nanosheets over isotropic zeolite nanoparticles. Attempts to obtain a dispersed suspension of zeolite nanosheets via exfoliation of their lamellar precursors have been hampered because of their structure deterioration and morphological damage (fragmentation, curling, and aggregation). We demonstrated the synthesis and structure determination of highly crystalline nanosheets of zeolite frameworks MWW and MFI. The purity and morphological integrity of these nanosheets allow them to pack well on porous supports, facilitating the fabrication of molecular sieve membranes.

  18. Advanced Lithium Battery Cathodes Using Dispersed Carbon Fibers as the Current Collector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha, Surendra K; Kiggans, Jim; Nanda, Jagjit; Dudney, Nancy J

    2011-01-01

    To fabricate LiFePO4 battery cathodes, highly conductive carbon fibers of 10-20 m in diameter have been used to replace a conventional aluminum (Al) foil current collector. This disperses the current collector throughout the cathode sheet and increases the contact area with the LiFePO4 (LFP) particles. In addition, the usual organic binder plus carbon-black can be replaced by a high temperature binder of <5 weight % carbonized petroleum pitch (P-pitch). Together these replacements increase the specific energy density and energy per unit area of the electrode. Details of the coating procedure, characterization and approach for maximizing the energy density are discussed. In a side-by-side comparison with conventional cathodes sheets of LFP on Al foil, the carbon fiber composite cathodes have a longer cycle life, higher thermal stability, and high capacity utilization with little sacrifice of the rate performance.

  19. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-01-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  20. Dispersion of seed vapor and gas ionization in an MHD second stage combustor and channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Bouillard, J.X.

    1992-07-01

    An approach is introduced for the simulation of a magnetohydrodynamic system consisting of a second stage combustor, a convergent nozzle, and a channel. The simulation uses an Argonne integral combustion flow computer code and another Argonne channel computer code to predict flow, thermal and electric properties in the seed particle laden reacting flow in the system. The combustion code is a general hydrodynamics computer code for two-phase, two-dimensional, turbulent, and reacting flows, based on mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws for gaseous and condensed phases. The channel code is a multigrid three-dimensional computer code for compressible flow subject to magnetic and electric interactions. Results of this study suggests that (1) the processes of seed particle evaporation, seed vapor dispersion, and gas ionization in the reacting flow are critical to the evaluation of the downstream channel performance and (2) particle size, loading, and inlet profile have strong effects on wall deposition and plasma temperature development.

  1. Phonon dispersion and quantization tuning of strained carbon nanotubes for flexible electronics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gautreau, Pierre; Chu, Yanbiao; Basaran, Cemal; Ragab, Tarek

    2014-06-28

    Graphene and carbon nanotubes are materials with large potentials for applications in flexible electronics. Such devices require a high level of sustainable strain and an understanding of the materials electrical properties under strain. Using supercell theory in conjunction with a comprehensive molecular mechanics model, the full band phonon dispersion of carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain is studied. The results suggest an overall phonon softening and open up the possibility of phonon quantization tuning with uniaxial strain. The change in phonon quantization and the resulting increase in electron-phonon and phonon-phonon scattering rates offer further explanation and theoretical basis to the experimental observation of electrical properties degradation for carbon nanotubes under uniaxial strain.

  2. Effect of magnetic field on the wave dispersion relation in three-dimensional dusty plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang Xuefeng [School of Mathematical Sciences, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Wang Zhengxiong [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2012-07-15

    Three-dimensional plasma crystals under microgravity condition are investigated by taking into account an external magnetic field. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the body centered cubic (bcc) and the face centered cubic (fcc) plasma crystals are obtained explicitly when the magnetic field is perpendicular to the wave motion. The wave dispersion relations of dust lattice modes in the bcc and fcc plasma crystals are calculated numerically when the magnetic field is in an arbitrary direction. The numerical results show that one longitudinal mode and two transverse modes are coupled due to the Lorentz force in the magnetic field. Moreover, three wave modes, i.e., the high frequency phonon mode, the low frequency phonon mode, and the optical mode, are obtained. The optical mode and at least one phonon mode are hybrid modes. When the magnetic field is neither parallel nor perpendicular to the primitive wave motion, all the three wave modes are hybrid modes and do not have any intersection points. It is also found that with increasing the magnetic field strength, the frequency of the optical mode increases and has a cutoff at the cyclotron frequency of the dust particles in the limit of long wavelength, and the mode mixings for both the optical mode and the high frequency phonon mode increase. The acoustic velocity of the low frequency phonon mode is zero. In addition, the acoustic velocity of the high frequency phonon mode depends on the angle of the magnetic field and the wave motion but does not depend on the magnetic field strength.

  3. Understanding the anomalous dispersion of doubly-ionized carbon plasmas near 47 nm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, J; Castor, J I; Iglesias, C A; Cheng, K T; Dunn, J; Johnson, W R; Filevich, J; Purvis, M A; Grava, J; Rocca, J J

    2008-04-15

    Over the last several years we have predicted and observed plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one in the soft X-ray regime. These plasmas are usually a few times ionized and have ranged from low-Z carbon plasmas to mid-Z tin plasmas. Our main calculational tool has been the average atom code. We have recently observed C{sup 2+} plasmas with an index of refraction greater than one at a wavelength of 46.9 nm (26.44 eV). In this paper we compare the average atom method, AVATOMKG, against two more detailed methods, OPAL and CAK, for calculating the index of refraction for the carbon plasmas and discuss the different approximations used. We present experimental measurements of carbon plasmas that display this anomalous dispersion phenomenon. It is shown that the average atom calculation is a good approximation when the strongest lines dominate the dispersion. However, when weaker lines make a significant contribution, the more detailed calculations such as OPAL and CAK are essential. During the next decade X-ray free electron lasers and other X-ray sources will be available to probe a wider variety of plasmas at higher densities and shorter wavelengths so understanding the index of refraction in plasmas will be even more essential. With the advent of tunable X-ray lasers the frequency dependent interferometer measurements of the index of refraction may enable us to determine the absorption coefficients and line-shapes and make detailed comparisons against our atomic physics codes.

  4. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Doppler Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.

  5. Computation of probabilistic hazard maps and source parameter estimation for volcanic ash transport and dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madankan, R.; Pouget, S.; Singla, P.; Bursik, M.; Dehn, J.; Jones, M.; Patra, A.; Pavolonis, M.; Pitman, E.B.; Singh, T.; Webley, P.

    2014-08-15

    Volcanic ash advisory centers are charged with forecasting the movement of volcanic ash plumes, for aviation, health and safety preparation. Deterministic mathematical equations model the advection and dispersion of these plumes. However initial plume conditions height, profile of particle location, volcanic vent parameters are known only approximately at best, and other features of the governing system such as the windfield are stochastic. These uncertainties make forecasting plume motion difficult. As a result of these uncertainties, ash advisories based on a deterministic approach tend to be conservative, and many times over/under estimate the extent of a plume. This paper presents an end-to-end framework for generating a probabilistic approach to ash plume forecasting. This framework uses an ensemble of solutions, guided by Conjugate Unscented Transform (CUT) method for evaluating expectation integrals. This ensemble is used to construct a polynomial chaos expansion that can be sampled cheaply, to provide a probabilistic model forecast. The CUT method is then combined with a minimum variance condition, to provide a full posterior pdf of the uncertain source parameters, based on observed satellite imagery. The April 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajkull volcano in Iceland is employed as a test example. The puff advection/dispersion model is used to hindcast the motion of the ash plume through time, concentrating on the period 1416 April 2010. Variability in the height and particle loading of that eruption is introduced through a volcano column model called bent. Output uncertainty due to the assumed uncertain input parameter probability distributions, and a probabilistic spatial-temporal estimate of ash presence are computed.

  6. Dispersion mechanisms of a tidal river junction in the Sacramento–San Joaquin Delta, California

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gleichauf, Karla T.; Wolfram, Philip J.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2014-12-17

    In branching channel networks, such as in the Sacramento–San Joaquin River Delta, junction flow dynamics contribute to dispersion of ecologically important entities such as fish, pollutants, nutrients, salt, sediment, and phytoplankton. Flow transport through a junction largely arises from velocity phasing in the form of divergent flow between junction channels for a portion of the tidal cycle. Field observations in the Georgiana Slough junction, which is composed of the North and South Mokelumne rivers, Georgiana Slough, and the Mokelumne River, show that flow phasing differences between these rivers arise from operational, riverine, and tidal forcing. A combination of Acoustic Dopplermore » Current Profile (ADCP) boat transecting and moored ADCPs over a spring–neap tidal cycle (May to June 2012) monitored the variability of spatial and temporal velocity, respectively. Two complementary drifter studies enabled assessment of local transport through the junction to identify small-scale intrajunction dynamics. We supplemented field results with numerical simulations using the SUNTANS model to demonstrate the importance of phasing offsets for junction transport and dispersion. Different phasing of inflows to the junction resulted in scalar patchiness that is characteristic of MacVean and Stacey’s (2011) advective tidal trapping. Furthermore, we observed small-scale junction flow features including a recirculation zone and shear layer, which play an important role in intra-junction mixing over time scales shorter than the tidal cycle (i.e., super-tidal time scales). Thus, the study period spanned open- and closed-gate operations at the Delta Cross Channel. Synthesis of field observations and modeling efforts suggest that management operations related to the Delta Cross Channel can strongly affect transport in the Delta by modifying the relative contributions of tidal and riverine flows, thereby changing the junction flow phasing.« less

  7. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, main report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A.; Hora, S.C.; Lui, C.H.; Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M.; Paesler-Sauer, J.; Helton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, was completed in 1990. These codes estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The ultimate objective of the joint effort was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. Experts developed their distributions independently. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. To validate the distributions generated for the dispersion code input variables, samples from the distributions and propagated through the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the first of a three-volume document describing the project.

  8. Probabilistic accident consequence uncertainty analysis: Dispersion and deposition uncertainty assessment, appendices A and B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harper, F.T.; Young, M.L.; Miller, L.A.; Hora, S.C.; Lui, C.H.; Goossens, L.H.J.; Cooke, R.M.; Paesler-Sauer, J.; Helton, J.C.

    1995-01-01

    The development of two new probabilistic accident consequence codes, MACCS and COSYMA, completed in 1990, estimate the risks presented by nuclear installations based on postulated frequencies and magnitudes of potential accidents. In 1991, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) began a joint uncertainty analysis of the two codes. The objective was to develop credible and traceable uncertainty distributions for the input variables of the codes. Expert elicitation, developed independently, was identified as the best technology available for developing a library of uncertainty distributions for the selected consequence parameters. The study was formulated jointly and was limited to the current code models and to physical quantities that could be measured in experiments. To validate the distributions generated for the wet deposition input variables, samples were taken from these distributions and propagated through the wet deposition code model along with the Gaussian plume model (GPM) implemented in the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Resulting distributions closely replicated the aggregated elicited wet deposition distributions. Project teams from the NRC and CEC cooperated successfully to develop and implement a unified process for the elaboration of uncertainty distributions on consequence code input parameters. Formal expert judgment elicitation proved valuable for synthesizing the best available information. Distributions on measurable atmospheric dispersion and deposition parameters were successfully elicited from experts involved in the many phenomenological areas of consequence analysis. This volume is the second of a three-volume document describing the project and contains two appendices describing the rationales for the dispersion and deposition data along with short biographies of the 16 experts who participated in the project.

  9. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found tomore » be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.« less

  10. Dispersal Limitations on Fish Community Recovery Following Long-term Water Quality Remediation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McManamay, Ryan A.; Jett, Robert T.; Ryon, Michael G.; Gregory, Scott M.; Stratton, Sally H.; Peterson, Mark J.

