Sample records for discrete subsurface accumulations

  1. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

  2. Subsurface Analysis of the Mesaverde Group on and near the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico-its implication on Sites of Oil and Gas Accumulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridgley, Jennie

    2001-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the phase 2 Mesaverde study part of the Department of Energy funded project ''Analysis of oil-bearing Cretaceous Sandstone Hydrocarbon Reservoirs, exclusive of the Dakota Sandstone, on the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation, New Mexico'' was to define the facies of the oil-producing units within the subsurface units of the Mesaverde Group and integrate these results with outcrop studies that defined the depositional environments of these facies within a sequence stratigraphic context. The focus of this report will center on (1) integration of subsurface correlations with outcrop correlations of components of the Mesaverde, (2) application of the sequence stratigraphic model determined in the phase one study to these correlations, (3) determination of the facies distribution of the Mesaverde Group and their relationship to sites of oil and gas accumulation, (4) evaluation of the thermal maturity and potential source rocks for oil and gas in the Mesaverde Group, and (5) evaluation of the structural features on the Reservation as they may control sites of oil accumulation.

  3. Addressing Common Subsurface Challenges

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Common Subsurface Challenges Mastering the subsurface for energy production and storage and for the management of energy waste streams constitutes an energy "grand challenge." To...

  4. subsurface science | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Instruments: Radiological XPS Tags: fluorescence spectrometer SPEX Fluorolog 2 excitation emission spectra single photon ultraviolet subsurface science Volume: Issue: Pages:...

  5. Adaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    ­ discrete Galerkin method applying finite differences for the discretization in time and the StreamlineAdaptive Methods for Modelling Transport Processes in Fractured Subsurface Systems 3rd­adaptive methods for modelling transport processes in fractured rock. As a simplification, ideal tracers

  6. Subsurface Flow and Transport | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface related to contaminant transport, carbon cycling, enhanced oil recovery and carbon dioxide sequestration. See a complete list of Subsurface Flow and Transport...

  7. Subsurface Excavations (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation addresses subsurface excavations conducted for all purposes other than the exploration or production of gas and oil resources that may adversely affect water resources of the state...

  8. Subsurface Contamination Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Yuan

    2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

  9. Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

    2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

  10. Poster on Subsurface Technology & Engineering Research, Development...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subsurface Initiative, focused on revolutionizing sustainable subsurface energy production and storage through transformational improvements in the ability to access,...

  11. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  12. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier is disclosed for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates. 5 figs.

  13. Containment of subsurface contaminants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A barrier for reducing the spread of a plume of subsurface contaminants. The apparatus includes a well system for injecting a fluid, such as air, just outside and below the periphery of the plume. The fluid is injected at a pressure sufficient to lower the hydraulic conductivity of the soil from the point of injection to the surface thus establishing a curtain-like barrier to groundwater movement. The barrier is established upgradient of the plume to divert groundwater away, or preferably completely around the plume to reduce the flow of groundwater into or out of the plume. The barrier enables the remediation of the confined contamination and then, when the injection of the fluid is halted, the barrier quickly dissipates.

  14. Crosscutting Subsurface Initiative: Adaptive Control of Subsurface Fractures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The subsurface provides most of the worlds energy and offers great potential for CO2, nuclear waste, and energy storage. Despite decades of research and recent successes in new extraction methods...

  15. Maintaining Subsurface Drip Irrigation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Bordovsky, Jim; Fipps, Guy

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip irrigation system should last more than 20 years if properly maintained. Important maintenance procedures include cleaning the filters, flushing the lines, adding chlorine and injecting acids. Details of these procedures...

  16. Microbial Transport in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginn, Timothy R.; Camesano, Terri; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Nelson, Kirk B.; Clement, T. P.; Wood, Brian D.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we focus on the physical, chemical, and biological processes involved in the transport of bacteria in the saturated subsurface. We will first review conceptual models of bacterial phases in the subsurface, and then the processes controlling fate and transport on short (e.g., bioremediation) time scales. Finally we briefly review field bacterial transport experiments and discuss a number of issues that impact the application of current process descriptions and models at the field scale.

  17. Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

    2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

  18. ESF Subsurface Standby Generator Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. Fernandez

    1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this analysis is to outline and recommend two standby generator systems. These systems shall provide power during a utility outage to critical Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and to subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Critical loads that will be supported by these generator systems will be identified and evaluated. Additionally, other requirements from the Exploratory Studies Facilities Design Requirements (ESFDR) document will be evaluated. Finally, the standby generator systems will be integrated into the existing ESF subsurface distribution system. The objective of this analysis is to provide design inputs for an efficient and reliable standby generator systems which will provide power for critical loads during a power outage; specifically, Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and the subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Additionally, preliminary one-line diagrams will be developed using this analysis as a primary input.

  19. Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the Impact on the Redox Chemistry of TiO2(110). Anticorrelation between Surface and Subsurface Point Defects and the...

  20. SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.W. Markman

    2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

  1. Method of installing subsurface barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  2. Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging."AGU Hydrology Section Newsletter (December 2011):24-28. Authors: TC Johnson MJ Truex DM Wellman J...

  3. PV production Accumulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Profile COMPARISON BETWEEN LEAD-ACID AND LI-ION ACCUMULATORS IN STAND-ALONE PHOTOVOLTAIC SYSTEM USING-ion accumulators more and more envisioned in such applications. In this paper, sizing optimisations of SAPV systems have been lead for each accumulator technology considered. The photovoltaic system has been simulated

  4. Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Sheffield

    2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

  5. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Uranium(VI) Diffusion in Low-Permeability Subsurface Materials. Abstract: Uranium(VI) diffusion was investigated in...

  6. Explicit Interleavers for a Repeat Accumulate Accumulate (RAA) code construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guruswami, Venkatesan

    Explicit Interleavers for a Repeat Accumulate Accumulate (RAA) code construction Venkatesan: widad@cs.washington.edu Abstract-- Repeat Accumulate Accumulate (RAA) codes are turbo-like codes where), then an accumulator, then a second permutation, and finally a second accumulator. Bazzi, Mahdian, and Spielman (2003

  7. Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

    2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

  8. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  9. Microbial life in the deep terrestrial subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fliermans, C.B. [E.I. DuPont de Nemours and Co., Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River Lab.; Balkwill, D.L. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States); Beeman, R.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1988-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and function of microorganisms is a vital issue in microbial ecology. The US Department of Energy`s Program, ``Microbiology of the Deep Subsurface,`` concentrates on establishing fundamental scientific information about organisms at depth, and the use of these organisms for remediation of contaminants in deep vadose zone and groundwater environments. This investigation effectively extends the Biosphere hundreds of meters into the Geosphere and has implications to a variety of subsurface activities.

  10. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes: Systematic Codes Achieving the Binary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sason, Igal

    Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes: Systematic Codes Achieving the Binary Erasure Channel Capacity@ee.technion.ac.il Abstract The paper introduces ensembles of accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes which asymp- totically by the first capacity-achieving ensembles of ir- regular repeat-accumulate (IRA) codes with bounded complexity

  11. MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

  12. Subsurface clade of Geobacteraceae that predominates in a diversity of Fe(III)-reducing subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, Dawn; O'Neil, Regina; Vrionis, Helen A.; N'guessan, Lucie A.; Ortiz-Bernad, Irene; Larrahondo, Maria J.; Adams, Lorrie A.; Ward, Joy A.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Chavan, Milind A.; Johnson, Jessica P.; Long, Philip E.; Lovely, Derek R.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are distinct differences in the physiology of Geobacter species available in pure culture. Therefore, to understand the ecology of Geobacter species in subsurface environments, it is important to know which species predominate. Clone libraries were assembled with 16S rRNA genes and transcripts amplified from three subsurface environments in which Geobacter species are known to be important members of the microbial community: (1) a uranium-contaminated aquifer located in Rifle, CO, USA undergoing in situ bioremediation; (2) an acetate-impacted aquifer that serves as an analog for the long-term acetate amendments proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation and (3) a petroleum-contaminated aquifer in which Geobacter species play a role in the oxidation of aromatic hydrocarbons coupled with the reduction of Fe(III). The majority of Geobacteraceae 16S rRNA sequences found in these environments clustered in a phylogenetically coherent subsurface clade, which also contains a number of Geobacter species isolated from subsurface environments. Concatamers constructed with 43 Geobacter genes amplified from these sites also clustered within this subsurface clade. 16S rRNA transcript and gene sequences in the sediments and groundwater at the Rifle site were highly similar, suggesting that sampling groundwater via monitoring wells can recover the most active Geobacter species. These results suggest that further study of Geobacter species in the subsurface clade is necessary to accurately model the behavior of Geobacter species during subsurface bioremediation of metal and organic contaminants

  13. Heating systems for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

  14. Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

  15. Temporal Specifications with Accumulative Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boker, Udi

    Temporal Specifications with Accumulative Values Udi Boker, Krishnendu Chatterjee, Thomas A the accumulation of values along a computation. It is either the accumulated summation, as with the energy objectives, or the accumulated average, as with the mean-payoff objectives. We investigate the extension

  16. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Area Subsurface Sediments Grantee-Led Research Beyenal H.of Reactive Transport Grantee-Led Research Choreover J.Subsurface Metal Contaminants Grantee-Led Research Daley R.

  17. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench at the Hanford Site. Carbon Tetrachloride Flow and Transport in the Subsurface of the 216-Z-9 Trench...

  18. On-Site Wastewater Treatment Systems: Subsurface Drip Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A subsurface drip system distributes wastewater to the lawn through a system of tubing installed below the ground. This publication explains the advantages and disadvantages of subsurface drip distribution systems, as well as estimated costs...

  19. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Subsurface clade of Geobacteraceae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lovley, Derek

    undergoing in situ bioremediation; (2) an acetate-impacted aquifer that serves as an analog for the long-term acetate amendments proposed for in situ uranium bioremediation and (3) a petroleum-contaminated aquifer subsurface bioremediation of metal and organic contaminants. The ISME Journal (2007) 1, 663677; doi:10

  20. Methods for forming long subsurface heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kim, Dong Sub

    2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming a longitudinal subsurface heater includes longitudinally welding an electrically conductive sheath of an insulated conductor heater along at least one longitudinal strip of metal. The longitudinal strip is formed into a tubular around the insulated conductor heater with the insulated conductor heater welded along the inside surface of the tubular.

  1. New Horizons for Deep Subsurface Microbiology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onstott, Tullis

    University in Sweden, the En- vironmental Institute in Denmark, and at sev- eral institutions in Russia, beneath 0.5 km of permafrost, and within and beneath gas hydrate deposits of varying depths. Deep, hot to the marine realm, the terrestrial subsurface contains ecosystems whose chemo- autotrophic nature increases

  2. Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Prospects for Subsurface CO2 Sequestration Abbas Firoozabadi and Philip Cheng Dept. of Chemical in Wiley InterScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). Keywords: CO2 sequestration, mixing, diffusion coal in the future. Coal has a high carbon to hydrogen ratio while natural gas, the premium fuel

  3. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediments undergoing U(VI) bioremediation. Abstracts Designinto subsurface bioremediation. Abstracts BUGS Modeling:attenuation or engineered bioremediation conditions, to

  4. A Design Model for Subsurface Drip Irrigation in Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    and useful tool when applied to the design of subsurface irrigation systems #12;Acknowledgements This projectA Design Model for Subsurface Drip Irrigation in Arizona Michael Liga Advisor: Dr. Don Slack Biosystems Engineering University of Arizona #12;Water Issue Subsurface Drip Irrigation Benefits Increased

  5. Discrete Element Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, J; Johnson, S

    2007-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Distinct Element Method (also frequently referred to as the Discrete Element Method) (DEM) is a Lagrangian numerical technique where the computational domain consists of discrete solid elements which interact via compliant contacts. This can be contrasted with Finite Element Methods where the computational domain is assumed to represent a continuum (although many modern implementations of the FEM can accommodate some Distinct Element capabilities). Often the terms Discrete Element Method and Distinct Element Method are used interchangeably in the literature, although Cundall and Hart (1992) suggested that Discrete Element Methods should be a more inclusive term covering Distinct Element Methods, Displacement Discontinuity Analysis and Modal Methods. In this work, DEM specifically refers to the Distinct Element Method, where the discrete elements interact via compliant contacts, in contrast with Displacement Discontinuity Analysis where the contacts are rigid and all compliance is taken up by the adjacent intact material.

  6. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  7. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  8. Subsurface materials management and containment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kosteinik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2004-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  9. Polytypic Downwards Accumulations Jeremy Gibbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jeremy

    Polytypic Downwards Accumulations Jeremy Gibbons School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences@brookes.ac.uk. Abstract. A downwards accumulation is a higher­order operation that distributes information downwards The notion of scans or accumulations on lists is well known, and has proved very fruitful for expressing

  10. Generic Downwards Accumulations Jeremy Gibbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jeremy

    Generic Downwards Accumulations Jeremy Gibbons School of Computing and Mathematical Sciences@brookes.ac.uk. Abstract. A downwards accumulation is a higher-order operation that distributes information downwards; the resulting de#12;nition is co-inductive. 1 Introduction The notion of scans or accumulations on lists is well

  11. Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, C.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

  12. A discrete fractional random transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

    2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

  13. Discrete Fourier Transform Javier Montoya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Discrete Fourier Transform Javier Montoya Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing ETH Zurich March 16, 2012 1 Introduction The Discrete form of the Fourier transform is known as Discrete Fourier Transform domain using the Inverse Discrete Fourier Transform (IDFT): f(x) = 1 N N-1 x=0 F(u)ej 2 N ux for u = 0, 1

  14. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

  15. Parallel heater system for subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

    2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

  16. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  17. Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO Overview OCHCO OverviewRepositoryManagementFacilityExcellence | DepartmentSubsurface

  18. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

  19. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam Microscopy. Subsurface Examination of a Foliar Biofilm Using Scanning Electron- and Focused-Ion-Beam...

  20. aerated subsurface flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 81 DRILLING AUTOMATION FOR SUBSURFACE PLANETARY EXPLORATION ABSTRACT CiteSeer Summary: Future in-situ lunarmartian resource utilization and...

  1. Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the...

  2. Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Field California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Using Micro-Seismicity and Seismic Velocities to Map Subsurface...

  3. Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada,...

  4. Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Abstract In...

  5. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miletto, M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. Lovley. 2000. Anaerobic bioremediation of benzene underon sustainable bioremediation of uranium- contaminatedduring in situ U(VI) bioremediation with a field-portable

  6. New barrier fluids for subsurface containment of contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, G.J.; Persoff, P.; Holman, H.Y.; Muller, S.J.; Pruess, K.; Radke, C.J.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In some situations, containment of contaminants in the subsurface may be preferable to removal or treatment in situ. In these cases, it maybe possible to form barriers by injecting fluids (grouts) that set in place and reduce the formation permeability. This paper reports laboratory work to develop two types of fluids for this application: colloidal silica (CS) and polysiloxane (PSX). Falling-head permeameter tests of grouted Hanford sand, lasting 50 days, showed hydraulic conductivities of order 10{sup -7} cm/sec for these two materials. Low initial viscosity of the grout is necessary to permit injection without causing fracturing or surface uplift. Experiments with crosslinked polysiloxanes showed that they could be diluted to achieve adequately low viscosity without losing their ability to cure. Control of the gel time is important for grout emplacement. Gel time of CS grouts increased with increasing pH (above 6.5) and with decreasing ionic strength. Salt solutions were added to the colloid-to increase the ionic strength and control gel time. When injected into Hanford sand, the CS grout gelled much more quickly than the same formula without sand. This effect results from salinity that is present in pore water and from multi-valent ions that are desorbed from clays and ion-exchanged for mono-valent ions in the grout. Ion-exchange experiments showed that most of the multi-valent ions could be removed-by flushing the sand with 15 PV of 4% NaCl and sand treated in this manner did not accelerate the gelling of the grout. When grout is injected into unsaturated soil it slumps, leaving the soil only partially saturated and achieving less permeability reduction upon gelling. Multiple injections of CS grout in 1-D sand columns demonstrated that by accumulating the residual gelled grout saturations from several injections, low permeability can be achieved.

  7. 1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdn, Carlos

    1D subsurface electromagnetic fields excited by energized steel casing Wei Yang1 , Carlos Torres the possibility of enabling steel-cased wells as galvanic sources to detect and quantify spatial variations of electrical conductivity in the subsurface. The study assumes a vertical steel-cased well that penetrates

  8. Differential Geometry: Discrete Exterior Calculus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    Differential Geometry: Discrete Exterior Calculus [Build Your Own DEC at Home. Elcott et al., 2006] [Discrete Differential Forms for Computational Modeling. Desbrun et al., 2005] [Discrete Exterior Calculus-simplices in : where c is a real-valued function. The space of k-chains is denoted Ck(). = k cc )( #12;Chains

  9. Optimal joule heating of the subsurface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

  10. Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard C. Logan

    2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

  11. Accelerating Subsurface Transport Simulation on Heterogeneous Clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Oreste; Gawande, Nitin A.; Tumeo, Antonino

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactive transport numerical models simulate chemical and microbiological reactions that occur along a flowpath. These models have to compute reactions for a large number of locations. They solve the set of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) that describes the reaction for each location through the Newton-Raphson technique. This technique involves computing a Jacobian matrix and a residual vector for each set of equation, and then solving iteratively the linearized system by performing Gaussian Elimination and LU decomposition until convergence. STOMP, a well known subsurface flow simulation tool, employs matrices with sizes in the order of 100x100 elements and, for numerical accuracy, LU factorization with full pivoting instead of the faster partial pivoting. Modern high performance computing systems are heterogeneous machines whose nodes integrate both CPUs and GPUs, exposing unprecedented amounts of parallelism. To exploit all their computational power, applications must use both the types of processing elements. For the case of subsurface flow simulation, this mainly requires implementing efficient batched LU-based solvers and identifying efficient solutions for enabling load balancing among the different processors of the system. In this paper we discuss two approaches that allows scaling STOMP's performance on heterogeneous clusters. We initially identify the challenges in implementing batched LU-based solvers for small matrices on GPUs, and propose an implementation that fulfills STOMP's requirements. We compare this implementation to other existing solutions. Then, we combine the batched GPU solver with an OpenMP-based CPU solver, and present an adaptive load balancer that dynamically distributes the linear systems to solve between the two components inside a node. We show how these approaches, integrated into the full application, provide speed ups from 6 to 7 times on large problems, executed on up to 16 nodes of a cluster with two AMD Opteron 6272 and a Tesla M2090 per node.

  12. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, M.L.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, AbraOF SUBSURFACE GASOLINE CONTAMINATION Marc L. Fischer, Abrareporting indoor air contamination (6,7). Estimation of

  13. FINITE ELEMENT METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-IMPLICIT SCHEME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    METHOD FOR SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY USING A MIXED EXPLICIT-arising in subsurface hydrology. These problems includeFinite Element Method in Hydrology," Int. Jour. Num. Meth.

  14. STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

  15. The Dynamical Discrete Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. R. G. Fontes; C. M. Newman; K. Ravishankar; E. Schertzer

    2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamical discrete web (DDW), introduced in recent work of Howitt and Warren, is a system of coalescing simple symmetric one-dimensional random walks which evolve in an extra continuous dynamical parameter s. The evolution is by independent updating of the underlying Bernoulli variables indexed by discrete space-time that define the discrete web at any fixed s. In this paper, we study the existence of exceptional (random) values of s where the paths of the web do not behave like usual random walks and the Hausdorff dimension of the set of such exceptional s. Our results are motivated by those about exceptional times for dynamical percolation in high dimension by H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif, and in dimension two by Schramm and Steif. The exceptional behavior of the walks in DDW is rather different from the situation for dynamical random walks of Benjamini, H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif. In particular, we prove that there are exceptional values of s for which the walk from the origin S^s(n) has limsup S^s(n)/\\sqrt n \\leq K with a nontrivial dependence of the Hausdorff dimension on K. We also discuss how these and other results extend to the dynamical Brownian web, a natural scaling limit of DDW. The scaling limit is the focus of a paper in preparation; it was studied by Howitt and Warren and is related to the Brownian net of Sun and Swart.

  16. Deep subsurface drip irrigation using coal-bed sodic water: Part I. Water and solute movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Breit, George N.; Healy, Richard W.; Zupancic, John W.; Hammack, Richard

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water co-produced with coal-bed methane (CBM) in the semi-arid Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana commonly has relatively low salinity and high sodium adsorption ratios that can degrade soil permeability where used for irrigation. Nevertheless, a desire to derive beneficial use from the water and a need to dispose of large volumes of it have motivated the design of a deep subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) system capable of utilizing that water. Drip tubing is buried 92 cm deep and irrigates at a relatively constant rate year-round, while evapotranspiration by the alfalfa and grass crops grown is seasonal. We use field data from two sites and computer simulations of unsaturated flow to understand water and solute movements in the SDI fields. Combined irrigation and precipitation exceed potential evapotranspiration by 300480 mm annually. Initially, excess water contributes to increased storage in the unsaturated zone, and then drainage causes cyclical rises in the water table beneath the fields. Native chloride and nitrate below 200 cm depth are leached by the drainage. Some CBM water moves upward from the drip tubing, drawn by drier conditions above. Chloride from CBM water accumulates there as root uptake removes the water. Year over year accumulations indicated by computer simulations illustrate that infiltration of precipitation water from the surface only partially leaches such accumulations away. Field data show that 7% and 27% of added chloride has accumulated above the drip tubing in an alfalfa and grass field, respectively, following 6 years of irrigation. Maximum chloride concentrations in the alfalfa field are around 45 cm depth but reach the surface in parts of the grass field, illustrating differences driven by crop physiology. Deep SDI offers a means of utilizing marginal quality irrigation waters and managing the accumulation of their associated solutes in the crop rooting zone.

  17. Enhanced bioremediation of subsurface contamination: Enzyme recruitment and redesign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brockman, F.J.; Ornstein, R.L.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface systems containing radionuclide, heavy metal, and organic wastes must be carefully attended to avoid further impacts to the environment or exposures to human populations. It is appropriate, therefore, to invest in basic research to develop the requisite tools and methods for addressing complex cleanup problems. The rational modification of subsurface microoganisms by enzyme recruitment and enzyme design, in concert with engineered systems for delivery of microorganisms and nutrients to the contaminated zone, are potentially useful tools in the spectrum of approaches that will be required for successful remediation of deep subsurface contamination.

  18. RADIOIODINE GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE SRS SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.; Emerson, H.; Powell, B.; Roberts, K.; Zhang, S.; Xu, C.; Schwer, K.; Li, H.; Ho, Y.; Denham, M.; Yeager, C.; Santschi, P.

    2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine-129 is one of the key risk drivers for several Savannah River Site (SRS) performance assessments (PA), including that for the Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility in E-Area. In an effort to reduce the uncertainty associated with the conceptual model and the input values used in PA, several studies have recently been conducted dealing with radioiodine geochemistry at the SRS. The objective of this report was to review these recent studies and evaluate their implications on SRS PA calculations. For the first time, these studies measured iodine speciation in SRS groundwater and provided technical justification for assuming the presence of more strongly sorbing species (iodate and organo-iodine), and measured greater iodine sediment sorption when experiments included these newly identified species; specifically they measured greater sorption coefficients (K{sub d} values: the concentration ratio of iodine on the solid phase divided by the concentration in the aqueous phase). Based on these recent studies, new best estimates were proposed for future PA calculations. The new K{sub d} values are greater than previous recommended values. These proposed K{sub d} values reflect a better understanding of iodine geochemistry in the SRS subsurface environment, which permits reducing the associated conservatism included in the original estimates to account for uncertainty. Among the key contributing discoveries supporting the contention that the K{sub d} values should be increased are that: 1) not only iodide (I{sup -}), but also the more strongly sorbing iodate (IO{sub 3}{sup -}) species exists in SRS groundwater (average total iodine = 15% iodide, 42% iodate, and 43% organoiodine), 2) when iodine was added as iodate, the measured K{sub d} values were 2 to 6 times greater than when the iodine was added as iodide, and perhaps most importantly, 3) higher desorption (10 to 20 mL/g) than (ad)sorption (all previous studies) K{sub d} values were measured. The implications of this latter point is that the iodine desorption process would be appreciably slower than the (ad)sorption process, and as such would control the rate (and the PA K{sub d} value) that iodine sorbed to and therefore migrated through the subsurface sediment. High desorption K{sub d} values would result in the effective K{sub d} for a reactive transport model being closer to the desorption K{sub d} value (the rate limiting value) than the (ad)sorption K{sub d} value. In summary, our understanding of {sup 129}I geochemistry has greatly improved, reducing the uncertainty associated with the PAs conceptual model, thereby permitting us to reduce the conservatism presently incorporated in PA input values to describe {sup 129}I fate and transport in the SRS subsurface environment.

  19. Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical Processes During Stimulated Subsurface Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Kemna, Andreas; Wilkins, Michael J.; Druhan, Jennifer L.; Arntzen, Evan V.; N'Guessan, A. Lucie; Long, Philip E.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how microorganisms alter their physical and chemical environment during bioremediation is hindered by our inability to resolve subsurface microbial activity with high spatial resolution. Here we demonstrate the use of a minimally invasive geophysical technique to monitor stimulated microbial activity during acetate amendment in an aquifer near Rifle, Colorado. During electrical induced polarization (IP) measurements, spatiotemporal variations in the phase response between imposed electric current and the resultant electric field correlated with changes in groundwater geochemistry accompanying stimulated iron and sulfate reduction and sulfide mineral precipitation. The magnitude of the phase response varied with measurement frequency (0.125 and 1 Hz) andwasdependent upon the dominant metabolic process. The spectral effect was corroborated using a biostimulated column experiment containing Rifle sediments and groundwater. Fluids and sediments recovered from regions exhibiting an anomalous phase response were enriched in Fe(II), dissolved sulfide, and cell-associated FeS nanoparticles. The accumulation of mineral precipitates and electroactive ions altered the ability of pore fluids to conduct electrical charge, accounting for the anomalous IP response and revealing the usefulness of multifrequency IP measurements for monitoring mineralogical and geochemical changes accompanying stimulated subsurface bioremediation.

  20. Discrete dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirsch, M.; Morisi, S.; Peinado, E.; Valle, J. W. F. [AHEP Group, Institut de Fisica Corpuscular--C.S.I.C./Universitat de Valencia, Edificio Institutos de Paterna, Apartado 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new motivation for the stability of dark matter (DM). We suggest that the same non-Abelian discrete flavor symmetry which accounts for the observed pattern of neutrino oscillations, spontaneously breaks to a Z{sub 2} subgroup which renders DM stable. The simplest scheme leads to a scalar doublet DM potentially detectable in nuclear recoil experiments, inverse neutrino mass hierarchy, hence a neutrinoless double beta decay rate accessible to upcoming searches, while {theta}{sub 13}=0 gives no CP violation in neutrino oscillations.

  1. Installing a Subsurface Drip Irrigation System for Row Crops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication describes the components of a subsurface drip irrigation system and the procedure for installing such a system. Each step is outlined and illustrated. Steps include tape injection, trenching, connecting drip lines, back...

  2. Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Research review Geophysical subsurface imaging for ecological applications Author resistivity imaging, geophysical imaging, ground-penetrating radar, plantsoil interactions, soil be costly, time consuming, andinfeasible, especially if the spatial scales involved are large. Geophysical

  3. Subsurface characterization of the San Jacinto River Research site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leik, Jason Allan

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop an effective petroleum repudiation ics. strategy, the interaction between surface and shallow subsurface water was determined for the San Jacinto River Oi1 Spill Remediation Research site. The ten-acre wetland is located...

  4. Laboratory simulation of subsurface airflow beneath a building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corsello, Joseph William

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vapor intrusion is the vapor-phase migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings due to subsurface soil or groundwater contamination. Oxygen replenishment rates beneath a building are significant for ...

