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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

subsurface science | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science subsurface science Leads No leads are available at this time. Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron. Abstract: The...

2

Subsurface Contamination Control  

SciTech Connect

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

3

Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the

6

Surfactants and subsurface remediation  

SciTech Connect

Because of the limitations of pump-and-treat technology, attention is now focused on the feasibility of surfactant use to increase its efficiency. Surfactants have been studied for use in soil washing and enhanced oil recovery. Although similarities exist between the applications, there are significant differences in the objectives of the technologies and the limitations placed on surfactant use. In this article we review environmental studies concerned with the fate and transport of surface-active compounds in the subsurface environment and discuss key issues related to their successful use for in situ aquifer remediation, particularly with respect to nonaqueous-phase liquids.

West, C.C.; Harwell, J.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

EMSL - Subsurface Flow and Transport  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock...

8

Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. Resources and Techniques Users have access to all the...

9

Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and compare experimental and numerical results to address the nation's most challenging problems in the subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil...

10

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The subsurface provides most of the world’s energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste, and energy storage.  Despite decades of research and recent successes in new extraction methods...

11

Maintaining Subsurface Drip Irrigation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A subsurface drip irrigation system should last more than 20 years if properly maintained. Important maintenance procedures include cleaning the filters, flushing the lines, adding chlorine and injecting acids. Details of these procedures...

Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Bordovsky, Jim; Fipps, Guy

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

SciTech Connect

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Subsurface Fire Hazards Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The results from this report are preliminary and cannot be used as input into documents supporting procurement, fabrication, or construction. This technical report identifies fire hazards and proposes their mitigation for the subsurface repository fire protection system. The proposed mitigation establishes the minimum level of fire protection to meet NRC regulations, DOE fire protection orders, that ensure fire containment, adequate life safety provisions, and minimize property loss. Equipment requiring automatic fire suppression systems is identified. The subsurface fire hazards that are identified can be adequately mitigated.

Logan, R.C.

1999-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

15

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

16

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation. The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume Map Booklets, etc.) and under each "document type", there is a list of documents and/or hyperlinks to a reference. The Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page will continue to reflect additional information as it is identified. Strategic Plans Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS) Groundwater Plume Map Booklets Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

17

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

18

Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Subsurface Synthesis and Characterization of Ag Nanoparticles Embedded in MgO. Abstract: Metal nanoparticles...

19

Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments. Effect of Extent of Natural Subsurface Bioreduction on Fe-mineralogy of Subsurface Sediments....

20

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanford’s 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

JSR-14-Task-013 Subsurface Characterization Letter Report_09192014...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

of the state of stress of engineered subsurface systems in order to address major energy and security challenges of the nation. In addition to the engineered subsurface being...

22

Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Wave-Based Subsurface Guide Star  

SciTech Connect

Astronomical or optical guide stars are either natural or artificial point sources located above the Earth's atmosphere. When imaged from ground-based telescopes, they are distorted by atmospheric effects. Knowing the guide star is a point source, the atmospheric distortions may be estimated and, deconvolved or mitigated in subsequent imagery. Extending the guide star concept to wave-based measurement systems to include acoustic, seismo-acoustic, ultrasonic, and radar, a strong artificial scatterer (either acoustic or electromagnetic) may be buried or inserted, or a pre-existing or natural sub-surface point scatterer may be identified, imaged, and used as a guide star to determine properties of the sub-surface volume. That is, a data collection is performed on the guide star and the sub-surface environment reconstructed or imaged using an optimizer assuming the guide star is a point scatterer. The optimization parameters are the transceiver height and bulk sub-surface background refractive index. Once identified, the refractive index may be used in subsequent reconstructions of sub-surface measurements. The wave-base guide star description presented in this document is for a multimonostatic ground penetrating radar (GPR) but is applicable to acoustic, seismo-acoustic, and ultrasonic measurement systems operating in multimonostatic, multistatic, multibistatic, etc., modes.

Lehman, S K

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

24

Subsurface Science (The Molecular Environmental Science Group) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Science Subsurface Science BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne arrow Subsurface Science The Molecular Environmental Science Group (MESG) The MESG is part of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main foci during the creation and growth of the MESG has been the development of an internationally recognized integrated multidisciplinary scientific team focused on the investigation of fundamental biogeochemical questions. Presently, expertise that is represented by members of the MES Group includes x-ray Physics, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Microbiology, (Bio)geochemistry, and radiolimnology. Additional expertise in electron microscopy, x-ray microscopy, Microbial Ecology, and Bioinformatics often is provided by collaborations with scientists outside of our group.

25

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

28

Methods for forming long subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

Kim, Dong Sub

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench...

30

Discrete Hamiltonian variational integrators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......Journal of Numerical Analysis (2011) 31, 1497-1532 doi:10.1093/imanum/drq027 Advance Access publication on March 17, 2011 Discrete Hamiltonian variational integrators MELVIN LEOK Department of Mathematics, University of California, San......

Melvin Leok; Jingjing Zhang

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths David Coeurjolly that are visible from a source pixel. Based on these definitions, we define discrete geodesic paths in dis- crete domain with obstacles. This allows us to introduce a new geodesic metric in discrete geometry

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

32

A discrete fractional random transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

Timothy DeVol

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

36

Heat exchanger-accumulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Probable hydrologic effects of subsurface mining  

SciTech Connect

This case history provides information on the ground-water system and presents the results of an analysis of present and future hydrologic effects of coal mining in the Appalachian coal basin. Although emphasis is on the probable hydrologic effects due to subsurface mining, examples and discussions are equally applicable to surface mine problems. The case history is based on an ongoing study in Greene County which will be completed in 1983. Cooperators in this project were the Pennsylvania Geologic and Topographic Survey and the Greene County Commissioners. The study stemmed from local interest in the rural water supply of the county which is predominantly groundwater.

Stoner, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

39

Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

40

Grand Challenges: Request for Information on the Subsurface ...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

resources while mitigating impacts of their use constitute major technical and socio-political challenges and opportunities. Next generation advances in subsurface technologies...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of...

42

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

43

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

setting for researchers in both applied and basic science fields. A wealth of subsurface data is available to support research activities and remedial decision making. Led by the...

44

Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

45

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

46

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

48

2D and 3D Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 2D and 3D Visibility in Discrete Geometry: an application to discrete geodesic paths D discrete geodesic paths in discrete domain with obstacles. This allows us to introduce a new geodesic metric in discrete geometry. Keywords: discrete visibility, geodesic path, distance transform, discrete

Boyer, Edmond

49

Bohmian Mechanics with Discrete Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A deterministic Bohmian mechanics for operators with continuous and discrete spectra is presented. Randomness enters only through initial conditions. Operators with discrete spectra are incorporated into Bohmian mechanics by associating with each operator a continuous variable in which a finite range of the continuous variable correspond to the same discrete eigenvalue. In this way Bohmian mechanics can handle the creation and annihilation of particles. Examples are given and generalizations are discussed.

R. A. Hyman; Shane A. Caldwell; Edward Dalton

2004-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

50

Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development, and Demonstration Crosscut (SubTER)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A new DOE Subsurface Crosscut, known as SubTER, coalesces energy technologies that use the subsurface for energy production, storage, and waste management.

51

The algebra of discrete torsion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 1, 2004 ... ... of Vafa's and Douglas's picture of discrete torsion, J. High Energy ... Quasi Hopf algebras, group cohomology and orbifold models, Nuclear.

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

52

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

Discrete Pearson distributions  

SciTech Connect

These distributions are generated by a first order recursive scheme which equates the ratio of successive probabilities to the ratio of two corresponding quadratics. The use of a linearized form of this model will produce equations in the unknowns matched by an appropriate set of moments (assumed to exist). Given the moments we may find valid solutions. These are two cases; (1) distributions defined on the non-negative integers (finite or infinite) and (2) distributions defined on negative integers as well. For (1), given the first four moments, it is possible to set this up as equations of finite or infinite degree in the probability of a zero occurrence, the sth component being a product of s ratios of linear forms in this probability in general. For (2) the equation for the zero probability is purely linear but may involve slowly converging series; here a particular case is the discrete normal. Regions of validity are being studied. 11 refs.

Bowman, K.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Shenton, L.R. [Georgia Univ., Athens, GA (United States); Kastenbaum, M.A. [Kastenbaum (M.A.), Basye, VA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization Marco Dorigo Gianni Di Caro IRIDIA CP 194/6 Universit algorithms, ant colony optimiza- tion, swarm intelligence, metaheuris- tics, natural computation Abstract This article presents an overview of recent work on ant algorithms, that is, algorithms for discrete

Hutter, Frank

55

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

56

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

57

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Abstract Extended logging and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic induction measurements were performed at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field as part of an ongoing effort to employ electromagnetic induction logging to geothermal reservoir characterization. The principal goal of this effort is to discern subsurface features useful in geothermal production, such as larger scale mapping of geothermal reservoirs and smaller scale mapping of producing

58

High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has ...

Joshua L. Bandfield

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

59

2014 JASON Report: State of Stress in Engineered Subsurface Systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A new report by an independent panel recommends that the Energy Department take a leading role in understanding subsurface systems to better address the nation’s energy and security issues. JASON –...

60

DOE Solicits Feedback on Subsurface Characterization to Commercialize Viable EGS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

To better engineer commercially viable EGS technologies, the Energy Department is soliciting information to more accurately measure and quantify vital subsurface parameters in EGS settings and how they change throughout EGS development phases.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsurface porous rocks that covers...definition ofa reservoir is made more...extent, porosity, hydrocarbon...possibility for the reservoir to be profitable...assessment of rock formation...reservoir quality. The selection...ofporosity, permeability, and hydrocarbon...

Darwin V. Ellis

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

62

On the use of drogues for measuring subsurface ocean currents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Drogues are frequently used to measure ocean currents. Wind drag and subsurface drag on the ... , as well as non-linear effects of current velocity gradients, can cause slippage past the ... must be considered wh...

Dr. David A. Booth

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication describes the components of a subsurface drip irrigation system and the procedure for installing such a system. Each step is outlined and illustrated. Steps include tape injection, trenching, connecting drip lines, back-filling...

Enciso, Juan

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

64

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Channel erosion due to subsurface flow Braunen Smith,1 Arshad Kudrolli,1 Alexander E. Lobkovsky,2, and D. H. Rothman, J. Fluid Mech. 503, 357 2004 . 2 A. E. Lobkovsky, B. Smith, A. Kudrolli, D. C. Mohrig

Kudrolli, Arshad

65

BOD5 removal in subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The frequency of on-site systems for treatment of domestic wastewater is increasing with new residential development in both rural and low-density suburban areas. Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCW) have emerged as a viable option to achieve...

Melton, Rebecca Hobbs

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

66

Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

Corsello, Joseph William

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Fate of Brine Applied to Unpaved Roads at a Radioactive Waste Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl– might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl– in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl– concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl– concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl– was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl– remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl– in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface disposal area.

Larry C. Hull; Carolyn W. Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Long-term hydraulic properties of subsurface flow constructed wetlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS A Thesis by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to the Office of Graduate studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1994 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering LONG-TERM HYDRAULIC PROPERTIES OF SUBSURFACE FLOW CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS by GLENN ALLEN TURNER Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfdlment of the requirements for the degree...

Turner, Glenn Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

69

Subsurface distributions of petroleum from an offshore well blowout. The Ixtoc I blowout, Bay of Campeche  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Subsurface distributions of petroleum from an offshore well blowout. ... Photochemistry of Deepwater Horizon Oil ...

Paul D. Boehm; David L. Fiest

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

71

Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems – the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOE’s high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow equations and up-scaled advective-diffusive transport equations for chemical species. We are rigorously testing the relationship between these two scales by evaluating macroscopic parameters using the volume averaging methodology applied to pore scale model results.

Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test Development of Artificial Ash Accelerated Accumulation Test Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions...

73

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A large number of microearthquake seismograms have been recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California geothermal reservoir. Shear-wave splitting induced by the alignment of cracks in the reservoir has been widely observed in the recordings. Over 100 events with body wave magnitude greater than 1.0 from

74

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Abstract Two injection wells (DV 38-32 and DV 27-32) in the Senator thermal area of the northern Dixie Valley geothermal field supply all the injectate reaching the field's northernmost group of production wells. These injectors are also the only wells in the field drilled between the surface

75

Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Neutron and Gamma Ray Scattering Measurements for Subsurface Geochemistry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...subsurface porous rocks that covers a large...academic definition ofa reservoir is made more precise...areal extent, porosity, hydrocarbon content...possibility for the reservoir to be profitable...the assessment of rock formation properties...analyses ofporosity, permeability, and hydrocarbon...

Darwin V. Ellis

1990-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

77

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The use of seismic anisotropy for characterizing subsurface fracture ori- entations and intensity anisotropy as a routine technique for fracture characterization is partly because of its inability to pro- vide information about sizes and vol- ume of fractures. Although both grain-scale micro

Edinburgh, University of

78

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

79

Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOE’s Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOE’s Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

Mays, David C. [University of Colorado Denver

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization Marco Dorigo and Gianni Di Caro IRIDIA, Universit´e Libre, Switzerland luca@idsia.ch Abstract This paper overviews recent work on ant algorithms, that is, algorithms and of some of the most important aspects of the ACO meta-heuristic. 1 Introduction Ant algorithms were first

Gambardella, Luca Maria

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ant Algorithms for Discrete Optimization Marco Dorigo and Gianni Di Caro IRIDIA, Universit#19;e, Switzerland luca@idsia.ch Abstract This paper overviews recent work on ant algorithms, that is, algorithms work and of some of the most important aspects of the ACO meta-heuristic. 1 Introduction Ant algorithms

Ducatelle, Frederick

82

Discrete bidding games Mike Develin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tic-Tac-Toe, are suitable for recreational play. We also present an analysis of Tic-Tac-Toe for both discrete and real-valued bidding. Contents 1 Introduction 2 1.1 A game of bidding Tic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 5 A partial order on games 21 6 Bidding Tic-Tac-Toe 23 6.1 Optimal moves

Payne, Sam

83

VARIATIONAL ESTIMATES FOR DISCRETE SCHR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

­dimensional discrete SchrË?odinger operator. We prove that if # ess (H) # [-2, 2], then H-H 0 is compact and # ess (H V = 0. One of our main results in this paper is Theorem 1. If # ess (H) # [-2, 2], then V (n) # 0 that # ess (H) = [-2, 2] if and only if V (n) # 0. Our motivation for this result came from two sources

84

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

85

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

86

Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

Aleman, S.E.

1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

88

A VSP transformation technique for the determination of subsurface structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is the dominant wavelength. With the surface reflection profiling technique, resolution typically ranges from tens to hundreds of meters. With this degree of resolution, a detailed understanding of the subsurface is hard to achieve, In a vertical seismic... Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Terry W. Spencer An algorithm was developed which transforms a vertical seismic profile (VSP) from the time-depth domain into the offset-time domain. The procedure operates by calculating the dips of the reflectors...

Malloy, Jeffrey Edward

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... with known lithologie in- tervals and electric logs. These fossils were re- covered from most lithologies. Chert, including novaculite and tripolitic types, and dark micritic 4 The University of Kansas Paleontological Contributions—Paper 54 limestone yield...

Kauffman, A. E.

1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

90

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene-Catalyst Interaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene? Catalyst Interaction Robert S. Weatherup,*,† Hakim Amara,‡ Raoul Blume,§ Bruno Dlubak,?,? Bernhard C. Bayer,† Mamadou Diarra,?,# Mounib Bahri,‡ Andrea Cabrero-Vilatela,† Sabina Caneva... , France * S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The dynamics of the graphene?catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth- resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical...

Weatherup, Robert S.; Amara, Hakim; Blume, Raoul; Dlubak, Bruno; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Diarra, Mamadou; Bahri, Mounib; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Caneva, Sabina; Kidambi, Piran R.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Schloegl, Robert; Ducastelle, François; Bichara, Christophe; Hofmann, Stephan

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

91

Chapter 28 - Nanotechnology for Contaminated Subsurface Remediation: Possibilities and Challenges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Groundwater represents a significant source of potable and industrial process water throughout the world. With population growth the availability of this precise resource is becoming increasingly scarce. Historically, the subsurface was thought to act as a natural filter of wastes injected into the ground. The potential for these wastes to persist in the subsurface for decades, potentially contaminating drinking water sources was ignored. Not only do toxic compounds have significant detrimental impacts on the environment and human health, there are also economic and social costs associated with contaminated groundwater. Due to increased demands on groundwater resources and historical contamination there is a need to remediate contaminated groundwater to meet current and future demands. At many hazardous sites, however, current remediation technologies routinely defy attempts at satisfactory restoration. As a result new, innovative remediation technologies are required. Nanomaterials are receiving widespread interest in a variety of fields due to their unique, beneficial chemical, physical, and mechanical properties. They have recently been proposed to address a number of environmental problems including the remediation of the contaminated subsurface. A wide variety of nanoparticles, such as metallic (e.g., zero valent iron or bimetallic nanoparticles) and carbon based nanoparticles (e.g., C60 nanoparticles) have been investigated to assess their potential for contaminated site remediation. Studies suggest that nanoparticles have the ability to convert or sequester a wide variety of subsurface contaminants (e.g., chlorinated solvents and heavy metals). In addition they are more reactive than similar, larger sized, reactive materials. The majority of these studies have, however, been conducted at the batch scale. Considerable work is necessary prior to the application of nanotechnology for contaminated site remediation. One problem, for example, is the delivery of reactive nanometals to the contaminated source zone where they will react. This chapter will summarize the use of nanoparticles for contaminated site remediation and highlight some of the challenges that remain unresolved.

Denis M. O’Carroll

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Evaluation of the application uniformity of subsurface drip distribution systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. .......................................................................................13 Table 3. Recommended acid concentration to treat water (Netafim, 2000a)................15 Table 4. Methods of comparison of statistical uniformity (ASAE, 1999). ...................19 Table 5. Evaluation of type Y emitter flow rates... is This thesis is written to conform to the style of Transactions of the ASAE. 2 essential for proper treatment of wastewater. Subsurface drip distribution systems can be used in these areas, but the effects of different site conditions and drip emitter...

Weynand, Vance Leo

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

95

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE DEVELOPMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface development transportation structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333P7 ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

R. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

96

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

Scheibe, Timothy D.

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fate of Magnesium Chloride Brine Applied to Suppress Dust from Unpaved Roads at the INEEL Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

Between 1984 and 1993, MgCl2 brine was used to suppress dust on unpaved roads at a radioactive waste subsurface disposal area. Because Cl– might enhance corrosion of buried metals in the waste, we investigated the distribution and fate of Cl– in the vadose zone using pore water samples collected from suction lysimeters and soluble salt concentrations extracted from sediment samples. The Cl/Br mass ratio and the total dissolved Cl– concentration of pore water show that brine contamination occurs primarily within 13 m of treated roads, but can extend as much as 30 m laterally in near-surface sedimentary deposits. Within the deep vadose zone, which consists of interlayered basalt lava flows and sedimentary interbeds, brine has moved up to 110 m laterally. This lateral migration suggests formation of perched water and horizontal transport during periods of high recharge. In a few locations, brine migrated to depths of 67 m within 3 to 5 yr. Elevated Cl– concentrations were found to depths of 2 m in roadbed material. In drainage ditches along roads, where runoff accumulates and recharge of surface water is high, Cl– was flushed from the sediments in 3 to 4 yr. In areas of lower recharge, Cl– remained in the sediments after 5 yr. Vertical brine movement is directly related to surface recharge through sediments. The distribution of Cl– in pore water and sediments is consistent with estimates of vadose zone residence times and spatial distribution of surface water recharge from other investigations at the subsurface

Larry Hull; Carolyn Bishop

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Paleotopography and hydrocarbon accumulation: Williston, Powder River, and Denver basins  

SciTech Connect

Recent geomorphic analyses of 1:24,000 scale topographic maps in the three major basins of the northern Great Plains have disclosed a persistent system of basement paleotopographic features that trend north-northeast throughout the region. Superimposed across this system and subtly influenced by it, are the northwesterly trending Laramide structural features. Paleozoic depositional patterns have been strongly influenced by the paleoridge and trough system formed by the north-northeast features. Mesozoic deposition has also been affected by the ancient subsurface system but in a more subtle manner. Many of the Paleozoic and Mezoxoic hydrocarbon locations in the three basins appear to be the results of paleotopographic control on hydrocarbon accumulation sites. This affect ranges from Paleozoic reef sites in the Williston basin through paleotrough localization of Pennsylvanian Minnelusa production in the Powder River basin to fractured Cretaceous Niobrara production at the Silo field in the Denver basin. Basement paleotopography is the underlying factor in all deposition and subsequent hydrocarbon migration in any basin. As such, it should be considered a major factor in the exploration for oil and gas.

Thomas, G.E. (Thomas and Associates, Denver, CO (United States))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Injection of organic carbon into the subsurface as an electron donor for bioremediation of redox-sensitive contaminants like uranium often leads to mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation efficacy. This work combines reactive transport modeling with a column experiment and field measurements to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/accumulation during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. We use the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to explicitly simulate microbial community dynamics of iron and sulfate reducers, and their impacts on reaction rates. The column experiment shows clear evidence of mineral precipitation, primarily in the form of calcite and iron monosulfide. At the field scale, reactive transport simulations suggest that the biogeochemical reactions occur mostly close to the injection wells where acetate concentrations are highest, with mineral precipitate and biomass accumulation reaching as high as 1.5% of the pore space. This work shows that reactive transport modeling coupled with field data can be an effective tool for quantitative estimation of mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, thus improving the design of bioremediation strategies.

Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Hubbard, S.S.

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Towards Industrial Strength Discrete Optimization via Simulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Industrial Strength Discrete Optimization via Simulation: Multi-Fidelity Optimization and Data-Driven Robustness Event Sponsor: Mathematics and Computing Science - LANS...

102

Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Subsurface Facies Analysis of the Devonian Berea Sandstone in Southeastern Ohio.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??James Evans, AdvisorThe Devonian Berea Sandstone is an internally complex, heterogeneous unit that appears prominently both in outcrop and subsurface in Ohio. While the unit… (more)

Garnes, William Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Dissemination and visualisation of earth system models for the Dutch subsurface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For more than a century, geological surveys have gathered a great amount of subsurface data. Within the last decade, major technological advancements have revolutionised geoscience interpretations. Multidiscip...

Jan-Diederik van Wees; Rob Versseput…

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers. Citation: Boyd V, H Yoon, C Zhang, M Oostrom, NJ Hess, BW Fouke, AJ Valocchi, and CJ...

107

Computation of Polarized Subsurface BRDF for Rendering Charly Collin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this paper we employ the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE), which is the polarized version of the radiative transfer equation in- side the material. We use a discrete ordinate based method to solve the VRTE BRDF computation requires the simulation of light interaction inside the medium. Radiative transport

Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

108

The positron accumulator ring for the APS  

SciTech Connect

The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) is designed to accumulate and damp positrons from the 450-MeV linac during the 0.5-s cycle time of the injector synchrotron for the APS 7-GeV storage ring. During 0.4 s of each synchrotron cycle, up to 24 linac pulses are injected into the horizontal phase space of the PAR at a 60-Hz rate. Each injected pulse occupies about 1.3 of the circumference of the accumulator ring. After 0.1 s for longitudinal damping, the single accumulated bunch is transferred to one of the 353-MHz buckets of the injector synchrotron RF system. The bunch is accelerated to 7 GeV and transferred to the storage ring, while the PAR accumulates the next bunch of positrons. 2 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Crosbie, E.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Modeling subsurface contaminant reactions and transport at the watershed scale  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this research are: (1) to numerically examine the multiscale effects of physical and chemical mass transfer processes on watershed scale, variably saturated subsurface contaminant transport, and (2) to conduct numerical simulations on watershed scale reactive solute transport and evaluate their implications to uncertainty characterization and cost benefit analysis. Concurrent physical and chemical nonequilibrium caused by inter aggregate gradients of pressure head and solute concentration and intra-aggregate geochemical and microbiological processes, respectively, may arise at various scales and flowpaths. To this date, experimental investigations of these complex processes at watershed scale remain a challenge and numerical studies are often needed for guidance of water resources management and decision making. This research integrates the knowledge bases developed during previous experimental and numerical investigations at a proposed waste disposal site at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study the concurrent effects of physical and chemical nonequilibrium. Comparison of numerical results with field data indicates that: (1) multiregion, preferential flow and solute transport exist under partially saturated condition and can be confirmed theoretically, and that (2) mass transfer between pore regions is an important process influencing contaminant movement in the subsurface. Simulations of watershed scale, multi species reactive solute transport suggest that dominance of geochemistry and hydrodynamics may occur simultaneously at different locales and influence the movement of one species relative to another. Execution times on the simulations of the reactive solute transport model also indicate that the model is ready to assist the selection of important parameters for site characterization.

Gwo, J.P.; Jardine, P.M.; D`Azevedo, E.F. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Wilson, G.V. [Desert Research Inst., Las Vegas, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Mathematical Structure of Discrete Space-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this letter we briefly investigate the mathematical structure of space-time in the framework of discretization. It is shown that the discreteness of space-time may result in a new mechanical system which differ from the usual quantum mechanics (QM).

An-Wei Zhang

2009-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

111

Learning to profit with discrete investment rules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The learning of optimal discrete investment rules is analysed and related to the problem of forecasting financial returns. The aim is twofold: to characterize some `good' learning methods for agents using investment rules of this form and to explain why many observed investment rules such as technical trading rules are discrete. A consistent estimator for discrete investment rules is used and it is shown, using simulations, that direct estimation of investment rules is preferable to the estimation of forecasting models to be used in such rules. This model and the associated results indicate there are a number of reasons why it may be easier to learn a good discrete investment rule than to learn a continuous rule; this provides a partial explanation of why discrete investment rules are used so widely.

Spyros Skouras

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Extreme events in discrete nonlinear lattices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We perform statistical analysis on discrete nonlinear waves generated though modulational instability in the context of the Salerno model that interpolates between the intergable Ablowitz-Ladik (AL) equation and the nonintegrable discrete nonlinear Schrodinger (DNLS) equation. We focus on extreme events in the form of discrete rogue or freak waves that may arise as a result of rapid coalescence of discrete breathers or other nonlinear interaction processes. We find power law dependence in the wave amplitude distribution accompanied by an enhanced probability for freak events close to the integrable limit of the equation. A characteristic peak in the extreme event probability appears that is attributed to the onset of interaction of the discrete solitons of the AL equation and the accompanied transition from the local to the global stochasticity monitored through the positive Lyapunov exponent of a nonlinear map.

A. Maluckov; Lj. Hadzievski; N. Lazarides; G. P. Tsironis

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Quantised Angular Momentum Vectors and Projection Angle Distributions for Discrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantised Angular Momentum Vectors and Projection Angle Distributions for Discrete Radon-integral angular momenta angle sets. Keywords: Discrete projection, tomography, digital angles, finite Radon that may be well suited to describe projections on discrete grids. The resulting angle sets

Boyer, Edmond

114

A Discrete Event Simulation Model For Unstructured Supervisory Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Discrete Event Simulation Model For Unstructured Supervisory Control Of Unmanned Vehicles Committee #12;2 A Discrete Event Simulation Model For Unstructured Supervisory Control Of Unmanned multipleoperator multiplevehicle discrete event simulation model (MOMUVDES) is developed which captures

Cummings, Mary "Missy"

115

Quantification of subsurface heat storage in a GCM simulation Andrew H. MacDougall,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the subsurface of the GCM ECHO-G. With a 600-m BBC and driven by ECHO-G future temperatures, the FDLSM subsurface absorbs 6.2 (7.5) times more heat than the ECHO-G soil model (10 m deep) under the Intergovernmental Panel

Beltrami, Hugo

116

Protozoa in Subsurface Sediments from Sites Contaminated with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...with Aviation Gasoline or Jet Fuel James L. Sinclair 1 * Don H...of aviation gasoline and jet fuel spill areas at a Coast Guard...aerobic bacteria, protozoa, algae, and fungae in deep subsurface...aviation gasoline and JP-4 jet fuel in subsurface core samples...