    2016-02-22

    Holistic restoration approaches, such as water quality remediation, are likely to meet conservation objectives because they are typically implemented at watershed scales, as opposed to individual stream reaches. However, habitat fragmentation may impose constraints on the ecological effectiveness of holistic restoration strategies by limiting colonization following remediation. We questioned the importance of dispersal limitations to fish community recovery following long-term water quality remediation and species reintroductions across the White Oak Creek (WOC) watershed near Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA). Long-term (26 years) responses in fish species richness and biomass to water quality remediation were evaluated in light of habitat fragmentation andmore » population isolation from instream barriers, which varied in their passage potential. In addition, ordination techniques were used to determine the relative importance of habitat connectivity and water quality, in explaining variation fish communities relative to environmental fluctuations, i.e. streamflow. Ecological recovery (changes in richness) at each site was negatively related to barrier index, a measure of community isolation by barriers relative to stream distance. Following species reintroductions, dispersal by fish species was consistently in the downstream direction and upstream passage above barriers was non-existent. The importance of barrier index in explaining variation in fish communities was stronger during higher flow conditions, but decreased over time an indication of increasing community stability and loss of seasonal migrants. Compared to habitat fragmentation, existing water quality concerns (i.e., outfalls, point source discharges) were unrelated to ecological recovery, but explained relatively high variation in community dynamics. Our results suggest that habitat fragmentation limited the ecological effectiveness of intensive water quality remediation efforts and fish reintroduction

  11. Generalized chemical route to develop fatty acid capped highly dispersed semiconducting metal sulphide nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patel, Jayesh D.; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Mighri, Frej; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Laval, Quebec, QC, G1K 7P4 ; Ajji, Abdellah; Chemical Engineering Department, Ecole Polytechnique, C.P. 6079, Succ. Centre-Ville Montreal, QC, H3C 3A7

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: ► Chemical route for the synthesis of OA-capped CdS, ZnS and PbS at low temperature. ► Synthesized nanocrystals via thermolysis of their metal–oleate complexes. ► Size quantized nanocrystals were highly dispersed and stable at room temperature. -- Abstract: This work deals with the synthesis of highly dispersed semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) of cadmium sulphide (CdS), zinc sulphide (ZnS) and lead sulphide (PbS) through a simple and generalized process using oleic acid (OA) as surfactant. To synthesize these NCs, metal–oleate (M–O) complexes were obtained from the reaction at 140 °C between metal acetates and OA in hexanes media. Subsequently, M–O complexes were sulphurized using thioacetamide at the same temperature. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) characterizations show that the synthesized products are of nanoscale-size with highly crystalline cubic phase. The optical absorption of OA-capped metal sulphide NCs confirms that their size quantization induced a large shift towards visible region. Photoluminescence (PL) spectrum of CdS NCs shows a broad band-edge emission with shallow and deep-trap emissions, while PL spectrum of ZnS NCs reveals a broad emission due to defects states on the surface. The thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy indicate that fatty acid monolayers were bound strongly on the nanocrystal surface as a carboxylate and the two oxygen atoms of the carboxylate were coordinated symmetrically to the surface of the NCs. The strong binding between the fatty acid and the NCs surface enhances the stability of NCs colloids. In general, this generalized route has a great potential in developing nanoscale metal sulphides for opto-electronic devices.

  12. Facile route of biopolymer mediated ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles in aqueous dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Collins, A. M.; Mann, S.

    2014-10-24

    In this paper, we present a facile method for production stable aqueous dispersion of ferrocene (FO) nanoparticles. Ferrocene compounds were employed to achieve stable nanodispersions, stabilized with three different biopolymers namely, alginate, CM-dextran and chitosan. The nanoparticles produce are spherical, less than 10 nm in mean diameter and highly stable without any sedimentation. Fourier infrared transform (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies confirmed the purity of ferrocene nanoparticles there is no modifications occur during the preparation route. FTIR spectra results were consistent with the presence of absorption band of cyclopentadienyl ring (C{sub 5}H{sub 5}{sup −} ion) which assigned to ν(C-C) vibrations (1409 cm-1), δ(C-H) stretching at 1001 cm{sup −1} and π(C-H) vibrations at 812 cm{sup −1}. Furthermore, all functional group for biopolymers such as CO from carboxyl group of CM-dextran and sodium alginate appears at 1712 cm{sup −1} and 1709 cm{sup −1} respectively, indicating there are steric repulsion interactions for particles stabilization. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of sedimented samples of the biopolymers-stabilized ferrocene (FO) showed all reflections which were indexed respectively to the (−110), (001), (−201), (−111), (200), (−211), (210), (120) and (111) according to the monoclinic phase ferrocene. This confirmed that the products obtained were of high purity of Fe and EDAX analysis also suggests that the presence of the Fe element in the colloidal dispersion.

  13. Reflection thermal diffuse x-ray scattering for quantitative determination of phonon dispersion relations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mei, A. B.; Hellman, O.; Schlepuetz, C. M.; Rockett, A.; Chiang, T. -C.; Hultman, L.; Petrov, I.; Greene, J. E.

    2015-11-03

    Synchrotron reflection x-ray thermal diffuse scattering (TDS) measurements, rather than previously reported transmission TDS, are carried out at room temperature and analyzed using a formalism based upon second-order interatomic force constants and long-range Coulomb interactions to obtain quantitative determinations of MgO phonon dispersion relations (h) over bar omega(j) (q), phonon densities of states g((h) over bar omega), and isochoric temperature-dependent vibrational heat capacities cv (T). We use MgO as a model system for investigating reflection TDS due to its harmonic behavior as well as its mechanical and dynamic stability. Resulting phonon dispersion relations and densities of states are found to be in good agreement with independent reports from inelastic neutron and x-ray scattering experiments. Temperature-dependent isochoric heat capacities cv (T), computed within the harmonic approximation from (h) over bar omega(j) (q) values, increase with temperature from 0.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 100 K to 1.4 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 200 K and 1.9 x 10-4 eV/atom K at 300 K, in excellent agreement with isobaric heat capacity values cp (T) between 4 and 300 K. We anticipate that the experimental approach developed here will be valuable for determining vibrational properties of heteroepitaxial thin films since the use of grazing-incidence (θ ≲ θc where θc is the density-dependent critical angle) allows selective tuning of x-ray penetration depths to ≲ 10 nm.

  14. Accumulation capacitance frequency dispersion of III-V metal-insulator-semiconductor devices due to disorder induced gap states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galatage, R. V.; Zhernokletov, D. M.; Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M.; Vogel, E. M.

    2014-07-07

    The origin of the anomalous frequency dispersion in accumulation capacitance of metal-insulator-semiconductor devices on InGaAs and InP substrates is investigated using modeling, electrical characterization, and chemical characterization. A comparison of the border trap model and the disorder induced gap state model for frequency dispersion is performed. The fitting of both models to experimental data indicate that the defects responsible for the measured dispersion are within approximately 0.8 nm of the surface of the crystalline semiconductor. The correlation between the spectroscopically detected bonding states at the dielectric/III-V interface, the interfacial defect density determined using capacitance-voltage, and modeled capacitance-voltage response strongly suggests that these defects are associated with the disruption of the III-V atomic bonding and not border traps associated with bonding defects within the high-k dielectric.

  15. A Study of the Effects of Different Urban Wind Models on Dispersion Patterns Using Joint Urban 2003 Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, A A; Brown, M J

    2012-02-21

    The Quick Urban & Industrial Complex (QUIC) Dispersion Modeling System has been developed to rapidly compute the transport and dispersion of toxic agent releases in the vicinity of buildings. It is composed of a wind solver, an 'urbanized' Lagrangian random-walk model, and a graphical user interface. QUIC has two different wind models: (a) The QUIC-URB wind solver, an empirically-based diagnostic wind model and (b) The QUIC-CFD (RANS) solver, based on the 3D Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations. In this paper, we discuss the effect of different wind models on dispersion patterns in dense built-up areas. The model-computed wind from the two urban wind models- QUIC-URB and QUIC-CFD are used to drive the dispersion model. The concentration fields are then compared to measurements from the Oklahoma City Joint Urban 2003 field experiment. QUIC produces high-resolution 3-D mean wind and concentration fields around buildings, in addition to deposition on the ground and building surfaces. It has options for different release types, including point, moving point, line, area, and volumetric sources, as well as dense gas, explosive buoyant rise, multi-particle size, bioslurry, and two-phase releases. Other features include indoor infiltration, a pressure solver, outer grid simulations, vegetative canopies, and population exposure calculations. It has been used for biological agent sensor siting in cities, vulnerability assessments for heavier-than-air chemical releases at industrial facilities, and clean-up assessments for radiological dispersal device (RDD) releases in cities (e.g., see Linger et al., 2005; Brown, 2006a, b). QUIC has also been used for dust transport studies (Bowker et al., 2007a) and for the impact of highway sound barriers on the transport and dispersion of vehicle emissions (Bowker et al., 2007b).

  16. High-frequency solitons in media with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves with nonuniform dispersion and nonlinearity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aseeva, N. V. Gromov, E. M.; Tyutin, V. V.

    2015-12-15

    The dynamics of high-frequency field solitons is considered using the extended nonhomogeneous nonlinear Schrödinger equation with induced scattering from damped low-frequency waves (pseudoinduced scattering). This scattering is a 3D analog of the stimulated Raman scattering from temporal spatially homogeneous damped low-frequency modes, which is well known in optics. Spatial inhomogeneities of secondorder linear dispersion and cubic nonlinearity are also taken into account. It is shown that the shift in the 3D spectrum of soliton wavenumbers toward the short-wavelength region is due to nonlinearity increasing in coordinate and to decreasing dispersion. Analytic results are confirmed by numerical calculations.

  17. Dispersion states and acid properties of SiO{sub 2}-supported Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Jie; Li, Qing-Jie; Fan, Yi-Ning

    2013-06-15

    Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} samples were prepared by the incipient-wetness impregnation method using niobium oxalate aqueous solution. The microstructure and dispersion process of the niobia species supported on SiO{sub 2} were characterized by means of power X-ray diffraction (XRD), laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), and UVvis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UVvis DRS). The acid properties were investigated by the method of Hammett indicator and Pyridine adsorption infrared (Py-IR) spectroscopy. The results showed that the dispersion process of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was performed by consuming surface hydroxyl groups of the amorphous SiO{sub 2} support. The aggregation of niobia species led to the formation of microcrystalline particles, so that there was no a clear monolayer dispersion capacity for Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} supported on amorphous SiO{sub 2}. Furthermore, the catalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by the condensation reaction of iso-butene (IB) and iso-butyraldehyde (IBA) to form 2,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexadiene (DMHD). The catalytic activities of the as-prepared samples for the condensation and their acid properties were strongly affected by the dispersion states. - Graphical abstract: The acid amount and strength of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} samples varied with the increase of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} loading. The catalytic activities of the as-prepared samples for the condensation and their acid properties were strongly affected by the dispersion states. - Highlights: The dispersed process of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} was completed by consuming surface hydroxyl groups of SiO{sub 2}. XRD quantitative phase analysis is not applicable for oxides dispersing on amorphous support. The catalytic activity of Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2} is closely related to the dispersion state of SiO{sub 2}.

  18. Input-output relations at dispersing and absorbing planar multilayers for the quantized electromagnetic field containing evanescent components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanbekyan, Mikayel; Knoell, Ludwig; Welsch, Dirk-Gunnar

    2003-06-01

    By using the Green-function concept of quantization of the electromagnetic field in dispersing and absorbing media, the quantized field in the presence of a dispersing and absorbing dielectric multilayer plate is studied. Three-dimensional input-output relations are derived for both amplitude operators in the k space and the field operators in the coordinate space. The conditions are discussed, under which the input-output relations can be expressed in terms of bosonic operators. The theory applies to both (effectively) free fields and fields, created by active atomic sources inside and/or outside the plate, including also evanescent-field components.

  19. Dispersion measurement as a method of quantifying geologic characterization and defining reservoir heterogeneity. Annual report, July 12, 1990--September 12, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menzie, D.E.

    1992-04-01

    Since reservoirs are heterogeneous, nonuniform, and anisotropic, the success or failure of many enhanced oil recovery techniques rests on our prediction of internal variability and the paths of fluid flow in the reservoir. The main objective of this project is to develop a greater understanding of reservoir heterogeneities through dispersion measurement. In this annual report, an approach to ways to estimate the dispersivities of reservoir rocks from well logs is presented. From a series of rock property measurements and dispersion tests the following studies have been made: A measure of rock heterogeneity is developed by using the effluent concentration at one pore volume injection in a matched viscosity miscible displacement. By this approach, a heterogeneity factor is determined from the measured S-shaped dispersion curve. The parameter f in the Coats-Smith capacitance model is redefined as the dispersion fraction f{sub d} (or mechanical mixing fraction). At the f{sub d} pore volume injection, the dynamic miscible displacement efficiency reaches maximum. Reflected on the dispersion curve, this number corresponds to the peak of the first derivative of concentration. With the concept of dispersion fraction, a unique solution to the capacitance model is obtained, and then an equivalent dispersivity is defined. Through experimental data on Berea and Brown sandstone samples, it has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic. Through a key parameter of tortuosity, dispersivity is related to rock petrophysical properties. This semi-theoretical relationship forms the basis for determining dispersivities from well logs. The approach is validated through experimental studies on Berea and Brown sandstone samples. It has been found that the equivalent dispersivity is an exponential function of the heterogeneity factor and can be used as a reservoir characteristic.

