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1

Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers  

SciTech Connect

Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Electrical Subsurface Grounding Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The purpose and objective of this analysis is to determine the present grounding requirements of the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) subsurface electrical system and to verify that the actual grounding system and devices satisfy the requirements.

J.M. Calle

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

4

Subsurface Contamination Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are two objectives of this report, ''Subsurface Contamination Control''. The first is to provide a technical basis for recommending limiting radioactive contamination levels (LRCL) on the external surfaces of waste packages (WP) for acceptance into the subsurface repository. The second is to provide an evaluation of the magnitude of potential releases from a defective WP and the detectability of the released contents. The technical basis for deriving LRCL has been established in ''Retrieval Equipment and Strategy for Wp on Pallet'' (CRWMS M and O 2000g, 6.3.1). This report updates the derivation by incorporating the latest design information of the subsurface repository for site recommendation. The derived LRCL on the external surface of WPs, therefore, supercede that described in CRWMS M and O 2000g. The derived LRCL represent the average concentrations of contamination on the external surfaces of each WP that must not be exceeded before the WP is to be transported to the subsurface facility for emplacement. The evaluation of potential releases is necessary to control the potential contamination of the subsurface repository and to detect prematurely failed WPs. The detection of failed WPs is required in order to provide reasonable assurance that the integrity of each WP is intact prior to MGR closure. An emplaced WP may become breached due to manufacturing defects or improper weld combined with failure to detect the defect, by corrosion, or by mechanical penetration due to accidents or rockfall conditions. The breached WP may release its gaseous and volatile radionuclide content to the subsurface environment and result in contaminating the subsurface facility. The scope of this analysis is limited to radioactive contaminants resulting from breached WPs during the preclosure period of the subsurface repository. This report: (1) documents a method for deriving LRCL on the external surfaces of WP for acceptance into the subsurface repository; (2) provides a table of derived LRCL for nuclides of radiological importance; (3) Provides an as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) evaluation of the derived LRCL by comparing potential onsite and offsite doses to documented ALARA requirements; (4) Provides a method for estimating potential releases from a defective WP; (5) Provides an evaluation of potential radioactive releases from a defective WP that may become airborne and result in contamination of the subsurface facility; and (6) Provides a preliminary analysis of the detectability of a potential WP leak to support the design of an airborne release monitoring system.

Y. Yuan

2001-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

5

Subsurface connection methods for subsurface heaters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for heating a subsurface formation is described. The system includes a first elongated heater in a first opening in the formation. The first elongated heater includes an exposed metal section in a portion of the first opening. The portion is below a layer of the formation to be heated. The exposed metal section is exposed to the formation. A second elongated heater is in a second opening in the formation. The second opening connects to the first opening at or near the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated. At least a portion of an exposed metal section of the second elongated heater is electrically coupled to at least a portion of the exposed metal section of the first elongated heater in the portion of the first opening below the layer to be heated.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Bass, Ronald Marshall (Houston, TX); Kim, Dong Sub (Sugar Land, TX); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Stegemeier, George Leo (Houston, TX); Keltner, Thomas Joseph (Spring, TX); Carl, Jr., Frederick Gordon (Houston, TX)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

6

SUBSURFACE EMPLACEMENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this analysis is to identify issues and criteria that apply to the design of the Subsurface Emplacement Transportation System (SET). The SET consists of the track used by the waste package handling equipment, the conductors and related equipment used to supply electrical power to that equipment, and the instrumentation and controls used to monitor and operate those track and power supply systems. Major considerations of this analysis include: (1) Operational life of the SET; (2) Geometric constraints on the track layout; (3) Operating loads on the track; (4) Environmentally induced loads on the track; (5) Power supply (electrification) requirements; and (6) Instrumentation and control requirements. This analysis will provide the basis for development of the system description document (SDD) for the SET. This analysis also defines the interfaces that need to be considered in the design of the SET. These interfaces include, but are not limited to, the following: (1) Waste handling building; (2) Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) surface site layout; (3) Waste Emplacement System (WES); (4) Waste Retrieval System (WRS); (5) Ground Control System (GCS); (6) Ex-Container System (XCS); (7) Subsurface Electrical Distribution System (SED); (8) MGR Operations Monitoring and Control System (OMC); (9) Subsurface Facility System (SFS); (10) Subsurface Fire Protection System (SFR); (11) Performance Confirmation Emplacement Drift Monitoring System (PCM); and (12) Backfill Emplacement System (BES).

T. Wilson; R. Novotny

1999-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

7

Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The nature of solid earth tidal strain and surface load deformation due to the influence of gravitational forces and barometric pressure loading are discussed. The pore pressure response to these types of deformation is investigated in detail, including the cases of a confined aquifer intersected by a well and a discrete fracture intersected by a well. The integration of the tidal response method with conventional pump tests in order to independently calculate the hydraulic parameters of the

8

On discrete cosine transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The discrete cosine transform (DCT), introduced by Ahmed, Natarajan and Rao, has been used in many applications of digital signal processing, data compression and information hiding. There are four types of the discrete cosine transform. In simulating the discrete cosine transform, we propose a generalized discrete cosine transform with three parameters, and prove its orthogonality for some new cases. A new type of discrete cosine transform is proposed and its orthogonality is proved. Finally, we propose a generalized discrete W transform with three parameters, and prove its orthogonality for some new cases.

Zhou, Jianqin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

Eric Loros

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

10

Subsurface Ventilation System Description Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Ventilation System supports the construction and operation of the subsurface repository by providing air for personnel and equipment and temperature control for the underground areas. Although the system is located underground, some equipment and features may be housed or located above ground. The system ventilates the underground by providing ambient air from the surface throughout the subsurface development and emplacement areas. The system provides fresh air for a safe work environment and supports potential retrieval operations by ventilating and cooling emplacement drifts. The system maintains compliance within the limits established for approved air quality standards. The system maintains separate ventilation between the development and waste emplacement areas. The system shall remove a portion of the heat generated by the waste packages during preclosure to support thermal goals. The system provides temperature control by reducing drift temperature to support potential retrieval operations. The ventilation system has the capability to ventilate selected drifts during emplacement and retrieval operations. The Subsurface Facility System is the main interface with the Subsurface Ventilation System. The location of the ducting, seals, filters, fans, emplacement doors, regulators, and electronic controls are within the envelope created by the Ground Control System in the Subsurface Facility System. The Subsurface Ventilation System also interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical System for power, the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System to ensure proper and safe operation, the Safeguards and Security System for access to the emplacement drifts, the Subsurface Fire Protection System for fire safety, the Emplacement Drift System for repository performance, and the Backfill Emplacement and Subsurface Excavation Systems to support ventilation needs.

NONE

2000-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

11

Adaptive Discrete Cosine Transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory and performance of the adaptive discrete cosine transform filter is examined. The discrete cosine transform filter is a realization of an FIR filter as the cascade of an all-zero FIR filter with a bank of IIR digital resonators. Each bank ... Keywords: FIR filter, IIR digital resonators, LMS algorithm, adaptive discrete cosine transform filter, adaptive filters, all-zero FIR filter, filter coefficient, frequency, magnitude, phase, transfer function, update method

S. J. Bukowinski; L. Gerhardt; M. Fargues; G. Coutu

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Six Science Secrets of the Subsurface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article highlights recent fundamental scientific research on subsurface radionuclide migration.

Manke, Kristin L.; Wiley, Julie G.

2010-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

When Discrete Meets Differential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We provide a theoretical proof showing that under a proportional noise model, the discrete eight point algorithm behaves similarly to the differential eight point algorithm when the motion is small. This implies that the discrete algorithm can handle ... Keywords: Perturbation analysis, Structure from motion

Wen-Yan Lin; Geok-Choo Tan; Loong-Fah Cheong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Yucca Mountain Project is entering a the license application (LA) stage in its mission to develop the nation's first underground nuclear waste repository. After a number of years of gathering data related to site characterization, including activities ranging from laboratory and site investigations, to numerical modeling of processes associated with conditions to be encountered in the future repository, the Project is realigning its activities towards the License Application preparation. At the current stage, the major efforts are directed at translating the results of scientific investigations into sets of data needed to support the design, and to fulfill the licensing requirements and the repository design activities. This document addresses the program need to address specific technical questions so that an assessment can be made about the suitability and adequacy of data to license and construct a repository at the Yucca Mountain Site. In July 2002, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published an Integrated Issue Resolution Status Report (NRC 2002). Included in this report were the Repository Design and Thermal-Mechanical Effects (RDTME) Key Technical Issues (KTI). Geotechnical agreements were formulated to resolve a number of KTI subissues, in particular, RDTME KTIs 3.04, 3.05, 3.07, and 3.19 relate to the physical, thermal and mechanical properties of the host rock (NRC 2002, pp. 2.1.1-28, 2.1.7-10 to 2.1.7-21, A-17, A-18, and A-20). The purpose of the Subsurface Geotechnical Parameters Report is to present an accounting of current geotechnical information that will help resolve KTI subissues and some other project needs. The report analyzes and summarizes available qualified geotechnical data. It evaluates the sufficiency and quality of existing data to support engineering design and performance assessment. In addition, the corroborative data obtained from tests performed by a number of research organizations is presented to reinforce conclusions derived from the pool of data gathered within a full QA-controlled domain. An evaluation of the completeness of the current data is provided with respect to the requirements for geotechnical data to support design and performance assessment.

D. Rigby; M. Mrugala; G. Shideler; T. Davidsavor; J. Leem; D. Buesch; Y. Sun; D. Potyondy; M. Christianson

2003-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

15

ESF Subsurface Standby Generator Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to outline and recommend two standby generator systems. These systems shall provide power during a utility outage to critical Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and to subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Critical loads that will be supported by these generator systems will be identified and evaluated. Additionally, other requirements from the Exploratory Studies Facilities Design Requirements (ESFDR) document will be evaluated. Finally, the standby generator systems will be integrated into the existing ESF subsurface distribution system. The objective of this analysis is to provide design inputs for an efficient and reliable standby generator systems which will provide power for critical loads during a power outage; specifically, Alcove No.5's thermal test loads and the subsurface flow through ventilation loads. Additionally, preliminary one-line diagrams will be developed using this analysis as a primary input.

L. Fernandez

1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

16

SUBSURFACE VISUAL ALARM SYSTEM ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

The ''Subsurface Fire Hazard Analysis'' (CRWMS M&O 1998, page 61), and the document, ''Title III Evaluation Report for the Surface and Subsurface Communication System'', (CRWMS M&O 1999a, pages 21 and 23), both indicate the installed communication system is adequate to support Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) activities with the exception of the mine phone system for emergency notification purposes. They recommend the installation of a visual alarm system to supplement the page/party phone system The purpose of this analysis is to identify data communication highway design approaches, and provide justification for the selected or recommended alternatives for the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system. This analysis is being prepared to document a basis for the design selection of the data communication method. This analysis will briefly describe existing data or voice communication or monitoring systems within the ESF, and look at how these may be revised or adapted to support the needed data highway of the subsurface visual alarm. system. The existing PLC communication system installed in subsurface is providing data communication for alcove No.5 ventilation fans, south portal ventilation fans, bulkhead doors and generator monitoring system. It is given that the data communication of the subsurface visual alarm system will be a digital based system. It is also given that it is most feasible to take advantage of existing systems and equipment and not consider an entirely new data communication system design and installation. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Briefly review and describe existing available data communication highways or systems within the ESF. (2) Examine technical characteristics of an existing system to disqualify a design alternative is paramount in minimizing the number of and depth of a system review. (3) Apply general engineering design practices or criteria such as relative cost, and degree of difficulty and complexity in determining requirements in adapting existing data communication highways to support the subsurface visual alarm system. These requirements would include such things as added or new communication cables, added Programmable Logic Controller (PLC), Inputs and Outputs (I/O), and communication hardware components, and human machine interfaces and their software operating system. (4) Select the best data communication highway system based on this review of adapting or integrating with existing data communication systems.

D.W. Markman

2001-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

17

A discrete fractional random transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a discrete fractional random transform based on a generalization of the discrete fractional Fourier transform with an intrinsic randomness. Such discrete fractional random transform inheres excellent mathematical properties of the fractional Fourier transform along with some fantastic features of its own. As a primary application, the discrete fractional random transform has been used for image encryption and decryption.

Zhengjun Liu; Haifa Zhao; Shutian Liu

2006-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page The below listing provides additional references related to Subsurface & Groundwater Remediation. The references are categorized by documents types (e.g., Strategic Plans, Groundwater Plume Map Booklets, etc.) and under each "document type", there is a list of documents and/or hyperlinks to a reference. The Subsurface Knowledge Reference Page will continue to reflect additional information as it is identified. Strategic Plans Scientific Opportunities to Reduce Risk in Groundwater and Soil Remediation Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS) Groundwater Plume Map Booklets Groundwater Contamination and Treatment at Department of Energy Sites -

19

EMSL: Science: Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial & Subsurface Ecosystems Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems logo Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains Visualization of CFD-simulated fluid velocities within a single pore space between randomly packed spherical grains. The Terrestrial and Subsurface Ecosystems Science Theme focuses on the dynamics of nutrients, metabolites, and contaminants at biogeochemical interfaces in heterogeneous environments across multiple scales. By providing a mechanistic understanding of biogeochemical and microbial processes in soils and the subsurface, and linking those processes via pore-scale hydrological models, EMSL can improve strategies for sustainable solutions to contaminant attenuation, remediation and biogeochemical

20

Method of installing subsurface barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, components, and methods relating to subterranean containment barriers. Laterally adjacent tubular casings having male interlock structures and multiple female interlock structures defining recesses for receiving a male interlock structure are used to create subterranean barriers for containing and treating buried waste and its effluents. The multiple female interlock structures enable the barriers to be varied around subsurface objects and to form barrier sidewalls. The barrier may be used for treating and monitoring a zone of interest.

Nickelson, Reva A. (Shelley, ID); Richardson, John G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sloan, Paul A. (Rigby, ID)

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geophysical characterization of subsurface barriers  

SciTech Connect

An option for controlling contaminant migration from plumes and buried waste sites is to construct a subsurface barrier of a low-permeability material. The successful application of subsurface barriers requires processes to verify the emplacement and effectiveness of barrier and to monitor the performance of a barrier after emplacement. Non destructive and remote sensing techniques, such as geophysical methods, are possible technologies to address these needs. The changes in mechanical, hydrologic and chemical properties associated with the emplacement of an engineered barrier will affect geophysical properties such a seismic velocity, electrical conductivity, and dielectric constant. Also, the barrier, once emplaced and interacting with the in situ geologic system, may affect the paths along which electrical current flows in the subsurface. These changes in properties and processes facilitate the detection and monitoring of the barrier. The approaches to characterizing and monitoring engineered barriers can be divided between (1) methods that directly image the barrier using the contrasts in physical properties between the barrier and the host soil or rock and (2) methods that reflect flow processes around or through the barrier. For example, seismic methods that delineate the changes in density and stiffness associated with the barrier represents a direct imaging method. Electrical self potential methods and flow probes based on heat flow methods represent techniques that can delineate the flow path or flow processes around and through a barrier.

Borns, D.J.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Dynamical Discrete Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamical discrete web (DDW), introduced in recent work of Howitt and Warren, is a system of coalescing simple symmetric one-dimensional random walks which evolve in an extra continuous dynamical parameter s. The evolution is by independent updating of the underlying Bernoulli variables indexed by discrete space-time that define the discrete web at any fixed s. In this paper, we study the existence of exceptional (random) values of s where the paths of the web do not behave like usual random walks and the Hausdorff dimension of the set of such exceptional s. Our results are motivated by those about exceptional times for dynamical percolation in high dimension by H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif, and in dimension two by Schramm and Steif. The exceptional behavior of the walks in DDW is rather different from the situation for dynamical random walks of Benjamini, H\\"aggstrom, Peres and Steif. In particular, we prove that there are exceptional values of s for which the walk from the origin S^s(n) has limsup S^s(n)/\\sqrt n \\leq K with a nontrivial dependence of the Hausdorff dimension on K. We also discuss how these and other results extend to the dynamical Brownian web, a natural scaling limit of DDW. The scaling limit is the focus of a paper in preparation; it was studied by Howitt and Warren and is related to the Brownian net of Sun and Swart.

L. R. G. Fontes; C. M. Newman; K. Ravishankar; E. Schertzer

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

23

Subsurface Excavations (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

legislation addresses subsurface excavations conducted for all purposes other than the exploration or production of gas and oil resources that may adversely affect water...

24

capabilitiesFlier_subsurfaceFlow_WEB  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

use is applied to EMSL's sci- ence themes of Biological Interactions and Dynamics, GeochemistryBiogeochemistry and Subsurface Science, as well as Science of Interfacial...

25

Quantum gravity and inventory accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We begin by studying inventory accumulation at a LIFO (last-in-first-out) retailer with two products. In the simplest version, the following occur with equal probability at each time step: first product ordered, first product produced, second product ordered, second product produced. The inventory thus evolves as a simple random walk on Z^2. In more interesting versions, a p fraction of customers orders the "freshest available" product regardless of type. We show that the corresponding random walks scale to Brownian motions with diffusion matrices depending on p. We then turn our attention to the critical Fortuin-Kastelyn random planar map model, which gives, for each q>0, a probability measure on random (discretized) two-dimensional surfaces decorated by loops, related to the q-state Potts model. A longstanding open problem is to show that as the discretization gets finer, the surfaces converge in law to a limiting (loop-decorated) random surface. The limit is expected to be a Liouville quantum gravity surface decorated by a conformal loop ensemble, with parameters depending on q. Thanks to a bijection between decorated planar maps and inventory trajectories (closely related to bijections of Bernardi and Mullin), our results about the latter imply convergence of the former in a particular topology. A phase transition occurs at p = 1/2, q=4.

Scott Sheffield

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

26

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and...

27

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR) Contractor-Grantee Workshop--Abstracts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abiotic Reactions in Hanford 300 Area Subsurface Sedimentsin the subsurface at Hanford’s 300 Area. To initially studycore samples from the Hanford 300 Area IFRC site. Uranium

Hazen, Terry C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied...

29

Thermodynamics of discrete quantum processes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define thermodynamic configurations and identify two primitives of discrete quantum processes between configurations for which heat and work can be defined in a natural way. This allows us to uncover a general second law for any discrete trajectory that consists of a sequence of these primitives, linking both equilibrium and non-equilibrium configurations. Moreover, in the limit of a discrete trajectory that passes through an infinite number of configurations, i.e. in the reversible limit, we recover the saturation of the second law. Finally, we show that for a discrete Carnot cycle operating between four configurations one recovers Carnot's thermal efficiency.

Janet Anders; Vittorio Giovannetti

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Latent heat accumulating greenhouse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention relates to a latent heat accumulating greenhouse utilizing solar heat. The object of the invention is to provide a greenhouse which is simple in construction, of high efficiency for heat absorbing and capable of much absorbing and accumulating of heat. A heat accumulating chamber partitioned by transparent sheets is provided between the attic and a floor surface facing north in the greenhouse. A blower fan is disposed to confront an opening provided at the lower portion in said heat accumulating chamber. Also, in the heat accumulating chamber, a heat accumulating unit having a large number of light transmitting windows and enclosing a phase transformation heat accumulating material such as CaC1/sub 2/.6H/sub 2/O, Na/sub 2/SO/sub 4/.10H/sub 2/O therein is detachably suspended in a position close to windowpanes at the north side.

Yano, N.; Ito, H.; Makido, I.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Trace Anomaly in Geometric Discretization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I develop the simplest geometric-discretized analogue of two dimensional scalar field theory, which qualitatively reproduces the trace anomaly of the continuous theory. The discrete analogue provides an interpretation of the trace anomaly in terms of a non-trivial transformation of electric-magnetic duality-invariant modes of resistor networks that accommodate both electric and magnetic charge currents.