  5. Monitoring the subsurface with quasi-static deformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sneider, Roel; Spetzler, Hartmut

    2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This project consisted of three sub-projects that are all aimed at monitoring the subsurface with geophysical methods. The objectives of these sub-projects are: to investigate the use of seismic waves for remote monitoring of temperature changes in the Yucca Mountain nuclear repository; to investigate the use of measured changes in the tidal tilt as a diagnostic for the infiltration of fluids in the subsurface; and to extract the electrostatic response from dynamic field fluctuations.

  6. Capacity-Achieving Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes for the BEC with Bounded Complexity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sason, Igal

    Capacity-Achieving Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes for the BEC with Bounded Complexity Igal-Achieving Codes and Complexity 2 Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes 3 Simulations 4 Symmetry, Duality, and New Transmission Rates Cheaper Systems Why Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) Codes ? They can provide better

  7. Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janet Anders; Vittorio Giovannetti

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

  8. Discrete torsion defects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilka Brunner; Nils Carqueville; Daniel Plencner

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Orbifolding two-dimensional quantum field theories by a symmetry group can involve a choice of discrete torsion. We apply the general formalism of `orbifolding defects' to study and elucidate discrete torsion for topological field theories. In the case of Landau-Ginzburg models only the bulk sector had been studied previously, and we re-derive all known results. We also introduce the notion of `projective matrix factorisations', show how they naturally describe boundary and defect sectors, and we further illustrate the efficiency of the defect-based approach by explicitly computing RR charges. Roughly half of our results are not restricted to Landau-Ginzburg models but hold more generally, for any topological field theory. In particular we prove that for a pivotal bicategory, any two objects of its orbifold completion that have the same base are orbifold equivalent. Equivalently, from any orbifold theory (including those based on nonabelian groups) the original unorbifolded theory can be obtained by orbifolding via the `quantum symmetry defect'.

  9. Constucting Discrete KSurfaces Ivan Sterling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sterling, Ivan

    Constucting Discrete KSurfaces Ivan Sterling (joint work with Tim Ho#mann, and Ulrich Pinkall) Old it is possible to find other examples (FIGURE 4). 2 #12; Figure 4. Ho#manSterling Discrete KSurface 4. Computer and examples can be found at www.jreality.de. References [1] G.T. Bennett, A new mechanism, Engineering 76

  10. FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbordt, Martin

    ' & $ % FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model Thesis submitted UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Thesis FPGA Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Acceleration of Discrete Molecular Dynamics Simulation Joshua Model ABSTRACT Molecular dynamics simulation

  11. Intercellular Genomics of Subsurface Microbial Colonies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortoleva, Peter; Tuncay, Kagan; Gannon, Dennis; Meile, Christof

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes progress in the second year of this project. The objective is to develop methods and software to predict the spatial configuration, properties and temporal evolution of microbial colonies in the subsurface. To accomplish this, we integrate models of intracellular processes, cell-host medium exchange and reaction-transport dynamics on the colony scale. At the conclusion of the project, we aim to have the foundations of a predictive mathematical model and software that captures the three scales of these systems the intracellular, pore, and colony wide spatial scales. In the second year of the project, we refined our transcriptional regulatory network discovery (TRND) approach that utilizes gene expression data along with phylogenic similarity and gene ontology analyses and applied it successfully to E.coli, human B cells, and Geobacter sulfurreducens. We have developed a new Web interface, GeoGen, which is tailored to the reconstruction of microbial TRNs and solely focuses on Geobacter as one of DOEs high priority microbes. Our developments are designed such that the frameworks for the TRND and GeoGen can readily be used for other microbes of interest to the DOE. In the context of modeling a single bacterium, we are actively pursuing both steady-state and kinetic approaches. The steady-state approach is based on a flux balance that uses maximizing biomass growth rate as its objective, subjected to various biochemical constraints, for the optimal values of reaction rates and uptake/release of metabolites. For the kinetic approach, we use Karyote, a rigorous cell model developed by us for an earlier DOE grant and the DARPA BioSPICE Project. We are also investigating the interplay between bacterial colonies and environment at both pore and macroscopic scales. The pore scale models use detailed representations for realistic porous media accounting for the distribution of grain size whereas the macroscopic models employ the Darcy-type flow equations and up-scaled advective-diffusive transport equations for chemical species. We are rigorously testing the relationship between these two scales by evaluating macroscopic parameters using the volume averaging methodology applied to pore scale model results.

  12. Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

    2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

  13. Discrete generalized multigroup theory and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study develops a fundamentally new discrete generalized multigroup energy expansion theory for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. Discrete orthogonal polynomials are used, in conjunction with the traditional ...

  14. Capacity-Achieving Ensembles of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sason, Igal

    Capacity-Achieving Ensembles of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes for the Erasure Channel-- The paper introduces ensembles of accumulate- repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes which asymptotically achieve by the first capacity-achieving ensembles of irregular repeat- accumulate (IRA) codes with bounded complexity

  15. Subsurface models of coal occurrence, Oak Grove field, Black Warrior basin, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pashin, J.C. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface investigation of coal occurrence in the Black Creek-Cobb interval of Oak Grove field is based on cross sections and isopach maps made from more than 500 density logs. This study was designed to identify styles of coal occurrence in the Black Warrior basin to aid in coalbed-methane exploration and production. Coal occurrence in parts of the Black Warrior basin may be characterized in terms of end-member fluvial and structural control. Fluvial processes apparently were the major controls on coal occurrence in the Black Creek cycle, where sandstone and coal thickness are inversely related. Additionally, occurrence of thick sandstone sequences above the thickest coal beds suggests that peat compaction provided sites for channel avulsion. In the Mary Lee and Cobb cycles, more coal beds occur in a downthrown fault block than in an upthrown block, and in the Pratt and Cobb cycles, the thickest coal beds occur on the downthrown side of a fault. Only in the Mary Lee cycle, where thick peat accumulated in an abandoned tributary system, is coal thickest on the upthrown block. Most coal beds in Oak Grove field are thickest on the downthrown block because differential subsidence apparently promoted peat accumulation. Clastic influx favors beds splits in the downthrown block, but joining of beds in the Pratt cycle may reflect sheltering by the fault. In the Mary Lee cycle, in contrast, channel incision evidently provided local relief sufficient for thick peat to accumulate in lows on the upthrown block. Although fluvial and structural processes result in varied styles of coal occurrence, models of coal occurrence have resulted in a predictive framework that may aid in strategic well siting and completion.

  16. Discrete Structures for Computer Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dragan, Feodor F.

    -5% Final Exam 40% #12;Why Discrete Math? Design efficient computer systems. How did Google manage to build issues. #12;16 Sub-Category Graph No Threshold New Science of Networks NYS Electric Power Grid (Thorp

  17. International Symposium on Discrete Mathematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, China Ghent University, Belgium CAS-MPG Partner Institute for Computational Biology, ChinaInternational Symposium on Discrete Mathematics and Mathematical Biology August 2627, 2013 Find Interdisciplinary Centre for Bioinformatics #12;

  18. Connection between aluminium exclusion and accumulation in the aluminium accumulator buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum Moench)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klug, Benjamin; Horst, Walter J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the root apex of the Al accumulator, buckwheat Material &membrane flux of Al in the Al accumulator, buckwheat. Ma and

  19. Presented by Parallel Discrete Event Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of discrete event execution on high performance computing Business Sensitive Different optimizations

  20. Linking deposit morphology and clogging in subsurface remediation: Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, David C. [University of Colorado Denver

    2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Groundwater is a crucial resource for water supply, especially in arid and semiarid areas of the United States west of the 100th meridian. Accordingly, remediation of contaminated groundwater is an important application of science and technology, particularly for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), which oversees a number of groundwater remediation sites from Cold War era mining. Groundwater remediation is complex, because it depends on identifying, locating, and treating contaminants in the subsurface, where remediation reactions depend on interacting geological, hydrological, geochemical, and microbiological factors. Within this context, permeability is a fundamental concept, because it controls the rates and pathways of groundwater flow. Colloid science is intimately related to permeability, because when colloids are present (particles with equivalent diameters between 1 nanometer and 10 micrometers), changes in hydrological or geochemical conditions can trigger a detrimental reduction in permeability called clogging. Accordingly, clogging is a major concern in groundwater remediation. Several lines of evidence suggest that clogging by colloids depends on (1) colloid deposition, and (2) deposit morphology, that is, the structure of colloid deposits, which can be quantified as a fractal dimension. This report describes research, performed under a 2-year, exploratory grant from the DOEs Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) program. This research employed a novel laboratory technique to simultaneously measure flow, colloid deposition, deposit morphology, and permeability in a flow cell, and also collected field samples from wells at the DOEs Old Rifle remediation site. Field results indicate that suspended solids at the Old Rifle site have fractal structures. Laboratory results indicate that clogging is associated with colloid deposits with smaller fractal dimensions, in accordance with previous studies on initially clean granular media. Preliminary modeling has identified the deposit radius of gyration as a candidate variable to account for clogging as a function of (1) colloid accumulation and (2) deposit morphology.

  1. Detecting urbanization effects on surface and subsurface thermal environment --A case study of Osaka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shaopeng

    of the human impacts on the subsurface thermal environment. The objective of this study is to analyze surface island effects Subsurface thermal environment 1. Introduction 20th century global warming is well

  2. Metapopulation extinction caused by mutation accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Michael

    Metapopulation extinction caused by mutation accumulation Kevin Higgins* and Michael Lynch Ecology suggests that the risk of extinction by mutation accumulation can be comparable to that by environmental to greatly accelerate the accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations, lowering the ge- netic effective size

  3. Minimum Energy Accumulative Routing in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sundaram, Ravi

    Minimum Energy Accumulative Routing in Wireless Networks Jiangzhuo Chen, Lujun Jia, Xin Liu to address the energy efficient routing problem in multi-hop wireless networks with accumulative relay. In the accumulative relay model, partially overheard signals of previous transmis- sions for the same packet are used

  4. Energy Efficient Routing with Mutual Information Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy Efficient Routing with Mutual Information Accumulation Tolga Girici, and Ahmet Cihat Kazez the use of ideal rateless codes, so that a node can accumulate transmission rates from the transmission compared with classical cooperative schemes that use energy accumulation. However, the resource allocation

  5. Reducing Power Dissipation in Pipelined Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Reducing Power Dissipation in Pipelined Accumulators Gian Carlo Cardarilli(1), Alberto Nannarelli(2 Informatics, Technical University of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby, Denmark Abstract-- Fast accumulation is required). Accumulators nec- essary for DDFS are then deeply pipelined down to the bit-level with two main consequences

  6. Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real numbers (extended abstract) J and space are continuous and accumulations can be devised to unlimitedly accelerate a computation with rational numbers for coordinates and speeds, the time of any accumulation is a c.e. (compu- tably

  7. Subsurface Defect Detection in Metals with Pulsed Eddy Current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plotnikov, Yuri A. [GE Global Research Center, One Research Circle, Niskayuna, NY 12309-1135 (United States); Bantz, Walter J. [GE Aircraft Engines M and QTD, 10270 St. Rita Lane, Cincinnati, OH 45215 (United States)

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy current (EC) method is traditionally used for open surface crack detection in metallic components. Subsurface voids in bulk metals can also be detected by the eddy current devices. Taking into consideration the skin effect in conductive materials, a lower frequency of electromagnetic excitation is used for a deeper penetration. A set of special specimens was designed and fabricated to investigate sensitivity to subsurface voids. Typically, flat bottom holes (FBHs) are used for subsurface defect simulation. This approach is not very representative of real defects for eddy current inspection because the FBH depth extends to the bottom of the specimen. Two-layer specimens with finite depth FBHs were fabricated and scanned with conventional EC of variable frequency. Sensitivity and spatial resolution of EC diminish with flaw depth. The pulsed EC approach was applied for flaw detection at variable distance under the surface. The transient response from multi-layer model was derived and compared to experiments. The multi-frequency nature of pulsed excitation provides effective coverage of a thick layer of material in one pass. Challenging aspects of subsurface flaw detection and visualization using the EC technique are discussed.

  8. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    consortium led by Chevron, in gas hydrate drilling, research expeditions [6], and observatories [5, 7] which help to evaluate methane hydrate as an energy resource. Although the existence of gas hydrates and energy recovery involving the evolution of methane gas in the subsurface. In particular, we develop

  9. METHANE IN SUBSURFACE: MATHEMATICAL MODELING AND COMPUTATIONAL CHALLENGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peszynska, Malgorzata

    ), in collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and an industry consortium led by Chevron, in gas hydrate as an energy resource. Although the existence of gas hydrates in nature has been known for many decades, our and energy recovery involving the evolution of methane gas in the subsurface. In particular, we develop

  10. USING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY TO EXAMINE THE SUBSURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barton, Jennifer K.

    : (1) a homogeneous glassy phase; (2) a liquid­liquid phase separated state; and (3) a crystallizedUSING OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY TO EXAMINE THE SUBSURFACE MORPHOLOGY OF CHINESE GLAZES M of their glazes. The images revealed unique phase assemblage modes in different samples. The results suggest

  11. Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenz, Ralph D.

    1 Subsurface Ambient Thermoelectric Power for Moles and Penetrators1 Ralph D. Lorenz, Lunar for electrical power generation for planetary exploration applications using thermoelectric conversion of the vehicle. Proof-of-concept experiments are described using off-the-shelf thermoelectric CPU cooling plates

  12. mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    mineral grains pore spaces Subsurface Geology and Resource Exploration Locating earth resources deals with the exploration for oil, which is important to Louisiana, the Gulf of Mexico area oil (petroleum) and natural gas, that are refined for use as fuels. When sediments are deposited

  13. Variability of the methane trapping in martian subsurface clathrate hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caroline Thomas; Olivier Mousis; Sylvain Picaud; Vincent Ballenegger

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane CH4 heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 300-600 years on the basis of photochemistry, its release from a subsurface reservoir or an active primary source of methane have been invoked in the recent literature. Among the existing scenarios, it has been proposed that clathrate hydrates located in the near subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of the detected CH4. Here, we accurately determine the composition of these clathrate hydrates, as a function of temperature and gas phase composition, by using a hybrid statistical thermodynamic model based on experimental data. Compared to other recent works, our model allows us to calculate the composition of clathrate hydrates formed from a more plausible composition of the martian atmosphere by considering its main compounds, i.e. carbon dioxyde, nitrogen and argon, together with methane. Besides, because there is no low temperature restriction in our model, we are able to determine the composition of clathrate hydrates formed at temperatures corresponding to the extreme ones measured in the polar caps. Our results show that methane enriched clathrate hydrates could be stable in the subsurface of Mars only if a primitive CH4-rich atmosphere has existed or if a subsurface source of CH4 has been (or is still) present.

  14. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  15. The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Subsurface Fluid Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski S Mechanics of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage by Michael Lawrence Szulczewski Submitted to the Department capture and storage (CCS), CO2 is captured at power plants and then injected into deep geologic reservoirs

  16. SUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    and warm friendship. I also wish to extend my appreciation to the EMSP (Environmental Management ScienceSUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND CENTRIFUGAL for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Crop and Soil Sciences August

  17. Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface Timothy R. Ginn a,*, Brian D. Wood b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Processes in microbial transport in the natural subsurface Timothy R. Ginn a,*, Brian D. Wood b microbial transport in the saturated subsurface. We begin with the conceptual models of the biophase of bioremediation and pathogen transport in the natural subsurface. ? 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved

  18. Perception as evidence accumulation 1 Perception as evidence accumulation and Bayesian inference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norris, Dennis

    Perception as evidence accumulation 1 Perception as evidence accumulation and Bayesian inference.norris@mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk #12;Perception as evidence accumulation 2 Abstract In this paper we argue that perception is Bayesian inference based on accumulation of noisy evidence and that, in masked priming, the perceptual system

  19. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of organic carbon into the subsurface as an electron donor for bioremediation of redox-sensitive contaminants like uranium often leads to mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation efficacy. This work combines reactive transport modeling with a column experiment and field measurements to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/accumulation during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. We use the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to explicitly simulate microbial community dynamics of iron and sulfate reducers, and their impacts on reaction rates. The column experiment shows clear evidence of mineral precipitation, primarily in the form of calcite and iron monosulfide. At the field scale, reactive transport simulations suggest that the biogeochemical reactions occur mostly close to the injection wells where acetate concentrations are highest, with mineral precipitate and biomass accumulation reaching as high as 1.5% of the pore space. This work shows that reactive transport modeling coupled with field data can be an effective tool for quantitative estimation of mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, thus improving the design of bioremediation strategies.

  20. Syntectonic hydrocarbon migration and accumulation in Miley Reservoir, Rincon field, Ventura County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, D.E.; Harrison, R.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Miley reservoir of the Rincon field is located in the Central Transverse Ranges of southern California on a structural high that borders the Santa Barbara Channel. The east-west-trending Rincon and Ventura anticlines are part of a major oil-productive trend containing the Rincon, San Miguelito, and Ventura Avenue fields, which have estimated ultimate recovery of 1.7 billion BOE. Hydrocarbon accumulations in the multiple and stacked reservoirs within these three fields are controlled by the complex interplay of late Pleistocene folding and reverse fault development. The detailed interpretation reported here combines reservoir performance data with subsurface structural geology and sequential tectonic development to provide a new understanding of the relationship of migration barriers to oil accumulation and production. The Miley reservoir is an axial- and fault-controlled accumulation on the eastern terminus of the Rincon anticline. It is located in a structural saddle formed by the doubly plunging Rincon and Ventura anticlinal trend. Three operative trapping mechanisms confine oil pools: (1) axial accumulations associated with reverse fault closures; (2) traps on the hanging wall of dip-slip reverse faults; and (3) a permeability barrier developed in response to flexural slip folding. Oil trapped within the Rincon-Miley reservoir was primarily generated beneath the Santa Barbara Channel and migrated up the south flank of the anticlinal trend. Four stages of structural development and hydrocarbon migration, encompassing the last 700,000 years, have implications for the enhanced development of reservoirs on this anticlinal trend.

  1. Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

  2. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    1999-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media. The code is designed specifically to handle complex multi-layer and/or heterogeneous aquifer systems in an efficient manner and accommodates a wide range of boundary conditions. Additionally, 1-D and 2-D (in Cartesian coordinates) problems are handled in FACT by simply limiting the number of elements in a particular direction(s) to one. The governing equations in FACT are formulated only in Cartesian coordinates.

  3. Chitinozoans in the subsurface Lower Paleozoic of West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kauffman, A. E.

    1971-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS PALEONTOLOGICAL CONTRIBUTIONS October 22, 1971 Paper 54 CHITINOZOANS IN THE SUBSURFACE LOWER PALEOZOIC OF WEST TEXAS A. E. KAUFFMAN Humble Oil & Refining Company, Midland, Texas ABSTRACT Studies based on both comprehensive... are found throughout the West Texas area. As generally accepted by operational petroleum geologists, the Simpson Group comprises the Joins Formation (limestone and dolomite); Oil Creek Formation (sandstone, shale, and limestone); McLish Formation (sand...

  4. Method of sealing casings of subsurface materials management system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  5. Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

  6. Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

  7. Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene-Catalyst Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherup, Robert S.; Amara, Hakim; Blume, Raoul; Dlubak, Bruno; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Diarra, Mamadou; Bahri, Mounib; Cabrero-Vilatela, Andrea; Caneva, Sabina; Kidambi, Piran R.; Martin, Marie-Blandine; Deranlot, Cyrile; Seneor, Pierre; Schloegl, Robert; Ducastelle, Franois; Bichara, Christophe; Hofmann, Stephan

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Interdependency of Subsurface Carbon Distribution and Graphene? Catalyst Interaction Robert S. Weatherup,*, Hakim Amara, Raoul Blume, Bruno Dlubak,?,? Bernhard C. Bayer, Mamadou Diarra,?,# Mounib Bahri, Andrea Cabrero-Vilatela, Sabina Caneva... , France * S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: The dynamics of the graphene?catalyst interaction during chemical vapor deposition are investigated using in situ, time- and depth- resolved X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and complementary grand canonical...

  8. Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

  9. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research FY11 Second Quarter Performance Measure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Long Term Measure for 2011 under the Performance Assessment Rating Tool (PART) measure is to "Refine subsurface transport models by developing computational methods to link important processes impacting contaminant transport at smaller scales to the field scale." The second quarter performance measure is to "Provide a report on computational methods linking genome-enabled understanding of microbial metabolism with reactive transport models to describe processes impacting contaminant transport in the subsurface." Microorganisms such as bacteria are by definition small (typically on the order of a micron in size), and their behavior is controlled by their local biogeochemical environment (typically within a single pore or a biofilm on a grain surface, on the order of tens of microns in size). However, their metabolic activity exerts strong influence on the transport and fate of groundwater contaminants of significant concern at DOE sites, in contaminant plumes with spatial extents of meters to kilometers. This report describes progress and key findings from research aimed at integrating models of microbial metabolism based on genomic information (small scale) with models of contaminant fate and transport in aquifers (field scale).

  10. Review: Some Low-Frequency Electrical Methods for Subsurface Characterization and Monitoring in Hydrogeology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Revil, Andre; Karaoulis, M.; Johnson, Timothy C.; Kemna, Andreas

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-frequency geoelectrical methods include mainly self-potential, resistivity, and induced polarization. These methods are commonly used to solve hydrogeological problems in the shallow subsurface and provide complementary information to each other and to in-situ measurements. The self-potential method is a passive measurement of the electrical response associated with the in-situ generation of current mainly due to the flow of pore water in porous media, a salinity gradient, and/or the concentration of redox-active species. It can be used to visualize groundwater flow patterns, to determine permeability, and to detect preferential flow paths. Electrical resistivity is dependent on the water content, the temperature, the salinity of the pore water, and the clay content and mineralogy. Induced polarization characterizes the ability of rocks to store electrical energy in terms of ion accumulations in the pore water. Electrical resistivity, time-domain and frequency-domain induced polarization methods can be used to image the permeability and the distribution of contaminants in the ground.

  11. Software is Discrete Mathematics University of Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page, Rex L.

    , discrete mathematics, predicate logic, correctness proofs, formal methods, software engineering. 1Software is Discrete Mathematics Rex L Page University of Oklahoma School of Computer Science Descriptors D.2.4 [Software Engineering]: Software/Program Verification correctness proofs, formal methods

  12. Computing downwards accumulations on trees quickly Jeremy Gibbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jeremy

    Computing downwards accumulations on trees quickly Jeremy Gibbons Abstract. Downwards accumulations the leaves. Under certain conditions, a downwards accumulation is both `efficient' (computable in fact yield a stronger conclusion: the accumulation can be computed in parallel time proportional

  13. Discrete and Hybrid Nonholonomy Antonio Bicchi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piccoli, Benedetto

    Discrete and Hybrid Nonholonomy Antonio Bicchi1 , Alessia Marigo2 , and Benedetto Piccoli3 1 Centro such as cars, trucks with trailers, rolling 3D objects, underactuated mechanisms, satellites, etc., has made of systems, allowing for discrete and hybrid (mixed continuous and discrete) configurations and transi- tions

  14. Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Hao-hua

    Numerical Valuation of Discrete Barrier Options with the Adaptive Mesh Model and Other Competing for discrete barrier options such that many methods have been suggested and declared to price discrete barrier options fast and accurately but no one can tell exactly that what method is the best. We also make

  15. Discretized configurations and partial partitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the discretized configuration space of $k$ points in the $n$-simplex is homotopy equivalent to a wedge of spheres of dimension $n-k+1$. This space is homeomorphic to the order complex of the poset of ordered partial partitions of $\\{1,\\...,n+1\\}$ with exactly $k$ parts. We also compute the Euler characteristic in two different ways, thereby obtaining a topological proof of a combinatorial recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind.

  16. VARIATIONAL ESTIMATES FOR DISCRETE SCHR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ­dimensional discrete Schr?odinger operator. We prove that if # ess (H) # [-2, 2], then H-H 0 is compact and # ess (H V = 0. One of our main results in this paper is Theorem 1. If # ess (H) # [-2, 2], then V (n) # 0 that # ess (H) = [-2, 2] if and only if V (n) # 0. Our motivation for this result came from two sources

  17. Outcrop gamma-ray logging applied to subsurface petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slatt, R.M.; Borer, J.M.; Horn, B.W. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a gamma-ray log profile of an outcrop with a hand-held scintillometer has many applications to subsurface petroleum geology. The outcrop gamma-ray log provides a readily understandable bridge between what is observed in outcrop and what is to be interpreted on well logs and seismic records. Several examples are presented in this paper that demonstrate major applications. An outcrop from the Cretaceous Mesaverde Group in Colorado provides an excellent example of the use of outcrop gamma-ray logs to better visualize spatial variability of depositional settings for improved well log correlations. Out crops from the Cretaceous Almond Formation, Niobrara Formation, and Graneros Shale in Colorado serve as examples of outcrop gamma-ray logging used to correlate outcrops with their subsurface equivalents for improved lithologic and stratigraphic interpretation of well logs. Outcrops of the Cretaceous Sharon Springs Member of the Pierre Shale in Colorado and the Eocene Green River Formation in Wyoming provide examples of the application of outcrop-gamma ray logging to identify and characterize organic-rich shales in outcrops and on well logs. Outcrops of the Pennsylvanian Jackfork Formation in Arkansas demonstrate the use of outcrop logging to yield improved interpretation of reservoir quality on well logs and for one- and two-dimensional seismic modeling. An outcrop of Precambrian and Cambro-Ordovician rocks from Algeria provides an example of outcrop logging to recognize unconformities and other major surfaces on well logs. An outcrop of the Niobrara Formation in Colorado is used as an example for improved understanding of horizontal gamma-ray log response. The example logs presented are all drived with a hand-held scintillometer. This technique is simple, quick, and relatively inexpensive, so is recommended for any outcrop work that is intended to be applied t;o subsurface well logs or seismic interpretation.

  18. Subsurface drip systems for land application of residential wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neal, Byron Anthony

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    classification of the most restrictive soil layer ranging between 4. 12 I/m /day (0. 1 gal/ft /day) for class IV (clay) soils to 20. 6 Vm /day (0. 50 gaV ft /day) for class Ia (sand/gravel) soils (TNRCC, 1997). Texas's design criteria for hydraulic loading... gallons) of wastewater per day. The soil type used for designing the subsurface drip system is a sandy clay loam (type III, 30 TAC Chapter 285, 1997). From the TNRCC (1995) regulations, the hydraulic application rate is 8. 15 I/m /day (0. 20 gal/ft /day...

  19. Influence of Mg2+ on CaCO3 precipitation during subsurface reactive...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    subsurface reactive transport in a homogeneous silicon-etched pore network. Abstract: Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) geochemical reactions exert a fundamental control on the...

