National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for disease medical infirmary

  1. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April...

  2. Conventional Medical Screening Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Medical screening is a strategy used to identify diseases or conditions in a select population at an early stage, often before signs and symptoms develop, and to refer individuals with suspicious findings to their personal physician or a specialist for further testing, diagnosis, and treatment. The program is not intended to serve as a substitute for routine medical exams through an individual's personal physician.

  3. Medical Messages

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    of contents Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) planning tools planning tools Medical ... No prior history of cardiac or other medical problems. Note: ECG ...

  4. Medical Plans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Plans Medical Plans A comprehensive benefits package with plan options for health care and retirement to take care of our employees today and tomorrow. Contact Benefits Office (505) 667-1806 Email Medical Plans The Lab offers employees the choice between two medical plans through Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBS). Both medical plans offer free preventive care and in and out of network coverage from the same network of BCBS providers. High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) - A more

  5. Medical Screening

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Medical Screening: Provide medical screening exams that are designed to check for health conditions related to occupational exposures to former workers who choose to participate in the program, including a re-screen exam every three years.

  6. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits ...

  7. Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Beryllium Disease | Department of Energy Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Former Workers Medical Facilities with Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease April 2011 This document provides a listing of medical facilities within the United States with experience in evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD). Because the medical community at large is not experienced in the evaluation and treatment of individuals with CBD, this list is

  8. Medical Records Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Medical records check list: Information that should be requested by SOMD of receiving facility Medical records: Problem list: list of all past and current medical diagnosis and ...

  9. Picture of the Week: Hot cells for medical isotopes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Hot cells for medical isotopes Isotopes from Los Alamos are used for the diagnosis of cardiac disease, calibration of PET scanners which in turn diagnose cancer, neurological disease, inflammatory diseases, trauma, and other circulatory diseases, and are increasingly being investigated for their potential to treat a variety of localized pathologies. June 7, 2015 Hot cells for medical isotopes x View extra-large image on Flickr » Every year, over 1,000,000 cardiac, cancer and other patients

  10. Medical Aspects of Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-05

    This presentation covers the medical evaluation as part of a human reliability program, particularly the various medical qualifications and potential disqualifiers.

  11. Former Worker Medical Screening Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Former Worker Medical Screening Program Former Worker Medical Screening Program The Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) provides ongoing medical screening examinations, at no cost, to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor workers who may be at risk for occupational diseases. The FWP is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS) and reflects our commitment to the health and safety of all DOE workers - past

  12. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program | Department of Energy Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program The following document is the Office of the General Counsel (GC) interpretation

  13. Medical Information | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Information JLab's Occupational Medicine group provides a variety of occupational health services for employees and lab users. We assist visitors and subcontractors with medical emergencies, provide first-aid treatment and coordinate referrals to qualified off-site providers for more serious cases. We also have available to employees a wide range of medical monitoring and wellness-related services. All of these are provided at no cost to employees and with strict medical confidentiality.

  14. Emergency Medical Support

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-08-21

    This volume defines coordination between emergency planners and emergency medical support. Canceled by DOE G 151.1-4.

  15. PPPL inventors win award for device that creates medical isotope...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    inventors win award for device that creates medical isotope vital for diagnosing diseases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 29, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook ...

  16. Medical Facilities With Experience Evaluating CBD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 Medical Facilities With Experience Evaluating Chronic Beryllium Disease Cleveland Clinic Foundation Raid Dweik, M.D., FACP, F.C.C.P. Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine 9500 Euclid Avenue Cleveland, OH 44195 Contact: Jessica Phone: 216-445-5763 East Tennessee Pulmonary Associates R. Hal Hughes, M.D. East Tennessee Pulmonary Associates 800 Oak Ridge Turnpike Oak Ridge, TN 37830-9657 Phone: 865-483-3594 Philip Harber, M.D. 7230 Medical Center Drive, Ste 300 West Hills, CA 91307 Contact:

  17. Occupational Medical Program

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-12-08

    The Occupational Medical Program (OMP) oversees all Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) health care, and provides services to all managing and operating (M&O) contractors at the INEL and for the Department of Energy Idaho Office (DOE-ID). The evolution of the automated OMP at the INEL is guided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) directives and regulations. The OMP is developing a multiyear plan for the computerization of patient and demographics, epidemiology, medical records, andmore » surveillance. This plan will require the following six development phases: Employee Demographic Phase, Patient Surveillance Certification and Restrictions Phase, Electronic Notification Phase, Epidemiology-Industrial Hygiene/Radiation Exposure/OMP Integration Phase, Medical Scheduling Phase, and Medical Records Phase.« less

  18. Transportation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, D.L.

    1997-11-19

    A Draft Technical Information Document (HNF-1855) is being prepared to evaluate proposed interim tritium and medical isotope production at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). This assessment examines the potential health and safety impacts of transportation operations associated with the production of medical isotopes. Incident-free and accidental impacts are assessed using bounding source terms for the shipment of nonradiological target materials to the Hanford Site, the shipment of irradiated targets from the FFTF to the 325 Building, and the shipment of medical isotope products from the 325 Building to medical distributors. The health and safety consequences to workers and the public from the incident-free transportation of targets and isotope products would be within acceptable levels. For transportation accidents, risks to works and the public also would be within acceptable levels. This assessment is based on best information available at this time. As the medical isotope program matures, this analysis will be revised, if necessary, to support development of a final revision to the Technical Information Document.

  19. AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DIAGNOSIS; DISEASES; GAMMA CAMERAS; GENETICS...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Converting energy to medical progress nuclear medicine NONE 62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; DIAGNOSIS; DISEASES; GAMMA CAMERAS; GENETICS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; PATIENTS; RADIATION...

  20. Indoor air quality & airborne disease control in healthcare facilities...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Subject: 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; CONTROL SYSTEMS; DISEASES; THERMAL COMFORT; SPACE HVAC SYSTEMS Word ...

  1. Medical imaging systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-06-25

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

  2. Improving medical waste disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, L.

    1994-05-01

    This article describes the use of electron-beam irradiation, steam detoxification, and microwave disinfection systems rather than incineration to rid the waste stream of medical scraps. The topics of the article include biological waste stream sources and amounts, pyrolysis and oxidation, exhaust gas cleanup, superheated steam sterilization and detoxification.

  3. RNA simulations boost understanding of retroviral diseases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RNA simulations boost understanding of retroviral diseases RNA simulations boost understanding of retroviral diseases New molecular dynamics research into how RNA folds into hairpin-shaped structures called tetraloops could provide important insights into new treatments for retroviral diseases. May 31, 2016 An example of RNA folded into a tetraloop, in this case the "Z-form duplex" under study that could provide medical treatment opportunities for retroviral diseases such as Zika and

  4. ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Management (Published by REAC/TS) The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical Management Proceedings of the Fifth International REAC/TS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness and the Biodosimetry Workshop As part of its mission to provide continuing education for personnel responsible for treating radiation injuries, REAC/TS hosted the Fifth International REAC/TS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness symposium and

  5. Providence Newberg Medical Center

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Newberg, Oregon In 2002, Providence Health & Services began planning a new 188,000 square foot medical center in Newberg, Oregon to respond to the growing community's need for accessible health care. Since this was Providence's first new hospital in almost thirty years, its leaders decided to approach the project through innovative planning, design, and construction, including the achievement of lifecycle energy savings and a potential LEED certification. The hospital is comprised of 40 inpatient beds with views out to the surrounding rural landscape or into lushly planted internal courtyards.

  6. Implantable medical sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darrow, Christopher B.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Lee, Abraham P.; Wang, Amy W.

    2001-01-01

    An implantable chemical sensor system for medical applications is described which permits selective recognition of an analyte using an expandable biocompatible sensor, such as a polymer, that undergoes a dimensional change in the presence of the analyte. The expandable polymer is incorporated into an electronic circuit component that changes its properties (e.g., frequency) when the polymer changes dimension. As the circuit changes its characteristics, an external interrogator transmits a signal transdermally to the transducer, and the concentration of the analyte is determined from the measured changes in the circuit. This invention may be used for minimally invasive monitoring of blood glucose levels in diabetic patients.

  7. ORISE: The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents provides the basic information needed for the medical management of victims of radiation ...

  8. TEPP-Medical Messages | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEPP-Medical Messages TEPP-Medical Messages Medical Messages Index Medical Messages (2.22 MB) More Documents & Publications TEPP - Exercise Evaluation Forms Transuranic Waste Tabletop Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

  9. Medical Applications of Non-Medical Research: Applications Derived from BES-Supported Research and Research at BES Facilities

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    1998-07-01

    This publication contains stories that illustrate how the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) research and major user facilities have impacted the medical sciences in the selected topical areas of disease diagnosis, treatment (including drug development, radiation therapy, and surgery), understanding, and prevention.

  10. Medication List- September 14, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scale is created to provide a guide for the physician determination of ability to work for HRP certified persons with certain conditions and while taking certain medications.

  11. Converting Energy to Medical Progress [Nuclear Medicine

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    2001-04-01

    For over 50 years the Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been investing to advance environmental and biomedical knowledge connected to energy. The BER Medical Sciences program fosters research to develop beneficial applications of nuclear technologies for medical diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. Today, nuclear medicine helps millions of patients annually in the United States. Nearly every nuclear medicine scan or test used today was made possible by past BER-funded research on radiotracers, radiation detection devices, gamma cameras, PET and SPECT scanners, and computer science. The heart of biological research within BER has always been the pursuit of improved human health. The nuclear medicine of tomorrow will depend greatly on today's BER-supported research, particularly in the discovery of radiopharmaceuticals that seek specific molecular and genetic targets, the design of advanced scanners needed to create meaningful images with these future radiotracers, and the promise of new radiopharmaceutical treatments for cancers and genetic diseases.

  12. Medical imaging systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V.

    2012-07-24

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

  13. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, D. T.; Metcalf, J. R.; North, M. P.; Richardson, T. L.; Underwood, S. A.; Shelton, P. M.; Ray, W. B.; Morrell, M. L.; Caldwell, III, D. C.

    2012-04-16

    Electronic Management of medical records has taken a back seat both in private industry and in the government. Record volumes continue to rise every day and management of these paper records is inefficient and very expensive. In 2005, the White House announced support for the development of electronic medical records across the federal government. In 2006, the DOE issued 10 CFR 851 requiring all medical records be electronically available by 2015. The Y-12 National Security Complex is currently investing funds to develop a comprehensive EMR to incorporate the requirements of an occupational health facility which are common across the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). Scheduling, workflow, and data capture from medical surveillance, certification, and qualification examinations are core pieces of the system. The Electronic Medical Business Operations System (EMBOS) will provide a comprehensive health tool solution to 10 CFR 851 for Y-12 and can be leveraged to the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC); all site in the NWC must meet the requirements of 10 CFR 851 which states that all medical records must be electronically available by 2015. There is also potential to leverage EMBOS to the private4 sector. EMBOS is being developed and deployed in phases. When fully deployed the EMBOS will be a state-of-the-art web-enabled integrated electronic solution providing a complete electronic medical record (EMR). EMBOS has been deployed and provides a dynamic electronic medical history and surveillance program (e.g., Asbestos, Hearing Conservation, and Respirator Wearer) questionnaire. Table 1 below lists EMBOS capabilities and data to be tracked. Data to be tracked: Patient Demographics – Current/Historical; Physical Examination Data; Employee Medical Health History; Medical Surveillance Programs; Patient and Provider Schedules; Medical Qualification/Certifications; Laboratory Data; Standardized Abnormal Lab Notifications; Prescription Medication Tracking and Dispensing; Allergies

  14. Electronic Medical Business Operations System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-04-16

    Electronic Management of medical records has taken a back seat both in private industry and in the government. Record volumes continue to rise every day and management of these paper records is inefficient and very expensive. In 2005, the White House announced support for the development of electronic medical records across the federal government. In 2006, the DOE issued 10 CFR 851 requiring all medical records be electronically available by 2015. The Y-12 National Securitymore » Complex is currently investing funds to develop a comprehensive EMR to incorporate the requirements of an occupational health facility which are common across the Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC). Scheduling, workflow, and data capture from medical surveillance, certification, and qualification examinations are core pieces of the system. The Electronic Medical Business Operations System (EMBOS) will provide a comprehensive health tool solution to 10 CFR 851 for Y-12 and can be leveraged to the Nuclear Weapon Complex (NWC); all site in the NWC must meet the requirements of 10 CFR 851 which states that all medical records must be electronically available by 2015. There is also potential to leverage EMBOS to the private4 sector. EMBOS is being developed and deployed in phases. When fully deployed the EMBOS will be a state-of-the-art web-enabled integrated electronic solution providing a complete electronic medical record (EMR). EMBOS has been deployed and provides a dynamic electronic medical history and surveillance program (e.g., Asbestos, Hearing Conservation, and Respirator Wearer) questionnaire. Table 1 below lists EMBOS capabilities and data to be tracked. Data to be tracked: Patient Demographics – Current/Historical; Physical Examination Data; Employee Medical Health History; Medical Surveillance Programs; Patient and Provider Schedules; Medical Qualification/Certifications; Laboratory Data; Standardized Abnormal Lab Notifications; Prescription Medication Tracking and Dispensing

  15. Improving Anti-Influenza Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Anti-Influenza Medications Improving Anti-Influenza Medications Print Monday, 07 March 2016 16:16 The annual flu epidemics caused by influenza viruses, especially the influenza A virus, affect about 10-20% of the world's population each season. This highly contagious illness can trigger serious complications and can still lead at times to death, even today. Scientists have been working for a while with the M2 proton channel from the influenza A virus, which is one of nature's smallest

  16. Achromatic and uncoupled medical gantry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsoupas, Nicholaos; Kayran, Dmitry; Litvinenko, Vladimir; MacKay, William W.

    2011-11-22

    A medical gantry that focus the beam from the beginning of the gantry to the exit of the gantry independent of the rotation angle of the gantry by keeping the beam achromatic and uncoupled, thus, avoiding the use of collimators or rotators, or additional equipment to control the beam divergence, which may cause beam intensity loss or additional time in irradiation of the patient, or disadvantageously increase the overall gantry size inapplicable for the use in the medical treatment facility.

  17. Medical Surveillance | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Surveillance Medical surveillance examinations help to identify and monitor Ames Laboratory and ISU employees who work under conditions and with materials that have a potential health risk. Some of these hazards include carcinogens, toxic chemicals, noise, lasers, and biological agents. Examinations are done in order to prevent occupational related problems. The history, review of exposures, physical examination, and associated laboratory tests provide an assessment of overall health

  18. Medical Plans for Medicare-Eligible Retirees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medicare-Eligible Medical Medical Plans for Medicare-Eligible Retirees Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of medical benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of the Laboratory's medical benefits. Retiree medical plan premiums are subject to graduated eligibility. The Laboratory offers the following medical plans to Medicare-eligible retirees for the 2016 calendar year: National Exclusive Provider

  19. Medical Plans for Non-Medicare Retirees

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Non-Medicare Medical Medical Plans for Non-Medicare Retirees Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of medical benefits. Contact Retiree Insurance Providers The Laboratory offers the following two medical plans to non-Medicare retirees for the 2016 calendar year: High-Deductible Health Plan (HDHP) Preferred Provider Option (PPO) Plan Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Mexico (BCBSNM) is the provider of the Laboratory's medical benefits. Retiree medical plan premiums are subject

  20. Shape memory polymer medical device (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Shape memory polymer medical device Title: Shape memory polymer medical device A system for removing matter from a conduit. The system includes the steps of passing a transport ...