James L. Sinclair; Don H. Kampbell; Mike L. Cook; John T. Wilson

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

To appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be simulated accurately but slowly by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papersTo appear in the SIGGRAPH conference proceedings A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport introduces a simple model for subsurface light transport in translucent materials. The model enables

Stanford University

119

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

120

Experiences and Challenges Scaling PFLOTRAN, a PETSc-based Code for Subsurface Reactive Flow Simulations,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, groundwater, solvers 1 Introduction Over the past several decades, subsurface (ground- water) flow these simplified ground- water models are still in wide use, advances in subsurface science have enabled and the efficacy of proposed remediation strategies for legacy waste sites. For years, traditional models

Mills, Richard

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

122

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

123

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

124

Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Isolation of Discrete Nanoparticle-DNA Conjugates for Plasmonic Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Isolation of Discrete Nanoparticle-DNA Conjugates forABSTRACT. Discrete DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates with DNABG_Keywords”). GOLD, NANOPARTICLE, NANOCRYSTAL, PLASMON,

Claridge, Shelley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Localizing Organomercury Uptake and Accumulation in Zebrafish...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Uptake and Accumulation in Zebrafish Larvae at the Tissue and Cellular Level Mercury is a well-known poison, but it is perhaps at its most dangerous when bound by organic...

127

Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) for various surface and subsurface applications, such as profiling the surface and subsurface of pavements, detecting and localizing small buried Anti-Personnel (AP) mines and measuring the liquid level in a tank. These sensors meet the critical requirements...

Park, Joongsuk

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

128

Languages and semantics of grammatical discrete structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Applying grammatical formalisms to engineering problems requires consideration of spatial, functional, and behavioral design attributes. This paper explores structural design languages and semantics for the generation of feasible and purposeful discrete ... Keywords: Design Languages, Engineering Grammars, Structural Layout, Structural Semantics

Kristina Shea; Jonathan Cagan

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

From nothing to something: discrete integrable systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chinese ancient sage Laozi said that everything comes from `nothing'. Einstein believes the principle of nature is simple. Quantum physics proves that the world is discrete. And computer science takes continuous systems as discrete ones. This report is devoted to deriving a number of discrete models, including well-known integrable systems such as the KdV, KP, Toda, BKP, CKP, and special Viallet equations, from `nothing' via simple principles. It is conjectured that the discrete models generated from nothing may be integrable because they are identities of simple algebra, model-independent nonlinear superpositions of a trivial integrable system (Riccati equation), index homogeneous decompositions of the simplest geometric theorem (the angle bisector theorem), as well as the M\\"obious transformation invariants.

S Y Lou; Yu-qi Li; Xiao-yan Tang

2014-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

130

Discrete Polyhedrization of a Lattice Point Set  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We introduce a polyhedral representation of surfaces for analysis and recognition of three-dimensional digital images. Our representation is basedon combinatorial topology. By using a discrete version of combinatorial topology we also present an algorithm ...

Yukiko Kenmochi; Atsushi Imiya

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Port-Hamiltonian systems on discrete manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper offers a geometric framework for modeling port-Hamiltonian systems on discrete manifolds. The simplicial Dirac structure, capturing the topological laws of the system, is defined in terms of primal and dual cochains related by the coboundary operators. This finite-dimensional Dirac structure, as discrete analogue of the canonical Stokes-Dirac structure, allows for the formulation of finite-dimensional port-Hamiltonian systems that emulate the behaviour of the open distributed-parameter systems with Hamiltonian dynamics.

Marko Seslija; Jacquelien M. A. Scherpen; Arjan van der Schaft

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

132

Discrete Plasmons in Finite Semiconductor Multilayers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We observe discrete plasmons in layered 2D electron gases with a large, but finte, number of periods. The twofold degeneracy of plasmon modes with wave numbers in the first Brillouin zone of the infinite system is lifted by the loss of complete periodicity in the finite system. These characteristic discrete plasmon doublets are measured in inelastic-light-scattering spectra of multilayer GaAs/(AlGa)As heterostructures.

A. Pinczuk; M. G. Lamont; A. C. Gossard

1986-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Time-Symmetric Discretization of The Harmonic Oscillator  

SciTech Connect

We explicitly and analytically demonstrate that simple time-symmetric discretization of the harmonic oscillator (used as a simple model of a discrete dynamical system), leads to discrete equations of motion whose solutions are perfectly stable at all time scales, and whose energy is exactly conserved. This result is important for both fundamental discrete physics, as well as for numerical analysis and simulation.

Antippa, Adel F. [Departement de Physique Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, G9A 5H7 (Canada); Dubois, Daniel M. [Centre for Hyperincursion and Anticipation in Ordered Systems, CHAOS asbl, Institute of Mathematics, B37, University of Liege Grande Traverse 12, B-4000 LIEGE 1 (Belgium)

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

134

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

135

Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

Andrei Khrennikov; Yaroslav Volovich

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

137

A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

138

Strontium isotopic study of subsurface brines from Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect

The abundance of the radiogenic isotope /sup 87/Sr in a subsurface brine can be used as a tracer of brine origin, evolution, and diagenetic effects. The authors have determined the /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of over 60 oil-field waters from the Illinois basin, where brine origin is perplexing because of the absence of any significant evaporite strata. Initially, they analyzed brines from 15 petroleum-producing sandstone and carbonate units; waters from Ordovician, Silurian, Devonian, and Mississippian strata have /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios in the range 0.7079-0.7108. All but those from the Ste. Genevieve Limestone (middle Mississippian) are more radiogenic in /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr than seawater values for this interval of geologic time. The detrital source of the more radiogenic /sup 87/Sr may be the New Albany Shale group, considered to be a major petroleum source rock in the basin. The /sup 87/Sr//sup 86/Sr ratios of Ste. Genevieve brines apparently evolved without a contribution from fluid-shale interaction.

hetherington, E.A.; Stueber, A.M.; Pushkar, P.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Limiting factors and microbial organometallic transformations in anaerobic subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect

Microbial communities from subsurface materials were analyzed for microbial community-particle size relationships, effects of arsenic and mercury compounds on microbial community structure, and limiting factors influencing mercury volatilization under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The microbial communities showed strong relationships to particle size and size distribution. Major differences were found in relation to aerobic and anaerobic populations and for aerobic populations between the largest and smallest fractions. Under aerobic conditions, a significant increase in low nutrient responsive microbes occurred. After exposure to four metal compounds (phenylmercuric acetate (PMA), mercuric chloride (HgCl{sub 2}), phenylarsonic acid (PAA), and sodium arsenate (Na{sub 2}AsO{sub 4})) major changes in populations occurred. Previous exposure to these metals increased the aerobic and anaerobic populations of GS-9, indicating an adaptive response. In GS-20, previous exposure to all four compounds caused a decrease in both the aerobic and anaerobic populations. The effect was most pronounced in sediments treated with PMA or HgCl{sub 2}. Limiting nutritional factors for the volatilization of mercury under aerobic and anaerobic conditions were identified in control and PMA impacted samples from GS-9 and GS-20.

Klein, D.A.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

142

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration New computational technique creates high resolution maps of subsurface CO2 after geologic sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Sanjay Srinivasan, UT-Austin High resolution inverted seismic images of CO2 migration at the Cranfield,

143

Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis  

SciTech Connect

This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

Hall, B.W.

1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

144

Gas Chromatographic Determination of Aviation Gasoline and JP-4 Jet Fuel in Subsurface Core Samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......capillary column gas chromatography...subsurface material. Water samples from...have a higher water solubility than the other...aroma- tics in water and solid wastes...jars inside a nitrogen atmosphere glovebox...subsequent analysis. Gas chromatography......

Steve A. Vandegrift; Don H. Kampbell

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

A problem solving environment for subsurface flow and transport phenomena Matthew Farthinga  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hold vast fresh water reserves of vital importance to our lives above ground, but are susceptible to depletion and contamination. Hence questions about the man- agement and remediation of subsurface systems

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

146

Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

Stecher, Matthew C

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

Chan, Godine Kok Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Phosphorus sorption in subsurface constructed wetlands: investigations focused on calcareous materials and their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phosphorus sorption in subsurface constructed wetlands: investigations focused on calcareous attractive sorption capacities using batch experiments, however experiments carried out in open reactors. NOMENCLATURE b: Langmuir adjustable parameter representing the maximum sorption capacity c: P concentration (mg

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

149

A model of the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the subsurface structure at the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir based on surface-to-borehole seismic data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

150

Nonlinear Acoustic Phenomena in Subsurface Bubble Layers and its Usage for Bubble Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper contains a brief review of our recent theoretical and experimental investigations of nonlinear acoustic phenomena in sub-surface bubble layers produced by breaking waves and results concerning linear a...

A. M. Sutin

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Salinity Constraints on Subsurface Archaeal Diversity and Methanogenesis in Sedimentary Rock Rich in Organic Matter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...These substrates yield more energy (78.7 to 191.1 kJ per mol substrate...concentrations by offsetting the energy cost of the increased osmoregulatory...2005. Microbial community in a geothermal aquifer associated with the subsurface...

Patricia J. Waldron; Steven T. Petsch; Anna M. Martini; Klaus Nüsslein

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

152

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools,...

153

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial community profile  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface characterization of groundwater contaminated by landfill leachate using microbial from groundwater monitoring wells located within and around an aquifer contaminated with landfill. In this landfill leachate application, the weighted SOM assembles the microbial community data from monitoring

Vermont, University of

154

Energy Efficient Routing with Mutual Information Accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the use of ideal rateless codes, so that a node can accumulate transmission rates from the transmission problem becomes more complex, as it involves the determination of 1) Routing path, 2) Transmission duration of each node, and 3) Transmission power of each node. We formulated the problem as an optimization

Boyer, Edmond

155

RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.  

SciTech Connect

During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by...

Lau, Chun Lok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Discrete Optimization A simulated annealing approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the constrained and the unconstrained circular cutting problem based upon simulated annealing. We define an energyDiscrete Optimization A simulated annealing approach for the circular cutting problem Mhand Hifi corner of the initial rectangle. Such values of the energy correspond to configurations where pieces

Zissimopoulos, Vassilis

158

Massively Parallel Computation of Discrete Logarithms \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an order of magnitude using such an analysis. Among the reasons for this are: ffl if a high­level language, keeping in mind that log g a is only determined modulo the multiplicative order of g. For general be extremely useful to chart the increase in difficulty of computing discrete logarithms as the field size

McCurley, Kevin

159

Massively Parallel Computation of Discrete Logarithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an order of magnitude using such an analysis. Among the reasons for this are: · if a high-level language, keeping in mind that logg a is only determined modulo the multiplicative order of g. For general be extremely useful to chart the increase in difficulty of computing discrete logarithms as the field size

Gordon, Dan

160

Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics'' In a recent Letter [1], Li and Kwok use a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for microfluidics. Their main claim is that an LBE model for microfluidics can be constructed based on the ``Bhatnagar-Gross-Kooky [sic]'' model by including ``the

Luo, Li-Shi

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Quantum Gravity Phenomenology, Lorentz Invariance and Discreteness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum Gravity Phenomenology, Lorentz Invariance and Discreteness Fay Dowker #3; , Joe Henson y invariant, and we recall the reasons why. For illustration, we introduce a phenomenological model of massive { LLI violating phenomenological e#11;ects of quantum gravity { has grown up around this idea

Sorkin, Rafael Dolnick

162

On the discrete bicycle transformation S. Tabachnikov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the discrete bicycle transformation S. Tabachnikov E. Tsukerman 1 Introduction The motivation for this paper comes from the study of a simple model of bicycle motion. The bicycle is modeled as an oriented segment in the plane of fixed length , the wheelbase of the bicycle. The motion is constrained so

Tabachnikov, Sergei

163

Formation of morphogen gradients: Local accumulation time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spatial regulation of cell differentiation in embryos can be provided by morphogen gradients, which are defined as the concentration fields of molecules that control gene expression. For example, a cell can use its surface receptors to measure the local concentration of an extracellular ligand and convert this information into a corresponding change in its transcriptional state. We characterize the time needed to establish a steady-state gradient in problems with diffusion and degradation of locally produced chemical signals. A relaxation function is introduced to describe how the morphogen concentration profile approaches its steady state. This function is used to obtain a local accumulation time that provides a time scale that characterizes relaxation to steady state at an arbitrary position within the patterned field. To illustrate the approach we derive local accumulation times for a number of commonly used models of morphogen gradient formation.

Alexander M. Berezhkovskii; Christine Sample; Stanislav Y. Shvartsman

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

164

Defining Employee Perceptions of Discretion: When, Where, and How  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The construct employee discretion has been researched under many labels (e.g., flexibility, autonomy). As a result, employee discretion has been operationalized differently across multiple streams of research leading to construct deficiency...

Thompson, Rebecca Jean

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

166

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Discrete Green's functions University of California, San Diego  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Green's functions Fan Chung University of California, San Diego La Jolla, CA 92093-0112 S study discrete Green's functions and their relationship with discrete Laplace equations. Several methods for deriving Green's functions are discussed. Green's functions can be used to deal with diffusion

Graham, Fan Chung

168

Accumulated photon echo in ruby and alexandrite  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The technique of picosecond accumulated photon echo is applied to 700-at. ppm ruby and 2000-at. ppm alexandrite. The decay of the photon-echo intensity versus the probe-pulse delay displays a beat. A detailed analysis on the basis of Bloch equations shows that the beat frequency is associated with the zero-field splitting of the 4A2 ground state, and that its phase and amplitude are determined by the amount of population communication within this state. Precise values for the spontaneous decay time of 2A¯(2E) and the 4A2 zero-field splitting are derived.

M. H. F. Overwijk; P. J. Rump; J. I. Dijkhuis; H. W. de Wijn

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Fractional Zaslavsky and Henon Discrete Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the memory of Professor George M. Zaslavsky passed away on November 25, 2008. In the field of discrete maps, George M. Zaslavsky introduced a dissipative standard map which is called now the Zaslavsky map. G. Zaslavsky initialized many fundamental concepts and ideas in the fractional dynamics and kinetics. In this paper, starting from kicked damped equations with derivatives of non-integer orders we derive a fractional generalization of discrete maps. These fractional maps are generalizations of the Zaslavsky map and the Henon map. The main property of the fractional differential equations and the correspondent fractional maps is a long-term memory and dissipation. The memory is realized by the fact that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights.

Vasily E. Tarasov

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

171

Discrete Abelian gauge symmetries and axions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine two popular extensions of beyond the Standard Model physics within the framework of intersecting D6-brane models: discrete Zn symmetries and Peccei-Quinn axions. The underlying natural connection between both extensions is formed by the presence of massive U(1) gauge symmetries in D-brane model building. Global intersecting D6-brane models on toroidal orbifolds of the type T6/Z2N and T6/Z2xZ2M with discrete torsion offer excellent playgrounds for realizing these extensions. A generation-dependent Z2 symmetry is identified in a global Pati-Salam model, while global left-right symmetric models give rise to supersymmetric realizations of the DFSZ axion model. In one class of the latter models, the axion as well as Standard Model particles carry a non-trivial Z3 charge.

Honecker, Gabriele

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Discrete Abelian gauge symmetries and axions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We combine two popular extensions of beyond the Standard Model physics within the framework of intersecting D6-brane models: discrete Zn symmetries and Peccei-Quinn axions. The underlying natural connection between both extensions is formed by the presence of massive U(1) gauge symmetries in D-brane model building. Global intersecting D6-brane models on toroidal orbifolds of the type T6/Z2N and T6/Z2xZ2M with discrete torsion offer excellent playgrounds for realizing these extensions. A generation-dependent Z2 symmetry is identified in a global Pati-Salam model, while global left-right symmetric models give rise to supersymmetric realizations of the DFSZ axion model. In one class of the latter models, the axion as well as Standard Model particles carry a non-trivial Z3 charge.

Gabriele Honecker; Wieland Staessens

2015-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Reactive Membrane Barriers for Containment of Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The overall goal of this project was to develop reactive membrane barriers--a new and flexible technique to contain and stabilize subsurface contaminants. Polymer membranes will leak once a contaminant is able to diffuse through the membrane. By incorporating a reactive material in the polymer, however, the contaminant is degraded or immobilized within the membrane. These processes increase the time for contaminants to breakthrough the barrier (i.e. the lag time) and can dramatically extend barrier lifetimes. In this work, reactive barrier membranes containing zero-valent iron (Fe{sup 0}) or crystalline silicotitanate (CST) were developed to prevent the migration of chlorinated solvents and cesium-137, respectively. These studies were complemented by the development of models quantifying the leakage/kill time of reactive membranes and describing the behavior of products produced via the reactions within the membranes. First, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} and CST were prepared and tested. Although PVA is not useful in practical applications, it allows experiments to be performed rapidly and the results to be compared to theory. For copper ions (Cu{sup 2+}) and carbon tetrachloride, the barrier was effective, increasing the time to breakthrough over 300 times. Even better performance was expected, and the percentage of the iron used in the reaction with the contaminants was determined. For cesium, the CST laden membranes increased lag times more than 30 times, and performed better than theoretical predictions. A modified theory was developed for ion exchangers in reactive membranes to explain this result. With the PVA membranes, the effect of a groundwater matrix on barrier performance was tested. Using Hanford groundwater, the performance of Fe{sup 0} barriers decreased compared to solutions containing a pH buffer and high levels of chloride (both of which promote iron reactivity). For the CST bearing membrane, performance improved by a factor of three when groundwater was used in place of deionized water. The performance of high density polyethylene (HDPE) membranes containing Fe{sup 0} was then evaluating using carbon tetrachloride as the target contaminant. Only with a hydrophilic additive (glycerol), was the iron able to extend lag times. Lag times were increased by a factor of 15, but only 2-3% of the iron was used, likely due to formation of oxide precipitates on the iron surface, which slowed the reaction. With thicker membranes and lower carbon tetrachloride concentrations, it is expected that performance will improve. Previous models for reactive membranes were also extended. The lag time is a measurement of when the barrier is breached, but contaminants do slowly leak through prior to the lag time. Thus, two parameters, the leakage and the kill time, were developed to determine when a certain amount of pollutant has escaped (the kill time) or when a given exposure (concentration x time) occurs (the leakage). Finally, a model was developed to explain the behavior of mobile reaction products in reactive barrier membranes. Although the goal of the technology is to avoid such products, it is important to be able to predict how these products will behave. Interestingly, calculations show that for any mobile reaction products, one half of the mass will diffuse into the containment area and one half will escape, assuming that the volumes of the containment area and the surrounding environment are much larger than the barrier membrane. These parameters/models will aid in the effective design of barrier membranes.

William A. Arnold; Edward L. Cussler

2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

174

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Bacterial biomass found to have an impact. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

175

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Microbial transformations of natural organic compounds and radionuclides in subsurface environments  

SciTech Connect

A major national concern in the subsurface disposal of energy wastes is the contamination of ground and surface waters by waste leachates containing radionuclides, toxic metals, and organic compounds. Microorganisms play an important role in the transformation of organic compounds, radionuclides, and toxic metals present in the waste and affect their mobility in subsurface environments. Microbial processes involved in dissolution, mobilization, and immobilization of toxic metals under aerobic and anaerobic conditions are briefly reviewed. Metal complexing agents and several organic acids produced by microbial action affect mobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in subsurface environments. Information on the persistence of and biodegradation rates of synthetic as well as microbiologically produced complexing agents is scarce but important in determining the mobility of metal organic complexes in subsoils. Several gaps in knowledge in the area of microbial transformation of naturally occurring organics, radionuclides, and toxic metals have been identified, and further basic research has been suggested. 31 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Francis, A.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Increased Visceral Fat Accumulation in Patients with Primary Gout  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A cluster of several atherogenic risk factors, visceral fat accumulation was more increased in gout patients. In addition, visceral fat was more accumulated in gout patients who were overexcreters of uric acid .....

Sumio Takahashi; Tetsuya Yamamoto…

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......gamma-ray Irradiation Enhanced Boron-10 Compound Accumulation in Murine Tumors...effects of gamma-ray irradiation on boron-10 compound accumulation in a murine...sodium) administration. Then, the boron-10 concentrations in tumor and normal......

Yong Liu; Kenji Nagata; Shin-ichiro Masunaga; Minoru Suzuki; Genro Kashino; Yuko Kinashi; Hiroki Tanaka; Yoshinori Sakurai; Akira Maruhashi; Koji Ono

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Subsurface geology of Corpus Christi Bay, Neuces County, Texas  

SciTech Connect

Prolific production in Corpus Christi Bay has occurred mainly in the regressive Frio Barrier Bar System and the associated shore face-shelf environment. All production in Corpus Christi Bay area is below the Anahuac transgressive wedge with the greatest accumulation in the 1st Marg. sand, which has produced a minimum of 680 BCF of gas in the Red Fish Bay-Mustang Island Common 10 reservoir, the largest single reservoir in South Texas. The 1st Marg. sands have produced in excess of 990 BCFG from four fields in Corpus Christi Bay. Shallow hydrocarbons in Corpus Christi Bay are associated with the South Texas Frio Barrier Bar System and are structurally trapped on large fault bound anticlines or up-to-the-coast relief faults. Deeper production from the Frio Sands is mainly on the Barrier Bar shoreface and associated with fault bounded anticlinal closures. Structural complexity increases with depth especially along the large strike aligned growth faults, some up to 4000 ft displacement, and the associated rollover anticlines. subsidiary faults, and shale plugs. These deeper reservoirs are usually pressure-depletion drives. The oil industry can point with pride to the co-existence with the fragile bay environment while extracting huge reserves. Most of the wells are on State of Texas marine leases and are controlled by State rules and City of Corpus Christi Bay drilling ordinances.

Collins, J.W.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Preliminary development of a comprehensive calibrated subsurface pathway simulator for the subsurface disposal area at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The first detailed comprehensive simulation study to evaluate fate and transport of low-level, mixed, and transuranic wastes buried in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) has recently been conducted. The study took advantage of pertinent information relating to describing aqueous- and vapor-phase movement of contaminants in the primarily fractured basalt subsurface. The study included spatially and temporally variable infiltration, barometric pressure changes, positive down-hole air pressure during well drilling, vapor-vacuum extraction, and regional hydraulic gradients. Use of the TETRAD simulation code allowed all the pertinent information to be included into a single comprehensive model of the SDA subsurface. An overview of the model implementation and comparisons of calibrated model results to the observed vadose zone water distribution, volatile organic vapor concentrations, and aqueous concentrations of volatile organics and nitrate are presented. Additionally, comparisons between simulated and observed concentrations for other contaminants which were not used for model calibration are made. As part of this modeling exercise, inadequacies in the available data relating to characterization of non-sorbing aqueous-phase transport have been identified. Even with the identified data inadequacies, the comparisons between simulated and observed contaminants along with the calibration results give confidence that the model is a conservative representation of flow and transport in the subsurface at the SDA. The results from this modeling study are being used to guide additional data collection activities at the SDA for purposes of increasing confidence in the appropriateness of model predictions.

Magnuson, S.; Sondrup, J.; Becker, B.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Controlling lipid accumulation in cereal grains  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plant oils have so far been mostly directed toward food and feed production. Nowadays however, these oils are more and more used as competitive alternatives to mineral hydrocarbon-based products. This increasing demand for vegetable oils has led to a renewed interest in elucidating the metabolism of storage lipids and its regulation in various plant systems. Cereal grains store carbon in the form of starch in a large endosperm and as oil in an embryo of limited size. Complementary studies on kernel development and metabolism have paved the way for breeding or engineering new varieties with higher grain oil content. This could be achieved either by increasing the relative proportion of the oil-rich embryo within the grain, or by enhancing oil synthesis and accumulation in embryonic structures. For instance, diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT) that catalyses the ultimate reaction in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol appears to be a promising target for increasing oil content in maize embryos. Similarly, over-expression of the maize transcriptional regulators ZmLEAFY COTYLEDON1 and ZmWRINKLED1 efficiently stimulates oil accumulation in the kernels of transgenic lines. Redirecting carbon from starch to oil in the endosperm, though not yet realized, is discussed.

Guillaume Barthole; Loïc Lepiniec; Peter M. Rogowsky; Sébastien Baud

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not be affected by the increasing hydrostatic pressure of water as a function of water depth. Springs and heavy weights will be discussed as two options to replace nitrogen in accumulators. Efficient deep water accumulators would reduce the number of accumulators...

Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

184

A mathematical model for simulation of a water table profile between two parallel subsurface drains using fractional derivatives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

By considering the initial and boundary conditions corresponding to parallel subsurface drains, the linear form of a one-dimensional fractional Boussinesq equation was solved and an analytical mathematical model was developed to predict the water table ... Keywords: Bess algorithm, Fractional Boussinesq equation, Glover-Dumm's model, Heterogeneity, Subsurface drainage

Behrouz Mehdinejadiani; Abd Ali Naseri; Hossein Jafari; Afshin Ghanbarzadeh; Dumitru Baleanu

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Dynamics of Subsurface and Surface Chemisorption for B, C, and N on Gaas and Inp  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Hellmann-Feynman molecular-dynamics simulations, we have investigated interactions of first-row elements with the (110) surfaces of GaAs and InP. We find that these atoms prefer to occupy subsurface sites. The open structure...

MENON, M.; Allen, Roland E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Mechanical models of sandfish locomotion reveal principles of high performance subsurface sand-swimming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...when the lycra sleeve is loose. The outer layer reduces the wear on the thin inner layer, allowing greater than 100 subsurface...Dorgan, K. , S. Arwade, and P. Jumars 2007 Burrowing in marine muds by crack propagation: kinematics and forces. J. Exp...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Ice-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Antarctica, the resulting ice-shelf loss and attendant HSIS acceleration would produce a Heinrich eventIce-shelf collapse from subsurface warming as a trigger for Heinrich events Shaun A. Marcotta,1-discharge events from the Hudson Strait Ice Stream (HSIS) of the Laurentide Ice Sheet, referred to as Heinrich

Schmittner, Andreas

188

Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hemisphere with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on 26 August 2003. The upper panel shows the filament spineSubsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R and their Interrelation Y. Lin,1 S. F. Martin,2 and O. Engvold1 Abstract. The main structural components of solar

Lin, Yong

189

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

191

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

192

Role of microbial exopolymeric substances (EPS) on chromium sorption and transport in heterogeneous subsurface soils: I. Cr(III) complexation with EPS in aqueous solution  

SciTech Connect

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

Kantar, C.; Dodge, C.; Demiray, H.; Dogan, N.M.