  20. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, K.H.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    associated with bioremediation of uranium to submicromolarGenes during in Situ Bioremediation of Uranium-Contaminatedduring subsurface bioremediation Kenneth H. Williams 1* ,

  1. Method for Implementing Subsurface Solid Derived Concentration Guideline Levels (DCGL) - 12331

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lively, J.W. [MACTEC Development Corporation (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and other federal agencies currently approve the Multi-Agency Radiation Site Survey and Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) as guidance for licensees who are conducting final radiological status surveys in support of decommissioning. MARSSIM provides a method to demonstrate compliance with the applicable regulation by comparing residual radioactivity in surface soils with derived concentration guideline levels (DCGLs), but specifically discounts its applicability to subsurface soils. Many sites and facilities undergoing decommissioning contain subsurface soils that are potentially impacted by radiological constituents. In the absence of specific guidance designed to address the derivation of subsurface soil DCGLs and compliance demonstration, decommissioning facilities have attempted to apply DCGLs and final status survey techniques designed specifically for surface soils to subsurface soils. The decision to apply surface soil limits and surface soil compliance metrics to subsurface soils typically results in significant over-excavation with associated cost escalation. MACTEC, Inc. has developed the overarching concepts and principles found in recent NRC decommissioning guidance in NUREG 1757 to establish a functional method to derive dose-based subsurface soil DCGLs. The subsurface soil method developed by MACTEC also establishes a rigorous set of criterion-based data evaluation metrics (with analogs to the MARSSIM methodology) that can be used to demonstrate compliance with the developed subsurface soil DCGLs. The method establishes a continuum of volume factors that relate the size and depth of a volume of subsurface soil having elevated concentrations of residual radioactivity with its ability to produce dose. The method integrates the subsurface soil sampling regime with the derivation of the subsurface soil DCGL such that a self-regulating optimization is naturally sought by both the responsible party and regulator. This paper describes the concepts and basis used by MACTEC to develop the dose-based subsurface soil DCGL method. The paper will show how MACTEC's method can be used to demonstrate that higher concentrations of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils (as compared with surface soils) can meet the NRC's dose-based regulations. MACTEC's method has been used successfully to obtain the NRC's radiological release at a site with known radiological impacts to subsurface soils exceeding the surface soil DCGL, saving both time and cost. Having considered the current NRC guidance for consideration of residual radioactivity in subsurface soils during decommissioning, MACTEC has developed a technically based approach to the derivation of and demonstration of compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs for radionuclides. In fact, the process uses the already accepted concepts and metrics approved for surface soils as the foundation for deriving scaling factors used to calculate subsurface soil DCGLs that are at least equally protective of the decommissioning annual dose standard. Each of the elements identified for consideration in the current NRC guidance is addressed in this proposed method. Additionally, there is considerable conservatism built into the assumptions and techniques used to arrive at subsurface soil scaling factors and DCGLs. The degree of conservatism embodied in the approach used is such that risk managers and decision makers approving and using subsurface soil DCGLs derived in accordance with this method can be confident that the future exposures will be well below permissible and safe levels. The technical basis for the method can be applied to a broad variety of sites with residual radioactivity in subsurface soils. Given the costly nature of soil surveys, excavation, and disposal of soils as low-level radioactive waste, MACTEC's method for deriving and demonstrating compliance with subsurface soil DCGLs offers the possibility of significant cost savings over the traditional approach of applying surface soil DCGLs to subsurface soils. Furthermore, while yet u

  2. Variability of the methane trapping in martian subsurface clathrate hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Caroline; Picaud, Sylvain; Ballenegger, Vincent

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent observations have evidenced traces of methane CH4 heterogeneously distributed in the martian atmosphere. However, because the lifetime of CH4 in the atmosphere of Mars is estimated to be around 300-600 years on the basis of photochemistry, its release from a subsurface reservoir or an active primary source of methane have been invoked in the recent literature. Among the existing scenarios, it has been proposed that clathrate hydrates located in the near subsurface of Mars could be at the origin of the small quantities of the detected CH4. Here, we accurately determine the composition of these clathrate hydrates, as a function of temperature and gas phase composition, by using a hybrid statistical thermodynamic model based on experimental data. Compared to other recent works, our model allows us to calculate the composition of clathrate hydrates formed from a more plausible composition of the martian atmosphere by considering its main compounds, i.e. carbon dioxyde, nitrogen and argon, together with met...

  3. DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE FACILITIES INCLUDING NON-METALLIC PIPE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. Herb Duvoisin

    2003-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    CyTerra has leveraged our unique, shallow buried plastic target detection technology developed under US Army contracts into deeper buried subsurface facilities and including nonmetallic pipe detection. This Final Report describes a portable, low-cost, real-time, and user-friendly subsurface plastic pipe detector (LULU- Low Cost Utility Location Unit) that relates to the goal of maintaining the integrity and reliability of the nation's natural gas transmission and distribution network by preventing third party damage, by detecting potential infringements. Except for frequency band and antenna size, the LULU unit is almost identical to those developed for the US Army. CyTerra designed, fabricated, and tested two frequency stepped GPR systems, spanning the frequencies of importance (200 to 1600 MHz), one low and one high frequency system. Data collection and testing was done at a variety of locations (selected for soil type variations) on both targets of opportunity and selected buried targets. We developed algorithms and signal processing techniques that provide for the automatic detection of the buried utility lines. The real time output produces a sound as the radar passes over the utility line alerting the operator to the presence of a buried object. Our unique, low noise/high performance RF hardware, combined with our field tested detection algorithms, represents an important advancement toward achieving the DOE potential infringement goal.

  4. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

  5. Stochastic and Deterministic Assembly Processes in Subsurface Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stegen, James C.; Lin, Xueju; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2012-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of microbial community ecology is to understand the forces that structure community composition. Deterministic selection by specific environmental factors is sometimes important, but in other cases stochastic or ecologically neutral processes dominate. Lacking is a unified conceptual framework aiming to understand why deterministic processes dominate in some contexts but not others. Here we work towards such a framework. By testing predictions derived from general ecological theory we aim to uncover factors that govern the relative influences of deterministic and stochastic processes. We couple spatiotemporal data on subsurface microbial communities and environmental parameters with metrics and null models of within and between community phylogenetic composition. Testing for phylogenetic signal in organismal niches showed that more closely related taxa have more similar habitat associations. Community phylogenetic analyses further showed that ecologically similar taxa coexist to a greater degree than expected by chance. Environmental filtering thus deterministically governs subsurface microbial community composition. More importantly, the influence of deterministic environmental filtering relative to stochastic factors was maximized at both ends of an environmental variation gradient. A stronger role of stochastic factors was, however, supported through analyses of phylogenetic temporal turnover. While phylogenetic turnover was on average faster than expected, most pairwise comparisons were not themselves significantly non-random. The relative influence of deterministic environmental filtering over community dynamics was elevated, however, in the most temporally and spatially variable environments. Our results point to general rules governing the relative influences of stochastic and deterministic processes across micro- and macro-organisms.

  6. Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

  7. Discrete Sets of Singular Cardinality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.

    1983-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    singular cardinal k and a closed, cofinal in k, set of cardinals, {kb: ,. Throughout this paper, Y will be a discrete subset of a space X with | Y \\ = k. We say that t? = (A)...

  8. Bell's Jump Process in Discrete Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan Barrett; Matthew Leifer; Roderich Tumulka

    2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The jump process introduced by J. S. Bell in 1986, for defining a quantum field theory without observers, presupposes that space is discrete whereas time is continuous. In this letter, our interest is to find an analogous process in discrete time. We argue that a genuine analog does not exist, but provide examples of processes in discrete time that could be used as a replacement.

  9. Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

  10. Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

  11. Evaluation of Subsurface Exploration Programs By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Subsurface Exploration Programs By Photios G. Ioannou, A.M. ASCE Abstract: This paper presents a decision support system for the evaluation of geologic explo- ration programs in underground construction. This system can be used to quantify the economic value of different subsurface investigation

  12. Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial Heterogeneity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossman, Ethan L.

    Sulfur Cycling in the Terrestrial Subsurface: Commensal Interactions, Spatial Scales, and Microbial microbial processes in the terrestrial subsurface. Previous geochemical studies suggested that sulfide environment in shallow sediments (5 m), and produces acidic waters (pH 3.8) that are rich in sulfate (28 m

  13. High spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a total optical power proportional to its absolute temperature to the fourth power. An object that hasHigh spatial resolution subsurface thermal emission microscopy S. B. Ippolito,a) S. A. Thorne, M. G increasing lens technique to subsurface thermal emission microscopy of Si integrated circuits. We achieve

  14. Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chahar, B. R.

    Optimal Spacing in an Array of Fully Penetrating Ditches for Subsurface Drainage Bhagu R. Chahar1 courses, race courses, parks, and other amenities Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 . Subsurface drainage system 1995 . An extensive solu- tion has been obtained by Chahar and Vadodaria 2008 for drain- age from

  15. Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loon, E. Emiel van

    Analytical solutions to a hillslope-storage kinematic wave equation for subsurface flow Peter Troch­617] to describe the bedrock slope, we derive more general solutions to the hillslope-storage kinematic wave reserved. Keywords: Hillslope hydrology; Subsurface flow; Kinematic wave approximation; Method

  16. SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steele, Dean D.

    SUBSURFACE DRIP IRRIGATION SYSTEMS FOR SPECIALTY CROP PRODUCTION IN NORTH DAKOTA D.D.Steele, R.G.Greenland, B. L. Gregor ABSTRACT. Subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) systems offer advantages over other types of irrigation systems for specialty crop production, including water savings, improved trafficability

  17. FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleman, S.E.

    2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

  18. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  19. Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

  20. Performance Analysis of Accumulator-based Revocation Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Performance Analysis of Accumulator-based Revocation Mechanisms Jorn Lapon1, Markulf Kohlweiss3 issues is the efficient revocation of anonymous credentials. Currently, accumulator based re- vocation- cations. Keywords: Anonymous Credentials, Revocation, Accumulators 1 Introduction In an increasing

  1. Short communication Limits to deficit accumulation in elderly people

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitnitski, Arnold B.

    Short communication Limits to deficit accumulation in elderly people Kenneth Rockwood *, Arnold We evaluated limits to the accumulation of deficits (symptoms, diseases, disabilities) for 33 which, even in developed countries, further deficit accumulation is not sustainable. # 2006 Elsevier

  2. Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Joongsuk

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ) for various surface and subsurface applications, such as profiling the surface and subsurface of pavements, detecting and localizing small buried Anti-Personnel (AP) mines and measuring the liquid level in a tank. These sensors meet the critical requirements...

  3. Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

    2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

  4. TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.J. Fernandez

    1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

  5. Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mike

    Verifying Volume Rendering Using Discretization Error Analysis Tiago Etiene, Daniel Jonsson, Timo--We propose an approach for verification of volume rendering correctness based on an analysis of the volume rendering integral, the basis of most DVR algorithms. With respect to the most common discretization

  6. Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process Continuous-time Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process Sharp large deviations for the non-stationary Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process Bernard Bercu Bordeaux University-Uhlenbeck process 1 / 46 #12;Introduction Discrete-time autoregressive process Continuous-time Ornstein

  7. Discrete analysis of stochastic NMR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, Sam Tak-Sum

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stochastic NMR is an efficient technique for high field in vivo imaging and spectroscopic studies in cases where the peak rf power required may be prohibitively high for conventional pulsed NMR techniques. This dissertation presents a theoretical analysis of a stochastic NMR method of acquiring spectroscopy data. The spin system is excited with rf pulses where the flip angles or the phases of the pulses are samples of a discrete stochastic process. The method is formulated as a stochastic difference equation which is then converted to ordinary deterministic difference equations describing the input-output cross-correlation, average signal power and signal power spectrum. The solutions of these equations are used to evaluate the stochastic, technique in terms of peak rf power requirement, spectral distortions and signal-to-noise ratio. Experimental results are also presented which verify the results of the discrete analysis. The analysis shows that the maximum signal-to-noise ratio is achieved when the RMS flip angle is approximately the Ernst angle. When the RMS flip angle is below the Ernst angle, the input-output cross-correlation is a good estimate of the FID. Increase of excitation power causes line broadening. In addition, the use of random flip angle, fixed phase excitation causes a notch artifact and non-uniform response across the spectrum both of which are not found in two new types of excitation, the random phase excitation and the random quadrature excitation. The signal power spectrum is also a good estimate of the real spectrum. The approximation of the cross-correlation by a time average causes systematic noise. The amount of systematic noise is found to be significantly reduced when an entire maximum length sequence (MLS) is used for excitation. Noise-like distortion at high power MLS excitation is discovered to be related to the number of feedback paths in the MLS generator. 29 refs., 58 figs.

  8. Identification and Estimation of a Discrete Game of Complete Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajari, Patrick

    We discuss the identification and estimation of discrete games of complete information. Following Bresnahan and Reiss (1990, 1991), a discrete game is a generalization of a standard discrete choice model where utility ...

  9. Resonance and web structure in discrete soliton systems: the two-dimensional Toda lattice and its fully discrete and ultra-discrete versions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken-ichi Maruno; Gino Biondini

    2005-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a class of solutions of the two-dimensional Toda lattice equation, its fully discrete analogue and its ultra-discrete limit. These solutions demonstrate the existence of soliton resonance and web-like structure in discrete integrable systems such as differential-difference equations, difference equations and cellular automata (ultra-discrete equations).

  10. Efficient wavefunction propagation by minimizing accumulated action

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary B. Walters

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new technique to calculate the evolution of a quantum wavefunction in a chosen spatial basis by minimizing the accumulated action. Introduction of a finite temporal basis reduces the problem to a set of linear equations, while an appropriate choice of temporal basis set offers improved convergence relative to methods based on matrix exponentiation for a class of physically relevant problems.

  11. Calibration of Accumulator and Debuncher Scrapers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ellerbrock, A.; Werkema, S.; Wisner, B.; /Fermilab

    1992-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    During the past week a careful calibration of the accumulator and debuncher scrapers was made. The procedure was to measure the actual scraper movement relative to some fixed external reference point with a caliper while observing the readback of the associated ACNET device on a VAX console. The results of this calibration are summarized.

  12. Dynamic Accumulators and Application to Efficient Revocation of Anonymous Credentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lysyanskaya, Anna

    Dynamic Accumulators and Application to Efficient Revocation of Anonymous Credentials Abstract An accumulator scheme, as introduced by Benaloh and de Mare [BdM94] and further studied by Bari??c and Pfitzmann the accumulator, such that there is a (short) witness that a given input was incorporated into the accumulator

  13. Genetic Network Programming based Rule Accumulation for Agent Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    1 Genetic Network Programming based Rule Accumulation for Agent Control Lutao WANG 2013, THEN Genetic Network Programming with Rule Accumulation(GNP-RA)GNP GNP-RA GNP GNP-RAGNP-RA GNP with Multi-Order Rule Accumulation(GNP-MRA), GNP with Rule Accumulation and Pruning(GNP-RAP), GNP

  14. Response times from ensembles of accumulators Bram Zandbelt1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmeri, Thomas

    Response times from ensembles of accumulators Bram Zandbelt1 , Braden A. Purcell1 , Thomas J accumulator models and by neurophysiologists through the activity of neurons believed to instantiate be explained by a single model accumulator arise from numerous, redundant accumulator neurons, each of which

  15. Dynamic Accumulators and Application to Efficient Revocation of Anonymous Credentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lysyanskaya, Anna

    Dynamic Accumulators and Application to Efficient Revocation of Anonymous Credentials Jan Camenisch An accumulator scheme, as introduced by Benaloh and de Mare [BdM94] and further studied by Bari´c and Pfitzmann the accumulator, such that there is a (short) witness that a given input was incorporated into the accumulator

  16. Selenium Accumulation in Brassicaceae Plant Species and its Biotransfer to Insect Pollinators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hladun, Kristen

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a cost to accumulating Se in secondary accumulator plants.In secondary accumulator plants, selenate can be reduced toelements found in non-accumulator plants (Brown and Shrift

  17. Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

  18. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

    1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

  19. A high-performance workflow system for subsurface simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Chen, Xingyuan; Finsterle, Stefan A.; Freshley, Mark D.; Gorton, Ian; Gosink, Luke J.; Keating, Elizabeth; Lansing, Carina; Moeglein, William AM; Murray, Christopher J.; Pau, George Shu Heng; Porter, Ellen A.; Purohit, Sumit; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Vesselinov, Velimir V.; Waichler, Scott R.

    2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface modeling applications typically neglect uncertainty in the conceptual models, past or future scenarios, and attribute most or all uncertainty to errors in model parameters. In this contribution, uncertainty in technetium-99 transport in a heterogeneous, deep vadose zone is explored with respect to the conceptual model using a next generation user environment called Akuna. Akuna provides a range of tools to manage environmental modeling projects, from managing simulation data to visualizing results from high-performance computational simulators. Core toolsets accessible through the user interface include model setup, grid generation, parameter estimation, and uncertainty quantification. The BC Cribs site at Hanford in southeastern Washington State is used to demonstrate Akuna capabilities. At the BC Cribs site, conceptualization of the system is highly uncertain because only sparse information is available for the geologic conceptual model, the physical and chemical properties of the sediments, and the history of waste disposal operations. Using the Akuna toolset to perform an analysis of conservative solute transport, significant prediction uncertainty in simulated concentrations is demonstrated by conceptual model variation. This demonstrates that conceptual model uncertainty is an important consideration in sparse data environments such as BC Cribs. It is also demonstrated that Akuna and the underlying toolset provides an integrated modeling environment that streamlines model setup, parameter optimization, and uncertainty analyses for high-performance computing applications.

  20. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: Application guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, W.E.; Aimo, N.J.; Oostrom, M.; White, M.D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and ground water at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstrated Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineering simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator are documented in three companion guide guides. This document, the Application Guide, provides a suite of example applications of the STOMP simulator.

  1. STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: User`s guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy, through the Office of Technology Development, has requested the demonstration of remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater at arid sites. This demonstration program, called the VOC-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration Program (Arid-ID), has been initially directed at a volume of unsaturated and saturated soil contaminated with carbon tetrachloride, on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. A principal subtask of the Arid-ID program involves the development of an integrated engineering simulator for evaluating the effectiveness and efficiency of various remediation technologies. The engineering simulator`s intended users include scientists and engineers who are investigating soil physics phenomena associated with remediation technologies. Principal design goals for the engineer simulator include broad applicability, verified algorithms, quality assurance controls, and validated simulations against laboratory and field-scale experiments. An important goal for the simulator development subtask involves the ability to scale laboratory and field-scale experiments to full-scale remediation technologies, and to transfer acquired technology to other arid sites. The STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator has been developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for modeling remediation technologies. Information on the use, application, and theoretical basis of the STOMP simulator theory and discussions on the governing equations, constitutive relations, and numerical solution algorithms for the STOMP simulator.

  2. The effect of subsurface temperature variability on the predictability of SST in the tropical Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Susan Carr

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were used in experiment 3. All variations reveal the same results; SST predictions are improved with the addition of subsurface variability in the equatorial region at longer lead times, while the north tropical and western regions show little...

  3. Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Godine Kok Yan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

  4. Full wavefield inversion methods for monitoring time-lapse subsurface velocity changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Di, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative measurements of seismic velocity changes from time-lapse seismic experiments provide dynamic information about the subsurface that improves the understanding of the geology and reservoir properties. In this ...

  5. Exploring the Earths subsurface with virtual seismic sources and receivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolson, Heather Johan

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional methods of imaging the Earths subsurface using seismic waves require an identifiable, impulsive source of seismic energy, for example an earthquake or explosive source. Naturally occurring, ambient seismic waves form an ever...

  6. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  7. Stochastic analysis of dense nonaqueous phase liquid dissolution in naturally heterogeneous subsurface systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Xin, 1973-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field-scale Dense Nonaqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) dissolution in three-dimensional heterogeneous subsurface systems is investigated using a stochastic approach that treats the variability of flow properties as three-dimensional ...

  8. Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex.

  9. Geophysical characterization of the effects of fractures and stress on subsurface reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the effect of fractures on reservoir characterization and subsurface rock property measurements using seismic data. Based on the scale of a fracture relative to seismic wavelength, we divide the dissertation into ...

  10. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  11. Wastewater treatment and flow patterns in an onsite subsurface flow constructed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stecher, Matthew C

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common as a secondary treatment of onsite domestic wastewater. Even though SFCWs are being used widely, sufficient data has not been collected to determine how parameters...

  12. Spatially Discrete FitzHugh-Nagumo Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elmer, Christopher E.; Van Vleck, Erik

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider pulse and front solutions to a spatially discrete FitzHugh--Nagumo equation that contains terms to represent both depolarization and hyperpolarization of the nerve axon. We demonstrate a technique for deriving ...

  13. The Discrete AKNS-D Hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoning Wu

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we consider the discrete AKNS-D hierarchy, find the construction of the hierarchy, prove the bilinear identity and give the construction of the $\\tau$-functions of this hierarchy.

  14. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, P.E.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARACTERIZATION OF U CONTAMINATION AND SOLID PHASE MINERALOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN THE RIFLE SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS. Geological

  15. Final Report: Manganese Redox Mediation of UO2 Stability and Uranium Fate in the Subsurface: Molecular and Meter Scale Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tebo, Bradley M. [OSHU; Tebo, Bradley M.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to remediate U contamination in the subsurface is the immobilization of U via injection of an electron donor, e.g., acetate, which leads to stimulation of the bioreduction of U(VI), the more mobile form of U, to U(IV), the less mobile form. This process is inevitably accompanied by the sequential reductive dissolution of Mn and Fe oxides and often continuing into sulfate-reducing conditions. When these reducing zones, which accumulate U(IV), experience oxidizing conditions, reduced Fe and Mn can be reoxidized forming Fe and Mn oxides that, along with O2, can impact the stability of U(IV). The focus of our project has been to investigate (i) the effects of Mn(II) on the dissolution of UO2 under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, (ii) the oxidative dissolution of UO2 by soluble Mn(III), (iii) the fate of U once it is oxidized by MnO2 in both laboratory and field settings, and (iv) the effects of groundwater constituents on the coupled Mn(II)/U(IV) oxidation process. Additionally, studies of the interaction of Se, found at the DOE site at Rifle, CO, and Mn cycling were initiated to understand if observed seasonal fluctuations of Se and Mn are directly linked and whether any such linkages can affect the stability of U(IV).

  16. Thickness estimation of subsurface layers in asphalt pavement using monstatic ground penetrating radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, Chun Lok

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering THICKNESS ESTIMATION OF SUBSURFACE LAYERS IN ASPHALT PAVEMENT USING MONSTATIC GROUND PENETRATING RADAR A Thesis CHUN LOK LAU Approved as to style and content by... ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS. LIST OF FIGURES. . CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. 1. 1 Importance of pavement profile data. 1. 2 Principle of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) . . . 1. 3 Subsurface layer thickness measurement method. . . . . . II GPR ANTENNA AND SYSTEM CALIBRATION...

  17. Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachmann, David

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

  18. Review of Geophysical Techniques to Define the Spatial Distribution of Subsurface Properties or Contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, Christopher J.; Last, George V.; Truex, Michael J.

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a letter report to Fluor Hanford, Inc. The purpose of this report is to summarize state-of-the-art, minimally intrusive geophysical techniques that can be used to clarify subsurface geology, structure, moisture, and chemical composition. The technology review focused on geophysical characterization techniques that provide two- or three-dimensional information about the spatial distribution of subsurface properties and/or contaminants.

  19. Sub-surface dissolution of evaporites in the Eastern Mediterranean sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camerlenghi, Angelo Alessandro

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Oceanography SUB-SURFACE DISSOLUTION OF EVAPORITES IN THE EASTERN MEDITERRANEAN SEA A Thesis by ANGELO ALESSANDRO CAMERLENGHI Approved as to style and content by: Pl&DWa~rg~~~ William R. Bryair...

  20. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, W. Tyler, E-mail: watkinswt@virginia.edu; Siebers, Jeffrey V. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Moore, Joseph A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Gordon, James [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States); Hugo, Geoffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  1. Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Khrennikov; Yaroslav Volovich

    2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

  2. Biogeochemical Processes In Ethanol Stimulated Uranium Contaminated Subsurface Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohanty, Santosh R.; Kollah, Bharati; Hedrick, David B.; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Roden, Eric E.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laboratory incubation experiment was conducted with uranium contaminated subsurface sediment to assess the geochemical and microbial community response to ethanol amendment. A classical sequence of TEAPs was observed in ethanol-amended slurries, with NO3- reduction, Fe(III) reduction, SO4 2- reduction, and CH4 production proceeding in sequence until all of the added 13C-ethanol (9 mM) was consumed. Approximately 60% of the U(VI) content of the sediment was reduced during the period of Fe(III) reduction. No additional U(VI) reduction took place during the sulfate-reducing and methanogenic phases of the experiment. Only gradual reduction of NO3 -, and no reduction of U(VI), took place in ethanol-free slurries. Stimulation of additional Fe(III) or SO4 2- reduction in the ethanol-amended slurries failed to promote further U(VI) reduction. Reverse transcribed 16S rRNA clone libraries revealed major increases in the abundance of organisms related to Dechloromonas, Geobacter, and Oxalobacter in the ethanolamended slurries. PLFAs indicative of Geobacter showed a distinct increase in the amended slurries, and analysis of PLFA 13C/12C ratios confirmed the incorporation of ethanol into these PLFAs. A increase in the abundance of 13C-labeled PLFAs indicative of Desulfobacter, Desulfotomaculum, and Desulfovibrio took place during the brief period of sulfate reduction which followed the Fe(III) reduction phase. Our results show that major redox processes in ethanol-amended sediments can be reliably interpreted in terms of standard conceptual models of TEAPs in sediments. However, the redox speciation of uranium is complex and cannot be explained based on simplified thermodynamic considerations.

  3. ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

  4. The Stimulation of Hydrocarbon Reservoirs with Subsurface Nuclear Explosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LORENZ,JOHN C.

    2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1965 and 1979 there were five documented and one or more inferred attempts to stimulate the production from hydrocarbon reservoirs by detonating nuclear devices in reservoir strata. Of the five documented tests, three were carried out by the US in low-permeability, natural-gas bearing, sandstone-shale formations, and two were done in the USSR within oil-bearing carbonates. The objectives of the US stimulation efforts were to increase porosity and permeability in a reservoir around a specific well by creating a chimney of rock rubble with fractures extending beyond it, and to connect superimposed reservoir layers. In the USSR, the intent was to extensively fracture an existing reservoir in the more general vicinity of producing wells, again increasing overall permeability and porosity. In both countries, the ultimate goals were to increase production rates and ultimate recovery from the reservoirs. Subsurface explosive devices ranging from 2.3 to about 100 kilotons were used at depths ranging from 1208 m (3963 ft) to 2568 m (8427 ft). Post-shot problems were encountered, including smaller-than-calculated fracture zones, formation damage, radioactivity of the product, and dilution of the BTU value of tie natural gas with inflammable gases created by the explosion. Reports also suggest that production-enhancement factors from these tests fell short of expectations. Ultimately, the enhanced-production benefits of the tests were insufficient to support continuation of the pro-grams within increasingly adversarial political, economic, and social climates, and attempts to stimulate hydrocarbon reservoirs with nuclear devices have been terminated in both countries.

  5. Anomalous porosity preservation and preferential accumulation of gas hydrate in the Andaman accretionary wedge, NGHP-01 site 17A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Kelly K.; Johnson, Joel E.; Torres, Marta E.; Hong, WeiLi; Giosan, Liviu; Solomon, E.; Kastner, Miriam; Cawthern, Thomas; Long, Philip E.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to well established properties that control the presence or absence of the hydrate stability zone, such as pressure, temperature, and salinity, additional parameters appear to influence the concentration of gas hydrate in host sediments. The stratigraphic record at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea, eastern Indian Ocean, illustrates the need to better understand the role pore-scale phenomena play in the distribution and presence of marine gas hydrates in a variety of subsurface settings. In this paper we integrate field-generated datasets with newly acquired sedimentology, physical property, imaging and geochemical data with mineral saturation and ion activity products of key mineral phases such as amorphous silica and calcite, to document the presence and nature of secondary precipitates that contributed to anomalous porosity preservation at Site 17A in the Andaman Sea. This study demonstrates the importance of grain-scale subsurface heterogeneities in controlling the occurrence and distribution of concentrated gas hydrate accumulations in marine sediments, and document the importance that increased permeability and enhanced porosity play in supporting gas concentrations sufficient to support gas hydrate formation. The grain scale relationships between porosity, permeability, and gas hydrate saturation documented at Site 17A likely offer insights into what may control the occurrence and distribution of gas hydrate in other sedimentary settings.