  1. Medical Screening Protocol for the Former Worker Medical Screening...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    recommendations; repeat CT scan offered on an annual basis after initial baseline Welding Lung Asthma Chronic obstructive lung disease Respiratory symptoms...

  2. NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Environmental Assessment for NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99 (DOE/EA-1929) Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation/ Global Threat Reduction Initiative August 2012 EA for NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Mo-99 i COVER SHEET ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR NORTHSTAR MEDICAL TECHNOLOGIES LLC COMMERCIAL

  3. Treatment of Anthrax Disease Frequently Asked Questions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judd, Kathleen S.; Young, Joan E.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Malone, John D.

    2010-05-14

    This document provides a summary of Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) on the treatment of anthrax disease caused by a wide-area release of Bacillus anthracis spores as an act bioterrorism. These FAQs are intended to provide the public health and medical community, as well as others, with guidance and communications to support the response and long-term recovery from an anthrax event.

  4. Medical and Transmission Vector Vocabulary Alignment with Schema.org

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, William P.; Chappell, Alan R.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-04-21

    Available biomedical ontologies and knowledge bases currently lack formal and standards-based interconnections between disease, disease vector, and drug treatment vocabularies. The PNNL Medical Linked Dataset (PNNL-MLD) addresses this gap. This paper describes the PNNL-MLD, which provides a unified vocabulary and dataset of drug, disease, side effect, and vector transmission background information. Currently, the PNNL-MLD combines and curates data from the following research projects: DrugBank, DailyMed, Diseasome, DisGeNet, Wikipedia Infobox, Sider, and PharmGKB. The main outcomes of this effort are a dataset aligned to Schema.org, including a parsing framework, and extensible hooks ready for integration with selected medical ontologies. The PNNL-MLD enables researchers more quickly and easily to query distinct datasets. Future extensions to the PNNL-MLD will include Traditional Chinese Medicine, broader interlinks across genetic structures, a larger thesaurus of synonyms and hypernyms, explicit coding of diseases and drugs across research systems, and incorporating vector-borne transmission vocabularies.

  5. Medical implants and methods of making medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Wendy J; Yonker, Clement R; Fulton, John L; Tarasevich, Barbara J; McClain, James B; Taylor, Doug

    2014-09-16

    A medical implant device having a substrate with an oxidized surface and a silane derivative coating covalently bonded to the oxidized surface. A bioactive agent is covalently bonded to the silane derivative coating. An implantable stent device including a stent core having an oxidized surface with a layer of silane derivative covalently bonded thereto. A spacer layer comprising polyethylene glycol (PEG) is covalently bonded to the layer of silane derivative and a protein is covalently bonded to the PEG. A method of making a medical implant device including providing a substrate having a surface, oxidizing the surface and reacting with derivitized silane to form a silane coating covalently bonded to the surface. A bioactive agent is then covalently bonded to the silane coating. In particular instances, an additional coating of bio-absorbable polymer and/or pharmaceutical agent is deposited over the bioactive agent.

  6. HDHP Medical PPO Medical Dental Vision Legal Disability Life

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HDHP Medical PPO Medical Dental Vision Legal Disability Life Dep Life AD&D 401(k) Vacation Sick Holiday Regular - Full/Part time X X X X X X X X X X X X X Regular - Casual X X TERM - Full/Part time X X X X X X X X X X X X X TERM - Casual X X Post Doc - Full/Part time X X X X X X X X X X X X X Post Doc - Casual X X Graduate Student - Full/Part time X X X X X X X X X X X X X Graduate Student - Casual X X Post Bachelors Student - Full/Part time X X X X X X X X X X X X X Post Bachelors Student -

  7. Beryllium disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-20

    After two workers at the nuclear weapons plant at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee were diagnosed earlier this year with chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a rare and sometimes fatal scarring of the lungs, the Department of Energy ordered up a 4-year probe. Now, part of that probe has begun - tests conducted by the Oak Ridge Associated Universities' Center for Epidemiological Research measuring beryllium sensitivity in 3,000 people who've been exposed to the metal's dust since Manhattan Project managers opened the Y-12 plant at Oak Ridge in 1943. Currently, 119 Y-12 employees process beryllium, which has a number of industrial uses, including rocket heat shields and nuclear weapon and electrical components. The disease often takes 20 to 25 years to develop, and the stricken employees haven't worked with beryllium for years. There is no cure for CBD, estimated to strike 2% of people exposed to the metal. Anti-inflammatory steroids alleviate such symptoms as a dry cough, weight loss, and fatigue. Like other lung-fibrosis diseases that are linked to lung cancer, some people suspect CBD might cause some lung cancer. While difficult to diagnose, about 900 cases of CBD have been reported since a Beryllium Case Registry was established in 1952. The Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that about 10,000 DOE employees and 800,000 people in private industry have worked with beryllium.

  8. Medical Surveillance for Former Workers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Takaro Jordan Firestone

    2009-05-29

    The Former Hanford Worker Medical Monitoring Program, directed by the Occupational and Environmental Medicine Program at the University of Washington, served former production and other non-construction workers who were potentially exposed to workplace hazards while working for the USDOE or its contractors at Hanford. The USDOE Former Workers Program arose from Congressional action in the Defense Authorization of 1993 (Public Law 102). Section 3162 stated that, “The Secretary shall establish and carry out a program for the identification and ongoing medical evaluation of current and former Department of Energy employees who are subject to significant health risks as a result of exposure of such employees to hazardous or radioactive substances during such employment.” (This also covers former employees of USDOE contractors and subcontractors.) The key objective has been to provide these former workers with medical evaluations in order to determine whether workers have experienced significant risk due to workplace exposure to hazards. Exposures to asbestos, beryllium, and noise can produce specific medical conditions: asbestosis, berylliosis, and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Each of these conditions can be identified by specific, non-invasive screening tests, which are widely available. Treatments are also available for individuals affected by these conditions. This project involved two phases. Phase I involved a needs and risk assessment, characterizing the nature and extent of workplace health hazards which may have increased the risk for long-term health effects. We categorized jobs and tasks by likelihood of exposures to specific workplace health hazards; and located and established contact with former Hanford workers. Phase II involved implementation of medical monitoring programs for former workers whose individual work history indicated significant risk for adverse health effects. We identified 118,000 former workers, employed from 1943 to 1997

  9. Reactor-Produced Medical Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirzadeh, Saed; Mausner, Leonard; Garland, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    The therapeutic use of radionuclides in nuclear medicine, oncology and cardiology is the most rapidly growing use of medical radionuclides. Since most therapeutic radionuclides are neutron rich and decay by beta emission, they are reactor-produced. This chapter deals mainly with production approaches with neutrons. Neutron interactions with matter, neutron transmission and activation rates, and neutron spectra of nuclear reactors are discussed in some detail. Further, a short discussion of the neutron-energy dependence of cross sections, reaction rates in thermal reactors, cross section measurements and flux monitoring, and general equations governing the reactor production of radionuclides are presented. Finally, the chapter is concluded by providing a number of examples encompassing the various possible reaction routes for production of a number of medical radionuclides in a reactor.

  10. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R.; Gelbart, W. Z.

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  11. medical | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    medical NNSA research and capabilities shed light on the human brain From a brain-inspired supercomputer for physics simulations to materials science from the structure of cow eyes, NNSA's laboratories are adept at linking biology with technology to benefit both fields of study. In June, which is Alzheimer's and Brain Awareness Month, Americans reflect... Sandia, UCLA develop screening libraries to discover drug targets for viral infections As headlines highlight the threat of viruses like Ebola

  12. Laser separation of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eerkens, J.W.; Puglishi, D.A.; Miller, W.H.

    1996-12-31

    There is an increasing demand for different separated isotopes as feed material for reactor and cyclotron-produced radioisotopes used by a fast-growing radiopharmaceutical industry. One new technology that may meet future demands for medical isotopes is molecular laser isotope separation (MLIS). This method was investigated for the enrichment of uranium in the 1970`s and 1980s by Los Alamos National Laboratory, Isotope Technologies, and others around the world. While South Africa and Japan have continued the development of MLIS for uranium and are testing pilot units, around 1985 the United States dropped the LANL MLIS program in favor of AVLIS (atomic vapor LIS), which uses electron-beam-heated uranium metal vapor. AVLIS appears difficult and expensive to apply to most isotopes of medical interest, however, whereas MLIS technology, which is based on cooled hexafluorides or other gaseous molecules, can be adapted more readily. The attraction of MLIS for radiopharmaceutical firms is that it allows them to operate their own dedicated separators for small-quantity productions of critical medical isotopes, rather than having to depend on large enrichment complexes run by governments, which are only optimal for large-quantity productions. At the University of Missouri, the authors are investigating LIS of molybdenum isotopes using MoF{sub 6}, which behaves in a way similar to UF{sub 6}, studied in the past.

  13. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasza, Kenneth E.; Oras, John; Son, HyunJin

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  14. JLab Registration/International Services - Medical Insurance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Insurance A visitor and student medical insurance plan is available for purchase. A copy of each insurance applicant's valid visa/immigration documentation (if a foreign national) or driver's license (if US citizen) is required to process insurance documentation. This insurance option is offered to insure the availability of quality medical care to all of our visiting researchers and their dependents while at Jefferson Lab. Medical plans include prescription cards to all enrollees. This

  15. Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (10 CFR 850) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (10 CFR 850) Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (10 CFR 850) The DOE established a chronic beryllium disease prevention program (CBDPP) to reduce the number of workers currently exposed to beryllium in the course of their work at DOE facilities managed by DOE or its contractors, minimize the levels of, and potential for, exposure to beryllium, and establish medical surveillance requirements to ensure early detection of the

  16. Dry phase reactor for generating medical isotopes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mackie, Thomas Rockwell; Heltemes, Thad Alexander

    2016-05-03

    An apparatus for generating medical isotopes provides for the irradiation of dry-phase, granular uranium compounds which are then dissolved in a solvent for separation of the medical isotope from the irradiated compound. Once the medical isotope is removed, the dissolved compound may be reconstituted in dry granular form for repeated irradiation.

  17. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  18. AVLIS enrichment of medical isotopes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynam, C.A.; Scheibner, K.F.; Stern, R.C.; Worden, E.F.

    1996-12-31

    Under the Sponsorship of the United states Enrichment Corporation (USEC), we are currently investigating the large scale separation of several isotopes of medical interest using atomic vapor isotope separation (AVLIS). This work includes analysis and experiments in the enrichment of thallium 203 as a precursor to the production of thallium 201 used in cardiac imaging following heart attacks, on the stripping of strontium 84 from natural strontium as precursor to the production of strontium 89, and on the stripping of lead 210 from lead used in integrated circuits to reduce the number of alpha particle induced logic errors.

  19. Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility Medical...

  20. ORISE: The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident Preparedness: Medical Management Proceedings of the Fifth International REACTS Symposium on the Medical Basis for Radiation-Accident ...

  1. Medical Records Checklist - September 14, 2010 | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information that should be requested by SOMD of receiving facility Medical records: Problem list: list of all past and current medical diagnosis and surgical procedures. Medication ...

  2. New Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation Created | Jefferson...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation Created New Center for Advanced Medical ... the director of Hampton University's new Center for Advanced Medical Instrumentation. ...

  3. Medical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Thomlinson, W.

    1991-10-01

    Ever since the first diagnostic x-ray was done in the United States on February 3, 1896, the application of ionizing radiation to the field of medicine has become increasingly important. Both in clinical medicine and basic research the use of x-rays for diagnostic imaging and radiotherapy is now widespread. Radiography, angiography, CAT and PETT scanning, mammography, and nuclear medicine are all examples of technologies developed to image the human anatomy. In therapeutic applications, both external and internal sources of radiation are applied to the battle against cancer. The development of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has allowed exciting advances to take place in many of these applications. The new sources provide tunable, high-intensity monochromatic beams over a wide range of energies which can be tailored to specific programmatic needs. This paper surveys those areas of medical research in which synchrotron radiation facilities are actively involved.

  4. The Imaging and Medical Beam Line at the Australian Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hausermann, Daniel; Hall, Chris; Maksimenko, Anton; Campbell, Colin

    2010-07-23

    As a result of the enthusiastic support from the Australian biomedical, medical and clinical communities, the Australian Synchrotron is constructing a world-class facility for medical research, the 'Imaging and Medical Beamline'. The IMBL began phased commissioning in late 2008 and is scheduled to commence the first clinical research programs with patients in 2011. It will provide unrivalled x-ray facilities for imaging and radiotherapy for a wide range of research applications in diseases, treatments and understanding of physiological processes. The main clinical research drivers are currently high resolution and sensitivity cardiac and breast imaging, cell tracking applied to regenerative and stem cell medicine and cancer therapies. The beam line has a maximum source to sample distance of 136 m and will deliver a 60 cm by 4 cm x-ray beam1 - monochromatic and white - to a three storey satellite building fully equipped for pre-clinical and clinical research. Currently operating with a 1.4 Tesla multi-pole wiggler, it will upgrade to a 4.2 Tesla device which requires the ability to handle up to 21 kW of x-ray power at any point along the beam line. The applications envisaged for this facility include imaging thick objects encompassing materials, humans and animals. Imaging can be performed in the range 15-150 keV. Radiotherapy research typically requires energies between 30 and 120 keV, for both monochromatic and broad beam.

  5. Isotope production agreement benefits medical patients | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    LLC (NSTec), and Henderson, Nevada-based Global Medical Isotope Systems, LLC (GMIS). ... Known primarily as the management and operations contractor for the Nevada National ...

  6. ORISE: Radiation Treatment Medication Package Inserts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training RANET Asset Resources Overview Frequently Asked Questions about Radiation Understanding Radiation Video Series The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents Dose Estimates ...

  7. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Medications The Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) is a valuable resource in the use of drug therapies to treat radiation exposure. REACTS ...

  8. ORISE Resources: Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to mass casualties that may involve radiological injuries. The interactive, two-hour training, titled Radiological and Nuclear Terrorism: Medical Response to Mass Casualties...

  9. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  10. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Medical Data Management

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ORISE) provides the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other government agencies with health and medical data management and related information technology services. Through...

  11. EIS-0249: Medical Isotopes Production Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to establish a production capability for molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) and related medical isotopes.

  12. New Medical Technology | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Healthcare We're making healthcare accessible for people around the globe, increasing quality of care and expanding medical treatment boundaries. Home > Innovation > Healthcare How...

  13. Implementation Guide of Medical Standards for Firefighters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These guidelines were prepared to assist the DOE contractor site occupational medical programs in developing NFPA-based firefighter standards that comply with the ADA.

  14. Timing of testing and treatment for asymptomatic diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K?rk?zlar, Eser; Faissol, Daniel M.; Griffin, Paul M.; Swann, Julie L.