2011-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

193

Role of Microbial Exopolymeric Substances (EPS) on Chromium Sorption and Transport in Heterogeneous Subsurface Soils: I. Cr(III) Complexation with EPS in Aqueous Solution  

SciTech Connect

Chromium (III) binding by exopolymeric substances (EPS) isolated from Pseudomonas putida P18, Pseudomonas aeruginosa P16 and Pseudomonas stutzeri P40 strains were investigated by the determination of conditional stability constants and the concentration of functional groups using the ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations. Spectroscopic (EXAFS) analysis was also used to obtain information on the nature of Cr(III) binding with EPS functional groups. The data from ion-exchange experiments and potentiometric titrations were evaluated using a non-electrostatic discrete ligand approach. The modeling results show that the acid/base properties of EPSs can be best characterized by invoking four different types of acid functional groups with arbitrarily assigned pK{sub a} values of 4, 6, 8 and 10. The analysis of ion-exchange data using the discrete ligand approach suggests that while the Cr binding by EPS from P. aeruginosa can be successfully described based on a reaction stoichiometry of 1:2 between Cr(III) and HL{sub 2} monoprotic ligands, the accurate description of Cr binding by EPSs extracted from P. putida and P. stutzeri requires postulation of 1:1 Cr(III)-ligand complexes with HL{sub 2} and HL{sub 3} monoprotic ligands, respectively. These results indicate that the carboxyl and/or phosphoric acid sites contribute to Cr(III) binding by microbial EPS, as also confirmed by EXAFS analysis performed in the current study. Overall, this study highlights the need for incorporation of Cr-EPS interactions into transport and speciation models to more accurately assess microbial Cr(VI) reduction and chromium transport in subsurface systems, including microbial reactive treatment barriers.

C Kantar; H Demiray; N Dogan; C Dodge

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

194

NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

Kaplan, D.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

195

Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models  

SciTech Connect

This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates Inc., Redmond, WA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Company, Midland, TX (United States). Mid-Continent Region Production

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Robustness of discrete-time control systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The Bilinear Approach s-Plane to z-Plane F. Overbounding and Testing for Stability G. Interlacing Properties of Interval Polynomials Interlacing Property for Continuous- Time Systems Interlacing Property for Discrete- Time Systems Page 26 27 29 33... of p(z) from F(+t) Calculation of s+q Calculation of s~i Calculation of the Minimum Distance of p(z) from P&? Calculation of s Calculation of s Calculation of the Minimum Distance of p(z) from Flsi Calculation of ss Calculation of ss E...

Aguirre, Gabriel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models  

SciTech Connect

This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates, Redmond, VA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Modified discrete random walk with absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We obtain expected number of arrivals, probability of arrival, absorption probabilities and expected time before absorption for a modified discrete random walk on the (sub)set of integers. In a [pqrs] random walk the particle can move one step forward or backward, stay for a moment in the same state or it can be absorbed immediately in the current state. M[pqrs] is a modified version, where probabilities on both sides of a multiple function barrier M are of different [pqrs] type.

Theo van Uem

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

199

Efficient energy stable schemes with spectral discretization in space ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct energy stable schemes for the time discretization of the highly nonlinear ... shape) in order to achieve a well-defined energy for the system.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Lowest-rank Solutions of Continuous and Discrete Lyapunov ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fortunately,. Mesbahi and Papavassilopoulos [On the rank minimization prob- ... with the semidefinite cone constraint, the lowest-rank solutions of the discrete ...

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A Discrete Algorithm for Crystal Structure Prediction of Organic Molecules  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main features of the new algorithm are analysis of the molecule, discretization of the space, statistical atom-pair functions and clustering due to a similarity index.

Hofmann, D.W.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

DNA Origami Directed Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Self-Assembly of Discrete Silver Nanoparticle Architectures Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2010 Volume: 49 Pages: 2700-2704 ABSTRACT: DNA origami...

203

2-D discrete element modeling of unconsolidated sandstones.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work unconsolidated sands saturated with heavy oil were modeled using a discrete element numerical model, (DEM). The DEM code was built in Mathematica… (more)

Franquet Barbara, Javier Alejandro

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Seasonal trends in growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and metals in six species of emergent aquatic macrophytes  

SciTech Connect

Growth and biomass accumulation of selected nutrients and trace metals were monitored for six species of aquatic macrophytes during June, August and November, 1993. Plant species were cultivated in two polyculture treatments, each replicated three times. Polyculture I consisted of Scirpus acutus (hardstem bullrush), Phragmites communes (common reed), and Phalaris arundinacea (canary grass). Polyculture H consisted of Typha spp. (cattail), Scirpus atrovirens (green bullrush), and Scirpus cyperinus (wool grass). Each of the six cells (6 x 9 x 0.6 m), was operated as a gravel-substrate, subsurface-flow wetlands in a continuous recirculating mode. At six week intervals, macro, micro and trace elements were dissolved and added to the sump of the recirculating system. On each of three sampling dates, replicate shoot and root samples were collected, segregated by species and tissue type (roots, rhizomes, stems and leaves), and prepared for gravimetric biomass estimates and chemical analysis. Tissue specific concentrations of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu, were determined on each date for each species and tissue type. Results will be discussed with respect to species specific growth rates, biomass accumulation, and seasonal uptake and translocation of plant nutrients.

Behrends, L.L.; Bailey, E.; Bulls, M.J.; Coonrod, H.S.; Sikora, F.J.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

Cai, Yujun [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)] [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Li, Jian-Dong [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States)] [Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, and Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Yan, Chen, E-mail: Chen_Yan@urmc.rochester.edu [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)] [Aab Cardiovascular Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

206

PBL FY 2002 Third Quarter Review Forecast of Generation Accumulated...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Power Business Line Generation Accumulated Net Revenues Forecast for Financial-Based Cost Recovery Adjustment Clause (FB CRAC) FY 2002 Third Quarter Review Forecast in Millions...

207

FY 2002 Generation Audited Accumulated Net Revenues, February...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 021003 February 2003 Bonneville Power Administration Power Business Line FY 2002 Generation Audited Accumulated Net Revenues for Financial- Based Cost Recovery Adjustment...

208

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

209

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Discretization and Algorithms for Strong Coupling in Computational Aeroelasticity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.2 Structural discretization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.3 Mimicing the energy and the behaviour of the corresponding algorithmic processes. A discretization that mimics the energy budget the ambitions to do so for the overall aeroelastic scheme. A conservative load projection at the uid

212

EQUILIBRIUM RECONSTRUCTION FROM DISCRETE MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS IN A TOKAMAK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EQUILIBRIUM RECONSTRUCTION FROM DISCRETE MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS IN A TOKAMAK Blaise Faugeras (joint of the equilibrium in a Tokamak from discrete magnetic mea- surements. In order to solve this inverse problem we of a plasma in a Tokamak [1]. The state variable of interest in the modelization of such an equilibrium under

Faugeras, Blaise

213

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs Mahmoud Ghoniem, Youssef algorithms for video de- noising and simplification based on discrete regularization on graphs. The main difference between video and image denoising is the temporal redundancy in video sequences. Recent works

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

214

Induction Generation Ostrowski Recognition Discrete geometry and numeration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Induction Generation Ostrowski Recognition Discrete geometry and numeration V. Berth´e LIRMM;Induction Generation Ostrowski Recognition A classical problem in Diophantine approximation How to approximate a line in R3 by points in Z3 ? How to define a discrete line in R3? #12;Induction Generation

215

Optimal Algorithms for Generating Discrete Random Variables with Changing Distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimal Algorithms for Generating Discrete Random Variables with Changing Distributions T. Hagerup arithmetic and the floor function, 3. generating a uniformly distributed real number between 0 and 1 K. Mehlhorn I. Munro Abstract We give optimal algorithms for generating discrete random variables

Mehlhorn, Kurt

216

Combined Delta-Nabla Sum Operator in Discrete Fractional Calculus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a more general discrete fractional operator, given by convex linear combination of the delta and nabla fractional sums. Fundamental properties of the new fractional operator are proved. As particular cases, results on delta and nabla discrete fractional calculus are obtained.

Bastos, Nuno R O

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enhancing complex system performance using discrete-event simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we utilize discrete-event simulation (DES) merged with human factors analysis to provide the venue within which the separation and deconfliction of the system/human operating principles can occur. A concrete example is presented to illustrate ... Keywords: discrete event simulation, potential capacity, queuing model

Glenn O. Allgood; Mohammed M. Olama; Joe E. Lake

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics 1 Prof. Dr. Stefan Nickel ­ Health Care Logistics: Overview Health Care Logistics 11/28/2013 #12;Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics 2 Prof. Dr. Stefan Nickel ­ Health Care Logistics: Overview Health Care

Al Hanbali, Ahmad

219

Mechanical Integrators Derived from a Discrete Variational Principle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Integrators Derived from a Discrete Variational Principle Jerey M. Wendlandt1;2 Mechanical Engineering, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Jerrold E. Marsden3 for mechanical system simulation are created by using discrete algorithms to approximate the continuous equations

Marsden, Jerrold

220

A discrete model of energy-conserved wave function collapse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...articles 1009 159 A discrete model of energy-conserved wave function collapse Shan...100190, People's Republic of China Energy non-conservation is a serious problem...paper, we propose a discrete model of energy-conserved wave function collapse. It...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Long-Term Evolution of Anthropogenic Heat Fluxes into a Subsurface Urban Heat Island  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, we develop an analytical heat flux model to investigate possible drivers such as increased ground surface temperatures (GSTs) at artificial surfaces and heat losses from basements of buildings, sewage systems, subsurface district heating networks, and reinjection of thermal wastewater. ... Although only 41 of the original wells in 1977 could be used for measurements in 2011, both measurement campaigns yield representative regional GWT distributions because of the homogeneous distribution of the wells within the study area (Figure 1). ...

Kathrin Menberg; Philipp Blum; Axel Schaffitel; Peter Bayer

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

222

Subsurface Conditions Description of the B and BX and BY Waste Management Area  

SciTech Connect

This document provides a discussion of the subsurface conditions relevant to the occurrence and migration of contaminants in the vadose zone and groundwater underlying the 241-B, -BX, and -BY tank farms. This document provides a concise summary of existing information in support of characterization planning. This document includes a description of the available environmental contamination data and a limited, qualitative interpretation of these data.

WOOD, M.I.

2000-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

223

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

224

Identification of subsurface fractures in the Austin Chalk using vertical seismic profiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF SUSSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1992 Major Subject: Geophysics IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FRACTURES IN THE AUSTIN CHALK USING VERTICAL SEISMIC PROFILES A Thesis by KYLE THOMAS LEWALLEN Approved as to style and content by: T. W. Spencer...

Lewallen, Kyle Thomas

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

226

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Self-Accumulation of Information in the Nature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To understand why information accumulates despite the global entropy increase, we argue that existing composite entities, from atoms to galaxies, including lives, are information condensates, which accumulate information in a self-explanatory manner. In order to confirm and to illustrate this idea, we investigate the roles of information in survival of a hydrogen atom.

Keiichi Akama

2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

229

ORIGINAL PAPER Accumulation of vitamin E in potato (Solanum tuberosum)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER Accumulation of vitamin E in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers Elizabeth F. Crowell of tocopherols can be accumulated in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers through metabolic engineering. Two transgenes were constitutively over-expressed in potato: Arabid- opsis thaliana p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxy

Douches, David S.

230

Saccharomyces cerevisiae does not accumulate ethanol against a concentration gradient.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...found that this accumulation does not occur and that ethanol permeates...accumulation suggested that ethanol does not freely permeate the yeast...diffusion occurs so rapidly that it does not allow detectable intracellular...ed.), Biochemists's handbook. E & F. N. Spon Ltd., London...

J M Guijarro; R Lagunas

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Facilitated Strontium Transport by Remobilization of Strontium-Containing Secondary Precipitates in Hanford Site Subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Significantly enhanced immobilization of radionuclides (such as 90Sr and 137Cs) due to adsorption and coprecipitation with neo-formed colloid-sized secondary precipitates has been reported at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site. However, the stability of these secondary precipitates containing radionuclides in the subsurface under changeable field conditions is not clear. Here, the authors tested the remobilization possibility of Sr containing secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite) in the subsurface using saturated column experiments under different geochemical and flow conditions. The columns were packed with quartz sand that contained secondary precipitates (nitrate-cancrinite containing Sr), and leached using colloid-free solutions under different flow rates, varying pH, and ionic strength conditions. The results indicate remobilization of the neo-formed secondary precipitates could be possible given a change of background conditions. The remobility of the neo formed precipitates increased with the rise in the leaching solution flow rate and pH (in a range of pH 4 to 11), as well as with decreasing solution ionic strength. The increased mobility of Sr-containing secondary precipitates with changing background conditions can be a potential source for additional radionuclide transport in Hanford Site subsurface environments.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Subsurface and Plant Contamination During Natural Attenuation and Phytoremediation of Silt Loam Contaminated with Chlorinated Organic Compounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Root establishment of perennial ryegrass (L. Perenne) in diesel contaminated subsurface soil layers. Environ. Pollut. 145...15226510903353120 USEPA. 1996a. Clean up the nations waste sites: Markets and technology trends. Office of Solid Waste and Emergency...

Changhwan Cho; Soyoung Park; Kijune Sung

234

Evaluation of a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at Regional–Local Scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperature–moisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and land–atmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Discrete Exterior Geometry Approach to Structure-Preserving Discretization of Distributed-Parameter Port-Hamiltonian Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper addresses the issue of structure-preserving discretization of open distributed-parameter systems with Hamiltonian dynamics. Employing the formalism of discrete exterior calculus, we introduce a simplicial Dirac structure as a discrete analogue of the Stokes-Dirac structure and demonstrate that it provides a natural framework for deriving finite-dimensional port-Hamiltonian systems that emulate their infinite-dimensional counterparts. The spatial domain, in the continuous theory represented by a finite-dimensional smooth manifold with boundary, is replaced by a homological manifold-like simplicial complex and its augmented circumcentric dual. The smooth differential forms, in discrete setting, are mirrored by cochains on the primal and dual complexes, while the discrete exterior derivative is defined to be the coboundary operator. This approach of discrete differential geometry, rather than discretizing the partial differential equations, allows to first discretize the underlying Stokes-Dirac structure and then to impose the corresponding finite-dimensional port-Hamiltonian dynamics. In this manner, a number of important intrinsically topological and geometrical properties of the system are preserved.

Marko Seslija; Arjan van der Schaft; Jacquelien M. A. Scherpen

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

236

A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

237

The discrete potential Boussinesq equation and its multisoliton solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An alternate form of discrete potential Boussinesq equation is proposed and its multisoliton solutions are constructed. An ultradiscrete potential Boussinesq equation is also obtained from the discrete potential Boussinesq equation using the ultradiscretization technique. The detail of the multisoliton solutions is discussed by using the reduction technique. The lattice potential Boussinesq equation derived by Nijhoff et al. is also investigated by using the singularity confinement test. The relation between the proposed alternate discrete potential Boussinesq equation and the lattice potential Boussinesq equation by Nijhoff et al. is clarified.

Ken-ichi Maruno; Kenji Kajiwara

2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

238

The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost  

SciTech Connect

The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

Mukhtar, Saqib

1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

240

Femtosecond accumulated photon echo in Er-doped fibers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report the observation of accumulated photon echo in Er-doped fibers. We also demonstrate time reversal and autoconvolution of femtosecond pulses, which suggest that Er-doped fibers...

da Silva, V L; Silberberg, Y; Heritage, J P; Chase, E W; Saifi, M A; Andrejco, M J

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Constrained Interpolation Remap of Discrete Divergence Free Fields  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Shashkov M. 1 Shashkov M. 1 Constrained Interpolation Remap of Discrete Divergence Free Fields P.B. Bochev, * M. Shashkov † * Sandia National Laboratories, Org. 9214, Albuquerque, NM 87185 † Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-7, Los Alamos, NM 87545 We present a constrained interpolation (CI) algorithm for remapping of divergence free vector fields encoded as 2-cochains on a two-dimensional cell complex. On contractible domains discrete divergence free fields are 2-coboundaries and so they have potentials represented by 1-cochains. The algorithm takes advantage of this fact by using the discrete potential to effect the remapping of the divergence free field. The discrete potential is reconstructed and interpolated to the new cell complex. Application of

242

Applications of Algebraic Topology to Compatible Spatial Discretizations  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hyman J. 1 Hyman J. 1 Applications of Algebraic Topology to Compatible Spatial Discretizations P. B. Bochev, * J. M. Hyman † * Sandia National Laboratories, Org. 9214, Albuquerque, NM 87185 † Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-7, Los Alamos, NM 87545 We provide a common framework for compatible discretizations using algebraic topology to guide our analysis. The main concept is the natural inner product on cochains, which induces a combinatorial Hodge theory. The framework comprises of mutually consistent operations of differentiation and integration, has a discrete Stokes theorem, and preserves the invariants of the DeRham cohomology groups. The latter allows for an elementary calculation of the kernel of the discrete Laplacian. Our framework provides an abstraction that includes examples

243

Cavity QED implementation of the discrete quantum Fourier transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a scheme for the implementation of the discrete quantum Fourier transform using cavity quantum electrodynamics. In the proposed scheme a series of atoms whose atomic coherence carries the input state passes through a series of cavities...

Scully, Marlan O.; Zubairy, M. Suhail

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Resolution of grain scale interactions using the Discrete Element Method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Granular materials are an integral part of many engineering systems. Currently, a popular tool for numerically investigating granular systems is the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Nearly all implementations of the DEM, ...

Johnson, Scott M. (Scott Matthew), 1978-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

A piecewise linear finite element discretization of the diffusion equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it discretizes the diffusion equation on an arbitrary polyhedral mesh. We implemented our method in the KULL software package being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This code previously utilized Palmer's method as its diffusion solver, which...

Bailey, Teresa S

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nano-tribology of discrete track recording media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.27 (a) Schematic of slider flying over disk and pressure1.27 (a) Schematic of slider flying over disk and pressureat very small slider-disk flying heights for discrete track

Yoon, Yeoungchin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Simulation of the head disk interface for discrete track media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of discrete tracks on the steady state flying behavior of sub ambient proximity sliders. A ... air bearing simulator is used to simulate the flying characteristics of sliders ov...

Maik Duwensee; Shoji Suzuki; Judy Lin; David Wachenschwanz…

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

2-D discrete element modeling of unconsolidated sandstones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

developed in this thesis is compared to the results of triaxial tests performed in cylindrical core samples of unconsolidated sandstones saturated with heavy oil. The discrete element model treats the sand as a two dimensional assembly of particles...

Franquet Barbara, Javier Alejandro

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

249

NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DISCRETE TOMOGRAPHY K.J. Batenburg a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DISCRETE TOMOGRAPHY K.J. Batenburg a W.A. Kosters b a Mathematical Institute of crystalline solids at atomic resolution from electron microscopic images can be considered the "holy grail

Kosters, Walter

250

Discrete Propagation in Numerically Simulated Nocturnal Squall Lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Simulations of a typical midlatitude squall line were used to investigate a mechanism for discrete propagation, defined as convective initiation ahead of an existing squall line leading to a faster propagation speed for the storm complex. Radar ...

Robert G. Fovell; Gretchen L. Mullendore; Seung-Hee Kim

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Global confinement and discrete dynamo activity in the MST reversed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

confinement and discrete dynamo activity in the MST reversed-field pinch* S. Hokin,+ A. Almagri, S. Assadi, J. Beckstead, G. Chartas, N. Cracker, M. Cudzinovic, D. Den Hat-tog, FL...

252

AC transmission system planning choosing lines from a discrete set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission system planning (TSP) is a difficult nonlinear optimization problem involving non-convex quadratic terms, as well as discrete variables. We extend prior results for linear relaxations, drawing on a preliminary ...

Gilbertson, Eric W.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

Norvell, Robert Gerald

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

254

Testing efficiency of storage in the subsurface: frio brine pilot experiment  

SciTech Connect

Can we demonstrate that subsurface storage is an effective method of reducing emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere? The Frio Brine Pilot Experiment is designed to test storage performance of a typical subsurface environment in an area where large-volume sources and sinks are abundant, near Houston, Texas, USA. We employed extensive pre-experiment characterization and modeling to identify significant factors that increase or decrease risk of leakage from the injection zone. We then designed the experiment to focus on those factors, as well as to test for presence or absence of events that are not expected. A fully developed reservoir model of heterogeneous reworked fluvial sandstones of the Frio Formation documents three-dimensional compartmentalization of the injection horizon by faulting associated with salt-dome intrusion and growth. Modeling using the TOUGH2 simulator showed that a significant source of uncertainty for subsurface performance of injected CO2 is residual CO2 saturation during storage. If initial displacement of water during injection is efficient and capillary effects create the expected residual saturation of 30 percent CO2, the volume occupied by the plume will be limited, and long-term storage can be expected even in an open system. If, however, during injection, CO2 moves out from the injection well along high-permeability pathways, it may not contact most pores, and residual saturation will have a smaller effect on storage. Our experiment is therefore designed to monitor plume geometry and CO2 saturation near the injection well and closely spaced observation well. Leakage out of the injection zone as a result of well engineering or other flaws in the seal is also monitored in the sandstone immediately overlying the injection zone and at the surface using multiple techniques. Permitting strategies include cooperation among two State agencies, as well as Federal NEPA assessment, because of the innovative aspects of the experiment.

Hovorka, Susan D.; Doughty, Christine; Holtz, Mark

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fractional Equations of Kicked Systems and Discrete Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting from kicked equations of motion with derivatives of non-integer orders, we obtain "fractional" discrete maps. These maps are generalizations of well-known universal, standard, dissipative, kicked damped rotator maps. The main property of the suggested fractional maps is a long-term memory. The memory effects in the fractional discrete maps mean that their present state evolution depends on all past states with special forms of weights. These forms are represented by combinations of power-law functions.

Vasily E. Tarasov; George M. Zaslavsky

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Hamilton Operators, Discrete Symmetries, Brute Force and SymbolicC++  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To find the discrete symmetries of a Hamilton operator $\\hat H$ is of central importance in quantum theory. Here we describe and implement a brute force method to determine the discrete symmetries given by permutation matrices for Hamilton operators acting in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space. Spin and Fermi systems are considered as examples. A computer algebra implementation in SymbolicC++ is provided.

Willi-Hans Steeb; Yorick Hardy

2012-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

Seismic Survey Report for Central Nevada Test Area, Subsurface, Correction Action Unit 443, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The seismic survey was successful in imaging the water table and underlying structures at the site. The configuration of the water table reflector confirms the general southeast horizontal flow direction in the alluvial aquifer. Offsets in the water table reflector, both at known faults that reach the surface and at subsurface faults not previously recognized, indicate that both extension and blast-related faults are barriers to lateral groundwater flow. The results from this study have been used to optimally locate two new wells designed to monitor head levels and possible contaminant migration in the alluvial aquifer at CTNA.

None

2008-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

SciTech Connect

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

260

Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

8 - Introduction to discrete dislocation statics and dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides an introduction to discrete dislocation statics and dynamics. The chapter deals with the simulation of plasticity of metals at the microscopic and mesoscopic scale using space- and time-discretized dislocation statics and dynamics. The complexity of discrete dislocation models is due to the fact that the mechanical interaction of ensembles of such defects is of an elastic nature and, therefore, involves long-range interactions. Space-discretized dislocation simulations idealize dislocations outside the dislocation cores as linear defects that are embedded within an otherwise homogeneous, isotropic or anisotropic, linear elastic medium. The aim of the chapter is to concentrate on those simulations that are discrete in both space and time. It explicitly incorporates the properties of individual lattice defects in a continuum formulation. The theoretical framework of linear continuum elasticity theory is overviewed as required for the formulation of basic dislocation mechanics. The chapter also discusses the dislocation statics, where the fundamentals of linear isotropic and anisotropic elasticity theory that are required in dislocation theory are reviewed. The chapter describes the dislocation dynamics, where it is concerned with the introduction of continuum dislocation dynamics. The last two sections deal with kinematics of discrete dislocation dynamics and dislocation reactions and annihilation.

Dierk Raabe

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Enhancements to and Characterization of the Very Early Time Electromagnetic (VETEM) Prototype Instrument and Applications to Shallow Subsurface Imaging at Sites in the DOE Complex - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Field tests and deployments of VETEM is a flexible and highly effective new system for electromagnetic imaging that offers significant new 3D electromagnetic imaging capabilities in the shallow subsurface. Important new numerical modeling techniques have been produced, which are applicable to electromagnetic subsurface imaging, and suggest further research and development. In addition, this research has also produced a flexible, fast, and fully functional prototype VETEM system that has produced some remarkable subsurface images, has bridged the gap between pure research and applications, and is now available for use at DOE sites that have shallow subsurface imaging needs.

Wright, D.L.; Chew, W.C.

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Understanding the Long Term Ecosystem Stability of a Fen Mire by Analyzing Subsurface Geology, Eco-Hydrology and Nutrient Stoichiometry – Case Study of the Rospuda Valley (NE Poland)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Rospuda valley, two mire parts differ considerably with respect to subsurface geological settings and long–term vegetation stability. By jointly analysing sub...

Ewa Jab?o?ska; Tomasz Falkowski; Jaros?aw Chorma?ski; Filip Jarzombkowski…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Phytosiderophore Effects on Subsurface Actinide Contaminants: Potential for Phytostabilization and Phytoextraction  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to understand the influence of phytosiderophore-producing plants (grasses, including crops such as wheat and barley) on the biogeochemistry of actinide and other metal contaminants in the subsurface environment, and to determine the potential of phytosiderophore-producing plants for phytostabilization and phytoextraction of actinides and some metal soil contaminants. Phytosiderophores are secreted by graminaceous plants such as barley and wheat for the solubilization, mobilization and uptake of Fe and other essential nutrients from soils. The ability for these phytosiderophores to chelate and absorb actinides using the same uptake system as for Fe is being investigated though characterization of actinide-phytosiderophore complexes (independently of plants), and characterization of plant uptake of such complexes. We may also show possible harm caused by these plants through increased chelation of actinides that increase in actinide mobilization & migration in the subsurface environment. This information can then be directly applied by either removal of harmful plants, or can be used to develop plant-based soil stabilization/remediation technologies. Such technologies could be the low-cost, low risk solution to many DOE actinide contamination problems.

Ruggiero, Christy

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Staining of in vivo subsurface degradation in dental composites with silver nitrate  

SciTech Connect

A previously reported technique for staining areas of degradation in dental composite restorations was evaluated in 51 removed restorations. The staining reagent was silver nitrate, which penetrated the degraded subsurface as ionic silver and was subsequently developed into colored deposits of metallic silver. Several artefacts were recognized that resulted in an apparent image of subsurface stain. Most importantly, the presence of a layer of adsorbed silver on the edge of the specimen exaggerated the extent of staining. In order for the true depth of stain to be determined, thin sections of the materials should first be examined with a stereomicroscope to distinguish any contribution from adsorbed silver on the specimen edge. With this regimen, no stain was present in 41% of the restorations, and in a further 30%, the depth of stain was less than 50 microns. In two composites, the depth of stain was greater than 900 microns, and in a number of specimens, localized stain was found in association with attrition scars. Energy-dispersive x-ray analysis indicated that the amount of silver present in the degraded layers was very small. Overall, the results indicated that the staining technique is useful in the study of composite degradation.