  6. WORKING PAPER N 2009 -41 Migration and capital accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , remittances, capital accumulation, rural poverty PARIS-JOURDAN SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES LABORATOIRE D. Key Words: Migration; Remittances; Capital Accumulation; Rural Poverty. Paris School of Economics (PSE) and Poverty Action Lab (J-PAL Europe), 48 Boulevard Jourdan, 75014 Paris, France. chiodi

  7. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  8. Abstract geometrical computation 7: Geometrical accumulations and computably

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    Abstract geometrical computation 7: Geometrical accumulations and computably enumerable real to accumulating drawings into a single point. Such points are characterized in the context of Abstract geometrical and space are con- tinuous and accumulations can happen. Constructions exist to un- boundedly accelerate

  9. Accelerating Pipelined Integer and Floating-Point Accumulations in Configurable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martonosi, Margaret

    Accelerating Pipelined Integer and Floating-Point Accumulations in Configurable Hardware addition until the end of a repeated calculation such as accumulation or dot- product; this effectively and floating- point designs that use our technique. Our pipelined integer multiply-accumulate (MAC) design

  10. On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators Philippe Camacho Dept@dcc.uchile.cl December 15, 2009 Abstract A cryptographic accumulator is a scheme where a set of elements is represented into the set. In their survey on accumulators [FN02], Fazzio and Nicolisi noted that the Camenisch

  11. Sacrificing Reproductive Success for the Primitive Accumulation of Cattle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Sacrificing Reproductive Success for the Primitive Accumulation of Cattle DURAN BELL and SHUNFENG accumulation processes of the Mukogodo, a low status group in northern Kenya. The Mukogodo appear the marrying out of daughters in order to accumulate cattle and parental neglect of sons, in order (we claim

  12. The Accumulated Experience Ant Colony for the Travelling Salesman Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, James

    The Accumulated Experience Ant Colony for the Travelling Salesman Problem Marcus Randall, James, as a consequence of this link, the rest of the path may be longer than if another link was chosen. The Accumulated city and the potential next city in conjunction with the distance. The accumulated experience ant

  13. Universal Accumulators with Efficient Nonmembership Jiangtao Li1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ninghui

    Universal Accumulators with Efficient Nonmembership Proofs Jiangtao Li1 , Ninghui Li2 , and Rui Xue of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign rxue@uiuc.edu Abstract. Based on the notion of accumulators, we propose a new cryptographic scheme called universal accumulators. This scheme enables one to commit to a set of values using

  14. Supporting Non-membership Proofs with Bilinear-map Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supporting Non-membership Proofs with Bilinear-map Accumulators Ivan Damg°ard Nikos Triandopoulos an extension of Nguyen's bilinear-map based accumulator scheme [8] to support non-membership witnesses and corresponding non-membership proofs, i.e., cryptographic proofs that an element has not been accumulated

  15. Selective Degradation of Accumulated Secretory Proteins in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mecham, Robert

    Selective Degradation of Accumulated Secretory Proteins in the Endoplasmic Reticulum A POSSIBLE was not se- creted, nor was there an intracellular accumulation of the protein. In contrast, fibronectin accumulated within the cells in the presence of BFA. Northern analysis of mRNA levels in FCL cells showed

  16. Data Clustering Using Evidence Accumulation Ana L.N. Fred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fred, Ana

    Data Clustering Using Evidence Accumulation Ana L.N. Fred Telecommunications Institute Instituto State University, USA jain@cse.msu.edu Abstract We explore the idea of evidence accumulation for com, ultimately imposing hyper-spherical clusters on the data. We explore the idea of evidence accumulation

  17. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Mutation accumulation in Tetrahymena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordo, Isabel

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Mutation accumulation in Tetrahymena Patrcia H Brito1* , Elsa are estimated in mutation accumulation experiments where replicate lines are propagated in conditions that allow mutations to randomly accumulate without the purging effect of natural selection. These experiments have

  18. On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hevia, Alejandro

    On the Impossibility of Batch Update for Cryptographic Accumulators Philippe Camacho and Alejandro. {pcamacho,ahevia}@dcc.uchile.cl Abstract. A cryptographic accumulator is a scheme where a set of elements membership into the set. If new values are added or existent values are deleted from the accumulator

  19. INTRODUCTION The accumulation of osmolytes, specifically `compatible' osmolytes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    4615 INTRODUCTION The accumulation of osmolytes, specifically `compatible' osmolytes, is a key and Ferraris, 2008). Various molecular pathways relating to osmolyte accumulation, including cotransporter activity and biosynthesis enzymes, have been shown to be induced in order to accumulate myo-inositol within

  20. Does imperfect competition foster capital accumulation in a developing economy ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Does imperfect competition foster capital accumulation in a developing economy ? Pascal Belan competition and capital accumulation in a dual economy, with traditional and modern sectors and two types. Capitalists accumulate wealth in the modern sector. The economy is open to cap- ital flows, but capitalists

  1. Neurobiology of Disease Psychosine Accumulates in Membrane Microdomains in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bongarzone, Ernesto R.

    Neurobiology of Disease Psychosine Accumulates in Membrane Microdomains in the Brain of Krabbe of GALC ( -galactosylceramidase) that leads to a progressive accumulation of some galactosyl-sphingolipids in the brain. We hypothesized that the accumulation of psychosine (galactosyl-sphingosine) in the TWI CNS may

  2. Neuromelanin biosynthesis is driven by excess cytosolic catecholamines not accumulated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulzer, David

    Neuromelanin biosynthesis is driven by excess cytosolic catecholamines not accumulated by synaptic by increasing vesicular accumulation of neurotransmitter. The NM is in a stable complex with ferric iron, and NM synthesis thus results from excess cytosolic catecholamines not accumulated into synaptic vesicles

  3. The coordinates of isolated accumulations are exactly computable real numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    The coordinates of isolated accumulations are exactly computable real numbers J´er^ome Durand and Smale. The key is that accumulations can be de- vised to accelerate the computation and provide an exact for coordinates and speeds, the collections of positions of accumulations in both space and time are exactly

  4. Gibberellins accumulate in the elongating endodermal cells of Arabidopsis root

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Gibberellins accumulate in the elongating endodermal cells of Arabidopsis root Eilon Shania,1 , Roy. The labeled GAs specifically accumulated in the endo- dermal cells of the root elongation zone that GA accumulation is an active and highly regulated process. Our results strongly suggest the presence

  5. Self terminating, guided or accumulator models of visual search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oram, Mike

    1 Self terminating, guided or accumulator models of visual search: Evidence from stimulus inversion? Efficient search Blonde? #12;2 Accumulator models & visual search Information acquisition hypothesis E.g. Ratcliff 1978; McClelland 1979; Loftus 1983; Carpenter & Williams, 1995; Gold & Shadlen, 2001 Accumulator

  6. Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Compliance of Hazardous Waste Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs) All Hazardous waste generated to be chemically hazardous and shall be kept in a Satellite Accumulation Area (SAA). The safety coordinator will keep a list of all SAA's in the division and must be notified before an accumulation area

  7. Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    Greenland snow accumulation estimates from satellite radar scatterometer data Mark R. Drinkwater accumulation on the Greenland ice sheet. Microwave radar backscatter images of Greenland are derived using (or decrease) in net snow accumulation on the polar ice caps. The net mass balance of the Greenland

  8. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

    1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

  9. Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

  10. Soil microbe Bacillus subtilis (GB03) induces biomass accumulation and salt tolerance with lower sodium accumulation in wheat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Par, Paul W.

    Soil microbe Bacillus subtilis (GB03) induces biomass accumulation and salt tolerance with lower sodium accumulation in wheat Jin-Lin ZhangA,B,E , Mina AzizB , Yan QiaoC , Qing-Qiang HanA , Jing Li to promote biomass accumulation and increase salt tolerance was investigated in wheat (Triticum aestivum

  11. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, A.L.; Cooper, J.F.; Daily, W.D.

    1996-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination. 1 fig.

  12. Using electrokinetic phenomena and electrical resistance tomography to characterize the movement of subsurface fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates generally to the remote detections of subsurface liquid contaminants using in combination a geophysical technique known as ERT and an EKS. Electrokinetic transport is used to enhance the ability of electrical resistance tomography (ERT) to detect position and movement of subsurface contaminant liquids, particles or ions. ERT images alone are difficult to interpret because of natural inhomogeneities in soil composition and electrical properties. By subtracting two or more ERT images obtained before and after field induced movement, a high contrast image of a plume of distinct electrokinetic properties can be seen. The invention is applicable to important subsurface characterization problems including, as examples, (1) detection of liquid-saturated plumes of contaminants such as those associated with leaks from underground storage tanks containing hazardous concentrated electrolytes, (2) detection and characterization of soils contaminated with organic pollutants such as droplets of gasoline; and (3) monitoring the progress of electrokinetic containment or clean up of underground contamination.

  13. Advances in quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging by mode-synthesizing atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitry, P.; Bourillot, E.; Plassard, C.; Lacroute, Y.; Lesniewska, E. [ICB, UMR CNRS 6303 CNRS-University of Bourgogne, Dijon F-21078 (France); Tetard, L. [Nanoscience Technology Center, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32826 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on advances toward quantitative non-destructive nanoscale subsurface investigation of a nanofabricated sample based on mode synthesizing atomic force microscopy with heterodyne detection, addressing the need to correlate the role of actuation frequencies of the probe f{sub p} and the sample f{sub s} with depth resolution for 3D tomography reconstruction. Here, by developing a simple model and validating the approach experimentally through the study of the nanofabricated calibration depth samples consisting of buried metallic patterns, we demonstrate avenues for quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging. Our findings enable the reconstruction of the sample depth profile and allow high fidelity resolution of the buried nanostructures. Non-destructive quantitative nanoscale subsurface imaging offers great promise in the study of the structures and properties of complex systems at the nanoscale.

  14. Fast mix table construction for material discretization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S. R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An effective hybrid Monte Carlo-deterministic implementation typically requires the approximation of a continuous geometry description with a discretized piecewise-constant material field. The inherent geometry discretization error can be reduced somewhat by using material mixing, where multiple materials inside a discrete mesh voxel are homogenized. Material mixing requires the construction of a 'mix table,' which stores the volume fractions in every mixture so that multiple voxels with similar compositions can reference the same mixture. Mix table construction is a potentially expensive serial operation for large problems with many materials and voxels. We formulate an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse mix table in O(number of voxels x log number of mixtures) time. The new algorithm is implemented in ADVANTG and used to discretize continuous geometries onto a structured Cartesian grid. When applied to an end-of-life MCNP model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor with 270 distinct materials, the new method improves the material mixing time by a factor of 100 compared to a naive mix table implementation. (authors)

  15. Regularized Discrete Optimal Transport Sira Ferradans1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Jean-Francois.Aujol@math.u-bordeaux1.fr Abstract. This article introduces a generalization of discrete in modified images. In this article, we propose a variational formalism to relax and regularize the transport dedicated linear solvers (transportation simplex) and combinatorial algorithms (such as the Hungarian

  16. All-optical discrete vortex switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Desyatnikov, Anton S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Dennis, Mark R. [H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Ferrando, Albert [Interdisciplinary Modeling Group, InterTech and Departament d'Optica, Universitat de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot (Spain)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce discrete vortex solitons and vortex breathers in circular arrays of nonlinear waveguides. The simplest vortex breather in a four-waveguide coupler is a nonlinear dynamic state changing its topological charge between +1 and -1 periodically during propagation. We find the stability domain for this solution and suggest an all-optical vortex switching scheme.

  17. Dynamic Discrete Power Control in Cellular Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avrachenkov, Konstantin

    1 Dynamic Discrete Power Control in Cellular Networks Eitan Altman, Konstantin Avrachenkov, Ishai. In each of the two frameworks, we consider both cooperative as well as non-cooperative power control. We utilization. It is, therefore, in the interests of the users to control their transmit powers levels so

  18. Model Uncertainty in Discrete Event Stanley Young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garg, Vijay

    Abstract Earlier work concerning control of discrete event systems usually assumed that a correct model to test for the correct model or noti cation that the remaining models cannot be controllably distin- guished. We use the nite state machine model with controllable and uncontrollable events presented

  19. Contributions to the development of residual discretizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Contributions to the development of residual discretizations for hyperbolic conservation laws with application to shallow water flows Manuscript submitted in fulfillment of the requirements for the obtention;Contents 1 Overview 9 1.1 Residual schemes for hyperbolic conservation laws

  20. Discrete profile alignment via constrained information bottleneck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    Discrete profile alignment via constrained information bottleneck Sean O'Rourke seano@cs.ucsd.edu Abstract Amino acid profiles, which capture position-specific mutation prob- abilities, are a richer encoding of biological sequences than the in- dividual sequences themselves. However, profile comparisons

  1. Discrete profile alignment via constrained information bottleneck

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chechik, Gal

    Discrete profile alignment via constrained information bottleneck Sean O'Rourke # seano@cs.ucsd.edu Abstract Amino acid profiles, which capture position­specific mutation prob­ abilities, are a richer encoding of biological sequences than the in­ dividual sequences themselves. However, profile comparisons

  2. Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Li-Shi

    Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics'' In a recent Letter [1], Li and Kwok use a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for microfluidics. Their main claim is that an LBE model for microfluidics can be constructed based on the ``Bhatnagar-Gross-Kooky [sic]'' model by including ``the

  3. Surface and subsurface characterization of uranium contamination at the Fernald environmental management site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Perkins, R.W.; Abel, K.H.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils, and the three-dimensional distribution of the uranium at these sites must be thoroughly characterized before any effective remedial protocols can be established. To this end, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) has been tasked by the DOE`s Office of Technology Development with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies for the measurement of uranium in surface and subsurface soils at the Fernald Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration site. These studies are detailed in this report.

  4. Possible Reasons Why Aluminum is a Beneficial Element for Melastoma malabathricum, an Aluminum Accumulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Toshihiro; Osaki, Mitsuru

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    growth, especially in Al accumulators (Watanabe and Osaki,Melastomataceae) is an Al accumulator and dominant speciesL. (Myrtaceae, Al non-accumulator) are members of order

  5. Controller Synthesis of Discrete Linear Plants Using MATTEO SLANINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaranarayanan, Sriram

    Controller Synthesis of Discrete Linear Plants Using Polyhedra MATTEO SLANINA Stanford University controllers for linear discrete systems with disturbances. Given a plant description and a safety We study techniques for synthesizing synchronous controllers for affine plants with disturbances

  6. Discretization and Algorithms for Strong Coupling in Computational Aeroelasticity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    8 4.1 Flow discretization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 4.2 Structural discretization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 4.3 Mimicing the energy.4 A bifurcation at M1 = 0:95 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 6.5 Stability chart

  7. Defining Employee Perceptions of Discretion: When, Where, and How

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Rebecca Jean

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    discretion: choice over when, where, and how one works. Second, the influence of these three forms of discretion on both work-related outcomes (job satisfaction, burnout, and turnover intentions) and nonwork-related outcomes (life satisfaction, work...

  8. Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Spring 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Spring 2008 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Discrete Mathematics, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar

  9. Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Spring 2011 Instructor Dr. Amites Sarkar Text Discrete Mathematics, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar@wwu.edu #12;

  10. Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Winter 2009 Instructor Amites Sarkar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Amites

    Math 209 Discrete Mathematics Winter 2009 Instructor Amites Sarkar Text Discrete Mathematics, Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, in 216 Bond Hall. My phone number is 650 7569 and my e-mail is amites.sarkar

  11. Discrete Spectral Transformations of Skew Orthogonal Polynomials and Associated Discrete Integrable Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiroshi Miki; Hiroaki Goda; Satoshi Tsujimoto

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete spectral transformations of skew orthogonal polynomials are presented. From these spectral transformations, it is shown that the corresponding discrete integrable systems are derived both in 1+1 dimension and in 2+1 dimension. Especially in the (2+1)-dimensional case, the corresponding system can be extended to 2x2 matrix form. The factorization theorem of the Christoffel kernel for skew orthogonal polynomials in random matrix theory is presented as a by-product of these transformations.

  12. Discrete spectral transformations of skew orthogonal polynomials and associated discrete integral systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miki, Hiroshi; Tsujimoto, Satoshi

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete spectral transformations of skew orthognal polynomials are presented. From these spectral transformations, it is shown that the corresponding discrete integrable systems are derived both in 1+1 dimension and in 2+1 dimension. Especially in the 2+1 dimensional case, the corresponding system can be extended to 2x2 matrix form. The factorization theorem of the skew-Christoffel kernel in random matrix theory is presented as a by-product of these transformations.

  13. ERROR ESTIMATES FOR THE EULER DISCRETIZATION OF AN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimal control, nonlinear systems, state constraints, Euler discretization, rate of ... convergence, provided with modern variational techniques, are also [25];...

  14. Complex Systems Science for Subsurface Fate and Transport Report from the August 2009 Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The subsurface environment, which encompasses the vadose and saturated zones, is a heterogeneous, geologically complex domain. Believed to contain a large percentage of Earth's biomass in the form of microorganisms, the subsurface is a dynamic zone where important biogeochemical cycles work to sustain life. Actively linked to the atmosphere and biosphere through the hydrologic and carbon cycles, the subsurface serves as a storage location for much of Earth's fresh water. Coupled hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical processes occurring within the subsurface environment cause the local and regional natural chemical fluxes that govern water quality. These processes play a vital role in the formation of soil, economically important fossil fuels, mineral deposits, and other natural resources. Cleaning up Department of Energy (DOE) lands impacted by legacy wastes and using the subsurface for carbon sequestration or nuclear waste isolation require a firm understanding of these processes and the documented means to characterize the vertical and spatial distribution of subsurface properties directing water, nutrient, and contaminant flows. This information, along with credible, predictive models that integrate hydrological, microbiological, and geochemical knowledge over a range of scales, is needed to forecast the sustainability of subsurface water systems and to devise ways to manage and manipulate dynamic in situ processes for beneficial outcomes. Predictive models provide the context for knowledge integration. They are the primary tools for forecasting the evolving geochemistry or microbial ecology of groundwater under various scenarios and for assessing and optimizing the potential effectiveness of proposed approaches to carbon sequestration, waste isolation, or environmental remediation. An iterative approach of modeling and experimentation can reveal powerful insights into the behavior of subsurface systems. State-of-science understanding codified in models can provide a basis for testing hypotheses, guiding experiment design, integrating scientific knowledge on multiple environmental systems into a common framework, and translating this information to support informed decision making and policies. Subsurface behavior typically has been investigated using reductionist, or bottom-up approaches. In these approaches, mechanisms of small-scale processes are quantified, and key aspects of their behaviors are moved up to the prediction scale using scaling laws and models. Reductionism has and will continue to yield essential and comprehensive understanding of the molecular and microscopic underpinnings of component processes. However, system-scale predictions cannot always be made with bottom-up approaches because the behaviors of subsurface environments often simply do not result from the sum of smaller-scale process interactions. Systems exhibiting such behavior are termed complex and can range from the molecular to field scale in size. Complex systems contain many interactive parts and display collective behavior including emergence, feedback, and adaptive mechanisms. Microorganisms - key moderators of subsurface chemical processes - further challenge system understanding and prediction because they are adaptive life forms existing in an environment difficult to observe and measure. A new scientific approach termed complex systems science has evolved from the critical need to understand and model these systems, whose distinguishing features increasingly are found to be common in the natural world. In contrast to reductionist approaches, complexity methods often use a top-down approach to identify key interactions controlling diagnostic variables at the prediction scale; general macroscopic laws controlling system-scale behavior; and essential, simplified models of subsystem interactions that enable prediction. This approach is analogous to systems biology, which emphasizes the tight coupling between experimentation and modeling and is defined, in the context of Biological Systems Science research programs under DOE'

  15. Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport models: One-dimensional soil thaw

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

    Analytical solutions for benchmarking cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport Freezing and thawing a b s t r a c t Numerous cold regions water flow and energy transport models have of powerful simulators of cold regions subsurface water flow and energy transport have emerged in recent years

  16. Revisiting the Foundations of Subsurface Scattering Gladimir V. G. Baranoski Aravind Krishnaswamy Bradley Kimmel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waterloo, University of

    images. For applications in several areas (e.g., entertainment and games industries) believable images. Our investigation is supported by comparisons involving the original measured data that motivated the application of phase functions in tissue subsurface scattering simulations. We hope that the results of our

  17. Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

  18. Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Yong

    hemisphere with the Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope on 26 August 2003. The upper panel shows the filament spineSubsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R and their Interrelation Y. Lin,1 S. F. Martin,2 and O. Engvold1 Abstract. The main structural components of solar

  19. SOURCE SEPARATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE DEFECTS IN THE EDDY CURRENT NDT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    SOURCE SEPARATION TECHNIQUES APPLIED TO THE DETECTION OF SUBSURFACE DEFECTS IN THE EDDY CURRENT NDT component analysis, to process the data from the eddy current inspection of riveted lap joints. An eddy methods are proposed for processing such eddy current data by means of both the considered source

  20. Multicomponent seismic data registration for subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Gulf of Mexico Sergey Fomel, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Paul E. Murray, Bob A. Hardage with application to subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we extend-S images. Application of this technique to data from the Gulf of Mexico reveals the structure of sediments

  1. Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Subsurface and Atmospheric Influences on Solar Activity ASP Conference Series, Vol. 383, c 2008 R descriptions of the ambient coronal magnetic field struc- ture and the associated solar wind streams thanks twist, cur- rent sheets, and other unstable or energized configurations in the active region vicinity. 1

  2. Recent developments in model-based optimization and control of subsurface flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    ; identifiability; model reduction. 1. INTRODUCTION The production of oil and gas from petroleum reservoirs the pores of subsurface rock lay- ers. The production life of a petroleum reservoir generally lasts a number configurations and production strategies, but an emerging use is in the 'real-time' optimization and control

  3. Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

    1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

  4. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  5. SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA R. Komm National Solar Observatory 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 komm@noao.edu ABSTRACT We analyze GONG and MDI observations closer to the surface. GONG and MDI data show the same results. Di#11;erences occur mainly at high

  6. Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

  7. Atomic-Scale Chemical, Physical and Electronic Properties of the Subsurface Hydride of Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, Paul

    2014-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed low-temperature, extreme-high vacuum scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) to investigate the roles of subsurface hydride (H) and deuteride (D) in the surface reconstruction and surface reactivity of Pd{110}. Specifically, we gained the ability to tailor the surface structure of Pd{110} both by preparation method and by deposition of deuterium from the gas phase. We observed thiophene at low coverage on Pd{110} to determine its adsorption orientation and electronic structure through scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) namely, conductance spectroscopy and differential conductance imaging. We developed the methods necessary to coadsorb D adatoms with thiophene molecules, and to induce the reaction of individual molecules with predefined subsurface H or D features. In the case of Pd{110}, we found a much more pronounced effect from subsurface D, as it is influenced by the surface directionality. These experiments facilitate an understanding of the role of surface and subsurface H and D in heterogeneous catalytic processes, specifically in the hydrodesulfuization (HDS) of thiophene, an important and ubiquitous component found to be detrimental to petroleum refining.

  8. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to be the primary energy source for life in this geothermal sys- tem, the main organisms identified by phylotype energy source that drives primary productivity in this and potentially other geothermal ecosystemsDiversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

  9. Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firoozabadi, Abbas

    Mathematical Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Injection in the Subsurface for Improved Hydrocarbon Recovery and Sequestration Philip C. Myint, Laurence Rongy, Kjetil B. Haugen, Abbas Firoozabadi Department. Combustion of fossil fuels contributes to rising atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) levels that have been

  10. Relationship Between Soil Moisture Storage and Deep Percolation and Subsurface Return Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieber, J. L.

    . The one-dimensional form of the Richards equation was used for the percolation process and the two-dimensional form of the Richards equation was used for the subsurface return flow process. In each case the Richards equation was transformed to a set...

  11. TRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    that catchment or even slope scale simulation using parameters of the Darcy-Buckingham-Richards equation, the validity of the Richards equation (or the Darcy- Buckingham equation in its steady-state form) at slopeTRACER AND DARCY-BASED IDENTIFICATION OF SUBSURFACE FLOW, BUKIT TIMAH FOREST, SINGAPORE M

  12. Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Durable and easy to install: Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Background: Subsurface Water Retention Technology (SWRT) Benefits Durable and easy to install: Water retaining membranes can last at least 40 years and can be installed quickly and costeffectively permeable marginal soils converting them to much higher production levels of food crops. Better water

  13. Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower-boundary sensitivities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smerdon, Jason E.

    Simulating heat transport of harmonic temperature signals in the Earth's shallow subsurface: Lower changes, freeze-thaw cycles, and hydrologic dynamics. It is uncertain, however, whether the reported atmospheric simulations. Citation: Smerdon, J. E., and M. Stieglitz (2006), Simulating heat transport

  14. Category: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    have to be measured with accuracy. Index terms: Physical properties of rocks: 5199 GeneralCategory: Subsurface Hydrology Theoretical prediction of poroelastic properties of argillaceous rocks from in situ specific storage coefficient Ph. Cosenza1 '2 , M. Ghoreychi3 , G. de Marsily \\ G

  15. Author's personal copy Model-based control of multiphase flow in subsurface oil reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    wells. However, even when using such secondary recovery tech- niques, most of the oil remains trapped t An emerging method to increase the recovery of oil from subsurface reservoirs is the application of mea this primary recovery phase ends, and it will be necessary to inject water or gas into the reservoir

  16. IMPROVED UNDERSTANDING OF SUBSURFACE HYDROLOGY IN VARIABLE SOURCE AREAS AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR WATER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    and nutrient transport from a greater distance has to be considered in water management during events with wet and subsurface runoff generation and chemical transport and how these processes can be captured in ungaged basins was instrumented (trenched) in the southern tier of New York, U.S. Water flux from different soil layers

  17. aminobutyric acid accumulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cr Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 202 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  18. abscisic acid accumulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cr Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 213 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  19. acid accumulation limits: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cr Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 293 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  20. aortic cholesterol accumulation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cr Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 328 Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH Geosciences Websites Summary: Prediction of...

  1. accumulate transcription machinery: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, HAMBURG : Germany (2009)" 12;))).(.(1.( 110 s economic (and energetic) cost of storage accumulator system is still limiting the...

  2. Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate) accumulation in microbial communities using laser ablation isotope ratio Spatially tracking 13C labeled substrate (bicarbonate)...

  3. accumulation areas rcra: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ivn 10 PV production Accumulator Physics Websites Summary: European Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conference, HAMBURG : Germany (2009)" 12;))).(.(1.( 110 s economic (and...

  4. Using Circular Programs to Deforest in Accumulating Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckmiller, Rolf

    Using Circular Programs to Deforest in Accumulating Parameters Janis Voigtl¨ander (voigt) deforestation, tree transducers CCS categories and subject descriptors: D.1.1 [Programming Techniques

  5. aps positron accumulator: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Emission and Accumulation of Antiprotons and Positrons from Supersymmetric Dark Matter HEP - Phenomenology (arXiv) Summary: We estimate the amount of antiprotons and...

  6. NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D.

    2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

  7. Determination of Importance Evaluation for Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Subsurface Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.J. Byrne

    2001-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas including the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) Cross Drift. This evaluation applies specifically to site characterization testing activities ongoing and planned in the Subsurface ESF. ESF site characterization activities are being performed to obtain the information necessary to determine whether the Yucca Mountain Site is suitable as a geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. A more detailed description of these testing activities is provided in Section 6 of this DIE. Generally, the construction and operation of excavations associated with these testing activities are evaluated in the DIE for the Subsurface ESF (CRWMS M&O 1999a) and the DIE for the ESF ECRB Cross Drift (CRWMS M&O 2000a). The scope of this DIE also entails the proposed Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test at Busted Butte. Although, not a part of the TS Loop or ECRB Cross Drift, the associated testing activities are Subsurface testing activities. Busted Butte is located to the south south-east of the TS Loop and is outside the Conceptual Controlled Area Boundary (CCAB). These activities provide access to the Calico Hills (CH) geologic structure. In the case of Busted Butte, construction and operation of excavations are evaluated herein (since this activity was not previously evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1999a). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether Subsurface ESF testing, and associated activities, could potentially impact site characterization testing and/or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified in Section 13. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIS) and are not evaluated in this DIE. This DIE focuses on integrating and compiling the evaluations of previous DIES which were prepared for various ESF subsurface testing activities, including the use of temporary items currently located or being developed for these testing activities, and to provide a bounding evaluation for potential future ESF subsurface testing activities that are sufficiently similar to the generic testing activities addressed herein. Subsurface testing activities items/facilities evaluated herein include: ongoing and planned testing in the TS Loop, alcoves, and niches, planned testing in the ECRB Starter Tunnel, borehole drilling and workover, and tracers, fluids, and materials (TFM) usage. Detailed identification of individual testing items/facilities and generic descriptions for subsurface-testing-related activities are provided in Section 6. The conclusions and requirements of this DIE conservatively bound the conclusions and requirements of previously approved DIES for the ESF subsurface testing activities addressed herein, based on conservative engineering judgment and on concurrence with this DIE (via a formal review process) by the originating and reviewing organizations of the previously approved evaluations. Hence, this DIE supersedes the following DIES listed in Table 1.1.