Czech, B

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Adaptive and Efficient Computing for Subsurface Simulation within ParFlow  

SciTech Connect

This project is concerned with the PF.WRF model as a means to enable more accurate predictions of wind fluctuations and subsurface storage. As developed at LLNL, PF.WRF couples a groundwater (subsurface) and surface water flow model (ParFlow) to a mesoscale atmospheric model (WRF, Weather Research and Forecasting Model). It was developed as a unique tool to address coupled water balance and wind energy questions that occur across traditionally separated research regimes of the atmosphere, land surface, and subsurface. PF.WRF is capable of simulating fluid, mass, and energy transport processes in groundwater, vadose zone, root zone, and land surface systems, including overland flow, and allows for the WRF model to both directly drive and respond to surface and subsurface hydrologic processes and conditions. The current PF.WRF model is constrained to have uniform spatial gridding below the land surface and matching areal grids with the WRF model at the land surface. There are often cases where it is advantageous for land surface, overland flow and subsurface models to have finer gridding than their atmospheric counterparts. Finer vertical discretization is also advantageous near the land surface (to properly capture feedbacks) yet many applications have a large vertical extent. However, the surface flow is strongly dependent on topography leading to a need for greater lateral resolution in some regions and the subsurface flow is tightly coupled to the atmospheric model near the surface leading to a need for finer vertical resolution. In addition, the interactions (e.g. rain) will be highly variable in space and time across the problem domain so an adaptive scheme is preferred to a static strategy to efficiently use computing and memory resources. As a result, this project focussed on algorithmic research required for development of an adaptive simulation capability in the PF.WRF system and its subsequent use in an application problem in the Central Valley of California. This report documents schemes of use for a future implementation of an adaptive grid capability within the ParFlow subsurface flow simulator in PF.WRF. The methods describe specific handling of the coarse/fine boundaries within a cell-centered discretization of the nonlinear parabolic Richards equation model for variable saturated flow. In addition, we describe development of a spline fit and table lookup method implemented within ParFlow to enhance computational efficiency of variably saturated flow calculations.

Tiedeman, H; Woodward, C S

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

33

On the Dynamics of Equatorial Subsurface Countercurrents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The equatorial subsurface countercurrents (SSCC are strong, steady, geostrophically balanced eastward flows situated below the high speed core of the Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC) at 3–5°N and S. The dynamics of these currents are explored using ...

Michael J. McPhaden

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Sequestration of ethane in the cryovolcanic subsurface of Titan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturn's largest satellite, Titan, has a thick atmosphere dominated by nitrogen and methane. The dense orange-brown smog hiding the satellite's surface is produced by photochemical reactions of methane, nitrogen and their dissociation products with solar ultraviolet, which lead primarily to the formation of ethane and heavier hydrocarbons. In the years prior to the exploration of Titan's surface by the Cassini-Huygens spacecraft, the production and condensation of ethane was expected to have formed a satellite-wide ocean one kilometer in depth, assuming that it was generated over the Solar system's lifetime. However, Cassini-Huygens observations failed to find any evidence of such an ocean. Here we describe the main cause of the ethane deficiency on Titan: cryovolcanic lavas regularly cover its surface, leading to the percolation of the liquid hydrocarbons through this porous material and its accumulation in subsurface layers built up during successive methane outgassing events. The liquid stored in the pores may, combined with the ice layers, form a stable ethane-rich clathrate reservoir, potentially isolated from the surface. Even with a low open porosity of 10% for the subsurface layers, a cryovolcanic icy crust less than 2300 m thick is required to bury all the liquid hydrocarbons generated over the Solar system's lifetime.

Olivier Mousis; Bernard Schmitt

2008-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

35

Discrete generalized multigroup theory and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study develops a fundamentally new discrete generalized multigroup energy expansion theory for the linear Boltzmann transport equation. Discrete orthogonal polynomials are used, in conjunction with the traditional ...

Zhu, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

SUBSURFACE REPOSITORY INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM DESIGN  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to develop preliminary high-level functional and physical control system architectures for the proposed subsurface repository at Yucca Mountain. This document outlines overall control system concepts that encompass and integrate the many diverse systems being considered for use within the subsurface repository. This document presents integrated design concepts for monitoring and controlling the diverse set of subsurface operations. The subsurface repository design will be composed of a series of diverse systems that will be integrated to accomplish a set of overall functions and objectives. The subsurface repository contains several Instrumentation and Control (I&C) related systems including: waste emplacement systems, ventilation systems, communication systems, radiation monitoring systems, rail transportation systems, ground control monitoring systems, utility monitoring systems (electrical, lighting, water, compressed air, etc.), fire detection and protection systems, retrieval systems, and performance confirmation systems. Each of these systems involve some level of I&C and will typically be integrated over a data communication network. The subsurface I&C systems will also integrate with multiple surface-based site-wide systems such as emergency response, health physics, security and safeguards, communications, utilities and others. The scope and primary objectives of this analysis are to: (1) Identify preliminary system level functions and interface needs (Presented in the functional diagrams in Section 7.2). (2) Examine the overall system complexity and determine how and on what levels these control systems will be controlled and integrated (Presented in Section 7.2). (3) Develop a preliminary subsurface facility-wide design for an overall control system architecture, and depict this design by a series of control system functional block diagrams (Presented in Section 7.2). (4) Develop a series of physical architectures that present preliminary concepts for integrating the diverse set of control systems to be used within the subsurface repository facility (Presented in Section 7.3). (5) Develop initial concepts for an overall subsurface data communication system that can be used to integrate critical and data-intensive control systems (Presented in Section 7.4). (6) Discuss technology trends and control system design issues (Presented in Section 7.5).

C.J. Fernado

1998-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

37

Subsurface Science (The Molecular Environmental Science Group) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Science Subsurface Science BIO Home Page About BIO News Releases Research Publications People Contact Us Organization Chart Site Index Inside BIO BIO Safety About Argonne arrow Subsurface Science The Molecular Environmental Science Group (MESG) The MESG is part of the Biosciences Division at Argonne National Laboratory. One of the main foci during the creation and growth of the MESG has been the development of an internationally recognized integrated multidisciplinary scientific team focused on the investigation of fundamental biogeochemical questions. Presently, expertise that is represented by members of the MES Group includes x-ray Physics, Environmental Chemistry, Environmental Microbiology, (Bio)geochemistry, and radiolimnology. Additional expertise in electron microscopy, x-ray microscopy, Microbial Ecology, and Bioinformatics often is provided by collaborations with scientists outside of our group.

38

Autonomous microexplosives subsurface tracing system final report.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the autonomous micro-explosive subsurface tracing system is to image the location and geometry of hydraulically induced fractures in subsurface petroleum reservoirs. This system is based on the insertion of a swarm of autonomous micro-explosive packages during the fracturing process, with subsequent triggering of the energetic material to create an array of micro-seismic sources that can be detected and analyzed using existing seismic receiver arrays and analysis software. The project included investigations of energetic mixtures, triggering systems, package size and shape, and seismic output. Given the current absence of any technology capable of such high resolution mapping of subsurface structures, this technology has the potential for major impact on petroleum industry, which spends approximately $1 billion dollar per year on hydraulic fracturing operations in the United States alone.

Engler, Bruce Phillip; Nogan, John; Melof, Brian Matthew; Uhl, James Eugene; Dulleck, George R., Jr.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Rivas, Raul R.; Cooper, Paul W.; Warpinski, Norman Raymond; Kravitz, Stanley H.

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

MSTS - Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator theory manual  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, through the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office, has designated the Yucca Mountain site in Nevada for detailed study as the candidate US geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Site characterization will determine the suitability of the Yucca Mountain site for the potential waste repository. If the site is determined suitable, subsequent studies and characterization will be conducted to obtain authorization from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to construct the potential waste repository. A principal component of the characterization and licensing processes involves numerically predicting the thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment of the Yucca Mountain site to the potential repository over a 10,000-year period. The thermal and hydrologic response of the subsurface environment to the repository is anticipated to include complex processes of countercurrent vapor and liquid migration, multiple-phase heat transfer, multiple-phase transport, and geochemical reactions. Numerical simulators based on mathematical descriptions of these subsurface phenomena are required to make numerical predictions of the thermal and hydrologic response of the Yucca Mountain subsurface environment The engineering simulator called the Multiphase Subsurface Transport Simulator (MSTS) was developed at the request of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project Office to produce numerical predictions of subsurface flow and transport phenomena at the potential Yucca Mountain site. This document delineates the design architecture and describes the specific computational algorithms that compose MSTS. Details for using MSTS and sample problems are given in the {open_quotes}User`s Guide and Reference{close_quotes} companion document.

White, M.D.; Nichols, W.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Induction heaters used to heat subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes an elongated electrical conductor located in the subsurface formation. The electrical conductor extends between at least a first electrical contact and a second electrical contact. A ferromagnetic conductor at least partially surrounds and at least partially extends lengthwise around the electrical conductor. The electrical conductor, when energized with time-varying electrical current, induces sufficient electrical current flow in the ferromagnetic conductor such that the ferromagnetic conductor resistively heats to a temperature of at least about 300.degree. C.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Bass, Ronald M. (Houston, TX)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Heating systems for heating subsurface formations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methods and systems for heating a subsurface formation are described herein. A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a sealed conduit positioned in an opening in the formation and a heat source. The sealed conduit includes a heat transfer fluid. The heat source provides heat to a portion of the sealed conduit to change phase of the heat transfer fluid from a liquid to a vapor. The vapor in the sealed conduit rises in the sealed conduit, condenses to transfer heat to the formation and returns to the conduit portion as a liquid.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

42

Discrete Breathers in Deformed Graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The linear and nonlinear dynamics of elastically deformed graphene have been studied. The region of the stability of a planar graphene sheet has been represented in the space of the two-dimensional strain (? xx, ? yy) with the x and y axes oriented in the zigzag and armchair directions, respectively. It has been shown that the gap in the phonon spectrum appears in graphene under uniaxial deformation in the zigzag or armchair direction, while the gap is not formed under a hydrostatic load. It has been found that graphene deformed uniaxially in the zigzag direction supports the existence of spatially localized nonlinear modes in the form of discrete breathers, the frequency of which decreases with an increase in the amplitude. This indicates soft nonlinearity in the system. It is unusual that discrete breather has frequency within the phonon spectrum of graphene. This is explained by the fact that the oscillation of the discrete breather is polarized in the plane of the graphene sheet, while the phonon spectral band where the discrete breather frequency is located contains phonons oscillating out of plane. The stability of the discrete breather with respect to the small out-of-plane perturbation of the graphene sheet has been demonstrated. DOI: 10.1134/S0021364011190106 1.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Quantum chaos on discrete graphs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adapting a method developed for the study of quantum chaos on {\\it quantum (metric)} graphs \\cite {KS}, spectral $\\zeta$ functions and trace formulae for {\\it discrete} Laplacians on graphs are derived. This is achieved by expressing the spectral secular equation in terms of the periodic orbits of the graph, and obtaining functions which belongs to the class of $\\zeta$ functions proposed originally by Ihara \\cite {Ihara}, and expanded by subsequent authors \\cite {Stark,Sunada}. Finally, a model of "classical dynamics" on the discrete graph is proposed. It is analogous to the corresponding classical dynamics derived for quantum graphs \\cite {KS}.

Uzy Smilansky

2007-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

44

Surface detection of free hydrocarbon microseepage from subsurface petroleum accumulation: case study  

SciTech Connect

In January 1979, Pemex began a 2-yr test project designed to evaluate the surface detection of free hydrocarbon microseepage as an integrated exploration tool. The tests were performed by analyzing samples collected over fields selected to represent various hydrocarbon entrapment conditions. The structure selected is a lenticular anticline that produces oil from an Austin equivalent at 2500 m and dry gas from the Jurassic at approximately 3500 m. The 350 surface samples definitely indicate that methane is seeping into the near-surface sediments and forming a distinct anomaly directly above the 2 superimposed reservoirs. Apparently, only the methane is able to migrate through the stratigraphic section, and the heavier components, if they were able to escape from the Cretaceous reservoir, have been stripped and retained by the sediments. The surface anomaly appears to contain elements of both a circular halo and a centralized anomaly that overlies the apex of the producing structure.

Brown, S.W.; Salce, J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

Timothy DeVol

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

46

The discrete versus continuous controversy in physics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a sample of the deep and multiple interplay between discrete and continuous behaviours and the corresponding modellings in physics. The aim of this overview is to show that discrete and continuous features coexist in any natural phenomenon, ...

Annick Lesne

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Discrete space-time symmetries  

SciTech Connect

Symmetries have always fascinated human beings; they are found in nature, art, and architecture. Physicists, like other scientists have often used symmetries as a basis of their understanding of nature. When the dynamics is unknown, symmetries serve to delineate and define it. When the dynamics is known, symmetries are used to study structure. These two lectures review the theory and present understanding and status of two discrete space-time symmetries,, namely parity (P) and time reversal (T).

Henley, E.M.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

Discrete space-time symmetries  

SciTech Connect

Symmetries have always fascinated human beings; they are found in nature, art, and architecture. Physicists, like other scientists have often used symmetries as a basis of their understanding of nature. When the dynamics is unknown, symmetries serve to delineate and define it. When the dynamics is known, symmetries are used to study structure. These two lectures review the theory and present understanding and status of two discrete space-time symmetries,, namely parity (P) and time reversal (T).

Henley, E.M.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Locally exact modifications of discrete gradient schemes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Locally exact integrators preserve linearization of the original system at every point. We construct energy-preserving locally exact discrete gradient schemes for arbitrary multidimensional canonical Hamiltonian systems by modifying classical discrete gradient schemes. Modifications of this kind are found for any discrete gradient.

Cie?li?ski, Jan L

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Discrete conformal mappings via circle patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce a novel method for the construction of discrete conformal mappings from surface meshes of arbitrary topology to the plane. Our approach is based on circle patterns, that is, arrangements of circles---one for each face---with prescribed ... Keywords: Conformal parameterizations, circle patterns, discrete analytic functions, discrete differential geometry, meshing, texture mapping

Liliya Kharevych; Boris Springborn; Peter Schröder

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Accumulations Final Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Interrelation of Global Climate and the Response of Oceanic Hydrate Accumulations Final Report Date: July 15, 2013 Period: October 1, 2008 - June 30, 2013 NETL Manager: Skip Pratt Principal Investigators: Matthew Reagan (LBNL), Philip W. Jones (LLNL) 1. Goal of this report This report will summarize previously reported or published results concerning the behavior of hydrates subjected to warming, highlighting contributing and mitigating factors relating to the possibility of rapid climate feedbacks. We will thus assess various scenarios and possibilities for the relationship between climate and hydrates: i.e., the likelihood of a "clathrate

53

Parallel heater system for subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is disclosed. The system includes a plurality of substantially horizontally oriented or inclined heater sections located in a hydrocarbon containing layer in the formation. At least a portion of two of the heater sections are substantially parallel to each other. The ends of at least two of the heater sections in the layer are electrically coupled to a substantially horizontal, or inclined, electrical conductor oriented substantially perpendicular to the ends of the at least two heater sections.

Harris, Christopher Kelvin (Houston, TX); Karanikas, John Michael (Houston, TX); Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

54

Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); McKinzie, II. Billy John (Houston, TX)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

55

Discrete symmetries and neutrino masses  

SciTech Connect

We constructed a model of neutrino masses using Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism with U(1)xZ{sub 3}xZ{sub 2} flavor symmetry. The model predicts that (2/3)m{sub 2}/m{sub 3}{approx}{radical}(2)sin{theta}{sub 13} at lepton number violating scale M{sub 1}. It is shown that the small values for m{sub 2}/m{sub 3} and sin{theta}{sub 13} are consequences of breaking discrete symmetries.

Siyeon, Kim [Department of Physics, Chung-Ang University, Seoul 156-756 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Heat exchanger-accumulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chombo-Crunch: Advanced Simulation of Subsurface Flow and Reactive Transport Processes Associated with Carbon Sequestration PI Name: David Trebotich Institution: Lawrence Berkeley...

58

Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

genome sequencing. Principal Investigators: Wen-Tso Liu, University of Illinois Program: CSP 2011 Home > Sequencing > Why sequence archaea in a terrestrial subsurface aquifer...

59

EMSL: Science: Geochemistry/Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeochemistryBiogeochemistry and Subsurface Science pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Pyramid-like surface structure of the mineral, hematite Research in this...

60

Historical Ocean Subsurface Temperature Analysis with Error Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective analysis of monthly ocean subsurface temperatures from 1950 to 1998 is carried out. The analysis scheme and the results with estimated analysis errors are presented.

Masayoshi Ishii; Masahide Kimoto; Misako Kachi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Instruments for subsurface monitoring of geothermal subsidence  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The requirements for a subsurface geothermal subsidence instrument were reviewed. Available instruments for monitoring subsurface displacements, both vertical and horizontal, were studied and the most capable instruments identified. Techniques and materials for improving existing or developing new instruments were evaluated. Elements of sensor and signal technology with potential for high temperature monitoring of subsidence were identified. Drawing from these studies, methods to adapt production wells for monitoring were proposed and several new instrumentation systems were conceptually designed. Finally, four instrumentation systems were selected for future development. These systems are: triple sensor induction sensor probe (with casing collar markers); triple sensor gamma ray detector probe (with radioactive markers); triple sensor reed switch probe (with magnet markers); and triple sensor oscillator-type magnet detector probe (with magnet markers). All are designed for use in well casing incorporating slip couplings or bellows sections, although the gamma ray detector probe may also be used in unlined holes. These systems all measure vertical moement. Instruments to measure horizontal displacement due to geothermal subsidence were studied and the required instrument performance was judged to be beyond the state-of-the-art. Thus, no conceptual designs for instruments to monitor horizontal movement are included.

O'Rourke, J.E.; Ranson, B.B.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

63

SOLIDS ACCUMULATION SCOUTING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were scanned after tank supernatant was removed. 4. Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds. This sampler was designed and built to remove small sections of the mounds to evaluate concentrations of the stainless steel solids at different special locations. 5. Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler in appropriate locations over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank where mixing is poor. These devices and techniques were effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing heavier particles and could perform well at a larger scale The experiment contained two campaigns with each comprised of ten cycles to fill and empty the scaled staging tank. The tank was filled without mixing, but emptied, while mixing, in seven batches; the first six were of equal volumes of 13.1 gallons each to represent the planned fullscale batches of 145,000 gallons, and the last, partial, batch of 6.9 gallons represented a full-scale partial batch of 76,000 gallons that will leave a 72-inch heel in the staging tank for the next cycle. The sole difference between the two campaigns was the energy to mix the scaled staging tank, i.e., the nozzle velocity and jet rotational speed of the two jet pumps. Campaign 1 used 22.9 ft/s, at 1.54 rpm based on past testing and Campaign 2 used 23.9 ft/s at 1.75 rpm, based on visual observation of minimum velocity that allowed fast settling solids, i.e., sand and stainless steel, to accumulate on the scaled tank bottom.

Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

64

Bell's Jump Process in Discrete Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The jump process introduced by J. S. Bell in 1986, for defining a quantum field theory without observers, presupposes that space is discrete whereas time is continuous. In this letter, our interest is to find an analogous process in discrete time. We argue that a genuine analog does not exist, but provide examples of processes in discrete time that could be used as a replacement.

Jonathan Barrett; Matthew Leifer; Roderich Tumulka

2005-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

ASSESSMENT OF THE SUBSURFACE FATE OF MONOETHANOLAMINE  

SciTech Connect

Burial of amine reclaimer unit sludges and system filters has resulted in contamination of soil at the CanOxy Okotoks decommissioned sour gas-processing plant with amines, amine byproducts, and salts. A three-phase research program was devised to investigate the natural attenuation process that controls the subsurface transport and fate of these contaminants and to apply the results toward the development of a strategy for the remediation of this type of contamination in soils. Phase I experimental activities examined interactions between monoethanolamine (MEA) and sediment, the biodegradability of MEA in soils at various concentrations and temperatures, and the biodegradability of MEA sludge contamination in a soil slurry bioreactor. The transport and fate of MEA in the subsurface was found to be highly dependant on the nature of the release, particularly MEA concentration and conditions of the subsurface environment, i.e., pH, temperature, and oxygen availability. Pure compound biodegradation experiments in soil demonstrated rapid biodegradation of MEA under aerobic conditions and moderate temperatures (>6 C). Phase II landfarming activities confirmed that these contaminants are readily biodegradable in soil under ideal laboratory conditions, yet considerable toxicity was observed in the remaining material. Examination of water extracts from the treated soil suggested that the toxicity is water-soluble. Phase II activities led to the conclusion that landfarming is not the most desirable bioremediation technique; however, an engineered biopile with a leachate collection system could remove the remaining toxic fraction from the soil. Phase III was initiated to conduct field-based experimental activities to examine the optimized remediation technology. A pilot-scale engineered biopile was constructed at a decommissioned gas-sweetening facility in Okotoks, Alberta, Canada. On the basis of a review of the analytical and performance data generated from soil and leachate samples, the biopile operation has successfully removed all identified amines and removed significant amounts of organic nitrogen and organic carbon. Salts initially present in the soil and salts generated during the biodegradation of contaminants remain to be flushed from the soil. Laboratory data show that these salts are readily removable with a simple soil leach.