Mair, L.H. (Univ. of Liverpool (England))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Electron probe micro-analysis for subsurface demineralization and remineralization of dental enamel  

SciTech Connect

A quantitative study of fluoride distribution profile changes in dental enamel was conducted by means of electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA). Fluoride-deposited hydroxyapatite powders were chosen as fluoride standards, and analytical conditions were optimized. The lower limit of detection for fluoride was estimated to be 270 ppm, with an accelerating voltage of 5 kV, a specimen current of 40 nA, and a counting time of 40 seconds. Fluoride profiles in fluoride-treated dental enamel, which exhibited intact surface layers and subsurface demineralization, were determined. The results were also compared with those of an acid-abrasion method, and reasonable consistency was found between these two methods, although the acid-abrasion procedure yielded a slightly lower fluoride content in the initial layers, followed by a higher content of fluoride in the deeper layers. The precision of fluoride profile data obtained from EPMA permits further studies to be conducted on the kinetics of subsurface demineralization and intact surface layer formation (white spot formation) which is observed during the acid challenge of dental enamel.

Chu, J.S.; Fox, J.L.; Higuchi, W.I.; Nash, W.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks  

SciTech Connect

Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: •Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. •Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

268

Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors  

SciTech Connect

Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Mapping subsurface radionuclide migration and groundwater flow with organic tracers. [Shallow-land burial  

SciTech Connect

At Pacific Northwest Laboratory we have had the opportunity to study the subsurface migration of radionuclides at the Maxey Flats burial site. We constructed an experimental study area adjacent to one of the waste-filled trenches at the site. In this report we describe some preliminary results of organic research currently underway at Maxey Flats. This research is aimed at: (1) elucidating the role of organic species in the subsurface migration of radionuclides; and (2) testing the usefulness of artificial and in situ organic groundwater tracers for mapping radionuclide migration and groundwater flow. We also describe two analytical procedures developed for this research. First, as part of a survey study of organics in Maxey Flats groundwater we have developed a procedure for the isolation and characterization of trace levels of organics in radioactive groundwaters. Second, for a detailed chemical speciation study we developed a procedure based on steric exclusion chromatography for testing whether or not organics are chelated to radionuclides. 1 figure, 1 table.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.; Myers, R.B.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Automated laser scatter detection of surface and subsurface defects in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components  

SciTech Connect

Silicon Nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics are currently a primary material of choice to replace conventional materials in many structural applications because of their oxidation resistance and desirable mechanical and thermal properties at elevated temperatures. However, surface or near-subsurface defects, such as cracks, voids, or inclusions, significantly affect component lifetimes. These defects are currently difficult to detect, so a technique is desired for the rapid automated detection and quantification of both surface and subsurface defects. To address this issue, the authors have developed an automated system based on the detection of scattered laser light which provides a 2-D map of surface or subsurface defects. This system has been used for the analysis of flexure bars and button-head tensile rods of several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. Mechanical properties of these bars have also been determined and compared with the laser scatter results.

Steckenrider, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical Properties and Defect Recovery. Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical...

274

Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form  

SciTech Connect

The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The project’s tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

Bakray, Tamar [Rutgers University

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

275

7.10 MATLAB Experiment on Discrete-Time Systems Purpose: In this experiment, we analyze time responses of a higher-order linear discrete-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7.10 MATLAB Experiment on Discrete-Time Systems Purpose: In this experiment, we analyze time responses of a higher-order linear discrete- time system using MATLAB. We study system impulse, step-time dynamic systems using MATLAB. Consider the linear discrete-time system

Gajic, Zoran

276

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the CNTA Subsurface Sites (CAU Number 443), Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) planned environmental investigation of the subsurface Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) No. 443. The CNTA is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, adjacent to U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CNTA was the site of Project Faultless, a nuclear device detonated in the subsurface by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton. Two similar tests were planned for the CNTA, but neither of them was completed. Based on the general definition of a corrective action investigation (CAI) from Section IV.14 of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO), the purpose of the CAI is ''to gather data sufficient to characterize the nature, extent, and rate of migration or potential rate of migration from releases or discharges of pollutants or contaminants and/or potential releases or discharges from corrective action units identified at the facilities''. For CNTA CAU 443 the concepts developed for the Underground Test Area (UGTA) CAUs will be applied on a limited scale. For the UGTA CAUs, ''the objective of the CAI process is to define boundaries around each UGTA CAU that establish areas that contain water that may be unsafe for domestic and municipal use,'' as stated in Appendix VI of the FFACO (1996). Based on this strategy the CAI for CAU 443 will start with modeling using existing data. New data collection activities are generally contingent upon the results of the modeling and may or may not be part of the CAI. Specific objectives of the CAI ar e as follows: (1) determine the characteristics of the groundwater flow system, the sources of contamination, and the transport processes to acceptable levels of uncertainty; (2) develop a credible numerical model of groundwater flow and contaminant transport for the UC-1 Subsurface Corrective Action Site (CAS) and downgradient areas; and, (3) develop stochastic predictions of the contaminant boundary at an acceptable level of uncertainty.

USDOE/NV

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics  

SciTech Connect

A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Discrete symmetry in graphene: the Dirac equation and beyond  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this pedagogical paper we review the discrete symmetries of the Dirac equation using elementary tools, but in a comparative order: the usual 3 + 1 dimensional case and the 2 + 1 dimensional case. Motivated by new applications of the 2d Dirac equation in condensed matter, we further analyze the discrete symmetries of a full tight-binding model in hexagonal lattices without conical approximations. We touch upon an effective CPT symmetry breaking that occurs when deformations and second-neighbor corrections are considered.

Sadurní, Emerson; Rosado, Alfonso

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Discrete Lange-Newell criterion for dissipative systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the derivation of the discrete complex Ginzburg-Landau equation with first- and second-neighbor couplings using a nonlinear electrical network. Furthermore, we discuss theoretically and numerically modulational instability of plane carrier waves launched through the line. It is pointed out that the underlying analysis not only spells out the discrete Lange-Newell criterion by the means of the linear stability analysis at which the modulational instability occurs for the generation of a train of ultrashort pulses, but also characterizes the long-time dynamical behavior of the system when the instability grows.

Fabien II Ndzana; Alidou Mohamadou; Timoleon Crépin Kofané

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

280

Addendum to the CAIP for CAU 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

513-ADD 513-ADD ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447: PROJECT SHOAL AREA, NEVADA SUBSURFACE SITE DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 1 March 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 (423) 576-8401 ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

282

Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team  

SciTech Connect

The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination  

SciTech Connect

Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Metal Accumulation by Aquacultured Seedlings of Indian Mustard  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Metal Accumulation by Aquacultured Seedlings of Indian Mustard ... Spectra were calibrated using the spectrum of Cd metal foil, collected simultaneously with each data set; the first energy inflection point of cadmium foil was assumed to be 26?714 eV. ...

David E. Salt; Ingrid J. Pickering; Roger C. Prince; Deloressa Gleba; Slavik Dushenkov; Robert D. Smith; Ilya Raskin

1997-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Transient accumulation of elastic energy in proton translocating ATP synthase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hypothesis Transient accumulation of elastic energy in proton translocating ATP synthase Dmitry A 12 March 1999 Abstract ATP synthase is conceived as a rotatory engine with two reversible drives that the hydrolysis of three molecules of ATP in FI drives the shaft over a full circle in three steps of 120³ each

Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen

288

The accumulation of nonylphenol in a wastewater recycling process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mathematical model was developed in this paper to describe the nonylphenol (NP) accumulation in the effluent of a wastewater recycling system. The model quantitatively presented the relationships among the NP concentrations in the raw wastewater and the system effluent, the number of wastewater recycling cycles, the water recycling ratio, the system NP removal efficiency, and the NP accumulation factor. The mathematical model was then verified through experimental modeling of a wastewater recycling process, and it was indicated that the Pearson correlation coefficient between mathematical simulation and experimental modeling results was 0.652. The study results indicated that the NP accumulation factor of a wastewater recycling system would approach a constant for large number of wastewater recycling cycles given the wastewater recycling ratio and system NP removal efficiency. The results also revealed that the NP concentration in the effluent increased with the wastewater recycling ratio given the system NP removal efficiency, and the increase of NP removal efficiency would decrease the NP accumulation in the system effluent under a given wastewater recycling ratio condition. The model was then applied to compute the maximum wastewater recycling ratio, predict reclaimed water quality and direct the design and management of sewage recycling systems in China.

Rui-Xia Hao; Yu-Wen Zhou; Shui-Yuan Cheng; Jian-Bing Li; Man Zhao; Xi Chen; Ning Yao

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the gas balance at night (when GPP is zero) and then GPP is calculated from Eq. 2. This gas COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

Berkowitz, Alan R.

290

Review of Alternative Technologies for Pretreatment of Accumulated HLW  

SciTech Connect

Accumulated liquid high-level wastes (HLW) from nuclear centers in Russia and the United States (U. S.) contain great amounts of nonradioactive salts; it is prudent to vitrify not the entire volume of these wastes, but only the concentrates of radionuclides recovered from them. For this purpose, different pretreatment technologies based on liquid-liquid extraction are under development.

Romanovsky, V.; Rimski-Korsakov, A.

2002-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

291

Perinatal Undernutrition: Accumulation of Catecholamines in Rat Brain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the pregnant· rats consumed food containing 8 per- cent protein: half were fed 24 percent protein (6). ThusPerinatal Undernutrition: Accumulation of Catecholamines in Rat Brain Abstract. Brains of rats in the brains of rats (2) and children (3). This decrease could reflect changes in the number of neurons

Wurtman, Richard

292

A Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy Pat Hanrahan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by solving the full radiative transfer equation [1]. Only a few papers in graphics have taken this approachA Practical Model for Subsurface Light Transport Henrik Wann Jensen Stephen R. Marschner Marc Levoy transport in translucent materials. The model enables efficient simulation of effects that BRDF models

O'Brien, James F.

293

Subsurface Imaging using Ground-Penetrating Radar Measurements Nathan Goodman, Carl Leuschen, Richard Plumb and Chris Allen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of transmitters and receivers in several common configurations, such as the offset VRP, cross-borehole of the subsurface layers. Further- more, the advantages of ground-penetrating radar over drill- ing and digging FACILITY Work has just been completed on a fully automated test facility. A large concrete box

Kansas, University of

294

Enumeration and Characterization of Iron(III)-Reducing Microbial Communities from Acidic Subsurface Sediments Contaminated with Uranium(VI)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...bioremediation potential in uranium-contaminated subsurface...reduced. Once nitrate is depleted, U(VI) and Fe(III...bacteria, a study in a uranium-contaminated mill tailing...sludge. American Public Health Association, Washington...detection of trace levels of uranium by laser-induced kinetic...

Lainie Petrie; Nadia N. North; Sherry L. Dollhopf; David L. Balkwill; Joel E. Kostka

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stable iodine 129I Radioactive iodine-129 238U Uranium-238 ABTS 2, 2’-azino-bis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid ATP Adenosine-5'-triphosphate Br- Bromide Cl- Chloride CoA Coenzyme A DOE Department of Energy DOE-EM Department... 5.5 Discussion ................................................................................ 95 VI SUMMARY ......................................................................................... 100 6.1 Accumulation of I...

Li, Hsiu-Ping

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Discrete geodesic regression in shape space Benjamin Berkels1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete geodesic regression in shape space Benjamin Berkels1 , P. Thomas Fletcher2 , Behrend Benedikt.Wirth@cims.nyu.edu Abstract. A new approach for the effective computation of geodesic re- gression curves in shape spaces is presented. Here, one asks for a geodesic curve on the shape manifold

Rumpf, Martin

298

Discrete RNA Libraries from Pseudo-Torsional Space  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The discovery that RNA molecules can fold into complex structures and carry out diverse cellular roles has led to interest in developing tools for modeling RNA tertiary structure. While significant progress has been made in establishing that the RNA backbone is rotameric, few libraries of discrete conformations specifically for use in RNA modeling have been validated. Here, we present six libraries of discrete RNA conformations based on a simplified pseudo-torsional notation of the RNA backbone, comparable to phi and psi in the protein backbone. We evaluate the ability of each library to represent single nucleotide backbone conformations, and we show how individual library fragments can be assembled into dinucleotides that are consistent with established RNA backbone descriptors spanning from sugar to sugar. We then use each library to build all-atom models of 20 test folds, and we show how the composition of a fragment library can limit model quality. Despite the limitations inherent in using discretized libraries, we find that several hundred discrete fragments can rebuild RNA folds up to 174 nucleotides in length with atomic-level accuracy (libraries presented here could easily be incorporated into RNA structural modeling, analysis, or refinement tools.

Elisabeth Humphris-Narayanan; Anna Marie Pyle

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Coded Adaptive Linear Precoded Discrete Multitone Over PLC Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coded Adaptive Linear Precoded Discrete Multitone Over PLC Channel Fahad Syed Muhammmad, Jean- DMT system is presented in the power line communication (PLC) context with a loading algorithm which spectral density constraint. Using a multipath model of PLC channel, it is shown that the proposed coded

Boyer, Edmond

300

Physics in discrete spaces (A): Space-Time organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We put forward a model of discrete physical space that can account for the structure of space- time, give an interpretation to the postulates of quantum mechanics and provide a possible explanation to the organization of the standard model of particles.

P. Peretto

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Topological horseshoes in travelling waves of discretized nonlinear wave equations  

SciTech Connect

Applying the concept of anti-integrable limit to coupled map lattices originated from space-time discretized nonlinear wave equations, we show that there exist topological horseshoes in the phase space formed by the initial states of travelling wave solutions. In particular, the coupled map lattices display spatio-temporal chaos on the horseshoes.

Chen, Yi-Chiuan, E-mail: YCChen@math.sinica.edu.tw [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Mathematics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Shyan-Shiou, E-mail: sschen@ntnu.edu.tw [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Mathematics, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Juan-Ming, E-mail: jmyuan@pu.edu.tw [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Financial and Computational Mathematics, Providence University, Shalu, Taichung 43301, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Discrete Mathematics 110 (1992) 43-59 North-Holland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

' or `combine' de Bruijn cycles? (vii) What are the analogues for larger alphabets (k symbols rather than 2Discrete Mathematics 110 (1992) 43-59 North-Holland 43 Universal structures Fan Chung cycles Revised 12 April 1991 Abstract Chung, F., P. Diaconis and R. Graham, Universal cycles for combinatorial

Diaconis, Persi

303

The RUTGERS YOUNG SCHOLARS PROGRAM in DISCRETE MATHEMATICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science [DIMACS], and is supported by a grant from school students who share your fascination with mathematics. ... attend a variety of mathematical assistants who are graduate and undergraduate Rutgers students majoring in mathematics or computer science

304

Nonconservative exact small-sample inference for discrete data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exact small-sample methods for discrete data use probability distributions that do not depend on unknown parameters. However, they are conservative inferentially: the actual error probabilities for tests and confidence intervals are bounded above by ... Keywords: Binomial distribution, Clopper-Pearson confidence interval, Fuzzy inference, Mid-P-value

Alan Agresti; Anna Gottard

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Discrete Ordinate Method for Solving Inhomogeneous Vector Radiative Transfer Equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

paper.. This type of equation appears when modeling radiative transport in plane parallel media. WeDiscrete Ordinate Method for Solving Inhomogeneous Vector Radiative Transfer Equation We describe here a solution method for equations of the type given by: µ I(,µ) +I(,µ)- () 2 1 -1 Z(,µ,µ )I(,µ )dµ

Pattanaik, Sumanta N.

306

Sparse Twisted Tensor Frame Discretization Parametric Transport Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parametric, high-dimensional transport Equations such as Vlasov-Poisson, Boltzmann and Radiative Transfer associated with the transport equation and by subsequent Galerkin discretization with a novel, sparse tensor of the phase space. In [22], for a model parametric transport problem arising in radiative transport, the use

Grohs, Philipp

307

Discrete wave turbulence of rotational capillary water waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discrete wave turbulent regime of capillary water waves with constant non-zero vorticity. The explicit Hamiltonian formulation and the corresponding coupling coefficient are obtained. We also present the construction and investigation of resonance clustering. Some physical implications of the obtained results are discussed.

Adrian Constantin; Elena Kartashova; Erik Wahlén

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

308

Simulation on Discrete Fracture Network Using Flexible Voronoi Gridding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

........................................... 3 1.2.2 Gridding Techniques ............................................................. 4 1.2.2.1 Globally Orthogonal Grid ...................................... 5 1.2.2.2 Corner Point Grid... ................................................... 5 1.2.3 Locally Orthogonal Grid ....................................................... 6 1.3 Introduction to Discrete Fracture Network Simulation ................... 7 1.4 Introduction to Fracture Aperture Measurement Using X-Ray CT...

Syihab, Zuher

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

309

3D discrete rotations using hinge angles Yohan Thibaulta,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3D discrete rotations using hinge angles Yohan Thibaulta, , Akihiro Sugimotob , Yukiko Kenmochia a of Informatics, Japan Abstract In this paper, we study 3D rotations on grid points computed by using only integers. For that purpose, we investigate the intersection between the 3D half- grid and the rotation

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

310

New C*-completions of discrete groups and related spaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article PAPERS New C*-completions of discrete groups and related...associate a C*-algebra completion of the group ring that encapsulates...every ideal D (), the ideal completion C D() is a compact quantum...normal subgroup of infinite index. Suppose D1 () and D2......

Nathanial P. Brown; Erik P. Guentner

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Discrete Applied Mathematics 121 (2002) 139153 NeST graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Applied Mathematics 121 (2002) 139­153 NeST graphs Ryan B. Haywarda; , Paul E. Kearneyb; received in revised form 14 March 2001; accepted 26 March 2001 Abstract We establish results on NeST graphs show the equivalence of proper NeST graphs and unit NeST graphs, the equivalence of ÿxed distance NeST

Hayward, Ryan B.

312

Energy-Efficient Discrete Cosine Transform on Ronald Scrofano  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy-Efficient Discrete Cosine Transform on FPGAs Ronald Scrofano Department of Computer Science is brought to mobile devices, it becomes important that it is possible to calculate the DCT in an energy-efficient the DCT with a linear array of PEs. This design is optimized for energy efficiency. We analyze the energy

Jang, Ju-Wook

313

Finite Element Discretization Strategies for the Inverse Electrocardiographic (ECG) Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite Element Discretization Strategies for the Inverse Electrocardiographic (ECG) Problem Dafang electrocardiographic (ECG) problems re- quires the ability to both quantify and minimize approxi- mation errors specifically for the inverse ECG prob- lem. By quantitatively analyzing the connection between the ill

Utah, University of

314

Extreme-Point Stability Tests for Discrete-Time Polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TA9 -10:40 Extreme-Point Stability Tests for Discrete-Time Polynomials F. PCrez *, C been an increasinginterest in finding extreme- point results for the study of stability of uncertain in the coefficients space where Schur stability of the extremes im- plies the stability of the entire family 12). Our

315

DISCRETE QUANTUM MECHANICS AND THE SPEED OF LIGHT JOSEPH TOLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCRETE QUANTUM MECHANICS AND THE SPEED OF LIGHT JOSEPH TOLES From S. McAdam, Unknowable Matters that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. So instead of showing that it's impossible to determine the speed of light. 2. Associated Physics Photons are the smallest single unit of transverse electromagnetic

Morrow, James A.

316

Touch-down and take-off hysteresis of magnetic recording sliders on discrete track media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The flying behavior of a slider over discrete track ... by the presence of the grooves on the disk. In particular, the steady state flying height of a slider flying over discrete track media is lower than that of...

Y. Yoon; F. E. Talke

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Routing with Mutual Information Accumulation in Wireless Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate optimal routing and scheduling strategies for multi-hop wireless networks with rateless codes. Rateless codes allow each node of the network to accumulate mutual information with every packet transmission. This enables a significant performance gain over conventional shortest path routing. Further, it also outperforms cooperative communication techniques that are based on energy accumulation. However, it creates complex and combinatorial networking decisions concerning which nodes participate in transmission, and which decode ordering to use. We formulate the general problem as a combinatorial optimization problem and then make use of several structural properties to simplify the solution and derive an optimal greedy algorithm. Although the reduced problem still has exponential complexity, using the insight obtained from the optimal solution to a line network, we propose two simple heuristics that can be implemented in polynomial time in a distributed fashion and compare them with the optimal s...

Urgaonkar, Rahul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affect the response of the compo- rsent. The efiects of damage are refiected through the property degradation of the structure as the subcritical damage accumulates. For laminated composites, this sub- critical damage takes the form of matrix cracks... identifies damage as dominant. cracks and fracture mechanics is applied to predict crack growth. The physical significance of the damage mode is retained with this approach. LJnfor- tunately, the damage states in composite materials contain a multitude...

Lo, David Chi Shing

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

Continued Fraction Expansion Approaches to Discretizing Fractional Order Derivatives—an Expository Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper attempts to present an expository review of continued fraction expansion (CFE) based discretization schemes for fractional order differentiators...

Yangquan Chen; Blas M. Vinagre; Igor Podlubny

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

TIME DISCRETE GEODESIC PATHS IN THE SPACE OF IMAGES B. BERKELS, A. EFFLAND, M. RUMPF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIME DISCRETE GEODESIC PATHS IN THE SPACE OF IMAGES B. BERKELS, A. EFFLAND, M. RUMPF Abstract and intensity variation. A robust and effective variational time discretization of geodesics paths is proposed requirements for the input images, the existence of discrete geodesic paths defined as minimizers

Rumpf, Martin

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DISCRETE GEODESIC CALCULUS IN THE SPACE OF VISCOUS FLUIDIC MARTIN RUMPF AND BENEDIKT WIRTH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCRETE GEODESIC CALCULUS IN THE SPACE OF VISCOUS FLUIDIC OBJECTS MARTIN RUMPF AND BENEDIKT WIRTH cheap dissimilarity measure, a time discrete geodesic calculus is developed, and applications to shape in shape space. The notion of discrete geodesics defined as energy minimizing paths gives rise

Rumpf, Martin

322

Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical study of natural convection in a vertical porous annulus with discrete heating M. Sankar online 20 December 2010 Keywords: Natural convection Annulus Discrete heating Porous medium Radii ratio to discrete heating. The outer wall is maintained iso- thermally at a lower temperature, while the top

Lopez, John M.

323

A DUALITY APPROACH TO THE GENEALOGIES OF DISCRETE NON-NEUTRAL WRIGHT-FISHER MODELS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A DUALITY APPROACH TO THE GENEALOGIES OF DISCRETE NON-NEUTRAL WRIGHT-FISHER MODELS THIERRY E formu- lae still are of great use when considering discrete non-neutral Wright-Fisher models, Running title: Duality and Discrete Non-Neutral Wright-Fisher Models. Keywords: Wright-Fisher Models

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Rheological Behavior of Xanthan Gum Solution Related to Shear Thinning Fluid Delivery for Subsurface Remediation  

SciTech Connect

Xanthan gum, a biopolymer, forms shear thinning fluids which can be used as delivery media to improve the distribution of remedial amendments injected into heterogeneous subsurface environments. The rheological behavior of the shear thinning solution needs to be known to develop an appropriate design for field injection. In this study, the rheological properties of xanthan gum solutions were obtained under various chemical and environmental conditions relevant to delivery of remedial amendments to groundwater. Higher xanthan concentration raised the absolute solution viscosity and increased the degree of shear thinning. Addition of remedial amendments (e.g., phosphate, sodium lactate, ethyl lactate) caused the dynamic viscosity of xanthan gum to decrease, but the solutions maintained shear-thinning properties. Use of simple salt (e.g. Na+, Ca2+) to increase the solution ionic strength also decreased the dynamic viscosity of xanthan and the degree of shear thinning, although the effect is a function of xanthan gum concentration and diminished as the xanthan gum concentration was increased. At high xanthan concentration, addition of salt to the solution increased dynamic viscosity. In the absence of sediments, xanthan gum solutions maintain their viscosity properties for months. However, xanthan gum solutions were shown to lose dynamic viscosity over a period of days to weeks when contacted with saturated site sediment. Loss of viscosity is attributed to physical and biodegradation processes.

Zhong, Lirong; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Szecsody, James E.

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Elevation of surficial sediment/basalt contact in the Subsurface Disposal Area, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact at the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA), within the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) is presented to provide a data base for future remedial actions at this site. About 1,300 elevation data from published and unpublished reports, maps, and surveyors notes were compiled to generate maps and cross-sections of the surficial sediment/basalt contact. In general, an east to west trending depression exists in the south central portion of the SDA with basalt closer to land surface on the northern and southern boundaries of the SDA. The lowest elevation of the surficial sediment/basalt contact is 4,979 ft and the greatest is land surface at 5,012 ft. The median elevation of the sediment/basalt interface is 4,994 ft. The median depth to basalt in the SDA is 16 ft if land surface elevation is assumed to be 5,010 ft. The depth from land surface to the sediment/basalt interface ranges from 24 ft in the southeast corner of the SDA to less than 3 ft at the north-central boundary of the SDA.

Hubbell, J.M.

1993-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

326

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced Polymer Technology for Containing and Immobilizing Strontium-90 in the Subsurface - 8361  

SciTech Connect

Many Department of Energy (DOE) sites, including Idaho and Hanford, have heavy metals and/or radionuclides (e.g. strontium-90) present that are strongly adsorbed in the vadose zone, but which nevertheless are propagating toward the water table. A key challenge for immobilization of these contaminants is bringing the chosen amendment or remediation technology into contact with the contaminated porous medium, while ensuring that contaminated water and colloids do not escape. This is particularly challenging when the subsurface geology is complex and highly heterogeneous, as is the case at many DOE sites. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in collaboration with the University of Texas at Austin (UT) has conducted research sponsored through the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) Advanced Remediation Technologies Phase I program that successfully demonstrated application of a novel, pH-triggered advanced polymer for creating a physical barrier that prevents heavy metals and radionuclides in vadose zone soil and soil-pore water from migrating to the groundwater. The focus of this paper is on the column and sandbox experiments conducted by researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory in support of the Phase I program objectives. Proof of these concepts provides a technology basis for confining or isolating a volume of contaminated groundwater, to be implemented in future investigations at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) at INL.

K. Baker; G. Heath; C. Scott; A. Schafer; S. Bryant; M. Sharma; C. Huh; S. K. Choi

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

On the Role of Subsurface Oxygen and Ethylenedioxy in Ethylene Epoxidation on Silver.  

SciTech Connect

The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The thermochemical stability of various three-component phases containing oxygen, ethylene, and Ag(111) was determined as a function of oxygen and ethylene chemical potential using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory calculations. Ethylenedioxy is stable over a wide range of conditions, although its formation may be kinetically hindered in some cases. Ethylene and ethylene-containing oxametallacycles are also found to be stable over a reasonably large range of chemical potentials, particularly if ethylenedioxy formation is neglected. Furthermore, subsurface oxygen (Osb) is seen to be present in the three-component systems at a variety of conditions; minimum energy path calculations performed at a coverage of 1/2 ML Osb suggest that this species may actually increase the reaction barrier for ring closure leading to ethylene oxide elimination from Ag(111).

Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2007-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

329

MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

330

Relative contributions of natural and waste-derived organics to the subsurface transport of radionuclides  

SciTech Connect

Our laboratory is studying the role of organic compounds in the subsurface transport of radionuclides at shallow-land burial sites of low-level nuclear waste, including a commercial site at Maxey Flats, Kentucky, and an aqueous waste disposal site. At the Maxey Flats site, several radionuclides, notably Pu and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic, organic complexes. Waste-derived organics, particularly chelating agents such as EDTA, HEDTA and associated degradation products (e.g., ED3A), are abundant in aqueous waste leachates and appear to account for the complexation. EDTA, and probably other waste-derived chelating agents as well, are chelated to the Pu and /sup 60/Co in the leachates, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. In contrast, at the low-level aqueous waste disposal site, naturally-occurring organics, ranging from low molecular weight (MW) acids to high MW humic acids, account for the bulk of the groundwater's organic content. Certain radionuclides, notably /sup 60/Co, /sup 103/Ru and /sup 125/Sb, are mobile as anionic complexes. These radionuclides are clearly associated with higher MW organics, presumably humic and fulvic acids with nominal MW's > 1000. It is clear, therefore, that naturally-occurring organics may play an important role in radionuclide transport, particularly at nuclear waste burial sites containing little in the way of waste-derived organics.

Toste, A.P.; Myers, R.B.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Controllable discrete diffraction in cascade-induced waveguides  

SciTech Connect

A new method for generating periodic lattices in quadratically nonlinear media by the three-wave cascade interaction is proposed. This method allows one to obtain stable structures with changeable parameters. These structures make it possible to realise the all-optical control of the character of the laser beam propagation. The use of the discrete diffraction allows the signal multiplexing in optical processing and information transfer devices and the control of the number of channels at the crystal output. The effect of the discrete diffraction anisotropy in the system of induced waveguides makes it possible to redistribute in the specified way the energy in the channels at the output. It is shown that the optical switching efficiency is maximal in the regime of the transverse Bragg resonance. The signal switching rate in optical lattices induced in a quadratically nonlinear medium is limited by the time of light propagation though the crystal and can achieve several terahertz. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

Borovkova, O V; Lobanov, V E; Sukhorukov, Anatolii P [M. V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics, Moscow (Russian Federation); Sukhorukova, A K [Russian State Geological Prospecting University, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fast Computation Algorithm for Discrete Resonances among Gravity Waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditionally resonant interactions among short waves, with large real wave-numbers, were described statistically and only a small domain in spectral space with integer wave-numbers, discrete resonances, had to be studied separately in resonators. Numerical simulations of the last few years showed unambiguously the existence of some discrete effects in the short-waves part of the wave spectrum. Newly presented model of laminated turbulence explains theoretically appearance of these effects thus putting a novel problem - construction of fast algorithms for computation of solutions of resonance conditions with integer wave-numbers of order $10^3$ and more. Example of such an algorithm for 4-waves interactions of gravity waves is given. Its generalization on the different types of waves is briefly discussed.

Elena Kartashova

2006-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

334

Quantum Mechanics and Discrete Time from "Timeless" Classical Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study classical Hamiltonian systems in which the intrinsic proper time evolution parameter is related through a probability distribution to the physical time, which is assumed to be discrete. - This is motivated by the ``timeless'' reparametrization invariant model of a relativistic particle with two compactified extradimensions. In this example, discrete physical time is constructed based on quasi-local observables. - Generally, employing the path-integral formulation of classical mechanics developed by Gozzi et al., we show that these deterministic classical systems can be naturally described as unitary quantum mechanical models. The emergent quantum Hamiltonian is derived from the underlying classical one. It is closely related to the Liouville operator. We demonstrate in several examples the necessity of regularization, in order to arrive at quantum models with bounded spectrum and stable groundstate.

H. -T. Elze

2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mechanism for a bounded and discrete mass spectrum of fermions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism for determining fermion masses in four spacetime dimensions is presented, which uses a scalar-field domain wall extending in a fifth spacelike dimension and a special choice of Yukawa coupling constants. A bounded and discrete fermion mass spectrum is obtained, which depends on a combination of the Yukawa coupling constants and the parameters of the scalar potential. A similar mechanism for a finite mass spectrum may apply to $(1+1)$--dimensional fermions relevant to condensed matter physics.

Klinkhamer, F R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Renormalized waves and discrete breathers in $?$-FPU chains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate via numerical simulation that in the \\textit{strongly} nonlinear limit, the $\\beta$-FPU system in thermal equilibrium behaves surprisingly like weakly nonlinear waves in properly renormalized normal variables. This arises because the collective effect of strongly nonlinear interactions effectively renormalizes linear dispersion frequency and leads to effectively weak interaction among these renormalized waves. Furthermore, we show that the dynamical scenario for thermalized $\\beta$-FPU chains is spatially highly localized discrete breathers riding chaotically on spatially extended, renormalized waves.

Boris Gershgorin; Yuri V. Lvov; David Cai

2005-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Discrete-Gauss states and the generation of focussing dark beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete-Gauss states are a new class of gaussian solutions of the free Schr\\"odinger equation owning discrete rotational symmetry. They are obtained by acting with a discrete deformation operator onto Laguerre-Gauss modes. We present a general analytical construction of these states and show the necessary and sufficient condition for them to host embedded dark beams structures. We unveil the intimate connection between discrete rotational symmetry, orbital angular momentum, and the generation of focussing dark beams. The distinguishing features of focussing dark beams are discussed. The potential applications of Discrete-Gauss states in advanced optical trapping and quantum information processing are also briefly discussed.

Albert Ferrando

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

338

The role of nanopores on U(VI) sorption and redox behavior in U(VI)-contaminated subsurface sediments  

SciTech Connect

Most reactive surfaces in clay-dominated sediments are present within nanopores (pores of nm dimension). The behavior of geological fluids and minerals in nanopores is significantly different from those in normal non-nanoporous environments. The effect of nanopore surfaces on U(VI) sorption/desorption and reduction is likely to be significant in clay-rich subsurface environments. Our research results from both model nanopore system and natural sediments from both model system (synthetic nanopore alumina) and sediments from the ORNL Field Research Center prove that U(VI) sorption on nanopore surfaces can be greatly enhanced by nanopore confinement environments. The results from the project provide advanced mechanistic, quantitative information on the physiochemical controls on uranium sorption and redox behavior in subsurface sediments. The influence of nanopore surfaces on coupled uranium sorption/desorption and reduction processes is significant in virtually all subsurface environments, because most reactive surfaces are in fact nanopore surfaces. The results will enhance transfer of our laboratory-based research to a major field research initiative where reductive uranium immobilization is being investigated. Our results will also provide the basic science for developing in-situ colloidal barrier of nanoporous alumina in support of environmental remediation and long term stewardship of DOE sites.

Xu, Huifang; Roden, Eric E.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Jung, Hun-Bok; Konishi, Hiromi; Boyanov, Maxim; Sun, Yubing; Mishra, Bhoopesh

2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

339

Hydrogeological influences on petroleum accumulations in the Arabian Gulf  

SciTech Connect

The stratigraphic and topographic conditions in the Arabian Gulf are appropriate for the instigation and maintenance of an active hydrodynamic regime. The setting is that of a gentle basin surrounded by topographic highs. The central Arabian highlands to the west-southwest, the Tarus-Zagros mountains to the north, and the Oman mountains to the east rim the structural low occupied by the Gulf. Elevations in these areas reach maximum values of approximately 1000 meters. Paleozoic through Cenozoic strata stretch continuously across the basin, are relatively unfaulted, and outcrop in the topographic highs. Such a setting is propitious for a regional hydrodynamic system with meteoric recharge in the topographic highs and discharge in the middle of the Gulf. The prolific oil and gas accumulations of this region would be subject to influence by these hydrodynamic processes. The existence of such a hydrodynamic regime is documented by a variety of evidence, including potentiometric data, water salinity measurements, and observed tilts in oil-water contacts. Potentiometric data for several Tertiary and Cretaceous units on the Arabian platform, in the Gulf, and in Iraq show a pattern of consistently decreasing potential from topographic highs to lows. Water salinities show a consistent, but inverse, variation with the potentiometric data. Tilted oil-water contacts in Cretaceous and Jurassic reservoirs are observed in several fields of the Gulf region. The direction and magnitude of the observed tilts are consistent with the water potential and salinity data, and suggest that petroleum accumulations are being influenced by a regional hydrodynamic drive. Basin modelling is used to simulate petroleum generation and migration scenarios, and to integrate these histories with the structural evolution of the Gulf. The integrated modelling study illustrates the influence of hydrodynamic processes on the distribution of petroleum accumulations.

Vizgirda, J.; Burke, L. [Mobil New Business Development, Dallas TX (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Optimisation of operating parameters during the accumulator charging process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this work involving the charging process of hydro-pneumatic accumulators in the hydrostatic power transmission system is to propose ''optimal'' operating parameters of the control system, which will allow low petrol consumption, low emission of toxic fumes and verification of the proposed model. As a tool for the simulation work, a simulation application from the Simulink library for a Matlab environment was used. As a result of the research, characteristics of the process quantities, which confirm correctness of the proposed operating parameters of the control system were obtained. In addition, the quantitative and qualitative identification of the presented model was conducted.

Zbigniew Pawelski; Sebastian Wittich

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Problem of cold accumulation as a matter of energy saving and optimization of energy consumption  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is shown that the problem of cold accumulation is complicated, and the importance of cold carriers, the temperature of generated and accumulated cold, methods of its utilization, and particularly for large ...

A. M. Arkharov; A. I. Leont’ev; V. V. Sychev…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Watershed scale fungal community characterization along a pH gradient in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to characterize fungal communities in a subsurface environment co-contaminated with uranium and nitrate at the watershed scale, and to determine the potential contribution of fungi to contaminant transformation (nitrate attenuation). The abundance, distribution and diversity of fungi in subsurface groundwater samples were determined using quantitative and semi-quantitative molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR of eukaryotic SSU rRNA genes and pyrosequencing of fungal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions. Potential bacterial and fungal denitrification was assessed in sediment-groundwater slurries amended with antimicrobial compounds and in fungal pure cultures isolated from subsurface. Our results demonstrate that subsurface fungal communities are dominated by members of the phylum Ascomycota, and a pronounced shift in fungal community composition occurs across the groundwater pH gradient at the field site, with lower diversity observed under acidic (pH < 4.5) conditions. Fungal isolates recovered from subsurface sediments were shown to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide, including cultures of the genus Coniochaeta that were detected in abundance in pyrosequence libraries of site groundwater samples. Denitrifying fungal isolates recovered from the site were classified, and found to be distributed broadly within the phylum Ascomycota, and within a single genus within the Basidiomycota. Potential denitrification rate assays with sediment-groundwater slurries showed the potential for subsurface fungi to reduce nitrate to nitrous oxide under in situ acidic pH conditions.

Jasrotia, Puja [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Green, Stefan [University of Illinois, Chicago] [University of Illinois, Chicago; Canion, Andy [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Overholt, Will [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Prakash, Om [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wafula, Dennis [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta; Hubbard, Daniela [Florida State University, Tallahassee] [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Schadt, Christopher Warren [ORNL] [ORNL; Brooks, Scott C [ORNL] [ORNL; Kostka, [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An Analysis of Surface and Subsurface Lineaments and Fractures for Oil and Gas Exploration in the Mid-Continent Region  

SciTech Connect

An extensive literature search was conducted and geological and mathematical analyses were performed to investigate the significance of using surface lineaments and fractures for delineating oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Tremendous amount of data were acquired including surface lineaments, surface major fracture zones, surface fracture traces, gravity and magnetic lineaments, and Precambrian basement fault systems. An orientation analysis of these surface and subsurface linear features was performed to detect the basic structural grains of the region. The correlation between surface linear features and subsurface oil and gas traps was assessed, and the implication of using surface lineament and fracture analysis for delineating hydrocarbon reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region discussed. It was observed that the surface linear features were extremely consistent in orientation with the gravity and magnetic lineaments and the basement faults in the Mid-Continent region. They all consist of two major sets bending northeast and northwest, representing, therefore, the basic structural grains of the region. This consistency in orientation between the surface and subsurface linear features suggests that the systematic fault systems at the basement in the Mid-Continent region have probably been reactivated many times and have propagated upward all the way to the surface. They may have acted as the loci for the development of other geological structures, including oil and gas traps. Also observed was a strong association both in orientation and position between the surface linear features and the subsurface reservoirs in various parts of the region. As a result, surface lineament and fracture analysis can be used for delineating additional oil and gas reserves in the Mid-Continent region. The results presented in this paper prove the validity and indicate the significance of using surface linear features for inferring subsurface oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region. Any new potential oil and gas reservoirs in the Mid-Continent region, if they exist, will be likely associated with the northeast- and northwest-trending surface lineaments and fracture traces in the region.

Guo, Genliang; and George, S.A.

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

344

STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, Version 4.0, User’s Guide  

SciTech Connect

This guide describes the general use, input file formatting, compilation and execution of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing single and multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. A description of the simulator’s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms are provided in a companion theory guide. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure constitutive relations. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. Source codes for the sequential versions of the simulator are available in pure FORTRAN 77 or mixed FORTRAN 77/90 forms. The pure FORTRAN 77 source code form requires a parameters file to define the memory requirements for the array elements. The mixed FORTRAN 77/90 form of the source code uses dynamic memory allocation to define memory requirements, based on a FORTRAN 90 preprocessor STEP, that reads the input files. The simulator utilizes a variable source code configuration, which allows the execution memory and speed to be tailored to the problem specifics, and essentially requires that the source code be assembled and compiled through a software maintenance utility. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Selected operational modes of the STOMP simulator are available for scalable execution on multiple processor (i.e., parallel) computers. These versions of the simulator are written in pure FORTRAN 90 with imbedded directives that are interpreted by a FORTRAN preprocessor. Without the preprocessor, the scalable version of the simulator can be executed sequentially on a single processor computer. The scalable versions of the STOMP modes carry the “-Sc” designator on the operational mode name. For example, STOMP-WCS-Sc is the scalable version of the STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) mode. A separate mode containing an evaporation model as a boundary condition on the upper surface of the computation domain has also been included. This mode, STOMP-WAE-B (Water-Air-Energy-Barriers) can be viewed as an extension of the STOMP-WAE (Water-Air-Energy) mode. Details of this particular mode are outlined by Ward et al. (2005)(a). STOMP V4.0 includes the reactive transport module ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic Equation Chemistry) for the STOMP-W (Water) and STOMP-WCS (Water-CO2-Salt) modes. For this particular module, the “-R” designator is included in the operational mode name (e.g., STOMP-W-R, STOMP-WCS-R-Sc). This mode is described in detail by White and McGrail (2005)(b). For all operational modes and processor implementations, the memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. Additional information about the simulator can be found on the STOMP webpage: http://stomp.pnl.gov. The website includes an introductory short course with problems ranging from simple one-dimensional saturated flow to complex multiphase system computations.

White, Mark D.; Oostrom, Martinus

2006-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Layerless Additive Manufacturing Process based on CNC Accumulation , Chi Zhou, Jingyuan Lao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1/13 A Layerless Additive Manufacturing Process based on CNC Accumulation Yong Chen* , Chi Zhou manufacturing, 5-axis SFF, CNC accumulation, build around inserts. 1. INTRODUCTION Most current additive process that is non-layer-based. The process is named Computer Numerically Controlled (CNC) accumulation

Chen, Yong

346

Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation Signal machines : localization of isolated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation Signal machines : localization of isolated'Orléans, Orléans, FRANCE 6 mars 2011 Journées Calculabilités Paris 1 / 39 #12;Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation 1 Signal machines and isolated accumulations 2 Necessary conditions

Durand-Lose, Jérôme

347

Neogene stratigraphy and sedimentology in eastern Azerbaijan: Outcrop observations and subsurface implications  

SciTech Connect

The largely Pliocene Productive Series of eastern Azerbaijan contains about 26 billion barrels oil equivalent. It is well exposed in outcrops on the Apsheron Peninsula which a joint team from the GIA and the BP and Statoil Alliance have described. Detailed biostratigraphic and petrographic studies have subsequently been carried out. Productive Series deposition was initiated by a dramatic relative sea-level fall which left the South Caspian an isolated basin fed by deeply incised precursors to the modern Volga, Amu Darya, and Kura rivers. Five facies associations have been recognised within the Productive Series at outcrop, encompassing a range of palaeoenvironments from alluvial braided river sandstones and conglomerates to delta-front siltstones and mudstones. The facies associations suggest a river-dominated, braid delta. Four idealised reservoir models can be recognised: fluvial, delta-plain, proximal delta-front and distal delta-front. Each has distinct grain-size and shale distributions. Studies of nearby oilfields suggest that these models form useful subsurface analogues. Flow simulation models suggest that each reservoir type has dramatically different performance. Productive Series sediments are typically loosely cemented and smectite rich, which may result in clay swelling and sand control problems. Localised reduction in reservoir quality is caused by fault-associated calcite cements. Proximal facies of the upper Productive Series contain porosity occluding gypsum cements. Palynology and nannopalaeontology have been applied to the Neogene sediments of Azerbaijan for almost the first time, and have given encouraging results, at least in terms of a broad biozonation. Micropaleontological analyses have also provided useful palaeoenvironmental data.

Ali-zade, A.A.; Guliyev, I.S.; Ateava, E.Z. [GIA, Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Revised fusulinid biostratigraphic zonation and depositional sequence correlation, subsurface Permian basin  

SciTech Connect

Current revisions in fusulinid zonation enable them to subdivide the fossiliferous Pennsylvanian and Lower Permian section in the Permian basin into more biostratigraphic zones than the older scheme of R.V. Hollingsworth, each zone of shorter temporal duration than has previously been recognized. The identification of distinct fusulinid assemblage subzones within the absolute chronology of radiometric dating provides the basis for these stratigraphic subdivisions. The Atoka is divided into five assemblage subzones, each with an approximate duration of 1.0 m.y. In the Strawn, five subzones each of about 0.8 m.y. duration are recognized within the Cherokee; the three subzones in the Marmaton are each of 0.67 m.y. duration. Within Canyon and Cisco shelf carbonate sections are presently recognized seven and six subzones, respectively; the approximate duration of each is 0.33 and 1.03 m.y. The shelf Wolfcamp section is divisible into seven subzones, each of about 2.36 m.y. span. The entire Leonard shelf section comprises six subzones, each of about 1.83 m.y. duration; three subzones are presently recognized in the lower Leonard and three cumulatively in the middle and upper Leonard sections. These biostratigraphic subzones correspond to single or composite sediment packages (parasequences) that can be correlated regionally from shelf into basinal strata, using wireline log and conventional and processed seismic sections. Such packages comprise parts of individual depositional sequences as recognized by seismic-stratigraphic interpretations. Carbonate (various shelf and foreshelf detrital facies) and sandstone reservoirs occur within individual subzones within these sequences and can be readily defined and mapped by subsurface facies studies.

Reid, A.M.; Reid, S.T.; Mazzullo, S.J.; Robbins, S.T.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment  

SciTech Connect

Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

350

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Geological characterization and statistical comparison of outcrop and subsurface facies: Shannon shelf sand ridges: Topical report  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of this research is to develop a methodology for constructing accurate quantitative models of reservoir heterogeneities. The resulting models are expected to improve predictions of flow patterns, spatial distribution of residual oil after secondary and tertiary recovery operations, and ultimate oil recovery. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary evaluation of the usefulness of outcrop information in characterizing analogous reservoirs and to develop research techniques necessary for model development. The Shannon Sandstone, a shelf sand ridge deposit in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, was studied. Sedimentologic and petrophysical features of an outcrop exposure of the High-Energy Ridge-Margin facies (HERM) within the Shannon were compared with those from a Shannon sandstone reservoir in Teapot Dome field. Comparisons of outcrop and subsurface permeability and porosity histograms, cumulative distribution functions, correlation lengths and natural logarithm of permeability versus porosity plots indicate a strong similarity between Shannon outcrop and Teapot Dome HERM facies petrophysical properties. Permeability classes found in outcrop samples can be related to crossbedded zones and shaley, rippled, and bioturbated zones. Similar permeability classes related to similar sedimentologic features were found in Teapot Dome field. The similarities of outcrop and Teapot Dome petrophysical properties, which are from the same geologic facies but from different depositional episodes, suggest that rocks deposited under similar depositional processes within a given deposystem have similar reservoir properties. The results of the study indicate that the use of quantitative outcrop information in characterizing reservoirs may provide a significant improvement in reservoir characterization. 17 refs., 5 tabs.

Jackson, S.; Szpakiewicz, M.; Tomutsa, L.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Magnus force in discrete and continuous two-dimensional superfluids  

SciTech Connect

Motion of vortices in two-dimensional superfluids in the classical limit is studied by solving the Gross-Pitaevskii equation numerically on a uniform lattice. We find that, in the presence of a superflow directed along one of the main lattice periods, vortices move with the superflow on fine lattices but perpendicular to it on coarse ones. We interpret this result as a transition from the full Magnus force in a Galilean-invariant limit to vanishing effective Magnus force in a discrete system, in agreement with the existing experiments on vortex motion in Josephson junction arrays.

Gecse, Z.; Khlebnikov, S. [Department of Physics, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Equilibria and Instabilities of a Slinky: Discrete Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Slinky is a well-known example of a highly flexible helical spring, exhibiting large, geometrically nonlinear deformations from minimal applied forces. By considering it as a system of coils that act to resist axial, shearing, and rotational deformations, we develop a discretized model to predict the equilibrium configurations of a Slinky via the minimization of its potential energy. Careful consideration of the contact between coils enables this procedure to accurately describe the shape and stability of the Slinky under different modes of deformation. In addition, we provide simple geometric and material relations that describe a scaling of the general behavior of flexible, helical springs.

Douglas P. Holmes; Andy D. Borum; Billy F. Moore III; Raymond H. Plaut; David A. Dillard

2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

354

A discrete-event simulation model for seaport operations.  

SciTech Connect

Discrete-event simulation has been used to assess detailed processes at seaports. Seaport operations are labor-intensive and require extensive use of personnel and machinery. The ability to conduct seaport operations efficiently can be improved significantly through proper utilization of seaport assets. The simulation described has been written in MODSIM II and addresses seaport operations in the context of military mobility. The simulation allows for multiple cargo types as well as multiple ship types. The overall goal of the simulation has been to determine seaport throughput capability.

Nevins, M. R.; Macal, C. M.; Joines, J.; Decision and Information Sciences; Transportation Engineering Agency

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Hydraulic accumulator-compressor for geopressured enhanced oil recovery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydraulic accumulator-compressor vessel using geothermal brine under pressure as a piston to compress waste (CO.sub.2 rich) gas is used in a system having a plurality of gas separators in tandem to recover pipeline quality gas from geothermal brine. A first high pressure separator feeds gas to a membrance separator which separates low pressure waste gas from high pressure quality gas. A second separator produces low pressure waste gas. Waste gas from both separators is combined and fed into the vessel through a port at the top as the vessel is drained for another compression cycle. High pressure brine is then admitted into the vessel through a port at the bottom of the vessel. Check valves control the flow of low pressure waste gas into the vessel and high pressure waste gas out of the vessel.

Goldsberry, Fred L. (Spring, TX)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

2012 Groundwater Monitoring Report Project Shoal Area Subsurface Corrective Action Unit 447  

SciTech Connect

The Project Shoal Area (PSA) in Nevada was the site of a 12-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1963. Although the surface of the site has been remediated, investigation of groundwater contamination resulting from the test is still in the corrective action process. Annual sampling and hydraulic head monitoring are conducted at the site as part of the subsurface corrective action strategy. Analytical results from the 2012 monitoring are consistent with those of the previous years, with tritium detected only in well HC-4. The tritium concentration in groundwater from well HC-4 remains far below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-established maximum contaminant level of 20,000 picocuries per liter. Concentrations of total uranium and gross alpha were also detected during this monitoring period, with uranium accounting for nearly all the gross alpha activity. The total uranium concentrations obtained from this monitoring period were consistent with previous results and reflect a slightly elevated natural uranium concentration, consistent with the mineralized geologic terrain. Isotopic ratios of uranium also indicate a natural source of uranium in groundwater, as opposed to a nuclear-test-related source. Water level trends obtained from the 2012 water level data were consistent with those of previous years. The corrective action strategy for the PSA is currently focused on revising the site conceptual model (SCM) and evaluating the adequacy of the current monitoring well network. Some aspects of the SCM are known; however, two major concerns are the uncertainty in the groundwater flow direction and the cause of rising water levels in site wells west of the shear zone. Water levels have been rising in the site wells west of the shear zone since the first hydrologic characterization wells were installed in 1996. While water levels in wells west of the shear zone continue to rise, the rate of increase is less than in previous years. The SCM will be revised, and an evaluation of the groundwater monitoring network will be conducted when water levels at the site have stabilized.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

359

Nontoxic chemical process for in situ permeability enhancement and accelerated decontamination of fine-grain subsurface sediments  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The remediation of heterogeneous subsurfaces is extremely time consuming and expensive with current and developing technologies. Although such technologies can adequately remove contaminants in the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, they cannot access the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The slow bleed of contaminants from the fine-grained sediments is the primary reason why subsurface remediation is so time-consuming and expensive. This invention addresses the problem of remediating contaminated fine-grained sediments. It is intended that, in the future, a heterogeneous site be treated by a hybrid process that first remediates the high hydraulic conductivity, coarse-grained sediments, to be followed by the process, described in this invention, to treat the contaminated low hydraulic conductivity fine-grained sediments. The invention uses cationic flocculents and organic solvents to collapse the swelling negative double layer surrounding water saturated clay particles, causing a flocculated, cracked clay structure. The modification of the clay fabric in fine-grained sediments dramatically increases the hydraulic conductivity of previously very tight clays many orders of magnitude.

Kansa, Edward J. (Livermore, CA); Wijesinghe, Ananda M. (Tracy, CA); Viani, Brian E. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Schur-decomposition for 3D matrix equations and its application in solving radiative discrete ordinates equations discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method  

SciTech Connect

The Schur-decomposition for three-dimensional matrix equations is developed and used to directly solve the radiative discrete ordinates equations which are discretized by Chebyshev collocation spectral method. Three methods, say, the spectral methods based on 2D and 3D matrix equation solvers individually, and the standard discrete ordinates method, are presented. The numerical results show the good accuracy of spectral method based on direct solvers. The CPU time cost comparisons against the resolutions between these three methods are made using MATLAB and FORTRAN 95 computer languages separately. The results show that the CPU time cost of Chebyshev collocation spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver is the least, and almost only one thirtieth to one fiftieth CPU time is needed when using the spectral method with 3D Schur-decomposition solver compared with the standard discrete ordinates method.