  20. Computation of generalized and exact dispersion relations for longitudinal plasma waves in nonextensive statistics and the effects of the nonextensivity on the oscillation modes and damps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.; Ebrahimi, V. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, Azarbaijan Shahid Madani University, 53714-161 Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-03-15

    We have derived generalized dispersion relations for longitudinal waves in collisionless thermal plasma using linear Vlasov-Poisson kinetic model and nonextensive distributions for electrons. The Maxwellian limit of the dispersion relations, where the q-nonextensive parameter tends to one, is calculated. The generalized dispersion relations are reduced to polynomials for some specific values of q. The well-known modes of oscillations such as the Langmuir and electron acoustic waves have been obtained by solving the dispersion relations. Some new modes of oscillation are also found. Finally, the dependence of the oscillation modes and damps on q is discussed.

  1. Predicted irradiation behavior of U sub 3 O sub 8 -Al dispersion fuels for production reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cronenberg, A.W. ); Rest, J. ); Hyder, M.L.; Morin, J.P.; Peacock, H.B. )

    1990-01-01

    Candidate fuels for the new heavy-water production reactor include uranium/aluminum alloy and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al dispersion fuels. The U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al dispersion fuel would make possible higher uranium loadings and would facilitate uranium recycle. Research efforts on U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al fuel include in-pile irradiation studies and development of analytical tools to characterize the behavior of dispersion fuels at high-burnup. In this paper the irradiation performance of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al is assessed using the mechanistic Dispersion Analysis Research Tool (DART) code. Predictions of fuel swelling and alteration of thermal conductivity are presented and compared with experimental data. Calculational results indicate good agreement with available data where the effects of as-fabricated porosity and U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al oxygen exchange reactions are shown to exert a controlling influence on irradiation behavior. The DART code is judged to be a useful tool for assessing U{sub 3}O{sub 8}--Al performance over a wide range of irradiation conditions. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Oil spill removal: Dispersants, absorbents, booms, and skimmers. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the techniques available for the removal of oil following major spills. Chemical dispersants, gelling agents, foam plastics, booms, skimmers, and burning are discussed. Specific oil spills are considered, and the environmental impacts of oil spills are noted. (Contains a minimum of 80 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  3. Oil spill removal: Dispersants, absorbents, booms, and skimmers. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the techniques available for the removal of oil following major spills. Chemical dispersants, gelling agents, foam plastics, booms, skimmers, and burning are discussed. Specific oil spills are considered, and the environmental impacts of oil spills are noted. (Contains a minimum of 77 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  4. Oil spill removal: Dispersants, absorbents, booms, and skimmers. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the techniques available for the removal of oil following major spills. Chemical dispersants, gelling agents, foam plastics, booms, skimmers, and burning are discussed. Specific oil spills are considered and the environmental impacts of oil spills are noted. (Contains a minimum of 207 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  5. Oil spill removal: Dispersants, absorbents, booms, and skimmers. (Latest citations from the Life Sciences Collection database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the techniques available for the removal of oil following major spills. Chemical dispersants, gelling agents, foam plastics, booms, skimmers, and burning are discussed. Specific oil spills are considered, and the environmental impacts of oil spills are noted.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  6. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wavemore » intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.« less

  7. Ocean current observations near McMurdo Station, Antarctica from 1991 to 1993: Relation to wastewater discharge dispersal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, J.P.

    1994-08-01

    Analyses of ocean currents in the vicinity of McMurdo Station, Antarctica, are relevant to the transport and dispersal of wastewater from the McMurdo Station sewage outfall pipe. Observations of ocean currents during the initial phases of this study have been presented by Howington and McFeters. These studies, using coliform bacterial counts as an indicator of dispersion of the wastewater plume and current meters to measure flow patterns, indicated that dispersal of the plume by local currents does not effectively remove the plume from the vicinity of McMurdo Sound, under the present outfall pipe location. Moreover, these studies suggest that, although the flow pattern is generally consistent with transport of the plume away from McMurdo Station, episodes of current reversal are sufficient to transport the wastewater plume along the shore toward the southeast, eventually overlapping the seawater intake area near the McMurdo jetty. Several concerns included (a) impacts of wastewater inputs to nearshore benthic and pelagic habitats adjacent to McMurdo Station, (b) effects of wastewater input to the McMurdo Station fresh water intake source, and (c) reduction in human impacts on the McMurdo Sound ecosystem. These concerns motivated studies to characterize nearshore currents more extensively in relation to dispersal of the wastewater plume. This report discusses analysis results of current observations from November 1992 to November 1993.

  8. System for obtaining smooth laser beams where intensity variations are reduced by spectral dispersion of the laser light (SSD)

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Short, R.W.; Craxton, S.; Letzring, S.A.; Soures, J.

    1991-09-10

    In an SSD (smoothing by spectral dispersion) system which reduces the time-averaged spatial variations in intensity of the laser light to provide uniform illumination of a laser fusion target, an electro-optic phase modulator through which a laser beam passes produces a broadband output beam by imposing a frequency modulated bandwidth on the laser beam. A grating provides spatial and angular spectral dispersion of the beam. Due to the phase modulation, the frequencies (''colors'') cycle across the beam. The dispersed beam may be amplified and frequency converted (e.g., tripled) in a plurality of beam lines. A distributed phase plate (DPP) in each line is irradiated by the spectrally dispersed beam and the beam is focused on the target where a smooth (uniform intensity) pattern is produced. The color cycling enhances smoothing and the use of a frequency modulated laser pulse prevents the formation of high intensity spikes which could damage the laser medium in the power amplifiers. 8 figures.

  9. Preparation, catalysis, and characterization of highly dispersed molybdenum sulfide catalysts supported on a NaY zeolite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okamoto, Yasuaki; Katsuyama, Hiromoto [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)] [Osaka Univ., Toyonaka, Osaka (Japan)

    1996-06-01

    The structure and dispersion of the molybdenum sulfides supported on a NaY zeolite were studied using XAFS techniques. It was found that molybdenum sulfide species prepared by sulfiding vapor deposited Mo(CO){sub 6} or by sulfiding molybdenum oxide dimer species encaged in the zeolite are highly dispersed and thermally stabilized against sintering or restructuring. These molybdenum species are formed via molybdenum sulfide dimer species as an intermediate. On the other hand, with the molybdenum sulfide catalysts prepared by an impregnation method, the sulfidation of molybdenum oxides was incomplete. The molybdenum oxide species are suggested to be mainly located in the zeolite cavities after calcination, forming isolated molybdenum oxides in tetrahedral configurations. The molybdenum sulfide species prepared from Mo(CO){sub 6} showed much higher catalytic activities for thiophene hydrodesulfurization and butadiene hydrogenation than the molybdenum sulfides prepared by the impregnation, in conformity with a higher dispersion and higher fraction of the molybdenum sulfide species. It is demonstrated that in combination with metal carbonyl techniques, zeolite supports are very suitable for the preparation of highly dispersed molybdenum sulfides at a high Mo loading.

  10. Microstructural Characterization of U-7Mo/Al-Si Alloy Matrix Dispersion Fuel Plates Fabricated at 500°C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Jan-Fong Jue; Bo Yao; Emmanuel Perez; Yongho Sohn; Curtis R. Clark

    2011-05-01

    The starting microstructure of a dispersion fuel plate will impact the overall performance of the plate during irradiation. To improve the understanding of the as-fabricated microstructures of U–Mo dispersion fuel plates, particularly the interaction layers that can form between the fuel particles and the matrix, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analyses have been performed on samples from depleted U–7Mo (U–7Mo) dispersion fuel plates with either Al–2 wt.% Si(Al–2Si) or AA4043 alloy matrix. It was observed that in the thick interaction layers, U(Al, Si)3 and U6Mo4Al43 were present, and in the thin interaction layers, (U, Mo) (Al, Si)3, U(Al, Si)4, U3Si3Al2, U3Si5, and possibly USi-type phases were observed. The U3Si3Al2 phase contained some Mo. Based on the results of this investigation, the time that a dispersion fuel plate is exposed to a relatively high temperature during fabrication will impact the nature of the interaction layers around the fuel particles. Uniformly thin, Si-rich layers will develop around the U–7Mo particles for shorter exposure times, and thicker, Si-depleted layers will develop for the longer exposure times.

  11. A Lagrangian-Eulerian method with zoomable hidden fine-mesh approach to solving advection-dispersion equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeh, G.T. )

    1990-06-01

    A Lagrangian-Eulerian method with zoomable hidden fine-mesh approach (LEZOOM), that can be adapted with either finite element or finite difference methods, is used to solve the advection-dispersion equation. The approach is based on automatic adaptation of zooming a hidden fine mesh in regions where the sharp front is located. Application of LEZOOM to four bench mark problems indicates that it can handle the advection-dispersion/diffusion problems with mesh Peclet numbers ranged from 0 to {infinity} and with mesh Courant numbers well in excess of 1. Difficulties that can be resolved with LEZOOM include numerical dispersion, oscillations, the clipping of peaks, and the effect of grid orientation. Nonuniform grid as well as spatial temporally variable flow pose no problems with LEZOOM. Both initial and boundary value problems can be solved accurately with LEZOOM. It is shown that although the mixed Lagrangian-Eulerian (LE) approach (LEZOOM without zooming) also produces excessive numerical dispersion as the upstream finite element (UFE) method, the LE approach is superior to the UFE method.

  12. Applying the cold plasma dispersion relation to whistler mode chorus waves: EMFISIS wave measurements from the Van Allen Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, D. P.; Chen, Y.; Kletzing, C. A.; Denton, M. H.; Kurth, W. S.

    2015-02-17

    Most theoretical wave models require the power in the wave magnetic field in order to determine the effect of chorus waves on radiation belt electrons. However, researchers typically use the cold plasma dispersion relation to approximate the magnetic wave power when only electric field data are available. In this study, the validity of using the cold plasma dispersion relation in this context is tested using Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations of both the electric and magnetic spectral intensities in the chorus wave band (0.1–0.9 fce). Results from this study indicate that the calculated wave intensity is least accurate during periods of enhanced wave activity. For observed wave intensities >10⁻³ nT², using the cold plasma dispersion relation results in an underestimate of the wave intensity by a factor of 2 or greater 56% of the time over the full chorus wave band, 60% of the time for lower band chorus, and 59% of the time for upper band chorus. Hence, during active periods, empirical chorus wave models that are reliant on the cold plasma dispersion relation will underestimate chorus wave intensities to a significant degree, thus causing questionable calculation of wave-particle resonance effects on MeV electrons.

  13. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez, Rodrigo A.; Moya, Pablo S.; Muoz, Vctor; Vias, Adolfo F.; Valdivia, J. Alejandro

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvn mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvn branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ??/?k?>?0) and an anomalous zone (where ??/?k?

  14. Effect of rapid thermal annealing temperature on the dispersion of Si nanocrystals in SiO{sub 2} matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saxena, Nupur Kumar, Pragati; Gupta, Vinay

    2015-05-15

    Effect of rapid thermal annealing temperature on the dispersion of silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) embedded in SiO{sub 2} matrix grown by atom beam sputtering (ABS) method is reported. The dispersion of Si NCs in SiO{sub 2} is an important issue to fabricate high efficiency devices based on Si-NCs. The transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the precipitation of excess silicon is almost uniform and the particles grow in almost uniform size upto 850 C. The size distribution of the particles broadens and becomes bimodal as the temperature is increased to 950 C. This suggests that by controlling the annealing temperature, the dispersion of Si-NCs can be controlled. The results are supported by selected area diffraction (SAED) studies and micro photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The discussion of effect of particle size distribution on PL spectrum is presented based on tight binding approximation (TBA) method using Gaussian and log-normal distribution of particles. The study suggests that the dispersion and consequently emission energy varies as a function of particle size distribution and that can be controlled by annealing parameters.

  15. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-12-19

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry–Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny–Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Furthermore, spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  16. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-12-19

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry–Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny–Turnermore » spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Furthermore, spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.« less

  17. Combustion of Shock-Dispersed Flake Aluminum - High-Speed Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neuwald, P; Reichenbach, H; Kuhl, A

    2006-06-19

    Charges of 0.5 g PETN were used to disperse 1 g of flake aluminum in a rectangular test chamber of 4 liter inner volume and inner dimensions of approximately 10 cm x 10 cm x 40 cm. The subsequent combustion of the flake aluminum with the ambient air in the chamber gave rise to a highly luminous flame. The evolution of the luminous region was studied by means of high-speed cinematography. The high-speed camera is responsive to a broad spectral range in the visible and near infra-red. For a number of tests this response range was narrowed down by means of a band-pass filter with a center wavelength of 488 nm and a half-width of 23 nm. The corresponding images were expected to have a stronger temperature dependence than images obtained without the filter, thus providing better capability to highlight hot-spots. Emission in the range of the pass-band of the filter can be due to continuous thermal radiation from hot Al and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles or to molecular band emission from gaseous AlO. A time-resolving spectrometer was improvised to inspect this topic. The results suggest that AlO emission occurs, but that the continuous spectrum is the dominating effect in our experiments.