James A. Sorensen; John R. Gallagher; Lori G. Kays

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Discrete Frontal Propagation in a Nonconvective Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface discrete frontal propagation in a wintertime, nonconvective environment is documented using conventional surface and upper-air data and simulated using the PSU–NCAR mesoscale model.

Joseph J. Charney; J. Michael Fritsch

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

NETL: Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation Software  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Discrete Fracture Reservoir Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW Shale Gas Flow Simulation Shale Gas Flow Simulation FRACGENNFFLOW, a fractured reservoir modeling software developed by the...

68

Recoverable Robust Knapsack: the Discrete Scenario Case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 24, 2011... different customers according to their demands maximizing the profit of ... In this paper, we show that for a fixed number of discrete scenarios ...

69

Bayesian Analysis of Discrete Longitudinal Data.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explores a Bayesian hierarchical model to compare treatment effectiveness for menopausal symptom relief. Specifically, this model recognizes the discrete nature of the data,… (more)

Bernini, Nicholas

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper sets forth comprehensive basics of Discrete Thermodynamics of Chemical Equilibria (DTD), developed by the author during the last decade and spread over series of publications. Based on the linear equations of irreversible thermodynamics, De Donder's definition of the thermodynamic force, and the Le Chatelier principle, DTD brings forward a notion of chemical equilibrium as a balance of internal and external thermodynamic forces, acting against a chemical system. The basic expression of DTD is a logistic map that ties together energetic characteristics of the chemical transformation in the system, its deviation from true thermodynamic equilibrium, and the sum of thermodynamic forces, causing that deviation. System deviation from thermodynamic equilibrium is the major variable of the theory. Solutions to the basic map define the chemical system domain of states comprising bifurcation diagrams with four areas, from true thermodynamic equilibrium to chaos, having specific distinctive meaning for chemica...

Zilbergleyt, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation.

Grate, Jay W.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

REPOSITORY SUBSURFACE LAYOUT OPTIONS AND ESF INTERFACE  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work completed by the repository subsurface design group during the 1993 fiscal year (FY93), and represents a portion of the ongoing, repository Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) effort. The ACD work is being performed in accordance with guidance and controls established for the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). This document draws information from other ACD reports prepared and submitted during the year, and from other program studies, including the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Title II design. Site specific data gathered by the Surface Based Testing (SBT) program has been included to the extent that it became available early enough for use in the designs presented herein.

Dana J. Rogers

1993-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

73

Repository Subsurface Preliminary Fire Hazard Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This fire hazard analysis identifies preliminary design and operations features, fire, and explosion hazards, and provides a reasonable basis to establish the design requirements of fire protection systems during development and emplacement phases of the subsurface repository. This document follows the Technical Work Plan (TWP) (CRWMS M&O 2001c) which was prepared in accordance with AP-2.21Q, ''Quality Determinations and Planning for Scientific, Engineering, and Regulatory Compliance Activities''; Attachment 4 of AP-ESH-008, ''Hazards Analysis System''; and AP-3.11Q, ''Technical Reports''. The objective of this report is to establish the requirements that provide for facility nuclear safety and a proper level of personnel safety and property protection from the effects of fire and the adverse effects of fire-extinguishing agents.

Richard C. Logan

2001-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating is disclosed. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, J.G.; Daily, W.D.

1994-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

75

Optimal joule heating of the subsurface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for simultaneously heating the subsurface and imaging the effects of the heating. This method combines the use of tomographic imaging (electrical resistance tomography or ERT) to image electrical resistivity distribution underground, with joule heating by electrical currents injected in the ground. A potential distribution is established on a series of buried electrodes resulting in energy deposition underground which is a function of the resistivity and injection current density. Measurement of the voltages and currents also permits a tomographic reconstruction of the resistivity distribution. Using this tomographic information, the current injection pattern on the driving electrodes can be adjusted to change the current density distribution and thus optimize the heating. As the heating changes conditions, the applied current pattern can be repeatedly adjusted (based on updated resistivity tomographs) to affect real time control of the heating.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Discrete particle transport in porous media : discrete observations of physical mechanisms influencing particle behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An understanding of how discrete particles in the micron to submicron range behave in porous media is important to a number of environmental problems. Discrete particle behavior in the interior of a porous medium is complex ...

Yoon, Joon Sik, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site Technologies Provide High-Resolution Subsurface Imaging of Vadose Zone Contamination at Hanford Site May 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution Shown here are high-resolution, three-dimensional ERT images of contaminant distribution RICHLAND, Wash. - Cold War waste disposal practices resulted in both planned and unplanned releases of large amounts of radionuclide and heavy metal contamination into the subsurface throughout the DOE complex. Characterizing the distribution of the resulting environmental contamination remains one of the single most significant challenges limiting subsurface remediation and closure, particularly for the

78

Super Gabor frames on discrete periodic sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to its potential applications in multiplexing techniques such as time division multiple access and frequency division multiple access, superframe has interested some mathematicians and engineering specialists. In this paper, we investigate super ... Keywords: 42C40, Discrete Zak transform, Discrete periodic sets, Gabor dual, Super Gabor frame, Superframe

Yun-Zhang Li; Qiao-Fang Lian

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Structural Workshop Paper---Estimating Discrete Games  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a critical review of the methods for estimating static discrete games and their relevance for quantitative marketing. We discuss the various modeling approaches, alternative assumptions, and relevant trade-offs involved in taking ... Keywords: discrete choice, games estimation, structural models

Paul B. Ellickson; Sanjog Misra

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Discrete-event modelling of fire spreading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We deal here with the application of discrete-event System Specification (DEVS) formalism to implement a semi-physical fire spread model. Currently, models from physics finely representing forest fires are not efficient and still under development. If ... Keywords: Cellular models, DEVS, Discrete-event modelling and simulation, Fire spread

Alexandre Muzy; Eric Innocenti; Antoine Aiello; Jean-François Santucci; Thierry Marcelli; Paul Antoine Santoni

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Black Hole Spectrum: Continuous or Discrete?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We formulate a qualitative argument, based on Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, to support the claim that when the effects of matter fields are assumed to overshadow the effects of quantum mechanics of spacetime, the discrete spectrum of black hole radiation, as such as predicted by Bekenstein's proposal for a discrete black hole area spectrum, reduces to Hawking's black-body spectrum.

Jarmo Makela

1996-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

82

Accumulator Based Test Set Embedding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this paper a test set embedding based on accumulator driven by an odd additive constant is presented. The problem is formulated around finding the… (more)

Sudireddy, Samara Simha Reddy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

MULTISCALE DISCRETIZATION OF SHAPE CONTOURS  

SciTech Connect

We present an efficient multi-scale scheme to adaptively approximate the continuous (or densely sampled) contour of a planar shape at varying resolutions. The notion of shape is intimately related to the notion of contour, and the efficient representation of the contour of a shape is vital to a computational understanding of the shape. Any polygonal approximation of a planar smooth curve is equivalent to a piecewise constant approximation of the parameterized X and Y coordinate functions of a discrete point set obtained by densely sampling the curve. Using the Haar wavelet transform for the piecewise approximation yields a hierarchical scheme in which the size of the approximating point set is traded off against the morphological accuracy of the approximation. Our algorithm compresses the representation of the initial shape contour to a sparse sequence of points in the plane defining the vertices of the shape's polygonal approximation. Furthermore, it is possible to control the overall resolution of the approximation by a single, scale-independent parameter.

Prasad, L.; Rao, R.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF SUBSURFACE MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES AFFECTING RADIONUCLIDE TRANSPORT AND BIOIMMOBILIZATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this project were to: (1) isolate and characterize novel anaerobic prokaryotes from subsurface environments exposed to high levels of mixed contaminants (U(VI), nitrate, sulfate), (2) elucidate the diversity and distribution of metabolically active metal- and nitrate-reducing prokaryotes in subsurface sediments, and (3) determine the biotic and abiotic mechanisms linking electron transport processes (nitrate, Fe(III), and sulfate reduction) to radionuclide reduction and immobilization. Mechanisms of electron transport and U(VI) transformation were examined under near in situ conditions in sediment microcosms and in field investigations at the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination predominated by uranium and nitrate. A total of 20 publications (16 published or 'in press' and 4 in review), 10 invited talks, and 43 contributed seminars/ meeting presentations were completed during the past four years of the project. PI Kostka served on one proposal review panel each year for the U.S. DOE Office of Science during the four year project period. The PI leveraged funds from the state of Florida to purchase new instrumentation that aided the project. Support was also leveraged by the PI from the Joint Genome Institute in the form of two successful proposals for genome sequencing. Draft genomes are now available for two novel species isolated during our studies and 5 more genomes are in the pipeline. We effectively addressed each of the three project objectives and research highlights are provided. Task I - Isolation and characterization of novel anaerobes: (1) A wide range of pure cultures of metal-reducing bacteria, sulfate-reducing bacteria, and denitrifying bacteria (32 strains) were isolated from subsurface sediments of the Oak Ridge Field Research Center (ORFRC), where the subsurface is exposed to mixed contamination of uranium and nitrate. These isolates which are new to science all show high sequence identity to sequences retrieved from ORFRC subsurface. (2) Based on physiological and phylogenetic characterization, two new species of subsurface bacteria were described: the metal-reducer Geobacter daltonii, and the denitrifier Rhodanobacter denitrificans. (3) Strains isolated from the ORFRC show that Rhodanobacter species are well adapted to the contaminated subsurface. Strains 2APBS1 and 116-2 grow at high salt (3% NaCl), low pH (3.5) and tolerate high concentrations of nitrate (400mM) and nitrite (100mM). Strain 2APBS1 was demonstrated to grow at in situ acidic pHs down to 2.5. (4) R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 is the first described Rhodanobacter species shown to denitrify. Nitrate is almost entirely converted to N2O, which may account for the large accumulation of N2O in the ORFRC subsurface. (5) G. daltonii, isolated from uranium- and hydrocarbon-contaminated subsurface sediments of the ORFRC, is the first organism from the subsurface clade of the genus Geobacter that is capable of growth on aromatic hydrocarbons. (6) High quality draft genome sequences and a complete eco-physiological description are completed for R. denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and G. daltonii strain FRC-32. (7) Given their demonstrated relevance to DOE remediation efforts and the availability of detailed genotypic/phenotypic characterization, Rhodanobacter denitrificans strain 2APBS1 and Geobacter daltonii strain FRC-32 represent ideal model organisms to provide a predictive understanding of subsurface microbial activity through metabolic modeling. Tasks II and III-Diversity and distribution of active anaerobes and Mechanisms linking electron transport and the fate of radionuclides: (1) Our study showed that members of genus Rhodanobacter and Geobacter are abundant and active in the uranium and nitrate contaminated subsurface. In the contaminant source zone of the Oak Ridge site, Rhodanobacter spp. are the predominant, active organisms detected (comprising 50% to 100% of rRNA detected). (2) We demonstrated for the first time that the function of micro

Joel E. Kostka; Lee Kerkhof; Kuk-Jeong Chin; Martin Keller; Joseph W. Stucki

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the waves generated by all surface sources. The subject of this report is use this data set to determine the subsurface structure as a function of azimuth. A total or 2005 first...

86

EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at 331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming EA-1331: Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site, Sweetwater County, Wyoming SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal for the Rock Springs In-Situ Oil Shale Retort Test Site remediation that would be performed at the Rock Springs site in Sweetwater County, Wyoming. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Finding of No Significant Impact Remediation of Subsurface and Groundwater Contamination at the Rock Springs in situ Oil Shale Retort Site July 31, 2000 EA-1331: Final Environmental Assessment

87

PNNL: Biological Sciences - A Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area -  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Role of Microenvironments and Transition Zones in Subsurface Reactive Contaminant Transport Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) The Subsurface Science Scientific Focus Area (SFA) is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The SFA team is performing integrated, multidisciplinary, science-theme-focused research on the role of microenvironments and transition zones in the reactive transport of technetium (Tc), uranium (U), and plutonium (Pu). The primary environmental system being studied is the groundwater-river interaction zone in the 300 area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. Ringold Sediments Redox boundary in Ringold sediments about 2.5 m below the Hanford-Ringold contact. The boundary is the point where oxygen and other terminal electron

88

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Electrical Measurements at Dixie Valley, Nevada, Using Single-Well and Surface-to-Well Induction Logging Abstract Extended logging and surface-to-borehole electromagnetic induction measurements were performed at the Dixie Valley Geothermal Field as part of an ongoing effort to employ electromagnetic induction logging to geothermal reservoir characterization. The principal goal of this effort is to discern subsurface features useful in geothermal production, such as larger scale mapping of geothermal reservoirs and smaller scale mapping of producing

89

A discrete curvature on a planar graph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Given a planar graph derived from a spherical, euclidean or hyperbolic tessellation, one can define a discrete curvature by combinatorial properties, which after embedding the graph in a compact 2d-manifold, becomes the Gaussian curvature.

M. Lorente

2004-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

Combining sustainability criteria with discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper attempts to highlight shortcomings in the concept of sustainability and ways to make the concept more workable by presenting the development of an Environmental Management Information System (EMIS) as a combination of discrete event simulation ...

Andi H. Widok; Volker Wohlgemuth; Bernd Page

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

A discrete model of thin shells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a discrete model for the behavior of thin flexible structures, such as hats, leaves, and aluminum cans, which are characterized by a curved undeformed configuration. Previously such models required complex continuum mechanics formulations ...

Eitan Grinspun

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Quantum Gravity Phenomenology, Lorentz Invariance and Discreteness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contrary to what is often stated, a fundamental spacetime discreteness need not contradict Lorentz invariance. A causal set's discreteness is in fact locally Lorentz invariant, and we recall the reasons why. For illustration, we introduce a phenomenological model of massive particles propagating in a Minkowski spacetime which arises from an underlying causal set. The particles undergo a Lorentz invariant diffusion in phase space, and we speculate on whether this could have any bearing on the origin of high energy cosmic rays.

Fay Dowker; Joe Henson; Rafael D. Sorkin

2003-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

93

Discrete gravity models and Loop Quantum Gravity: a short review  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the relation between loop quantum gravity on a fixed graph and discrete models of gravity. We compare Regge and twisted geometries, and discuss discrete actions based on twisted geometries and on the discretization of the Plebanski action. We discuss the role of discrete geometries in the spin foam formalism, with particular attention to the definition of the simplicity constraints.

Dupuis, Maite; Speziale, Simone

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associated With Uranium Bioremediation at Rifle transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/ accumulation

Hubbard, Susan

95

Energy Levels of "Hydrogen Atom" in Discrete Time Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze dynamical consequences of a conjecture that there exists a fundamental (indivisible) quant of time. In particular we study the problem of discrete energy levels of hydrogen atom. We are able to reconstruct potential which in discrete time formalism leads to energy levels of unperturbed hydrogen atom. We also consider linear energy levels of quantum harmonic oscillator and show how they are produced in the discrete time formalism. More generally, we show that in discrete time formalism finite motion in central potential leads to discrete energy spectrum, the property which is common for quantum mechanical theory. Thus deterministic (but discrete time!) dynamics is compatible with discrete energy levels.

Andrei Khrennikov; Yaroslav Volovich

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

96

Lower-Temperature Subsurface Layout and Ventilation Concepts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis combines work scope identified as subsurface facility (SSF) low temperature (LT) Facilities System and SSF LT Ventilation System in the Technical Work Plan for Subsurface Design Section FY 01 Work Activities (CRWMS M&O 2001b, pp. 6 and 7, and pp. 13 and 14). In accordance with this technical work plan (TWP), this analysis is performed using AP-3.10Q, Analyses and Models. It also incorporates the procedure AP-SI.1Q, Software Management. The purpose of this analysis is to develop an overall subsurface layout system and the overall ventilation system concepts that address a lower-temperature operating mode for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR). The objective of this analysis is to provide a technical design product that supports the lower-temperature operating mode concept for the revision of the system description documents and to provide a basis for the system description document design descriptions. The overall subsurface layout analysis develops and describes the overall subsurface layout, including performance confirmation facilities (also referred to as Test and Evaluation Facilities) for the Site Recommendation design. This analysis also incorporates current program directives for thermal management.

Christine L. Linden; Edward G. Thomas

2001-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal reservoir by analyzing shear-wave splitting of microearthquake seismorgrams Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A large number of microearthquake seismograms have been recorded by a downhole, three-component seismic network deployed around the Coso, California geothermal reservoir. Shear-wave splitting induced by the alignment of cracks in the reservoir has been widely observed in the recordings. Over 100 events with body wave magnitude greater than 1.0 from

98

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Subsurface Stratigraphy, Structure, and Alteration in the Senator Thermal Area, Northern Dixie Valley Geothermal Field, Nevada-Initial Results from Injection Well 38-32, and a New Structural Scenario for the Stillwater Escarpment Abstract Two injection wells (DV 38-32 and DV 27-32) in the Senator thermal area of the northern Dixie Valley geothermal field supply all the injectate reaching the field's northernmost group of production wells. These injectors are also the only wells in the field drilled between the surface

99

DETERMINATION OF IMPORTANCE EVALUATION FOR THE SUBSURFACE EXPORATORY STUDIES FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Determination of Importance Evaluation (DIE) applies to the Subsurface Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), encompassing the Topopah Spring (TS) Loop from Station 0+00 meters (m) at the North Portal to breakthrough at the South Portal (approximately 78+77 m), the Enhanced Characterization of the Repository Block (ECRB) East-West Cross Drift Starter Tunnel (to approximate ECRB Station 0+26 m), and ancillary test and operation support areas in the TS Loop. This evaluation applies to the construction, operation, and maintenance of these excavations. A more detailed description of these items is provided in Section 6.0. Testing activities are not evaluated in this DIE. Certain construction activities with respect to testing activities are evaluated; but the testing activities themselves are not evaluated. The DIE for ESF Subsurface Testing Activities (BAJ3000000-01717-2200-00011 Rev 01) (CRWMS M&O 1998a) evaluates Subsurface ESF Testing activities. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the TS Loop niches and alcove slot cuts is evaluated herein and is also discussed in CRWMS M&O 1998a. The construction, operation, and maintenance of the Busted Butte subsurface test area in support of the Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Transport Test is evaluated in CRWMS M&O 1998a. Potential test-to-test interference and the waste isolation impacts of testing activities are evaluated in the ESF Subsurface Testing Activities DIE and other applicable evaluation(s) for the Job Package (JP), Test Planning Package (TPP), and/or Field Work Package (FWP). The objectives of this DIE are to determine whether the Subsurface ESF TS Loop and associated excavations, including activities associated with their construction and operation, potentially impact site characterization testing or the waste isolation capabilities of the site. Controls needed to limit any potential impacts are identified. The validity and veracity of the individual tests, including data collection, are the responsibility of the assigned Principal Investigator(s) (PIs) and are not evaluated in this DIE.