    2010-07-01

    Many papers in the medical literature analyze the cost-effectiveness of screening for diseases by comparing a limited number of a priori testing policies under estimated problem parameters. However, this may be insufficient to determine the best timing of the tests or incorporate changes over time. In this paper, we develop and solve a Markov Decision Process (MDP) model for a simple class of asymptomatic diseases in order to provide the building blocks for analysis of a more general class of diseases. We provide a computationally efficient method for determining a cost-effective dynamic intervention strategy that takes into account (i) the results of the previous test for each individual and (ii) the change in the individuals behavior based on awareness of the disease. We demonstrate the usefulness of the approach by applying the results to screening decisions for Hepatitis C (HCV) using medical data, and compare our findings to current HCV screening recommendations.

  15. US Army Medical Materiel development activity, 1987 annual report. Progress report, 1 January-31 December 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedersen, C.E.

    1988-05-06

    Information relating to accomplishments in military medicine in three areas is presented. The Project Management Support Division (PMSD) provides centralized administrative, financial management, contracting, and logistical support to the Project Managers and staff. The Biological Systems Project Management Division manages the development and acquisition of biological products to prevent casualties or loss of soldier effectiveness due to disease. These diseases may be naturally acquired (close contact, unsanitary conditions, contaminated environment, biting insects), or delivered deliberately (aerosols). Product Officers exploit domestic and foreign medical technology to remedy deficiencies identified by the Combat Developer and monitor research projects for their application to disease protective measures. The Pharmaceutical Systems Project Management Division centrally manages the development and the initial production of pharmaceutical products (antidotes and drugs), related drug delivery systems (autoinjectors and transdermal patches), and decontamination products. These products are fielded as preventive, protective, and therapeutic modalities for use against chemical and biological warfare threats, certain endemic diseases, and the treatment of combat casualties. The Applied Medical Systems Project Management Division is a multidisciplinary team with broad mission responsibilities to centrally manage the development and initial production of applied medical products, related diagnostic equipment, optical corrective devices for protective masks, and pesticide delivery systems.

  16. DOE: Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor and subcontractor employees. The screening exams are offered by third party providers from universities, labor unions,...

  17. PARKING KEY: State Handicap Medically Permitted

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    PARKING KEY: State Handicap Medically Permitted Preferred (LEED) Visitor Motorcycle New Parking Spots / Parallel Parking NATIONAL SECURITY CAMPUS The DOE's National Security Campus is managed and operated by Honeywell. REVISED: August 2014

  18. Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Medical applications of nuclear physics and heavy-ion beams ...

  19. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine] (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Converting energy to medical progress nuclear medicine Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Converting energy to medical progress nuclear medicine You are accessing a ...

  20. Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Medical Hot Springs Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  1. Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Merle West Medical Center Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

  2. 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    3 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report February 2014 The 2013 Annual Report presents a detailed overview...

  3. The Medical Aspects of Radiation Incidents, 3rd Edition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Organ dose reference point 50 rem (committed) Approaches to Medical Management Medical management is specific and isotope-dependent; therefore identifying the isotope is crucial. ...

  4. DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. ... contractor employee pension and medical benefits to current employees and retirees. ...

  5. Scientist Helps NASA Develop Medical Device | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Scientist Helps NASA Develop Medical Device Scientist Helps NASA Develop Medical Device March 11, 2016 - 3:35pm Addthis Radiobiologist Matt Coleman displays a device like the ...

  6. PPPL inventors win award for device that creates medical isotope vital for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diagnosing diseases | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab inventors win award for device that creates medical isotope vital for diagnosing diseases By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe February 29, 2016 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook Gentile, right, and George Ascione, one of the co-inventors, show off their third-place award at the 11th Annual Innovation Forum at the Andlinger Center for Energy and the Environment on Feb. 24. (Photo by Elle Starkman/PPPL Office of Communications ) Gentile,

  7. Interim Chronic Beryllium Disease

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-12-08

    Establishes Departmental expectations for addressing chronic beryllium disease throughout the Department until a Departmental rule on beryllium is promulgated. This Notice was replaced by final rule 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program, published December 8, 1999.

  8. Medical information and the right to privacy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drell, D.

    1994-06-01

    This report is a compilation of submitted abstracts of papers presented at the DOE-supported workshop on medical information and the right to privacy held at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, DC, on June 9 and 10, 1994. The aim of this meeting is to provide a forum to discuss the legal, ethical and practical issues related to the computerization and use of medical data, as well as the potential impact the use of these data may have on an individual`s privacy. Topical areas include an overview of the Federal and legal requirements to collect medical data, historical experiences with worker screening programs, currently available medical surveillance technologies (both biomedical and computer technologies) and their limitations. In addition, an-depth assessment of the needs and interests of a wide spectrum of parties as they relate to the use of medical data from both a legal and privacy perspective is provided. The needs of the individual, the public (e.g., blood and tissue banks), private enterprises (e.g., industry and insurance carriers), and the government (e.g., FBI) are discussed. Finally, the practical and legal issues relating to the use of computers to carry, store and transmit this information are also examined. The abstracts are presented in the intended order of presentation as indicated in the agenda for the meeting.

  9. Management of hazardous medical waste in Croatia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinkovic, Natalija Vitale, Ksenija; Holcer, Natasa Janev; Dzakula, Aleksandar; Pavic, Tomo

    2008-07-01

    This article provides a review of hazardous medical waste production and its management in Croatia. Even though Croatian regulations define all steps in the waste management chain, implementation of those steps is one of the country's greatest issues. Improper practice is evident from the point of waste production to final disposal. The biggest producers of hazardous medical waste are hospitals that do not implement existing legislation, due to the lack of education and funds. Information on quantities, type and flow of medical waste are inadequate, as is sanitary control. We propose an integrated approach to medical waste management based on a hierarchical structure from the point of generation to its disposal. Priority is given to the reduction of the amounts and potential for harm. Where this is not possible, management includes reduction by sorting and separating, pretreatment on site, safe transportation, final treatment and sanitary disposal. Preferred methods should be the least harmful for human health and the environment. Integrated medical waste management could greatly reduce quantities and consequently financial strains. Landfilling is the predominant route of disposal in Croatia, although the authors believe that incineration is the most appropriate method. In a country such as Croatia, a number of small incinerators would be the most economical solution.

  10. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory | Department of Energy Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory (295.51 KB) More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System

  11. DOE, Westinghouse sponsor medical technician course

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sponsor Emergency Medical Technician Course CARLSBAD, N.M., February 24, 2000 - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Carlsbad Area Office and the Westinghouse Waste Isolation Division are sponsoring a six- week Emergency Medical Technician-Basic course, March 1-April 19, at the Skeen-Whitlock Building, 4021 National Parks Highway. Classes are from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Mondays, Wednesdays, and every other Friday, as scheduled. The course, held in conjunction with the University of New Mexico

  12. Chief Medical Officer | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chief Medical Officer Chief Medical Officer Dr. Ardaiz (far left), CMO, participating in the 2011 “Late Breaker” session of the American Occupational Health Conference (AOHC), the annual gathering of Occupational Medicine’s leading practitioners, discussing the health concerns associated with the Fukushima Daiichi disaster in Japan in March of 2011. Dr. Ardaiz (far left), CMO, participating in the 2011 "Late Breaker" session of the American Occupational Health Conference

  13. Former Worker Program Medical Protocol | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medical Protocol Former Worker Program Medical Protocol October 7, 2015 The medical protocol is intended to identify work-related health outcomes of relevance to DOE workers for which there are screening tests that are reasonably likely to be effective and beneficial to program participants. The protocol is intended to ensure consistency of approach in the medical evaluation of participants. Former Worker Program Medical Protocol (36.47 KB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Former Worker

  14. Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capsules | Argonne National Laboratory Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered Capsules Technology available for licensing: Molecule Nanoweaver, a unique tool that can be used as both a detector and a fabricator of high-tech patches, multilayered capsules, and other medical products. May increase the market for medical patches Allows creation of medical patches that are more efficient at delivering medication and treatment, speeding up the healing process PDF

  15. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California San Francisco VA Medical Center The San Francisco VA Medical Center is saving more than $500,000 and almost 3 million kWh every year through a retrofit financed by FEMP's Super ESPC Program. Overview The Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in San Francisco is saving almost 3 million kilowatt-hours of electricity, more than

  16. Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center, San Francisco, California San Francisco VA Medical Center The San Francisco VA Medical Center is saving more than $500,000 and almost 3 million kWh every year through a retrofit financed by FEMP's Super ESPC Program. Overview The Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center in San Francisco is saving almost 3 million kilowatt-hours of electricity, more than

  17. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medical Equipment Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Medical Equipment The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. Additional plug load data from medical office buildings were provided by Mazzetti, Inc. See below for a few highlights from monitoring large medical imaging equipment and medical office building plug loads. Graphic showing the average weekday energy use of a CT machine. Graph showing average weekday energy

  18. Contractor Employee Pension and Medical Benefits Policy

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-06-19

    To ensure that reimbursement of costs incurred by Department of Energy (DOE) contractors' pension and medical benefits are reasonable in accordance with applicable laws, regulations and contract requirements and reflect prudent business practices. This directive has been suspended as of June 19, 2006, for 1 year. For more information, see DOE N 251.66.

  19. WE-A-16A-01: International Medical Physics Symposium: Increasing Access to Medical Physics Education/Training and Research Excellence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bortfeld, T; Ngoma, T; Odedina, F; Morgan, S; Wu, R; Sajo, E; Ngwa, W

    2014-06-15

    health to help increase AMPERE and alleviate the growing global burden of cancer; To present and discuss a new model for harmonizing Medical Physics Training across countries and how this model (UMass and Heidelberg) could be extended to LMIC in collaboration with the IAEA; To highlight a new platform and program for facilitating contributions by Medical Physicists to increase AMPERE towards the elimination of global cancer disparities. Challenges in Cancer Control in Africa Twalib A. Ngoma, MD, Professor, Executive Director, Ocean Road Cancer Institute, Dar Es Salaam, Tanzania Cancer care in Africa is beset by lack of attention, political will, cancer registries, cancer plans, human resources, financial resources and treatment facilities.. As a result of this, cancer patients in Africa are far more likely to die of their disease than those in developed countries. According to data from the WHO 750,000 new cancer cases occur in Africa every year and this number is predicted to rise by 70% by 2020. To make matters worse, an estimated 75% of cancer patients in Africa have advanced or incurable cancers at diagnosis making palliative care the most realistic approach to their management. Furthermore, Cancer prevention is nearly nonexistent, cancer detection is rare and treatment usually comes too late and is inefficient. The overall mortality-to-incidence ratio for men with cancer in the Africa is 0.75 compared with 0.54 in the developed world while the ratios for women in Africa, is 0.65 compared with 0.45 for women in the developed world. There is also limited access to radiotherapy. According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), whilst developed countries usually have one radiotherapy machine per 250,000 people, most African nations have only one machine per ten million people. The above numbers are alarming and speak for themselves. The only solution to improve this alarming situation is to address the major challenges which African countries face in

  20. Former worekrs' notification adn medical screening Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patricia Quinn

    2005-11-30

    CPWR is carrying out a screening program for former Hanford construction workers. This program includes continuing screening and re-screening services for the former worker population. The Program contains the following general components: Start-up planning/needs assessment: A modified exposure assessment will be conducted to identify high-risk buildings or areas, primary exposures, and worker populations at risk. Outreach: CPWR, as the research arm of the Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, has direct access to workers. CPWR will rely on direct mailings to lists of former workers, and work through and rely on existing organizations (unions, union pension funds, employers, DOE site administrators, etc.) to reach former workers and "get the word out." CPWR will establish/maintain an outreach office at each site listed above. This office will serve as the face of the Program to workers and their communities. Communications and intake center: CPWR has two established toll-free phone numbers (1-800-866-9663 and 1-888-464-0009). There is also a dedicated website for the program (btmed.org). Workers can register with the Program by mail, telephone, or on-line. Work history: A standardized, structured work history is administered with modules that accommodate unique exposure scenarios for different occupations and different DOE sites. A work history interview is administered by a trained program interviewer. The work histories are used to determine whether a participant is eligible for the medical examination and to interpret the findings from the medical examination. Medical evaluation: The Program contracts with local medical providers qualified to deliver occupational medical screening services. All providers are credentialed. The Program contracts with a certified national laboratory and with NIOSH certified B-readers to review x-rays. Based on the work history, the participant is referred to a credentialed medical provider who is located close to

  1. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-31

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicago's recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work. The new green building houses the hospital's Family Medicine Residency Program and Specialty Medical Offices. The residency program has been vital in attracting new, young physicians to this medically underserved area. The new outpatient center will also help to allure needed medical providers to the community. The facility also has areas designated to women's health and community education. The Community Education Conference Room will provide learning opportunities to area residents. Emphasis will be placed on conserving resources and protecting our environment, as well as providing information on healthcare access and preventive medicine. The new Medical Office Building was constructed with numerous energy saving features. The exterior cladding of the building is an innovative, locally-manufactured precast concrete panel system with integral insulation that achieves an R-value in excess of building code requirements. The roof is a 'green roof' covered by native plantings, lessening the impact solar heat gain on the building, and reducing air conditioning requirements. The windows are low-E, tinted, and insulated to reduce cooling requirements in summer and heating requirements in winter. The main entrance has an air lock to prevent unconditioned air from entering the building and impacting interior air temperatures. Since much of the traffic in and out of the office building comes from the adjacent Jackson Park Hospital, a pedestrian bridge connects the two buildings, further

  2. Jackson Park Hospital Green Building Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Dorsey; Nelson Vasquez

    2010-03-01

    Jackson Park Hospital completed the construction of a new Medical Office Building on its campus this spring. The new building construction has adopted the City of Chicagoâ??s recent focus on protecting the environment, and conserving energy and resources, with the introduction of green building codes. Located in a poor, inner city neighborhood on the South side of Chicago, Jackson Park Hospital has chosen green building strategies to help make the area a better place to live and work.

  3. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  4. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiation Treatment Medications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Treatment Medications The Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) is a valuable resource in the use of drug therapies to treat radiation exposure. REAC/TS maintains a repository of clinical information and qualified staff provide expertise to practitioners worldwide on the use of calcium and zinc diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA) and Radiogardase (Prussian Blue). Calcium-DTPA and zinc-DTPA are injectable chelating agents used to enhance the excretion of plutonium

  5. Medical Sciences Division report for 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    This year`s Medical Sciences Division (MSD) Report is organized to show how programs in our division contribute to the core competencies of Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). ORISE`s core competencies in education and training, environmental and safety evaluation and analysis, occupational and environmental health, and enabling research support the overall mission of the US Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Ken Hogstrom, PI, & Medical Physics Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAMD Targets Cancer Ken Hogstrom, Marie Varnes, Kip Matthews, Erno Sajo, Medical Physics Group Department of Physics and Astronomy and Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center Current radiation therapy techniques treat cancer by irradiating a volume of tissue that contains both healthy and cancerous tissue. Potential damage to healthy tissue can limit the amount of radiation dose to the cancer. Professor Hogstrom and his crew search for drugs that will allow radiation dose to preferentially target the

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman medical probes and system for disease diagnosis and drug testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.