  18. Analysis of high-resolution spectra from a hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Phyllis; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-09-05

    To fully take advantage of a low-cost, small footprint hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer, a math- ematical reconstruction technique was developed to accurately capture the high-resolution and relative peak intensities from complex patterns. A Fabry-Perot etalon was coupled to a Czerny-Turner spectrometer, in- creasing spectral resolution by an order of magnitude without the commensurate increase in spectrometer size. Measurement of the industry standard Hg 313.1555/313.1844 nm doublet yielded a ratio of 0.682 with 1.8%error, which agreed well with an independent measurement and literature values. The doublet separation (29 pm), is similar to the U isotope shift (25 pm) at 424.437 nm that is of interest to monitoring nuclear nonpro-liferation activities. Additionally, the technique was applied to a LIBS measurement of the mineral cinnabar (HgS) and resulted in a ratio of 0.681. This reconstruction method could enable significantly smaller, portable high-resolution instruments with isotopic specificity, benefiting a variety of spectroscopic applications.

  19. Evaluation of internal contamination levels after a radiological dispersal device incident using portal monitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, R.C.; Hertel, Nolan; Ansari, A.; Manger, Ryan P; Freibert, E.J.

    2012-01-01

    Following a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) incident, it may be necessary to evaluate the internal contamination levels of a large number of potentially affected individuals to determine if immediate medical follow-up is necessary. Since the current laboratory capacity to screen for internal contamination is limited, rapid field screening methods can be useful in prioritizing individuals. This study evaluated the suitability of a radiation portal monitor for such screening. A model of the portal monitor was created for use with models of six anthropomorphic phantoms in Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5 (MCNP) X-5 Monte Carlo Team (MCNP A General Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code Version 5. LA-CP-03-0245. Vol. 2. Los Alamos National Laboratory, 2004.). The count rates of the portal monitor were simulated for inhalation and ingestion of likely radionuclides from an RDD for each of the phantoms. The time-dependant organ concentrations of the radionuclides were determined using Dose and Risk Calculation Software Eckerman, Leggett, Cristy, Nelson, Ryman, Sjoreen and Ward (Dose and Risk Calculation Software Ver. 8.4. ORNL/TM-2001/190. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 2006.). Portal monitor count rates corresponding to a committed effective dose E(50) of 10 mSv are reported.

  20. Establishing remediation levels in response to a radiological dispersal event (or dirty bomb).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elcock, D.; Klemic, G. A.; Taboas, A. L.; Environmental Assessment; Environmental Measurements Lab.; DOE-CH

    2004-05-01

    The detonation of a radiological dispersal device (RDD) could produce significant social and economic damage, the extent of which would depend largely on how quickly and effectively cleanup levels were established and on public acceptance of those levels. This paper shows that current radiological cleanup laws and regulations, models for converting dose or risk goals to cleanup concentrations, and existing site-specific criteria were not designed specifically for RDD cleanups but, absent changes, would apply by default. The goals and approaches of these legal and methodological structures often conflict; using them in response to terrorism could undermine public confidence, cause delays, and produce unnecessary costs or unacceptable cleanups. RDD cleanups would involve immediate priorities not envisioned in the existing radiological cleanup framework, such as balancing radiation risks with the health, economic, and other societal impacts associated with access to the infrastructure necessary to sustain society (e.g., hospitals, bridges, utilities). To minimize the achievement of terrorism goals, the elements of an RDD cleanup response -- including updating existing legal/regulatory structures to clarify federal authority, goals, and methods for developing RDD cleanup criteria -- must be in place soon; given the complexity of the issues and the potential societal impact, this effort should be expedited.

  1. Lattice vibrations in the Frenkel-Kontorova model. I. Phonon dispersion, number density, and energy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meng, Qingping; Wu, Lijun; Welch, David O.; Zhu, Yimei

    2015-06-17

    We studied the lattice vibrations of two inter-penetrating atomic sublattices via the Frenkel-Kontorova (FK) model of a linear chain of harmonically interacting atoms subjected to an on-site potential, using the technique of thermodynamic Green's functions based on quantum field-theoretical methods. General expressions were deduced for the phonon frequency-wave-vector dispersion relations, number density, and energy of the FK model system. In addition, as the application of the theory, we investigated in detail cases of linear chains with various periods of the on-site potential of the FK model. Some unusual but interesting features for different amplitudes of the on-site potential of themore » FK model are discussed. In the commensurate structure, the phonon spectrum always starts at a finite frequency, and the gaps of the spectrum are true ones with a zero density of modes. In the incommensurate structure, the phonon spectrum starts from zero frequency, but at a non-zero wave vector; there are some modes inside these gap regions, but their density is very low. In our approximation, the energy of a higher-order commensurate state of the one-dimensional system at a finite temperature may become indefinitely close to the energy of an incommensurate state. This finding implies that the higher-order incommensurate-commensurate transitions are continuous ones and that the phase transition may exhibit a “devil's staircase” behavior at a finite temperature.« less

  2. Unipolar time-differential charge sensing in non-dispersive amorphous solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldan, A. H.; Rowlands, J. A.; Tousignant, O.; Karim, K. S.

    2013-06-14

    The use of high resistivity amorphous solids as photodetectors, especially amorphous selenium, is currently of great interest because they are readily produced over large area at substantially lower cost compared to grown crystalline solids. However, amorphous solids have been ruled out as viable radiation detection media for high frame-rate applications, such as single-photon-counting imaging, because of low carrier mobilities, transit-time-limited photoresponse, and consequently, poor time resolution. To circumvent the problem of poor charge transport in amorphous solids, we propose unipolar time-differential charge sensing by establishing a strong near-field effect using an electrostatic shield within the material. For the first time, we have fabricated a true Frisch grid inside a solid-state detector by evaporating amorphous selenium over photolithographically prepared multi-well substrates. The fabricated devices are characterized with optical, x-ray, and gamma-ray impulse-like excitations. Results prove the proposed unipolar time-differential property and show that time resolution in non-dispersive amorphous solids can be improved substantially to reach the theoretical limit set by spatial spreading of the collected Gaussian carrier cloud.

  3. Asymmetry dependence of nucleon correlations in spherical nuclei extracted from a dispersive-optical-model analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, J. M.; Shane, R.; Waldecker, S. J.; Dickhoff, W. H.; Charity, R. J.; Sobotka, L. G.; Crowell, A. S.; Esterline, J. H.; Fallin, B.; Howell, C. R.; Westerfeldt, C.; Youngs, M.; Crowe, B. J. III; Pedroni, R. S.

    2011-06-15

    Neutron elastic-scattering angular distributions were measured at beam energies of 11.9 and 16.9 MeV on {sup 40,48}Ca targets. These data plus other elastic-scattering measurements, total and reaction cross-sections measurements, (e,e{sup '}p) data, and single-particle energies for magic and doubly magic nuclei have been analyzed in the dispersive optical-model (DOM), generating nucleon self-energies (optical-model potentials) that can be related, via the many-body Dyson equation, to spectroscopic factors and occupation probabilities. It is found that, for stable nuclei with N{>=}Z, the imaginary surface potential for protons exhibits a strong dependence on the neutron-proton asymmetry. This result leads to a more modest dependence of the spectroscopic factors on asymmetry. The measured data and the DOM analysis of all considered nuclei clearly demonstrate that the neutron imaginary surface potential displays very little dependence on the neutron-proton asymmetry for nuclei near stability (N{>=}Z).

  4. Site restoration: Estimation of attributable costs from plutonium-dispersal accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chanin, D.I.; Murfin, W.B.

    1996-05-01

    A nuclear weapons accident is an extremely unlikely event due to the extensive care taken in operations. However, under some hypothetical accident conditions, plutonium might be dispersed to the environment. This would result in costs being incurred by the government to remediate the site and compensate for losses. This study is a multi-disciplinary evaluation of the potential scope of the post-accident response that includes technical factors, current and proposed legal requirements and constraints, as well as social/political factors that could influence decision making. The study provides parameters that can be used to assess economic costs for accidents postulated to occur in urban areas, Midwest farmland, Western rangeland, and forest. Per-area remediation costs have been estimated, using industry-standard methods, for both expedited and extended remediation. Expedited remediation costs have been evaluated for highways, airports, and urban areas. Extended remediation costs have been evaluated for all land uses except highways and airports. The inclusion of cost estimates in risk assessments, together with the conventional estimation of doses and health effects, allows a fuller understanding of the post-accident environment. The insights obtained can be used to minimize economic risks by evaluation of operational and design alternatives, and through development of improved capabilities for accident response.

  5. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry andmore » wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.« less

  6. Quasi one-dimensional band dispersion and surface metallization in long-range ordered polymeric wires

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vasseur, Guillaume; Fagot-Revurat, Yannick; Sicot, Muriel; Kierren, Bertrand; Moreau, Luc; Malterre, Daniel; Cardenas, Luis; Galeotti, Gianluca; Lipton-Duffin, Josh; Rosei, Frederico; et al

    2016-01-04

    We study the electronic structure of an ordered array of poly(para-phenylene) chains produced by surface-catalyzed dehalogenative polymerization of 1,4-dibromobenzene on copper (110). The quantization of unoccupied molecular states is measured as a function of oligomer length by scanning tunnelling spectroscopy, with Fermi level crossings observed for chains longer than ten phenyl rings. Angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a quasi-one-dimensional valence band as well as a direct gap of 1.15 eV, as the conduction band is partially filled through adsorption on the surface. Tight-binding modelling and ab initio density functional theory calculations lead to a full description of the organic band-structure, includingmore » the k-dispersion, the gap size and electron charge transfer mechanisms, highlighting a strong substrate-molecule interaction that drives the system into a metallic behaviour. In summary, we have fully characterized the band structure of a carbon-based conducting wire. This model system may be considered as a fingerprint of -conjugation of surface organic frameworks.« less

  7. Methods for estimating wake flow and effluent dispersion near simple block-like buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosker, R.P. Jr.

    1981-05-01

    This report is intended as an interim guide for those who routinely face air quality problems associated with near-building exhaust stack placement and height, and the resulting concentration patterns. Available data and methods for estimating wake flow and effluent dispersion near isolated block-like structures are consolidated. The near-building and wake flows are described, and quantitative estimates for frontal eddy size, height and extent of roof and wake cavities, and far wake behavior are provided. Concentration calculation methods for upwind, near-building, and downwind pollutant sources are given. For an upwind source, it is possible to estimate the required stack height, and to place upper limits on the likely near-building concentration. The influences of near-building source location and characteristics relative to the building geometry and orientation are considered. Methods to estimate effective stack height, upper limits for concentration due to flush roof vents, and the effect of changes in rooftop stack height are summarized. Current wake and wake cavity models are presented. Numerous graphs of important expressions have been prepared to facilitate computations and quick estimates of flow patterns and concentration levels for specific simple buildings. Detailed recommendations for additional work are given.

  8. Improved Irradiation Performance of Uranium-Molybdenum/Aluminum Dispersion Fuel by Silicon Addition in Aluminum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-10-01

    Uranium-molybdenum fuel particle dispersion in aluminum is a form of fuel under development for conversion of high-power research and test reactors from highly enriched to low-enriched uranium in the U.S. Global Threat Reduction Initiative program (also known as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program). Extensive irradiation tests have been conducted to find a solution for problems caused by interaction layer growth and pore formation between U-Mo and Al. Adding a small amount of Si (up to [approximately]5 wt%) in the Al matrix was one of the proposed remedies. The effect of silicon addition in the Al matrix was examined using irradiation test results by comparing side-by-side samples with different Si additions. Interaction layer growth was progressively reduced with increasing Si addition to the matrix Al, up to 4.8 wt%. The Si addition also appeared to delay pore formation and growth between the U-Mo and Al.

  9. On the dispersion relation of the transit time instability in inverted fireballs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruenwald, J.

    2014-08-15

    Recently discovered inverted fireballs are non-linear plasma phenomena, which are formed in hollow grid anodes with high transparency in an existing background plasma. If a sufficiently large potential is applied, accelerated electrons from the bulk start to oscillate through the grid. Experimental investigations have shown that they produce different types of plasma instabilities. One of those oscillations is a transit time instability which originates from strong electron beams that travel through the inverted fireball. This type of instability is similar to vircator reflex oscillations and produces radio frequency waves. Hence, it is suitable to convert DC signals into signals oscillating in the MHz range. This paper analyses the dispersion relation of the transit time instability for three different plasma regimes. The regimes can be divided into a collision less regime, a regime with high collisionality and one in between those former two. It is demonstrated that the plasma properties of the surrounding background plasma have a strong influence on the behavior of the instability itself.