  8. Degeneracy and Discreteness in Cosmological Model Fitting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teng, Huan-Yu; Hu, Huan-Chen; Zhang, Tong-Jie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the degeneracy and discreteness problems in the standard cosmological model ({\\Lambda}CDM). We use the Observational Hubble Data (OHD) and the type Ia supernova (SNe Ia) data to study this issue. In order to describe the discreteness in fitting of data, we define a factor G to test the influence from each single data point and analyze the goodness of G. Our results indicate that a higher absolute value of G shows a better capability of distinguishing models, which means the parameters are restricted into smaller confidence intervals with a larger figure of merit evaluation. Consequently, we claim that the factor G is an effective way in model differentiation when using different models to fit the observational data.

  9. A combinatorial approach to discrete geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Bombelli; M. Lorente

    2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a paralell approach to discrete geometry: the first one introduces Voronoi cell complexes from statistical tessellations in order to know the mean scalar curvature in term of the mean number of edges of a cell. The second one gives the restriction of a graph from a regular tessellation in order to calculate the curvature from pure combinatorial properties of the graph. Our proposal is based in some epistemological pressupositions: the macroscopic continuous geometry is only a fiction, very usefull for describing phenomena at certain sacales, but it is only an approximation to the true geometry. In the discrete geometry one starts from a set of elements and the relation among them without presuposing space and time as a background.

  10. ${\\mathbb{Z}}_N$ graded discrete Lax pairs and discrete integrable systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allan P. Fordy; Pavlos Xenitidis

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a class of ${\\mathbb{Z}}_N$ graded discrete Lax pairs, with $N\\times N$ matrices, linear in the spectral parameter. We give a classification scheme for such Lax pairs and the associated discrete integrable systems. We present two potential forms and completely classify the generic case. Many well known examples belong to our scheme for $N=2$, so many of our systems may be regarded as generalisations of these. Even at $N=3$, several new integrable systems arise. Many of our equations are mutually compatible, so can be used together to form "coloured" lattices. We also present continuous isospectral deformations of our Lax pairs, giving compatible differential-difference systems, which play the role of continuous symmetries of our discrete systems. We present master symmetries and a recursive formulae for their respective hierarchies, for the generic case. We present two nonlocal symmetries of our discrete systems, which have a natural representation in terms of the potential forms. These give rise to the two-dimensional Toda lattice, with our nonlinear symmetries being the B\\"acklund transformations and our discrete system being the nonlinear superposition formula (for the generic case).

  11. Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

  12. Self-Accumulation of Information in the Nature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiichi Akama

    2014-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    To understand why information accumulates despite the global entropy increase, we argue that existing composite entities, from atoms to galaxies, including lives, are information condensates, which accumulate information in a self-explanatory manner. In order to confirm and to illustrate this idea, we investigate the roles of information in survival of a hydrogen atom.

  13. RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    RUPTURE BY DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN ROCKS David Amitrano LIRIGM, Universit J. Fourier, Grenoble of rocks is associated with microcracks nucleation and propagation, i.e. damage. The accumulation of damage as strength and modulus. The damage process can be studied both statically by direct observation of thin

  14. ORIGINAL PAPER Accumulation of vitamin E in potato (Solanum tuberosum)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douches, David S.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Accumulation of vitamin E in potato (Solanum tuberosum) tubers Elizabeth F. Crowell of tocopherols can be accumulated in potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers through metabolic engineering. Two transgenes were constitutively over-expressed in potato: Arabid- opsis thaliana p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate dioxy

  15. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a 'pulsed beam'; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a 'continuous beam.' A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose difference between the dynamic dose and 4D dose as a function of number of deliveries and/or total deliver time was also established.

  16. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  17. Bilinear control of discrete spectrum Schrdinger operators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kais Ammari; Zied Ammari

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The bilinear control problem of the Schr\\"odinger equation $i\\frac{\\partial}{\\partial t}\\psi(t)$ $=(A+u(t) B)\\psi(t)$, where $u(t)$ is the control function, is investigated through topological irreducibility of the set $\\mathfrak{M}=\\{e^{-it (A+u B)}, u\\in \\mathbb{R}, t>0\\}$ of bounded operators. This allows to prove the approximate controllability of such systems when the uncontrolled Hamiltonian $A$ has a simple discrete spectrum and under an appropriate assumption on $B$.

  18. Quantumness of discrete Hamiltonian cellular automata

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hans-Thomas Elze

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize a recent study of discrete (integer-valued) Hamiltonian cellular automata (CA) showing that their dynamics can only be consistently defined, if it is linear in the same sense as unitary evolution described by the Schr\\"odinger equation. This allows to construct an invertible map between such CA and continuous quantum mechanical models, which incorporate a fundamental scale. Presently, we emphasize general aspects of these findings, the construction of admissible CA observables, and the existence of solutions of the modified dispersion relation for stationary states.

  19. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates, Redmond, VA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  20. Discrete sine-Gordon dynamics on networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutykh, Denys

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we consider the sine-Gordon equation formulated on domains which are not locally homeomorphic to any subset of the Euclidean space. More precisely, we formulate the discrete dynamics on trees and graphs. Each edge is assumed to be a 1D uniform lattice with end points identified with graph vertices. A special treatment is needed at the junctions in order to couple 1D lattices into a global communicating network. Our approach is based on considering the local conservation properties. Some preliminary numerical results are shown on a simple graph containing four loops. These results show the performance of the scheme in non-trivial realistic conditions.

  1. Unitary Evolution on a Discrete Phase Space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. G. Floratos; S. Nicolis

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct unitary evolution operators on a phase space with power of two discretization. These operators realize the metaplectic representation of the modular group SL(2,Z_{2^n}). It acts in a natural way on the coordinates of the non-commutative 2-torus, T_{2^n}^2$ and thus is relevant for non-commutative field theories as well as theories of quantum space-time. The class of operators may also be useful for the efficient realization of new quantum algorithms.

  2. Modified discrete random walk with absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theo van Uem

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We obtain expected number of arrivals, probability of arrival, absorption probabilities and expected time before absorption for a modified discrete random walk on the (sub)set of integers. In a [pqrs] random walk the particle can move one step forward or backward, stay for a moment in the same state or it can be absorbed immediately in the current state. M[pqrs] is a modified version, where probabilities on both sides of a multiple function barrier M are of different [pqrs] type.

  3. SNAP:SN (Discrete Ordinates) Application Proxy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited ReleaseWelcome to theAbsorptionFinalSNAP:SN (Discrete

  4. Further RAGE modeling of asteroid mitigation: surface and subsurface explosions in porous objects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dearholt, William R [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disruption or mitigation of a potentially hazardous object (PHO) by a high-energy subsurface burst is considered. This is just one possible method of impact-hazard mitigation. We present RAGE hydrocode models of the shock-generated disruption of PHOs by subsurface nuclear bursts using scenario-specific models from realistic RADAR shape models. We will show 2D and 3D models for the disruption by a large energy source at the center of such PHO models ({approx}100 kt-10 Mt) specifically for the shape of the asteroid 25143 Itokawa. We study the effects of non-uniform composition (rubble pile), shallow buried bursts for the optimal depth of burial and porosity.

  5. Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

    2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

  6. Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

  7. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper discusses the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification.

  8. Changes in the subsurface stratification of the Sun with the 11-year activity cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandrine Lefebvre; Alexander Kosovichev

    2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the changes of the Sun's subsurface stratification inferred from helioseismology data. Using SOHO/MDI (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager) data for the last 9 years and, more precisely, the temporal variation of f-mode frequencies, we have computed the variation of the radius of subsurface layers of the Sun by applying helioseismic inversions. We have found a variability of the ``helioseismic'' radius in antiphase with the solar activity, with the strongest variations of the stratification being just below the surface around 0.995$R_{\\odot}$. Besides, the radius of the deeper layers of the Sun, between 0.975$R_{\\odot}$ and 0.99$R_{\\odot}$ changes in phase with the 11-year cycle.

  9. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  10. Subsurface materials management and containment system, components thereof and methods relating thereto

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nickelson, Reva A.; Richardson, John G.; Kostelnik, Kevin M.; Sloan, Paul A.

    2006-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

  11. Geochemistry of silicate-rich rocks can curtail spreading of carbon dioxide in subsurface aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, S. S. S.; Andres, J. T. H.

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    of carbon sequestration and dissolution rates in the subsurface, suggesting that pooled carbon dioxide may remain in the shallower regions of the formation for hundreds to thousands of years. The deeper regions of the reservoir can remain virtually carbon... interests. References 1. Marini, L. Geochemical Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide. (Elsevier 2007). 2. IPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage, edited by Metz B. et al. (Cambridge University Press, UK and New York, USA, 2005). 3. Falkowski...

  12. Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

  13. The modeling of RF stacking of protons in the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Phil S.; /Fermilab /Rochester U.; McGinnis, David P.; Chou, Weiren; /Fermilab

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When the Run2 collider program is terminated in 2009, the present pbar source will be available for other usages. One possible application is to convert the Antiproton Accumulator to a proton accumulator so that the beam power from the Main Injector could be greatly enhanced [1]. The Accumulator has the unique feature of very large momentum acceptance. It is possible to stack 3-4 Booster batches in the longitudinal phase space before transferring them to the Main Injector or Recycler. This note shows the simulation of RF stacking using the code ESME [2].

  14. Development of microwave and millimeter-wave integrated-circuit stepped-frequency radar sensors for surface and subsurface profiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Joongsuk

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    for subsurface and surface measurements including small size, light weight, good accuracy, fine resolution and deep penetration. In addition, two novel wideband microstrip quasi-TEM horn antennae that are capable of integration with a seamless connection have...

  15. On using rational enzyme redesign to improve enzyme-mediated microbial dehalogenation of recalcitrant substances in deep-subsurface environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ornstein, R.L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavily halogenated hydrocarbons are one of the most prevalent classes of man-made recalcitrant environmental contaminants and often make their way into subsurface environments. Biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface often occurs at extremely slow rates because native enzymes of indigenous microbes are unable to efficiently metabolize such synthetic substances. Cost-effective engineering solutions do not exist for dealing with disperse and recalcitrant pollutants in the deep subsurface (i.e., ground water, soils, and sediments). Timely biodegradation of heavily chlorinated compounds in the deep subsurface may be best accomplished by rational redesign of appropriate enzymes that enhance the ability of indigenous microbes to metabolize these substances. The isozyme family cytochromes P450 are catalytically very robust and are found in all aerobic life forms and may be active in may anaerobes as well. The author is attempting to demonstrate proof-of-principle rational enzyme redesign of cytochromes P450 to enhance biodehalogenation.

  16. Seeing inside chips and cells: High-resolution subsurface imaging of integrated circuits, quantum dots and subcellular structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    techniques for IC failure analysis ­ solid immersion lens microscopy and solid immersion lens thermography improvement from >5µm to a resolution of 1.3µm, representing the best subsurface thermography to date

  17. Characterizing the Groundwater-Surface Water Interactions in Different Subsurface Geologic Environments Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Molly

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow aquifers located near streams can be affected by groundwater contamination as a result of recharge from surface water; however, stream stage variation, subsurface geology, and seasonal changes can alter the magnitude of groundwater...

  18. Subsurface flow constructed wetland: treatment of domestic wastewater by gravel and tire chip media and ultraviolet disinfection of effluent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Amanda Yvette

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface flow constructed wetlands (SFCWs) are becoming increasingly common in on-site treatment of wastewater. Gravel is the most popular form of wetland fill medium, but tire chips provide more porosity, are less dense, and cheaper. Before...

  19. Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

    2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energys Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

  20. Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  1. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programs Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

  2. Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Nevin, Kelly P.; Franks, Ashley; Englert, Andreas L.; Long, Philip E.; Lovley, Derek R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density (?50 mA/m2) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control produced low, steady currents (?0.2 mA/m2). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. These results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode and that current levels are likely related to rates of subsurface metabolism. It is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  3. Development of Enabling Scientific Tools to Characterize the Geologic Subsurface at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenna, Timothy C.; Herron, Michael M.

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report to the Department of Energy provides a summary of activities conducted under our exploratory grant, funded through U.S. DOE Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Program in the category of enabling scientific tools, which covers the period from July 15, 2010 to July 14, 2013. The main goal of this exploratory project is to determine the parameters necessary to translate existing borehole log data into reservoir properties following scientifically sound petrophysical relationships. For this study, we focused on samples and Ge-based spectral gamma logging system (SGLS) data collected from wells located in the Hanford 300 Area. The main activities consisted of 1) the analysis of available core samples for a variety of mineralogical, chemical and physical; 2) evaluation of selected spectral gamma logs, environmental corrections, and calibration; 3) development of algorithms and a proposed workflow that permits translation of log responses into useful reservoir properties such as lithology, matrix density, porosity, and permeability. These techniques have been successfully employed in the petroleum industry; however, the approach is relatively new when applied to subsurface remediation. This exploratory project has been successful in meeting its stated objectives. We have demonstrated that our approach can lead to an improved interpretation of existing well log data. The algorithms we developed can utilize available log data, in particular gamma, and spectral gamma logs, and continued optimization will improve their application to ERSP goals of understanding subsurface properties.

  4. A Strategy to Conduct an Analysis of the Long-Term Performance of Low-Activity Waste Glass in a Shallow Subsurface Disposal System at Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neeway, James J.; Pierce, Eric M.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The federal facilities located on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State have been used extensively by the U.S. government to produce nuclear materials for the U.S. strategic defense arsenal. Currently, the Hanford Site is under the stewardship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM). A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste resulting from the production of nuclear materials has accumulated, mainly in 177 underground single- and double-shell tanks located in the central plateau of the Hanford Site (Mann et al., 2001). The DOE-EM Office of River Protection (ORP) is proceeding with plans to immobilize and permanently dispose of the low-activity waste (LAW) fraction onsite in a shallow subsurface disposal facility (the Integrated Disposal Facility [IDF]). Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was contracted to provide the technical basis for estimating radionuclide release from the engineered portion of the IDF (the source term) as part of an immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glass testing program to support future IDF performance assessments (PAs).

  5. attila discrete ordinance: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 428 VARIATIONAL ESTIMATES FOR DISCRETE SCHR Mathematics Websites...

  6. attila discrete ordinates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 428 VARIATIONAL ESTIMATES FOR DISCRETE SCHR Mathematics Websites...

  7. aux ordonnees discretes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    recurrence satisfied by the Stirling numbers of the second kind. Abrams, Aaron; Hower, Valerie 2010-01-01 326 VARIATIONAL ESTIMATES FOR DISCRETE SCHR Mathematics Websites...

  8. analyzing incomplete discrete: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geometric Approach to ML Estimation With Incomplete Data: Application to Semi Reilly, James P. 94 Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics Quantum Physics...

  9. A quantitative description of mesh dependence for the discretization ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    that coming from a ferromagnetic spin energy. The critical case can be regarded as an interpolation between the two. Key words. spatial discretization, singularly

  10. Efficient energy stable schemes with spectral discretization in space ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct energy stable schemes for the time discretization of the highly nonlinear ... shape) in order to achieve a well-defined energy for the system.

  11. optimization of discrete control systems with varying structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    xx

    2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    (in russian). 4. Mansimov, K.B., Maharramov, Sh.F.: Necessary conditions of optimality for discrete system with variable structure and rolling right end of the path.

  12. Discretization schemes for diffusion operators on general meshes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbin, Raphale

    : Navier Stokes equations Flow in porous media, Darcy equation. discretization of -div( u)) A can Supplementary constraint from the oil reservoir simulation community: cell centred schemes transport equations

  13. Lowest-rank Solutions of Continuous and Discrete Lyapunov ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziyan Luo

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 9, 2012 ... Abstract: The low-rank solutions of continuous and discrete Lyapunov equations are of great importance but generally difficult to achieve in...

  14. The robust stabilization problem for discrete-time descriptor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudiu Dinicu

    2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 23, 2014 ... Abstract: We investigate the robust stabilization problem for the descriptor discrete-time systems and build an optimal solution in the case when...

  15. Accumulation Rate of Bound States of Dipoles in Graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Rademacher; Heinz Siedentop

    2015-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that the bound state energies of the two-dimensional massive Dirac operator with dipole type potentials accumulate with exponentials rate at the band edge. In fact we prove a corresponding formula of De Martino et al (2014)

  16. Period tripling accumulation point for complexified Henon map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. B. Isaeva; S. P. Kuznetsov

    2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Accumulation point of period-tripling bifurcations for complexified Henon map is found. Universal scaling properties of parameter space and Fourier spectrum intrinsic to this critical point is demonstrated.

  17. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  18. Proper Lagoon Management to Reduce Odor and Excessive Sludge Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    1999-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper management techniques to reduce odor and excessive sludge accumulation include maintaining pH and salt levels, pumping regularly, maintaining adequate bacteria levels, and designing for efficiency. Definitions of key words are boxed for easy...

  19. Quantifying the surface-subsurface biogeochemical coupling during the VERTIGO ALOHA and K2 studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, P.W.; Gall, M.P.; Silver, M.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Coale, Susan L.; Bidigare, Robert R.

    2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A central question addressed by the VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean) study was 'What controls the efficiency of particle export between the surface and subsurface ocean'? Here, we present data from sites at ALOHA (N Central Pacific Gyre) and K2 (NW subarctic Pacific) on phytoplankton processes, and relate them via a simple planktonic foodweb model, to subsurface particle export (150-500 m). Three key factors enable quantification of the surface-subsurface coupling: a sampling design to overcome the temporal lag and spatial displacement between surface and subsurface processes; data on the size-partitioning of Net Primary Production (NPP) and subsequent transformations prior to export; estimates of the ratio of algal- to faecal-mediated vertical export flux. At ALOHA, phytoplankton were characterized by low stocks, NPP, F{sub v}/F{sub m} (N-limited), and were dominated by picoplankton. The HNLC waters at K2 were characterized by both two-fold changes in NPP and floristic shifts (high to low proportion of diatoms) between deployment 1 and 2. Prediction of export exiting the euphotic zone was based on size-partitioning of NPP, a copepod-dominated foodweb and a ratio of 0.2 (ALOHA) and 0.1 (K2) for algal:faecal particle flux. Predicted export was 20-22 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} at ALOHA (i.e. 10-11% NPP (0-125 m); 1.1-1.2 x export flux at 150 m (E{sub 150}). At K2, export was 111 mg C m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (21% NPP (0-50 m); 1.8 x E{sub 150}) and 33 mg POC m{sup -2} d{sup -1} (11% NPP, 0-55 m); 1.4 x E{sub 150}) for deployments 1 and 2, respectively. This decrease in predicted export at K2 matches the observed trend for E{sub 150}. Also, the low attenuation of export flux from 60 to 150 m is consistent with that between 150 to 500 m. This strong surface-subsurface coupling suggests that phytoplankton productivity and floristics play a key role at K2 in setting export flux, and moreover that pelagic particle transformations by grazers strongly influence to what extent sinking particles are further broken down in the underlying waters of the Twilight Zone.

  20. The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

  1. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  2. Final Technical Report: Viral Infection of Subsurface Microorganisms and Metal/Radionuclide Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, Karrie A.; Bender, Kelly S.; Li, Yusong

    2013-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Microbially mediated metabolisms have been identified as a significant factor either directly or indirectly impacting the fate and transport of heavy metal/radionuclide contaminants. To date microorganisms have been isolated from contaminated environments. Examination of annotated finished genome sequences of many of these subsurface isolates from DOE sites, revealed evidence of prior viral infection. To date the role that viruses play influencing microbial mortality and the resulting community structure which directly influences biogeochemical cycling in soils and sedimentary environments remains poorly understood. The objective of this exploratory study was to investigate the role of viral infection of subsurface bacteria and the formation of contaminant-bearing viral particles. This objective was approached by examining the following working hypotheses: (i) subsurface microorganisms are susceptible to viral infections by the indigenous subsurface viral community, and (ii) viral surfaces will adsorb heavy metals and radionuclides. Our results have addressed basic research needed to accomplish the BER Long Term Measure to provide sufficient scientific understanding such that DOE sites would be able to incorporate coupled physical, chemical and biological processes into decision making for environmental remediation or natural attenuation and long-term stewardship by establishing viral-microbial relationships on the subsequent fate and transport of heavy metals and radionuclides. Here we demonstrated that viruses play a significant role in microbial mortality and community structure in terrestrial subsurface sedimentary systems. The production of viral-like particles within subsurface sediments in response to biostimulation with dissolved organic carbon and a terminal electron acceptor resulted in the production of viral-like particles. Organic carbon alone did not result in significant viral production and required the addition of a terminal electron acceptor (nitrate), indicating that nutrients are not limiting viral production, but rather substrates that can be converted into energy for host metabolism. Our results also revealed that cell abundance was not correlated to the mineralization of organic carbon, but rather viruses were positively correlated with carbon mineralization. This is a result of viral-mediated cell lysis and demonstrates that viruses are sensitive indicators of microbial activity. Viruses as an indicator of microbial activity was not unique to batch culture studies as results obtained from an in situ field experiment conducted at the DOE Old Rifle Field site. This study revealed that viral abundance increased in response to the injection of oxygenated groundwater and influx of dissolved organic carbon whereas cell abundance changes were minimal. However, the extent to which viral-mediated cell lysis alters organic matter pools subsequently influencing microbial community structure and biogeochemical function remains a critical question in subsurface biogeochemical cycling. The production of significant numbers of viruses in groundwater has implications for nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport in groundwater. We have demonstrated that the virus surface is reactive and will adsorb heavy metals. Thus viruses can promote colloidal contaminant mobility. Interestingly, the presence of heavy metals has a positive effect on infectivity of the phage, increasing phage infection which could lead to further production of viruses. Together, the results indicate that the sorption of metals to the surface of viruses could not only contribute to nanoparticulate metal as well as carbon transport but could also enhance infectivity further contributing to cell lysis which could subsequently influence biogeochemical cycling. As more viruses infect host microbial populations the high concentration of metals would enhance infection, resulting in cell lysis, and decreasing the metabolically active host population while yielding greater numbers of viruses capable of transporting contaminats. Additional studie

  3. Information storage capacity of discrete spin systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beni Yoshida

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the limits imposed on information storage capacity of physical systems is a problem of fundamental and practical importance which bridges physics and information science. There is a well-known upper bound on the amount of information that can be stored reliably in a given volume of discrete spin systems which are supported by gapped local Hamiltonians. However, all the previously known systems were far below this theoretical bound, and it remained open whether there exists a gapped spin system that saturates this bound. Here, we present a construction of spin systems which saturate this theoretical limit asymptotically by borrowing an idea from fractal properties arising in the Sierpinski triangle. Our construction provides not only the best classical error-correcting code which is physically realizable as the energy ground space of gapped frustration-free Hamiltonians, but also a new research avenue for correlated spin phases with fractal spin configurations.

  4. Discrete solitons and vortices on anisotropic lattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kevrekidis, P.G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-4515 (United States); Frantzeskakis, D.J. [Department of Physics, University of Athens, Panepistimiopolis, Zografos, Athens 15784 (Greece); Carretero-Gonzalez, R. [Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Group, Department of Mathematics and Statistics, and Computational Science Research Center, San Diego State University, San Diego, California 92182-7720 (United States); Malomed, B.A. [Department of Interdisciplinary Studies, School of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Bishop, A.R. [Theoretical Division and Center for Nonlinear Studies, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the effects of anisotropy on solitons of various types in two-dimensional nonlinear lattices, using the discrete nonlinear Schroedinger equation as a paradigm model. For fundamental solitons, we develop a variational approximation that predicts that broad quasicontinuum solitons are unstable, while their strongly anisotropic counterparts are stable. By means of numerical methods, it is found that, in the general case, the fundamental solitons and simplest on-site-centered vortex solitons ('vortex crosses') feature enhanced or reduced stability areas, depending on the strength of the anisotropy. More surprising is the effect of anisotropy on the so-called 'super-symmetric' intersite-centered vortices ('vortex squares'), with the topological charge S equal to the square's size M: we predict in an analytical form by means of the Lyapunov-Schmidt theory, and confirm by numerical results, that arbitrarily weak anisotropy results in dramatic changes in the stability and dynamics in comparison with the degenerate, in this case, isotropic, limit.

  5. XXZ scalar products, Miwa variables and discrete KP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Foda; G. Schrader

    2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the quantum/classical integrable model correspondence in the context of inhomogeneous finite length XXZ spin-1/2 chains with periodic boundary conditions and show that the Bethe scalar product of an arbitrary state and a Bethe eigenstate is a discrete KP tau-function. The continuous Miwa variables of discrete KP are the rapidities of the arbitrary state.

  6. From Discrete Specifications to Hybrid Control1 Paulo Tabuada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    @seas.upenn.edu Abstract A great challenge for modern systems theory is the de- sign of controllers for continuous systems inside physical devices has resulted in great challenges for modern and future systems and control theory given a discrete- time controllable linear system and a discrete specifica- tion (in the form

  7. Model Transformation with Hierarchical Discrete-Event Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Transformation with Hierarchical Discrete- Event Control Thomas Huining Feng Electrical permission. #12;Model Transformation with Hierarchical Discrete-Event Control by Huining Feng B.S. (Nanjing Date Date University of California, Berkeley Spring 2009 #12;Model Transformation with Hierarchical

  8. Directed Control of Discrete Event Systems: Optimization Based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ratnesh

    Directed Control of Discrete Event Systems: Optimization Based Approach J. Huang and R. Kumar an optimal director. Keywords: Discrete event systems, optimal control, supervisory control, directed control sense for plants that are executor of controllable events. In this paper we develop an optimization

  9. EQUILIBRIUM RECONSTRUCTION FROM DISCRETE MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS IN A TOKAMAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faugeras, Blaise

    EQUILIBRIUM RECONSTRUCTION FROM DISCRETE MAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS IN A TOKAMAK Blaise Faugeras (joint of the equilibrium in a Tokamak from discrete magnetic mea- surements. In order to solve this inverse problem we of a plasma in a Tokamak [1]. The state variable of interest in the modelization of such an equilibrium under

  10. Discrete Wavelet Diffusion for Image Denoising Kashif Rajpoot1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajpoot, Nasir

    Discrete Wavelet Diffusion for Image Denoising Kashif Rajpoot1 , Nasir Rajpoot2 , J. Alison Noble1 to iterative wavelet shrinkage, but only for (1) MallatZhong dyadic wavelet transform and (2) Haar wavelet shrinkage in the standard discrete wavelet transform (DWT) domain. Two of the major advantages

  11. A DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A DISCRETE WAVELET ANALYSIS OF FREAK WAVES IN THE OCEAN EN-BING LIN AND PAUL C. LIU Received 25 wavelet analysis on a freak wave. We demonstrate several applications of wavelets and discrete and continuous wavelet transforms on the study of a freak wave. A modeling setting for freak waves will also

  12. A Discrete-Event Systems Approach to Modeling Dextrous Manipulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Nick

    A Discrete-Event Systems Approach to Modeling Dextrous Manipulation S. L. Ricker? N. Sarkar?y K-event systems. The applicability of discrete-event systems to the modeling of dextrous manipulation tasks of the manipulation task, resulting in control discontinuities. The need for tech- niques to facilitate a smooth

  13. University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presenter: Jeremy Fox University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice Models;Identification of Discrete Choice Models for Bundles and Binary Games Jeremy T. Fox University of Michigan and NBER Natalia Lazzati University of Michigan March 2014 Abstract We study nonparametric identification

  14. SHAPE MATCHING USING FUZZY DISCRETE PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hefei Institute of Intelligent Machines

    importantly, the recognition based on shape feature is also a central problem in those fields such as patternSHAPE MATCHING USING FUZZY DISCRETE PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION* Ji-Xiang Du1, 2 De-Shuang Huang1 based on fuzzy discrete particle swarm optimization (FDPSO) is proposed. Based on fuzzy theory and PSO

  15. Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics 1 Prof. Dr. Stefan Nickel Health Care Logistics: Overview Health Care Logistics 11/28/2013 #12;Institute of Operations Research Discrete Optimization and Logistics 2 Prof. Dr. Stefan Nickel Health Care Logistics: Overview Health Care

  16. Cryptanalysing the Critical Group: Efficiently Solving Biggs's Discrete Logarithm Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryptanalysing the Critical Group: Efficiently Solving Biggs's Discrete Logarithm Problem Simon R Kingdom s.blackburn@rhul.ac.uk November 7, 2008 Abstract Biggs has recently proposed the critical group that the discrete log problem can be efficiently solved in Biggs's groups. Thus this class of groups is not suitable

  17. Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Video Denoising and Simplification Via Discrete Regularization on Graphs Mahmoud Ghoniem, Youssef algorithms for video de- noising and simplification based on discrete regularization on graphs. The main difference between video and image denoising is the temporal redundancy in video sequences. Recent works

  18. ISS-Lyapunov Functions for Discontinuous Discrete-Time Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 ISS-Lyapunov Functions for Discontinuous Discrete-Time Systems Lars Grune and Christopher M. Kellett Abstract Input-to-State Stability (ISS) and the ISS-Lyapunov function have proved to be useful- ous discrete-time dynamics, we investigate ISS-Lyapunov functions for such systems. ISS-Lyapunov

  19. Assessing and Analyzing Near-Surface Radar Snow Accumulation Layers at Summit, Greenland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Overly, Thomas Buckmaster

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    depth are compared to physical properties, age-depth relationships, and accumulation rates from ice cores near Summit. Having established the radar horizons as annual accumulation markers, a 350-year record of accumulation rate is derived and analyzed...