    1999-01-26

    A probe for a surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometer includes a member of optically transmissive material for receiving the excitation radiation from a laser and for carrying the radiation emitted from a specimen to a detector. An end of the member for placing against the specimen has a coating that produces surface enhancement of the specimen during Raman scattering spectroscopic analysis. Specifically the coating is formed by a first layer of microparticles on the member and a metal layer over the first layer. The first layer may form a microstructure surface over which a metal layer is applied. Alternatively the coating may be a material containing microparticles of a metal. An optional layer of a material may be applied to the metal layer to concentrate onto the probe compounds of analytical interest onto the probe. 39 figs.

  8. Surface-enhanced raman medical probes and system for disease diagnosis and drug testing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    1999-01-01

    A probe for a surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrometer includes a member of optically transmissive material for receiving the excitation radiation from a laser and for carrying the radiation emitted from a specimen to a detector. An end of the member for placing against the specimen has a coating that produces surface enhancement of the specimen during Raman scattering spectroscopic analysis. Specifically the coating is formed by a first layer of microparticles on the member and a metal layer over the first layer. The first layer may form a microstructure surface over which a metal layer is applied. Alternatively the coating may be a material containing microparticles of a metal. An optional layer of a material may be applied to the metal layer to concentrate onto the probe compounds of analytical interest onto the probe.

  9. Update on the Hanford Site Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Training and Implementation Medical Clearance and Restriction Language- Communication ... as follows: *Medical Referrals *Medical Clearance & Restriction *Beryllium Work Permit ...

  10. Medical surveillance of employee health at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    Medical surveillance can best be defined as conducting specific, targeted medical examinations at pre-determined intervals for the purpose of assessing whether individuals have suffered work-related illness or injury. The objectives of the medical examinations are to determine if there is any evidence of illness or injury and to determine whether any illness or injury found is occupationally related. If illness or injury is found, the employee under medical surveillance can be referred for immediate treatment. Other employees in the same work group can be examined, and any hazardous defects in the workplace can be corrected. Additional objectives of these periodic examinations are to determine whether the employee's health status and physical fitness continue to be compatible with the safe performance of his assigned job tasks; to contribute to employee health maintenance by providing the opportunity for early detection, treatment, and prevention of disease or injuries; and to provide a documented record status that can be used in analysis of the health of the work group as a whole.

  11. Medical surveillance of employee health at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chester, T.J.

    1992-03-01

    Medical surveillance can best be defined as conducting specific, targeted medical examinations at pre-determined intervals for the purpose of assessing whether individuals have suffered work-related illness or injury. The objectives of the medical examinations are to determine if there is any evidence of illness or injury and to determine whether any illness or injury found is occupationally related. If illness or injury is found, the employee under medical surveillance can be referred for immediate treatment. Other employees in the same work group can be examined, and any hazardous defects in the workplace can be corrected. Additional objectives of these periodic examinations are to determine whether the employee`s health status and physical fitness continue to be compatible with the safe performance of his assigned job tasks; to contribute to employee health maintenance by providing the opportunity for early detection, treatment, and prevention of disease or injuries; and to provide a documented record status that can be used in analysis of the health of the work group as a whole.

  12. Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research and Medical ... Research and Medical Isotope Reactor Supply Our goal is to fuel research and test reactors with low-enriched uranium. Y-12 tops the short list of the ...

  13. Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides (Conference...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Thermal Imaging of Medical Saw Blades and Guides Better Than New, LLC., has ...

  14. ORISE: REAC/TS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    How ORISE is Making a Difference REACTS Provides Emergency Medical Response Expertise to Empire 09 Albany, N.Y. The Empire 09 exercise was held in Albany, N.Y. Medical and health...

  15. Coordinating Pediatric Medical Care during an Influenza Pandemic - Hospital Workbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HCTT CHE

    2010-01-01

    This workbook is intended to assist hospitals with coordinating medical care for pediatric influenza-like illness across their community.

  16. 2015 Market Research Report on Global Medical Grade Dioctyl Industry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    2015 Market Research Report on Global Medical Grade Dioctyl Industry Home There are currently no posts in this category. Syndicate...

  17. Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Outreach (Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Outreach: Identify and Notify Eligible DOE Workers About FWP Medical Screening Services All former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees from all facilities are eligible to participate in the program. Although the historical best estimate for the population of former workers who are entitled to receive medical evaluations under the FWP is upwards of 600,000

  18. Adventures in Infectious Diseases

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Fisher-Hoch, Susan [University of Texas School of Public Health

    2014-06-25

    Dr. Susan Fisher-Hoch, Virologist and Epidemiologist, will discuss her research and travels associated with viral hemorrhagic fevers. From the Ebola outbreak in Reston, Virginia to outbreaks of Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever in South Africa, Senegal, and Saudi Arabia, Dr. Fisher-Hoch has studied and tracked the pathophysiology of these viral diseases. These studies have led her from the Center for Disease Control in the United States, to Lyon, France where she was instrumental in designing, constructing, and rendering operational a laboratory capable of containing some of the world's most dangerous diseases.

  19. Medical Screening Protocol for the Former Worker Medical Screening Program U.S. Department of Energy, October 7, 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7/15 1 MEDICAL SCREENING PROTOCOL FOR THE FORMER WORKER MEDICAL SCREENING PROGRAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY General Principles: 1) The purpose of the medical evaluation component of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) is to provide interested former workers with targeted testing to screen for selected adverse health effects potentially related to their work in DOE operations. The program does not test for all potentially work-related conditions; for

  20. Duke University and Duke University Medical Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Duke University and Duke University Medical Center Date Revised: 3/5/97; 4/25/01 PERSONNEL DOSIMETER REQUEST AND RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY 1. Name (Please print - Last name, First name, MI) 2. Duke Unique ID 3. Date of Birth 4. Age (in full years) 5. Gender (circle one) Male Female 6. WORK Telephone No. 7. Name of Department AND Authorized User X-rays Specify type of equipment: 8. Type of radiation to be monitored Radioactive Materials Specify radioisotopes: Other Specify: 9. Have you been

  1. Los Alamos is developing powerful medical tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Portable MRI Community Connections: Your link to news and opportunities from Los Alamos National Laboratory Latest Issue: September 1, 2016 all issues All Issues » submit Los Alamos is developing powerful medical tool Portable MRI to aid wounded soldiers and less affluent regions June 1, 2015 Lighter-weight MRI device uses low-power magnetic fields to image the brain and other soft-tissue anatomy. Lighter-weight MRI device uses low-power magnetic fields to image the brain and other soft-tissue

  2. Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor concept.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coats, Richard Lee; Dahl, James J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the Sandia National Laboratories Medical Isotope Reactor and hot cell facility concepts. The reactor proposed is designed to be capable of producing 100% of the U.S. demand for the medical isotope {sup 99}Mo. The concept is novel in that the fuel for the reactor and the targets for the {sup 99}Mo production are the same. There is no driver core required. The fuel pins that are in the reactor core are processed on a 7 to 21 day irradiation cycle. The fuel is low enriched uranium oxide enriched to less than 20% {sup 235}U. The fuel pins are approximately 1 cm in diameter and 30 to 40 cm in height, clad with Zircaloy (zirconium alloy). Approximately 90 to 150 fuel pins are arranged in the core in a water pool {approx}30 ft deep. The reactor power level is 1 to 2 MW. The reactor concept is a simple design that is passively safe and maintains negative reactivity coefficients. The total radionuclide inventory in the reactor core is minimized since the fuel/target pins are removed and processed after 7 to 21 days. The fuel fabrication, reactor design and operation, and {sup 99}Mo production processing use well-developed technologies that minimize the technological and licensing risks. There are no impediments that prevent this type of reactor, along with its collocated hot cell facility, from being designed, fabricated, and licensed today.

  3. Fridges to fight childhood disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lerner, T.

    1983-04-01

    A solar-powered refrigerator/freezer has been installed in a medical center in Bhoorbaral, India. The installation and performance of the refrigerator/freezer are described.

  4. Automated diagnostic kiosk for diagnosing diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, John Frederick; Birch, James Michael

    2014-02-11

    An automated and autonomous diagnostic apparatus that is capable of dispensing collection vials and collections kits to users interesting in collecting a biological sample and submitting their collected sample contained within a collection vial into the apparatus for automated diagnostic services. The user communicates with the apparatus through a touch-screen monitor. A user is able to enter personnel information into the apparatus including medical history, insurance information, co-payment, and answer a series of questions regarding their illness, which is used to determine the assay most likely to yield a positive result. Remotely-located physicians can communicate with users of the apparatus using video tele-medicine and request specific assays to be performed. The apparatus archives submitted samples for additional testing. Users may receive their assay results electronically. Users may allow the uploading of their diagnoses into a central databank for disease surveillance purposes.

  5. Gas bubble disease: introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fickeisen, D.H.; Schneider, M.J.; Wedemeyer, G.A.

    1980-11-01

    In 1970, gas bubble disease was identified as a serious problem affecting salmonids in the Columbia and Snake river systems. The source of supersaturation was entrainment of air into water spilling over hydroelectric dams. Regional research projects focusing on tolerance bioassays were immediately implemented. Since then, the scope of gas bubble disease research has broadened to include problems in other aquatic systems, with other species. Emphasis has shifted from defining tolerance limits in bioassay systems to exploring behavioral and physiological aspects. Various methods of degasifying supersaturated water have been developed.

  6. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V

    2013-12-31

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in the subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  7. Multi-channel medical imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frangioni, John V.

    2016-05-03

    A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remain in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may provide an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide used to capture images. The system may be configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. The systems described herein provide two or more diagnostic imaging channels for capture of multiple, concurrent diagnostic images and may be used where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by two or more images that are independently marked for functional interest.

  8. Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medical Screening Program Brochure Former Worker Medical Screening Program Brochure December 2014 The FWP brochure provides important information to inform former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees about the benefits and services offered under the DOE Former Worker Medical Screening Program. Some of the topics described in the brochure include: a description of the program, how it is implemented, who is eligible to participate, what tests are offered, where exams

  9. HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Security Summit: Fact Sheet | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) HEU Minimization and the Reliable Supply of Medical Isotopes Nuclear Security Summit: Fact Sheet March 26, 2012 Molybdenum-99 (Mo-99) is used to produce technetium-99m (Tc-99m), a medical isotope that is used in about 100,000 diagnostic medical procedures globally every day. Today, Mo-99 is produced at aging facilities in Europe, Canada and South Africa primarily using highly-enriched uranium (HEU) - a

  10. Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment Equipment used in hospitals and laboratories can use significant amounts of water, offering the opportunity for substantial water savings by making a few small changes to how and when the water is used by the equipment. Water-consuming equipment in laboratories and medical facilities include water purification systems, sterilization and disinfection systems photographic and x-ray

  11. Scientists develop affordable way to generate medical isotopes | Argonne

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Laboratory develop affordable way to generate medical isotopes By Angela Hardin * October 15, 2012 Tweet EmailPrint Technology within financial reach of small hospitals ARGONNE, Ill. (Oct. 15, 2012) - Scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory have developed a safe and affordable way to ensure a reliable U.S. supply of certain medical isotopes. Although the invention is at a conceptual stage, it has the potential to provide critical medical

  12. Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Benefits » Wellness Programs » Foreign Travel Health & Wellness Information » Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Checklist for Medical Issues When Traveling Overseas Before the Trip A written confirmation from an appropriate manager, i.e., a Travel Authorization or memorandum, that identifies the employee and country(ies) that will be visited should be provided the medical support staff 4-8 weeks prior to the trip or, if less than 4 weeks, as soon as management or the

  13. ORISE: Argonne National Laboratory Electonic Medical Records System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    designed to manage worker health data Argonne Electronic Medical Records System ORISE collaborates to successfully design electronic medical records system for Argonne National Laboratory Health worker accessing electronic medical records Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) provides occupational health examinations and monitors exposures to workplace hazards for its employees. ANL has been operating since 1946 and, in ANL's legacy system, worker health and occupational exposure records were

  14. Briefing: DOE and the Life and Medical Sciences

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Aristides Patrinos, Deputy Director for Research, NYU Center for Urban Science and Progress, discussed DOE and the Life and Medical Sciences in his presentation entitled, The Promise and Challenges of the Human Genome Program. Sharlene Weatherwax, Associate Director, Biological and Environmental Research, Office of Science, DOE, discussed DOE and the Life and Medical Sciences in her presentation entitled, The Department of Energy's Activities Supporting the Life and Medical Sciences.

  15. Healthcare Energy: State University of New York Upstate Medical University

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    East Wing | Department of Energy State University of New York Upstate Medical University East Wing Healthcare Energy: State University of New York Upstate Medical University East Wing The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two hospitals. This page contains highlights from monitoring at the East Wing, a hospital building addition at the State University of New York Upstate Medical University. In the figure above, click on

  16. Los Alamos National Laboratory medical plan to cover PMC services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical plan to cover PMC services Los Alamos National Laboratory medical plan to cover PMC services United Healthcare has agreed to retroactively treat Physicians Medical Center of Santa Fe (PMC) as an in-network facility. March 13, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new

  17. Medical and biofuel advances possible with new gene regulation tool

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical and biofuel advances possible with new gene regulation tool Medical and biofuel advances possible with new gene regulation tool The key is a tunable switch made from a small non-coding RNA molecule that could have value for medical and even biofuel production purposes. August 20, 2015 Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory have manufactured molecular "dimmer" switches to control cellular metabolism with exquisite precision. The research has potential widespread

  18. 2014 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report 2014 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report March 2015 The 2014 Annual Report presents a detailed overview of the accomplishments, progress, and future endeavors of the U.S. Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program. The report includes: Program Overview Program Implementation Program Accomplishments Future Endeavors Individual Project Descriptions Exams Conducted through the Former Worker Program

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Training - Medical Training TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training The TEC Training and Medical Training Issues Topic Group was formed to address the training issues for emergency responders in the event of a radioactive material transportation incident. The Topic Group first met in 1996 to assist DOE in developing an approach to address radiological emergency response training needs and to avoid redundancy of existing training materials. The

  20. Jefferson Lab Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer PEM This PEM image shows two cancerous lesions. The one on the right was depicted by conventional mammography, but the one on the left was only identified by the PEM unit. Image courtesy: Eric Rosen, Duke University Medical Center Jefferson Lab Medical Imager Spots Breast Cancer March 3, 2005 Newport News, VA - A study published in the February issue of the journal Radiology shows that a positron emission mammography (PEM) device designed and built by Jefferson

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Cornell University Medical College -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 28 Cornell University Medical College - NY 28 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: CORNELL UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE (NY.28 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: Cornell University and Medical College NY.28-1 Location: New York , New York NY.28-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.28-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. NY.28-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated -

  2. Bush Administration to Expand Department of Energy Former Worker Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Screening Program | Department of Energy to Expand Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program Bush Administration to Expand Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program February 9, 2005 - 10:05am Addthis Estimates project that over 25,000 additional workers will receive screening Program Fact Sheet [PDF] U.S. Map of Medical Screening Sites [GIF] WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today announced that the Bush administration will add

  3. DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Liabilities | Department of Energy Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities DOE Seeks Input On Addressing Contractor Pension and Medical Benefits Liabilities March 27, 2007 - 12:10pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced in the Federal Register that it is seeking public comment on how to address the increasing costs and liabilities of contractor employee pension and medical benefits. Under the Department of Energy's unique

  4. 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report February 2014 The 2013 Annual Report presents a detailed overview of the accomplishments, progress, and future endeavors of the U.S. Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program. The report includes: Program Overview Program Implementation Program Accomplishments Individual Project Descriptions Exams Conducted through the Former Worker Program Program

  5. Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases Using Wikipedia to forecast diseases Scientists can now monitor and forecast diseases around the globe more effectively by analyzing views of Wikipedia articles. November 13, 2014 Del Valle and her team observe findings from their research on disease patterns from analyzing Wikipedia articles. Del Valle and her team observe findings from their research on disease patterns from analyzing Wikipedia articles. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505)

  6. Microsoft Word - HABAdv#241medical supportcontractor.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    beryllium, and chemical vapors? e. How will you place emphasis on the preventative health care of the employees? HAB Consensus Advice 241 Subject: Medical Support Contractor...