  10. ALTERNATIVES OF MACCS2 IN LANL DISPERSION ANALYSIS FOR ONSITE AND OFFSITE DOSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, John HC

    2012-05-01

    In modeling atmospheric dispersion to determine accidental release of radiological material, one of the common statistical analysis tools used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System, Version 2 (MACCS2). MACCS2, however, has some limitations and shortfalls for both onsite and offsite applications. Alternative computer codes, which could provide more realistic calculations, are being investigated for use at LANL. In the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), the suitability of MACCS2 for the calculation of onsite worker doses was a concern; therefore, ARCON96 was chosen to replace MACCS2. YMP's use of ARCON96 provided results which clearly demonstrated the program's merit for onsite worker safety analyses in a wide range of complex configurations and scenarios. For offsite public exposures, the conservatism of MACCS2 on the treatment of turbulence phenomena at LANL is examined in this paper. The results show a factor of at least two conservatism in calculated public doses. The new EPA air quality model, AERMOD, which implements advanced meteorological turbulence calculations, is a good candidate for LANL applications to provide more confidence in the accuracy of offsite public dose projections.

  11. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  12. THE NEW YORK CITY URBAN DISPERSION PROGRAM MARCH 2005 FIELD STUDY: TRACER METHODS AND RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WATSON, T.B.; HEISER, J.; KALB, P.; DIETZ, R.N.; WILKE, R.; WIESER, R.; VIGNATO, G.

    2005-10-01

    The Urban Dispersion Program March 2005 Field Study tracer releases, sampling, and analytical methods are described in detail. There were two days where tracer releases and sampling were conducted. A total of 16.0 g of six tracers were released during the first test day or Intensive Observation Period (IOP) 1 and 15.7 g during IOP 2. Three types of sampling instruments were used in this study. Sequential air samplers, or SAS, collected six-minute samples, while Brookhaven atmospheric tracer samplers (BATS) and personal air samplers (PAS) collected thirty-minute samples. There were a total of 1300 samples resulting from the two IOPs. Confidence limits in the sampling and analysis method were 20% as determined from 100 duplicate samples. The sample recovery rate was 84%. The integrally averaged 6-minute samples were compared to the 30-minute samples. The agreement was found to be good in most cases. The validity of using a background tracer to calculate sample volumes was examined and also found to have a confidence level of 20%. Methods for improving sampling and analysis are discussed. The data described in this report are available as Excel files. An additional Excel file of quality assured tracer data for use in model validation efforts is also available. The file consists of extensively quality assured BATS tracer data with background concentrations subtracted.

  13. Freeze-cast alumina pore networks: Effects of freezing conditions and dispersion medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, S. M.; Xiao, X.; Faber, K. T.

    2015-11-01

    Alumina ceramics were freeze-cast from water- and camphene-based slurries under varying freezing conditions and examined using X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Pore network characteristics, i.e., porosity, pore size, geometric surface area, and tortuosity, were measured from XCT reconstructions and the data were used to develop a model to predict feature size from processing conditions. Classical solidification theory was used to examine relationships between pore size, temperature gradients, and freezing front velocity. Freezing front velocity was subsequently predicted from casting conditions via the two-phase Stefan problem. Resulting models for water-based samples agreed with solidification-based theories predicting lamellar spacing of binary eutectic alloys, and models for camphene-based samples concurred with those for dendritic growth. Relationships between freezing conditions and geometric surface area were also modeled by considering the inverse relationship between pore size and surface area. Tortuosity was determined to be dependent primarily on the type of dispersion medium. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. HGSYSTEMUF6. Model for Simulating Dispersion due to Atmospheric Release of UF6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, G; Chang, J.C.; Zhang, J.X.; Bloom, S.G.; Goode, W.D. Jr; Lombardi, D.A.; Yambert, M.W.

    1998-08-01

    HGSYSTEMUF6 is a suite of models designed for use in estimating consequences associated with accidental, atmospheric release of Uranium Hexafluoride (UF6) and its reaction products, namely Hydrogen Fluoride (HF), and other non-reactive contaminants which are either negatively, neutrally, or positively buoyant. It is based on HGSYSTEM Version 3.0 of Shell Research LTD., and contains specific algorithms for the treatment of UF6 chemistry and thermodynamics. HGSYSTEMUF6 contains algorithms for the treatment of dense gases, dry and wet deposition, effects due to the presence of buildings (canyon and wake), plume lift-off, and the effects of complex terrain. The models components of the suite include (1) AEROPLUME/RK, used to model near-field dispersion from pressurized two-phase jet releases of UF6 and its reaction products, (2) HEGADAS/UF6 for simulating dense, ground based release of UF6, (3) PGPLUME for simulation of passive, neutrally buoyant plumes (4) UF6Mixer for modeling warm, potentially reactive, ground-level releases of UF6 from buildings, and (5) WAKE, used to model elevated and ground-level releases into building wake cavities of non-reactive plumes that are either neutrally or positively buoyant.

  15. The effect of spherical nanoparticles on rheological properties of bi-dispersed magnetorheological fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kannappan, K. Thiruppathi; Laherisheth, Zarana; Parekh, Kinnari; Upadhyay, R. V.

    2015-06-24

    In the present investigation, the rheological properties of bi-dispersed magnetorheological (MR) fluid based on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanosphere and microsphere of iron particles are experimentally investigated. The MR fluid is prepared by substituting nanosphere of 40nm Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles in MR fluids having microsphere iron particles (7-8 μm). Three different weight fractions (0%, 1% and 3%) of nanosphere-microsphere MR fluids are synthesized. In the absence of the magnetic field, substitution of magnetic nanosphere decreases the viscosity lower than without substituted sample at high as well as low shear rate. Upon the application of the magnetic field, the particles align along the direction of the field, which promotes the yield stress. Here too the yield stress value decreases with magnetic nanosphere substitution. This behaviour is explain based on the inter-particle interaction as well as formation of nanosphere cloud around the magnetic microsphere, which effectively reduces the viscosity and works as weak point when chains are formed. Variation of dynamic yield stress with magnetic field is explained using microscopic model. In any event such fluid does not sediment and is not abrasive so it could be useful if not too high yield stress is needed.

  16. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  17. Analysis of high-resolution spectra from a hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ko, Phyllis; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-09-05

    To fully take advantage of a low-cost, small footprint hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer, a math- ematical reconstruction technique was developed to accurately capture the high-resolution and relative peak intensities from complex patterns. A Fabry-Perot etalon was coupled to a Czerny-Turner spectrometer, in- creasing spectral resolution by an order of magnitude without the commensurate increase in spectrometer size. Measurement of the industry standard Hg 313.1555/313.1844 nm doublet yielded a ratio of 0.682 with 1.8%error, which agreed well with an independent measurement and literature values. The doublet separation (29 pm), is similar to the U isotope shift (25 pm) at 424.437 nm thatmore » is of interest to monitoring nuclear nonpro-liferation activities. Additionally, the technique was applied to a LIBS measurement of the mineral cinnabar (HgS) and resulted in a ratio of 0.681. In addition, this reconstruction method could enable significantly smaller, portable high-resolution instruments with isotopic specificity, benefiting a variety of spectroscopic applications.« less

  18. Analysis of high-resolution spectra from a hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ko, Phyllis; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-09-05

    To fully take advantage of a low-cost, small footprint hybrid interferometric/dispersive spectrometer, a math- ematical reconstruction technique was developed to accurately capture the high-resolution and relative peak intensities from complex patterns. A Fabry-Perot etalon was coupled to a Czerny-Turner spectrometer, in- creasing spectral resolution by an order of magnitude without the commensurate increase in spectrometer size. Measurement of the industry standard Hg 313.1555/313.1844 nm doublet yielded a ratio of 0.682 with 1.8%error, which agreed well with an independent measurement and literature values. The doublet separation (29 pm), is similar to the U isotope shift (25 pm) at 424.437 nm that is of interest to monitoring nuclear nonpro-liferation activities. Additionally, the technique was applied to a LIBS measurement of the mineral cinnabar (HgS) and resulted in a ratio of 0.681. In addition, this reconstruction method could enable significantly smaller, portable high-resolution instruments with isotopic specificity, benefiting a variety of spectroscopic applications.

  19. Method for electrically producing dispersions of a nonconductive fluid in a conductive medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DePaoli, D.W.; Tsouris, C.; Feng, J.Q.

    1998-06-09

    A method is described for use in electrically forming dispersions of a nonconducting fluid in a conductive medium that minimizes power consumption, gas generation, and sparking between the electrode of the nozzle and the conductive medium. The method utilizes a nozzle having a passageway, the wall of which serves as the nozzle electrode, for the transport of the nonconducting fluid into the conductive medium. A second passageway provides for the transport of a flowing low conductivity buffer fluid which results in a region of the low conductivity buffer fluid immediately adjacent the outlet from the first passageway to create the necessary protection from high current drain and sparking. An electrical potential difference applied between the nozzle electrode and an electrode in contact with the conductive medium causes formation of small droplets or bubbles of the nonconducting fluid within the conductive medium. A preferred embodiment has the first and second passageways arranged in a concentric configuration, with the outlet tip of the first passageway withdrawn into the second passageway. 4 figs.

  20. Method for electrically producing dispersions of a nonconductive fluid in a conductive medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DePaoli, David W.; Tsouris, Constantinos; Feng, James Q.

    1998-01-01

    A method for use in electrically forming dispersions of a nonconducting fluid in a conductive medium that minimizes power consumption, gas generation, and sparking between the electrode of the nozzle and the conductive medium. The method utilizes a nozzle having a passageway, the wall of which serves as the nozzle electrode, for the transport of the nonconducting fluid into the conductive medium. A second passageway provides for the transport of a flowing low conductivity buffer fluid which results in a region of the low conductivity buffer fluid immediately adjacent the outlet from the first passageway to create the necessary protection from high current drain and sparking. An electrical potential difference applied between the nozzle electrode and an electrode in contact with the conductive medium causes formation of small droplets or bubbles of the nonconducting fluid within the conductive medium. A preferred embodiment has the first and second passageways arranged in a concentric configuration, with the outlet tip of the first passageway withdrawn into the second passageway.

  1. Development of NEXRAD Wind Retrievals as Input to Atmospheric Dispersion Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Newsom, Rob K.; Allwine, K Jerry; Xu, Qin; Zhang, Pengfei; Copeland, Jeffrey H.; Sun, Jenny

    2007-03-06

    The objective of this study is to determine the feasibility that routinely collected data from the Doppler radars can appropriately be used in Atmospheric Dispersion Models (ADMs) for emergency response. We have evaluated the computational efficiency and accuracy of two variational mathematical techniques that derive the u- and v-components of the wind from radial velocities obtained from Doppler radars. A review of the scientific literature indicated that the techniques employ significantly different approaches in applying the variational techniques: 2-D Variational (2DVar), developed by NOAAs (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's) National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) and Variational Doppler Radar Analysis System (VDRAS), developed by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR). We designed a series of numerical experiments in which both models employed the same horizontal domain and resolution encompassing Oklahoma City for a two-week period during the summer of 2003 so that the computed wind retrievals could be fairly compared. Both models ran faster than real-time on a typical single dual-processor computer, indicating that they could be used to generate wind retrievals in near real-time. 2DVar executed ~2.5 times faster than VDRAS because of its simpler approach.

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling of the February 2014 Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasstrom, John; Piggott, Tom; Simpson, Matthew; Lobaugh, Megan; Tai, Lydia; Pobanz, Brenda; Yu, Kristen

    2015-07-22

    This report presents the results of a simulation of the atmospheric dispersion and deposition of radioactivity released from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site in New Mexico in February 2014. These simulations were made by the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and supersede NARAC simulation results published in a previous WIPP report (WIPP, 2014). The results presented in this report use additional, more detailed data from WIPP on the specific radionuclides released, radioactivity release amounts and release times. Compared to the previous NARAC simulations, the new simulation results in this report are based on more detailed modeling of the winds, turbulence, and particle dry deposition. In addition, the initial plume rise from the exhaust vent was considered in the new simulations, but not in the previous NARAC simulations. The new model results show some small differences compared to previous results, but do not change the conclusions in the WIPP (2014) report. Presented are the data and assumptions used in these model simulations, as well as the model-predicted dose and deposition on and near the WIPP site. A comparison of predicted and measured radionuclide-specific air concentrations is also presented.