  20. Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical Properties and Defect Recovery. Atomic-Level Computer Simulation of SiC: Defect Accumulation, Mechanical...

  1. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron(III) oxyhydroxides: effects of mineral solubility andMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedthe accumulation of new mineral phases and biomass. Word

  2. A major gene for leaf cadmium accumulation in maize (Zea mays L.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soric, Roberta; Loncaric, Zdenko; Kovacevic, Vlado; Brkic, Ivan; Simic, Domagoj

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    programs to select low Cd accumulators in maize. This can beselection for high Cd (hyper)accumulators in maize can be of

  3. PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected to be dominated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PISCES FY11 Research Highlight Tritium accumulation within the ITER vessel is expected vessel. Another possible technique to mitigate tritium accumulation in these codeposited surfaces

  4. Coulomb stress accumulation along the San Andreas Fault system Bridget Smith and David Sandwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    Coulomb stress accumulation along the San Andreas Fault system Bridget Smith and David Sandwell deformation, SCEC velocities, crustal stress Citation: Smith, B., and D. Sandwell, Coulomb stress accumulation

  5. The microbial methane cycle in subsurface sediments. Final project report, July 1, 1993--August 31, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grossman, E.L.; Ammerman, J.W. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Suflita, J.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Botany and Microbiology

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this study were to determine the factors controlling microbial activity and survival in the subsurface and, specifically, to determine whether microbial communities in aquitards and in aquifer microenvironments provide electron donors and/or acceptors that enhance microbial survival in aquifers. Although the original objectives were to focus on methane cycling, the authors pursued an opportunity to study sulfur cycling in aquifer systems, a process of much greater importance in microbial activity and survival, and in the mobility of metals in the subsurface. Furthermore, sulfur cycling is pertinent to the Subsurface Science Program`s study at Cerro Negro, New Mexico. The study combined field and laboratory approaches and microbiological, molecular, geochemical, and hydrogeological techniques. During drilling operations, sediments were collected aseptically and assayed for a variety of microorganisms and metabolic capabilities including total counts, viable aerobic heterotrophs, total anaerobic heterotrophs, sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) and sulfate reduction activity (in situ and in slurries), methanogens, methanotrophs, and Fe- and S-oxidizers, among others. Geochemical analyses of sediments included organic carbon content and {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C ratio, sulfur chemistry (reduced sulfur, sulfate), {sup 34}S/{sup 32}S, {sup 13}C/{sup 12}C, {sup 14}C, tritium, etc. The authors drilled eight boreholes in the Eocene Yegua formation at four localities on the Texas A&M University campus using a hollow-stem auger drilling rig. The drilling pattern forms a T, with three well clusters along the dip direction and two along strike. Four boreholes were sampled for sediments and screened at the deepest sand interval encountered, and four boreholes were drilled to install wells in shallower sands. Boreholes range in depth from 8 to 31 m, with screened intervals ranging from 6 to 31 m. Below are the results of these field studies.

  6. Synoptic analysis of near surface and subsurface temperatures in the Atlantic Ocean following hurricane BETSY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Landis, Robert Clarence

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressures Sea Surface Temperature Pattern before Hurricane Betsy 26 Sea Surface Temperature Pattern after Hur ricane Betsy 27 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 23 - 29 August 1965 28 Seven-Day Average Sea Surface Temperatures; 8 - 14.... SHIIDEO ARE o IS / / / WATER 79'-80' F 73' 72' 71' BT NO. Ie 28 38 48 58 BETSY FIG, IB. SUBSURFACE THERMAL STRUCTURE BEFORE HURRICANE BETSY ALONG SECTION A. 204 21' 22' NORTH LATITUDE 23' 24' 25' 26 27' 28' 82. 5' 80. 5' 100 I 200 IJI IJI IJ...

  7. Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

  8. REVIEW AND ANALYSIS Research Activities at U.S. Government Agencies in Subsurface Reactive Transport Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    All T. Cygan; Caroline T. Stevens; Robert W. Puls; Steven B. Yabusaki; Robert D; David R. Turner

    Subsurface reactive transport modeling may be defi ned as the use of mathematical models to simulate the fate and transport of dissolved species and particulates in groundwater as these species are transported through porous media and react with each other, with mineral surfaces, and with microbes associated with the porous media matrix. This type of modeling has evolved over the last 30 yr from a specialized research topic involving a dozen or so practitioners (with often large stacks of computer punch cards) to a common offi ce tool found today on the personal computer (and occasional supercomputer) of many environmental chemists, geochemists, and soil scientists. The devel-

  9. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  10. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurTheBrookhaven NationalRegionals » High School Rules,Subsurface Biogeochemical

  11. Accumulation of entanglement in a continuous variable memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Paternostro; M. S. Kim; G. M. Palma

    2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the accumulation of entanglement in a memory device built out of two continuous variable (CV) systems. We address the case of a qubit mediating an indirect joint interaction between the CV systems. We show that, in striking contrast with respect to registers built out of bidimensional Hilbert spaces, entanglement superior to a single ebit can be efficiently accumulated in the memory, even though no entangled resource is used. We study the protocol in an immediately implementable setup, assessing the effects of the main imperfections.

  12. Generalized discrete orbit function transforms of affine Weyl groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasz Czy?ycki; Ji? Hrivnk

    2014-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The affine Weyl groups with their corresponding four types of orbit functions are considered. Two independent admissible shifts, which preserve the symmetries of the weight and the dual weight lattices, are classified. Finite subsets of the shifted weight and the shifted dual weight lattices, which serve as a sampling grid and a set of labels of the orbit functions, respectively, are introduced. The complete sets of discretely orthogonal orbit functions over the sampling grids are found and the corresponding discrete Fourier transforms are formulated. The eight standard one-dimensional discrete cosine and sine transforms form special cases of the presented transforms.

  13. Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumm, C.R.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems.

  14. Information storage capacity of discrete spin systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, Beni, E-mail: rouge@caltech.edu

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the limits imposed on information storage capacity of physical systems is a problem of fundamental and practical importance which bridges physics and information science. There is a well-known upper bound on the amount of information that can be stored reliably in a given volume of discrete spin systems which are supported by gapped local Hamiltonians. However, all the previously known systems were far below this theoretical bound, and it remained open whether there exists a gapped spin system that saturates this bound. Here, we present a construction of spin systems which saturate this theoretical limit asymptotically by borrowing an idea from fractal properties arising in the Sierpinski triangle. Our construction provides not only the best classical error-correcting code which is physically realizable as the energy ground space of gapped frustration-free Hamiltonians, but also a new research avenue for correlated spin phases with fractal spin configurations. -- Highlights: We propose a spin model with fractal ground states and study its coding properties. We show that the model asymptotically saturates a theoretical limit on information storage capacity. We discuss its relations to various theoretical physics problems.

  15. In situ mapping of radionuclides in subsurface and surface soils: 1994 Summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Knopf, M.A.; Abel, K.H.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium production and support facilities at several DOE sites occasionally caused local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the US Department of Energy, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of target contaminants must be characterized. Traditional means of measuring radionuclide activities in soil are cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often do not accurately reflect conditions over very large areas. New technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow cheaper, faster, and safer characterization of radionuclides in soils at these sites. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked with adapting, developing, and demonstrating technologies to measure uranium in surface and subsurface soils. In partial completion of this effort, PNL developed an improved in situ gamma-ray spectrometry system to satisfy the technical requirements. This document summarizes fiscal-year 1994 efforts at PNL to fulfill requirements for TTP {number_sign}321103 (project {number_sign}19307). These requirements included (a) developing a user-friendly software package for reducing field-acquired gamma-ray spectra, (b) constructing an improved data-acquisition hardware system for use with high-purity germanium detectors, (c) ensuring readiness to conduct field mapping exercises as specified by the sponsor, (d) evaluating the in situ gamma-ray spectrometer for the determination of uranium depth distribution, and (e) documenting these efforts.

  16. Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

  17. Intermediate-Scale Laboratory Experiments of Subsurface Flow and Transport Resulting from Tank Leaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington River Protection Solutions contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to conduct laboratory experiments and supporting numerical simulations to improve the understanding of water flow and contaminant transport in the subsurface between waste tanks and ancillary facilities at Waste Management Area C. The work scope included two separate sets of experiments: Small flow cell experiments to investigate the occurrence of potential unstable fingering resulting from leaks and the limitations of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator to predict flow patterns and solute transport behavior under these conditions. Unstable infiltration may, under certain conditions, create vertically elongated fingers potentially transporting contaminants rapidly through the unsaturated zone to groundwater. The types of leak that may create deeply penetrating fingers include slow release, long duration leaks in relatively permeable porous media. Such leaks may have occurred below waste tanks at the Hanford Site. Large flow experiments to investigate the behavior of two types of tank leaks in a simple layered system mimicking the Waste Management Area C. The investigated leaks include a relatively large leak with a short duration from a tank and a long duration leak with a relatively small leakage rate from a cascade line.

  18. An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Wheeler, Mary F. [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)] [Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM), Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia) [Dept. of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia); Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Computational Sciences, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) as a general method for parameter estimation based on stochastic estimation of gradients using an ensemble of directional derivatives. ISEM eliminates the need for adjoint coding and deals with the numerical simulator as a blackbox. The proposed method employs directional derivatives within a GaussNewton iteration. The update equation in ISEM resembles the update step in ensemble Kalman filter, however the inverse of the output covariance matrix in ISEM is regularized using standard truncated singular value decomposition or Tikhonov regularization. We also investigate the performance of a set of shrinkage based covariance estimators within ISEM. The proposed method is successfully applied on several nonlinear parameter estimation problems for subsurface flow models. The efficiency of the proposed algorithm is demonstrated by the small size of utilized ensembles and in terms of error convergence rates.

  19. Regionalization of subsurface stormflow parameters of hydrologic models: Derivation from regional analysis of streamflow recession curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ye, Sheng; Li, Hongyi; Huang, Maoyi; Ali, Melkamu; Leng, Guoyong; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Wang, Shaowen; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsurface stormflow is an important component of the rainfallrunoff response, especially in steep terrain. Its contribution to total runoff is, however, poorly represented in the current generation of land surface models. The lack of physical basis of these common parameterizations precludes a priori estimation of the stormflow (i.e. without calibration), which is a major drawback for prediction in ungauged basins, or for use in global land surface models. This paper is aimed at deriving regionalized parameterizations of the storagedischarge relationship relating to subsurface stormflow from a topdown empirical data analysis of streamflow recession curves extracted from 50 eastern United States catchments. Detailed regression analyses were performed between parameters of the empirical storagedischarge relationships and the controlling climate, soil and topographic characteristics. The regression analyses performed on empirical recession curves at catchment scale indicated that the coefficient of the power-law form storagedischarge relationship is closely related to the catchment hydrologic characteristics, which is consistent with the hydraulic theory derived mainly at the hillslope scale. As for the exponent, besides the role of field scale soil hydraulic properties as suggested by hydraulic theory, it is found to be more strongly affected by climate (aridity) at the catchment scale. At a fundamental level these results point to the need for more detailed exploration of the co-dependence of soil, vegetation and topography with climate.

  20. Polymer/Silicate composites New Materials for Subsurface Permeable Reactive Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason K. Harrup; Michael G. Jones; Linda Polson; Byron White

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations were performed into the suitability of novel nanocomposites to serve as materials for subsurface permeable reactive barriers (PRBs). These new materials are Type I nanocomposites they are preformed organic polymers embedded in an inorganic matrix without significant covalent bonding between the components. The required properties for these materials to function efficiently are: 1) a tunable water passing rate to approximate the hydraulic conductivity of the subsurface environment where the PRB will be placed, 2) sufficient mechanical strength (both wet and dry) to maintain barrier integrity, 3) the ability to incorporate selective metal sequestration agents so that they remain active yet do not leach from the barrier, and 4) to be deployable through direct injection methods such that trenching is not needed. Additionally, there is a need to keep the technology as low cost as possible, while remaining reliable. Results recently obtained in our laboratory show that our materials, remarkably, exhibit all of these properties and show great promise as vadose zone deployable PRBs.

  1. An Electrode-based approach for monitoring in situ microbial activity during subsurface bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, K.H.; Nevin, K.P.; Franks, A.; Englert, A.; Long, P.E.; Lovley, D.R.

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Current production by microorganisms colonizing subsurface electrodes and its relationship to substrate availability and microbial activity was evaluated in an aquifer undergoing bioremediation. Borehole graphite anodes were installed downgradient from a region of acetate injection designed to stimulate bioreduction of U(VI); cathodes consisted of graphite electrodes embedded at the ground surface. Significant increases in current density ({<=}50 mA/m{sup 2}) tracked delivery of acetate to the electrodes, dropping rapidly when acetate inputs were discontinued. An upgradient control electrode not exposed to acetate produced low, steady currents ({<=}0.2 mA/m{sup 2}). Elevated current was strongly correlated with uranium removal but minimal correlation existed with elevated Fe(II). Confocal laser scanning microscopy of electrodes revealed firmly attached biofilms, and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated the electrode surfaces were dominated (67-80%) by Geobacter species. This is the first demonstration that electrodes can produce readily detectable currents despite long-range (6 m) separation of anode and cathode, and these results suggest that oxidation of acetate coupled to electron transfer to electrodes by Geobacter species was the primary source of current. Thus it is expected that current production may serve as an effective proxy for monitoring in situ microbial activity in a variety of subsurface anoxic environments.

  2. Demonstration of close-coupled barriers for subsurface containment of buried waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dwyer, B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate a close-coupled barrier for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and resistant polymer layer. Close-coupled barrier technology is applicable for final, interim, or emergency containment of subsurface waste forms. Consequently, when considering the diversity of technology application, the construction emplacement and material technology maturity, general site operational requirements, and regulatory compliance incentives, the close-coupled barrier system provides an alternative for any hazardous or mixed waste remediation plan. This paper will discuss the installation of a close-coupled barrier and the subsequent integrity verification. The demonstration will take place at a cold site at the Hanford Geotechnical Test Facility, 400 Area, Hanford, Washington.

  3. Chemotactic behavior of deep subsurface bacteria toward carbohydrates, amino acids and a chlorinated alkene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez de Victoria, G. (Puerto Rico Univ., Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico). Dept. of Biology)

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemotactic behavior of deep terrestrial subsurface bacteria toward amino acids, carbohydrates and trichloroethylene was assayed using a modification of the capillary method and bacterial enumeration by acridine orange direct counts. Eleven isolates of bacteria isolated from six different geological formations were investigated. A bimodal response rather than an absolute positive or negative response was observed in most assays. Most of the isolates were positively chemotactic to low concentrations of substrates and were repelled by high concentrations of the same substrate. However, this was not the case for trichloroethylene (TCE) which was mostly an attractant and elicited the highest responses in all the isolates when compared with amino acids and carbohydrates. The movement rates of these isolates in aseptic subsurface sediments in the absence and presence of TCE were also determined using a laboratory model. All of the isolates showed distinct response range, peak, and threshold concentrations when exposed to the same substrates suggesting that they are possibly different species as has been inferred from DNA homology studies. 101 refs., 4 figs., 57 tabs.

  4. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  5. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H{sub 2}O{sub 2} injection as an oxygenation technique.

  6. Evaluation of a subsurface oxygenation technique using colloidal gas aphron injections into packed column reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, R.A.; Coles, P.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bioremediation may be a remedial technology capable of decontaminating subsurface environments. The objective of this research was to evaluate the use of colloidal gas aphron (CGA) injection, which is the injection of micrometer-size air bubbles in an aqueous surfactant solution, as a subsurface oxygenation technique to create optimal growth conditions for aerobic bacteria. Along with this, the capability of CGAs to act as a soil-washing agent and free organic components from a coal tar-contaminated matrix was examined. Injection of CGAs may be useful for remediation of underground coal gasification (UCG) sites. Because of this, bacteria and solid material from a UCG site located in northeastern Wyoming were used in this research. Colloidal gas aphrons were generated and pumped through packed column reactors (PCRS) containing post-burn core materials. For comparison, PCRs containing sand were also studied. Bacteria from this site were tested for their capability to degrade phenol, a major contaminant at the UCG site, and were also used to bioaugment the PCR systems. In this study we examined: (1) the effect of CGA injection on dissolved oxygen concentrations in the PCR effluents, (2) the effect of CGA, H[sub 2]O[sub 2], and phenol injections on bacterial populations, (3) the stability and transport of CGAs over distance, and (4) CGA injection versus H[sub 2]O[sub 2] injection as an oxygenation technique.

  7. On the possibility of cosmic ray-induced ionizing radiation-powered life in subsurface environments in the Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atri, Dimitra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photosynthesis is a highly efficient mechanism developed by terrestrial life to utilize the energy from photons of solar origin for biological use. Subsurface regions are isolated from the photosphere, and consequently are incapable of utilizing this energy. This opens up the opportunity for life to cultivate alternative mechanisms in order to take advantage of other available energy sources. Studies have shown that in subsurface environments, life can use energy generated from geochemical and geothermal processes to sustain a minimal metabolism. Another mechanism is radiolysis, in which particles emitted by radioactive substances are indirectly utilized for metabolism. One such example is the bacterium fueled by radiation, found 2 miles deep in a South African mine, which consumes hydrogen formed from particles emitted by radioactive U, Th and K present in rock. An additional source of radiation in the subsurface environments is secondary particles, such as muons generated by Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs). It ...

  8. Interaction of atomic hydrogen with the {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface and subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'angelo, M.; Enriquez, H.; Rodriguez, N.; Aristov, V. Yu.; Soukiassian, P.; Tejeda, A.; Michel, E. G.; Pedio, M.; Ottaviani, C.; Perfetti, P. [Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex, France and Departement de Physique, Universite de Paris-Sud, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Departamento de Fisica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid, Spain and Laboratoire SIMA, DSM-DRECAM-SPCSI, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, Saclay, Bat. 462, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); ISM-CNR, Via del fosso del cavaliere 100, 00133, Rome (Italy) and Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste, 34012 Basovizza (Italy)

    2007-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate clean and atomic hydrogen exposed {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surfaces by synchrotron radiation-based Si 2p core-level photoemission spectroscopy. The clean 3x2 surface reconstruction exhibits three surface and subsurface components. Upon hydrogen exposures, those surface and subsurface components are shifted to lower binding energies by large values, indicating significant charge transfer to the surface and subsurface regions, in excellent agreement with the recently discovered H-induced {beta}-SiC(100) 3x2 surface metallization. In addition, the interaction of hydrogen results in a large reactive component at Si 2p supporting an asymmetric charge transfer in the third plane below the surface, in agreement with previous experimental investigations. However, the results are inconsistent with recent ab initio theoretical ''frozen'' calculations predicting H atom to be in a bridge-bond position.

  9. The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The problem may arise when the wellhead is at water depth of more than 3500 ft. In deep water drilling, the accumulators should be placed on the subsea blowout preventer stack to reduce hydraulic response times and provide a hydraulic power supply in case...

  10. Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Michael L.

    COMMENTARY Is Net Ecosystem Production Equal to Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation? Gary M. Lovett,* Jonathan J. Cole, and Michael L. Pace Institute of Ecosystem Studies, Millbrook, New York 12545, USA ABSTRACT Net ecosystem production (NEP), defined as the difference between gross primary production

  11. Holocene Carbon Accumulation of Fen Peatlands in Boreal Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Zicheng

    by tephra deposition. Peat accumulation rates vary by more than an or- der of magnitude and decline from 5500 to 1300 cal BP, resulting in a convex depth­age curve, which contrasts with the carbon is a function of the balance be- tween the primary production of living plants and the decomposition of all

  12. BWeb Notes for Chapter 4: Accumulating the Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ford, Andrew

    take the time to perform the accumulation carefully will can arrive at these answers with long delays in the adjustment of the stock variables. Further information on the implications "monthly counters" and "conveyor stocks" to simulate systems with "schooling behavior" in which major

  13. Using Circular Programs to Deforest in Accumulating Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eckmiller, Rolf

    Using Circular Programs to Deforest in Accumulating Parameters Janis Voigtl ? ander # Department classical deforestation techniques fail. In order to avoid multiple traversals of the input data structure, deforestation, intermediate data structures, lazy composition, lazy evalu­ ation, multiple traversals, program

  14. Absorption cross-section 139 Accumulation mode, of aerosol 146

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Daniel J.

    133, 151 residence times 153 size distributions 144 Air composition 2 molecular weight 4, 6 Albedo 122 dioxide Coagulation (aerosol) 146 Column model 32 Conditional unstability 56 Continuity equation 75261 INDEX A Absorption cross-section 139 Accumulation mode, of aerosol 146 Acetaldehyde (CH3CHO

  15. Bias adjustment of radar-based 3-hour precipitation accumulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    projection of KNMI radar images 55 4 #12;Chapter 1 Introduction Since June 2003 a daily gauge is generated at 1400 UTC when the majority of the manual gauge observations have been reported. The radar-gaugeBias adjustment of radar-based 3-hour precipitation accumulations Iwan Holleman Technical Report

  16. Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation Signal machines : localization of isolated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durand-Lose, Jérôme

    Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation Signal machines : localization of isolated accumulation Jérôme Durand-Lose Laboratoire d'Informatique Fondamentale d'Orléans, Université d of isolated accumulation 1 Signal machines and isolated accumulations 2 Necessary conditions

  17. Autophagy induced by Alexander disease-mutant GFAP accumulation is regulated by p38/MAPK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulzer, David

    Autophagy induced by Alexander disease-mutant GFAP accumulation is regulated by p38/MAPK and m protein accumulation as well as astrocyte function. In this study, we found that GFAP accumulation induces is negatively regulated by mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). The activation of p38 MAPK by GFAP accumulation

  18. Behavioural Processes 71 (2006) 2940 Effects of temporal clumping and payoff accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stevens, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Behavioural Processes 71 (2006) 2940 Effects of temporal clumping and payoff accumulation accumulation and temporal clumping on impulsiveness and cooperation. Payoff accumulation refers to a situation where the benefits gained from each choice trial accumulate from one trial to the next, and only become

  19. Temporal Specifications with Accumulative Values UDI BOKER, The Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya, Israel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boker, Udi

    A Temporal Specifications with Accumulative Values UDI BOKER, The Interdisciplinary Center objectives lies the accumulation of values along a computation. It is often the accumulated sum, as with energy objectives, or the accumulated average, as with mean-payoff objectives. We investigate

  20. Routing with Mutual Information Accumulation in Energy-Limited Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uysal-Biyikoglu, Elif

    latency than classical energy accumulation techniques. The focus of this study is energy efficient design

  1. Manipulation of subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? using a scanning tunneling microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stollenwerk, A. J.; Gu, G.; Hurley, N.; Beck, B.; Spurgeon, K.; Kidd, T. E.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence that subsurface carbon nanoparticles in Bi?Sr?CaCu?O8+? can be manipulated with nanometer precision using a scanning tunneling microscope. High resolution images indicate that most of the carbon particles remain subsurface after transport observable as a local increase in height as the particle pushes up on the surface. Tunneling spectra in the vicinity of these protrusions exhibit semiconducting characteristics with a band gap of approximately 1.8 eV, indicating that the incorporation of carbon locally alters the electronic properties near the surface.

  2. Final report - Reduction of mercury in saturated subsurface sediments and its potential to mobilize mercury in its elemental form

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakray, Tamar [Rutgers University

    2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of our project was to investigate Hg(II) reduction in the deep subsurface. We focused on microbial and abiotic pathways of reduction and explored how it affected the toxicity and mobility of Hg in this unique environment. The projects tasks included: 1. Examining the role of mer activities in the reduction of Hg(II) in denitrifying enrichment cultures; 2. Investigating the biotic/abiotic reduction of Hg(II) under iron reducing conditions; 3. Examining Hg(II) redox transformations under anaerobic conditions in subsurface sediments from DOE sites.

  3. Design of discrete-time filters for efficient implementation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Dennis

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cost of implementation of discrete-time filters is often strongly dependent on the number of non-zero filter coefficients or the precision with which the coefficients are represented. This thesis addresses the design ...

  4. Resolution of grain scale interactions using the Discrete Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Scott M. (Scott Matthew), 1978-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granular materials are an integral part of many engineering systems. Currently, a popular tool for numerically investigating granular systems is the Discrete Element Method (DEM). Nearly all implementations of the DEM, ...

  5. Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dershowitz, William S.; Curran, Brendan; Einstein, Herbert; LaPointe, Paul; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate

    2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The report presents summaries of technology development for discrete feature modeling in support of the improved oil recovery (IOR) for heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, the report describes the demonstration of these technologies at project study sites.

  6. Optimization With Parity Constraints: From Binary Codes to Discrete Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    Optimization With Parity Constraints: From Binary Codes to Discrete Integration Stefano Ermon guarantees on the quality of the solution found. Markov Chain Monte Carlo [17, 21, 32] and Importance

  7. Embed and Project: Discrete Sampling with Universal Hashing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bejerano, Gill

    Embed and Project: Discrete Sampling with Universal Hashing Stefano Ermon, Carla P. Gomes Dept Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods. MCMC techniques are a specialized form of local search that only

  8. Analysis of steel silo structures on discrete supports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hongyu

    The objective of this thesis is to broaden current knowledge of the strength and buckling/collapse of shells, with special reference to steel silo structures on discrete supports, and thus to provide design guidance of ...

  9. Direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; J. Vollmer; S. Herminghaus; M. Brinkmann

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel computational method for direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials. The method is well-suited for the measurement of jamming phase diagram of a wide range of discrete particle systems such as granular materials, foams, and colloids. We further successfully apply the method to evaluate the jamming phase diagram of wet granular material in order to demonstrates the applicability of the model.