  7. NNSA Conducts Advanced Radiation Medical Training in Taiwan ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Advanced Radiation Medical Training in Taiwan | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  8. NNSA conducts hands-on radiation medical training in Taiwan ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hands-on radiation medical training in Taiwan | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

  9. Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Molecule Nanoweaver Creates High-Tech Medical Patches and Multilayered Capsules Technology available for licensing: Molecule Nanoweaver, a unique tool that can be used as both a...

  10. ORISE: REAC/TS Radiological Incident Medical Consultation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS), ORISE provides advice and consultation to emergency personnel responsible for the medical management of radiation ...

  11. Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2015 Annual Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    BeLPT Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test BTMed Building Trades National Medical ... Security Site (formerly known as Nevada Test Site) NSSP National Supplemental Screening ...

  12. Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and Environmental Monitoring. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of Multifunctional Electrode Arrays for Medical Diagnostics and Environmental Monitoring. ...

  13. Former Worker Medical Screening Program 2014 Annual Report, March...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    BeLPT Beryllium Lymphocyte Proliferation Test BTMed Building Trades National Medical ... Security Site (formerly known as Nevada Test Site) NSSP National Supplemental Screening ...

  14. ORISE: REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education Courses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    medicine. Physicians, physicians' assistants, nurses, emergency medical technicians, health physicists and first responders benefit from the lectures, discussions and hands-on...

  15. Radioisotopes for Medical Diagnostics and Cancer Therapy at BNL...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    to spin-off field: Development of new radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and cancer therapy. The Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) runs parasitically off of the Brookhaven ...

  16. Expert Panel: Forecast Future Demand for Medical Isotopes | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Though the cost of providing a reliable and diverse supply of isotopes for medical use may ... More Documents & Publications Final Report, NEAC Subcommittee for Isotope Research & ...

  17. Flexible Medical Radioisotope Production | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The Science The Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) provides high energy protons to specialized targets to create radioisotopes with medical utility, either diagnostic or ...

  18. Best Management Practice #12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Best Management Practice 12: Laboratory and Medical Equipment Equipment used in hospitals ... Find more information on the alternative water sources best management practice. Explore ...

  19. Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Small-Scale Reactor for the Production of Medical Isotopes Sandia National Laboratories ... Out LEU reactor is ready to construct -US government is looking for investors. We have ...

  20. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, L E

    2007-09-17

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R&D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

  1. Global Security, Medical Isotopes, and Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahle, Larry

    2007-10-26

    Over the past century basic nuclear science research has led to the use of radioactive isotopes into a wide variety of applications that touch our lives everyday. Some are obvious, such as isotopes for medical diagnostics and treatment. Others are less so, such as National/Global security issues. And some we take for granted, like the small amount of 241 Am that is in every smoke detector. At the beginning of this century, we are in a position where the prevalence and importance of some applications of nuclear science are pushing the basic nuclear science community for improved models and nuclear data. Yet, at the same time, the push by the basic nuclear science community to study nuclei that are farther and farther away from stability also offer new opportunities for many applications. This talk will look at several global security applications of nuclear science, summarizing current R and D and need for improved nuclear data It will also look at how applications of nuclear science, such as to medicine, will benefit from the push for more and more powerful radioactive ion beam facilities.

  2. Rotatable superconducting cyclotron adapted for medical use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blosser, Henry G. (East Lansing, MI); Johnson, David A. (Williamston, MI); Riedel, Jack (East Lansing, MI); Burleigh, Richard J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A superconducting cyclotron (10) rotatable on a support structure (11) in an arc of about 180.degree. around a pivot axis (A--A) and particularly adapted for medical use is described. The rotatable support structure (13, 15) is balanced by being counterweighted (14) so as to allow rotation of the cyclotron and a beam (12), such as a subparticle (neutron) or atomic particle beam, from the cyclotron in the arc around a patient. Flexible hose (25) is moveably attached to the support structure for providing a liquified gas which is supercooled to near 0.degree. K. to an inlet means (122) to a chamber (105) around superconducting coils (101, 102). The liquid (34) level in the cyclotron is maintained approximately half full so that rotation of the support structure and cyclotron through the 180.degree. can be accomplished without spilling the liquid from the cyclotron. With the coils vertically oriented, each turn of the winding is approximately half immersed in liquid (34) and half exposed to cold gas and adequate cooling to maintain superconducting temperatures in the section of coil above the liquid level is provided by the combination of cold gas/vapor and by the conductive flow of heat along each turn of the winding from the half above the liquid to the half below.

  3. Medical and Biohazardous Waste Generator's Guide (Revision2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waste Management Group

    2006-11-29

    These guidelines describe procedures to comply with all Federal and State laws and regulations and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) policy applicable to State-regulated medical and unregulated, but biohazardous, waste (medical/biohazardous waste). These guidelines apply to all LBNL personnel who: (1) generate and/or store medical/biohazardous waste, (2) supervise personnel who generate medical/biohazardous waste, or (3) manage a medical/biohazardous waste pickup location. Personnel generating biohazardous waste at the Joint Genome Institute/Production Genomics Facility (JGI/PGF) are referred to the guidelines contained in Section 9. Section 9 is the only part of these guidelines that apply to JGI/PGF. Medical/biohazardous waste referred to in this Web site includes biohazardous, sharps, pathological and liquid waste. Procedures for proper storage and disposal are summarized in the Solid Medical/Biohazardous Waste Disposal Procedures Chart. Contact the Waste Management Group at 486-7663 if you have any questions regarding medical/biohazardous waste management.

  4. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  5. EA-1929: NorthStar Medical Technologies LLC, Commercial Domestic Production of the Medical Isotope Molybdenum-99

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the potential environmental impacts of a proposal to use federal funds to support and accelerate Northstar Medical Radioisotopes' project to develop domestic, commercial production capability for the medical isotope Molybdenum-99 without the use of highly enriched uranium.

  6. Oxygen generator for medical applications (USIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staiger, C. L.

    2012-03-01

    The overall Project objective is to develop a portable, non-cryogenic oxygen generator capable of supplying medical grade oxygen at sufficient flow rates to allow the field application of the Topical Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy (THOT{reg_sign}) developed by Numotech, Inc. This project was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) and is managed by collaboration between Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Numotech, Inc, and LLC SPE 'Spektr-Conversion.' The project had two phases, with the objective of Phase I being to develop, build and test a laboratory prototype of the membrane-pressure swing adsorber (PSA) system producing at 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum of 98% oxygen purity. Phase II objectives were to further refine and identify the pre-requisites needed for a commercial product and to determine the feasibility of producing 15 L/min of oxygen with a minimum oxygen purity of 99%. In Phase I, Spektr built up the necessary infrastructure to perform experimental work and proceeded to build and demonstrate a membrane-PSA laboratory prototype capable of producing 98% purity oxygen at a flow rate of 5 L/min. Spektr offered a plausible path to scale up the process for 15 L/min. Based on the success and experimental results obtained in Phase I, Spektr performed work in three areas for Phase II: construction of a 15 L/min PSA; investigation of compressor requirements for the front end of the membrane/PSA system; and performing modeling and simulation of assess the feasibility of producing oxygen with a purity greater than 99%. Spektr successfully completed all of the tasks under Phase II. A prototype 15 L/min PSA was constructed and operated. Spektr determined that no 'off the shelf' air compressors met all of the specifications required for the membrane-PSA, so a custom compressor will likely need to be built. Modeling and simulation concluded that production of oxygen with purities greater than 99% was possible

  7. DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned

  8. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance CenterTraining Site (REACTS) ...

  9. Energy Conservation Lessons Hit Home For Medical Student

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    University of Missouri medical student and new homeowner Venessa A. Lee is scrutinizing energy use more closely after spending the summer as an intern conducting energy audits on public buildings.

  10. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system (Patent...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. A medical synchrotron which ...

  11. 2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Annual Report highlighting the accomplishments of this program, which provides critical services to those who served and sacrificed through their work in the Department and its predecessor agencies.

  12. Niowave Develops Production Route for Medical Radioisotopes with...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    The lack of a domestic supply and current use of techniques requiring weapons grade uranium led Congress to pass the American Medical Isotope Production Act in 2013. The Act ...

  13. Chief Medical Officer Web Site Services Available To All DOE...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chief Medical Officer Web Site Services Available To All DOE Employees Did you ever wonder ... Security (HSS), has developed a number of web pages to help you find information ...

  14. Prevention and Treatment of Fouled Medical Device Surfaces - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search Prevention and Treatment of Fouled Medical Device Surfaces Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00256_ID2324.pdf (655 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryTo prevent infection due to contamination on medical devices inserted into the body, ORNL researchers developed a method to inhibit bacteria growth and formation of biofilm. The

  15. EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee | Department of Energy 8: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee EA-1488: Environmental Assessment for the U-233 Disposition, Medical Isotope Production, and Building 3019 Complex Shutdown at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

  16. ORISE: REAC/TS Medical Management of Radiation Incidents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Medical Management of Radiation Incidents As part of its primary mission for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) at the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is available 24 hours a day, seven days a week to consult with officials from any federal, state or local government agency; industries; international governments or organizations; or individuals needing assistance with the medical management of a radiation

  17. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rockefeller Institute for Medical

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Research - NY 0-21 Rockefeller Institute for Medical Research - NY 0-21 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: ROCKEFELLER INSTITUTE FOR MEDICAL RESEARCH (NY.0-21) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: New York , New York NY.0-21-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.0-21-1 Site Operations: Research and development involving only small amounts of radioactive material in a controlled environment. NY.0-21-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated -

  18. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Rochester Medical Lab -

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    NY 20 Rochester Medical Lab - NY 20 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER MEDICAL LAB. (NY.20) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Rochester , New York NY.20-1 Evaluation Year: 1987 NY.20-1 Site Operations: Research activities involving small quantities of radioactive materials in a controlled environment. NY.20-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Potential for contamination remote NY.20-2 Radioactive

  19. Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine] (Technical Report)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | SciTech Connect Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine] Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Converting energy to medical progress [nuclear medicine] × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this

  20. Establishing advanced practice for medical imaging in New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yielder, Jill; Young, Adrienne; Park, Shelley; Coleman, Karen

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: This article presents the outcome and recommendations following the second stage of a role development project conducted on behalf of the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology (NZIMRT). The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that may be used to formulate Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession. It commenced in 2011, following on from initial research that occurred between 2005 and 2008 investigating role development and a possible career structure for medical radiation technologists (MRTs) in New Zealand (NZ). Methods: The study sought to support the development of profiles and criteria that could be used to develop Advanced Scopes of Practice for the profession through inviting 12 specialist medical imaging groups in NZ to participate in a survey. Results: Findings showed strong agreement on potential profiles and on generic criteria within them; however, there was less agreement on specific skills criteria within specialist areas. Conclusions: The authors recommend that one Advanced Scope of Practice be developed for Medical Imaging, with the establishment of generic and specialist criteria. Systems for approval of the overall criteria package for any individual Advanced Practitioner (AP) profile, audit and continuing professional development requirements need to be established by the Medical Radiation Technologists Board (MRTB) to meet the local needs of clinical departments. It is further recommended that the NZIMRT and MRTB promote and support the need for an AP pathway for medical imaging in NZ.

  1. 5th International REAC/TS Symposium: The Medical Basis for Radiation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ...TS Symposium: The Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness Skip site ...TS Symposium: The Medical Basis for Radiation Accident Preparedness Sept. 27-29, 2011 ...

  2. Ventilation assessment of an infectious disease ward housing TB patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crandall, M.S.; Hughes, R.T.

    1996-05-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) assisted the National Center for Infectious Diseases and the National Center for Prevention Services, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), in their investigation of nosocomial transmission of tuberculosis (TB) at a Veterans Administration Medical Center. NIOSH was asked to determine whether ventilation requirements expected of TB patient isolation facilities were being met. In the Infectious Disease ward (513), 24 staff were given a tuberculin skin test (TST) in the summer of 1991. Eleven (46%) were positive then, and 13 were negative. Ten of the 13 testing negative in 1991 were retested within a year, and 5 (50%) converted to a positive TST. NIOSH investigators made ventilation measurements on Ward 5B, an infectious diseases ward housing patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), two of them with infectious TB, to determine the status of the systems serving the area. Airflow measurements showed that in all the single-patient rooms, exhaust airflow was essentially zero. The average supply airflow varied above and below the designed value. These rooms were all positively pressurized, which would be recommended for the isolation of infectious patients. Based on the measurements made during this evaluation, it was recommended that a separate isolation facility be constructed in the hospital to house infectious patients. Interim corrective measures for the systems in place were also recommended.

  3. Management of Low-Level Radioactive Waste from Research, Hospitals and Nuclear Medical Centers in Egypt - 13469

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, M.A.; Selim, Y.T.; Lasheen, Y.F.

    2013-07-01

    The application of radioisotopes and radiation sources in medical diagnosis and therapy is an important issue. Physicians can use radioisotopes to diagnose and treat diseases. Methods of treatment, conditioning and management of low level radioactive wastes from the use of radiation sources and radioisotopes in hospitals and nuclear medicine application, are described. Solid Radioactive waste with low-level activity after accumulation, minimization, segregation and measurement, are burned or compressed in a compactor according to the international standards. Conditioned drums are transported to the interim storage site at the Egyptian Atomic Energy Authority (EAEA) represented in Hot Labs and Waste Management Center (HLWMC) for storage and monitoring. (authors)

  4. Determining the risk of cardiovascular disease using ion mobility of lipoproteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benner, W. Henry; Krauss, Ronald M.; Blanche, Patricia J.