W.J. Clark

1999-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

Accumulated waste characterization work plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PORTS) as part of the uranium enrichment complex produces enriched uranium for power generation and defense purposes. Since the beginning of diffusion plant operations in 1953, a variety of waste materials and excess equipment has been generated through both normal operations and as part of major system upgrade programs. However, as a result of the closure of former onsite radioactive management facilities and limited onsite and offsite disposal facilities for mixed (hazardous and radioactive) wastes, PORTS has accumulated large quantities of waste awaiting final disposition. These accumulated wastes were estimated in the Accumulated Waste Plan (AWP) to consist of some 21,700 containers of the radioactive, RCRA hazardous, PCB, mixed and asbestos wastes in various storage areas and process buildings with PORTS. In order to proper manage these wastes onsite and prepare for them for ultimate treatment or disposal, a detailed understanding of the waste contents and characteristics must be developed. The strategy for managing and disposing of these wastes was outlined in the AWP. The purpose of this Accumulated Waste Characterization Work Plan (AWCWP) is to provide a detailed plan for characterizing waste containers from the existing PORTS inventory. The AWCWP documents the process and analytical information currently available and describes statistically-based sampling and analyses required to support proper regulatory classification.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Subsurface Pathway Flow and Transport Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

Migration of contaminants through the complex subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area was simulated for an ongoing Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability (CERCLA) assessment. A previously existing model for simulating flow and transport through the vadose zone for this site was updated to incorporate information obtained from recent characterization activities. Given the complexity of the subsurface at this site, the simulation results were acknowledged to be uncertain. Rather than attempt parametric approaches to quantify uncertainty, it was recognized that conceptual uncertainty involving the controlling processes was likely dominant. So, the effort focused on modeling different scenarios to evaluate the impact of the conceptual uncertainty.

Magnuson, S.O.

2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Ultrastructural and flow cytometric analyses of lipid accumulation in microalgae  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lipid accumulation in three species of microalgae was investigated with flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Previous studies using batch cultures of a algae have led to the assumption that lipid accumulation in microalgae is a gradual process requiring at least several days for completion. However, FCM reveals, through changes in the chlorophyll:lipid ratio, that the time span required for individual cells to change metabolic state is short. Simultaneous FCM measurements of chlorophyll and nile red (neutral lipid) fluorescence in individual cells of nitrogen-deficient Isochrysis populations revealed a bimodal population distribution as one stage in the lipid accumulation process. The fact that two discrete populations exist, with few cells in an intermediate stage, suggests rapid response to a liqid trigger. Interpretations of light and electron microscopic observations are consistent with this hypothesis. The time required for an entire population to achieve maximum lipid content is considerably longer than that required for a single cell, due to the variation in response time among cells. In this study high lipid cultures were sometimes obtained by using FCM to separate high lipid cells from the remainder of the population. FCM holds much promise for strain enhancement but considerable developmental work, directed at providing more consistent results, remains to be done. 8 refs., 35 figs.

Solomon, J.A.; Hand, R.E. Jr.; Mann, R.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fast Mix Table Construction for Material Discretization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An effective hybrid Monte Carlo--deterministic implementation typically requires the approximation of a continuous geometry description with a discretized piecewise-constant material field. The inherent geometry discretization error can be reduced somewhat by using material mixing, where multiple materials inside a discrete mesh voxel are homogenized. Material mixing requires the construction of a ``mix table,'' which stores the volume fractions in every mixture so that multiple voxels with similar compositions can reference the same mixture. Mix table construction is a potentially expensive serial operation for large problems with many materials and voxels. We formulate an efficient algorithm to construct a sparse mix table in $O(\\text{number of voxels}\\times \\log \\text{number of mixtures})$ time. The new algorithm is implemented in ADVANTG and used to discretize continuous geometries onto a structured Cartesian grid. When applied to an end-of-life MCNP model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor with 270 distinct materials, the new method improves the material mixing time by a factor of 100 compared to a naive mix table implementation.

Johnson, Seth R [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of see-saw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mechanisms for flavon vacuum alignment and different model building strategies that have been proposed to generate the reactor angle. We then briefly review grand unified theories (GUTs) and how they may be combined with discrete family symmetry to describe all quark and lepton masses and mixing. Finally we discuss three model examples which combine an SU(5) GUT with the discrete family symmetries A4, S4 and Delta(96).

Stephen F. King; Christoph Luhn

2013-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

105

Electroless plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus are disclosed for producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles by electroless techniques. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with each other for a time sufficient for such to occur.

Mayer, Anton (Los Alamos, NM)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Electrolytic plating apparatus for discrete microsized particles  

SciTech Connect

Method and apparatus are disclosed for electrolytically producing very uniform coatings of a desired material on discrete microsized particles. Agglomeration or bridging of the particles during the deposition process is prevented by imparting a sufficiently random motion to the particles that they are not in contact with a powered cathode for a time sufficient for such to occur.

Mayer, Anton (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

Review of potential subsurface permeable barrier emplacement and monitoring technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report focuses on subsurface permeable barrier technologies potentially applicable to existing waste disposal sites. This report describes candidate subsurface permeable barriers, methods for emplacing these barriers, and methods used to monitor the barrier performance. Two types of subsurface barrier systems are described: those that apply to contamination.in the unsaturated zone, and those that apply to groundwater and to mobile contamination near the groundwater table. These barriers may be emplaced either horizontally or vertically depending on waste and site characteristics. Materials for creating permeable subsurface barriers are emplaced using one of three basic methods: injection, in situ mechanical mixing, or excavation-insertion. Injection is the emplacement of dissolved reagents or colloidal suspensions into the soil at elevated pressures. In situ mechanical mixing is the physical blending of the soil and the barrier material underground. Excavation-insertion is the removal of a soil volume and adding barrier materials to the space created. Major vertical barrier emplacement technologies include trenching-backfilling; slurry trenching; and vertical drilling and injection, including boring (earth augering), cable tool drilling, rotary drilling, sonic drilling, jetting methods, injection-mixing in drilled holes, and deep soil mixing. Major horizontal barrier emplacement technologies include horizontal drilling, microtunneling, compaction boring, horizontal emplacement, longwall mining, hydraulic fracturing, and jetting methods.

Riggsbee, W.H.; Treat, R.L.; Stansfield, H.J.; Schwarz, R.M. [Ebasco Environmental, Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Phillips, S.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier  

SciTech Connect

A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

109

Subsurface Jets in the Northwestern Gulf of Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface jets, defined as having velocity maxima >40 cm s?1 at depths between 100 and 350 m, and being surrounded by much weaker near-surface currents, have been observed over the northwestern Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The observations ...

Peter Hamilton; Antoine Badan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) has established the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) to satisfy manage and dispose of the waste currently stored in the underground storage tanks. The retrieval element of TWRS includes a work scope to develop subsurface impermeable barriers beneath SSTs. The barriers could serve as a means to contain leakage that may result from waste retrieval operations and could also support site closure activities by facilitating cleanup. Three types of subsurface barrier systems have emerged for further consideration: (1) chemical grout, (2) freeze walls, and (3) desiccant, represented in this feasibility study as a circulating air barrier. This report contains analyses of the costs and relative risks associated with combinations retrieval technologies and barrier technologies that from 14 alternatives. Eight of the alternatives include the use of subsurface barriers; the remaining six nonbarrier alternative are included in order to compare the costs, relative risks and other values of retrieval with subsurface barriers. Each alternative includes various combinations of technologies that can impact the risks associated with future contamination of the groundwater beneath the Hanford Site to varying degrees. Other potential risks associated with these alternatives, such as those related to accidents and airborne contamination resulting from retrieval and barrier emplacement operations, are not quantitatively evaluated in this report.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J.; McCormak, W.D.; Trenkler, T.; Walters, M.F. [Ensearch Environmental, Inc. (United States); Rouse, J.K.; McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest, Inc., Richland, WA (United States); Cruse, J.M. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impact of Subsurface Temperature Variability on Surface Air Temperature Variability: An AGCM Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anomalous atmospheric conditions can lead to surface temperature anomalies, which in turn can lead to temperature anomalies in the subsurface soil. The subsurface soil temperature (and the associated ground heat content) has significant memory—...

Sarith P. P. Mahanama; Randal D. Koster; Rolf H. Reichle; Max J. Suarez

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Discrete variable theory of triatomic photodissociation  

SciTech Connect

The coupled equations describing the photodissociation process are expressed in the discrete variable representation (DVR) in which the coupled equations are labeled by quadrature points rather than by internal basis functions. A large reduction in the dimensionality of the coupled equations can be realized since the spatially localized bound state nuclear wave function vanishes at most of the quadrature points, making only certain orientations of the fragments important in the region of strong interaction (small separation). The discrete variable theory of photodissociation is applied to the model dissociation of bent HCN in which the CN fragment is treated as a rigid rotor. The truncated DVR rotational distributions are compared with the exact close coupled rotational distributions, and excellent agreement with greatly reduced dimensionality of the equations is found.

Heather, R.W.; Light, J.C.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Bessel-Zernike Discrete Variable Representation Basis  

SciTech Connect

The connection between the Bessel discrete variable basis expansion and a specific form of an orthogonal set of Jacobi polynomials is demonstrated. These so-called Zernike polynomials provide alternative series expansions of suitable functions over the unit interval. Expressing a Bessel function in a Zernike expansion provides a straightforward method of generating series identities. Furthermore, the Zernike polynomials may also be used to efficiently evaluate the Hankel transform for rapidly decaying functions or functions with finite support.

Cerjan, C J

2005-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

114

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft Oliver Junge Center-Bl¨obaum partially supported by the CRC 376 Oliver Junge Discrete mechanics, optimal control and formation flying spacecraft p.1 #12;Outline mechanical optimal control problem direct discretization of the variational

Patrick, George

115

Adaptive fuzzy logic control of discrete-time dynamical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to achieve tracking control of a class of unknown nonlinear dynamical systems using a discrete-time fuzzy logic controller (FLC). Designing a discrete-time FLC is significant because almost all FLCs are implemented on digital ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Discrete-time control, Fuzzy approximation, Fuzzy logic, Universal fuzzy controller

S. Jagannathan; M. W. Vandegrift; F. L. Lewis

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Seismic Mapping Of The Subsurface Structure At The Ryepatch Geothermal Reservoir Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: In 1998 a 3-D surface seismic survey was conducted to explore the structure of the Rye Patch geothermal reservoir (Nevada) to determine if modern seismic techniques could be successfully applied in geothermal environments. Furthermore, it was intended to map the structural features which may control geothermal production in the reservoir. The results

117

U.S. Department of Energy Subsurface Biogeochemical Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Subsurface Biogeochemical Research. Click to return to home page. Department of Energy Office of Science. Click to visit main DOE SC site. About the Program Research User Facilities PI Meeting Site Map Contact Us About SBR Overview Impact of SBR Research Bibliography Research Abstracts Reports and Documents Document Archive Timeline Related DOE Programs Related Meetings Calendar Contact Information David Lesmes Paul Bayer All SBR Contacts Office of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science Simulation of Pore-Scale Fluid Flow Research Snapshot Approach Bibliography Research Abstracts Research Highlights Performance Measures and Milestones Archive Calls for Proposals Announcements Major Programmatic Components National Laboratory SFAs University-Led Projects

118

Using electrical impedance tomography to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) to map subsurface hydraulic conductivity. EIT can be used to map hydraulic conductivity in the subsurface where measurements of both amplitude and phase are made. Hydraulic conductivity depends on at least two parameters: porosity and a length scale parameter. Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT) measures and maps electrical conductivity (which can be related to porosity) in three dimensions. By introducing phase measurements along with amplitude, the desired additional measurement of a pertinent length scale can be achieved. Hydraulic conductivity controls the ability to flush unwanted fluid contaminants from the surface. Thus inexpensive maps of hydraulic conductivity would improve planning strategies for subsequent remediation efforts. Fluid permeability is also of importance for oil field exploitation and thus detailed knowledge of fluid permeability distribution in three-dimension (3-D) would be a great boon to petroleum reservoir analysts.

Berryman, James G. (Danville, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Roberts, Jeffery J. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system  

SciTech Connect

A greenhouse of an underground heat accumulation system is described wherein the radiant energy of the sun or wasted thermal energy is accumulated in the soil below the floor of the greenhouse over a prolonged period of time, and spontaneous release of the accumulated energy into the interior of the greenhouse begins in the wintertime due to a time lag of heat transfer through the soil. The release of the accumulated energy lasts throughout the winter.

Fujie, K.; Abe, K.; Uchida, A.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Multi-step heater deployment in a subsurface formation  

SciTech Connect

A method for installing a horizontal or inclined subsurface heater includes placing a heating section of a heater in a horizontal or inclined section of a wellbore with an installation tool. The tool is uncoupled from the heating section. A lead in section is mechanically and electrically coupled to the heating section of the heater. The lead-in section is located in an angled or vertical section of the wellbore.

Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX)

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CLASSIFICATION OF THE MGR SUBSURFACE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this analysis is to document the Quality Assurance (QA) classification of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) subsurface electrical distribution system structures, systems and components (SSCs) performed by the MGR Safety Assurance Department. This analysis also provides the basis for revision of YMP/90-55Q, Q-List (YMP 1998). The Q-List identifies those MGR SSCs subject to the requirements of DOE/RW-0333PY ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (QARD) (DOE 1998).

R.J. Garrett

1999-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Downhole burner systems and methods for heating subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas burner assembly for heating a subsurface formation includes an oxidant conduit, a fuel conduit, and a plurality of oxidizers coupled to the oxidant conduit. At least one of the oxidizers includes a mix chamber for mixing fuel from the fuel conduit with oxidant from the oxidant conduit, an igniter, and a shield. The shield includes a plurality of openings in communication with the oxidant conduit. At least one flame stabilizer is coupled to the shield.

Farmayan, Walter Farman (Houston, TX); Giles, Steven Paul (Damon, TX); Brignac, Jr., Joseph Phillip (Katy, TX); Munshi, Abdul Wahid (Houston, TX); Abbasi, Faraz (Sugarland, TX); Clomburg, Lloyd Anthony (Houston, TX); Anderson, Karl Gregory (Missouri City, TX); Tsai, Kuochen (Katy, TX); Siddoway, Mark Alan (Katy, TX)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

123

STOMP, Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases, theory guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide describes the simulator`s governing equations, constitutive functions and numerical solution algorithms of the STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) simulator, a scientific tool for analyzing multiple phase subsurface flow and transport. The STOMP simulator`s fundamental purpose is to produce numerical predictions of thermal and hydrologic flow and transport phenomena in variably saturated subsurface environments, which are contaminated with volatile or nonvolatile organic compounds. Auxiliary applications include numerical predictions of solute transport processes including radioactive chain decay processes. In writing these guides for the STOMP simulator, the authors have assumed that the reader comprehends concepts and theories associated with multiple-phase hydrology, heat transfer, thermodynamics, radioactive chain decay, and nonhysteretic relative permeability, saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The authors further assume that the reader is familiar with the computing environment on which they plan to compile and execute the STOMP simulator. The STOMP simulator requires an ANSI FORTRAN 77 compiler to generate an executable code. The memory requirements for executing the simulator are dependent on the complexity of physical system to be modeled and the size and dimensionality of the computational domain. Likewise execution speed depends on the problem complexity, size and dimensionality of the computational domain, and computer performance. One-dimensional problems of moderate complexity can be solved on conventional desktop computers, but multidimensional problems involving complex flow and transport phenomena typically require the power and memory capabilities of workstation or mainframe type computer systems.

White, M.D.; Oostrom, M.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Methods and system for subsurface stabilization using jet grouting  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for stabilizing a subsurface area such as a buried waste pit for either long term storage, or interim storage and retrieval. A plurality of holes are drilled into the subsurface area with a high pressure drilling system provided with a drill stem having jet grouting nozzles. A grouting material is injected at high pressure through the jet grouting nozzles into a formed hole while the drill stem is withdrawn from the hole at a predetermined rate of rotation and translation. A grout-filled column is thereby formed with minimal grout returns, which when overlapped with other adjacent grout-filled columns encapsulates and binds the entire waste pit area to form a subsurface agglomeration or monolith of grout, soil, and waste. The formed monolith stabilizes the buried waste site against subsidence while simultaneously providing a barrier against contaminate migration. The stabilized monolith can be left permanently in place or can be retrieved if desired by using appropriate excavation equipment. The jet grouting technique can also be utilized in a pretreatment approach prior to in situ vitrification of a buried waste site. The waste encapsulation methods and systems are applicable to buried waste materials such as mixed waste, hazardous waste, or radioactive waste.

Loomis, Guy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Weidner, Jerry R. (Iona, ID); Farnsworth, Richard K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessmore, James J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Towards a Number Theoretic Discrete Hilbert Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for the development of a number theoretic discrete Hilbert transform. The forward transformation has been applied by taking the odd reciprocals that occur in the DHT matrix with respect to a power of 2. Specifically, the expression for a 16-point transform is provided and results of a few representative signals are provided. The inverse transform is the inverse of the forward 16-point matrix. But at this time the inverse transform is not identical to the forward transform and, therefore, our proposed number theoretic transform must be taken as a provisional result.

Kandregula, Renuka

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Bilinear control of discrete spectrum Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The bilinear control problem of the Schr\\"odinger equation $i\\frac{\\partial}{\\partial t}\\psi(t)$ $=(A+u(t) B)\\psi(t)$, where $u(t)$ is the control function, is investigated through topological irreducibility of the set $\\mathfrak{M}=\\{e^{-it (A+u B)}, u\\in \\mathbb{R}, t>0\\}$ of bounded operators. This allows to prove the approximate controllability of such systems when the uncontrolled Hamiltonian $A$ has a simple discrete spectrum and under an appropriate assumption on $B$.

Kais Ammari; Zied Ammari

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

A BASIC program for calculating subsurface water temperatures using chemical geothermometers—implication to geothermal reservoir estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: BASIC, Na-K-Ca geothermometer, Na/K ratio, geothermometer, silica geothermometer, subsurface temperature

Ali El-Naqa; Nasser Abu Zeid

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

A Family of Discrete Magnetically Switchable Nanoballs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal and light-induced magnetic properties of a family of discrete magnetically switchable 'nanoball' species (3 nm in diameter) is reported. The self-assembly of these materials is accomplished by the use of the metallo building block, [Cu([Tp{sup 4-py}])(NCCH{sub 3})] ([Tp{sup 4-py}]=tris-[3-(4{prime}-pyridyl)pyrazol-1-yl]hydroborate), combined with a [Fe(NCX){sub 2}] (X = S, Se and BH{sub 3}) species. We previously showed that the thiocyanate analogue (Fe(NCS)-nano) undergoes a thermal and light-induced spin crossover (SCO) - the largest such discrete SCO material reported. Now included in this family are the Se and BH{sub 3} analogues, Fe(NCSe)-nano and Fe(NCBH{sub 3})-nano, which show increased thermal transition temperatures (T{sub 1/2} = 124 K, 162 and 173 K). This variation in transition temperature over the series S < Se < BH{sub 3} results in diverse photomagnetic properties, such that the light-induced excited spin state trapping (LIESST) effect is exhibited to varying degrees and at different temperatures by the S, Se and BH{sub 3} analogues.

Duriska, Martin B.; Neville, Suzanne M.; Moubaraki, Boujemaa; Murray, Keith S.; Balde, Chérif; Létard, Jean-François; Kepert, Cameron J.; Batten, Stuart R. (Sydney); (Monash); (CNRS-LSP)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Neutrino Mass and Mixing with Discrete Symmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a review article about neutrino mass and mixing and flavour model building strategies based on discrete family symmetry. After a pedagogical introduction and overview of the whole of neutrino physics, we focus on the PMNS mixing matrix and the latest global fits following the Daya Bay and RENO experiments which measure the reactor angle. We then describe the simple bimaximal, tri-bimaximal and golden ratio patterns of lepton mixing and the deviations required for a non-zero reactor angle, with solar or atmospheric mixing sum rules resulting from charged lepton corrections or residual trimaximal mixing. The different types of seesaw mechanism are then reviewed as well as the sequential dominance mechanism. We then give a mini-review of finite group theory, which may be used as a discrete family symmetry broken by flavons either completely, or with different subgroups preserved in the neutrino and charged lepton sectors. These two approaches are then reviewed in detail in separate chapters including mec...