  3. IN-SYNC. II. VIRIAL STARS FROM SUBVIRIAL CORES—THE VELOCITY DISPERSION OF EMBEDDED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN NGC 1333

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R.; Covey, Kevin R.; Arce, Héctor G.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Da Rio, Nicola; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael; Wilson, John C.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Rebull, Luisa; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-02-01

    The initial velocity dispersion of newborn stars is a major unconstrained aspect of star formation theory. Using near-infrared spectra obtained with the APOGEE spectrograph, we show that the velocity dispersion of young (1-2 Myr) stars in NGC 1333 is 0.92 ± 0.12 km s{sup –1} after correcting for measurement uncertainties and the effect of binaries. This velocity dispersion is consistent with the virial velocity of the region and the diffuse gas velocity dispersion, but significantly larger than the velocity dispersion of the dense, star-forming cores, which have a subvirial velocity dispersion of 0.5 km s{sup –1}. Since the NGC 1333 cluster is dynamically young and deeply embedded, this measurement provides a strong constraint on the initial velocity dispersion of newly formed stars. We propose that the difference in velocity dispersion between stars and dense cores may be due to the influence of a 70 μG magnetic field acting on the dense cores or be the signature of a cluster with initial substructure undergoing global collapse.

  4. Atmospheric dispersion and deposition of iodine-131 released from the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramsdell, J.V.; Simonen, C.A.; Burk, K.W.; Stage, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Approximately 2.6x10{sup 4} TBq (700,000 curies) of iodine-131 were released to the air from reactor fuel processing plants on the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington State from December 1944 through December 1949. The Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project developed a suite of codes to estimate the doses that might have resulted from these releases. The Regional Atmospheric Transport Code for Hanford Emission Tracking (RATCHET) computer code is part of this suite. The RATCHET code implements a Lagrangian-trajectory, Gaussian-puff dispersion model that uses hourly meteorological and release rate data to estimate daily time-integrated air concentrations and surface contamination for use in dose estimates. In this model, iodine is treated as a mixture of three species (nominally, inorganic gases, organic gases, and particles). Model deposition parameters are functions of the mixture and meteorological conditions. A resistance model is used to calculate dry deposition velocities. Equilibrium between concentrations in the precipitation and the air near the ground is assumed in calculating wet deposition of gases, and irreversible washout of the particles is assumed. RATCHET explicitly treats the uncertainties in model parameters and meteorological conditions. Uncertainties in iodine-131 release rates and partitioning among the nominal species are treated by varying model input. The results of 100 model runs for December 1944 through December 1949 indicate that monthly average air concentrations and deposition have uncertainties ranging from a factor of two near the center of the time-integrated plume to more than an order of magnitude near the edge. These results indicate that -10% of the iodine-131 released to the atmosphere decayed during transit in the study area, -56% was deposited within the study area, and the remaining 34% was transported out of the study area while still in the air.

  5. Ultrafast dark-field surface inspection with hybrid-dispersion laser scanning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazaki, Akio; Kim, Chanju; Chan, Jacky; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Goda, Keisuke; Watanabe, Masahiro; Jalali, Bahram

    2014-06-23

    High-speed surface inspection plays an important role in industrial manufacturing, safety monitoring, and quality control. It is desirable to go beyond the speed limitation of current technologies for reducing manufacturing costs and opening a new window onto a class of applications that require high-throughput sensing. Here, we report a high-speed dark-field surface inspector for detection of micrometer-sized surface defects that can travel at a record high speed as high as a few kilometers per second. This method is based on a modified time-stretch microscope that illuminates temporally and spatially dispersed laser pulses on the surface of a fast-moving object and detects scattered light from defects on the surface with a sensitive photodetector in a dark-field configuration. The inspector's ability to perform ultrafast dark-field surface inspection enables real-time identification of difficult-to-detect features on weakly reflecting surfaces and hence renders the method much more practical than in the previously demonstrated bright-field configuration. Consequently, our inspector provides nearly 1000 times higher scanning speed than conventional inspectors. To show our method's broad utility, we demonstrate real-time inspection of the surface of various objects (a non-reflective black film, transparent flexible film, and reflective hard disk) for detection of 10??m or smaller defects on a moving target at 20?m/s within a scan width of 25?mm at a scan rate of 90.9?MHz. Our method holds promise for improving the cost and performance of organic light-emitting diode displays for next-generation smart phones, lithium-ion batteries for green electronics, and high-efficiency solar cells.

  6. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, K. K.; Sanders, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  7. MODELING DISPERSION FROM CHEMICALS RELEASED AFTER A TRAIN COLLISION IN GRANITEVILLE, SOUTH CAROLINA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buckley, R; Chuck Hunter, C; Robert Addis, R; Matt Parker, M

    2006-08-07

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Weather INformation and Display (WIND) System was used to provide meteorological and atmospheric modeling/consequence assessment support to state and local agencies following the collision of two Norfolk Southern freight trains on the morning of January 6, 2005. This collision resulted in the release of several toxic chemicals to the environment, including chlorine. The dense and highly toxic cloud of chlorine gas that formed in the vicinity of the accident was responsible for nine fatalities, and caused injuries to more than five hundred others. Transport model results depicting the forecast path of the ongoing release were made available to emergency managers in the county's Unified Command Center shortly after SRNL received a request for assistance. Support continued over the ensuing two days of the active response. The SRNL also provided weather briefings and transport/consequence assessment model results to responders from South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC), the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Emergency Operations Center (EOC), Department of Energy Headquarters, and hazmat teams dispatched from the SRS. Although model-generated forecast winds used in consequence assessments conducted during the incident were provided at 2-km horizontal grid spacing during the accident response, a high-resolution Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS, version 4.3.0) simulation was later performed to examine potential influences of local topography on plume migration. The detailed RAMS simulation was used to determine meteorology using multiple grids with an innermost grid spacing of 125 meters. Results from the two simulations are shown to generally agree with meteorological observations at the time; consequently, local topography did not significantly affect wind in the area. Use of a dense gas dispersion model to simulate localized plume behavior using the higher resolution winds indicated

  8. Wave dispersion in the hybrid-Vlasov model: Verification of Vlasiator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kempf, Yann; Pokhotelov, Dimitry; Koskinen, Hannu E. J.; Department of Physics, University of Helsinki, P.O. Box 64, 00014 Helsinki ; Alfthan, Sebastian von; Palmroth, Minna; Vaivads, Andris

    2013-11-15

    Vlasiator is a new hybrid-Vlasov plasma simulation code aimed at simulating the entire magnetosphere of the Earth. The code treats ions (protons) kinetically through Vlasov's equation in the six-dimensional phase space while electrons are a massless charge-neutralizing fluid [M. Palmroth et al., J. Atmos. Sol.-Terr. Phys. 99, 41 (2013); A. Sandroos et al., Parallel Comput. 39, 306 (2013)]. For first global simulations of the magnetosphere, it is critical to verify and validate the model by established methods. Here, as part of the verification of Vlasiator, we characterize the low-? plasma wave modes described by this model and compare with the solution computed by the Waves in Homogeneous, Anisotropic Multicomponent Plasmas (WHAMP) code [K. Rnnmark, Kiruna Geophysical Institute Reports No. 179, 1982], using dispersion curves and surfaces produced with both programs. The match between the two fundamentally different approaches is excellent in the low-frequency, long wavelength range which is of interest in global magnetospheric simulations. The left-hand and right-hand polarized wave modes as well as the Bernstein modes in the Vlasiator simulations agree well with the WHAMP solutions. Vlasiator allows a direct investigation of the importance of the Hall term by including it in or excluding it from Ohm's law in simulations. This is illustrated showing examples of waves obtained using the ideal Ohm's law and Ohm's law including the Hall term. Our analysis emphasizes the role of the Hall term in Ohm's law in obtaining wave modes departing from ideal magnetohydrodynamics in the hybrid-Vlasov model.

  9. Legacy Site Decontamination Experience as Applied to the Urban Radiological Dispersal Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drake, J.L.; MacKinney, J.A.

    2007-07-01

    Pursuant to the National Response Plan, Nuclear/Radiological Incident Annex [1], the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is assigned lead agency responsibility for decontamination and clean-up efforts following a domestic terrorist event involving a radiological dispersal device (RDD). An RDD incident in a modern city environment poses many of the same issues and problems traditionally faced at 'legacy' clean up projects being performed across our country. However there are also many aspects associated with an urban RDD clean-up that have never been faced in legacy site remediation. For example, the demolition and destructive technologies widely used in legacy remediation would be unacceptable in the case of historically or architecturally significant properties or those with prohibitively high replacement cost; contaminated properties will likely belong to numerous small private entities whose business interests are at stake; reducing the time required to decontaminate and return a city to normal use cannot be overemphasized due to its tremendous economic and political impact. The mission of the EPA's National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC) includes developing the best technology and tools needed for field personnel to achieve their goals should that event occur. To that end, NHSRC has been exploring how the vast experience within the legacy site remediation community could be tapped to help meet this need, and to identify gaps in decontamination technology. This paper articulates much of what has been learned over the past year as a result of efforts to identify these technology and procedural needs to address the urban RDD. This includes comparing and contrasting remediation techniques and methodologies currently used in nuclear facility and site cleanup with those that would be needed following an urban RDD event. Finally, this presentation includes an appeal to the radiological decontamination community to come forward with ideas and technologies

  10. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  11. Decontamination of Terrorist-Dispersed Radionuclides from Surfaces in Urban Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Robert; Sutton, Mark; Gates-Anderson, Dianne; Gray, Jeremy; Hu, Qinhong; McNab, Walt; Viani, Brian

    2008-01-15

    Research is currently underway at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to advance the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment. Investigations have focused on more optimized decontamination agents for cesium (Cs) and americium (Am) specifically for use in mass transit infrastructure and urban environments. This project is designed to enhance the capability of the United States to effectively respond to a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD) attack. The work addresses recognized data gaps by advancing the basic scientific knowledge of radionuclide-substrate interactions in the urban environment and provides a solution to a national need. The research is focused in four major areas: (1) a better understanding of urban surface conditions that influence the efficacy of decontamination processes, (2) development of prototype decontamination agents for Am and Cs optimized for use in urban environments, (3) the development of capabilities to realistically contaminate surfaces at both the real world and laboratory scale and (4) a validated model for radionuclide-surface interactions. The decontamination of urban surfaces following the detonation of an RDD presents a number of challenges. The following key points are found to be critical for the efficiency of decontamination agents in an urban environment: - Particle size and surface deposition of radionuclide particles on urban surface materials. - Interactions between radionuclides and urban materials. - The presence of grime and carbonation/alteration layers on the surface of urban surfaces. - Post-detonation penetration of radionuclides strongly affected by the dynamic wetting/drying processes. A laboratory scale contamination system has been developed allowing for samples to be contaminated and radionuclide interactions to be studied. In combination with laboratory scale experiments, a real scale outdoor test is scheduled for the spring of 2007. In conclusion

  12. Revisiting the dispersion measure of fast radio bursts associated with gamma-ray burst afterglows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Yun-Wei, E-mail: yuyw@mail.ccnu.edu.cn [Institute of Astrophysics, Central China Normal University, Wuhan 430079 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Some fast radio bursts (FRBs) are expected to be associated with the afterglow emission of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), while a short-lived, supermassive neutron star (NS) forms during the GRBs. I investigate the possible contributions to the dispersion measure (DM) of the FRBs from the GRB ejecta and the wind blown from the precollapsing NS. On the one hand, sometimes an internal X-ray plateau afterglow could be produced by the NS wind, which indicates that a great number of electron-positron pairs are carried by the wind. If the pair-generation radius satisfies a somewhat rigorous condition, the relativistic and dense wind would contribute a high DM to the associated FRB, which can be comparable to and even exceed the DM contributed by the intergalactic medium. On the other hand, if the wind only carries a Goldreich-Julian particle flux, its DM contribution would become negligible; meanwhile, the internal plateau afterglow would not appear. Alternatively, the FRB should be associated with a GRB afterglow produced by the GRB external shock, i.e., an energy-injection-caused shallow-decay afterglow or a normal single-power-law afterglow if the impulsive energy release of the GRB is high enough. In the latter case, the DM contributed by the high-mass GRB ejecta could be substantially important, in particular, for an environment of main-sequence stellar wind. In summary, a careful assessment on the various DM contributors could be required for the cosmological application of the expected FRB-GRB association. The future DM measurements of GRB-associated FRBs could provide a constraint on the physics of NS winds.

  13. Summary of Prior Work on Joining of Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, Ian G; Tatlock, Gordon J; Badairy, H.; Chen, C-L.