Li Benwen [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, P.O. Box 314, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China)], E-mail: heatli@hotmail.com; Tian Shuai; Sun Yasong; Hu, Zhang-Mao [Key Laboratory of Electromagnetic Processing of Materials (Ministry of Education), Northeastern University, P.O. Box 314, Shenyang, Liaoning 110004 (China)

2010-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Harnessing microbial subsurface metal reduction activities to synthesise nanoscale cobalt ferrite with enhanced magnetic properties  

SciTech Connect

Nanoscale ferrimagnetic particles have a diverse range of uses from directed cancer therapy and drug delivery systems to magnetic recording media and transducers. Such applications require the production of monodisperse nanoparticles with well-controlled size, composition, and magnetic properties. To fabricate these materials purely using synthetic methods is costly in both environmental and economical terms. However, metal-reducing microorganisms offer an untapped resource to produce these materials. Here, the Fe(III)-reducing bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens is used to synthesize magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. A combination of electron microscopy, soft X-ray spectroscopy, and magnetometry techniques was employed to show that this method of biosynthesis results in high yields of crystalline nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution and magnetic properties equal to the best chemically synthesized materials. In particular, it is demonstrated here that cobalt ferrite (CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles with low temperature coercivity approaching 8 kOe and an effective anisotropy constant of {approx} 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -3} can be manufactured through this biotechnological route. The dramatic enhancement in the magnetic properties of the nanoparticles by the introduction of high quantities of Co into the spinel structure represents a significant advance over previous biomineralization studies in this area using magnetotactic bacteria. The successful production of nanoparticulate ferrites achieved in this study at high yields could open up the way for the scaled-up industrial manufacture of nanoparticles using environmentally benign methodologies. Production of ferromagnetic nanoparticles for pioneering cancer therapy, drug delivery, chemical sensors, catalytic activity, photoconductive materials, as well as more traditional uses in data storage embodies a large area of inorganic synthesis research. In particular, the addition of transition metals other than Fe into the structure of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) has been shown to greatly enhance the magnetic properties of the particles, tailoring them to different commercial uses. However, synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles is often carried out at high temperatures with toxic solvents resulting in high environmental and energy costs. Additionally, these ferrite nanoparticles are not intrinsically biocompatible, and to make them suitable for insertion into the human body is a rather intricate task. A relatively unexplored resource for magnetic nanomaterial production is subsurface Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, as these microorganisms are capable of producing large quantities of nanoscale magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) at ambient temperatures. Metal-reducing bacteria live in environments deficient in oxygen and conserve energy for growth through the oxidation of hydrogen or organic electron donors, coupled to the reduction of oxidized metals such as Fe(III)-bearing minerals. This can result in the formation of magnetite via the extracellular reduction of amorphous Fe(III)-oxyhydroxides causing the release of soluble Fe(II) and resulting in complete recrystallization of the amorphous mineral into a new phase. Some previous studies have reported altering the composition of biogenic magnetite produced by Fe(III)-reducing bacteria for industrial and environmental applications. However, research into the commercial exploitation of bacteria to form magnetic minerals has focused primarily on magnetotactic bacteria which form magnetosomal magnetite internally using very different pathways to those bacteria forming magnetite outside the cell. Magnetotactic bacteria live at the sediment-water interface and use internal nanomagnets to guide them to their preferred environmental niche using the Earth's magnetic field. Since magnetotactic bacteria generally grow optimally under carefully controlled microaerobic conditions, the culturing processes for these organisms are challenging and result in low yields of nanomagnetite. Despite these limitations, magnetotactic bacteria have bee

Coker, Victoria S.; Telling, Neil D.; van der Laan, Gerrit; Pattrick, Richard A.D.; Pearce, Carolyn I.; Arenholz, Elke; Tuna, Floriana; Winpenny, Richard E.P.; Lloyd, Jonathan R.

2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

DOE/EA-1331: Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Site (07/31/00)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

31 31 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT REMEDIATION OF SUBSURFACE AND GROUNDWATER CONTAMINATION AT THE ROCK SPRINGS IN SITU OIL SHALE RETORT SITE SWEETWATER COUNTY, WYOMING July 2000 Prepared by: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory NEPA COMPLIANCE SUMMARY SHEET LEAD AGENCY U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) TITLE Environmental Assessment for Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs In Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site; Sweetwater County Wyoming. CONTACT Additional copies or information concerning the Environmental Assessment (EA) can

363

Anomalies of discrete symmetries in various dimensions and group cohomology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study 't Hooft anomalies for discrete global symmetries in bosonic theories in 2, 3 and 4 dimensions. We show that such anomalies may arise in gauge theories with topological terms in the action, if the total symmetry group is a nontrivial extension of the global symmetry by the gauge symmetry. Sometimes the 't Hooft anomaly for a d-dimensional theory with a global symmetry G can be canceled by anomaly inflow from a (d+1)-dimensional topological gauge theory with gauge group G. Such d-dimensional theories can live on the surfaces of Symmetry Protected Topological Phases. We also give examples of theories with more severe 't Hooft anomalies which cannot be canceled in this way.

Anton Kapustin; Ryan Thorngren

2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Prismatic Algorithm for Discrete D.C. Programming Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose the first exact algorithm for minimizing the difference of two submodular functions (D.S.), i.e., the discrete version of the D.C. programming problem. The developed algorithm is a branch-and-bound-based algorithm which responds to the structure of this problem through the relationship between submodularity and convexity. The D.S. programming problem covers a broad range of applications in machine learning because this generalizes the optimization of a wide class of set functions. We empirically investigate the performance of our algorithm, and illustrate the difference between exact and approximate solutions respectively obtained by the proposed and existing algorithms in feature selection and discriminative structure learning.

Kawahara, Yoshinobu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Spectra of Discrete Schrödinger Operators with Primitive Invertible Substitution Potentials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the spectral properties of discrete Schr\\"odinger operators with potentials given by primitive invertible substitution sequences (or by Sturmian sequences whose rotation angle has an eventually periodic continued fraction expansion, a strictly larger class than primitive invertible substitution sequences). It is known that operators from this family have spectra which are Cantor sets of zero Lebesgue measure. We show that the Hausdorff dimension of this set tends to $1$ as coupling constant $\\lambda$ tends to $0$. Moreover, we also show that at small coupling constant, all gaps allowed by the gap labeling theorem are open and furthermore open linearly with respect to $\\lambda$. Additionally, we show that, in the small coupling regime, the density of states measure for an operator in this family is exact dimensional. The dimension of the density of states measure is strictly smaller than the Hausdorff dimension of the spectrum and tends to $1$ as $\\lambda$ tends to $0$.

May Mei

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

366

Supratransmission induced by waves collisions in a discrete electrical lattice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We numerically performed a way to produce a supratransmission phenomenon in the Salerno equation describing the dynamics of modulated waves in a discrete nonlinear transmission lattice. For the natural supratransmission phenomenon, there exists a threshold of amplitude for which energy can flow in the line. We show that gap transmission is possible with driven amplitude below the threshold due to the collision of different plane waves coming from both edges of the line. One of the two plane waves has a frequency in the forbidden gap, and another has a frequency in the allowed phonon band. During collision, the wave in the allowed band is considered as a perturbation of the ones in the forbidden gap.

A. B. Togueu Motcheyo; C. Tchawoua; J. D. Tchinang Tchameu

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

367

Second Law of Thermodynamics with Discrete Quantum Feedback Control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new thermodynamic inequality is derived which leads to the maximum work that can be extracted from multi-heat-baths with the assistance of discrete quantum feedback control. The maximum work is determined by the free-energy difference and a generalized mutual information content between the thermodynamic system and the feedback controller. This maximum work can exceed that in conventional thermodynamics and, in the case of a heat cycle with two heat baths, the heat efficiency can be greater than that of the Carnot cycle. The consistency of our results with the second law of thermodynamics is ensured by the fact that work is needed for information processing of the feedback controller.

Takahiro Sagawa and Masahito Ueda

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

368

Quantal Heating of Conducting Electrons with Discrete Spectrum  

SciTech Connect

Usually heating of conducting electrons by dc electric field results in an increase of electron temperature. In this paper we show that the dc heating of 2D electrons, placed in quantized magnetic fields, results in a peculiar electron distribution, which has the same broadening or an effective 'temperature' as the unbiased electron system. The quantal heating, however, violates strongly the Ohm's Law. In the conducting system with discrete electron spectrum the quantal heating results in spectacular decrease of electron resistance and transition of the electrons into a state with zero differential resistance (ZDR). Finally the heating leads to apparent dc driven metal-insulator transition, which correlates with the transition into the ZDR state. The correlation is very unexpected and is not understood.

Vitkalov, S. A. [Department of Physics, The City College of New York, New York, NY 10031 (United States); Bykov, A. A. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effect of Zn, Mn, and Fe on Cd accumulation in phytoplankton ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examined the effect of important controlling factors (free ion concentrations of Cd, Zn, and Mn and Fe limitation of growth rate) on Cd accumulation by an ...

370

E-Print Network 3.0 - antiproton accumulator aa Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELENA Collaboration Summary: : The trapping, cooling and accumulation of extremely cold antiprotons. Energies ten orders of magnitude lower... , Principle U.S. Institutions...

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerobic hydrogen accumulation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

accumulation in the system (9). If high concentrations... to be measured as total biogas pro- duction. Hydrogen gas does not ordinarily ... Source: Logan, Bruce E.- Department...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - apoplastic solute accumulation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was unaffected until cell breakage, confirming... In photosynthetic tissues, transitory starch accumulates in chloroplasts during the daylight and is degraded Source: Mudgettt,...

373

ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance), 4/30/13  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas.  The Facility Representative...

374

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulated recoverable oil Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recoverable oil Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: accumulated recoverable oil Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Published in Energy Volume...

375

Integrating discretization and association rule-based classification for Alzheimer's disease diagnosis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper shows a computer aided diagnosis (CAD) combining continuous attribute discretization and association rule mining for the early diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) based on emission computed tomography images. A mask is obtained from the ... Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Association rules, Computed aided diagnosis, Discretization, Image histogram

R. Chaves; J. RamíRez; J. M. GóRriz

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

From max-plus algebra to nonexpansive mappings: a nonlinear theory for discrete event systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discrete event systems provide a useful abstraction for modelling a wide variety of systems: digital circuits, communication networks, manufacturing plants, etc. Their dynamics--stability, equilibrium states, cyclical behaviour, asymptotic average delays--are ... Keywords: cycle time, discrete event system, fixed point, max-plus semiring, nonexpansive map, nonlinear eigenvalue, nonnegative matrix, topical function

Jeremy Gunawardena

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Resonant plasmon scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders A. E. Miroshnichenko,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant plasmon scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders A. E scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.71.174306 PACS number Josephson junction systems,2 coupled nonlinear optical waveguides,3 lattice vi- brations in crystals,4

Flach, Sergej

378

Resonant plasmon scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders A. E. Miroshnichenko,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resonant plasmon scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders A. E in Josephson junction ladders. We predict the existence of Fano resonances, and find them by computing in the plasmon scattering by discrete breathers in Josephson junction ladders. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevB.71

379

Rank Tests for the Observability of Discrete-Time Jump Linear Systems with Inputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rank Tests for the Observability of Discrete-Time Jump Linear Systems with Inputs Ehsan Elhamifar of rank tests on the parameters of the JLS when the discrete state sequence is arbitrary. Our key verify observ- ability by checking a number of rank tests that is only quadratic in the number

380

A New Approach to Fuzzy Modeling and Control of Discrete-Time Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], the advantage of fuzzy logic in modeling and control is in the ability to combine modeling (constructingA New Approach to Fuzzy Modeling and Control of Discrete-Time Systems Michael Margaliot and Gideon Langholz #3; Abstract We present a new approach to fuzzy modeling and control of discrete-time sys- tems

Margaliot, Michael

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Some unusual discrete VLF emissions observed at a low-latitude ground station at Agra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some unusual discrete VLF emissions observed at a low-latitude ground station at Agra B. Singh February 1997 / Accepted: 17 February 1997 Abstract. A detailed analysis of the VLF emissions data obtained°1¢ N, L = 1.15) has yielded some unusual discrete VLF emissions of the rising type. These include (1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

382

Discrete Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) Thin-Film Interdigital Varactors on Alumina: Design, Fabrication, Characterization, and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Barium Strontium Titanate (BST) Thin-Film Interdigital Varactors on Alumina: Design, Raleigh, NC-27695-7914, USA. Email:jayeshnath@ieee.org Abstract -- Discrete Barium Strontium Titanate (BST, capacitors, BST, ferroelectric, thin-film, barium strontium titanate, bandpass filter, IP3, ACPR, temperature

383

Area and Throughput Trade-Offs in the Design of Pipelined Discrete Wavelet Transform Architectures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Area and Throughput Trade-Offs in the Design of Pipelined Discrete Wavelet Transform Architectures wavelet transform (DWT) as a linear space-to-frequency transform of the image domain in an irreversible compression. This irreversible discrete wavelet transform is implemented by FIR filter using 9/7 Daubechies

Boyer, Edmond

384

PARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the radiative transport equation on parallel computers. Mathematical libraries developed by third parties the discrete ordi- nates method. They observed that the global nature of radiative transport resultedPARALLEL COMPUTATIONS OF RADIATIVE HEAT TRANSFER USING THE DISCRETE ORDINATES METHOD Gautham

Utah, University of

385

Stability of discrete memory states to stochastic fluctuations in neuronal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

endowed with feedback loops, for short-term memory. Fluctuations are due to highly irregular spike firing on an autophosphorylation mechanism of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II CaMKII molecules. There, fluctuations in calcium concentration can lead to discrete changes in the number of ions bound to a protein5 and discrete

Wang, Xiao-Jing

386

Rectangular discrete radon transform for buildings extraction from high resolution satellite images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a new approach titled Rectangular Discrete Radon Transform (RDRT) which is based on the generalization of the classical Radon transform to project the images with rectangular objects instead of straight lines. The RDRT was conceived ... Keywords: high resolution satellite image, rectangular buildings, rectangular discrete radon transform

Elouedi Ines; Hamouda Atef; Rojbani Hmida

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

ORIGINAL PAPER A new discrete electromagnetism-based meta-heuristic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL PAPER A new discrete electromagnetism-based meta-heuristic for solving Electromagnetism-like Mechanism (SEM) is one of the swarm-based optimization methods which is examined Electromagnetism-like Mechanism is proposed which utilizes Genetic Algorithm (GA) operators to work in discrete

Li, Xiaodong

388

A Discrete Event Simulation Model for "Efficient Selection of Relay Vehicles for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A Discrete Event Simulation Model for "Efficient Selection of Relay Vehicles for Broadcasting discrete event-driven simulation model for DIB and EDIB protocols on VANET. We define six types of events the ACK message to the sender. The following variables are used in the simulation model: · vehs stores

Lin, Jason Yi-Bing

389

A Mixed Finite-Element Discretization of the Energy-Transport Model for Semiconductors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Mixed Finite-Element Discretization of the Energy-Transport Model for Semiconductors Stefan Holst #12;tting mixed #12;nite-element method is used to discretize the stationary energy. Energy-transport models describe the ow of electrons through a semi- conductor device, in uenced by di

Pietra, Paola

390

Nonlinear Schrodinger equations and their spectral semi-discretizations over long times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a convolution potential avoids resonances among the frequencies (eigen- values) of the linearized systemNonlinear Schr¨odinger equations and their spectral semi-discretizations over long times Ludwig¨odinger equations with small initial data (or small nonlinearity) and their spec- tral semi-discretizations in space

Tübingen, Universität

391

Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network  

SciTech Connect

Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the evolution of porosity and permeability in shallow-to-deep subsurface siliciclastic and limestone rock reservoirs. As a result, these carbonate water-rock interactions play a critically important role in research on groundwater remediation, geological carbon sequestration, and hydrocarbon exploration. A study was undertaken to determine the effects of Mg2+ concentration on CaCO3 crystal morphology, precipitation rate, and porosity occlusion under flow and mixing conditions similar to those in subsurface aquifers.

Boyd, Victoria; Yoon, Hongkyu; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus; Hess, Nancy J.; Fouke, Bruce W.; Valocchi, Albert J.; Werth, Charles J.

2014-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Pre-Phase 1 Aging Assessment of the BWR and PWR Accumulators  

SciTech Connect

Accumulators are important components used in many systems at commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors in the United States. The accumulators are vessels attached to fluid systems to provide 1) a limited backup source of stored fluid energy for hydraulic/pneumatic mechanical equipment, 2) a damping effect on pressure pulses in fluid systems, and 3) a volume of fluid to be injected passively into a fluid system. Accumulators contain a gas that is compressed or expanded as the fluid from the system enters or exits the accumulator. The gas and fluid in accumulators are usually separated from each other by a piston or bladder. In support of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Nuclear Aging Research Program (NPAR), the Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted an analysis of available industry databases to determine if accumulator components already had been studied in other NPAR assessments and to evaluate each accumulator type for applicable aging issues. The results of this preliminary study indicate that two critical uses of accumulators have been previously evaluated by the NPAR program. NUREGICR-5699, Aging and Service Wear of Control Rod Drive Mechanisms for BUT Nuclear Plants (Greene 199 I), identified two hydraulic control unit components subject to aging failures: accumulator nitrogen-charging cartridge valves and the scram water accumulator. In addition, NUREGICR-6001, Aging Assessment of BWR Standby Liquid Control Systems (Buckley et al. 1992), identified two predominant aging-related accumulator failures that result in a loss of the nitrogen blanket pressure: (charging) valve wear and failure of the gas bladder. The present study has identified five prevalent aging-related accumulator failures: rupture of the accumulator bladder separation of the metal disc from the bottom of the bladder leakage of the gas from the charging valve leakage past the safety injection tank manway cover gasket leakage past O-rings. An additional study of the accumulator subcomponents associated with these failures is recommended, including an evaluation of current inspection programs to verify that they are detecting the aging degradation effects. The study may also provide beneficial input to the design of passive accumulator applications in advanced reactor designs.

Buckely, G. D.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Delay-dependent robust $$H_\\infty $$ control for 2-D discrete nonlinear systems with state delays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the problem of robust $$H_\\infty $$ control for a class of 2-D (two-dimensional) discrete state delayed systems with sector nonlinearity ... Keywords: $$H_\\infty $$ performance, 2D discrete systems, Exponential stability, State delays

Shipei Huang; Zhengrong Xiang

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effect of viscoelastic postseismic relaxation on estimates of interseismic crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of interseismic crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada William C. Hammond,1 Corné Kreemer,1 March 2010. [1] We estimate the longterm crustal strain rate at Yucca Mountain (YM), Nevada from GPS crustal strain accumulation at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Geophys. Res. Lett., 37, L06307, doi:10.1029/2010GL

Tingley, Joseph V.

395

Cytosolic Phosphorylating Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenases Affect Arabidopsis Cellular Metabolism and Promote Seed Oil Accumulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Metabolism and Promote Seed Oil Accumulation [C...Biology, University of Missouri, St. Louis, Missouri...Unit, St. Louis, Missouri 63132 www.plantcell...contributes to enhanced seed oil accumulation. The...Acid Composition and Oil Content Dried Arabidopsis...were quantified using gas chromatography supplied...

Liang Guo; Fangfang Ma; Fang Wei; Brian Fanella; Doug K. Allen; Xuemin Wang

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks  

SciTech Connect

Discrete Event Modeling of Algae Cultivation and Harvesting at Commercial Scale: Capital Costs, Operating Costs, and System Bottlenecks

Lacey, Ph.D, P.E., Ronald E. [Texas A& M University

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

397

Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Document/Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Subsurface, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 3 March 2006 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. DOE/NV--1025--Rev. 3 Available for public sale, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Phone: 800.553.6847 Fax: 703.605.6900 Email: orders@ntis.gov Online ordering: http://www.ntis.gov/ordering.htm Available electronically at http://www.osti.gov/bridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062

398

Final Report Coupling in silico microbial models with reactive transport models to predict the fate of contaminants in the subsurface.  

SciTech Connect

This project successfully accomplished its goal of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with hydrological and geochemical models to predict the activity of subsurface microorganisms during uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, it was demonstrated how this modeling approach can be used to develop new strategies to optimize bioremediation. The approach of coupling genome-scale metabolic models with reactive transport modeling is now well enough established that it has been adopted by other DOE investigators studying uranium bioremediation. Furthermore, the basic principles developed during our studies will be applicable to much broader investigations of microbial activities, not only for other types of bioremediation, but microbial metabolism in diversity of environments. This approach has the potential to make an important contribution to predicting the impact of environmental perturbations on the cycling of carbon and other biogeochemical cycles.

Lovley, Derek R.

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear tests monitoring through the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) which should detect nuclear tests down to 1 kiloton (kt) TNT equivalent anywhere on the planet. The IMS), hydroacoustic and infrasound waves will help check for underground, under-water and atmospheric nuclear testsGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 27, NO. 15, PAGES 2245-2248, AUGUST 1, 2000 Sub-surface nuclear

Hourdin, Chez Frédéric

400

A Discrete Evolutionary Model for Chess Players' Ratings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Elo system for rating chess players, also used in other games and sports, was adopted by the World Chess Federation over four decades ago. Although not without controversy, it is accepted as generally reliable and provides a method for assessing players' strengths and ranking them in official tournaments. It is generally accepted that the distribution of players' rating data is approximately normal but, to date, no stochastic model of how the distribution might have arisen has been proposed. We propose such an evolutionary stochastic model, which models the arrival of players into the rating pool, the games they play against each other, and how the results of these games affect their ratings. Using a continuous approximation to the discrete model, we derive the distribution for players' ratings at time $t$ as a normal distribution, where the variance increases in time as a logarithmic function of $t$. We validate the model using published rating data from 2007 to 2010, showing that the parameters obtained...

Fenner, Trevor; Loizou, George

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Short note: A simplified technique for the efficient and highly accurate discretization of boundary integral equations in 2D on domains with corners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Keywords: Acoustic scattering, Boundary integral equation, Corner singularity, Direct solver, Grid refinement, High-order discretization, Nyström discretization, Quadrature, Weakly singular integral equation

A. Gillman; S. Hao; P. G. Martinsson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a square channel with discrete rib turbulators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in which two opposite walls are roughened with parallel and crossed arrays of full ribs, cross-cut discrete ribs, and beveled discrete ribs. The discrete ribs are staggered in alternate rows of three and two ribs The rib-roughened channel models... and length on the convective heat transfer in nb-roughened triangular ducts. Ribs were placed on two of the three walls of the test ducts to model the internal cooling passage at the leading edge of a. turbine airfoil. The local heat transfer augmentation...

McMillin, Robert Dale

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

403

Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

in the ability to access, characterize, predict, and adaptively manipulate fracture and flow processes over scales from nanometers to kilometers. This town hall...

404

$N$-boson spectrum from a Discrete Scale Invariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the analysis of the $N$-boson spectrum computed using a soft two-body potential the strength of which has been varied in order to cover an extended range of positive and negative values of the two-body scattering length $a$ close to the unitary limit. The spectrum shows a tree structure of two states, one shallow and one deep, attached to the ground-state of the system with one less particle. It is governed by an unique universal function, $\\Delta(\\xi)$, already known in the case of three bosons. In the three-particle system the angle $\\xi$, determined by the ratio of the two- and three-body binding energies $E_3/E_2=\\tan^2\\xi$, characterizes the Discrete Scale Invariance of the system. Extending the definition of the angle to the $N$-body system as $E_N/E_2=\\tan^2\\xi$, we study the $N$-boson spectrum in terms of this variable. The analysis of the results, obtained for up to $N=16$ bosons, allows us to extract a general formula for the energy levels of the system close to the unitary limit. Interestingly, a linear dependence of the universal function as a function of $N$ is observed at fixed values of $a$. We show that the finite-range nature of the calculations results in the range corrections that generate a shift of the linear relation between the scattering length $a$ and a particular form of the universal function. We also comment on the limits of applicability of the universal relations.

A. Kievsky; N. K. Timofeyuk; M. Gattobigio

2014-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

405

A LARGE SCALE CONTINUUM-DISCRETE NUMERICAL MODELLING: APPLICATION TO OVERBURDEN DAMAGE OF A SALT CAVERN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAVERN SOULEY Mountaka1 , MERCERAT Diego2 , DRIAD-LEBEAU Lynda1 , BERNARD Pascal2 1 INERIS, Ecole des collapse). KEYWORDS: cavern, numerical modelling, continuum-discrete, overburden, damage. RÃ?SUMÃ?: Dans l

Boyer, Edmond

406

NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DISCRETE TOMOGRAPHY K.J. Batenburg a W.A. Kosters b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DISCRETE TOMOGRAPHY K.J. Batenburg a W.A. Kosters b a Mathematical Institute of crystalline solids at atomic resolution from electron microscopic images can be considered the ``holy grail

Kosters, Walter

407

Discrete Packet Analysis for Improved Atmospheric Rejection on Modulated Laser Signals  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show discusses how the method of discrete packet analysis improves atmospheric compensation for quasi-CW fluorescence detection methods. This is key to improving remote sensing capabilities.

O'Neill, M., McKenna, I., DiBenedetto, J., Capelle, G., Trainham, R.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

408

Discrete flow mapping: transport of phase space densities on triangulated surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The response of a thin moulded aluminium car component (range rover shock tower) to...discretization schemes for the shallow-water equations. Mont. Weather Rev. 138...Lyon, RH . 1969 Statistical analysis of power injection and response in structures and...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Testing and examination of TMI-2 electrical components and discrete devices  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the approach and results of the in situ test conducted on TMI-2 reactor building electrical components and discrete devices. Also included are the necessary presumptions and assumptions to correlate observed anomalies to the accident.

Soberano, F.T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

A Parametric Mixed-Integer Optimization Algorithm for Multiobjective Engineering Problems Involving Discrete Decisions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the multiobjective problem involves continuous and discrete decisions, as is usually the case in process decision making, it can be formulated as follows: ... The parametric programming theory has mostly focused on linear problems (Gal, 1979). ...

Katerina P. Papalexandri; Theodora I. Dimkou

1998-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

411

A simple preconditioner for the SIPG discretization of linear elasticity equations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We deal with the solution of the systems of linear algebraic equations arising from Symmetric Interior Penalty discontinuous Galerkin (SIPG) discretization of linear elasticity problems in primal (displacement) formulation. The main focus of the paper ...

B. Ayuso; I. Georgiev; J. Kraus; L. Zikatanov

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

DSA Preconditioning for the S_N Equations with Strictly Positive Spatial Discretization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preconditioners based upon sweeps and diffusion-synthetic acceleration (DSA) have been constructed and applied to the zeroth and first spatial moments of the 1-D transport equation using SN angular discretization and a strictly positive nonlinear...

Bruss, Donald

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

Algebraic multigrid for stabilized finite element discretizations of the Navier Stokes equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multilevel method for the solution of systems of equations generated by stabilized Finite Element discretizations of the Euler and Navier Stokes equations on generalized unstructured grids is described. The method is ...

Okusanya, Tolulope Olawale, 1972 -

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Lattice discretization effects on the critical parameters of model nonpolar and polar fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lattice discretization effects on the critical parameters of model nonpolar and polar fluids Sarvin Moghaddam Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 Athanassios Z. Panagiotopoulosa) Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New

415

A Discrete Gust Model for Use in the Design of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Discrete gust models, although idealizations of actual atmospheric conditions, are useful for engineering design. For fatigue design, these models must be representative of the conditions a structure or vehicle will experience on a continuous ...

Walter Frost; Robert E. Turner

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme (DDFV) applied to ECG simulation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2D/3D Discrete Duality Finite Volume Scheme (DDFV) applied to ECG simulation. DDFV scheme part, the method is used for the resolution of a problem arising in bio-mathematics: the ECG

Coudière, Yves

417

Effects of ethanol on evoked unit activity in discrete layers of the hippocampus in rabbits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON EVOKED UNIT ACTIVITY IN DISCRETE LAYERS OF THE HIPPOCAMPUS IN RABBITS A Thesis by NILLIAM RAY FOLGER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1976 Major Subject: Biology EFFECTS OF ETHANOL ON EVOKED UNIT ACTIVITY IN DISCRETE LAYERS OF THE HIPPOCAMPUS IN RABBITS A Thesis by WILLIAM RAY FOLGER Approved as to style and content by: W. R. Klemm Chairman...