    2010-05-11

    A medical diagnostic method and instrumentation system for analyzing noncovalently bonded agglomerated biological particles is described. The method and system comprises: a method of preparation for the biological particles; an electrospray generator; an alpha particle radiation source; a differential mobility analyzer; a particle counter; and data acquisition and analysis means. The medical device is useful for the assessment of human diseases, such as cardiac disease risk and hyperlipidemia, by rapid quantitative analysis of lipoprotein fraction densities. Initially, purification procedures are described to reduce an initial blood sample to an analytical input to the instrument. The measured sizes from the analytical sample are correlated with densities, resulting in a spectrum of lipoprotein densities. The lipoprotein density distribution can then be used to characterize cardiac and other lipid-related health risks.

  5. Portable, space-saving medical patient support system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bzorgi; Fariborz

    2011-02-01

    A support platform having a stowed configuration and a deployed configuration on a floor. The support platform is related to stretcher devices that are used for transporting, confining, or conducting medical procedures on medical patients in medical emergencies. The support platform typically includes a work surface that has a geometric extent. A base that typically includes a plurality of frame members is provided, and the frame members are disposed across the geometric extent of, and proximal to, the work surface in the stowed configuration. The frame members are typically disposed on the floor in the deployed configuration. There is a foldable bracing system engaged with the work surface and engaged with the base. At least a portion of the foldable bracing system is disposed substantially inside at least a portion of the plurality of frame members in the stowed configuration. Further, the foldable bracing system is configured for translocation of the work surface distal from the base in the deployed configuration.

  6. Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: From Energy Applications to Advanced Medical Therapies

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Tijana Rajh

    2010-01-08

    Dr. Rajh will present a general talk on nanotechnology ? an overview of why nanotechnology is important and how it is useful in various fields. The specific focus will be on Solar energy conversion, environmental applications and advanced medical therapies. She has broad expertise in synthesis and characterization of nanomaterials that are used in nanotechnology including novel hybrid systems connecting semiconductors to biological molecules like DNA and antibodies. This technology could lead to new gene therapy procedures, cancer treatments and other medical applications. She will also discuss technologies made possible by organizing small semiconductor particles called quantum dots, materials that exhibit a rich variety of phenomena that are size and shape dependent. Development of these new materials that harnesses the unique properties of materials at the 1-100 nanometer scale resulted in the new field of nanotechnology that currently affects many applications in technological and medical fields.

  7. WE-E-16A-01: Medical Physics Economics Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodwin, J; Dirksen, B; White, G

    2014-06-15

    Radiology and Medical Physics reimbursement for Medicare services is constantly changing. In this presentation we will review the proposed reimbursement rules and levels for 2015 and compare them with those currently in effect for 2014. In addition, we will discuss the challenges that may lie ahead for the medical physics profession as the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) moves away from a fee for service payment model and towards one of prospective payment. Learning Objectives: Understand the differences in the Medicare reimbursement systems for outpatient departments as opposed to physicians and free standing centers. Learn the proposed Medicare rules for 2015 and how they may affect Radiology and Medical Physics revenues. Be aware of possible long term changes in reimbursement and how they may affect our employers, our pocket books and our profession.

  8. Eliminating Medical Waste Liabilities Through Mobile Maceration and Disinfection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. A. Rankin; N. R. Soelberg; K. M. Klingler; C. W. Lagle; L. L. Byers

    2006-02-01

    Commercial medical waste treatment technologies include incineration, melting, autoclaving, and chemical disinfection. Incineration disinfects, destroys the original nature of medical waste, and reduces the waste volume by converting organic waste content to carbon dioxide and water, leaving only residual inorganic ash. However, medical waste incinerator numbers have plummeted from almost 2,400 in 1995 to 115 in 2003 and to about 62 in 2005, due to negative public perception and escalating compliance costs associated with increasingly strict regulations. High-temperature electric melters have been designed and marketed as incinerator alternatives, but they are also costly and generally must comply with the same incinerator emissions regulations and permitting requirements. Autoclave processes disinfect medical waste at much lower operating temperatures than incinerators operate at, but are sometimes subject to limitations such as waste segregration requirements to be effective. Med-Shred, Inc. has developed a patented mobile shredding and chemical disinfecting process for on-site medical waste treatment. Medical waste is treated on-site at customer facilities by shredding and disinfecting the waste. The treated waste can then be transported in compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) requirements to a landfill for disposal as solid municipal waste. A team of Idaho National Laboratory engineers evaluated the treatment process design. The process effectiveness has been demonstrated in mycobacterium tests performed by Analytical Services Incorporated. A process description and the technical and performance evaluation results are presented in the paper. A treatment demonstration and microbiological disinfecting tests show that the processor functions as it was intended.

  9. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of Utah Medical Research

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Center - UT 02 Utah Medical Research Center - UT 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF UTAH, MEDICAL RESEARCH CENTER (UT.02) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Salt Lake City , Utah UT.02-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 UT.02-1 Site Operations: Research and development on animal inhalation of uranium dust during the 1950s. UT.02-2 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria UT.02-1 UT.02-2 Radioactive

  10. Early detection of contagious diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Estacio, Pedro; Chang, John

    2011-08-09

    This invention provides an electronic proximity apparatus and a surveillance method using such an apparatus for alerting individuals that are exposed to a contagious disease. When a person becomes symptomatic and is diagnosed as positive for a given contagious agent, individuals that have recently maintained a threshold proximity with respect to an infected individual are notified and advised to seek immediate medial care. Treatment of individuals in the very early phases of infection (pre-symptomatic) significantly reduces contagiousness of the infected population first exposed to the contagious disease, thus preventing spread of the disease throughout the general population.

  11. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Argonne National Laboratory Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce therapeutic hypothermia. Portable, automatic Advantageous for emergency care, cooling during surgeries, organ harvesting PDF icon ice_slurry

  12. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos, Stavros; Staggs, Michael C.

    2006-12-12

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  13. Near-infrared spectroscopic tissue imaging for medical applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Demos; Stavros , Staggs; Michael C.

    2006-03-21

    Near infrared imaging using elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence are explored for medical applications. The approach involves imaging using cross-polarized elastic light scattering and tissue autofluorescence in the Near Infra-Red (NIR) coupled with image processing and inter-image operations to differentiate human tissue components.

  14. 2015 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 Annual Report presents a detailed overview of the accomplishments, progress, and future endeavors of the U.S. Department of Energy Former Worker Medical Screening Program. The report includes Program Overview, Program Implementation, Program Findings, Individual Project Descriptions, Exams Conducted through the Former Worker Program, Exam Results, and Resources.

  15. 2015 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EHSS is privileged to present the 2015 Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Annual Report highlighting the accomplishments of this program, which provides critical services to those who served and sacrificed through their work in the Department and its predecessor agencies.

  16. Medical Isotope Production Analyses In KIPT Neutron Source Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talamo, Alberto; Gohar, Yousry

    2016-01-01

    Medical isotope production analyses in Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) neutron source facility were performed to include the details of the irradiation cassette and the self-shielding effect. An updated detailed model of the facility was used for the analyses. The facility consists of an accelerator-driven system (ADS), which has a subcritical assembly using low-enriched uranium fuel elements with a beryllium-graphite reflector. The beryllium assemblies of the reflector have the same outer geometry as the fuel elements, which permits loading the subcritical assembly with different number of fuel elements without impacting the reflector performance. The subcritical assembly is driven by an external neutron source generated from the interaction of 100-kW electron beam with a tungsten target. The facility construction was completed at the end of 2015, and it is planned to start the operation during the year of 2016. It is the first ADS in the world, which has a coolant system for removing the generated fission power. Argonne National Laboratory has developed the design concept and performed extensive design analyses for the facility including its utilization for the production of different radioactive medical isotopes. 99Mo is the parent isotope of 99mTc, which is the most commonly used medical radioactive isotope. Detailed analyses were performed to define the optimal sample irradiation location and the generated activity, for several radioactive medical isotopes, as a function of the irradiation time.

  17. 2014 Former Worker Medical Screening Program Annual Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EHSS is privileged to present the 2014 Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) Annual Report highlighting the accomplishments of this program, which provides critical services to those who served and sacrificed through their work in the Department and its predecessor agencies.

  18. The radiation oncology workforce: A focus on medical dosimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, Gregg F.; Mobile, Katherine; Yu, Yan

    2014-07-01

    The 2012 Radiation Oncology Workforce survey was conducted to assess the current state of the entire workforce, predict its future needs and concerns, and evaluate quality improvement and safety within the field. This article describes the dosimetrist segment results. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Workforce Subcommittee, in conjunction with other specialty societies, conducted an online survey targeting all segments of the radiation oncology treatment team. The data from the dosimetrist respondents are presented in this article. Of the 2573 dosimetrists who were surveyed, 890 responded, which resulted in a 35% segment response rate. Most respondents were women (67%), whereas only a third were men (33%). More than half of the medical dosimetrists were older than 45 years (69.2%), whereas the 45 to 54 years age group represented the highest percentage of respondents (37%). Most medical dosimetrists stated that their workload was appropriate (52%), with respondents working a reported average of 41.7 4 hours per week. Overall, 86% of medical dosimetrists indicated that they were satisfied with their career, and 69% were satisfied in their current position. Overall, 61% of respondents felt that there was an oversupply of medical dosimetrists in the field, 14% reported that supply and demand was balanced, and the remaining 25% felt that there was an undersupply. The medical dosimetrists' greatest concerns included documentation/paperwork (78%), uninsured patients (80%), and insufficient reimbursement rates (87%). This survey provided an insight into the dosimetrist perspective of the radiation oncology workforce. Though an overwhelming majority has conveyed satisfaction concerning their career, the study allowed a spotlight to be placed on the profession's current concerns, such as insufficient reimbursement rates and possible oversupply of dosimetrists within the field.

  19. A review of ion sources for medical accelerators (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.

    2012-02-15

    There are two major medical applications of ion accelerators. One is a production of short-lived isotopes for radionuclide imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission computer tomography. Generally, a combination of a source for negative ions (usually H- and/or D-) and a cyclotron is used; this system is well established and distributed over the world. Other important medical application is charged-particle radiotherapy, where the accelerated ion beam itself is being used for patient treatment. Two distinctly different methods are being applied: either with protons or with heavy-ions (mostly carbon ions). Proton radiotherapy for deep-seated tumors has become widespread since the 1990s. The energy and intensity are typically over 200 MeV and several 10{sup 10} pps, respectively. Cyclotrons as well as synchrotrons are utilized. The ion source for the cyclotron is generally similar to the type for production of radioisotopes. For a synchrotron, one applies a positive ion source in combination with an injector linac. Carbon ion radiotherapy awakens a worldwide interest. About 6000 cancer patients have already been treated with carbon beams from the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences in Japan. These clinical results have clearly verified the advantages of carbon ions. Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center and Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center have been successfully launched. Several new facilities are under commissioning or construction. The beam energy is adjusted to the depth of tumors. It is usually between 140 and 430 MeV/u. Although the beam intensity depends on the irradiation method, it is typically several 10{sup 8} or 10{sup 9} pps. Synchrotrons are only utilized for carbon ion radiotherapy. An ECR ion source supplies multi-charged carbon ions for this requirement. Some other medical applications with ion beams attract developer's interests. For example, the several types of

  20. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, Philippe

    1992-01-01

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts.

  1. Features of MCNP6 Relevant to Medical Radiation Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, H. Grady III; Goorley, John T.

    2012-08-29

    MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle) is a general-purpose Monte Carlo code for simulating the transport of neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons, and more recently other fundamental particles and heavy ions. Over many years MCNP has found a wide range of applications in many different fields, including medical radiation physics. In this presentation we will describe and illustrate a number of significant recently-developed features in the current version of the code, MCNP6, having particular utility for medical physics. Among these are major extensions of the ability to simulate large, complex geometries, improvement in memory requirements and speed for large lattices, introduction of mesh-based isotopic reaction tallies, advances in radiography simulation, expanded variance-reduction capabilities, especially for pulse-height tallies, and a large number of enhancements in photon/electron transport.

  2. Medical catheters thermally manipulated by fiber optic bundles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastagner, P.

    1992-10-06

    A maneuverable medical catheter comprising a flexible tube having a functional tip is described. The catheter is connected to a control source. The functional tip of the catheter carries a plurality of temperature activated elements arranged in parallel and disposed about the functional tip and held in spaced relation at each end. These elements expand when they are heated. A plurality of fiber optic bundles, each bundle having a proximal end attached to the control source and a distal end attached to one of the elements carry light into the elements where the light is absorbed as heat. By varying the optic fiber that is carrying the light and the intensity of the light, the bending of the elements can be controlled and thus the catheter steered. In an alternate embodiment, the catheter carries a medical instrument for gathering a sample of tissue. The instrument may also be deployed and operated by thermal expansion and contraction of its moving parts. 10 figs.

  3. Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovations | Argonne National Laboratory Metal Oxide Semiconductor Nanoparticles Open the Door to New Medical Innovations Technology available for licensing: novel nanometer-sized metal oxide semiconductors that allow targeting, initiating and control of in vitro and in vivo chemical reactions in biological molecules, such as DNA, proteins, and antibodies. Allows for targeting, initiation and control of in vitro and in vivo chemical reactions in biological molecules Commercial applications

  4. Energy use baselining study for the National Naval Medical Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parker, G.B.; Halverson, M.A.

    1992-04-01

    This report provides an energy consumption profile for fourteen buildings at the National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) in Bethesda, Maryland. Recommendations are also made for viable energy efficiency projects funded with assistance from the servicing utility (Potomic Electric Power Company) in the form of rebates and incentives available in their Demand Side Management (DSM) program and through Shared Energy Savings (SES) projects. This report also provides estimates of costs and potential energy savings of the recommended projects.

  5. ORISE: Advanced Radiation Medicine | REAC/TS Continuing Medical Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Advanced Radiation Medicine Dates Scheduled Register Online April 24-28, 2017 August 14-18, 2017 Fee: $275 Maximum enrollment: 28 30 hours AMA PRA Category 1 Credits(tm) This 4½-day course includes more advanced information for medical practitioners. This program is academically more rigorous than the REM course and is primarily for Physicians, Physician Assistants, Nurse Practitioners, and Nurses desiring an advanced level of information on the diagnosis and management of ionizing

  6. Information integrity and privacy for computerized medical patient records

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallegos, J.; Hamilton, V.; Gaylor, T.; McCurley, K.; Meeks, T.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories and Oceania, Inc. entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) in November 1993 to provide ``Information Integrity and Privacy for Computerized Medical Patient Records`` (CRADA No. SC93/01183). The main objective of the project was to develop information protection methods that are appropriate for databases of patient records in health information systems. This document describes the findings and alternative solutions that resulted from this CRADA.

  7. Rapid Cooling Using Ice Slurries for Industrial and Medical Applications -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Rapid Cooling Using Ice Slurries for Industrial and Medical Applications Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology Schematic of distributed-load ice slurry building cooling system Schematic of distributed-load ice slurry building cooling system Endoscopic view of a swine kidney covered with ice slurry delivered

  8. Intrinsic Feature-Based Pose Measurement for Medical Imaging Motion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compensation - Energy Innovation Portal Find More Like This Return to Search Intrinsic Feature-Based Pose Measurement for Medical Imaging Motion Compensation Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication 11-G00260_ID2341.pdf (497 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryTomographic imaging of awake, unrestrained animals or humans during a scan can result in blurring and unusable 3D images due to movement by the subject. This invention

  9. Impact of oil shortage on plastic medical supplies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, G.B.; Kline, B.