King, Stephen F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow  

SciTech Connect

Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Cantrell, K.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); McLaughlin, T.J. [Bovay Northwest Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Adaptive discrete cosine transform for feedback active noise control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory and performance of adaptive discrete cosine transform filters for feedback active noise control (ANC) is examined. The discrete cosine transform filter is a realization of an FIR filter as the cascade of an all-zero FIR filter with a bank ... Keywords: FIR filter, IIR digital resonators bank, active noise control, adaptive discrete cosine transform filters, adaptive filter, all-zero FIR filter, discrete cosine transform filter, feedback active noise control, filter-X LMS implementation, frequency, magnitude coefficient, phase coefficient, single error microphone, single loudspeaker, transfer function

G. Coutu; M. Dignan

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Discrete Quantum Spectrum of Observable Correlations from Inflation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The decoherence of quantum fluctuations into classical perturbations during inflation is discussed. A simple quantum mechanical argument, using a spatial particle wavefunction rather than a field description, shows that observable correlations from inflation must have a discrete spectrum, since they originate and freeze into the metric within a compact region. The number of discrete modes is estimated using a holographic bound on the number of degrees of freedom. The discreteness may be detectable in some models; for example, if there is a fundamental universal frequency spectrum, the inflationary gravitational wave background may be resolvable into discrete emission lines.

Craig J. Hogan

2005-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Discrete Variable Method for the Time Dependent and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Abstract: The discrete variable representation (DVR) has been found to be a very effective approach for the numerical solution of the Schroedinger ...

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Discrete Element Method Applied to the Vibration Process of Coke ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, effects of particle shape and size distribution on vibrated bulk density (VBD) of dry coke samples have been investigated. Discrete Element ...

135

Variational estimates using a discrete variable representation  

SciTech Connect

The advantage of using a discrete variable representation (DVR) is that the Hamiltonian of two interacting particles can be constructed in a very simple form. However, the DVR Hamiltonian is approximate and, as a consequence, the results cannot be considered as variational ones. We will show that the variational character of the results can be restored by performing a reduced number of integrals. In practice, for a variational description of the lowest n bound states only n(n+1)/2 integrals are necessary whereas D(D+1)/2 integrals are enough for the scattering states (D is the dimension of the S matrix). Applications of the method to the study of dimers of He, Ne and Ar, for both bound and scattering states, are presented.

Lombardi, M.; Barletta, P.; Kievsky, A. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Via Buonarroti 2, 56100 Pisa (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Pisa, 56100 Pisa (Italy)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Decreasing Isosurface Complexity Via Discrete Fitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the introduction of techniques for isosurface extraction from volumetric datasets, one of the hardest problems has been to reduce the number of generated triangles (or polygons). This paper presents an algorithm that considerably reduces the number of triangles generated by a Marching Cubes algorithm, while presenting very close or shorter running times. The algorithm first assumes discretization of the dataset space and replaces cell edge interpolation by midpoint selection. Under these assumptions the extracted surfaces are composed of polygons lying within a finite number of incidences, thus allowing simple merging of the output facets into large coplanar triangular facets. Lastly, the vertices which survived the decimation process are located on their exact positions and normals are computed. An experimental evaluation of the proposed approach on datasets relevant to biomedical imaging and chemical modeling is reported. 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: Volume rendering; Isosurface extraction; Marching cubes; Surface simplification 1.

Claudio Montani; Riccardo Scateni; Roberto Scopigno

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Increased Lipid Accumulation and Carbohydrate Synthesis in ...  

The methods do lead attenuated rates of photosynthesis and acetate uptake, the overall effect is a dramatic carbon production accumulation. Benefits.

138

Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations.

Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (San Francisco, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Using electrical resistance tomography to map subsurface temperatures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for measuring subsurface soil or rock temperatures remotely using electrical resistivity tomography (ERT). Electrical resistivity measurements are made using electrodes implanted in boreholes driven into the soil and/or at the ground surface. The measurements are repeated as some process changes the temperatures of the soil mass/rock mass. Tomographs of electrical resistivity are calculated based on the measurements using Poisson's equation. Changes in the soil/rock resistivity can be related to changes in soil/rock temperatures when: (1) the electrical conductivity of the fluid trapped in the soil's pore space is low, (2) the soil/rock has a high cation exchange capacity and (3) the temperature changes are sufficiently high. When these three conditions exist the resistivity changes observed in the ERT tomographs can be directly attributed to changes in soil/rock temperatures. This method provides a way of mapping temperature changes in subsurface soils remotely. Distances over which the ERT method can be used to monitor changes in soil temperature range from tens to hundreds of meters from the electrode locations. 1 fig.

Ramirez, A.L.; Chesnut, D.A.; Daily, W.D.

1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

140

Subsurface Ocean Signals from an Orbiting Polarization Lidar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Detection of subsurface returns from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) on the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite were demonstrated. Despite the coarse range resolution of this aerosol lidar, evidence of subsurface scattering was observed as a delay and broadening of the cross-polarized signal relative to the co-polarized signal in the three near-surface range bins. These two effects contributed to an increased depolarization at the nominal depth of 25 m. These features were all correlated with near-surface chlorophyll concentrations. An increase in the depolarization was also seen at a depth of 50 m under certain conditions, suggesting that chlorophyll concentration at that depth could be estimated if an appropriate retrieval technique can be developed. At greater depths, the signal is dominated by the temporal response of the detectors, which was approximated by an analytical expression. The depolarization caused by aerosols in the atmosphere was calculated and eliminated as a possible artifact.

James H. Churnside; I J. Mccarty; Xiaomei Lu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The discrete fractional random cosine and sine transforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the discrete fractional random transform (DFRNT), we present the discrete fractional random cosine and sine transforms (DFRNCT and DFRNST). We demonstrate that the DFRNCT and DFRNST can be regarded as special kinds of DFRNT and thus their mathematical properties are inherited from the DFRNT. Numeral results of DFRNCT and DFRNST for one and two dimensional functions have been given.

Zhengjun Liu; Qing Guo; Shutian Liu

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Discrete Wavelet Transform: Architectures, Design and Performance Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the demand for real time wavelet processors in applications such as video compression [1], Internet communications compression [2], object recognition [3], and numerical analysis, many architectures for the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) systems ... Keywords: computer architecture, digital filters, digital signal processors, discrete transforms, wavelet transforms

Michael Weeks; Magdy Bayoumi

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mixed-hybrid discretization methods for the P1 equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider mixed-hybrid discretization methods for the linear Boltzmann transport equation which is extensively used in computational neutron transport. Mixed-hybrid methods combine attractive features of both mixed and hybrid methods, namely the simultaneous ... Keywords: 02.60.Cb, 02.70.Dh, 65N12, 65N30, Linear Boltzmann transport equation, Mixed-hybrid discretization methods, P1 approximation

S. Van Criekingen; R. Beauwens

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Efficient optimal design of uncertain discrete time dynamical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider the problem of optimal design of an uncertain discrete time nonlinear dynamical system. The problem is formulated using an a-posterori design criterion, which can account for uncertainties generated by the dynamics of the system ... Keywords: Discrete time dynamical systems, Optimal design, Randomized algorithms, Uncertain parameters

Chenxi Lin; Thordur Runolfsson

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Discrete element modeling of machine-manure interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrete element method (DEM) was applied to the study of the machine-product interactions occurring in manure handling and land application equipment. Two types of conveying systems (scraper and 4-auger system) were modeled along with a hopper and ... Keywords: Conveying systems, Discrete element method (DEM), Flow rate, Manure, Numerical modeling, Specific energy, Spreader

H. Landry; C. Laguë; M. Roberge

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Two Classes of Elliptic Discrete Fourier Transforms: Properties and Examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the block structure of the matrix of the N-point discrete Fourier transform (DFT) in the real space R 2N . Each block of this matrix corresponds to the Givens transformation, or elementary rotation ... Keywords: Discrete Fourier transform, Fourier analysis, Signal and image processing

Artyom M. Grigoryan

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Partially blind threshold signatures based on discrete logarithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose a group-oriented partially blind (t, n) threshold signature scheme based on the discrete logarithm problem. By the scheme, any t out of n signers in a group can represent the group to sign partially blind threshold signatures, ... Keywords: Discrete logarithm, E-cash systems, Partially blind signatures, Privacy and security, Secure, Secure voting schemes, Threshold signatures

W. -S. Juang; C. -L. Lei

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Pricing Discretely Monitored Asian Options by Maturity Randomization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new methodology based on maturity randomization to price discretely monitored arithmetic Asian options when the underlying asset evolves according to a generic Lévy process. Our randomization technique considers the option expiry ... Keywords: Asian option, Lévy process, discrete monitoring, fast Fourier transform, integral equation, option pricing, quadrature formula

Gianluca Fusai; Daniele Marazzina; Marina Marena

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

On the solutions of generalized discrete Poisson equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The set of common numerical and analytical problems is introduced in the form of the generalized multidimensional discrete Poisson equation. It is shown that its solutions with square-summable discrete derivatives are unique up to a constant. The proof uses the Fourier transform as the main tool. The necessary condition for the existence of the solution is provided.

Roman Werpachowski

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

150

The Oak Ridge Field Research Center : Advancing Scientific Understanding of the Transportation, Fate, and Remediation of Subsurface Contamination Sources and Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical research, development, and testing of nuclear materials across this country resulted in subsurface contamination that has been identified at over 7,000 discrete sites across the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. With the end of the Cold War threat, DOE has shifted its emphasis to remediation, decommissioning, and decontamination of the immense volumes of contaminated groundwater, sediments, and structures at its sites. DOE currently is responsible for remediating 1.7 trillion gallons of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to approximately four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of contaminated soil, enough to fill approximately 17 professional sports stadiums.* DOE also sponsors research intended to improve or develop remediation technologies, especially for difficult, currently intractable contaminants or conditions. The Oak Ridge FRC is representative of some difficult sites, contaminants, and conditions. Buried wastes in contact with a shallow water table have created huge reservoirs of contamination. Rainfall patterns affect the water table level seasonally and over time. Further, the hydrogeology of the area, with its fractures and karst geology, affects the movement of contaminant plumes. Plumes have migrated long distances and to surface discharge points through ill-defined preferred flowpaths created by the fractures and karst conditions. From the standpoint of technical effectiveness, remediation options are limited, especially for contaminated groundwater. Moreover, current remediation practices for the source areas, such as capping, can affect coupled processes that, in turn, may affect the movement of subsurface contaminants in unknown ways. Research conducted at the FRC or with FRC samples therefore promotes understanding of the processes that influence the transport and fate of subsurface contaminants, the effectiveness and long-term consequences of extant remediation options, and the development of improved remediation strategies.

David Watson

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

151

Annual Cycle of Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30°N–20°S, East of 80°W) is studied on the basis of an extensive data bank of subsurface soundings. Calendar monthly maps are presented showing mixed layer depth, base of ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Jacques Merle

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

153

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Earth analysis methods, subsurface feature detection methods, earth analysis devices, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an earth analysis method includes engaging a device with the earth, analyzing the earth in a single substantially lineal direction using the device during the engaging, and providing information regarding a subsurface feature of the earth using the analysis.

West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Novascone, Stephen R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Jerry P. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

154

An iterative stochastic ensemble method for parameter estimation of subsurface flow models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameter estimation for subsurface flow models is an essential step for maximizing the value of numerical simulations for future prediction and the development of effective control strategies. We propose the iterative stochastic ensemble method (ISEM) ... Keywords: Iterative stochastic ensemble method, Parameter estimation, Regularization, Subsurface flow models

Ahmed H. Elsheikh, Mary F. Wheeler, Ibrahim Hoteit

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

FACT (Version 2.0) - Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport Documentation and User's Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a finite element code designed to model subsurface flow and contaminant transport, named FACT. FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code designed to simulate isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably saturated and fully saturated subsurface porous media.

Aleman, S.E.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

156

FITOVERT: A dynamic numerical model of subsurface vertical flow constructed wetlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces a mathematical model (FITOVERT) specifically developed to simulate the behaviour of vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands (VSSF-CWs). One of the main goals of the development of FITOVERT was to keep the complexity of the ... Keywords: Constructed wetlands, Hydrodynamics, Modelling, Reactive transport, Unsaturated flow, Vertical subsurface flow

D. Giraldi; M. de Michieli Vitturi; R. Iannelli

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 Subsurface Gasoline Contamination: An Indoor Air Quality Field Study Schematic of soil-gas and contaminant transport into a slab-on-grade building at a former service station site. Three effects are illustrated that can contribute to reducing the amount of contaminant available for entry into the building: biodegradation by soil microorganisms; a layer of soil that limits diffusive movement of the contaminant; and wind-driven ventilation of the soil below the building. Not illustrated are the effects of ventilation on contaminant concentrations inside the building. The transport of soil-gas-borne contaminants into buildings has been documented as a significant source of human exposure to some pollutants indoors; one example is radon, which has received widespread public

158

Subsurface safety valves: safety asset or safety liability  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the methods used to compare the risk of a blowout for a well completed with a subsurface safety valve (SSSV) vs. a completion without an SSSV. These methods, which could be applied to any field, include a combination of SSSV reliability and conventional risk analyses. The Kuparuk River Unit Working Interest Owners recently formed a group to examine the risks associated with installing and maintaining SSSV's in the Kuparuk field. The group was charged with answering the question: ''Assuming Kuparuk field operating conditions, are SSSV's a safety asset, or do numerous operating and maintenance procedures make them a safety liability.'' The results indicate that for the Kuparuk River Unit, an SSSV becomes a safety liability when the mean time between SSSV failures is less than one year. Since current SSSV mean time to failure (MTTF) at Kuparuk is approximately 1000 days, they are considered a safety asset.

Busch, J.M.; Llewelyn, D.C.G.; Policky, B.J.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Titan's Obliquity as evidence for a subsurface ocean?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the basis of gravity and radar observations with the Cassini spacecraft, the moment of inertia of Titan and the orientation of Titan's rotation axis have been estimated in recent studies. According to the observed orientation, Titan is close to the Cassini state. However, the observed obliquity is inconsistent with the estimate of the moment of inertia for an entirely solid Titan occupying the Cassini state. We propose a new Cassini state model for Titan in which we assume the presence of a liquid water ocean beneath an ice shell and consider the gravitational and pressure torques arising between the different layers of the satellite. With the new model, we find a closer agreement between the moment of inertia and the rotation state than for the solid case, strengthening the possibility that Titan has a subsurface ocean.

Baland, Rose-Marie; Yseboodt, Marie; Karatekin, Ozgur

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ultrasonic Imaging of Subsurface Objects Using Photorefractive Dynamic Holography  

SciTech Connect

The INEEL has developed a photorefractive ultrasonic imaging technology that records both phase and amplitude of ultrasonic waves on the surface of solids. Phase locked dynamic holography provides full field images of these waves scattered from subsurface defects in solids, and these data are compared with theoretical predictions. Laser light reflected by a vibrating surface is imaged into a photorefractive material where it is mixed in a heterodyne technique with a reference wave. This demodulates the data and provides an image of the ultrasonic waves in either 2 wave or 4 wave mixing mode. These data images are recorded at video frame rates and show phase locked traveling or resonant acoustic waves. This technique can be used over a broad range of ultrasonic frequencies. Acoustic frequencies from 2 kHz to 10 MHz have been imaged, and a point measuring (non-imaging) version of the system has measured picometer amplitudes at 1 GHz.

Deason, Vance Albert; Telschow, Kenneth Louis; Watson, Scott Marshall

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ranging methods for developing wellbores in subsurface formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for forming two or more wellbores in a subsurface formation includes forming a first wellbore in the formation. A second wellbore is directionally drilled in a selected relationship relative to the first wellbore. At least one magnetic field is provided in the second wellbore using one or more magnets in the second wellbore located on a drilling string used to drill the second wellbore. At least one magnetic field is sensed in the first wellbore using at least two sensors in the first wellbore as the magnetic field passes by the at least two sensors while the second wellbore is being drilled. A position of the second wellbore is continuously assessed relative to the first wellbore using the sensed magnetic field. The direction of drilling of the second wellbore is adjusted so that the second wellbore remains in the selected relationship relative to the first wellbore.

MacDonald, Duncan (Houston, TX)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

162

TITLE III EVALUATION REPORT FOR THE SUBSURFACE LIGHTING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this evaluation is to provide recommendations to ensure consistency between the technical baseline requirements, baseline design, and the as-constructed Subsurface Lighting System. Recommendations for resolving discrepancies between the as-constructed system, and the technical baseline requirements are included in this report. Cost and Schedule estimates are provided for all recommended modifications. This report does not address items which do not meet current safety or code requirements. These items are identified to the CMO and immediate action is taken to correct the situation. The report does identify safety and code items for which the A/E is recommending improvements. The recommended improvements will exceed the minimum requirements of applicable code and safety guide lines. These recommendations are intended to improve and enhance the operation and maintenance of the facility.

L.J. Fernandez

1998-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

163

Distribution of microbial biomass and the potential for anaerobic respiration in Hanford Site 300 Area subsurface sediment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface sediments were recovered from a 52 m deep borehole cored in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State to assess the potential for biogeochemical transformation of radionuclide contaminants. Microbial analyses were made on 17 sediment samples traversing multiple geological units: the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation (9-17.4 m), the oxic fine-grained upper Ringold Formation (17.7-18.1 m), and the reduced Ringold Formation (18.3-52m). Microbial biomass (measured as phospholipid) ranged from 7-974 pmols per g in discrete samples, with the highest numbers found in the Hanford formation. On average, strata below 17.4 m had 13-fold less biomass than those from shallower strata. The nosZ gene encoding nitrous oxide reductase had an abundance of 5-17% relative to total 16S rRNA genes below 18.3 m and Hanford-Ringold formation contact and the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface. Within this zone, copies of the dsrA gene and Geobacteraceae had the highest relative abundance. The majority of dsrA genes detected near the interface were related to Desulfotomaculum sp.. These analyses indicate that the region just below the contact between the Hanford and Ringold formations is a zone of active biogeochemical redox cycling.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Peacock, Aaron D.; McKinley, James P.; Resch, Charles T.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Rock bed heat accumulators. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The principal objectives of the research program on rock bed heat accumulators (or RBHA) are: (1) to investigate the technical and economic feasibility of storing large amounts of thermal energy (in the tens of MWt range) at high temperature (up to 500/sup 0/C) over extended periods of time (up to 6 months) using native earth or rock materials; (2) to conduct studies to establish the performance characteristics of large rock bed heat accumulators at various power and temperature levels compatible with thermal conversion systems; and (3) to assess the materials and environmental problems associated with the operation of such large heat accumulators. Results of the study indicate that rock bed heat accumulators for seasonal storage are both technically and economically feasible, and hence could be exploited in various applications in which storage plays an essential role such as solar power and total energy systems, district and cogeneration heating systems.

Riaz, M.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Multidimensional electron-photon transport with standard discrete ordinates codes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for generating electron cross sections that are compatible with standard discrete ordinates codes without modification. There are many advantages of using an established discrete ordinates solver, e.g. immediately available adjoint capability. Coupled electron-photon transport capability is needed for many applications, including the modeling of the response of electronics components to space and man-made radiation environments. The cross sections have been successfully used in the DORT, TWODANT and TORT discrete ordinates codes. The cross sections are shown to provide accurate and efficient solutions to certain multidimensional electronphoton transport problems.

Drumm, C.R.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Transmission Property of the Discrete Heisenberg Ferromagnetic Spin Chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a mechanism for displaying the transmission property of the discrete Heisenberg ferromagnetic spin chain (DHF) via a geometric approach. By the aid of a discrete nonlinear Schr\\"odinger-like equation which is the discrete gauge equivalent to the DHF, we show that the determination of transmitting coefficients in the transmission problem is always bistable. Thus a definite algorithm and general stochastic algorithms are presented. A new invariant periodic phenomenon of the non-transmitting behavior for the DHF, with a large probability, is revealed by an adoption of various stochastic algorithms.