  10. Isolation of Discrete Nanoparticle-DNA Conjugates for Plasmonic Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alivisatos, Paul; Claridge, Shelley A.; Liang, Huiyang W.; Basu, Sourav Roger; Frechet, Jean M.J.; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2008-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Discrete DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates with DNA lengths as short as 15 bases for both 5 nm and 20 nm gold particles have been purified by anion-exchange HPLC. Conjugates comprising short DNA (<40 bases) and large gold particles (>_ 20 nm) are difficult to purify by other means, and are potential substrates for plasmon coupling experiments. Conjugate purity is demonstrated by hybridizing complementary conjugates to form discrete structures, which are visualized by TEM.

  11. Discrete Symmetry and Stability in Hamiltonian Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tassos Bountis; George Chechin; Vladimir Sakhnenko

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this tutorial we address the existence and stability of periodic and quasiperiodic orbits in N degree of freedom Hamiltonian systems and their connection with discrete symmetries. Of primary importance in our study are the nonlinear normal modes (NNMs), i.e periodic solutions which represent continuations of the system's linear normal modes in the nonlinear regime. We examine the existence of such solutions and discuss different methods for constructing them and studying their stability under fixed and periodic boundary conditions. In the periodic case, we employ group theoretical concepts to identify a special type of NNMs called one-dimensional "bushes". We describe how to use linear combinations such NNMs to construct s(>1)-dimensional bushes of quasiperiodic orbits, for a wide variety of Hamiltonian systems and exploit the symmetries of the linearized equations to simplify the study of their destabilization. Applying this theory to the Fermi Pasta Ulam (FPU) chain, we review a number of interesting results, which have appeared in the recent literature. We then turn to an analytical and numerical construction of quasiperiodic orbits, which does not depend on the symmetries or boundary conditions. We demonstrate that the well-known "paradox" of FPU recurrences may be explained in terms of the exponential localization of the energies Eq of NNM's excited at the low part of the frequency spectrum, i.e. q=1,2,3,.... Thus, we show that the stability of these low-dimensional manifolds called q-tori is related to the persistence or FPU recurrences at low energies. Finally, we discuss a novel approach to the stability of orbits of conservative systems, the GALIk, k=2,...,2N, by means of which one can determine accurately and efficiently the destabilization of q-tori, leading to the breakdown of recurrences and the equipartition of energy, at high values of the total energy E.

  12. Harmonic pinnacles in the Discrete Gaussian model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eyal Lubetzky; Fabio Martinelli; Allan Sly

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2D Discrete Gaussian model gives each height function $\\eta : \\mathbb{Z}^2\\to\\mathbb{Z}$ a probability proportional to $\\exp(-\\beta \\mathcal{H}(\\eta))$, where $\\beta$ is the inverse-temperature and $\\mathcal{H}(\\eta) = \\sum_{x\\sim y}(\\eta_x-\\eta_y)^2$ sums over nearest-neighbor bonds. We consider the model at large fixed $\\beta$, where it is flat unlike its continuous analog (the Gaussian Free Field). We first establish that the maximum height in an $L\\times L$ box with 0 boundary conditions concentrates on two integers $M,M+1$ with $M\\sim \\sqrt{(1/2\\pi\\beta)\\log L\\log\\log L}$. The key is a large deviation estimate for the height at the origin in $\\mathbb{Z}^2$, dominated by "harmonic pinnacles", integer approximations of a harmonic variational problem. Second, in this model conditioned on $\\eta\\geq 0$ (a floor), the average height rises, and in fact the height of almost all sites concentrates on levels $H,H+1$ where $H\\sim M/\\sqrt{2}$. This in particular pins down the asymptotics, and corrects the order, in results of Bricmont, El-Mellouki and Fr\\"ohlich (1986), where it was argued that the maximum and the height of the surface above a floor are both of order $\\sqrt{\\log L}$. Finally, our methods extend to other classical surface models (e.g., restricted SOS), featuring connections to $p$-harmonic analysis and alternating sign matrices.

  13. Infrared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; Anita K. Gianotto; Michael E. McIlwain; Michael J. Van Stipdonk; Michael Kullman; Travis J. Cooper; David T. Moore; Nick Polfer; Jos Oomens; Ivan Infante; Lucas Visscher; Bertrand Siboulet; Wibe A. de Jong

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments, FELIX, was used to study the wavelength-resolved multiphoton dissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO22+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The apparent uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide or acetate, S was water, ammonia, acetone or acetonitrile, and n = 0-2. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations using B3LYP predicted values that were 30 40 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis set and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which resulted only very modest changes to the uranyl frequency, and did not universally shift values lower. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  14. Infared Spectroscopy of Discrete Uranyl Anion Complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenewold, G. S.; Gianotto, Anita K.; McIIwain, Michael E.; Van Stipdonk, Michael J.; Kullman, Michael; Moore, David T.; Polfer, Nick; Oomens, Jos; Infante, Ivan A.; Visscher, Lucas; Siboulet, Bertrand; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2008-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Free-Electron Laser for Infrared Experiments (FELIX) w 1 as used to study the wavelength-resolved multiple photon photodissociation of discrete, gas phase uranyl (UO2 2 2+) complexes containing a single anionic ligand (A), with or without ligated solvent molecules (S). The uranyl antisymmetric and symmetric stretching frequencies were measured for complexes with general formula [UO2A(S)n]+, where A was either hydroxide, methoxide, or acetate; S was water, ammonia, acetone, or acetonitrile; and n = 0-3. The values for the antisymmetric stretching frequency for uranyl ligated with only an anion ([UO2A]+) were as low or lower than measurements for [UO2]2+ ligated with as many as five strong neutral donor ligands, and are comparable to solution phase values. This result was surprising because initial DFT calculations predicted values that were 3040 cm-1 higher, consistent with intuition but not with the data. Modification of the basis sets and use of alternative functionals improved computational accuracy for the methoxide and acetate complexes, but calculated values for the hydroxide were greater than the measurement regardless of the computational method used. Attachment of a neutral donor ligand S to [UO2A]+ produced [UO2AS]+, which produced only very modest changes to the uranyl antisymmetric stretch frequency, and did not universally shift the frequency to lower values. DFT calculations for [UO2AS]+ were in accord with trends in the data, and showed that attachment of the solvent was accommodated by weakening of the U-anion bond as well as the uranyl. When uranyl frequencies were compared for [UO2AS]+ species having different solvent neutrals, values decreased with increasing neutral nucleophilicity.

  15. On Discrete Symmetries and Torsion Homology in F-Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph Mayrhofer; Eran Palti; Oskar Till; Timo Weigand

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between discrete gauge symmetries in F-theory compactifications and torsion homology on the associated Calabi-Yau manifold. Focusing on the simplest example of a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry, we show that there are two physically distinct ways that such a discrete gauge symmetry can arise. First, compactifications of M-Theory on Calabi-Yau threefolds which support a genus-one fibration with a bi-section are known to be dual to six-dimensional F-theory vacua with a $\\mathbb Z_2$ gauge symmetry. We show that the resulting five-dimensional theories do not have a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry but that the latter emerges only in the F-theory decompactification limit. Accordingly the genus-one fibred Calabi-Yau manifolds do not exhibit discrete torsion. Associated to the bi-section fibration is a Jacobian fibration which does support a section. Compactifying on these related but distinct varieties does lead to a $\\mathbb Z_2$ symmetry in five dimensions and, accordingly, we find explicitly an associated discrete torsion. We identify the expected particle and membrane system of the discrete symmetry in terms of wrapped M2 and M5 branes and present a field-theory description of the physics for both cases in terms of circle reductions of six-dimensional theories. Our results and methods generalise straightforwardly to larger discrete symmetries and to four-dimensional compactifications.

  16. AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANN, F.M.

    2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

  17. In situ, subsurface monitoring of vapor-phase TCE using fiber optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossabi, J. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Colston, B. Jr.; Brown, S.; Milanovich, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Lee, L.T. Jr. [Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS (United States). Geotechnical Lab.

    1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A vapor-phase, reagent-based, fiber optic trichloroethylene (TCE) sensor developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was demonstrated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in two configurations. The first incorporated the sensor into a down-well instrument bounded by two inflatable packers capable of sealing an area for discrete depth analysis. The second involved an integration of the sensor into the probe tip of the Army Corps of Engineers Waterways Experiment Station (WES) cone penetrometry system. Discrete depth measurements of vapor-phase concentrations of TCE in the vadose zone were successfully made using both configurations. These measurements demonstrate the first successful in situ sensing (as opposed to sampling) of TCE at a field site.

  18. Rates and products of degradation for MTBE and other oxygenate fuel additives in the subsurface environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tratnyek, P.G.; Church, C.D.; Pankow, J.F. [Oregon Graduate Inst., Portland, OR (United States). Dept. of Environmental Science and Engineering

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent realization that oxygenated fuel additives such as MTBE are becoming widely distributed groundwater contaminants has created a sudden and pressing demand for data on the processes that control their environmental fate. Explaining and predicting the subsequent environmental fate of these compounds is going to require extrapolations over long time frames that will be very sensitive to the quality of input data on each compound. To provide such data, they have initiated a systematic study of the pathways and kinetics of fuel oxygenate degradation under subsurface conditions. Batch experiments in simplified model systems are being performed to isolate specific processes that may contribute to MTBE degradation. A variety of degradation pathways can be envisioned that lead to t-butyl alcohol (TBA) as the primary or secondary product. However, experiments to date with a facultative iron reducing bacteria showed no evidence for TBA formation. Continuing experiments include mixed cultures from a range of aquifer materials representative of NAWQA study sites.

  19. Innovative technology for expedited site remediation of extensive surface and subsurface contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Audibert, J.M.E.; Lew, L.R.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Large scale surface and subsurface contamination resulted from numerous releases of feed stock, process streams, waste streams, and final product at a major chemical plant. Soil and groundwater was contaminated by numerous compounds including lead, tetraethyl lead, ethylene dibromide, ethylene dichloride, and toluene. The state administrative order dictated that the site be investigated fully, that remedial alternative be evaluated, and that the site be remediated within a year period. Because of the acute toxicity and extreme volatility of tetraethyl lead and other organic compounds present at the site and the short time frame ordered by the regulators, innovative approaches were needed to carry out the remediation while protecting plant workers, remediation workers, and the public.

  20. Hybrid nested sampling algorithm for Bayesian model selection applied to inverse subsurface flow problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elsheikh, Ahmed H., E-mail: aelsheikh@ices.utexas.edu [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Institute of Petroleum Engineering, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Wheeler, Mary F. [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States)] [Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences (ICES), University of Texas at Austin, TX (United States); Hoteit, Ibrahim [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)] [Department of Earth Sciences and Engineering, King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), Thuwal (Saudi Arabia)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Hybrid Nested Sampling (HNS) algorithm is proposed for efficient Bayesian model calibration and prior model selection. The proposed algorithm combines, Nested Sampling (NS) algorithm, Hybrid Monte Carlo (HMC) sampling and gradient estimation using Stochastic Ensemble Method (SEM). NS is an efficient sampling algorithm that can be used for Bayesian calibration and estimating the Bayesian evidence for prior model selection. Nested sampling has the advantage of computational feasibility. Within the nested sampling algorithm, a constrained sampling step is performed. For this step, we utilize HMC to reduce the correlation between successive sampled states. HMC relies on the gradient of the logarithm of the posterior distribution, which we estimate using a stochastic ensemble method based on an ensemble of directional derivatives. SEM only requires forward model runs and the simulator is then used as a black box and no adjoint code is needed. The developed HNS algorithm is successfully applied for Bayesian calibration and prior model selection of several nonlinear subsurface flow problems.

  1. Enhancing technology acceptance: The role of the subsurface contaminants focus area external integration team

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirwan-Taylor, H.; McCabe, G.H. [Battelle Seattle Research Center, WA (United States); Lesperance, A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kauffman, J.; Serie, P.; Dressen, L. [EnvironIssues (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US DOE is developing and deploying innovative technologies for cleaning up its contaminated facilities using a market-oriented approach. This report describes the activities of the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area`s (SCFA) External Integration Team (EIT) in supporting DOE`s technology development program. The SCFA program for technology development is market-oriented, driven by the needs of end users. The purpose of EIT is to understand the technology needs of the DOE sites and identify technology acceptance criteria from users and other stakeholders to enhance deployment of innovative technologies. Stakeholders include regulators, technology users, Native Americans, and environmental and other interest groups. The success of this national program requires close coordination and communication among technology developers and stakeholders to work through all of the various phases of planning and implementation. Staff involved must be willing to commit significant amounts of time to extended discussions with the various stakeholders.

  2. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The loggers fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  3. Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, Don T.; Erickson, Eugene E.; Casper, William L.; Everett, David M.

    2004-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Visual probes and methods for placing visual probes into subsurface areas in either contaminated or non-contaminated sites are described. In one implementation, the method includes driving at least a portion of a visual probe into the ground using direct push, sonic drilling, or a combination of direct push and sonic drilling. Such is accomplished without providing an open pathway for contaminants or fugitive gases to reach the surface. According to one implementation, the invention includes an entry segment configured for insertion into the ground or through difficult materials (e.g., concrete, steel, asphalt, metals, or items associated with waste), at least one extension segment configured to selectively couple with the entry segment, at least one push rod, and a pressure cap. Additional implementations are contemplated.

  4. Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

    2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

  5. DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

    2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I were to validate the SCS construction equipment and process, evaluate the system performance, validate the barrier constructability, and assess the barrier effectiveness. The objectives for Phase 11, which is a full-scale demonstration at a DOE site, are to perform an extensive characterization of the test site, to demonstrate the equipment and the installation process under site-specific performance and regulatory requirements, to validate the operational performance of the equipment, and to perform long-term verification of the barrier using monitoring wells. To date, significant progress has been made to establish the technical and economical feasibility of the SCS. This report describes the SCS conventional and specialized equipment, barrier materials, and construction process. It presents results of the specialized equipment Factory Test, the SCS Control Test and the SCS Advance Control Test at the RAHCO facility. Provided herein are the system performance capabilities and an estimated construction cost and schedule for a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 29-ft-deep containment barrier at the DOE Oak Ridge Bear Creek Burial Grounds are also provided.

  6. A Passive Probe for Subsurface Oceans and Liquid Water in Jupiter's Icy Moons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero-Wolf, Andrew; Maiwald, Frank; Heggy, Essam; Ries, Paul; Liewer, Kurt

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an interferometric reflectometer method for passive detection of subsurface oceans and liquid water in Jovian icy moons using Jupiter's decametric radio emission (DAM). The DAM flux density exceeds 3,000 times the galactic background in the neighborhood of the Jovian icy moons, providing a signal that could be used for passive radio sounding. An instrument located between the icy moon and Jupiter could sample the DAM emission along with its echoes reflected in the ice layer of the target moon. Cross-correlating the direct emission with the echoes would provide a measurement of the ice shell thickness along with its dielectric properties. The interferometric reflectometer provides a simple solution to sub-Jovian radio sounding of ice shells that is complementary to ice penetrating radar measurements better suited to measurements in the anti-Jovian hemisphere that shadows Jupiter's strong decametric emission. The passive nature of this technique also serves as risk reduction in case of radar transmi...

  7. Water ice permafrost on Mars: Layering structure and subsurface distribution according to HEND/Odyssey and MOLA/MGS data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuber, Maria

    . The first dataset measures the content of hydrogen (in the form of water or hydroxyl) in the soil previously analyzed neutron and gamma-ray data that subsurface water ice is present within this region of heavy water nuclei, D, and 2.2-MeV gamma-ray photons. Measurements of neutrons and 2.2-MeV gamma-rays

  8. Hanford tanks initiative work plan -- subsurface characterization to support the closure-readiness demonstration for tank 241-AX-104

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, D.B.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a plan for subsurface investigation near 241-AX-104 Single-Shell tank. Objectives of the investigation are soil sampling and analyses (physical and chemical), local stratigraphic correlation, groundwater background characterization, and geophysical surveys. The primary purpose of the investigation is to supply physical and hydraulic properties for numerical modeling of vadose zone flow and transport.

  9. Increasing subsurface water storage in discontinuous permafrost areas of the Lena River basin, Eurasia, detected from GRACE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Tong, J.; Zhang, T.; Kimball, J. S

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    or no change in ground water storage. Therefore, we con-ground- water table from 2002 through 2010 would be required to account for the subsurface water storageground water level over the same period repre- sents 1.9 cm of potential additional soil water storage

  10. A Many-Task Parallel Approach for Multiscale Simulations of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Yang, Xiaofan; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Agarwal, Khushbu; Chase, Jared M.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuum-scale models have long been used to study subsurface flow, transport, and reactions but lack the ability to resolve processes that are governed by pore-scale mixing. Recently, pore-scale models, which explicitly resolve individual pores and soil grains, have been developed to more accurately model pore-scale phenomena, particularly reaction processes that are controlled by local mixing. However, pore-scale models are prohibitively expensive for modeling application-scale domains. This motivates the use of a hybrid multiscale approach in which continuum- and pore-scale codes are coupled either hierarchically or concurrently within an overall simulation domain (time and space). This approach is naturally suited to an adaptive, loosely-coupled many-task methodology with three potential levels of concurrency. Each individual code (pore- and continuum-scale) can be implemented in parallel; multiple semi-independent instances of the pore-scale code are required at each time step providing a second level of concurrency; and Monte Carlo simulations of the overall system to represent uncertainty in material property distributions provide a third level of concurrency. We have developed a hybrid multiscale model of a mixing-controlled reaction in a porous medium wherein the reaction occurs only over a limited portion of the domain. Loose, minimally-invasive coupling of pre-existing parallel continuum- and pore-scale codes has been accomplished by an adaptive script-based workflow implemented in the Swift workflow system. We describe here the methods used to create the model system, adaptively control multiple coupled instances of pore- and continuum-scale simulations, and maximize the scalability of the overall system. We present results of numerical experiments conducted on NERSC supercomputing systems; our results demonstrate that loose many-task coupling provides a scalable solution for multiscale subsurface simulations with minimal overhead.

  11. Ordovician platform, slope, and basin facies in subsurface of southern North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alberstadt, L.P.; Colvin, G.; Sauve, J.

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordovician carbonates of the Nashville dome and Ozark dome regions have long been considered typical shelf deposits. In the subsurface to the south, in the Black Warrior basin, Mississippi Embayment, and Arkoma basin, these shelf carbonate units changed facies. The most significant change is the occurrence of a thick limestone unit characterized by a faunal and floral assemblage of Nuia, Girvanella (isolated long strands), Sphaerocodium, a delicate stacked-chambered organism (.algal), and sponge spicules and sponge mudstone clumps. In ascending order, the complete Ordovician sequence consists of: a lower dolostone, the Nuia-sponge limestone, a dolostone, and a limestone. The upper part of this four-fold sequence changes character westward into the Arkoma basin. The lower two units maintain their character for long distances along depositional strike and occur in parts of the Appalachians as far north as Newfoundland, and on the opposite side of the continent in Nevada. The Nuia-sponge assemblage is a distinctive petrographic marker and seems to be a persistent Ordovician rock and fossil assemblage of widespread occurrence. In Nevada, it occurs on the surface where it is associated with slump and slide features that suggest that it is an outer shelf or upper slope deposit. Coeval carbonates in the Ouachita Mountains are different and show indications of being deep water (basinal). Biostratigraphic evidence indicates that the succession in the subsurface is continuous; the regional Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician unconformity is absent. The Lower Ordovician-Middle Ordovician boundary falls near the top of the Nuia-sponge mudstone unit and not at the top of the underlying thick dolostone unit.

  12. Does aspartic acid racemization constrain the depth limit of the subsurface biosphere?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Onstott, T. C. [Princeton University] [Princeton University; Aubrey, A.D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Kieft, T L [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology] [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology; Silver, B J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Phelps, Tommy Joe [ORNL] [ORNL; Van Heerden, E. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Opperman, D. J. [University of the Free State] [University of the Free State; Bada, J L. [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,] [Geosciences Research Division, Scripps Instition of Oceanography, Univesity of California San Diego,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies of the subsurface biosphere have deduced average cellular doubling times of hundreds to thousands of years based upon geochemical models. We have directly constrained the in situ average cellular protein turnover or doubling times for metabolically active micro-organisms based on cellular amino acid abundances, D/L values of cellular aspartic acid, and the in vivo aspartic acid racemization rate. Application of this method to planktonic microbial communities collected from deep fractures in South Africa yielded maximum cellular amino acid turnover times of ~89 years for 1 km depth and 27 C and 1 2 years for 3 km depth and 54 C. The latter turnover times are much shorter than previously estimated cellular turnover times based upon geochemical arguments. The aspartic acid racemization rate at higher temperatures yields cellular protein doubling times that are consistent with the survival times of hyperthermophilic strains and predicts that at temperatures of 85 C, cells must replace proteins every couple of days to maintain enzymatic activity. Such a high maintenance requirement may be the principal limit on the abundance of living micro-organisms in the deep, hot subsurface biosphere, as well as a potential limit on their activity. The measurement of the D/L of aspartic acid in biological samples is a potentially powerful tool for deep, fractured continental and oceanic crustal settings where geochemical models of carbon turnover times are poorly constrained. Experimental observations on the racemization rates of aspartic acid in living thermophiles and hyperthermophiles could test this hypothesis. The development of corrections for cell wall peptides and spores will be required, however, to improve the accuracy of these estimates for environmental samples.

  13. Directly observing entropy accumulate on the horizon and holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ariel Edery; Hugues Beauchesne

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent numerical simulations of gravitational collapse show that there exists a special foliation of the spacetime where matter and entropy accumulate directly on the inside of the horizon surface. In this foliation, the time coincides with the proper time of the asymptotic static observer (ASO) and for spherical symmetry, this corresponds to isotropic coordinates. In this gauge, the three-volume in the interior shrinks to zero and only the horizon area remains at the end of collapse. In a different foliation, matter and entropy accumulate in the volume. The entropy is however independent of the foliation. Black hole holography is therefore a mapping from an arbitrary foliation, where information resides in the volume, to the special ASO frame, where it resides directly on the horizon surface.

  14. Surface accumulation of spermatozoa: a fluid dynamic phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Smith; John R. Blake

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent mathematical fluid dynamics models have shed light into an outstanding problem in reproductive biology: why do spermatozoa cells show a 'preference' for swimming near to surfaces? In this paper we review quantitative approaches to the problem, originating with the classic paper of Lord Rothschild in 1963. A recent 'boundary integral/slender body theory' mathematical model for the fluid dynamics is described, and we discuss how it gives insight into the mechanisms that may be responsible for the surface accumulation behaviour. We use the simulation model to explore these mechanisms in more detail, and discuss whether simplified models can capture the behaviour of sperm cells. The far-field decay of the fluid flow around the cell is calculated, and compared with a stresslet model. Finally we present some new findings showing how, despite having a relatively small hydrodynamic drag, the sperm cell 'head' has very significant effects on surface accumulation and trajectory.

  15. Accumulating Particles at the Boundaries of a Laminar Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Schindler; Peter Talkner; Marcin Kostur; Peter Hanggi

    2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The accumulation of small particles is analyzed in stationary flows through channels of variable width at small Reynolds number. The combined influence of pressure, viscous drag and thermal fluctuations is described by means of a Fokker-Planck equation for the particle density. It is shown that in the limit of vanishing particle size a uniform particle distribution is always approached in the long time limit. For extended spherical particles, conditions are specified that lead to inhomogeneous densities and consequently to particle accumulation and depletion. Hereby the boundary conditions for the particle density play a decisive role: The centers of spherical particles must keep the minimal distance of their radius from the fluid boundaries. The normal components of the forces acting on the sphere then may assume finite values which are diffusively transported into the bulk of the fluid.

  16. Probabilistic growth of large entangled states with low error accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuichiro Matsuzaki; Simon C Benjamin; Joseph Fitzsimons

    2009-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The creation of complex entangled states, resources that enable quantum computation, can be achieved via simple 'probabilistic' operations which are individually likely to fail. However, typical proposals exploiting this idea carry a severe overhead in terms of the accumulation of errors. Here we describe an method that can rapidly generate large entangled states with an error accumulation that depends only logarithmically on the failure probability. We find that the approach may be practical for success rates in the sub-10% range, while ultimately becoming unfeasible at lower rates. The assumptions that we make, including parallelism and high connectivity, are appropriate for real systems including measurement-induced entanglement. This result therefore shows the feasibility for real devices based on such an approach.

  17. Deviations from Berry--Robnik Distribution Caused by Spectral Accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Makino; S. Tasaki

    2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By extending the Berry--Robnik approach for the nearly integrable quantum systems,\\cite{[1]} we propose one possible scenario of the energy level spacing distribution that deviates from the Berry--Robnik distribution. The result described in this paper implies that deviations from the Berry--Robnik distribution would arise when energy level components show strong accumulation, and otherwise, the level spacing distribution agrees with the Berry--Robnik distribution.

  18. A matrix damage accumulation model for laminated composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, David Chi Shing

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . , Texas A8-M University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr. D. H. Allen Dr. C. E. Harris A damage evolutionary relationship was developed to model the accuntulation of' intraply matrix cracks in laminated composites. This relationship was formulated... (Member) 'le=-~8 ~ W. E. Haisler (Head of Department) C. E. Harris & (Co-Clrair of Committee) / g. C. La, ' M. . Lu (Member) Itfay 1990 ABSTRACT A Matrix Damage Accumulation Model for Laminated Composites . (May 1990) David Chi Shing Lo, B, S...

  19. TABLE 3.-Comparison of this work with literature values for the concentration of PCB's and DDT residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    residues in surface films and subsurface waters. All values in nanograms per liter, and are the sum of filtrate and filter from Table 2 where applicable. PCB's DDT residues Subsurface Subsurface Reference Location Surface films waters Surface films waters Seba and Corcoran Biscayne Bay NO' NO 185-13,710

  20. Analysis of Hanle-effect signals observed in Si-channel spin accumulation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamura, Yota, E-mail: takamura@spin.pe.titech.ac.jp [Imaging Science and Engineering Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan); Department of Physical Electronics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8552 (Japan); Akushichi, Taiju; Sadano, Adiyudha; Okishio, Takao; Shuto, Yusuke; Sugahara, Satoshi, E-mail: sugahara@isl.titech.ac.jp [Imaging Science and Engineering Laboratory, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta-cho, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8503 (Japan)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamined curve-fitting analysis for spin-accumulation signals observed in Si-channel spin-accumulation devices, employing widely-used Lorentz functions and a new formula developed from the spin diffusion equation. A Si-channel spin-accumulation device with a high quality ferromagnetic spin injector was fabricated, and its observed spin-accumulation signals were verified. Experimentally obtained Hanle-effect signals for spin accumulation were not able to be fitted by a single Lorentz function and were reproduced by the newly developed formula. Our developed formula can represent spin-accumulation signals and thus analyze Hanle-effect signals.

  1. Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Annual report, March 7, 1996--February 28, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dershowitz, W.S.; La Pointe, P.R.; Einstein, H.H.; Ivanova, V.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes progress on the project, {open_quotes}Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies{close_quotes} during the period March 7, 1996 to February 28, 1997. The report presents summaries of technology development for the following research areas: (1) development of hierarchical fracture models, (2) fractured reservoir compartmentalization and tributary volume, (3) fractured reservoir data analysis, and (4) integration of fractured reservoir data and production technologies. In addition, the report provides information on project status, publications submitted, data collection activities, and technology transfer through the world wide web (WWW). Research on hierarchical fracture models included geological, mathematical, and computer code development. The project built a foundation of quantitative, geological and geometrical information about the regional geology of the Permian Basin, including detailed information on the lithology, stratigraphy, and fracturing of Permian rocks in the project study area (Tracts 17 and 49 in the Yates field). Based on the accumulated knowledge of regional and local geology, project team members started the interpretation of fracture genesis mechanisms and the conceptual modeling of the fracture system in the study area. Research on fractured reservoir compartmentalization included basic research, technology development, and application of compartmentalized reservoir analyses for the project study site. Procedures were developed to analyze compartmentalization, tributary drainage volume, and reservoir matrix block size. These algorithms were implemented as a Windows 95 compartmentalization code, FraCluster.