    1981-03-01

    There is good evidence that production of plastic medical equipment may be a minuscule fraction of the overall petrochemical industry; yet, it is not immune to serious supply shortfall in an oil shortage crisis of either economic or military nature. In support of this allegation, researchers have introduced documented evidence that the US health care industry experienced plastic supply shortfall in the form of increased lead time and cost as a direct result of the 1973-1974 embargo. The industry was fortunate in that there was some cushion effect from residual inventories and that the embargo did not last longer. As a further example, it has been shown that the British industry was not so fortunate; it experienced definite signs of medical plastic shortfall and reaction by the medical profession. The US industry, from manufacturer to consumer, lacks contingency planning in spite of lessons learned from the last embargo. Contrary to the apparent consensus of popular opinion, plan is more than a four-lettered word. More planning and implementation is required if the US health care industry is to be ready to cope with the next oil shortage crisis.

  10. G R Inc formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    R Inc formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: G&R Inc (formerly known as Jawon Medical Co Ltd) Place: Gwangju, Gwangju, Korea (Republic) Zip:...

  11. Medical Examiner/Coroner on the Handling of a Body/Human Remains...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains that are Potentially Radiologically Contaminated Medical ExaminerCoroner on the Handling of a BodyHuman Remains ...

  12. Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 Domestic production of medical isotope Mo-99 moves a step closer Irradiated uranium fuel has been recycled and reused for molybdenum-99 ...

  13. Patching genes to fight disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  14. Combined Heat and Power System Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Campus - Case Study, 2013 | Department of Energy Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical Campus - Case Study, 2013 Combined Heat and Power System Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical Campus - Case Study, 2013 Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO), in collaboration with Burns & McDonnell Engineering Co., Inc., operates the largest chilled water district energy system in the United States at the Texas Medical Center, the largest medical center in the world. TECO installed a new

  15. Using Social Media for Actionable Disease Surveillance and Outbreak Management: A Systematic Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles-Smith, Lauren E.; Reynolds, Tera; Cameron, Mark; Conway, Mike; Lau, Eric H.; Olsen, Jennifer; Pavlin, Julie A.; Shigematsu, Mika; Streichert, Laura; Suda, Katie; Corley, Courtney D.

    2015-10-05

    Research studies show that social media may be valuable tools in the disease surveillance toolkit used for improving public health professionals ability to detect disease outbreaks faster than traditional methods and to enhance outbreak response. A social media work group, consisting of surveillance practitioners, academic researchers, and other subject matter experts convened by the International Society for Disease Surveillance, conducted a systematic primary literature review using the PRISMA framework to identify research, published through February 2013, answering either of the following questions: 1) Can social media be integrated into disease surveillance practice and outbreak management to support and improve public health? 2) Can social media be used to effectively target populations, specifically vulnerable populations, to test an intervention and interact with a community to improve health outcomes? Examples of social media included are Facebook, MySpace, microblogs (e.g., Twitter), blogs, and discussion forums. For Question 1, 33 manuscripts were identified, starting in 2009 with topics on Influenza-like Illnesses (n=15), Infectious Diseases (n = 6), Non-infectious Diseases (n=4), Medication and Vaccines (n=3), and Other (n=5). For Question 2, 32 manuscripts were identified, the first in 2000 with topics on Health Risk Behaviors (n=10), Infectious Diseases (n = 3), Non-infectious Diseases (n=9), and Other (n=10). The literature on the use of social media to support public health practice has identified many gaps and biases in current knowledge. Despite the potential for success identified in exploratory studies, there are limited studies on interventions and little use of social media in practice. However, information gleaned from the articles demonstrates the effectiveness of social media in supporting and improving public health and in identifying target populations for intervention. A primary recommendation resulting from the review is to identify

  16. Using social media for actionable disease surveillance and outbreak management. A systematic literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles-Smith, Lauren E.; Reynolds, Tera L.; Cameron, Mark A.; Conway, Mike; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Olsen, Jennifer M.; Pavlin, Julie A.; Shigematsu, Mika; Streichert, Laura C.; Suda, Katie J.; Corley, Courtney D.; Braunstein, Lidia Adriana

    2015-10-05

    Here, research studies show that social media may be valuable tools in the disease surveillance toolkit used for improving public health professionals’ ability to detect disease outbreaks faster than traditional methods and to enhance outbreak response. A social media work group, consisting of surveillance practitioners, academic researchers, and other subject matter experts convened by the International Society for Disease Surveillance, conducted a systematic primary literature review using the PRISMA framework to identify research, published through February 2013, answering either of the following questions: 1) Can social media be integrated into disease surveillance practice and outbreak management to support and improve public health? 2) Can social media be used to effectively target populations, specifically vulnerable populations, to test an intervention and interact with a community to improve health outcomes? Examples of social media included are Facebook, MySpace, microblogs (e.g., Twitter), blogs, and discussion forums. For Question 1, 33 manuscripts were identified, starting in 2009 with topics on Influenza-like Illnesses (n=15), Infectious Diseases (n = 6), Non-infectious Diseases (n=4), Medication and Vaccines (n=3), and Other (n=5). For Question 2, 32 manuscripts were identified, the first in 2000 with topics on Health Risk Behaviors (n=10), Infectious Diseases (n = 3), Non-infectious Diseases (n=9), and Other (n=10). The literature on the use of social media to support public health practice has identified many gaps and biases in current knowledge. Despite the potential for success identified in exploratory studies, there are limited studies on interventions and little use of social media in practice. However, information gleaned from the articles demonstrates the effectiveness of social media in supporting and improving public health and in identifying target populations for intervention. A primary recommendation resulting from the review is to

  17. Using social media for actionable disease surveillance and outbreak management. A systematic literature review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Charles-Smith, Lauren E.; Reynolds, Tera L.; Cameron, Mark A.; Conway, Mike; Lau, Eric H. Y.; Olsen, Jennifer M.; Pavlin, Julie A.; Shigematsu, Mika; Streichert, Laura C.; Suda, Katie J.; et al

    2015-10-05

    Here, research studies show that social media may be valuable tools in the disease surveillance toolkit used for improving public health professionals’ ability to detect disease outbreaks faster than traditional methods and to enhance outbreak response. A social media work group, consisting of surveillance practitioners, academic researchers, and other subject matter experts convened by the International Society for Disease Surveillance, conducted a systematic primary literature review using the PRISMA framework to identify research, published through February 2013, answering either of the following questions: 1) Can social media be integrated into disease surveillance practice and outbreak management to support and improvemore » public health? 2) Can social media be used to effectively target populations, specifically vulnerable populations, to test an intervention and interact with a community to improve health outcomes? Examples of social media included are Facebook, MySpace, microblogs (e.g., Twitter), blogs, and discussion forums. For Question 1, 33 manuscripts were identified, starting in 2009 with topics on Influenza-like Illnesses (n=15), Infectious Diseases (n = 6), Non-infectious Diseases (n=4), Medication and Vaccines (n=3), and Other (n=5). For Question 2, 32 manuscripts were identified, the first in 2000 with topics on Health Risk Behaviors (n=10), Infectious Diseases (n = 3), Non-infectious Diseases (n=9), and Other (n=10). The literature on the use of social media to support public health practice has identified many gaps and biases in current knowledge. Despite the potential for success identified in exploratory studies, there are limited studies on interventions and little use of social media in practice. However, information gleaned from the articles demonstrates the effectiveness of social media in supporting and improving public health and in identifying target populations for intervention. A primary recommendation resulting from the review

  18. ORISE: Agents of Opportunity for Terrorism Continuing Medical Education

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Course Agents of Opportunity for Terrorism On-line CME Course on Toxic Radiological Materials, Toxic Industrial Chemicals, and Toxic Industrial Materials Dates Scheduled Available 24/7 online. Fees and Credits Course Credits Type Costs AoO-TRMs (REM) Agents of Opportunity Day One 6.00 enduring $94.50 AoO-TIMs (ACMT) Agents of Opportunity Day Two 5.50 enduring $87.00 The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical

  19. Advising Japan on Medical Aspects of Radiation Exposure | ORAU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiley, Al; Sugarman, Steve

    2015-03-08

    Because of Japan's March 11, 2011, earthquake and tsunami, the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant suffered catastrophic damage—ultimately leaking dangerously high amounts of radiation that led to the evacuation of more than 80,000 Japanese citizens within a 12-mile radius of the crippled plant. Responding agencies were concerned about the medical impacts of radiation exposure, the effect upon food and water safety and what actions individuals could take to protect themselves. To provide advice and consultation, the physicians and health physicists at REAC/TS were on-call 24/7 and responded to more than 700 inquiries in the days and weeks that followed.

  20. Evaluating parallel relational databases for medical data analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rintoul, Mark Daniel; Wilson, Andrew T.

    2012-03-01

    Hospitals have always generated and consumed large amounts of data concerning patients, treatment and outcomes. As computers and networks have permeated the hospital environment it has become feasible to collect and organize all of this data. This raises naturally the question of how to deal with the resulting mountain of information. In this report we detail a proof-of-concept test using two commercially available parallel database systems to analyze a set of real, de-identified medical records. We examine database scalability as data sizes increase as well as responsiveness under load from multiple users.

  1. Electron Linac Offers Safe, Affordable Production Method for Medical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Isotopes (IN 10-001, IN 04-039, IN 05-107) - Energy Innovation Portal Electron Linac Offers Safe, Affordable Production Method for Medical Isotopes (IN 10-001, IN 04-039, IN 05-107) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology <em>Schematic of a dual beam ERL for isotope production</em> Schematic of a dual beam ERL for isotope production Technology Marketing Summary Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have devised a safe, affordable way to ensure a reliable

  2. Etiology of gas bubble disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouck, G.R.

    1980-11-01

    Gas bubble disease is a noninfectious, physically induced process caused by uncompensated hyperbaric pressure of total dissolved gases. When pressure compensation is inadequate, dissolved gases may form emboli (in blood) and emphysema (in tissues). The resulting abnormal physical presence of gases can block blood vessels (hemostasis) or tear tissues, and may result in death. Population mortality is generally skewed, in that the median time to death occurs well before the average time to death. Judged from mortality curves, three stages occur in gas bubble disease: (1) a period of gas pressure equilibrium, nonlethal cavitation, and increasing morbidity; (2) a period of rapid and heavy mortality; and (3) a period of protracted survival, despite lesions, and dysfunction that eventually terminates in total mortality. Safe limits for gas supersaturation depend on species tolerance and on factors that differ among hatcheries and rivers, between continuous and intermittent exposures, and across ranges of temperature and salinity.

  3. Internet-Based Survey Evaluating Use of Pain Medications and Attitudes of Radiation Oncology Patients Toward Pain Intervention

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simone, Charles B. Vapiwala, Neha; Hampshire, Margaret K.; Metz, James M.

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: Pain is a common symptom among cancer patients, yet many patients do not receive adequate pain management. Few data exist quantifying analgesic use by radiation oncology patients. This study evaluated the causes of pain in cancer patients and investigated the reasons patients fail to receive optimal analgesic therapy. Methods and Materials: An institutional review board-approved, Internet-based questionnaire assessing analgesic use and pain control was posted on the OncoLink (available at (www.oncolink.org)) Website. Between November 2005 and April 2006, 243 patients responded. They were predominantly women (73%), white (71%), and educated beyond high school (67%) and had breast (38%), lung (6%), or ovarian (6%) cancer. This analysis evaluated the 106 patients (44%) who underwent radiotherapy. Results: Of the 106 patients, 58% reported pain from their cancer treatment, and 46% reported pain directly from their cancer. The pain was chronic in 51% and intermittent in 33%. Most (80%) did not use medication to manage their pain. Analgesic use was significantly less in patients with greater education levels (11% vs. 36%, p = 0.002), with a trend toward lower use by whites (16% vs. 32%, p 0.082) and women (17% vs. 29%, p = 0.178). The reasons for not taking analgesics included healthcare provider not recommending medication (87%), fear of addiction or dependence (79%), and inability to pay (79%). Participants experiencing pain, but not taking analgesics, pursued alternative therapies for relief. Conclusions: Many radiation oncology patients experience pain from their disease and cancer treatment. Most study participants did not use analgesics because of concerns of addiction, cost, or failure of the radiation oncologist to recommend medication. Healthcare providers should have open discussions with their patients regarding pain symptoms and treatment.

  4. New Clues in Predicting Alzheimer's Disease

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jagust, William

    2013-05-29

    Theres a new clue in the search to identify the harbingers of Alzheimers disease. More info: http://newscenter.lbl.gov/feature-stories/2008/12/16/predict-alzheimers-disease/

  5. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Print Wednesday, 25 March 2015 00:00 A new study links protein instability with the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Using several biophysical techniques as well as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Light Source, researchers focused on the effects of mutations to a gene coding for a protein called

  6. Bioassay Phantoms Using Medical Images and Computer Aided Manufacturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. X. Geroge Xu

    2011-01-28

    A radiation bioassay program relies on a set of standard human phantoms to calibrate and assess radioactivity levels inside a human body for radiation protection and nuclear medicine imaging purposes. However, the methodologies in the development and application of anthropomorphic phantoms, both physical and computational, had mostly remained the same for the past 40 years. We herein propose a 3-year research project to develop medical image-based physical and computational phantoms specifically for radiation bioassay applications involving internally deposited radionuclides. The broad, long-term objective of this research was to set the foundation for a systematic paradigm shift away from the anatomically crude phantoms in existence today to realistic and ultimately individual-specific bioassay methodologies. This long-term objective is expected to impact all areas of radiation bioassay involving nuclear power plants, U.S. DOE laboratories, and nuclear medicine clinics.

  7. Rapid cycling medical synchrotron and beam delivery system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peggs, Stephen G. (Port Jefferson, NY); Brennan, J. Michael (East Northport, NY); Tuozzolo, Joseph E. (Sayville, NY); Zaltsman, Alexander (Commack, NY)

    2008-10-07

    A medical synchrotron which cycles rapidly in order to accelerate particles for delivery in a beam therapy system. The synchrotron generally includes a radiofrequency (RF) cavity for accelerating the particles as a beam and a plurality of combined function magnets arranged in a ring. Each of the combined function magnets performs two functions. The first function of the combined function magnet is to bend the particle beam along an orbital path around the ring. The second function of the combined function magnet is to focus or defocus the particle beam as it travels around the path. The radiofrequency (RF) cavity is a ferrite loaded cavity adapted for high speed frequency swings for rapid cycling acceleration of the particles.

  8. Kit for providing a technetium medical radioimaging agent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wildung, Raymond E.; Garland, Thomas R.; Li, Shu-Mei W.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward a kit for microbial reduction of a technetium compound to form other compounds of value in medical imaging. The technetium compound is combined in a mixture with non-growing microbial cells which contain a technetium-reducing enzyme system, a stabilizing agent and an electron donor in a saline solution under anaerobic conditions. The mixture is substantially free of an inorganic technetium reducing agent and its reduction products. The resulting product is Tc of lower oxidation states, the form of which can be partially controlled by the stabilizing agent. It has been discovered that the microorganisms Shewanella alga, strain Bry and Shewanella putrifacians, strain CN-32 contain the necessary enzyme systems for technetium reduction and can form both mono nuclear and polynuclear reduced Tc species depending on the stabilizing agent.