Qing Ding; Wei Lin

2008-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Constrained Interpolation Remap of Discrete Divergence Free Fields  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Shashkov M. 1 Shashkov M. 1 Constrained Interpolation Remap of Discrete Divergence Free Fields P.B. Bochev, * M. Shashkov † * Sandia National Laboratories, Org. 9214, Albuquerque, NM 87185 † Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-7, Los Alamos, NM 87545 We present a constrained interpolation (CI) algorithm for remapping of divergence free vector fields encoded as 2-cochains on a two-dimensional cell complex. On contractible domains discrete divergence free fields are 2-coboundaries and so they have potentials represented by 1-cochains. The algorithm takes advantage of this fact by using the discrete potential to effect the remapping of the divergence free field. The discrete potential is reconstructed and interpolated to the new cell complex. Application of

168

Applications of Algebraic Topology to Compatible Spatial Discretizations  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Hyman J. 1 Hyman J. 1 Applications of Algebraic Topology to Compatible Spatial Discretizations P. B. Bochev, * J. M. Hyman † * Sandia National Laboratories, Org. 9214, Albuquerque, NM 87185 † Los Alamos National Laboratory, T-7, Los Alamos, NM 87545 We provide a common framework for compatible discretizations using algebraic topology to guide our analysis. The main concept is the natural inner product on cochains, which induces a combinatorial Hodge theory. The framework comprises of mutually consistent operations of differentiation and integration, has a discrete Stokes theorem, and preserves the invariants of the DeRham cohomology groups. The latter allows for an elementary calculation of the kernel of the discrete Laplacian. Our framework provides an abstraction that includes examples

169

Diabatically Driven Discrete Propagation of Surface Fronts: A Numerical Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete frontal propagation has been identified as a process whereby a surface front discontinuously moves forward, without evidence of frontal passage across a mesoscale region. Numerical simulations are employed to examine the upper-level ...

George H. Bryan; J. Michael Fritsch

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A discrete model of energy-conserved wavefunction collapse  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy nonconservation is a serious problem of dynamical collapse theories. In this paper, we propose a discrete model of energy-conserved wavefunction collapse. It is shown that the model is consistent with existing experiments and our macroscopic experience.

Gao, Shan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Discrete Feature Approach for Heterogeneous Reservoir Production Enhancement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents summaries of technology development for discrete feature modeling in support of the improved oil recovery (IOR) for heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, the report describes the demonstration of these technologies at project study sites.

Dershowitz, William S.; Curran, Brendan; Einstein, Herbert; LaPointe, Paul; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate

2002-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

172

The cost of conservative synchronization in parallel discrete event simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper analytically studies the performance of a synchronous conservative parallel discrete-event simulation protocol. The class of models considered simulates activity in a physical domain, and possesses a limited ability to predict future behavior. ... Keywords: conservative synchronization

David M. Nicol

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Discrete multi-material interface reconstruction for volume fraction data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Material interface reconstruction (MIR) is the task of constructing boundary interfaces between regions of homogeneous material, while satisfying volume constraints, over a structured or unstructured spatial domain. In this paper, we present a discrete ...

J. C. Anderson; C. Garth; M. A. Duchaineau; K. I. Joy

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

RFIDSim : a discrete event simulator for Radio Frequency Identification systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents RFIDSim, a discrete event process-oriented simulator designed to model Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) communication. The simulator focuses on the discovery and identification process of passive ...

Yu, Kenneth Kwan-Wai, 1979-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

AC transmission system planning choosing lines from a discrete set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission system planning (TSP) is a difficult nonlinear optimization problem involving non-convex quadratic terms, as well as discrete variables. We extend prior results for linear relaxations, drawing on a preliminary ...

Gilbertson, Eric W.

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

176

Rapid modeling of field maintenance using discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete event simulation has been applied to a wide range of applications areas due to its ability to represent stochastic systems over time. Maintenance, particularly field maintenance, is complex due to the interaction of different sub-systems of ...

Abdullah A. Alabdulkarim; Peter D. Ball; Ashutosh Tiwari

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Discrete Variational Calculus for B-spline Approximated Curves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study variational problems for curves approximated by B-spline curves. We show that, one can obtain discrete Euler-Lagrange equations, for the data describing the approximated curves. Our main application is to the curve completion problem in 2D and 3D. In this case, the aim is to find various aesthetically pleasing solutions as opposed to a solution of a physical problem. The Lagrangians of interest are invariant under the special Euclidean group action for which B-spline approximated curves are well suited. Smooth Lagrangians with special Euclidean symmetries involve curvature, torsion, and arc length. Expressions in these, in the original coordinates, are highly complex. We show that, by contrast, relatively simple discrete Lagrangians offer excellent results for the curve completion problem. The methods we develop for the discrete curve completion problem are general and can be used to solve other discrete variational problems for B-spline curves.

Zhao, Jun

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A discrete BGK approximation for strongly degenerate parabolic problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A discrete BGK approximation for strongly degenerate parabolic problems with boundary conditions F strongly degenerate hyperbolic--parabolic equations with initial boundary condition. We prove a priori -- strongly degenerate parabolic equations -- singular perturbation problems -- BGK models 1 Introduction

179

Discrete Propagation in Numerically Simulated Nocturnal Squall Lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations of a typical midlatitude squall line were used to investigate a mechanism for discrete propagation, defined as convective initiation ahead of an existing squall line leading to a faster propagation speed for the storm complex. Radar ...

Robert G. Fovell; Gretchen L. Mullendore; Seung-Hee Kim

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

computation. Distributed estimation problems arise, for instance, in sensor networks, electric power grids data, and rely upon distributed mechanisms to merge local computations, such as intermediate dataContinuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication Florian D¨orfler, Fabio

Bullo, Francesco

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Lossless compression using the adaptive discrete cosine transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a technique using the adaptive discrete cosine transform for lossless waveform data compression. The technique is a variation on a two-stage lossless method that was developed by one of the authors. The earlier work employed an adaptive ... Keywords: ADPCM scheme, adaptive differential pulse code modulation-type, adaptive discrete cosine transform, data compression, encoding, integer residual sequence, lossless successive difference operation, lossless waveform data compression, storage, transmission, two-stage lossless method

L. Gerhardt; M. Fargues; G. Coutu

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Subsurface Biogeochemical Research | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subsurface Biogeochemical Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Research Abstracts Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Biological Systems Science Division (BSSD) Climate and Environmental Sciences Division (CESD) ARM Climate Research Facility Atmospheric System Research (ASR) Program Data Management Earth System Modeling (ESM) Program William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) Integrated Assessment of Global Climate Change Regional & Global Climate Modeling (RGCM) Program Subsurface Biogeochemical Research Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration External link Terrestrial Ecosystem Science Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC)

183

Molten salt as a heat transfer fluid for heating a subsurface formation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in an opening in the subsurface formation. An insulated conductor is located in the conduit. A material is in the conduit between a portion of the insulated conductor and a portion of the conduit. The material may be a salt. The material is a fluid at operating temperature of the heating system. Heat transfers from the insulated conductor to the fluid, from the fluid to the conduit, and from the conduit to the subsurface formation.

Nguyen, Scott Vinh (Houston, TX); Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Subsurface contamination focus area technical requirements. Volume II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is our vision, a vision that replaces the ad hoc or {open_quotes}delphi{close_quotes} method which is to get a group of {open_quotes}experts{close_quotes} together and make decisions based upon opinion. To fulfill our vision for the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), it is necessary to generate technical requirements or performance measures which are quantitative or measurable. Decisions can be supported if they are based upon requirements or performance measures which can be traced to the origin (documented) and are verifiable, i.e., prove that requirements are satisfied by inspection (show me), demonstration, analysis, monitoring, or test. The data from which these requirements are derived must also reflect the characteristics of individual landfills or plumes so that technologies that meet these requirements will necessarily work at specific sites. Other subjective factors, such as stakeholder concerns, do influence decisions. Using the requirements as a basic approach, the SCFA can depend upon objective criteria to help influence the areas of subjectivity, like the stakeholders. In the past, traceable requirements were not generated, probably because it seemed too difficult to do so. There are risks that the requirements approach will not be accepted because it is new and represents a departure from the historical paradigm.

Nickelson, D.; Nonte, J.; Richardson, J.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Lead Laboratory Providing Technical Assistance to the DOE Weapons Complex in Subsurface Contamination  

SciTech Connect

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA), a DOE-HQ EM-50 organization, is hosted and managed at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. SCFA is an integrated program chartered to find technology and scientific solutions to address DOE subsurface environmental restoration problems throughout the DOE Weapons Complex. Since its inception in 1989, the SCFA program has resulted in a total of 269 deployments of 83 innovative technologies. Until recently, the primary thrust of the program has been to develop, demonstrate, and deploy those remediation technology alternatives that are solutions to technology needs identified by the DOE Sites. Over the last several years, the DOE Sites began to express a need not only for innovative technologies, but also for technical assistance. In response to this need, DOE-HQ EM-50, in collaboration with and in support of a Strategic Lab Council recommendation directed each of its Focus Areas to implement a Lead Laboratory Concept to enhance their technical capabilities. Because each Focus Area is unique as defined by the contrast in either the type of contaminants involved or the environments in which they are found, the Focus Areas were given latitude in how they set up and implemented the Lead Lab Concept. The configuration of choice for the SCFA was a Lead-Partner Lab arrangement. Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) teamed with the SCFA as the Focus Area's Lead Laboratory. SRTC then partnered with the DOE National Laboratories to create a virtual consulting function within DOE. The National Laboratories were established to help solve the Nation's most difficult problems, drawing from a resource pool of the most talented and gifted scientists and engineers. Following that logic, SRTC, through the Lead-Partner Lab arrangement, has that same resource base to draw from to provide assistance to any SCFA DOE customer throughout the Complex. This paper briefly describes how this particular arrangement is organized and provides case histories that illustrate its strengths in solving problems and offering solutions. The program is designed to minimize red tape, maximize value, and to rapidly and cost effectively disseminate solutions to common problems facing the DOE.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Corey, J. C.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

186

Spontaneous discharge in nickel-zinc accumulations  

SciTech Connect

The authors have examined discharge in nickel-zinc accumulators and monitored the gas. The measurements were made at room temperature with types having two layers of hydrated cellulose separators on the zinc electrodes and capron separators on the nickel oxide ones. There was a ratio of 2.5 between the active masses of the negative and positive electrodes. After three controlled cycles the accumulators were tested for spontaneous discharge. Then they determined the spontaneous discharge after use. The hydrogen, oxygen, and nitrogen in the gas were determined by a gasometric method in combination with gas chromatography. The zinc and the nickel oxide electrodes contribute to the self-discharge, which considerably exceeds the capacity loss determined from the hydrogen production. The zinc electrode corrosion indicated by the hydrogen production increases when the accumulator is operated. When a charged battery is stored, nitrogen is produced as well as hydrogen and oxygen. The nitrate accelerates the spontaneous discharge.

Dmitrenko, V.E.; Zubov, M.S.; Kuznetsova, L.N.; Okhlobystin, N.I.; Toguzov, B.M.; Tikhomirov, Yu.V.

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

187

ABSTRACT: Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007... Ion-Induced Damage Accumulation and Electron-Beam-Enhanced ... damage accumulation in strontium titanate from 1.0 MeV Au irradiation

188

Characterizing Land–Atmosphere Coupling and the Implications for Subsurface Thermodynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to develop a Simple Land-Interface Model (SLIM) that captures the seasonal and interannual behavior of land–atmosphere coupling, as well as the subsequent subsurface temperature evolution. The model employs the one-...

Marc Stieglitz; Jason E. Smerdon

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USING MICRO-SEISMICITY AND SEISMIC VELOCITIES TO MAP SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC AND HYDROLOGIC STRUCTURE WITHIN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD, CALIFORNIA Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We relocate 14 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We utilize over 60,000 micro-seismic events using waveform crosscorrelation to augment the expansive catalog of Pand S-wave

190

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » January 2013 Mapping Subsurface CO2 Migration New computational technique creates high resolution maps of subsurface CO2 after geologic sequestration. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Image courtesy of Sanjay Srinivasan, UT-Austin High resolution inverted seismic images of CO2 migration at the Cranfield,

191

Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Located at the Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina, the Attenuation-Based Remedies in the Subsurface Applied Field Research Initiative (ABRS AFRI) was established to develop the tools,...

192

Fiber optic/cone penetrometer system for subsurface heavy metals detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a project designed to develop an intergrated fiber optic sensor/cone penetrometer system to analyze the heavy metals content of the subsurface as a site characterization tool.

Saggese, S.; Greenwell, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Rossby Wave Analysis of Subsurface Temperature Fluctuations along the Honolulu-San Francisco Great Circle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seven years of XBT observations collected between Honolulu and San Francisco reveal subsurface temperature fluctuations with strong, in-phase vertical coherence and fair horizontal coherence over 1000 km distance. Their annual and semi-annual ...

James Michael Price; Lorenz Magaard

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Synthetic Subsurface Pressure Derived from Bottom Pressure and Tide Gauge Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Synthetic subsurface pressure (SSP) can be formed from tide gauge records and from bottom pressure measurements to provide a consistent and convenient basis for comparison of these two different types of observations. Common methods for this ...

Sabine Harms; Clinton D. Winant

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Seasonal Variations of the Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Gulf of Guinea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the Gulf of Guinea is analyzed using the historical hydrographic data file. Of particular interest is the rapid vertical displacement of the thermal structure from the warm (March–May) season to the cold (July–...

Robert W. Houghton

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characteristics of Subsurface Ocean Response to ENSO Assessed from Simulations with the NCEP Climate Forecast System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface ocean temperature response to El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is examined based on 31-yr (1981–2011) simulations with the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Climate Forecast System (CFS) coupled model. The ...

Hui Wang; Arun Kumar; Wanqiu Wang

197

Effects of droplet size on intrusion of sub-surface oil spills  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the effects of droplet size on droplet intrusion in sub-surface oil spills. Laboratory experiments were performed where glass beads of various sizes, which serve to simulate oil droplets in deepsea oil ...

Chan, Godine Kok Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Annual Heat Gain of the Tropical Atlantic Computed from Subsurface Ocean Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Charts are presented which show the seasonal and annual rates of heat gain of the tropical North Atlantic Ocean. These rates have been computed using subsurface oceanographic data and wind-stress data. In these computations the interseasonal ...

David W. Behringer; Henry Stommel

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Freshening of Subsurface Waters in the Northwest Pacific Subtropical Gyre: Observations and Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface salinity anomalies propagating between mid- and low latitudes along isopycnal surfaces have been shown to play an important role in modulating ocean and climate variability. In this study, a sustained freshening and southwestward ...

Youfang Yan; Eric P. Chassignet; Yiquan Qi; William K. Dewar

200

Final Report: A Model Management System for Numerical Simulations of Subsurface Processes  

SciTech Connect

The DOE and several other Federal agencies have committed significant resources to support the development of a large number of mathematical models for studying subsurface science problems such as groundwater flow, fate of contaminants and carbon sequestration, to mention only a few. This project provides new tools to help decision makers and stakeholders in subsurface science related problems to select an appropriate set of simulation models for a given field application.

Zachmann, David

2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Reference Handbook for Site-Specific Assessment of Subsurface Vapor Intrusion to Indoor Air  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface vapor intrusion is only one of several possible sources for volatile and semi-volatile chemicals in indoor air. This report provides guidance on the site-specific assessment of the significance of subsurface vapor intrusion into indoor air. Topics covered include theoretical considerations, sampling and analysis considerations, recommended strategies and procedures, interpretive tools, mitigation measures, and suggestions for future research. This document reflects a comprehensive understandin...

2005-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

202

Wastewater Subsurface Drip Distribution: Peer-Reviewed Guidelines for Design, Operation, and Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface drip distribution is the most efficient method currently available for application and subsurface dispersal of wastewater to soil. Because it is so effective, drip distribution represents a viable option for wastewater disposal and reuse for all soil types. The technology is commonly used at sites where point source discharges and National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits are not appropriate due to environmental sensitivity of receiving streams. It is also commonly used a...

2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

203

An SQP-type solution method for constrained discrete-time optimal control problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: constrained optimal control, discrete-time systems, hydroelectric power-station systems, structured nonlinear programming

E. Arnold; H. Puta

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Armored Enzyme Nanoparticles for Remediation of Subsurface Contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The remediation of subsurface contaminants is a critical problem for the Department of Energy, other government agencies, and our nation. Severe contamination of soil and groundwater exists at several DOE sites due to various methods of intentional and unintentional release. Given the difficulties involved in conventional removal or separation processes, it is vital to develop methods to transform contaminants and contaminated earth/water to reduce risks to human health and the environment. Transformation of the contaminants themselves may involve conversion to other immobile species that do not migrate into well water or surface waters, as is proposed for metals and radionuclides; or degradation to harmless molecules, as is desired for organic contaminants. Transformation of contaminated earth (as opposed to the contaminants themselves) may entail reductions in volume or release of bound contaminants for remediation. Research at Rensselaer focused on the development of haloalkane dehalogenase as a critical enzyme in the dehalogenation of contaminated materials (ultimately trichloroethylene and related pollutants). A combination of bioinformatic investigation and experimental work was performed. The bioinformatics was focused on identifying a range of dehalogenase enzymes that could be obtained from the known proteomes of major microorganisms. This work identified several candidate enzymes that could be obtained through relatively straightforward gene cloning and expression approaches. The experimental work focused on the isolation of haloalkane dehalogenase from a Xanthobacter species followed by incorporating the enzyme into silicates to form biocatalytic silicates. These are the precursors of SENs. At the conclusion of the study, dehalogenase was incorporated into SENs, although the loading was low. This work supported a single Ph.D. student (Ms. Philippa Reeder) for two years. The project ended prior to her being able to perform substantive bioinformatics efforts that would identify more promising dehalogenase enzymes. The SEN synthesis, however, was demonstrated to be partially successful with dehalogenases. Further work would provide optimized dehalogenases in SENs for use in pollution remission.

Jonathan S. Dordick; Jay Grate; Jungbae Kim

2007-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

205

ACID GASES IN CO2-RICH SUBSURFACE GEOLOGIC ENVIRONMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of species behavior involving dilute fluid environments has been crucial for the advance of modern solvation thermodynamics through molecular-based formalisms to guide the development of macroscopic regression tools in the description of fluid behavior and correlation of experimental data (Chialvo 2013). Dilute fluid environments involving geologic formations are of great theoretical and practical relevance regardless of the thermodynamic state conditions. The most challenging systems are those involving highly compressible and reactive confined environments, i.e., where small perturbations of pressure and/or temperature can trigger considerable density changes. This in turn can alter significantly the species solvation, their preferential solvation, and consequently, their reactivity with one another and with the surrounding mineral surfaces whose outcome is the modification of the substrate porosity and permeability, and ultimately, the integrity of the mineral substrates. Considering that changes in porosity and permeability resulting from dissolution and precipitation phenomena in confined environments are at the core of the aqueous CO2-mineral interactions, and that caprock integrity (e.g., sealing capacity) depends on these key parameters, it is imperative to gain fundamental understanding of the mineral-fluid interfacial phenomena and fluid-fluid equilibria under mineral confinement at subsurface conditions. In order to undertand the potential effects of acid gases as contaminants of supercritical CO2 streams, in the next section we will discuss the thermodynamic behavior of CO2 fluid systems by addressing two crucial issues in the context of carbon capture, utilization and sequestration (CCUS) technologies: (i) Why should we consider (acid gas) CO2 impurities? and (ii) Why are CO2 fluid - mineral interactions of paramount relevance?

Chialvo, Ariel A [ORNL] [ORNL; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL] [ORNL; Cole, David [Ohio State University] [Ohio State University

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A three-level BDDC algorithm for Mortar discretizations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, a three-level BDDC algorithm is developed for the solutions of large sparse algebraic linear systems arising from the mortar discretization of elliptic boundary value problems. The mortar discretization is considered on geometrically non-conforming subdomain partitions. In two-level BDDC algorithms, the coarse problem needs to be solved exactly. However, its size will increase with the increase of the number of the subdomains. To overcome this limitation, the three-level algorithm solves the coarse problem inexactly while a good rate of convergence is maintained. This is an extension of previous work, the three-level BDDC algorithms for standard finite element discretization. Estimates of the condition numbers are provided for the three-level BDDC method and numerical experiments are also discussed.

Kim, H.; Tu, X.