Folger, William Ray

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Discrete and continuous exponential transforms of simple Lie groups of rank two  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop and describe continuous and discrete transforms of class functions on compact simple Lie group $G$ as their expansions into series of uncommon special functions, called here $\\E$-functions in recognition of the fact that the functions generalize common exponential functions. The rank of $G$ is the number of variables in the $\\E$-functions. A uniform discretization of the decomposition problem is described on lattices of any density and symmetry admissible for the Lie group $G$.

Iryna Kashuba; Jiri Patera

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

419

Subsurface Completion Report for Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect

Three underground nuclear tests were conducted on Amchitka Island, Alaska, in 1965, 1969, and 1971. The effects of the Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin tests on the environment were extensively investigated during and following the detonations, and the area continues to be monitored today. This report is intended to document the basis for the Amchitka Underground Nuclear Test Sites: Long Shot, Milrow, and Cannikin (hereafter referred to as ''Amchitka Site'') subsurface completion recommendation of No Further Remedial Action Planned with Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance, and define the long-term surveillance and maintenance strategy for the subsurface. A number of factors were considered in evaluating and selecting this recommendation for the Amchitka Site. Historical studies and monitoring data, ongoing monitoring data, the results of groundwater modeling, and the results of an independent stakeholder-guided scientific investigation were also considered in deciding the completion action. Water sampling during and following the testing showed no indication that radionuclides were released to the near surface, or marine environment with the exception of tritium, krypton-85, and iodine-131 found in the immediate vicinity of Long Shot surface ground zero. One year after Long Shot, only tritium was detectable (Merritt and Fuller, 1977). These tritium levels, which were routinely monitored and have continued to decline since the test, are above background levels but well below the current safe drinking water standard. There are currently no feasible means to contain or remove radionuclides in or around the test cavities beneath the sites. Surface remediation was conducted in 2001. Eleven drilling mud pits associated with the Long Shot, Milrow and Cannikin sites were remediated. Ten pits were remediated by stabilizing the contaminants and constructing an impermeable cap over each pit. One pit was remediated by removing all of the contaminated mud for consolidation in another pit. In addition to the mud pits, the hot mix plant was also remediated. Ongoing monitoring data does not indicate that radionuclides are currently seeping into the marine environment. Additionally, the groundwater modeling results indicate no seepage is expected for tens to thousands of years. If seepage does occur in the future, however, the rich, diverse ecosystems around the island could be at risk, as well as people eating foods from the area. An independent science study was conducted by the Consortium for Risk Evaluation with Stakeholder Participation (CRESP) in accordance with the Amchitka Independent Science Plan (2003). The study report was published on August 1, 2005. The CRESP study states ''our geophysical and biological analyses did not find evidence of risk from radionuclides from the consumption of marine foods, nor indication of any current radionuclide contaminated migration into the marine environment from the Amchitka test shots''. The study also found evidence supporting the groundwater modeling conclusions of very slow contaminant transport (CRESP, 2005). While no further action is recommended for the subsurface of the Amchitka Site, long-term stewardship of Amchitka Island will be instituted and will continue into the future. This will include institutional controls management and enforcement, post-completion monitoring, performance of five-year reviews, public participation, and records management. Long-term stewardship will be the responsibility of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. The Department of Energy is recommending completion of the investigation phase of the Amchitka Sites. The recommended remedy for the Amchitka Site is No Further Action with Long-Term Monitoring and Surveillance. The future long-term stewardship actions will be governed by a Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan. This Plan is currently being developed with input from the State, landowner, and other interested or affected stakeholders.

Echelard, Tim

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Surveillance Guide - ERS 14.1 Satellite Accumulation Ares (RCRA Compliance)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREAS SATELLITE ACCUMULATION AREAS 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's management of hazardous and mixed wastes in satellite accumulation areas. The Facility Representative evaluates compliance with DOE requirements as well as requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act and the Washington State Administrative Code. During this surveillance, the Facility Representative conducts a walk through of a satellite accumulation area and reviews the pertinent records. 2.0 References 2.1 40 CFR 260-270 2.2 Washington Administrative Code, Chapters 173-303 2.3 DOE 5400.3, Hazardous and Radioactive Mixed Waste Program 2.4 DOE 5820.2A, Radioactive Waste Management. 2.5 DOE/EH - 0333, Management of Hazardous Waste

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ACCUMULATION OF RADIOCESIUM BY MUSHROOMS IN THE ENVIRONMENT: A LITERATURE REVIEW  

SciTech Connect

During the last 50 years, a large amount of information on radionuclide accumulators or ''sentinel-type'' organisms in the environment has been published. Much of this work focused on the risks of food-chain transfer of radionuclides to higher organisms such as reindeer and man. However, until the 1980's and 1990's, there has been little published data on the radiocesium ({sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs) accumulation by mushrooms. This presentation will consist of a review of the published data for {sup 134,137}Cs accumulation by mushrooms in nature. This review will discuss the aspects that promote {sup 134,137}Cs uptake by mushrooms and focus on mushrooms that demonstrate a large propensity for use in the environmental biomonitoring of radiocesium contamination. It will also provide descriptions of habitats for many of these mushrooms and discuss on how growth media and other conditions relate to Cs accumulation.

Duff, M

2007-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

422

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulating terrestrial plant Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

search results for: accumulating terrestrial plant Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 A Primer on the Terrestrial Carbon Cycle: What We Don't Know, But Should Summary: primary...

423

Estimate of remaining life of blades in aircraft gas turbines from accumulated creep strain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of a multicomponent solution to the problem of calculating the remaining life of blades on the basis of accumulated creep strain with allowance for the effect of vibration loads is ...

A. N. Vetrov; A. G. Kucher

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Gas production potential of disperse low-saturation hydrate accumulations in oceanic sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bound gas in marine sediments: how much is really out there?methane hydrate in ocean sediment. Energy & Fuels 2005: 19:Accumulations in Oceanic Sediments George J. Moridis 1 and

Moridis, George J.; Sloan, E. Dendy

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Investigating the Accumulation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in a Mixed Conifer Forest, Santa Catalina Mountains, Tucson, AZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigating the Accumulation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls in a Mixed Conifer Forest, Santa forested locations, where the compounds presumably derive from atmospheric deposition [Moeckel et al, 2009]. Forest biomass and organic soil horizons present lipophilic interfaces for partitioning of PCBs from

Fay, Noah

426

Numerical Analysis of Overvoltage and Accumulated Energy at Quenching in Superconducting Fault Current Limiters  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present paper is devoted to a discussion of the overvoltage and accumulated energy which constitute problems when superconducting fault current limiters are introduced into electric power systems. These ... b...

S. Honjo; T. Hara; T. Yamamoto

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

E-Print Network 3.0 - affects starch accumulation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

starch Summary: the rate of starch synthesis and affects the composition of starch in potato tubers (Geigenber- ger et al... al. 1988) can accumulate as much as 15% of the normal...

428

Combining Vis–NIR hyperspectral imagery and legacy measured soil profiles to map subsurface soil properties in a Mediterranean area (Cap-Bon, Tunisia)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Previous studies have demonstrated that Visible Near InfraRed (Vis–NIR) hyperspectral imagery is a cost-efficient way to map soil properties at fine resolutions (~ 5 m) over large areas. However, such mapping is only feasible for the soil surface because the effective penetration depths of optical sensors do not exceed several millimeters. This study aims to determine how Vis–NIR hyperspectral imagery can serve to map the subsurface properties at four depth intervals (15–30 cm, 30–60 cm, 60–100 cm and 30–100 cm) when used with legacy soil profiles and images of parameters derived from digital elevation model (DEM). Two types of surface–subsurface functions, namely linear models and random forests, that estimate subsurface property values from surface values and landscape covariates were first calibrated over the set of legacy measured profiles. These functions were then applied to map the soil properties using the hyperspectral-derived digital surface soil property maps and the images of landscape covariates as input. Error propagation was addressed using a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the mapping uncertainties. The study was conducted in a pedologically contrasted 300 km2-cultivated area located in the Cap Bon region (Northern Tunisia) and tested on three soil surface properties (clay and sand contents and cation exchange capacity). The main results were as follows: i) fairly satisfactory (cross-validation R2 between 0.55 and 0.81) surface–subsurface functions were obtained for predicting the soil properties at 15–30 cm and 30–60 cm, whereas predictions at 60–100 cm were less accurate (R2 between 0.38 and 0.43); ii) linear models outperformed random-forest models in developing surface–subsurface functions; iii) due to the error propagations, the final predicted maps of the subsurface soil properties captured from 1/3 to 2/3 of the total variance with a significantly decreasing performance with depth; and iv) these maps brought significant improvements over the existing soil maps of the region and showed soil patterns that largely agreed with the local pedological knowledge. This paper demonstrates the added value of combining modern remote sensing techniques with old legacy soil databases.

Philippe Lagacherie; Anne-Ruth Sneep; Cécile Gomez; Sinan Bacha; Guillaume Coulouma; Mohamed Hédi Hamrouni; Insaf Mekki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect

This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Estimated duration of the subsurface reduction environment produced by the salt-stone disposal facility on the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The formula for Savannah River Site (SRS) salt-stone includes {approx}25 wt% slag to create a reducing environment for mitigating the subsurface transport of several radionuclides, including Tc-99. Based on laboratory measurements and two-dimensional reactive transport calculations, it was estimated that the SRS salt-stone waste form will maintain a reducing environment, and therefore its ability to sequester Tc-99, for well over 10,000 years. For example, it was calculated that {approx}16% of the salt-stone reduction capacity would be consumed after 213,000 years. For purposes of comparison, a second calculation was presented that was based on entirely different assumptions (direct spectroscopic measurements and diffusion calculations). The results from this latter calculation were near identical to those from this study. Obtaining similar conclusions by two extremely different calculations and sets of assumptions provides additional credence to the conclusion that the salt-stone will likely maintain a reducing environment in excess of 10,000 years. (authors)

Kaplan, D.I.; Hang, T. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Carolina (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Progress report, September 15, 1991--September 14, 1993  

SciTech Connect

Our interactive modeling for Gaussian beam modeling in two-dimensional, triangulated complex geologic structure, has been generalized to include transmission losses at interfaces, and density and Q-characterization of attenuation in layers. Also, multiple reflections and the option to model data from VSP acquisition geometry have been included. Shortcomings when the structure contains first-order discontinuities, however, limit the full geologic complexity that presently can be modeled by the Gaussian beam method. Other studies of wave filtering that arises for waves propagating nearly parallel to bedding reveal the importance of tunneling evanescent filtering on the propagating wavelet. Likewise, for reflections from steep interfaces, we have developed a dip-divergence correction to compensate for shortcomings in the conventional divergence correction for energy spreading. A new direction this past year, which we will be pursuing in the year ahead is analysis of errors in migration and dip-moveout (DMO) that arise when conventional imaging processing, which ignores anisotropy, is applied to data acquired where the subsurface is transversely isotropic. We are also developing approaches for taking anisotropy into account in these important imaging processes. Similarly, we have developed an efficient approach to performing DMO on P-SV-mode-converted data. Our interests in taking anisotropy into account have led us to study the importance of anisotropy in the overburden on reflection amplitude variations with offset (AVO).

Larner, K.; Hale, D.; Bleistein, N.; Cohen, J.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Approaches to identifying reservoir heterogeneity and reserve growth opportunities from subsurface data: The Oficina Formation, Budare field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

We applied an integrated geologic, geophysical, and engineering approach devised to identify heterogeneities in the subsurface that might lead to reserve growth opportunities in our analysis of the Oficina Formation at Budare field, Venezuela. The approach involves 4 key steps: (1) Determine geologic reservoir architecture; (2) Investigate trends in reservoir fluid flow; (3) Integrate fluid flow trends with reservoir architecture; and (4) Estimate original oil-in-place, residual oil saturation, and remaining mobile oil, to identify opportunities for reserve growth. There are three main oil-producing reservoirs in the Oficina Formation that were deposited in a bed-load fluvial system, an incised valley-fill, and a barrier-strandplain system. Reservoir continuity is complex because, in addition to lateral facies variability, the major Oficina depositional systems were internally subdivided by high-frequency stratigraphic surfaces. These surfaces define times of intermittent lacustrine and marine flooding events that punctuated the fluvial and marginal marine sedimentation, respectively. Syn and post depositional faulting further disrupted reservoir continuity. Trends in fluid flow established from initial fluid levels, response to recompletion workovers, and pressure depletion data demonstrated barriers to lateral and vertical fluid flow caused by a combination of reservoir facies pinchout, flooding shale markers, and the faults. Considerable reserve growth potential exists at Budare field because the reservoir units are highly compartment by the depositional heterogeneity and structural complexity. Numerous reserve growth opportunities were identified in attics updip of existing production, in untapped or incompletely drained compartments, and in field extensions.

Hamilton, D.S.; Raeuchle, S.K.; Holtz, M.H. [Bureau of Economic Geology, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Syntrophic Effects in a Subsurface Clostridial Consortium on Fe(III)-(Oxyhydr)oxide Reduction and Secondary Mineralization  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we cultivated from subsurface sediments an anaerobic Clostridia 25 consortium that was composed of a fermentative Fe-reducer Clostridium species (designated as 26 strain FGH) and a novel sulfate-reducing bacterium belonging to the Clostridia family 27 Vellionellaceae (designated as strain RU4). In pure culture, Clostridium sp. strain FGH mediated 28 the reductive dissolution/transformation of iron oxides during growth on peptone. When 29 Clostridium sp. FGH was grown with strain RU4 on peptone, the rates of iron oxide reduction 30 were significantly higher. Iron reduction by the consortium was mediated by multiple 31 mechanisms, including biotic reduction by Clostridium sp. FGH and biotic/abiotic reactions 32 involving biogenic sulfide by strain RU4. The Clostridium sp. FGH produced hydrogen during 33 fermentation, and the presence of hydrogen inhibited growth and iron reduction activity. The 34 sulfate-reducing partner strain RU4 was stimulated by the presence of H2 gas and generated 35 reactive sulfide which promoted the chemical reduction of the iron oxides. Characterization of 36 Fe(II) mineral products showed the formation of magnetite during ferrihydrite reduction, and 37 the precipitation of iron sulfides during goethite and hematite reduction. The results suggest an 38 important pathway for iron reduction and secondary mineralization by fermentative sulfate-39 reducing microbial consortia is through syntrophy-driven biotic/abiotic reactions with biogenic 40 sulfide.

Shah, Madhavi; Lin, Chu-Ching; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhao, Xiuhong; Wang, Yangping; Barkay, Tamar; Yee, Nathan

2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

434

Pilot demonstration of concentrated solar-powered desalination of subsurface agricultural drainage water and other brackish groundwater sources  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The energy–water nexus is addressed with the experimental demonstration of a solar-powered desalination process system. This system was designed for high-recovery treatment of subsurface agricultural drainage water as a reuse strategy as well as other brackish groundwater sources. These water sources may exhibit wide fluctuations in salinity and makeup and pose a high risk for operational troubles due to high scaling potential. A first-of-its-kind open-cycle vapor-absorption heat pump is coupled with a multiple-effect distillation train and a large parabolic trough solar thermal concentrator. Without the heat pump, the distillation operation showed a minimum thermal energy consumption of 261.87 kWhth/m3. With the heat pump, the thermal energy consumption was reduced by more than 49% to 133.2 kWhth/m3. This reduction in thermal energy requirement directly translates into a 49% reduction in solar array area required to power a process with the same freshwater production rate as a system without an integrated heat pump. An optimized design was modeled and the thermal energy performance of a commercial system is projected at 34.9 kWhth/m3 using a 10-effect MED operating at 85% recovery.

Matthew D. Stuber; Christopher Sullivan; Spencer A. Kirk; Jennifer A. Farrand; Philip V. Schillaci; Brian D. Fojtasek; Aaron H. Mandell

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Final Report DE-EE0005380: Assessment of Offshore Wind Farm Effects on Sea Surface, Subsurface and Airborne Electronic Systems  

SciTech Connect

Offshore wind energy is a valuable resource that can provide a significant boost to the US renewable energy portfolio. A current constraint to the development of offshore wind farms is the potential for interference to be caused by large wind farms on existing electronic and acoustical equipment such as radar and sonar systems for surveillance, navigation and communications. The US Department of Energy funded this study as an objective assessment of possible interference to various types of equipment operating in the marine environment where offshore wind farms could be installed. The objective of this project was to conduct a baseline evaluation of electromagnetic and acoustical challenges to sea surface, subsurface and airborne electronic systems presented by offshore wind farms. To accomplish this goal, the following tasks were carried out: (1) survey electronic systems that can potentially be impacted by large offshore wind farms, and identify impact assessment studies and research and development activities both within and outside the US, (2) engage key stakeholders to identify their possible concerns and operating requirements, (3) conduct first-principle modeling on the interactions of electromagnetic signals with, and the radiation of underwater acoustic signals from, offshore wind farms to evaluate the effect of such interactions on electronic systems, and (4) provide impact assessments, recommend mitigation methods, prioritize future research directions, and disseminate project findings. This report provides a detailed description of the methodologies used to carry out the study, key findings of the study, and a list of recommendations derived based the findings.

Ling, Hao [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Hamilton, Mark F. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Bhalla, Rajan [Science Applications International Corporation] [Science Applications International Corporation; Brown, Walter E. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Hay, Todd A. [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories] [The University of Texas at Austin Applied Research Laboratories; Whitelonis, Nicholas J. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Yang, Shang-Te [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin; Naqvi, Aale R. [The University of Texas at Austin] [The University of Texas at Austin

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Subsurface flow and transport of organic chemicals: an assessment of current modeling capability and priority directions for future research (1987-1995)  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical and computer modeling capability for assessing the subsurface movement and fate of organic contaminants in groundwater was examined. Hence, this study is particularly concerned with energy-related, organic compounds that could enter a subsurface environment and move as components of a liquid phase separate from groundwater. The migration of organic chemicals that exist in an aqueous dissolved state is certainly a part of this more general scenario. However, modeling of the transport of chemicals in aqueous solution has already been the subject of several reviews. Hence, this study emphasizes the multiphase scenario. This study was initiated to focus on the important physicochemical processes that control the behavior of organic substances in groundwater systems, to evaluate the theory describing these processes, and to search for and evaluate computer codes that implement models that correctly conceptualize the problem situation. This study is not a code inventory, and no effort was made to identify every available code capable of representing a particular process.

Streile, G.P.; Simmons, C.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Fe(III) Reduction and U(VI) Immobilization by Paenibacillus sp. Strain 300A, Isolated from Hanford 300A Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

A facultative iron-reducing (Fe(III)-reducing) Paenibacillus sp. strain was isolated from Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms that was capable of reducing soluble Fe(III) complexes (Fe(III)-NTA and Fe(III)-citrate) but unable to reduce poorly crystalline ferrihydrite (Fh). However, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of reducing Fh in the presence of low concentrations (2 µM) of either of electron transfer mediators (ETMs) flavin mononucleotide (FMN) or anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS). Maximum initial Fh reduction rates were observed at catalytic concentrations (<10 µM) of either FMN or AQDS. Higher FMN concentrations inhibited Fh reduction, while increased AQDS concentrations did not. We found that Paenibacillus sp. 300A also could reduce Fh in the presence of natural ETMs from Hanford 300A subsurface sediments. In the absence of ETMs, Paenibacillus sp. 300A was capable of immobilizing U(VI) through both reduction and adsorption. The relative contributions of adsorption and microbial reduction to U(VI) removal from the aqueous phase were ~7:3 in PIPES and ~1:4 in bicarbonate buffer. Our study demonstrated that Paenibacillus sp. 300A catalyzes Fe(III) reduction and U(VI) immobilization and that these reactions benefit from externally added or naturally existing ETMs in 300A subsurface sediments.

Ahmed, B.; Cao, B.; McLean, Jeffrey S.; Ica, Tuba; Dohnalkova, Alice; Istanbullu, Ozlem; Paksoy, Akin; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

438

Using high-order methods on adaptively refined block-structured meshes - discretizations, interpolations, and filters.  

SciTech Connect

Block-structured adaptively refined meshes (SAMR) strive for efficient resolution of partial differential equations (PDEs) solved on large computational domains by clustering mesh points only where required by large gradients. Previous work has indicated that fourth-order convergence can be achieved on such meshes by using a suitable combination of high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters and can deliver significant computational savings over conventional second-order methods at engineering error tolerances. In this paper, we explore the interactions between the errors introduced by discretizations, interpolations and filters. We develop general expressions for high-order discretizations, interpolations, and filters, in multiple dimensions, using a Fourier approach, facilitating the high-order SAMR implementation. We derive a formulation for the necessary interpolation order for given discretization and derivative orders. We also illustrate this order relationship empirically using one and two-dimensional model problems on refined meshes. We study the observed increase in accuracy with increasing interpolation order. We also examine the empirically observed order of convergence, as the effective resolution of the mesh is increased by successively adding levels of refinement, with different orders of discretization, interpolation, or filtering.

Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Najm, Habib N.; Kennedy, Christopher A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

An integrated CNC accumulation system for automatic building-around-inserts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper a non-layer-based additive manufacturing (AM) process named computer numerically controlled (CNC) accumulation process is presented for applications such as plastic part repairing and modification. To facilitate the CNC accumulation process, a novel three-dimensional (3D) laser scanning system based on a micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) device is developed for in situ scanning of inserted components. The integration of the scanning system in the CNC accumulation process enables the building-around-inserts with little human efforts. A point processing method based on the algebraic point set surface (APSS) fitting and layered depth-normal image (LDNI) representation is developed for converting the scanning points into triangular meshes. The newly developed 3D scanning system is compact and has sufficient accuracy for the CNC accumulation process. Based on the constructed surface model, data processing operations including multi-axis tool path planning and motion control are also investigated. Multiple test cases are performed to illustrate the capability of the integrated CNC accumulation process on addressing the requirements of building-around-inserts.

Xuejin Zhao; Yayue Pan; Chi Zhou; Yong Chen; Charlie C.L. Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Bellows-Type Accumulators for Liquid Metal Loops of Space Reactor Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

In many space nuclear power systems, the primary and/or secondary loops use liquid metal working fluids, and require accumulators to accommodate the change in the liquid metal volume and maintain sufficient subcooling to avoid boiling. This paper developed redundant and light-weight bellows-type accumulators with and without a mechanical spring, and compared the operating condition and mass of the accumulators for different types of liquid metal working fluids and operating temperatures: potassium, NaK-78, sodium and lithium loops of a total capacity of 50 liters and nominal operating temperatures of 840 K, 860 K, 950 K and 1340 K, respectively. The effects of using a mechanical spring and different structural materials on the design, operation and mass of the accumulators are also investigated. The structure materials considered include SS-316, Hastelloy-X, C-103 and Mo-14Re. The accumulator without a mechanical spring weighs 23 kg and 40 kg for a coolant subcooling of 50 K and 100 K, respectively, following a loss of the fill gas. The addition of a mechanical spring comes with a mass penalty, in favor of higher redundancy and maintaining a higher liquid metal subcooling.

Tournier, Jean-Michel; El-Genk, Mohamed S. [Institute for Space and Nuclear Power Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Chemical and Nuclear Engineering Department, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Large spin accumulation near a resistive interface due to spin-charge coupling  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally and theoretically investigate large spin signals in special nonlocal spin valves, where a vacuum break-junction is formed between the ferromagnetic spin detector and the nonmagnetic channel. The spin signals are clearly nonlocal and can be either non-inverted (meaning high nonlocal resistance for parallel states and low resistance for antiparallel states) or inverted. The magnitudes are significantly larger than those of standard metallic nonlocal devices with similar dimensions. The magnitudes and the signs can be understood by a theory of spin-charge coupling. The coupling between spin accumulation and charge accumulation across a resistive break junction leads to a large interfacial spin accumulation and thereby large spin signals. By analyzing the profiles of electrochemical potentials near the interface, we show that the sign of the spin signal depends on the values of spin-dependent conductivities, diffusion constants, and densities of states. The magnitude of the spin accumulation in the ferromagnetic spin detector can be higher than that in the nonmagnetic channel, enabling a rare amplification effect for spin accumulation.

Chen, Shuhan; Zou, Han; Chui, Siu-Tat; Ji, Yi, E-mail: yji@physics.udel.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

442

Corrective Action Decision Document/ Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 443: Central Nevada Test Area-Subsurface Central Nevada Test Area, Nevada, Rev. No. 0  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document/Corrective Action Plan (CADD/CAP) has been prepared for the subsurface at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 443, CNTA - Subsurface, Nevada, in accordance with the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order'' (FFACO) (1996). CAU 443 is located in Hot Creek Valley in Nye County, Nevada, north of U.S. Highway 6, about 48 kilometers north of Warm Springs, Nevada. The CADD/CAP combines the decision document (CADD) with the corrective action plan (CAP) and provides or references the specific information necessary to recommend corrective actions for the UC-1 Cavity (Corrective Action Site 58-57-001) at CAU 443, as provided in the FFACO. The purpose of the CADD portion of the document (Section 1.0 to Section 4.0) is to identify and provide a rationale for the selection of a recommended corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. To achieve this, the following tasks were required: (1) Develop corrective action objectives; (2) Identify corrective action alternative screening criteria; (3) Develop corrective action alternatives; (4) Perform detailed and comparative evaluations of the corrective action alternatives in relation to the corrective action objectives and screening criteria; and (5) Recommend a preferred corrective action alternative for the subsurface at CNTA. A Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) was performed in several stages from 1999 to 2003, as set forth in the ''Corrective Action Investigation Plan for the Central Nevada Test Area Subsurface Sites (Corrective Action Unit No. 443)'' (DOE/NV, 1999). Groundwater modeling was the primary activity of the CAI. Three phases of modeling were conducted for the Faultless underground nuclear test. The first involved the gathering and interpretation of geologic and hydrogeologic data into a three-dimensional numerical model of groundwater flow, and use of the output of the flow model for a transport model of radionuclide release and migration behavior (Pohlmann et al., 2000). The second modeling phase (known as a Data Decision Analysis [DDA]) occurred after the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection reviewed the first model and was designed to respond to concerns regarding model uncertainty (Pohll and Mihevc, 2000). The third modeling phase updated the original flow and transport model to incorporate the uncertainty identified in the DDA, and focused the model domain on the region of interest to the transport predictions. This third phase culminated in the calculation of contaminant boundaries for the site (Pohll et al., 2003).

Susan Evans

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Moment-Preserving SN Discretizations for the One-Dimensional Fokker-Planck Equation  

SciTech Connect

The Fokker-Planck equation: (1) Describes the transport and interactions of charged particles, (2) Many small-angle scattering collisions, (3) Asymptotic limit of the Boltzmann equation (Pomraning, 1992), and (4) The Boltzmann collision operator becomes the angular Laplacian. SN angular discretization: (1) Angular flux is collocated at the SN quadrature points, (2) The second-order derivatives in the Laplacian term must be discretized, and (3) Weighted finite-difference method preserves zeroth and first moments (Morel, 1985). Moment-preserving methods: (1) Collocate the Fokker-Planck operator at the SN quadrature points, (2) Develop several related and/or equivalent methods, and (3) Motivated by discretizations for the angular derivative appearing in the transport equation in one-dimensional spherical coordinates.