  9. Search of medical literature for indoor carbon monoxide exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brennan, T.; Ivanovich, M.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a literature search on carbon monoxide. The search was limited to the medical and toxicological databases at the National Library of Medicine (MEDLARS). The databases searched were Medline, Toxline and TOXNET. Searches were performed using a variety of strategies. Combinations of the following keywords were used: carbon, monoxide, accidental, residential, occult, diagnosis, misdiagnosis, heating, furnace, and indoor. The literature was searched from 1966 to the present. Over 1000 references were identified and summarized using the following abbreviations: The major findings of the search are: (1) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide exposures result in a large number of symptoms affecting the brain, kidneys, respiratory system, retina, and motor functions. (2) Acute and subacute carbon monoxide (CO) poisonings have been misdiagnosed on many occasions. (3) Very few systematic investigations have been made into the frequency and consequences of carbon monoxide poisonings.

  10. Methods for separating medical isotopes using ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luo, Huimin; Boll, Rose Ann; Bell, Jason Richard; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for extracting a radioisotope from an aqueous solution, the method comprising: a) intimately mixing a non-chelating ionic liquid with the aqueous solution to transfer at least a portion of said radioisotope to said non-chelating ionic liquid; and b) separating the non-chelating ionic liquid from the aqueous solution. In preferred embodiments, the method achieves an extraction efficiency of at least 80%, or a separation factor of at least 1.times.10.sup.4 when more than one radioisotope is included in the aqueous solution. In particular embodiments, the method is applied to the separation of medical isotopes pairs, such as Th from Ac (Th-229/Ac-225, Ac-227/Th-227), or Ra from Ac (Ac-225 and Ra-225, Ac-227 and Ra-223), or Ra from Th (Th-227 and Ra-223, Th-229 and Ra-225).

  11. EXS-16-0012 - In the Matter of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Siemens

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. | Department of Energy 12 - In the Matter of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. EXS-16-0012 - In the Matter of Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. On July 5, 2016, OHA granted an Application for Stay filed by Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc. and Siemens Healthcare Diagnostics Inc. (Siemens) in which the firm requested a stay of enforcement of the applicable provisions of DOE's Energy

  12. Combined Heat and Power System Enables 100% Reliability at Leading Medical Campus - Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-03-29

    Case study of Thermal Energy Corporation (TECO) demonstrating a high-efficiency combined heat and power (CHP) system at Texas Medical Center in Houston, Texas

  13. Discovery of a 〈210〉-fiber texture in medical-grade metastable...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Discovery of a 210-fiber texture in medical-grade metastable beta titanium wire This content will become publicly available on May 4, 2017 Title: Discovery of a ...

  14. New Easy-to-Use Medical Field Guide for Radiation Emergencies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    concepts, terminology, and definitions Occupational exposure and radiological terrorist exposure risks Guidelines for initial medical response to acute local and whole-body...

  15. The World's Largest Medical Center is Now Among the Most Energy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the Texas Medical Center Thermal Energy Corporation's ... 48 megawatt combined heat and power system. ... heat by a conventional generation process back into ...

  16. Reporting Prescription Drugs, Over-the-Counter Medications, and Dietary Supplements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Center for Human Reliability Studies

    2008-02-01

    Overview of types of prescription drugs and over-the-counter medications that must be reported in DOE's Human Reliability Program.

  17. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rathore, Dharmendar; Jani, Dewal; Nagarkatti, Rana

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  18. SU-E-P-01: An Informative Review On the Role of Diagnostic Medical Physicist in the Academic and Private Medical Centers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weir, V; Zhang, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The role of physicist in the academic and private hospital environment continues to evolve and expand. This becomes more obvious with the newly revised requirements of the Joint Commission (JC) on imaging modalities and the continued updated requirements of ACR accreditation for medical physics (i.e., starting in June 2014, a physicists test will be needed before US accreditation). We provide an informative review on the role of diagnostic medical physicist and hope that our experience will expedite junior physicists in understanding their role in medical centers, and be ready to more opportunities. Methods: Based on our experience, diagnostic medical physicists in both academic and private medical centers perform several clinical functions. These include providing clinical service and physics support, ensuring that all ionizing radiation devices are tested and operated in compliance with the State and Federal laws, regulations and guidelines. We also discuss the training and education required to ensure that the radiation exposure to patients and staff is as low as reasonably achievable. We review the overlapping roles of medical and health physicist in some institutions. Results: A detailed scheme on the new requirements (effective 7/1/2014) of the JC is provided. In 2015, new standards for fluoroscopy, cone beam CT and the qualifications of staff will be phased in. A summary of new ACR requirements for different modalities is presented. Medical physicist have other duties such as sitting on CT and fluoroscopy committees for protocols design, training of non-radiologists to meet the new fluoroscopy rules, as well as helping with special therapies such as Yittrium 90 cases. Conclusion: Medical physicists in both academic and private hospitals are positioned to be more involved and prominent. Diagnostic physicists need to be more proactive to involve themselves in the day to day activities of the radiology department.

  19. Physical analysis of the radiation shielding for the medical accelerators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Q. F.; Xing, Q. Z.; Kong, C. C.

    2009-02-01

    Radiation safety standards today require comprehensive shielding protection schemes for all particle accelerators. The original shielding system of BJ-20 (BeiJing-20 MeV), the high-energy medical electron linac, was designed only for the 18 MeV level. And the dose caused by the lost electrons in the 270 deg. bending magnet system was neglected. In this paper, the leakage dose of BJ-20 is carefully analyzed. The radiation leakage dose distribution of the photons coming from the accelerator head is obtained for energy levels of 6, 12, 14, and 18 MeV. The dose of the photoneutrons is especially analyzed for the 18 MeV level. The result gives that even neglecting the dose from the 270 deg. bending magnet system, the shielding system is still not enough for the energy levels lower than 18 MeV. The radiation leakage produced by electrons that are lost in the 270 deg. bending magnet system has been particularly studied. Using beam transport theory and Monte Carlo sampling methods, which have been combined in calculations, we have obtained the distribution of the energy, position, and direction of the lost electrons. These data were then further processed by the Monte Carlo N-particle (MCNP) code as input data. The results show that when the electron loss rate in the 270 deg. bending magnet system is 13.5%, the radiation leakage dose of the photons generated by the lost electrons is 0.1% higher than that at the isocenter, and the corresponding relative leakage dose of the photoneutrons reaches 0.045% around an angle of 170 deg. at 18 MeV level. Both of these parameters exceed radioprotection safety standards for medical accelerators. The original shielding design is therefore not suitable and is also incomplete since the radiation produced by the electrons being lost in the 270 deg. bending magnet system was neglected and the leakage dose for the low-energy levels was not considered in the original design. Our calculations provide a very useful tool for further

  20. Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Bond

    2006-07-01

    Laser Isotope Enrichment for Medical and Industrial Applications by Jeff Eerkens (University of Missouri), Jay Kunze (Idaho State University), and Leonard Bond (Idaho National Laboratory) The principal isotope enrichment business in the world is the enrichment of uranium for commercial power reactor fuels. However, there are a number of other needs for separated isotopes. Some examples are: 1) Pure isotopic targets for irradiation to produce medical radioisotopes. 2) Pure isotopes for semiconductors. 3) Low neutron capture isotopes for various uses in nuclear reactors. 4) Isotopes for industrial tracer/identification applications. Examples of interest to medicine are targets to produce radio-isotopes such as S-33, Mo-98, Mo-100, W-186, Sn-112; while for MRI diagnostics, the non-radioactive Xe-129 isotope is wanted. For super-semiconductor applications some desired industrial isotopes are Si-28, Ga-69, Ge-74, Se-80, Te-128, etc. An example of a low cross section isotope for use in reactors is Zn-68 as a corrosion inhibitor material in nuclear reactor primary systems. Neutron activation of Ar isotopes is of interest in industrial tracer and diagnostic applications (e.g. oil-logging). . In the past few years there has been a sufficient supply of isotopes in common demand, because of huge Russian stockpiles produced with old electromagnetic and centrifuge separators previously used for uranium enrichment. Production of specialized isotopes in the USA has been largely accomplished using old ”calutrons” (electromagnetic separators) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. These methods of separating isotopes are rather energy inefficient. Use of lasers for isotope separation has been considered for many decades. None of the proposed methods have attained sufficient proof of principal status to be economically attractive to pursue commercially. Some of the authors have succeeded in separating sulfur isotopes using a rather new and different method, known as condensation

  1. MO-D-16A-01: International Day of Medical Physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, K; Damilakis, J

    2014-06-15

    International Organization for Medical Physics (IOMP) which represents medical physicists in more than 80 countries decided to celebrate 7th November, birth date of the Polish and naturalized-French physicist Marie Sklodowska-Curie, as International Day of Medical Physics (IDMP). The main purpose of the initiative is to raise the visibility and awareness of medical physicist in the global community, to introduce ourselves to the general public, and bring a message to the community that a group of health professionals, the medical physicists are there to help the patients and other health professionals. First celebration was done in 2013 and now IDMP will be celebrated every year. The theme of IDMP will be different each year. The theme for 2013 was Radiation exposure from medical procedures, ask the Medical Physicist. The inaugural event was celebrated in 23 countries and the amount of attention gained was remarkable. Main IDMP events were held in Poland, birthplace of Marie Curie, and France, workplace of Marie Curie. This year IOMP celebrates the 2nd IDMP and theme will be Looking into the body-Advancement in Imaging through Medical Physics to draw attention to the profound contributions Medical Physics has made to the use of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation for the imaging of human body. A number of countries have informed about events that they are going to organize on IDMP. This gives wide attention to medical physics globally. AAPM is a major and important member of IOMP. It is hoped that AAPM will join in organizing activities. Learning Objectives: To learn about International Day of Medical Physics To become familiar with how first IDMP was celebrated in 2013 and learning achieved To understand on future plans for IDMPs.

  2. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Print A new study links protein instability with the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Using several biophysical techniques as well as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Light Source, researchers focused on the effects of mutations to a gene coding for a protein called superoxide dismutase (SOD). The study provides evidence that those proteins linked

  3. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Print A new study links protein instability with the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Using several biophysical techniques as well as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Light Source, researchers focused on the effects of mutations to a gene coding for a protein called superoxide dismutase (SOD). The study provides evidence that those proteins linked

  4. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Print A new study links protein instability with the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Using several biophysical techniques as well as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Light Source, researchers focused on the effects of mutations to a gene coding for a protein called superoxide dismutase (SOD). The study provides evidence that those proteins linked

  5. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease Print A new study links protein instability with the progression of a lethal degenerative disease: amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Using several biophysical techniques as well as small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Light Source, researchers focused on the effects of mutations to a gene coding for a protein called superoxide dismutase (SOD). The study provides evidence that those proteins linked

  6. Imaging of occupational and environmental lung diseases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akira, M.

    2008-03-15

    The chest radiograph is the basic tool for identifying occupational and environmental lung diseases; however, its sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of occupational and environmental lung diseases are low. High-resolution CT is the optimal method of recognizing parenchymal abnormalities in occupational and environmental disease. With the exception of pleural plaques, the CT findings of occupational and environmental lung diseases are nonspecific. Therefore, correlation of imaging features with history of exposure, other clinical features, and sometimes pathology is needed for the diagnosis of pneumoconiosis.

  7. Protein Instability and Lou Gehrig's Disease

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    called superoxide dismutase (SOD). The study provides evidence that those proteins linked to more severe forms of the disease are less stable structurally and more prone to...

  8. Synchrotron Radiation Therapy from a Medical Physics point of view

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prezado, Y.; Berkvens, P.; Braeuer-Krisch, E.; Renier, M.; Bravin, A.; Adam, J. F.; Martinez-Rovira, I.; Fois, G.; Thengumpallil, S.; Edouard, M.; Deman, P.; Vautrin, M.

    2010-07-23

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) therapy is a promising alternative to treat brain tumors, whose management is limited due to the high morbidity of the surrounding healthy tissues. Several approaches are being explored by using SR at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), where three techniques are under development Synchrotron Stereotactic Radiation Therapy (SSRT), Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT) and Minibeam Radiation Therapy (MBRT).The sucess of the preclinical studies on SSRT and MRT has paved the way to clinical trials currently in preparation at the ESRF. With this aim, different dosimetric aspects from both theoretical and experimental points of view have been assessed. In particular, the definition of safe irradiation protocols, the beam energy providing the best balance between tumor treatment and healthy tissue sparing in MRT and MBRT, the special dosimetric considerations for small field dosimetry, etc will be described. In addition, for the clinical trials, the definition of appropiate dosimetry protocols for patients according to the well established European Medical Physics recommendations will be discussed. Finally, the state of the art of the MBRT technical developments at the ESRF will be presented. In 2006 A. Dilmanian and collaborators proposed the use of thicker microbeams (0.36-0.68 mm). This new type of radiotherapy is the most recently implemented technique at the ESRF and it has been called MBRT. The main advantage of MBRT with respect to MRT is that it does not require high dose rates. Therefore it can be more easily applied and extended outside synchrotron sources in the future.

  9. Fast flux test facility radioisotope production and medical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schenter, R.E.; Smith, S.G.; Tenforde, T.S.

    1997-12-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is a 400-MW, sodium-cooled reactor that operated successfully from 1982 to 1992, conducting work in support of the liquid-metal reactor industry by developing and testing fuel assemblies, control rods, and other core reactor components. Upon termination of this program, the primary mission of FFTF ended, and it was placed in a standby mode in 1993. However, in January 1997 the U.S. Secretary of Energy requested that FFTF be evaluated for a future mission that would consist of a primary goal of producing tritium for nuclear defense applications and a secondary goal of supplying medical isotopes for research and clinical applications. Production by FFTF of tritium for U.S. nuclear weapons would augment the dual-track strategy now under consideration for providing a long-term tritium supply in the United States (consisting of a light water reactor option and an accelerator option). A decision by the Secretary of Energy on proceeding with steps leading toward the possible reactivation of FFTF will be made before the end of 1998.

  10. Feasibility study of medical isotope production at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massey, C.D.; Miller, D.L.; Carson, S.D.

    1995-12-01

    In late 1994, Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico, (SNL/NM), was instructed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production and Distribution Program (IPDP) to examine the feasibility of producing medically useful radioisotopes using the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) and the Hot Cell Facility (HCF). Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) would be expected to supply the targets to be irradiated in the ACRR. The intent of DOE would be to provide a capability to satisfy the North American health care system demand for {sup 99}Mo, the parent of {sup 99m}Tc, in the event of an interruption in the current Canadian supply. {sup 99m}Tc is used in 70 to 80% of all nuclear medicine procedures in the US. The goal of the SNL/NM study effort is to determine the physical plant capability, infrastructure, and staffing necessary to meet the North American need for {sup 99}Mo and to identify and examine all issues with potential for environmental impact.