2007-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

207

Higher-order discrete variational problems with constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An interesting family of geometric integrators for Lagrangian systems can be defined using discretizations of the Hamilton's principle of critical action. This family of geometric integrators is called variational integrators. In this paper, we derive new variational integrators for higher-order lagrangian mechanical system subjected to higher-order constraints. From the discretization of the variational principles, we show that our methods are automatically symplectic and, in consequence, with a very good energy behavior. Additionally, the symmetries of the discrete Lagrangian imply that momenta is conserved by the integrator. Moreover, we extend our construction to variational integrators where the lagrangian is explicitly time-dependent. Finally, some motivating applications of higher-order problems are considered; in particular, optimal control problems for explicitly time-dependent underactuated systems and an interpolation problem on Riemannian manifolds.

Leonardo Colombo; David Martín de Diego; Marcela Zuccalli

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

208

Methodology for characterizing modeling and discretization uncertainties in computational simulation  

SciTech Connect

This research effort focuses on methodology for quantifying the effects of model uncertainty and discretization error on computational modeling and simulation. The work is directed towards developing methodologies which treat model form assumptions within an overall framework for uncertainty quantification, for the purpose of developing estimates of total prediction uncertainty. The present effort consists of work in three areas: framework development for sources of uncertainty and error in the modeling and simulation process which impact model structure; model uncertainty assessment and propagation through Bayesian inference methods; and discretization error estimation within the context of non-deterministic analysis.

ALVIN,KENNETH F.; OBERKAMPF,WILLIAM L.; RUTHERFORD,BRIAN M.; DIEGERT,KATHLEEN V.

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DISCRETE SYMMETRIES OF THE BLACK-SCHOLES EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCRETE SYMMETRIES OF THE BLACK-SCHOLES EQUATION Gheorghe Silberberg Abstract The paper computes the full automorphism group of the Lie al- gebra associated to the Black-Scholes equation and determines symmetries. The present paper applies the whole procedure to the famous Black- Scholes partial differential

210

Solving Elliptic Curve Discrete Logarithm Problems Using Weil Descent  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide the first cryptographically interesting instance of the elliptic curve discrete logarithm problem which resists all previously known attacks, but which can be solved with modest computer resources using the Weil descent attack methodology of Frey. We report on our implementation of index-calculus methods for hyperelliptic curves over characteristic two finite fields, and discuss the cryptographic implications of our results.

Michael Jacobson; Alfred Menezes; Andreas Stein

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Simulation of mobile networks using discrete event system specification theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fourth generation (4G) of mobile telecommunication technology provides ultra-band internet access for mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets, and laptops. One of the challenges in the Long Term Evolution (LTE) 4G networks is the low data rate ... Keywords: DEVS, discrete event system specification, mobile networks

Mohammad Moallemi, Gabriel Wainer, Shafagh Jafer, Gary Boudreau, Ronald Casselman

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Discreteness and the transmission of light from distant sources  

SciTech Connect

We model the classical transmission of a massless scalar field from a source to a detector on a background causal set. The predictions do not differ significantly from those of the continuum. Thus, introducing an intrinsic inexactitude to lengths and durations--or more specifically, replacing the Lorentzian manifold with an underlying discrete structure--need not disrupt the usual dynamics of propagation.

Dowker, Fay [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Henson, Joe; Sorkin, Rafael D. [Perimeter Institute, 31 Caroline Street N., Waterloo, N2L 2Y5 (Canada)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

Optimization strategies for discrete multi-material stiffness optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design of composite laminated lay-ups are formulated as discrete multi-material selection problems. The design problem can be modeled as a non-convex mixed-integer optimization problem. Such problems are in general only solvable to global optimality ... Keywords: Integer optimization, Laminated composite materials, Optimal design, Sensitivity analysis, Solution strategies

Christian Frier Hvejsel; Erik Lund; Mathias Stolpe

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

DISPERSION AND DISSIPATION ERRORS OF TWO FULLY DISCRETE DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-dimensional Euler equations in gas dynamics. There has been abundant study on the dispersion analysis of many nuDISPERSION AND DISSIPATION ERRORS OF TWO FULLY DISCRETE DISCONTINUOUS GALERKIN METHODS HE YANG, FENGYAN LI, AND JIANXIAN QIU Abstract. The dispersion and dissipation properties of numerical meth- ods

Li, Fengyan

215

Power system failure analysis by using the discrete wavelet transform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Voltage variations are the most common power quality events that may result in corruption of different industrial processes. The electric power utility industry requires significant improvement in the quality of power provided to customers during faults ... Keywords: discrete wavelet transform, power system failure, wavelet entropy

Ismail Yilmazlar; Gulden Kokturk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Discrete-event simulation in Java: a practitioner's experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The experience of a simulation practitioner with development of a new Java simulation engine and its application to a large simulation model is described. Our simulation engine is implemented as a simple extension of the Java programming language and ... Keywords: Java, discrete-event simulation, parallel processing, practitioner, supply chain

D. H. King; Harvey S. Harrison

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

First–Order Representations of Discrete Linear MultidimensionalSystems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical local state–space models for discrete multidimensional linear systems, as proposed by Roesser or Fornasini and Marchesini, require causality of the resulting transfer matrices. We consider a generalization comprising non-causal ... Keywords: (Laurent) polynomial matrices, behavior, first–, input–, kernel and image representation, linear fractional transformation, minimality, order representation, output structure, properness

Eva Zerz

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Bounds for the price of discrete arithmetic Asian options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the pricing of European-style discrete arithmetic Asian options with fixed and floating strike is studied by deriving analytical lower and upper bounds. In our approach we use a general technique for deriving upper (and lower) bounds for ... Keywords: Asian option, Black and Scholes setting, analytical bounds, comonotonicity

M. Vanmaele; G. Deelstra; J. Liinev; J. Dhaene; M. J. Goovaerts

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Bounds for the price of discrete arithmetic Asian options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the pricing of European-style discrete arithmetic Asian options with fixed and floating strike is studied by deriving analytical lower and upper bounds. In our approach we use a general technique for deriving upper (and lower) bounds for ... Keywords: Analytical bounds, Asian option, Black and Scholes setting, Comonotonicity

M. Vanmaele; G. Deelstra; J. Liinev; J. Dhaene; M. J. Goovaerts

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Hidden maintenance opportunities in discrete and complex production lines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In manufacturing systems, many maintenance tasks require equipment to be stopped in order to safely perform them. However, such stoppage cannot last for too long since it might directly result in short-term production losses. In this paper, we investigate ... Keywords: Complex manufacturing systems, Discrete production, Maintenance opportunity windows

Xi Gu; Seungchul Lee; Xinran Liang; Mark Garcellano; Mark Diederichs; Jun Ni

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Specification of Discrete Event Models for Fire Spreading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fire-spreading phenomenon is highly complex, and existing mathematical models of fire are so complex themselves that any possibility of analytical solution is precluded. Instead, there has been some success when studying fire spread by means of simulation. ... Keywords: Cell-DEVS, Cellular Automata, DEVS, Discrete event simulation, fire spread

Alexandre Muzy; Eric Innocenti; Antoine Aiello; Jean-François Santucci; Gabriel Wainer

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Sparse image representation by discrete cosine/spline based dictionaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixed dictionaries generated by cosine and B-spline functions are considered. It is shown that, by highly nonlinear approaches such as Orthogonal Matching Pursuit, the discrete version of the proposed dictionaries yields a significant gain in the sparsity of an image representation.

Bowley, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Numerical Discretization of Rotated Diffusion Operators in Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method to improve the behavior of the numerical discretization of a rotated diffusion operator such as, for example, the isopycnal diffusion parameterization used in large-scale ocean models based on the so-called z-coordinate system is ...

J-M. Beckers; H. Burchard; E. Deleersnijder; P. P. Mathieu

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Estimating discrete Markov models from various incomplete data schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The parameters of a discrete stationary Markov model are transition probabilities between states. Traditionally, data consist in sequences of observed states for a given number of individuals over the whole observation period. In such a case, the estimation ... Keywords: Adaptive MCMC, Bayesian inference, Gaussian copulas, Industrial reliability, Markov models, Missing data

Alberto Pasanisi; Shuai Fu; Nicolas Bousquet

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Physics in discrete spaces (A): Space-Time organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We put forward a model of discrete physical space that can account for the structure of space- time, give an interpretation to the postulates of quantum mechanics and provide a possible explanation to the organization of the standard model of particles.

P. Peretto

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

226

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including ... Keywords: Aerosols, Aggregation, Particle adhesion, Particulate flow

J. S. Marshall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Concept inventories in computer science for the topic discrete mathematics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes concept inventories, specialized assessment instruments that enable educational researchers to investigate student (mis)understandings of concepts in a particular domain. While students experience a concept inventory as a set of ... Keywords: assessment, assessment tools, concept inventory, discrete mathematics, distractors, misconceptions

Vicki L. Almstrum; Peter B. Henderson; Valerie Harvey; Cinda Heeren; William Marion; Charles Riedesel; Leen-Kiat Soh; Allison Elliott Tew

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Optimisation-based scheduling: A discrete manufacturing case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work presents the development and implementation of a production scheduling system for an electrical appliance manufacturer. Based on recent advances in optimisation-based scheduling approaches, two different software architectures based on two ... Keywords: Discrete manufacturing, Electrical appliances, Mixed-integer linear programming, Optimization-based scheduling

Michael C. Georgiadis; Aaron A. Levis; Panagiotis Tsiakis; Ioannis Sanidiotis; Constantinos C. Pantelides; Lazaros G. Papageorgiou

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Frame sequential interpolation for discrete level-of-detail rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a method for automatic interpolation between adjacent discrete levels of detail to achieve smooth LOD changes in image space. We achieve this by breaking the problem into two passes: We render the two LOD levels individually ...

Daniel Scherzer; Michael Wimmer

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

The theory of deadlock avoidance via discrete control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deadlock in multithreaded programs is an increasingly important problem as ubiquitous multicore architectures force parallelization upon an ever wider range of software. This paper presents a theoretical foundation for dynamic deadlock avoidance in concurrent ... Keywords: concurrent programming, discrete control theory, dynamic deadlock avoidance, multicore processors, multithreaded programming, parallel programming

Yin Wang; Stéphane Lafortune; Terence Kelly; Manjunath Kudlur; Scott Mahlke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser`s wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known ``feature masks`` of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects. 29 figs.

Ellingson, W.A.; Brada, M.P.

1995-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Optical method and apparatus for detection of surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser is used in a non-destructive manner to detect surface and near-subsurface defects in dense ceramics and particularly in ceramic bodies with complex shapes such as ceramic bearings, turbine blades, races, and the like. The laser's wavelength is selected based upon the composition of the ceramic sample and the laser can be directed on the sample while the sample is static or in dynamic rotate or translate motion. Light is scattered off surface and subsurface defects using a preselected polarization. The change in polarization angle is used to select the depth and characteristics of surface/subsurface defects. The scattered light is detected by an optical train consisting of a charge coupled device (CCD), or vidicon, television camera which, in turn, is coupled to a video monitor and a computer for digitizing the image. An analyzing polarizer in the optical train allows scattered light at a given polarization angle to be observed for enhancing sensitivity to either surface or near-subsurface defects. Application of digital image processing allows subtraction of digitized images in near real-time providing enhanced sensitivity to subsurface defects. Storing known "feature masks" of identified defects in the computer and comparing the detected scatter pattern (Fourier images) with the stored feature masks allows for automatic classification of detected defects.

Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Brada, Mark P. (Goleta, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

ANALYSIS ON CORRELATIONS BETWEEN SUBSURFACE KINETIC HELICITY AND PHOTOSPHERIC CURRENT HELICITY IN ACTIVE REGIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation on correlations between photospheric current helicity and subsurface kinetic helicity is carried out by analyzing vector magnetograms and subsurface velocities for two rapidly developing active regions. The vector magnetograms are from the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (SDO/HMI) observed Stokes parameters, and the subsurface velocity is from time-distance data-analysis pipeline using HMI Dopplergrams. Over a span of several days, the evolution of the weighted current helicity shows a tendency similar to that of the weighted subsurface kinetic helicity, attaining a correlation coefficient above 0.60 for both active regions. Additionally, there seems to be a phase lag between the evolutions of the unweighted current and subsurface kinetic helicities for one of the active regions. The good correlation between these two helicities indicates that there is some intrinsic connection between the interior dynamics and photospheric magnetic twistedness inside active regions, which may help to interpret the well-known hemispheric preponderance of current-helicity distribution.

Gao Yu; Zhang Hongqi [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

234

Geochemistry, Fate, and Three-Dimensional Transport Modeling of Subsurface Cyanide Contamination at a Manufactured Gas Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the geochemistry, fate, and three-dimensional transport modeling of subsurface cyanide contamination at a manufactured gas plant.

2001-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

235

Uniformity of wastewater dispersal using subsurface drip emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An on-site wastewater treatment project site with two separate drip fields produced data on emitter flow rates and uniformity after 6 years of operation. The site served a two-bedroom residence in Weslaco, Texas, with treatment through a septic tank and subsurface flow constructed wetland. Filtration was accomplished with a small sand filter and screen filter. Results represent a worst-case scenario because the air relief valves were improperly installed and maintenance on the system was lacking. A pressure compensating (PC) emitter (Netafim Bioline 2.30 L/hr) and a pressure dependent (PD) emitter (Aqua-Drip 3.79 L/hr) were evaluated. When new, the PC emitters produced a mean discharge of 2.33 L/hr with a manufacturing coefficient of 0.043. The PD emitters, when new, produced a mean discharge of 4.30 L/hr and a manufacturing coefficient of variation of 0.016. The testing protocol was verified with the collection of data on new emitters. Two individual drip fields contained PC emitters (Netafim Bioline 3.50 L/hr) and PD emitters (Aqua-Drip 2.35 L/hr). The PC emitters were installed in a 200 m continuous length of tubing and the PD emitters were installed with ten individual lines of 15.24 m connected with a supply and return header. Wastewater with an average BOD? of 23 mg/L was applied to two drip fields for 6 years. Emitter flow rates for 313 PC emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 0.95 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.74 and the 251 PD emitters were reduced to a mean discharge of 1.52 L/hr with a coefficient of variation of 0.35. Two shock chlorination treatments with chlorine concentrations of 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L were used to increase the emitter's flow rate. Sixty PC and 61 PD emitters were evaluated. The initial average flow rate of the PC emitters was 0.818 L/hr. Average flow rates for the PC emitters increased significantly to 0.859 L/hr and 0.954 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L shock chlorination treatments, respectively. The initial flow rate of the PD emitters was 1.54 L/hr. The field flushing cycle represented an increase in flow rate to 1.60 L/hr. The shock chlorination treatments increased the average flow rate to 1.71 L/hr and 1.77 L/hr following the 500 mg/L and 1000 mg/L treatments respectively. All increases in mean discharge were statistically significant. Uniformity and over-application of wastewater were evaluated by analyzing the soil profile on a 1.22 m grid over the entire drain field. Statistical uniformity was 48.1 percent and 71.4 percent for the PC and PD emitters, respectively. The uniformity coefficient resulted in similar results with 70.1 percent for the PC emitters and 85.6 percent for the PD emitters. PC and PD fields caused an over-application of 55.3 percent and 58.5 percent of the field area, respectively.

Persyn, Russell Alan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Biological and Environmental Research (BER) BER Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Searchable Archive of BER Highlights External link Benefits of BER Funding Opportunities Biological & Environmental Research Advisory Committee (BERAC) News & Resources Contact Information Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy SC-23/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3251 F: (301) 903-5051 E: sc.ber@science.doe.gov More Information » March 2013 Understanding How Uranium Changes in Subsurface Environments Bacterial biomass found to have an impact. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo

237

TEST PLAN - SOLIDS ACCUMULATION SCOUTING STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.; Fowley, M.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

239

Diffusive Accumulation of Methane Bubbles in Seabed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider seabed bearing methane bubbles. In the absence of fractures the bubbles are immovably trapped in a porous matrix by surface tension forces; therefore the dominant mechanism of transfer of gas mass becomes the diffusion of gas molecules through the liquid. The adequate description of this process requires accounting "other-than-normal" (non-Fickian) diffusion effects, thermodiffusion and gravity action. We evaluate the diffusive flux of aqueous methane and predict the possibility of existence of bubble mass accumulation zones (which can appear independently from the presence/absence of hydrate stability zone) and effect of non-Fickian drift on the capacity of shallow and deep methane-hydrate deposits.

Goldobin, D S; Levesley, J; Lovell, M A; Rochelle, C A; Jackson, P; Haywood, A; Hunter, S; Rees, J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The Sensitivity of Mountain Snowpack Accumulation to Climate Warming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Controls on the sensitivity of mountain snowpack accumulation to climate warming (?S) are investigated. This is accomplished using two idealized, physically based models of mountain snowfall to simulate snowpack accumulation for the Cascade ...

Justin R. Minder

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Accumulation of different visual feature descriptors in a coherent framework  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a temporal accumulation scheme which disambiguates different kinds of visual 3D descriptors within one coherent framework. The accumulation consists of a twofold process: First, by means of a Bayesian filtering outliers become eliminated and ...

Jeppe Barsøe Jessen; Florian Pilz; Dirk Kraft; Nicolas Pugeault; Norbert Krüger

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Quadratic Galerkin Finite Element Schemes for the Vertical Discretization of Numerical Forecast Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A finite element scheme with second-order basis functions is introduced for vertical discretization using a spectral model for horizontal discretization. The basis functions are required to be continuous, and no assumption is made concerning the ...

J. Steppeler

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

DISCRETE TRANSPARENT BOUNDARY CONDITIONS FOR WIDE ANGLE PARABOLIC EQUATIONS IN UNDERWATER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISCRETE TRANSPARENT BOUNDARY CONDITIONS FOR WIDE ANGLE PARABOLIC EQUATIONS IN UNDERWATER ACOUSTICS "parabolic" equations (WAPEs) in underwater acoustics (assuming cylindrical symmetry). Existing the discretization of transparent bottom boundary conditions. In oceanography one wants to calculate the underwater

Ehrhardt, Matthias

244

Bounded skew high-order resolution schemes for the discrete ordinates method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrete ordinates method for the solution of the radiative heat transfer equation suffers from two main shortcomings, namely ray effects and numerical smearing. Spatial discretization, which is the cause of numerical smearing, constitutes the subject ...

P. J. Coelho

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

An Unsuspected Boundary-Induced Temporal Computational Mode in a Two-Time-Level Discretization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Normal-mode analyses are applied to various discrete forms of the one-dimensional, linearized, vertical acoustic equations in a height-based coordinate. First, the temporally discrete, spatially continuous equations are considered and the normal ...

Andrew Staniforth; Nigel Wood

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Discreteness of spectrum and positivity criteria for Schrödinger operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a class of necessary and sufficient conditions for the discreteness of spectrum of Schr\\"odinger operators with scalar potentials which are semibounded below. The classical discreteness of spectrum criterion by A.M.Molchanov (1953) uses a notion of negligible set in a cube as a set whose Wiener's capacity is less than a small constant times the capacity of the cube. We prove that this constant can be taken arbitrarily between 0 and 1. This solves a problem formulated by I.M.Gelfand in 1953. Moreover, we extend the notion of negligibility by allowing the constant to depend on the size of the cube. We give a complete description of all negligibility conditions of this kind. The a priori equivalence of our conditions involving different negligibility classes is a non-trivial property of the capacity. We also establish similar strict positivity criteria for the Schr\\"odinger operators with non-negative potentials.

Vladimir Maz'ya; Mikhail Shubin

2003-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

An adaptive synchronization protocol for parallel discrete event simulation  

SciTech Connect

Simulation, especially discrete event simulation (DES), is used in a variety of disciplines where numerical methods are difficult or impossible to apply. One problem with this method is that a sufficiently detailed simulation may take hours or days to execute, and multiple runs may be needed in order to generate the desired results. Parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) has been explored for many years as a method to decrease the time taken to execute a simulation. Many protocols have been developed which work well for particular types of simulations, but perform poorly when used for other types of simulations. Often it is difficult to know a priori whether a particular protocol is appropriate for a given problem. In this work, an adaptive synchronization method (ASM) is developed which works well on an entire spectrum of problems. The ASM determines, using an artificial neural network (ANN), the likelihood that a particular event is safe to process.