  2. Discrete KP equation with self-consistent sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Doliwa; Runliang Lin

    2014-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the discrete Kadomtsev-Petviashvili (KP) equation with sources obtained recently by the "source generalization" method can be incorporated into the squared eigenfunction symmetry extension procedure. Moreover, using the known correspondence between Darboux-type transformations and additional independent variables, we demonstrate that the equation with sources can be derived from Hirota's discrete KP equations but in a space of higher dimension. In this way we uncover the origin of the source terms as coming from multidimensional consistency of the Hirota system itself.

  3. Methodology for characterizing modeling and discretization uncertainties in computational simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ALVIN,KENNETH F.; OBERKAMPF,WILLIAM L.; RUTHERFORD,BRIAN M.; DIEGERT,KATHLEEN V.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research effort focuses on methodology for quantifying the effects of model uncertainty and discretization error on computational modeling and simulation. The work is directed towards developing methodologies which treat model form assumptions within an overall framework for uncertainty quantification, for the purpose of developing estimates of total prediction uncertainty. The present effort consists of work in three areas: framework development for sources of uncertainty and error in the modeling and simulation process which impact model structure; model uncertainty assessment and propagation through Bayesian inference methods; and discretization error estimation within the context of non-deterministic analysis.

  4. Discrete Intrinsic Redshifts from Quasars to Normal Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. B. Bell

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    It is pointed out that the discrete velocities found by Tifft in galaxies are harmonically related to the discrete intrinsic redshifts found in quasars. All are harmonically related to the constant 0.062 +/- 0.001, and this is the fourth independent analysis in which the redshift increment 0.062 has been shown to be significant. It is concluded that there is a quantized component in the redshift of both quasars and galaxies that has a common origin and is unlikely to be Doppler-related.

  5. Discrete canonical analysis of three dimensional gravity with cosmological constant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berra-Montiel; J. E. Rosales-Quintero

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the interplay between standard canonical analysis and canonical discretization in three-dimensional gravity with cosmological constant. By using the Hamiltonian analysis, we find that the continuum local symmetries of the theory are given by the on-shell space-time diffeomorphisms, which at the action level, corresponds to the Kalb-Ramond transformations. At the time of discretization, although this symmetry is explicitly broken, we prove that the theory still preserves certain gauge freedom generated by a constant curvature relation in terms of holonomies and the Gauss's law in the lattice approach.

  6. Distinct Cyclin D Genes Show Mitotic Accumulation or Constant Levels of Transcripts in Tobacco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murray, J.A.H.

    Distinct Cyclin D Genes Show Mitotic Accumulation or Constant Levels of Transcripts in Tobacco-type cyclins accumulate peri- odically during the S, G2, and early M phases (A types) or G2 and early M phases

  7. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NET ACCUMULATION FROM SHALLOW CORES FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John

    SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF NET ACCUMULATION FROM SHALLOW CORES FROM VESTFONNA ICE CAP variability of net accumulation from shallow cores from Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard. We analyse ice cores from Vestfonna ice cap (Nordaustlandet, Svalbard). Oxygen isoto- pic

  8. Identification of subsurface fractures in the Austin Chalk using vertical seismic profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewallen, Kyle Thomas

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accumulations of oil and gas in the Austin Chalk were proven (Doyle, 1955). Actual drilling interest in the Cretaceous marl has varied due not only to changing crude oil prices, but also to rapidly declining production rates from high initial potential tests... fractured reservoirs. The general method of study can be separated into five steps: (1) determine the seismic characteristics of fracturing on data with known Austin Chalk production, (2) define the structural setting of the study area by the correlation...

  9. A Vacuum Accumulation Solution to the Strong CP Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gia Dvali

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a solution to the strong CP problem in which there are no axions involved. The superselection rule of the \\theta-vacua is dynamically lifted in such a way that an infinite number of vacua are accumulated within the phenomenologically acceptable range of \\theta < 10^{-9}, whereas only a measure-zero set of vacua remains outside of this interval. The general prediction is the existence of membranes to which the standard model gauge fields are coupled. These branes may be light enough for being produced at the particle accelerators in form of the resonances with a characteristic membrane spectrum.

  10. Entanglement accumulation, retrieval, and concentration in cavity QED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Ballester

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to accumulate and retrieve entanglement in the fields of two remote cavities with pairs of two-level atoms is discussed. It is shown that this transfer and retrieval can be indeed ideal with a resonant interaction. The case of initial non-maximally entangled atomic pairs is also considered. This leads to the possibility of concentrating entanglement into a single pair at the retrieval stage. A teleportation protocol based on the same setup is presented. This makes possible teleportation with built-in entanglement concentration.

  11. An investigation of damage accumulation in graphite/epoxy laminates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norvell, Robert Gerald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Specimen A-4, [0/90?] , 98$ Ft s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen 8-5, [0/90, ] , 94$ s tu Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen C-S, [0/90, ] , 91$ Ft . . ~ Crack Angle and Length Distribution in Specimen E-9, tO /90... August 1985 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY LAMINATES A Thesis by ROBERT GERALD NORVELL Approved as to style and content by: David H. Allen (Co-Chair of C mmitt. ) Richard A. Schap...

  12. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These devices and techniques were very effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing plutonium and are expected to perform well at a larger scale. The operation of the techniques and their measurement accuracies will be discussed as well as the overall results of the accumulated solids test.

  13. Fast transverse instability in the NSNS Accumulator Ring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruggiero, A.G.; Blaskiewicz, M.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the results of investigation of possible fast transverse instabilities in the NSNS Accumulator Ring. The instability may be caused by the presence of stripline devices like kicker magnets, the active damper system, and by the RF cavities, and the sharp steps of the vacuum pipe. The instability can be overcome by adopting aluminum as the material of the vacuum pipe.Still the growth time of the instability remains short especially for the mode in proximity of the betatron tune.

  14. Structure and Function of Metal- and Nitrate-reducing Microbial Communities in the FRC Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akob, Denise M.; Mills, Heath J.; Kerkhof, Lee; Gihring, Thomas M.; Kostk, Joel E.

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this study is to evaluate structure-function relationships of sedimentary microbial communities likely to regulate U(VI) reduction and immobilization in the subsurface of Area 2 at the Field Research Center (FRC), Oak Ridge, TN. Microcosm experiments were conducted under near in situ conditions with FRC subsurface materials cocontaminated with high levels of U(VI) and nitrate. The activity, abundance, and community composition of microorganisms was determined in microcosm samples, stimulated with ethanol or glucose, and compared to those from sediment cores and unamended controls. Activity was assessed by monitoring terminal electron accepting processes (TEAPs; nitrate, sulfate, uranium, and iron reduction) as well as electron donor utilization. Microbial functional groups, nitrate- and iron(III)-reducing bacteria, were enumerated during the nitrate- and metal-reduction phases of the incubation and in sediment core samples using a most probable number (MPN) serial dilution assay. U(VI) and Fe(III) were reduced concurrently in the glucose but not the ethanol treatments. In ethanol-amended microcosms, U(VI) was reduced during a 4-day lag phase between nitrate- and Fe(III)-reduction phases. Biostimulation resulted in 3 to 5 orders of magnitude higher counts of Fe(III)-reducing bacteria, whereas populations of nitrate-reducers were enhanced by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude. One to 2 orders of magnitude more Fe(III)-reducers were observed in ethanol- as compared to glucose-amended treatments in parallel with enhanced U(VI) removal in ethanol treatments. Cultivatable Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in the ethanol treatments were dominated by Geobacter sp. while those cultured on glucose were dominated by fermentative organisms, i.e., Tolumonas sp. Currently, carbon substrate utilization is being examined through HPLC analysis of microcosm porewaters. In addition, changes in the overall microbial community composition are being assessed using cultivation-independent techniques, including fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (T-RFLP) and cloning/sequencing of structural and functional genes. Our results indicate that the microbially-catalyzed mechanism of U(VI) reduction is electron donor dependent and that more effective U(VI) removal is achieved in parallel with an enrichment of Geobacter sp. upon treatment with ethanol.

  15. Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moser, Duane; Russell, Chuck; Marshall, Matthew; Czerwinski, Ken; Daly, Michael J; Zavarin, Mavrik

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This exploratory research project is designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the possible existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations in Nevada Test Site (NTS) subsurface nuclear blast cavities. Although subsurface microbiological studies have been performed at the NTS in the past, radioactive zones have yet to be addressed. Nuclear blast zone microbiology is a completely new field and our team is well-positioned to collect and analyze samples that have never before been available to microbiologists. Relevant samples are now being obtained by incorporating microbiological collections into an ongoing annual hot well sampling program being conducted by other agencies. A combination of cultivation-based and molecular microbial detection protocols is being utilized at multiple locations to survey for uncultivable microorganisms and to develop a culture collection which will be characterized for radionuclide- and metal-reduction capabilities. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, a positive outcome from this work would have significant implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites. A primary objective of the project has been the establishment of the regulatory and technical framework necessary to enable our acquisition of samples. Thus, much of our activity in the first phase of this work has involved the development an approved Field Area Work Plan (FAWP), Radiological Work Permit (RWP), and other documentation required for radiological work at the NTS. We have also invested significant time into ensuring that all personnel possess the required training (e.g. Radworker II and 40 hr. HAZWOPER) for access to the hot well sampling sites. Laboratory facilities, required for field processing of radioactive samples as well as DNA extraction and other manipulations, have been secured both the NTS (Mercury, NV) and UNLV. Although our year-1 field work was delayed due to non-availability of samples, an aggressive sampling campaign is now underway and our first hot well samples were collected on Feb 5th, 2008. The unique nature of this site, coupled with the combined expertise of the collaborating laboratories (DRI, LLNL, PNNL, and the Harry Reid Center) makes the likelihood of our achieving discoveries of value to DOE, the individual researchers, and society high. As the selective pressures at atomic blast sites are probably different from those of production and disposal sites, these habitats may contain novel organisms of utility for bioremediation. Such organisms will have had to develop physiological mechanisms to survive high doses of ionizing radiation over the variety of rock types and hydrologic environments present at the NTS.

  16. Recovery Act: Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paolini, Christopher; Castillo, Jose

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling project focused primarily on extending an existing text-only, command-line driven, isothermal and isobaric, geochemical reaction-transport simulation code, developed and donated by Sienna Geodynamics, into an easier-to-use Web-based application for simulating long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in geologic reservoirs. The Web-based interface developed through this project, publically accessible via URL http://symc.sdsu.edu/, enables rapid prototyping of CO{sub 2} injection scenarios and allows students without advanced knowledge of geochemistry to setup a typical sequestration scenario, invoke a simulation, analyze results, and then vary one or more problem parameters and quickly re-run a simulation to answer what-if questions. symc.sdsu.edu has 2x12 core AMD Opteron 6174 2.20GHz processors and 16GB RAM. The Web-based application was used to develop a new computational science course at San Diego State University, COMP 670: Numerical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration, which was taught during the fall semester of 2012. The purpose of the class was to introduce graduate students to Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) through numerical modeling and simulation, and to teach students how to interpret simulation results to make predictions about long-term CO{sub 2} storage capacity in deep brine reservoirs. In addition to the training and education component of the project, significant software development efforts took place. Two computational science doctoral and one geological science masters student, under the direction of the PIs, extended the original code developed by Sienna Geodynamics, named Sym.8. New capabilities were added to Sym.8 to simulate non-isothermal and non-isobaric flows of charged aqueous solutes in porous media, in addition to incorporating HPC support into the code for execution on many-core XSEDE clusters. A successful outcome of this project was the funding and training of three new computational science students and one geological science student in technologies relevant to carbon sequestration and problems involving flow in subsurface media. The three computational science students are currently finishing their doctorial studies on different aspects of modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the geological science student completed his masters thesis in modeling the thermal response of CO{sub 2} injection in brine and, as a direct result of participation in this project, is now employed at ExxonMobil as a full-time staff geologist.

  17. CIS 1068: Practice Problems 11 Some practice with basic loop algorithms: step-by-step loops, sentinel loops, accumulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yates, Alexander

    , sentinel loops, accumulation loops, and nested loops. 1. Basic Step-by-Step Loops A basic step-by-step loop. Accumulation loops Accumulation loops keep track of and update information each time through the loop. Usually an accumulation loop. Accumulation loops are add-ons to either step-by-step or sentinel loops. You need to start

  18. Dimensionnement et gestion d'un systme de stockage thermique par hydro-accumulation : application la

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Dimensionnement et gestion d'un système de stockage thermique par hydro-accumulation : application de stockage thermique de type hydro-accumulation destiné à une chaufferie collective multi, mix-énergétique, stockage thermique, hydro-accumulation, dimensionnement optimal, gestion, graphe d

  19. Prediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William

    cyclone (NTC) activity (Gray et al. 1994) and accumulated cyclone energy (ACE; Bell et al. 2000) duringPrediction of Seasonal Atlantic Basin Accumulated Cyclone Energy from 1 July PHILIP J. KLOTZBACH-Interim) and explain over 60% of the cross-validated variance in post­30 June accumulated cyclone energy over

  20. Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Trying to make the connection: soil Ni speciation and plant accumulation. (S02-mcnearjr.415428-oral. To ascertain the effect of soil speciation on plant accumulation, a combination of micro-XRF, micro accumulation will help when making decisions as to how to remediate a site enriched with heavy metals. Speaker

  1. On Limits on the Computational Power of Data-Accumulating Stefan D. Bruda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruda, Stefan D.

    On Limits on the Computational Power of Data-Accumulating Algorithms Stefan D. Bruda Department@cs.queensu.ca August 10, 2005 Abstract In the data-accumulating paradigm, inputs arrive continuously in real time not depend on the form of the arrival law. Keywords: computational complexity, data-accumulating algorithms

  2. TOWARDS IMPROVING NETWORK FLOW WATERMARKS USING THE REPEAT-ACCUMULATE CODES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borisov, Nikita

    TOWARDS IMPROVING NETWORK FLOW WATERMARKS USING THE REPEAT-ACCUMULATE CODES Amir Houmansadr the efficiency of network flow watermarks. In particular, we use the Repeat-Accumulate codes, a class of low simulation and discuss design tradeoffs. Index Terms-- Repeat-Accumulate codes, network flow watermarking

  3. Optical induction of plasticity at single synapses reveals input-specific accumulation of CaMKII

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oertner, Thomas

    Optical induction of plasticity at single synapses reveals input-specific accumulation of Ca spines on the same dendrite, providing evidence that CaMKII accumulation at postsynaptic sites induces CaMKII accumulation in spines (810) have created much interest because CaMKII activation is both

  4. Accumulation-based Congestion Control Yong Xia, David Harrison, Shivkumar Kalyanaraman,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalyanaraman, Shivkumar

    1 Accumulation-based Congestion Control Yong Xia, David Harrison, Shivkumar Kalyanaraman, Kishore mechanism and uses accumulation, buffered packets of a flow inside the network routers, as a conges- tion accumulation- based congestion control (ACC), which fits into the nonlin- ear optimization framework proposed

  5. Dynamic Universal Accumulators for DDH Groups and Their Application to Attribute-Based Anonymous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dynamic Universal Accumulators for DDH Groups and Their Application to Attribute-Based Anonymous Report TR2009-643 April 19, 2009 Abstract We present the first dynamic universal accumulator that allows -- or has not -- been accumulated, where g generates G, to efficiently prove her knowledge of such x in zero

  6. Neural mechanisms of saccade target selection: gated accumulator model of the visualmotor cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schall, Jeffrey D.

    Neural mechanisms of saccade target selection: gated accumulator model of the visualmotor cascade, Vanderbilt University, PMB 407817, 2301 Vanderbilt Place, Nashville, TN 37240-7817, USA Keywords: accumulator neurons in the frontal eye field as evidence for stimulus salience that is accumulated in a network

  7. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Evidence Accumulation and the Moment of Recognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wagner, Anthony

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Evidence Accumulation and the Moment of Recognition: Dissociating as the culmination of an integrative process in which evidence supporting different response options accumulates with TR suggested that these regions participated in the accumulation of evidence supporting object

  8. Rutgers-Camden Researchers Identify a Key Protein for Yield and Biomass Accumulation in Plants.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Alice Y.C.

    Rutgers-Camden Researchers Identify a Key Protein for Yield and Biomass Accumulation in Plants. Growth, cell patterning, yield, and biomass accumulation in plants are controlled by multi and biomass accumulation. A particular protein, GIGANTUS1 (GTS1), named for its role in regulating a GIANT

  9. Do Damaged Proteins Accumulate in Caenorhabditis elegans L-Isoaspartate Methyltransferase (pcm-1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Steven

    Do Damaged Proteins Accumulate in Caenorhabditis elegans L-Isoaspartate Methyltransferase (pcm-1 for helping to limit the accumulation of damaged proteins in aging or- ganisms. In this study, the effect Caenorhabditis elegans. It was found that damaged proteins recognized by this enzyme accumulated to significant

  10. Simple I/O-efficient flow accumulation on grid terrains Herman Haverkort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haverkort, Herman

    Simple I/O-efficient flow accumulation on grid terrains Herman Haverkort TU Eindhoven Jeffrey #12;Drainage network analysis 1 2­5 6­12 13­50 flooding flow routing flow accumulation compute network analysis flow routingwatershed labelling flow accumulation #12;Analysing I/O-efficiency main

  11. Strong Accumulators from Collision-Resistant Hashing Philippe Camacho Alejandro Hevia Marcos Kiwi Roberto Opazo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hevia, Alejandro

    Strong Accumulators from Collision-Resistant Hashing Philippe Camacho Alejandro Hevia Marcos Kiwi§ Roberto Opazo¶ September 3, 2012 Abstract Accumulator schemes were introduced in order to repre- sent- bership proofs, i.e. short witnesses that a certain value belongs to the set. In universal accumulator

  12. ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    ACM SIGGRAPH 2002, San Antonio, TX Modeling the Accumulation of Wind-Driven Snow Technical Sketch of snow drifts formed by the accumulation of wind-blown snow near buildings and other obstacles. Our method combines previous work on snow accumulation [Fearing] with techniques for incompressible fluid

  13. A Floating-point Accumulator for FPGA-based High Performance Computing Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zambreno, Joseph A.

    A Floating-point Accumulator for FPGA-based High Performance Computing Applications Song Sun Joseph,zambreno}@iastate.edu Abstract--A floating-point accumulator for FPGA-based high performance computing applications is proposed and evaluated. Compared to previous work, our accumulator uses a fixed size circuit, and can reduce an arbitrary

  14. Efficient parallel algorithms for tree accumulations Jeremy Gibbons, Wentong Cai and David B. Skillicorn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbons, Jeremy

    Efficient parallel algorithms for tree accumulations Jeremy Gibbons, Wentong Cai and David B. Skillicorn Abstract. Accumulations are higher­order operations on structured objects; they leave the shape of an object unchanged, but replace elements of that object with accumulated information about other elements

  15. Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Measurement of Liquid Water Accumulation in a PEMFC with Dead-Ended Anode Jason B. Siegel,a, *,z, Maryland 20899, USA The operation and accumulation of liquid water within the cell structure of a polymer, accumulation of liquid water in the anode gas distribution channels was observed in most tested conditions

  16. Slow Cortical Dynamics and the Accumulation of Information over Long Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Uri

    Neuron Article Slow Cortical Dynamics and the Accumulation of Information over Long Timescales to identify brain regions that accumulate information over short and long timescales and to characterize movie, indicating that these regions accumulate information over relatively long time periods (several

  17. Capital accumulation and non-renewable energy resources: a special functions case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nesterov, Yurii

    2007/9 Capital accumulation and non-renewable energy resources: a special functions case Agustin Pérez-Barahona #12;CORE DISCUSSION PAPER 2007/9 Capital accumulation and non-renewable energy resources the implications of assuming different technologies for physical capital accumulation and consumption. More

  18. Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benscoter, Brian W.

    Association of postfire peat accumulation and microtopography in boreal bogs1 Brian W. Benscoter, Dale H. Vitt, and R. Kelman Wieder Abstract: Peatlands accumulate organic matter as peat because of disproportionate rates of production and decomposi- tion. However, peat accumulation heterogeneity has not been

  19. AXIAL-FIELD SYNCHRONOUS MACHINE WITH HOMOPOLAR FLUX IN THE AIRGAP FOR A FLYWHEEL ACCUMULATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    AXIAL-FIELD SYNCHRONOUS MACHINE WITH HOMOPOLAR FLUX IN THE AIRGAP FOR A FLYWHEEL ACCUMULATOR@bretagne.ens-cachan.fr Abstract: A new axial-field synchronous machine designed for a flywheel accumulator is presented herein with experimental results. Keywords: flywheel accumulator, axial-field synchronous machine, double-face printed

  20. Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final report: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzales, D.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing site are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards, in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 clean up protocol has been developed. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR Part 192 relative to supplemental standards.

  1. Continuum Representation for Simulating Discrete Events of Battery Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    the discrete events in the cycling studies of lithium-ion batteries as a continuum event has been proposed-order pseudo-two-dimensional lithium-ion battery model that has several coupled and nonlinear partial that are currently fol- lowed for the modeling of charge/discharge cycles of lithium-ion batteries involve different

  2. Fractal algebras of discretization sequences Steffen Roch (TU Darmstadt)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potts, Daniel

    Abstract Fractal algebras of discretization sequences Steffen Roch (TU Darmstadt) First a warning: Fractality, in the sense of these lectures, has nothing to do with fractal geometries or broken dimensions or other involved things. Rather, the notion fractal algebra had been chosen in order to emphasize

  3. Power Control for Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillén i Fàbregas, Albert

    . K. Rasmussen CUED / F-INFENG / TR 582 August 2007 #12;#12;1 Power Control for Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels Khoa D. Nguyen, Albert Guill´en i F`abregas and Lars K. Rasmussen Abstract We consider power systems employing orthogonal frequency division multiplexing. K. D. Nguyen and L. K. Rasmussen

  4. DISCRETE AND CONTINUOUS Website: http://AIMsciences.org DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiau, LieJune

    well known fact: When there is dry friction, the force necessary to put the system into motion. 806­815 OPERATOR SPLITTING METHOD FOR FRICTION CONSTRAINED DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS LieJune Shiau Department-discretization of those relations mod- eling a class of dynamical systems with friction was discussed. The main goal

  5. Two samples test for discrete power-law distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bessi, Alessandro

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Power-law distributions occur in wide variety of physical, biological, and social phenomena. In this paper, we propose a statistical hypothesis test based on the log-likelihood ratio to assess whether two samples of discrete data are drawn from the same power-law distribution.

  6. Energy-Efficient Discrete Cosine Transform on Ronald Scrofano

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jang, Ju-Wook

    Energy-Efficient Discrete Cosine Transform on FPGAs Ronald Scrofano Department of Computer Science is brought to mobile devices, it becomes important that it is possible to calculate the DCT in an energy-efficient the DCT with a linear array of PEs. This design is optimized for energy efficiency. We analyze the energy

  7. Multivariable Discrete Time Repetitive Control System Hammoud Saari1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Multivariable Discrete Time Repetitive Control System Hammoud Saari1 and Bernard Caron2 1 SETRAM, France hammoud.saari@yahoo.fr, bernard.caron@univ-savoie.fr Keywords: Repetitive Control, Multivariable), Ahn et al. (2007) and Saari et al. (2010)). Most of their works were focused on the problem

  8. Time-Variant Channel Equalization via Discrete Prolate Spheroidal Sequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zemen, Thomas

    are processed by an inverse discrete Fourier transform (DFT) to obtain an orthogonal frequency division Devices department (RCD), part of the Siemens AG Austria, Program and System Engineering (PSE) and the Telecommunications Research Center Vienna (ftw.) in the I0 project. Thomas Zemen was with Siemens AG Austria when he

  9. The Discrete Wavelet Transform and Wavelet Synopses Minos Garofalakis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garofalakis, Minos

    The Discrete Wavelet Transform and Wavelet Synopses Minos Garofalakis Technical University of Crete minos@acm.org SYNONYMS None. DEFINITION Wavelets are a useful mathematical tool for hierarchically decomposing functions in ways that are both efficient and theoretically sound. Broadly speaking, the wavelet

  10. Generic Average Modeling and Simulation of Discrete Controllers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    modeling of discrete controllers for PWM power conversion systems. The method applies a section be advantageous to have the capability of running AC analysis of digitally controlled power systems on a general the simulation of digitally controlled power conversion systems on general-purpose circuit simulators

  11. Discrete fracture modeling for fractured reservoirs using Voronoi grid blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Matthew Edward

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    or pseudofracture groups modeled in their own grid blocks. Discrete Fracture Modeling (DFN) is still a relatively new field, and most research on it up to this point has been done with Delaunay tessellations. This research investigates an alternative approach using...

  12. Wave-packet continuum discretization for quantum scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. A. Rubtsova; V. I. Kukulin; V. N. Pomerantsev

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A general approach to a solution of few- and many-body scattering problems based on a continuum-discretization procedure is described in detail. The complete discretization of continuous spectrum is realized using stationary wave packets which are the normalized states constructed from exact non-normalized continuum states. Projecting the wave functions and all scattering operators like $t$-matrix, resolvent, etc. on such a wave-packet basis results in a formulation of quantum scattering problem entirely in terms of discrete elements and linear equations with regular matrices. It is demonstrated that there is a close relation between the above stationary wave packets and pseudostates which are employed often to approximate the scattering states with a finite $L_2$ basis. Such a fully discrete treatment of complicated few- and many-body scattering problems leads to significant simplification of their practical solution. Also we get finite-dimensional approximations for complicated operators like effective interactions between composite particles constructed via the Feshbach-type projection formalism. As illustrations to this general approach we consider several important particular problems including multichannel scattering and scattering in the three-nucleon system within the Faddeev framework.

  13. Tensile damage response from discrete element virtual testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Tensile damage response from discrete element virtual testing A. DELAPLACE LMT-Cachan, ENS Cachan conditions on brittle materials, damage can generally not be re- duced to a simple scalar. Microcrack into account the damage anisotropy in phenomenological models is a possible option, but the identification

  14. Spectral discretization of Darcy's equations with pressure dependent porosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Spectral discretization of Darcy's equations with pressure dependent porosity by Mejdi Azaiez1 and the pressure p of the fluid. This system is an extension of Darcy's equations, which model the flow of the resulting system of equations which takes into account the axisymmetry of the domain and of the flow. We

  15. Mortar spectral element discretization of Darcy's equations in nonhomogeneous medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Mortar spectral element discretization of Darcy's equations in nonhomogeneous medium Mouna Daadaa Cedex 05 France. daadaa@ann.jussieu.fr 4 mai 2010 Abstract : We consider Darcy's equations. They turn out to be in good coherency with the theoretical results. Resume : Les equations de Darcy mod

  16. Error Exponent for Discrete Memoryless Multiple-Access Channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anastasopoulos, Achilleas

    Error Exponent for Discrete Memoryless Multiple-Access Channels by Ali Nazari A dissertation Bayraktar Associate Professor Jussi Keppo #12;c Ali Nazari 2011 All Rights Reserved #12;To my parents. ii Becky Turanski, Nancy Goings, Michele Feldkamp, Ann Pace, Karen Liska and Beth Lawson for efficiently

  17. Coded Adaptive Linear Precoded Discrete Multitone Over PLC Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Coded Adaptive Linear Precoded Discrete Multitone Over PLC Channel Fahad Syed Muhammmad, Jean- DMT system is presented in the power line communication (PLC) context with a loading algorithm which spectral density constraint. Using a multipath model of PLC channel, it is shown that the proposed coded

  18. Controlling Wild Mobile Robots Using Virtual Gates and Discrete Transitions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    Controlling Wild Mobile Robots Using Virtual Gates and Discrete Transitions Leonardo Bobadilla purposely design them to execute wild motions, which means each will strike every open set infinitely often, "wildly behaving" robots that move more-or-less straight until a wall is contacted. They then pick

  19. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  20. EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.