    2009-08-01

    There is a range of joining techniques available for use with ODS alloys, but care should be exercised in matching the technique to the final duty requirements of the joint. The goal for joining ODS alloys is a joint with no local disruption of the distribution of the oxide dispersion, and no significant change in the size and orientation of the alloy microstructure. Not surprisingly, the fusion welding processes typically employed with wrought alloys produce the least satisfactory results with ODS alloys, but some versions, such as fusion spot welding, and the laser and electron-beam welding technologies, have demonstrated potential for producing sound joints. Welds made using solid-state spot welding reportedly have exhibited parent metal properties. Thus, it is possible to employ processes that result in significant disruption of the alloy microstructure, as long as the processing parameters are adjustment to minimize the extent of or influence of the changes in the alloy microstructure. Selection among these joining approaches largely depends on the particular application and component configuration, and an understanding of the relationships among processing, alloy microstructure, and final properties is key. Recent developments have resulted in friction welding evolving to be a prime method for joining ODS sheet products, and variants of brazing/diffusion bonding have shown excellent promise for use with tubes and pipes. The techniques that come closest to the goal defined above involve solid-state diffusion bonding and, in particular, it has been found that secondary recrystallization of joints made by pulsed plasma-assisted diffusion can produce the desired, continuous, large alloy grain structure through the joint. Such joints have exhibited creep rupture failure at >82% of the load needed to fail the monolithic parent alloy at 1000 C.

  14. On the dispersion features of whistler waves in almost pure ion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundin, B. V.; Krafft, C.

    2011-10-15

    It is shown that in a multi-ion plasma of moderate density enriched by a large amount of negatively charged ions and/or heavy particulates, the lower cutoff frequencies of the electron whistler and the Z-mode (extraordinary) waves tend to each other, approaching the ion plasma frequency {omega}{sub pi}. The evolution of the dispersion curves {omega}(k, {theta}) of both wave modes is studied as a function of the relative electron density, beginning from the case of a moderate density plasma with comparable values of electron gyro- and plasma frequencies and {omega}{sub pi} essentially exceeding the ions' gyrofrequencies. When the fraction of free electrons is very small the transparency frequency domain of the electron whistler mode becomes very narrow, being located in the vicinity of {omega}{sub pi}. If the negatively charged ions have the smallest specific charges among other ion species then, under similar conditions, the so-called crossover effect and the accompanying polarization sense reverse can occur at frequencies essentially greater than the ions' gyrofrequencies. The revealed effects are characteristic of plasmas with excess of electronegative gas molecules or dust particulates highly adhesive to electrons, i.e., almost pure ion plasmas and/or pair-ion plasmas with extra small fractions of free electrons. Moreover, it is found that the vanishingly small electron fraction providing the same value of the electron whistler ion cutoff frequency normalized to the ion plasma frequency is essentially less for pair fullerene C{sub 60}{sup {+-}} than for pair hydrogen H{sup {+-}} plasmas. The technique to determine {omega}{sub pi} using the evolution of the whistler wave magnetic field polarization ellipse is also described.

  15. Effect of palladium dispersion on the capture of toxic components from fuel gas by palladium-alumina sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, John P.; Granite, Evan J.; Rupp, Erik C.; Stanko, Dennis C.; Howard, Bret; Pennline, Henry W.

    2011-05-01

    The dispersion and location of Pd in alumina-supported sorbents prepared by different methods was found to influence the performance of the sorbents in the removal of mercury, arsine, and hydrogen selenide from a simulated fuel gas. When Pd is well dispersed in the pores of the support, contact interaction with the support is maximized, Pd is less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur, and the sorbent has better long-term activity for adsorption of arsine and hydrogen selenide, but poorer adsorption capacity for Hg. As the contact interaction between Pd and the support is lessened the Pd becomes more susceptible to poisoning by sulfur, resulting in higher capacity for Hg, but poorer long-term performance for adsorption of arsenic and selenium.

  16. Effect of palladium dispersion on the capture of toxic components from fuel gas by palladium-alumina sorbents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltrus, J.P.; Granite, E.J.; Rupp, E.C.; Stanko, D.C.; Howard, B.; Pennline, H.W.

    2011-01-01

    The dispersion and location of Pd in alumina-supported sorbents prepared by different methods was found to influence the performance of the sorbents in the removal of mercury, arsine, and hydrogen selenide from a simulated fuel gas. When Pd is well dispersed in the pores of the support, contact interaction with the support is maximized, Pd is less susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. and the sorbent has better long-term activity for adsorption of arsine and hydrogen selenide. but poorer adsorption capacity for Hg. As the contact interaction between Pd and the support is lessened the Pd becomes more susceptible to poisoning by sulfur. resulting in higher capacity for Hg, but poorer long-term performance for adsorption of arsenic and selenium.

  17. Polarity characterization by anomalous x-ray dispersion of ZnO films and GaN lateral polar structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shelton, Christopher T.; Sachet, Edward; Paisley, Elizabeth A.; Hoffmann, Marc P.; Rajan, Joseph; Collazo, Ramn; Sitar, Zlatko; Maria, Jon-Paul

    2014-01-28

    We demonstrate the use of anomalous x-ray scattering of constituent cations at their absorption edge, in a conventional Bragg-Brentano diffractometer, to measure absolutely and quantitatively the polar orientation and polarity fraction of unipolar and mixed polar wurtzitic crystals. In one set of experiments, the gradual transition between c+ and c? polarity of epitaxial ZnO films on sapphire as a function of MgO buffer layer thickness is monitored quantitatively, while in a second experiment, we map the polarity of a lateral polar homojunction in GaN. The dispersion measurements are compared with piezoforce microscopy images, and we demonstrate how x-ray dispersion and scanning probe methods can provide complementary information that can discriminate between polarity fractions at a material surface and polarity fractions averaged over the film bulk.

  18. Dynamic evolution of temporal dissipative-soliton molecules in large normal path-averaged dispersion fiber lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Xueming

    2010-12-15

    The robust dissipative soliton molecules (DSM's) exhibiting as the quasirectangular spectral profile are investigated numerically and observed experimentally in mode-locked fiber lasers with the large normal path-averaged dispersion and the large net cavity dispersion. These DSM's have an independently evolving phase with a pulse duration T{sub 0} of about 20 ps and a peak-to-peak separation of about 8T{sub 0}. Under laboratory conditions, the proposed laser delivers vibrating DSM's with an oscillating amplitude of less than a percent of peak separation. Numerical simulations show that DSM's are characterized by a spectral modulation pattern with about a 3-dB modulation depth measured as an averaged value. The experimental observations are in excellent agreement with the numerical predictions.

  19. Closure of the Averaged Equations for Disperse Two-Phase Flow by Direct Numerical Simulation: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrea Prosperetti

    2006-03-24

    The report briefly describes the activities carried out in the course of the project. A first line of research was the development of systematic closure relations for averaged equations for disperse multiphase flow. A second line was the development of efficient numerical methods for the simulation of Navier-Stokes flows with many suspended particles. The report also lists the 21 journal articles in which this work is more fully decsribed.

  20. History of Resistance Welding Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Cladding and other High Temperature Materials at Center for Advanced Energy Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; Nathan Jerred; Dr. Indrajit Charit; James Cole

    2012-03-01

    Research proposal 08-1079, 'A Comparative Study of Welded ODS Cladding Materials for AFCI/GNEP,' was funded in 2008 under an Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) Research and Development Funding Opportunity, number DE-PS07-08ID14906. Th proposal sought to conduct research on joining oxide dispersion strengthen (ODS) tubing material to a solid end plug. This document summarizes the scientific and technical progress achieved during the project, which ran from 2008 to 2011.

  1. Prediction of U-Mo dispersion nuclear fuels with Al-Si alloy using artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susmikanti, Mike; Sulistyo, Jos

    2014-09-30

    Dispersion nuclear fuels, consisting of U-Mo particles dispersed in an Al-Si matrix, are being developed as fuel for research reactors. The equilibrium relationship for a mixture component can be expressed in the phase diagram. It is important to analyze whether a mixture component is in equilibrium phase or another phase. The purpose of this research it is needed to built the model of the phase diagram, so the mixture component is in the stable or melting condition. Artificial neural network (ANN) is a modeling tool for processes involving multivariable non-linear relationships. The objective of the present work is to develop code based on artificial neural network models of system equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This model can be used for prediction of type of resulting mixture, and whether the point is on the equilibrium phase or in another phase region. The equilibrium model data for prediction and modeling generated from experimentally data. The artificial neural network with resilient backpropagation method was chosen to predict the dispersion of nuclear fuels U-Mo in Al-Si matrix. This developed code was built with some function in MATLAB. For simulations using ANN, the Levenberg-Marquardt method was also used for optimization. The artificial neural network is able to predict the equilibrium phase or in the phase region. The develop code based on artificial neural network models was built, for analyze equilibrium relationship of U-Mo in Al-Si matrix.

  2. Dispersoid Distribution and Microstructure in Fe-Cr-Al Ferritic Oxide Dispersion-Strengthened Alloy Prepared by Friction Consolidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Catalini, David; Kaoumi, Djamel; Reynolds, Anthony; Grant, Glenn J.

    2015-07-09

    INCOLOY® MA956 is a ferritic Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS) alloy. Three different oxides, Y4Al2O9, YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12, have been observed in this alloy. The oxide particle sizes range from just a few up to hundreds of nm and these particles are responsible of the high temperature mechanical strength of this alloy. Mechanically alloyed MA956 powder was consolidated via Friction Consolidation using three different processing conditions. As a result, three small compacts of low porosity were produced. The compacts exhibited a refined equiaxed grain structure with grain sizes smaller than 10 µm and the desired oxide dispersion.YAlO3 and Y3Al5O12 were identified in the compacts by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Electron Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The size distribution of precipitates above 50 nm showed a direct proportionality between average precipitate size and grain size. The total energy input during processing was correlated with the relative amount of each of the oxides in the disks: the higher the total processing energy input, the higher the relative amount of Y3Al5O12 precipitates. The elemental composition of the oxide precipitates was also probed individually by EDS showing an aluminum enrichment trend as precipitates grow in size.

  3. Spent fuel sabotage test program, characterization of aerosol dispersal : interim final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregson, Michael Warren; Brockmann, John E.; Loiseau, Olivier; Klennert, Lindsay A.; Nolte, Oliver; Molecke, Martin Alan; Autrusson, Bruno A.; Koch, Wolfgang; Pretzsch, Gunter Guido; Brucher, Wenzel; Steyskal, Michele D.

    2008-03-01

    This multinational, multi-phase spent fuel sabotage test program is quantifying the aerosol particles produced when the products of a high energy density device (HEDD) interact with and explosively particulate test rodlets that contain pellets of either surrogate materials or actual spent fuel. This program provides source-term data that are relevant to plausible sabotage scenarios in relation to spent fuel transport and storage casks and associated risk assessments. We present details and significant results obtained from this program from 2001 through 2007. Measured aerosol results include: respirable fractions produced; amounts, nuclide content, and produced particle size distributions and morphology; measurements of volatile fission product species enhanced sorption--enrichment factors onto respirable particles; and, status on determination of the spent fuel ratio, SFR, needed for scaling studies. Emphasis is provided on recent Phase 3 tests using depleted uranium oxide pellets plus non-radioactive fission product dopants in surrogate spent fuel test rodlets, plus the latest surrogate cerium oxide results and aerosol laboratory supporting calibration work. The DUO{sub 2}, CeO{sub 2}, plus fission product dopant aerosol particle results are compared with available historical data. We also provide a status review on continuing preparations for the final Phase 4 in this program, tests using individual short rodlets containing actual spent fuel from U.S. PWR reactors, with both high- and lower-burnup fuel. The source-term data, aerosol results, and program design have been tailored to support and guide follow-on computer modeling of aerosol dispersal hazards and radiological consequence assessments. This spent fuel sabotage, aerosol test program was performed primarily at Sandia National Laboratories, with support provided by both the U.S. Department of Energy and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This program has significant input from, and is cooperatively

  4. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  5. Theoretical description based on general and exact nonextensive dispersion relations of plasma oscillation data and verification of new acoustic plasma waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebrahimi, V.; Esfandyari-Kalejahi, A.

    2014-09-15

    In this paper, first we represent the differences between spatial and temporal dispersions and their dependence on the measurement techniques for electrostatic waves in unmagnetized collisionless plasma. Then, three different experimental data are compared to the solutions of exact nonextensive dispersion relations for electron-ion and pair plasma. The results confirm the existence of new acoustic plasma waves. Furthermore, these comparisons yield a Maxwellian and a nonextensive plasma with nonextensive parameter q larger than one, and a Maxwellian plasma with some abnormal dispersion properties.

  6. Final Technical Report - High-Performance, Oxide-Dispersion-Strengthened Tubes for Production of Ethylene adn Other Industrial Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKimpson, Marvin G.