Warsa, James S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Prinja, Anil K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

444

Comparison of discrete and continuous thermal neutron scattering treatments in MCNP5  

SciTech Connect

The standard discrete thermal neutron S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment in MCNP5 is compared with a continuous S({alpha},{beta}) scattering treatment using a criticality suite of 119 benchmark cases and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data. In the analysis, six bound isotopes are considered: beryllium metal, graphite, hydrogen in water, hydrogen in polyethylene, beryllium in beryllium oxide and oxygen in beryllium oxide. Overall, there are only small changes in the eigenvalue (k{sub eff}) between discrete and continuous treatments. In the comparison of 64 cases that utilize S({alpha},{beta}) scattering, 62 agreed at the 95% confidence level, and the 2 cases with differences larger than 3 {sigma} agreed within 1 {sigma} when more neutrons were run in the calculations. The results indicate that the changes in eigenvalue between continuous and discrete treatments are random, small, and well within the uncertainty of measured data for reactor criticality experiments. (authors)

Pavlou, A. T. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Brown, F. B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Martin, W. R. [Univ. of Michigan, Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, 2355 Bonisteel Boulevard, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kiedrowski, B. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Monte Carlo Codes Group, MS A143, PO Box 1663, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA Project Processing Site. Revision 3, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The supplemental standards provisions of Title 40, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 192 (40 CFR Part 192) require the cleanup of radionuclides other than radium-226 (Ra-226) to levels ``as low as reasonably achievable`` (ALARA), taking into account site-specific conditions, if sufficient quantities and concentrations are present to constitute a significant radiation hazard. In this context, thorium-230 (Th-230) at the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site will require remediation. However, a seasonally fluctuating groundwater table at the site significantly complicates conventional remedial action with respect to cleanup. Characterization data indicate that in the offpile areas, the removal of residual in situ bulk Ra-226 and Th-230 such that the 1000-year projected Ra-226 concentration (Ra-226 concentration in 1000 years due to the decay of in situ Ra-226 and the in-growth of Ra-226 from in situ Th-230) complies with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cleanup standard for in situ Ra-226 and the cleanup protocol for in situ Th-230 can be readily achieved using conventional excavation techniques for bulk contamination without encountering significant impacts due to groundwater. The EPA cleanup standard and criterion for Ra-226 and the 1000-year projected Ra-226 are 5 and 15 picocuries per gram (pCi/g) above background, respectively, averaged over 15-centimeter (cm) deep surface and subsurface intervals and 100-square-meter (m{sup 2}) grid areas. Significant differential migration of Th-230 relative to Ra-226 has occurred over 40 percent of the subpile area. To effectively remediate the site with respect to Ra-226 and Th-230, supplemental standard is proposed and discussed in this report.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Subsurface temperature anomalies as a key to petroleum-producing areas in the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, eastern Kansas?  

SciTech Connect

The relation of subsurface temperature to `plain-type fold` structure in the Midcontinent (USA) as an exploration tool has been speculated on for a long time. Structural highs, termed `plains-type folds,` are partly the result of differential compaction of sediments over rigid crystalline fault blocks in the Precambrian basement. In the Midcontinent, bottom-hole temperature (BHT) data, temperatures measured in drillstem tests (DSTs), and structural data are abundant. In the Cherokee and Forest City Basins, we analyzed BHT data by depth and stratigraphic unit (Cambro-Ordovician Arbuckle carbonates; Mississippian carbonates; and Perm-Pennsylvanian clastics). By relating the BHTs to DSTs, it was noted that the thermal disturbance inherent in BHT by drilling is minor and comparable within a formation. Also, the signal-noise ratio of BHTs could be improved utilizing the large data set. Although the resulting BHT formation gradients show unexpected values from the thermal conductivity in the carbonates and from the evaluated temperature disturbance by the drilling process, analysis of the BHT spatial pattern shows a coincidence of structural highs and temperature anomalies both in the clastics and in the carbonates. These BHT anomalies are outlined by values higher than the regional temperature trend. We attribute the anomalies partly to the insulation effect of petroleum (which may include the self-generation of heat) and partly to the movement of fluids vertically through the fracture and fault system created in the sedimentary veneer. Numerous examples from the oil- and gas-producing areas in eastern Kansas show that the nature of origin of fluids contained in a porous medium can alter local geothermal conditions.

Merriam, D.F. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Foerster, A. [GeoForschungsZentrum Posdam (Germany)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

An Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Discretization of MHD on 3D Unstructured Grids  

SciTech Connect

We present an arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) discretization of the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) on unstructured hexahedral grids. The method is formulated using an operator-split approach with three distinct phases: electromagnetic diffusion, Lagrangian motion, and Eulerian advection. The resistive magnetic dynamo equation is discretized using a compatible mixed finite element method with a 2nd order accurate implicit time differencing scheme which preserves the divergence-free nature of the magnetic field. At each discrete time step, electromagnetic force and heat terms are calculated and coupled to the hydrodynamic equations to compute the Lagrangian motion of the conducting materials. By virtue of the compatible discretization method used, the invariants of Lagrangian MHD motion are preserved in a discrete sense. When the Lagrangian motion of the mesh causes significant distortion, that distortion is corrected with a relaxation of the mesh, followed by a 2nd order monotonic remap of the electromagnetic state variables. The remap is equivalent to Eulerian advection of the magnetic flux density with a fictitious mesh relaxation velocity. The magnetic advection is performed using a novel variant of constrained transport (CT) that is valid for unstructured hexahedral grids with arbitrary mesh velocities. The advection method maintains the divergence free nature of the magnetic field and is second order accurate in regions where the solution is sufficiently smooth. For regions in which the magnetic field is discontinuous (e.g. MHD shocks) the method is limited using a novel variant of algebraic flux correction (AFC) which is local extremum diminishing (LED) and divergence preserving. Finally, we verify each stage of the discretization via a set of numerical experiments.

Rieben, R N; White, D A; Wallin, B K; Solberg, J M

2006-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

448

Metal accumulation rates in sediments of the Mid-Atlantic ridge near 37°N  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

METAL ACCUMULATION RATES IN SEDIMENTS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE NEAR 37'N A Thesis by PATRICIA FAE SALTER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1977 Major Subject: Oceanography METAL ACCUMULATION RATES IN SEDIMENTS OF THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE NEAR 37 N A Thesis by PATRICIA FAE SALTER Approved as to style and content by; (Chairman of Committee) /~4~ r (Head of Depar tme t) (Mem er...

Salter, Patricia Fae

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Design and Prototyping of an Ionization Profile Monitor for the SNS Accumulator Ring  

SciTech Connect

An ionization profile monitor (IPM) has been designed for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Utilizing ionized electrons produced by beam-gas ionization, the SNS IPM uses a 120 kV bias potential to overcome beam space charge and accelerate electrons towards a movable particle detector. A 300 G magnetic field is used to confine the transverse electron motion, resulting in profile errors at the estimated 7% level. With a system bandwidth of 17.5 MHz. The SNS IPM is capable of measuring turn-by-turn beam profiles for a fully accumulated beam. This paper presents a description of the system and design.

Bartkoski, Dirk A [ORNL; Deibele, Craig E [ORNL; Polsky, Yarom [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A discrete element 3' of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 mRNA initiation sites mediates transcriptional activation by an HIV trans activator  

SciTech Connect

An important point of regulation in the reproductive growth and latency of the human and simian immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and SIV, respectively) is provided by virally encoded trans-activators (tat), proteins capable of dramatically increasing viral gene expression. The mechanism of this autostimulatory pathway has remained unclear, however, with substantial effects having been reported at the level of either mRNA accumulation, translational efficiency, or both. The authors' previous findings indicated that trans-activation results primarily from induction of RNA levels but could not distinguish between the roles of transcriptional rate, RNA stabilization, and RNA transport in this event. In addition, the boundaries of tat-responding elements, which would be valuable in elucidating the mode of tat action, are not precisely known. In this study, HIV-1 and HIV-2 long terminal repeat-directed expression was characterized by using in an vitro nuclear transcription assay to clarify this mechanism, and a detailed mutational analysis was undertaken to localize precisely the sequences participating in this process. Two key findings were revealed: an increased transcription rate was the primary event in tat-mediated activation of HIV-1 and HIV-2, and trans-activation was impaired by mutations in two regions, the TATA box and sequences between +19 to +42, a region lacking enhancer activity. These results implicate a discrete 3' regulatory element in the transcriptional activation of the HIVs.

Jakobovits, A.; Smith, D.H.; Jakobovits, E.B.; Capon, D.J.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Subsurface Site Characterization  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

and limestone. The Green River Formation is the primary formation of interest for oil shale development in the region. Quaternary-age deposits of alluvium, mudflows, talus...

452

Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of the President's Climate Action Plan, necessary to meet the 2050 greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reduction target. Increasing domestic energy supply from greater hydrocarbon...

453

EMSL - subsurface science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

science en Oxidative Remobilization of Technetium Sequestered by Sulfide-Transformed Nano Zerovalent Iron. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsoxidative-remobilization-tec...

454

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. Theme Leads Instruments Science Highlights Publications Leads Nancy J. Hess...

455

EMSL - Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cycle and ecosystem biogeochemistry and inform biogeochemistry components of Earth System Models. en Influence of Adsorption Site and Wavelength on the Photodesorption of NO...

456

subsurface geological field | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

457

EMSL - subsurface geological field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

transport of U(VI) at the field-scale. The results indicate that multi-rate U(VI) sorptiondesorption, U(VI) surface complexation reactions, and initial U(VI) concentrations...

458

www.btny.purdue.edu/weedscience/ Nitrogen Accumulation by Annual Grass Weeds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Roundup Ready corn or glufosinate (Liberty) in Liberty Link corn. So, if adoption of Roundup Ready corn projects that involved nitrogen accumulation by weeds in corn and impact on corn yield. In the next couple of articles I will summarize the results of these projects. The first project I will discuss was an evaluation

Ginzel, Matthew

459

12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid Accumulation during Seed Development Represses Seed Germination in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...synthase (AOS) and allene oxide cyclase (AOC) in the plastid. Dinor-oxo-phytodienoic...to the wild type (Table 1). A second AOC gene, AOC1, and the AOS gene were downregulated...Also, constitutive overexpression of AOC leads to accumulation of JA, OPDA, and...

Anuja Dave; M. Luisa Hernández; Zhesi He; Vasilios M.E. Andriotis; Fabián E. Vaistij; Tony R. Larson; Ian A. Graham

2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

460

Beach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

quantification was used at Coal Oil Point (COP), California to study the mechanisms transporting oil/tar fromBeach tar accumulation, transport mechanisms, and sources of variability at Coal Oil Point 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Santa Barbara Channel; Tar; Seeps; Oil slick; Oil

Luyendyk, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode  

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Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode Jason B. Siegel,a, *,z electrolyte membrane fuel cell PEMFC with a dead-ended anode is observed using neutron imaging gas diffusion layer. Even though dry hydrogen is supplied to the anode via pressure regulation

Stefanopoulou, Anna

462

Non-linear Damage Accumulation in Au-irradiated SrTiO3. | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Damage Accumulation in Au-irradiated SrTiO3. Abstract: Ion-induced damage in strontium titanate (SrTiO3) has been investigated using 1.0 MeV Au ions at 150 K and room...

463

Geological controls on gas accumulation in a unique Zechstein carbonate reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potentially contribute and combine favourably to Wissey's reservoir quality and gas reserves. It is nowGeological controls on gas accumulation in a unique Zechstein carbonate reservoir Craig Duguid, The King's Buildings, West Mains Road, Edinburgh, EH9 3JW, Scotland, UK Email: S0567834@sms.ed.ac.uk Gas

464

Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

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Manipulating RuBisCO accumulation in the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Xenie Johnson photosynthetic car- bon metabolism towards alternative pathways. Keywords RuBisCO � Chloroplast � RNA stability between green algae (Chlamydomonas X. Johnson (&) Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Unite

465

Exchangeable sodium accumulation and replacement in Southeast Texas soils under turfgrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

accumulation but exchangeable Na also increased as a function of years of irrigation. The multiple regression equation: SARE =-5.16 + 0.53 SARiw + 4.04 In (yr) (R2 = 0.86) best predicted SARE to a depth of 30 cm. This study also compared gypsum, a common...

Najjar, Namir Fouad

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Capital accumulation and non-renewable energy resources: a special functions case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

out that the usage of non-renewable energy resources im- plies a limit to the economic growth the negative effect of non-renewable energy re- sources on economic growth, even without technical progress2007/9 Capital accumulation and non-renewable energy resources: a special functions case Agustin

Nesterov, Yurii

467

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fecal coliform accumulation within a river subject to seasonally-disinfected wastewater discharges in the implications of seasonal disinfection practices of wastewater effluents for meeting water quality goals from municipal wastewater outfalls along the river, as well as upstream and downstream of each outfall

Mitch, William A.

468

Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage production and accumulation in SiC structures in inertial and magnetic fusion systems M wall in an IFE system is $10% lower than in an MFE system, while gas production and burnup rates magnetic (MFE) and inertial (IFE) confinement fusion systems. Variations in the geometry, neutron energy

Ghoniem, Nasr M.

469

H Gain Scheduling for Discrete-Time Systems with Control Delays and Time-Varying Parameters: a BMI Approach  

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H Gain Scheduling for Discrete-Time Systems with Control Delays and Time-Varying Parameters: a BMI. By using a memory at the feedback loop, a discrete gain scheduled controller which minimizes an upper bound, there is no denying the fact that gain scheduling has represented an important issue within control system theory [1

470

Discrete Event Simulation of QoS of a SCADA System Interconnecting a Power Grid and a Telco Network  

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Discrete Event Simulation of QoS of a SCADA System Interconnecting a Power Grid and a Telco Network, Telco network and Power grid act as a whole heterogeneous network. While SCADA system and Telco network can be well represented by means of discrete event simulators. To represent a Power grid a continuous

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

9. CS and discrete probability David Keil CS II 7/02 David Keil 1/03 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

probability) · Intuition: given some knowledge of an object, and some statistics about the population1 9. CS and discrete probability David Keil CS II 7/02 David Keil 1/03 1 Computer science and discrete probability · Probability space · Independent and dependent events · Conditional probability

Keil, David M.

472

An extension of the OpenModelica compiler for using Modelica models in a discrete event simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article describes a new back-end and run-time system for the OpenModelica compiler. This new back-end transforms a Modelica model into a module for the adevs discrete event simulation package, thereby extending adevs to encompass complex, hybrid ... Keywords: combined simulation, continuous system simulation, discrete event simulation, hybrid simulation, simulation languages

James Nutaro

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Assessment of storage lipid accumulation patterns in eucalanoid copepods from the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Members of the copepod family Eucalanidae are widely distributed throughout the world?s oceans and have been noted for their accumulation of storage lipids in high- and low-latitude environments. However, little is known about the lipid composition of eucalanoid copepods in low-latitude environments. The purpose of this study was to examine fatty acid and alcohol profiles in the storage lipids (wax esters and triacylglycerols) of Eucalanus inermis, Rhincalanus rostrifrons, R. nasutus, Pareucalanus attenuatus, and Subeucalanus subtenuis, collected primarily in the eastern tropical north Pacific near the Tehuantepec Bowl and Costa Rica Dome regions, noted for its oxygen minimum zone, during fall 2007 and winter 2008/2009. Adult copepods and particulate material were collected in the upper 50 m and from 200 to 300 m in the upper oxycline. Lipid profiles of particulate matter were generated to help ascertain information on ecological strategies of these species and on differential accumulation of dietary and modified fatty acids in the wax ester and triacylglycerol storage lipid components of these copepods in relation to their vertical distributions around the oxygen minimum zone. Additional data on phospholipid fatty acid and sterol/fatty alcohol fractions were also generated to obtain a comprehensive lipid data set for each sample. Rhincalanus spp. accumulated relatively large amounts of storage lipids (31–80% of dry mass (DM)), while E. inermis had moderate amounts (2–9% DM), and P. attenuatus and S. subtenuis had low quantities of storage lipid (0–1% DM). E. inermis and S. subtenuis primarily accumulated triacylglycerols (>90% of storage lipids), while P. attenuatus and Rhincalanus spp. primarily accumulated wax esters (>84% of storage lipids). Based on previously generated molecular phylogenies of the Eucalanidae family, these results appear to support genetic predisposition as a major factor explaining why a given species accumulates primarily triacylglycerols or wax esters, and also potentially dictating major fatty acid and alcohol accumulation patterns within the more highly modified wax ester fraction. Comparisons of fatty acid profiles between triacylglycerol and wax ester components in copepods with that in available prey suggested that copepod triacylglycerols were more reflective of dietary fatty acids, while wax esters contained a higher proportion of modified or de novo synthesized forms. Sterols and phospholipid fatty acids were similar between species, confirming high levels of regulation within these components. Similarities between triacylglycerol fatty acid profiles of E. inermis collected in surface waters and at >200 m depth indicate little to no feeding during their ontogenetic migration to deeper, low-oxygen waters.

Christine J. Cass; Kendra L. Daly; Stuart G. Wakeham

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Discrete Assembly of Synthetic Peptide-DNA Triplex Structures from Polyvalent Melamine-Thymine Bifacial Recognition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Assembly of Synthetic Peptide-DNA Triplex Structures from Polyvalent Melamine decadeoxyoligothymi- dine (dT10) tracts to form triplexes with a peptide-DNA strand ratio of 1:2. The synthetic, synthetic melamine-displaying peptide 1 induced assembly of a peptide-DNA triplex structures

Bong, Dennis

475

Management of a Smart Grid with Controlled-Delivery of Discrete Power Levels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Management of a Smart Grid with Controlled-Delivery of Discrete Power Levels Roberto Rojas of Technology Newark, NJ 07102 {rojas, yx63, grebel}@njit.edu Abstract--The present electrical grid uses two to power amounts. These two properties, although functional and practical, expose the grid to overload

Rojas-Cessa, Roberto

476

ON THE SYNTHESIS OF OPTIMAL SCHEDULERS IN DISCRETE EVENT CONTROL PROBLEMS WITH MULTIPLE GOALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE SYNTHESIS OF OPTIMAL SCHEDULERS IN DISCRETE EVENT CONTROL PROBLEMS WITH MULTIPLE GOALS HERV to modify if necessary and piece together, or schedule, all of the controllers built in the first step, optimal control, scheduler, traveling salesman problem AMS subject classifications. 93A99, 49-XX, 90C27

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

477

The inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the line  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the entire line with coefficients that stabilize to zero in one direction. We derive a necessary and a sufficient condition on the scattering data so that the inverse problem is uniquely solvable. Bibliography: 23 titles.

Khanmamedov, Agil Kh [Baku State University, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

478

Towards a discretely actuated steerable cannula for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have designed, developed, and evaluated the performance of a multi-degree-of-freedom discretely actuated steerable cannula with shape-memory alloy (SMA) actuators. This will enable us to deliver diagnostic as well as therapeutic devices to the target ... Keywords: Medical robots and systems, design and control, human-centered and life-like robotics, mechanics, motion control, smart actuators

Elif Ayvali; Chia-Pin Liang; Mingyen Ho; Yu Chen; Jaydev P Desai

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

The Subcritical Collapse of Predator Populations in Discrete-Time Predator-Prey Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Subcritical Collapse of Predator Populations in Discrete-Time Predator-Prey Models MICHAEL G undergo a subcritical flip bifurcation with a concomitant crash in the predator's popula- tion. We review a technique for distinguishing between subcritical and supercritical flip bifurcations and provide examples

de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

480

Dot Density Maps Dot density maps, or dot maps, portray the geographic distribution of discrete phenomena  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dot Density Maps Dot density maps, or dot maps, portray the geographic distribution of discrete for representing geographic patterns. Dot density maps are particularly useful for understanding global distribution of the mapped phenomenon and comparing relative densities of different regions on the map. Dot

Klippel, Alexander

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Discrete Convexity and Equilibria in Economies with Indivisible Goods and Money  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Convexity and Equilibria in Economies with Indivisible Goods and Money Vladimir Danilov (numeraire or money). The objective of this paper is to clarify a general mathematical mechanism which of indivisible goods and one perfectly divisible good (numeraire or money). This means that the commodity space

482

Hybrid Systems and Biology. Continuous and Discrete Modeling for Systems Biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Systems and Biology. Continuous and Discrete Modeling for Systems Biology Luca Bortolussi1 (IGA) alberto.policriti@appliedgenomics.org Abstract. Hybrid Systems are dynamical systems presenting both dis- crete and continuous evolution. Hybrid Automata are a formal model for hybrid systems

Bortolussi, Luca

483

HighFidelity Rapid Prototyping of 300mm Fabs through Discrete Event System Modeling #  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High­Fidelity Rapid Prototyping of 300mm Fabs through Discrete Event System Modeling # Jonghun Park and control. Keywords: High­fidelity modeling, 300mm Fab, Flexible Automation, Colored Petri Nets, Web­based Simulation, Rapid Prototyping # A preliminary version of this paper appeared in [28]. + Corresponding author

Reveliotis, Spiridon "Spyros"

484

Symbolic Dynamic Programming for Discrete and Continuous State MDPs Scott Sanner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

k + xi > 100 : 0 If our objective is to maximize the long-term value V (i.e., the sum of rewardsSymbolic Dynamic Programming for Discrete and Continuous State MDPs Scott Sanner NICTA & the ANU-theoretic planning for DC- MDPs, optimal solutions have only been defined so far for limited settings, e.g., DC

Sanner, Scott

485

Symbolic Variable Elimination for Discrete and Continuous Graphical Models Scott Sanner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symbolic Variable Elimination for Discrete and Continuous Graphical Models Scott Sanner NICTA & ANU, e.g., estimating the position and pose of entities from measurements in robotics, or radar track Intelligence (www.aaai.org). All rights reserved. n xx1 ...x2 d 10 d 0 100 P(d) = P(x |d) = d x i i Figure 1

Sanner, Scott

486

Decision making in fuzzy discrete event systems F. Lin a,c,*, H. Ying a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

includes a FDES decision model, a fuzzy objective generator for generating optimal control objectives Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Discrete event systems; Fuzzy logic; Decision making; HIV ``good'' to ``bad''. For such applications, we need to introduce fuzzy logic to DES. In a conference

Lin, Feng

487

Sensitivity Analysis of Discrete Stochastic Systems Rudiyanto Gunawan,* Yang Cao,y  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of system behavior on the parameters that affect the process dynamics. Classical sensitivity analysis to variations in the parameters that affect the system dynamics. A large sensitivity to a parameter suggestsSensitivity Analysis of Discrete Stochastic Systems Rudiyanto Gunawan,* Yang Cao,y Linda Petzold

Cao, Yang

488

QUANTITATIVE BOUNDS ON THE DISCRETE SPECTRUM OF NON SELF-ADJOINT QUANTUM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A55. Key words and phrases. Non self-adjoint relatively compact perturbations of self- adjoint compact perturbation with respect to the self- adjoint operator H0, then the Weyl's criterionQUANTITATIVE BOUNDS ON THE DISCRETE SPECTRUM OF NON SELF-ADJOINT QUANTUM MAGNETIC HAMILTONIANS

Boyer, Edmond

489

A New Incompressibility Discretization for a Hybrid Particle MAC Grid Representation with Surface Tension  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

implicit surface tension for our novel hybrid discretization, we demonstrate preliminary results for both. Surface tension forces exacerbate the situation by imposing a strict t = O(x3/2 ) time step restriction formulation of surface tension by looking at the changes of curvature over time. This was simplified in [26

Fedkiw, Ron

490

Discrete Mathematics 233 (2001) 175182 www.elsevier.com/locate/disc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete Mathematics 233 (2001) 175­182 www.elsevier.com/locate/disc Some remarks on cycles on cycles of graphs and directed graphs of the following form: `Does there exist a set of cycles with a property P that generates all the cycles by operation O?'. c 2001 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. 1

Matamala, Martín

491

Finite Element Analysis of a Composite Semi-Span Test Article With and Without Discrete Damage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AS&M, Inc. performed finite element analysis, with and without discrete damage, of a composite semi-span test article that represents the Boeing 220-passenger transport aircraft composite semi-span test article. A NASTRAN bulk data file and drawings ...

Lovejoy Andrew E.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

-transform MATLAB Laboratory Experiment Purpose: This experiment presents the frequency domain analysis of discrete-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5.6 -transform MATLAB Laboratory Experiment Purpose: This experiment presents the frequency domain analysis of discrete-time systems using MATLAB. The impulse, step, sinusoidal, and exponential on the ¡ -transform. In addition, MATLAB will be used to perform the partial fraction expansion and to find

Gajic, Zoran

493

Experimental Evaluation of Inventory-Based Discrete-Updating Market Maker for Intra-Firm Prediction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an inventory-based updating logic according to the transactions in the market. Laboratory experimentsExperimental Evaluation of Inventory-Based Discrete- Updating Market Maker for Intra-Firm Prediction Market System Using VIPS Hajime Mizuyama1 , Morio Ueda, Katsunobu Asada and Yu Tagaya 1 Department

Boyer, Edmond

494

Local Heating of Discrete Droplets Using Magnetic Porous Silicon-Based Photonic Crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of conventional microfluidic channel and heating systems. Introduction Much of the work on microfluidics to dateLocal Heating of Discrete Droplets Using Magnetic Porous Silicon-Based Photonic Crystals Ji-Ho Park and Technology (HarVard-MIT) and Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts

Bhatia, Sangeeta

495

Discrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the hyperbolic transient radiative-transport equation are not known. Ku- mar et al.4 considered the solution-pulsed laser transport is transient radiative-transfer theory. Complete an- alytical solutionsDiscrete-ordinates solution of short-pulsed laser transport in two-dimensional turbid media

Guo, Zhixiong "James"

496

A note on semi-discrete modelling in the life sciences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...equations at all (e.g. Shaw 1994; Jansen Sabelis 1995; Swinton et-al. 1997...significant use of semi-discrete models. Jansen Sabelis (1995) analysed first the consequences...A. R. , K. Gross, and V. A. A. Jansen 2000 Periodic mortality events in predator-prey...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Green's function of a finite chain and the discrete Fourier transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new expression for the Green's function of a finite one-dimensional lattice with nearest neighbor interaction is derived via discrete Fourier transform. Solution of the Heisenberg spin chain with periodic and open boundary conditions is considered as an example. Comparison to Bethe ansatz clarifies the relation between the two approaches.

S. Cojocaru

2007-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

498

An LMI approach to reliable guaranteed cost control of discrete-time systems with actuator failure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the reliable guaranteed cost control problem for discrete-time systems with actuator failures and a given quadratic cost function. The problem is to design a reliable guaranteed cost state feedback control law which can tolerate ... Keywords: Actuator failure, Guaranteed cost control, LMI, Reliable control

Li Yu

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

The Discrete LegendreFenchel Transform and its application to phase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 3. The double Discrete Legendre-Fenchel Transform 21 3.1. Properties of the double DLFT-dimensional functions 28 4.1. Factorization of the DLFT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 4.2. Factorization of the double DLFT with alternating dimensions . . . . . . . 29 4.3. Estimation of the dual set

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

500

Completeness in DiscreteTime Process Algebra Michel A. Reniers and Jan Joris Vereijken  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, discrete time, relative time, elimination, soundness, com­ pleteness, BPA, BPA # , BPA - drt --#, BPA - drt --ID, BPA drt --ID, BPA - drt , BPA drt , PA - drt --ID, ACP - drt --ID, PA drt , ACP drt , RSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2.2 Soundness and Completeness of BPA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 2

Reniers, Michel