    2006-04-06

    This project was undertaken by Michigan Technological University and Special Metals Corporation to develop creep-resistant, coking-resistant oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) tubes for use in industrial-scale ethylene pyrolysis and steam methane reforming operations. Ethylene pyrolysis tubes are exposed to some of the most severe service conditions for metallic materials found anywhere in the chemical process industries, including elevated temperatures, oxidizing atmospheres and high carbon potentials. During service, hard deposits of carbon (coke) build up on the inner wall of the tube, reducing heat transfer and restricting the flow of the hydrocarbon feedstocks. About every 20 to 60 days, the reactor must be taken off-line and decoked by burning out the accumulated carbon. This decoking costs on the order of $9 million per year per ethylene plant, accelerates tube degradation, and requires that tubes be replaced about every 5 years. The technology developed under this program seeks to reduce the energy and economic cost of coking by creating novel bimetallic tubes offering a combination of improved coking resistance, creep resistance and fabricability not available in current single-alloy tubes. The inner core of this tube consists of Incoloy(R) MA956, a commercial ferritic Fe-Cr-Al alloy offering a 50% reduction in coke buildup combined with improved carburization resistance. The outer sheath consists of a new material - oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Alloy 803(R) developed under the program. This new alloy retains the good fireside environmental resistance of Alloy 803, a commercial wrought alloy currently used for ethylene production, and provides an austenitic casing to alleviate the inherently-limited fabricability of the ferritic Incoloy(R) MA956 core. To provide mechanical compatibility between the two alloys and maximize creep resistance of the bimetallic tube, both the inner Incoloy(R) MA956 and the outer ODS Alloy 803 are oxide dispersion

  7. Update 3 to: A Dispersion Modeling Analysis of Downwash from Mirant's Potomac River Power Plant, Modeling Units 1 and 4 Together

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Docket No. EO-05-01. Docket No. EO-05-01. This report describes dispersion modeling performed for Units 1 and 4 at Mirant's Potomac River Generating Station. The purpose of the modeling was to...

  8. Gas atomized precursor alloy powder for oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rieken, Joel

    2011-12-13

    Gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) was employed as a simplified method for producing precursor powders for oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic stainless steels (e.g., Fe-Cr-Y-(Ti,Hf)-O), departing from the conventional mechanical alloying (MA) process. During GARS processing a reactive atomization gas (i.e., Ar-O{sub 2}) was used to oxidize the powder surfaces during primary break-up and rapid solidification of the molten alloy. This resulted in envelopment of the powders by an ultra-thin (t < 150 nm) metastable Cr-enriched oxide layer that was used as a vehicle for solid-state transport of O into the consolidated microstructure. In an attempt to better understand the kinetics of this GARS reaction, theoretical cooling curves for the atomized droplets were calculated and used to establish an oxidation model for this process. Subsequent elevated temperature heat treatments, which were derived from Rhines pack measurements using an internal oxidation model, were used to promote thermodynamically driven O exchange reactions between trapped films of the initial Cr-enriched surface oxide and internal Y-enriched intermetallic precipitates. This novel microstructural evolution process resulted in the successful formation of nano-metric Y-enriched dispersoids, as confirmed using high energy X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), equivalent to conventional ODS alloys from MA powders. The thermal stability of these Y-enriched dispersoids was evaluated using high temperature (1200°C) annealing treatments ranging from 2.5 to 1,000 hrs of exposure. In a further departure from current ODS practice, replacing Ti with additions of Hf appeared to improve the Y-enriched dispersoid thermal stability by means of crystal structure modification. Additionally, the spatial distribution of the dispersoids was found to depend strongly on the original rapidly solidified microstructure. To exploit this, ODS microstructures were engineered from different

  9. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy production may

  10. Reliable prediction of three-body intermolecular interactions using dispersion-corrected second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Yuanhang; Beran, Gregory J. O.

    2015-07-28

    Three-body and higher intermolecular interactions can play an important role in molecular condensed phases. Recent benchmark calculations found problematic behavior for many widely used density functional approximations in treating 3-body intermolecular interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the combination of second-order Møller-Plesset (MP2) perturbation theory plus short-range damped Axilrod-Teller-Muto (ATM) dispersion accurately describes 3-body interactions with reasonable computational cost. The empirical damping function used in the ATM dispersion term compensates both for the absence of higher-order dispersion contributions beyond the triple-dipole ATM term and non-additive short-range exchange terms which arise in third-order perturbation theory and beyond. Empirical damping enables this simple model to out-perform a non-expanded coupled Kohn-Sham dispersion correction for 3-body intermolecular dispersion. The MP2 plus ATM dispersion model approaches the accuracy of O(N{sup 6}) methods like MP2.5 or even spin-component-scaled coupled cluster models for 3-body intermolecular interactions with only O(N{sup 5}) computational cost.

  11. The individual and collective effects of exact exchange and dispersion interactions on the ab initio structure of liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiStasio, Robert A.; Santra, Biswajit; Li, Zhaofeng; Wu, Xifan; Car, Roberto

    2014-08-28

    In this work, we report the results of a series of density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) simulations of ambient liquid water using a hierarchy of exchange-correlation (XC) functionals to investigate the individual and collective effects of exact exchange (Exx), via the PBE0 hybrid functional, non-local van der Waals/dispersion (vdW) interactions, via a fully self-consistent density-dependent dispersion correction, and an approximate treatment of nuclear quantum effects, via a 30 K increase in the simulation temperature, on the microscopic structure of liquid water. Based on these AIMD simulations, we found that the collective inclusion of Exx and vdW as resulting from a large-scale AIMD simulation of (H{sub 2}O){sub 128} significantly softens the structure of ambient liquid water and yields an oxygen-oxygen structure factor, S{sub OO}(Q), and corresponding oxygen-oxygen radial distribution function, g{sub OO}(r), that are now in quantitative agreement with the best available experimental data. This level of agreement between simulation and experiment demonstrated herein originates from an increase in the relative population of water molecules in the interstitial region between the first and second coordination shells, a collective reorganization in the liquid phase which is facilitated by a weakening of the hydrogen bond strength by the use of a hybrid XC functional, coupled with a relative stabilization of the resultant disordered liquid water configurations by the inclusion of non-local vdW/dispersion interactions. This increasingly more accurate description of the underlying hydrogen bond network in liquid water also yields higher-order correlation functions, such as the oxygen-oxygen-oxygen triplet angular distribution, P{sub OOO}(θ), and therefore the degree of local tetrahedrality, as well as electrostatic properties, such as the effective molecular dipole moment, that are in much better agreement with experiment.

  12. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  13. Analysis of band structure, transmission properties, and dispersion behavior of THz wave in one-dimensional parabolic plasma photonic crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Askari, Nasim; Eslami, Esmaeil; Mirzaie, Reza

    2015-11-15

    The photonic band gap of obliquely incident terahertz electromagnetic waves in a one-dimensional plasma photonic crystal is studied. The periodic structure consists of lossless dielectric and inhomogeneous plasma with a parabolic density profile. The dispersion relation and the THz wave transmittance are analyzed based on the electromagnetic equations and transfer matrix method. The dependence of effective plasma frequency and photonic band gap characteristics on dielectric and plasma thickness, plasma density, and incident angle are discussed in detail. A theoretical calculation for effective plasma frequency is presented and compared with numerical results. Results of these two methods are in good agreement.

  14. Asymmetric spin-wave dispersion due to Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction in an ultrathin Pt/CoFeB film

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di, Kai; Zhang, Vanessa Li; Lim, Hock Siah; Ng, Ser Choon; Kuok, Meng Hau; Qiu, Xuepeng; Yang, Hyunsoo

    2015-02-02

    Employing Brillouin spectroscopy, strong interfacial Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions have been observed in an ultrathin Pt/CoFeB film. Our micromagnetic simulations show that spin-wave nonreciprocity due to asymmetric surface pinning is insignificant for the 0.8 nm-thick CoFeB film studied. The observed high asymmetry of the monotonic spin wave dispersion relation is thus ascribed to strong Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interactions present at the Pt/CoFeB interface. Our findings should further enhance the significance of CoFeB as an important material for magnonic and spintronic applications.

  15. Electrically tunable zero dispersion wavelengths in photonic crystal fibers filled with a dual frequency addressable liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahle, Markus Kitzerow, Heinz-Siegfried

    2015-11-16

    We present a liquid crystal (LC) infiltrated photonic crystal fiber, which enables the electrical tuning of the position of zero dispersion wavelengths (ZDWs). A dual frequency addressable liquid crystal is aligned perpendicular on the inclusion walls of a photonic crystal fiber, which results in an escaped radial director field. The orientation of the LC is controlled by applying an external electric field. Due to the high index of the liquid crystal the fiber guides light by the photonic band gap effect. Multiple ZDWs exist in the visible and near infrared. The positions of the ZDWs can be either blue or red shifted depending on the frequency of the applied voltage.

  16. Nitrogen-doped and simultaneously reduced graphene oxide with superior dispersion as electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Cheol-Ho; Yun, Jin-Mun; Lee, Sungho; Jo, Seong Mu; Yoo, Sung Jong; Cho, Eun Ae; Khil, Myung-Seob; Joh, Han-Ik

    2014-11-15

    Nitrogen doped graphene oxide (Nr-GO) with properties suitable for electrocatalysts is easily synthesized using phenylhydrazine as a reductant at relatively low temperature. The reducing agent removes various oxygen functional groups bonded to graphene oxide and simultaneously dope the nitrogen atoms bonded with phenyl group all over the basal planes and edge sites of the graphene. The Nr-GO exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction reaction compared to the commercial carbon black and graphene oxide due to the electronic modification of the graphene structure. In addition, Nr-GO shows excellent dispersibility in various solvent due to the dopant molecules.

  17. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 366: Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-12-31

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 366, Area 11 Plutonium Valley Dispersion Sites, and provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and confirmation that closure objectives for CAU 366 were met. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 as amended).

  18. Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Fe(sub 3)Al-Based Alloy Tubes: Application Specific Development for the Power Generation Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kad, B.K.

    1999-07-01

    A detailed and comprehensive research and development methodology is being prescribed to produce Oxide Dispersion Strengthened (ODS)-Fe3Al thin walled tubes, using powder extrusion methodologies, for eventual use at operating temperatures of up to 1100C in the power generation industry. A particular 'in service application' anomaly of Fe3Al-based alloys is that the environmental resistance is maintained up to 1200C, well beyond where such alloys retain sufficient mechanical strength. Grain boundary creep processes at such high temperatures are anticipated to be the dominant failure mechanism.

  19. Use of Source Term and Air Dispersion Modeling in Planning Demolition of Highly Alpha-Contaminated Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Droppo, James G.; Napier, Bruce A.; Rishel, Jeremy P.; Bloom, Richard W.

    2011-06-22

    The current cleanup of structures related to cold-war production of nuclear materials includes the need to demolish a number of highly alpha-contaminated structures. The process of planning for the demolition of such structures includes unique challenges related to ensuring the protection of both workers and the public. Pre-demolition modeling analyses were conducted to evaluate potential exposures resulting from the proposed demolition of a number of these structures. Estimated emission rates of transuranic materials during demolition are used as input to an air-dispersion model. The climatological frequencies of occurrence of peak air and surface exposures at locations of interest are estimated based on years of hourly meteorological records. The modeling results indicate that downwind deposition is the main operational limitation for demolition of a highly alpha-contaminated building. The pre-demolition modeling directed the need for better contamination characterization and/or different demolition methods—and in the end, provided a basis for proceeding with the planned demolition activities. Post-demolition modeling was also conducted for several contaminated structures, based on the actual demolition schedule and conditions. Comparisons of modeled and monitoring results are shown. Recent monitoring data from the demolition of a UO3 plant shows increments in concentrations that were previously identified in the pre-demolition modeling predictions; these comparisons confirm the validity and value of the pre-demolition source-term and air dispersion computations for planning demolition activities for other buildings with high levels of radioactive contamination.

  20. Canonical and kinetic forms of the electromagnetic momentum in an ad hoc quantization scheme for a dispersive dielectric

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.C.; Chiao, R.Y.

    2004-11-01

    An ad hoc quantization scheme for the electromagnetic field in a weakly dispersive, transparent dielectric leads to the definition of canonical and kinetic forms for the momentum of the electromagnetic field in a dispersive medium. The canonical momentum is uniquely defined as the operator that generates spatial translations in a uniform medium, but the quantization scheme suggests two possible choices for the kinetic momentum operator, corresponding to the Abraham or the Minkowski momentum in classical electrodynamics. Another implication of this procedure is that a wave packet containing a single dressed photon travels at the group velocity through the medium. The physical significance of the canonical momentum has already been established by considerations of energy and momentum conservation in the atomic recoil due to spontaneous emission, the Cerenkov effect, the Doppler effect, and phase matching in nonlinear optical processes. In addition, the data of the Jones and Leslie radiation pressure experiment is consistent with the assignment of one ({Dirac_h}/2{pi})k unit of canonical momentum to each dressed photon. By contrast, experiments in which the dielectric is rigidly accelerated by unbalanced electromagnetic forces require the use of the Abraham momentum.