Bisset, K.R.

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Four-body continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations  

SciTech Connect

The development of a continuum-bin scheme of discretization for three-body projectiles is necessary for studies of reactions of Borromean nuclei such as {sup 6}He within the continuum-discretized coupled-channels approach. Such a procedure, for constructing bin states on selected continuum energy intervals, is formulated and applied for the first time to reactions of a three-body projectile. The continuum representation uses the eigenchannel expansion of the three-body S matrix. The method is applied to the challenging case of the {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb reaction at 22 MeV, where an accurate treatment of both the Coulomb and the nuclear interactions with the target is necessary.

Rodriguez-Gallardo, M. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro de Fisica Nuclear, Universidade de Lisboa, Avenida Prof. Gama Pinto 2, P-1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Arias, J. M.; Moro, A. M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Camacho, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Avenida Thomas A. Edison, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Thompson, I. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Physical Science Directorate, P. O. Box 808, L-414, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Tostevin, J. A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

249

The discrete Kalman filtering approach for seismic signals deconvolution  

SciTech Connect

Seismic signals are a convolution of reflectivity and seismic wavelet. One of the most important stages in seismic data processing is deconvolution process; the process of deconvolution is inverse filters based on Wiener filter theory. This theory is limited by certain modelling assumptions, which may not always valid. The discrete form of the Kalman filter is then used to generate an estimate of the reflectivity function. The main advantage of Kalman filtering is capability of technique to handling continually time varying models and has high resolution capabilities. In this work, we use discrete Kalman filter that it was combined with primitive deconvolution. Filtering process works on reflectivity function, hence the work flow of filtering is started with primitive deconvolution using inverse of wavelet. The seismic signals then are obtained by convoluting of filtered reflectivity function with energy waveform which is referred to as the seismic wavelet. The higher frequency of wavelet gives smaller wave length, the graphs of these results are presented.

Kurniadi, Rizal; Nurhandoko, Bagus Endar B. [Departement of Physics Intitut Teknologi Bandung, Jl. Ganesha 10 Bandung (Indonesia)

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

Relative Fisher information of discrete classical orthogonal polynomials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The analytic information theory of discrete distributions was initiated in 1998 by C. Knessl, P. Jacquet and S. Szpankowski who addressed the precise evaluation of the Renyi and Shannon entropies of the Poisson, Pascal (or negative binomial) and binomial distributions. They were able to derive various asymptotic approximations and, at times, lower and upper bounds for these quantities. Here we extend these investigations in a twofold way. First, we consider a much larger class of distributions, the Rakhmanov distributions $\\rho_n(x)=\\omega(x)y_n^2(x)$, where $\\{y_n(x)\\}$ denote the sequences of discrete hypergeometric-type polynomials which are orthogonal with respect to the weight function $\\omega(x)$ of Poisson, Pascal, binomial and hypergeometric types; that is the polynomials of Charlier, Meixner, Kravchuk and Hahn. Second, we obtain the explicit expressions for the relative Fisher information of these four families of Rakhmanov distributions with respect to their respective weight functions.

Jesus S. Dehesa; Pablo Sánchez-Moreno; Rafael J. Yáñez

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

A study of discrete and continuum joint modeling techniques  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of a numerical and experimental study in which finite element and discrete element techniques were used to analyze a layered polycarbonate plate model subjected to uniaxial compression. Also, the two analysis techniques were used to compute the response of an eight meter diameter drift in jointed-rock. The drift was subjected to in-situ and far-field induced thermal stresses. The finite element analyses used a continuum rock model to represent the jointed-rock. A comparison of the analyses showed that the finite element continuum joint model consistently predicted less joint slippage than did the discrete element analyses, although far-field displacements compared well.

Jung, J.; Brown, S.R.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Test Map and Discreteness Criteria for Subgroups in PU(1,n;C)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the discreteness for non-elementary subgroup G in PU(1, n;C), under the assumption that G satisfies Condition A. Mainly, we present that one can use a test map, which need not to be in G, to examine the discreteness of G, and also show that G is discrete, if every two-loxodromic-generator subgroup of G is discrete.

Li, ChangJun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Biometric cryptosystem based on discretized fingerprint texture descriptors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper focuses on a biometric cryptosystem implementation and evaluation based on a number of fingerprint texture descriptors. The texture descriptors, namely, the Gabor filter-based FingerCode, a local binary pattern (LBP), and a local direction ... Keywords: BCH, BPA, Biometric discretization, DROBA, ECC, EER, Error-correcting code, FAR, FCS, FRR, Fingerprint texture descriptors, Fuzzy commitment scheme, GAR, LBP, LCM, LDP, LDPC, LDerivP, Local binary pattern, MPA, PEG, ROI, SPA

Yadigar Imamverdiyev; Andrew Beng Jin Teoh; Jaihie Kim

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Discrete diffusion Monte Carlo for frequency-dependent radiative transfer  

SciTech Connect

Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) is a technique for increasing the efficiency of Implicit Monte Carlo radiative-transfer simulations. In this paper, we develop an extension of DDMC for frequency-dependent radiative transfer. We base our new DDMC method on a frequency-integrated diffusion equation for frequencies below a specified threshold. Above this threshold we employ standard Monte Carlo. With a frequency-dependent test problem, we confirm the increased efficiency of our new DDMC technique.

Densmore, Jeffrey D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kelly, Thompson G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Urbatish, Todd J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

255

Connecting Blackbody Radiation, Relativity, and Discrete Charge in Classical Electrodynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is suggested that an understanding of blackbody radiation within classical physics requires the presence of classical electromagnetic zero-point radiation, the restriction to relativistic (Coulomb) scattering systems, and the use of discrete charge. The contrasting scaling properties of nonrelativistic classical mechanics and classical electrodynamics are noted, and it is emphasized that the solutions of classical electrodynamics found in nature involve constants which connect together the scales of length, time, and energy. Indeed, there are analogies between the electrostatic forces for groups of particles of discrete charge and the van der Waals forces in equilibrium thermal radiation. The differing Lorentz- or Galilean-transformation properties of the zero-point radiation spectrum and the Rayleigh-Jeans spectrum are noted in connection with their scaling properties. Also, the thermal effects of acceleration within classical electromagnetism are related to the existence of thermal equilibrium within a gravitational field. The unique scaling and phase-space properties of a discrete charge in the Coulomb potential suggest the possibility of an equilibrium between the zero-point radiation spectrum and matter which is universal (independent of the particle mass), and an equilibrium between a universal thermal radiation spectrum and matter where the matter phase space depends only upon the ratio mc^2/kT. The observations and qualitative suggestions made here run counter to the ideas of currently accepted quantum physics.

Timothy H. Boyer

2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

On discrete symmetries for a whole Abelian model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering the whole concept applied to gauge theory a nonlinear abelian model is derived. A next step is to understand on the model properties. At this work, it will be devoted to discrete symmetries. For this, we will work based in two fields reference systems. This whole gauge symmetry allows to be analyzed through different sets which are the constructor basis {l_brace}D{sub {mu}},X{sup i}{sub {mu}}{r_brace} and the physical basis {l_brace}G{sub {mu}I}{r_brace}. Taking as fields reference system the diagonalized spin-1 sector, P, C, T and PCT symmetries are analyzed. They show that under this systemic model there are conservation laws driven for the parts and for the whole. It develops the meaning of whole-parity, field-parity and so on. However it is the whole symmetry that rules. This means that usually forbidden particles as pseudovector photons can be introduced through such whole abelian system. As result, one notices that the fields whole {l_brace}G{sub {mu}I}{r_brace} manifest a quanta diversity. It involves particles with different spins, masses and discrete quantum numbers under a same gauge symmetry. It says that without violating PCT symmetry different possibilities on discrete symmetries can be accommodated.

Chauca, J.; Doria, R. [CBPF, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Aprendanet, Petropolis, 25600 (Brazil)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

257

Geo-MHYDAS: A landscape discretization tool for distributed hydrological modeling of cultivated areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The representation of landscape variabilities by means of an adequate landscape discretization is of major importance in distributed hydrological modeling. In this paper, we present Geo-MHYDAS, a landscape discretization tool that allows explicit representation ... Keywords: Cultivated catchment, Discretization, GIS, Hydrology, Landscape, Topology

P. Lagacherie; M. Rabotin; F. Colin; R. Moussa; M. Voltz

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A Bootstrap Method for Software Reliability Assessment Based on a Discretized NHPP Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss a bootstrap method for software reliability assessment based on a discretized no homogeneous Poisson process (NHPP) model. Ordinarily, model parameters of the discretized NHPP model are estimated by using the regression analysis based on the ... Keywords: Software reliability assessment, Discretized NHPP model, Regression analysis, Bootstrap method

Shinji Inoue; Shigeru Yamada

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Continuous vs. discrete models for the quantum harmonic oscillator and the hydrogen atom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kravchuk and Meixner polynomials of discrete variable are introduced for the discrete models of the harmonic oscillator and hydrogen atom. Starting from Rodrigues formula we construct raising and lowering operators, commutation and anticommutation relations. The physical properties of discrete models are figured out through the equivalence with the continuous models obtained by limit process.

M. Lorente

2004-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Determining the adaptive decision zone of discrete lot sizing model with changes of total cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Economic Order Quantity (EOQ) zone is beneficial for giving some latitude in picking the lot sizes in a continuous time inventory problem, but it is not suitable for a discrete time inventory problem, the discrete lot sizing (DLS) problem. In this ... Keywords: Alternative solutions, Decision making, Discrete lot sizing, EOQ zone

Dong-Shang Chang; Fu-Chiao Chyr; Fu-Chiang Yang

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

The quadratic-form identity for constructing the Hamiltonian structures of the discrete integrable systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The quadratic-form identity is extended to the discrete version which can be used to construct the Hamiltonian structures of the discrete integrable systems associated with the Lie algebra possessing degenerate Killing forms. Especially, it can be used ... Keywords: Discrete quadratic-form identity, Hamiltonian structure, Integrable couplings, Liouville integrability, Toda hierarchy

Yuqin Yao; Jie Ji; Dengyuan Chen; Yunbo Zeng

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Interim report: Manipulation of natural subsurface processes: Field research and validation.  

SciTech Connect

Often the only alternative for treating deep subsurface contamination is in situ manipulation of natural processes to change the mobility or form of contaminants. However, the complex interactions of natural subsurface physical, chemical, and microbial processes limit the predictability of the system-wide impact of manipulation based on current knowledge. This report is a summary of research conducted to examine the feasibility of controlling the oxidation-reduction (redox) potential of the unconfined aquifer at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State by introducing chemical reagents and microbial nutrients. The experiment would allow the testing of concepts and hypotheses developed from fundamental research in the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Subsurface Science Program. Furthermore, the achievement of such control is expected to have implications for in situ remediation of dispersed aqueous contaminants in the subsurface environment at DOE sites nationwide, and particularly at the Hanford Site. This interim report summarizes initial research that was conducted between July 1990 and October 1991.

Fruchter, J.S.; Spane, F.A.; Amonette, J.E. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CSAMT method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

SciTech Connect

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a CSAMT signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak.

Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Method for determining depth and shape of a sub-surface conductive object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The depth to and size of an underground object may be determined by sweeping a controlled source audio magnetotelluric (CSAMT) signal and locating a peak response when the receiver spans the edge of the object. The depth of the object is one quarter wavelength in the subsurface media of the frequency of the peak. 3 figures.

Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, Jr.

1984-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

265

Evaluation of positron emission tomography as a method to visualize subsurface microbial processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Positron emission tomography (PET) provides spatiotemporal monitoring in a nondestructive manner and has higher sensitivity and resolution relative to other tomographic methods. Therefore, this technology was evaluated for its application to monitor in situ subsurface bacterial activity. To date, however, it has not been used to monitor or image soil microbial processes. In this study, PET imaging was applied as a 'proof-of-principle' method to assess the feasibility of visualizing a radiotracer labeled subsurface bacterial strain (Rahnella sp. Y9602), previously isolated from uranium contaminated soils and shown to promote uranium phosphate precipitation. Soil columns packed with acid-purified simulated mineral soils were seeded with 2-deoxy-2-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-d-glucose ({sup 18}FDG) labeled Rahnella sp. Y9602. The applicability of [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion as a tracer for measuring hydraulic conductivity and {sup 18}FDG as a tracer to identify subsurface metabolically active bacteria was successful in our soil column studies. Our findings indicate that positron-emitting isotopes can be utilized for studies aimed at elucidating subsurface microbiology and geochemical processes important in contaminant remediation.

Kinsella K.; Schlyer D.; Kinsella, K.; Schlyer, D.J.; Fowler, J.S.; Martinez, R.J.; Sobecky, P.A.

2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

266

Sensitivity of a World Ocean GCM to Changes in Subsurface Mixing Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of a coarse-resolution model of the World Ocean to parameterization of subgrid-scale mixing is examined. The model is based on the GFDL code. Results are presented from a series of model runs where the subsurface mixing ...

Anthony C. Hirst; Wenju Cai

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Subsurface structure of the southern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subsurface correlation of sedimentary strata was attempted among ten geothermal wells in the southern portion of the Salton Sea Geothermal Field. The spontaneous potential (SP) log was the principal tool used for correlation purposes. The structure that emerges from the correlation diagrams is a shallow plunging syncline with an east-west axis perpendicular to the axis of the Salton Trough.

Chan, M.A.; Tewhey, J.D.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Multi-scale finite-volume method for elliptic problems in subsurface flow simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a multi-scale finite-volume (MSFV) method to solve elliptic problems with many spatial scales arising from flow in porous media. The method efficiently captures the effects of small scales on a coarse grid, is conservative, and ... Keywords: finite-volume, multi-scale physics, subsurface flow, upscaling

P. Jenny; S. H. Lee; H. A. Tchelepi

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Device and nondestructive method to determine subsurface micro-structure in dense materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and a device to detect subsurface three-dimensional micro-structure in a sample by illuminating the sample with light of a given polarization and detecting light emanating from the sample that has a different direction of polarization by means of a confocal optical system.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

270

Feasibility study of tank leakage mitigation using subsurface barriers. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This document reflects the evaluations and analyses performed in response to Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A - {open_quotes}Complete Evaluation of Subsurface Barrier Feasibility{close_quotes} (September 1994). In addition, this feasibility study was revised reflecting ongoing work supporting a pending decision by the DOE Richland Operations Office, the Washington State Department of Ecology, and the US Environmental Protection Agency regarding further development of subsurface barrier options for SSTs and whether to proceed with demonstration plans at the Hanford Site (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07B). Analyses of 14 integrated SST tank farm remediation alternatives were conducted in response to the three stated objectives of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-45-07A. The alternatives include eight with subsurface barriers and six without. Technologies used in the alternatives include three types of tank waste retrieval, seven types of subsurface barriers, a method of stabilizing the void space of emptied tanks, two types of in situ soil flushing, one type of surface barrier, and a clean-closure method. A no-action alternative and a surface-barrier-only alternative were included as nonviable alternatives for comparison. All other alternatives were designed to result in closure of SST tank farms as landfills or in clean-closure. Revision 1 incorporates additional analyses of worker safety, large leak scenarios, and sensitivity to the leach rates of risk controlling constituents. The additional analyses were conducted to support TPA Milestone M-45-07B.

Treat, R.L.; Peters, B.B.; Cameron, R.J. [Enserch Environmental, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Multicomponent seismic data registration for subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gulf of Mexico Sergey Fomel, Milo M. Backus, Michael V. DeAngelo, Paul E. Murray, Bob A. Hardage with application to subsurface characterization in the shallow Gulf of Mexico. In this study, we extend-S images. Application of this technique to data from the Gulf of Mexico reveals the structure of sediments

Texas at Austin, University of

272

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

NEPTUNIUM IV AND V SORPTIN TO END-MEMBER SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS TO THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of Np through the subsurface is expected to be primarily controlled by sorption to sediments. Therefore, understanding and quantifying Np sorption to sediments and sediments from the Savannah River Site (SRS) is vital to ensure safe disposal of Np bearing wastes. In this work, Np sorption to two sediments representing the geological extremes with respect to sorption properties expected in the SRS subsurface environment (named 'subsurface sandy sediment' and 'subsurface clayey sediment') was examined under a variety of conditions. First a series of baseline sorption tests at pH 5.5 under an oxic atmosphere was performed to understand Np sorption under typical subsurface conditions. These experiments indicated that the baseline K{sub d} values for the subsurface sandy and subsurface clayey sediments are 4.26 {+-} 0.24 L kg{sup -1} and 9.05 {+-} 0.61 L kg{sup -1}, respectively. These Np K{sub d} values of SRS sediments are the first to be reported since Sheppard et al. (1979). The previous values were 0.25 and 0.16 L kg{sup -1} for a low pH sandy sediment. To examine a possible range of K{sub d} values under various environmental scenarios, the effects of natural organic matter (NOM, also a surrogate for cellulose degradation products), the presence of various chemical reductants, and an anaerobic atmosphere on Np sorption were examined. The presence of NOM resulted in an increase in the Np K{sub d} values for both sediments. This behavior is hypothesized to be the result of formation of a ternary Np-NOM-sediment complex. Slight increases in the Np sorption (K{sub d} 13-24 L kg{sup -1}) were observed when performing experiments in the presence of chemical reductants (dithionite, ascorbic acid, zero-valent iron) or under anaerobic conditions. Presumably, the increased sorption can be attributed to a slight reduction of Np(V) to Np(IV), the stronger sorbing form of Np. The most significant result of this study is the finding that Np weakly sorbs to both end member sediments and that Np only has a slight tendency to reduce to its stronger sorbing form, even under the most strongly reducing conditions expected under natural SRS conditions. Also, it appears that pH has a profound effect on Np sorption. Based on the these new measurements and the revelations about Np redox chemistry, the following changes to 'Best K{sub d}' values, as defined in Kaplan (2006), for SRS performance assessment calculations are recommended.

Kaplan, D.

2009-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

274

Subsurface microbial community structure correlates with uranium redox phases during in situ field manipulation in a contaminated aquifer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-term field manipulation experiments investigating the effects of subsurface redox conditions on the fate and transport of soluble uranium(VI) were conducted over a 3 year period at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Center (OR-IFRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. In the highly contaminated source zone, introduction of ethanol to the subsurface stimulated native denitrifying, sulfate-reducing, iron-reducing and fermentative microorganisms and reduced U to below 0.03 mg/L. Subsequently, oxygen and nitrate were experimentally re-introduced into the subsurface to examine the potential for re-oxidation and re-mobilization of U(IV). Introduction of oxygen or nitrate caused changes in subsurface geochemistry and re-oxidation of U. After reoxidation, the subsurface experienced several months of starvation conditions before ethanol injection was restored to reduce the treatment zone. Subsurface microorganisms were characterized by community fingerprinting, targeted population analyses, and quantitative PCR of key functional groups in 50 samples taken during multiple phases of field manipulation. Statistical analysis confirmed the hypothesis that the microbial community would co-vary with the shifts in the subsurface geochemistry. The level of hydraulic connectivity of sampling wells to the injection well was readily tracked by microbial community analysis. We demonstrate quantitatively that specific populations, especially Desulfosporosinus, are heavily influenced by geochemical conditions and positively correlate with the immobilization of uranium. Following nitrate reoxidation, populations of Fe(II)-oxidizing, nitrate reducing organisms (Thiobacillus) showed an increase in relative abundance.

Kostka, Joel [Florida State University; Green, Stefan [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University; Criddle, Craig [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A concurrent, multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport  

SciTech Connect

The authors present an algorithm for the concurrent solution of the linear system arising from a multigroup, discrete ordinates model of neutron transport. The target architectures consist of distributed memory computers ranging from workstation clusters to massively parallel computers. Based on an analysis of the memory requirement and floating point complexity of matrix-vector multiplication in the iterative solution of the linear system, the authors propose a data layout and communication strategy designed to achieve scalability with respect to all phase space variables. Numerical results are presented to demonstrate the performance of the algorithm on the nCUBE/2.

Dorr, M.R.; Still, C.H.

1993-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

276

A Research on Production Optimization of Coupled Surface and Subsurface Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main objectives in the Oil & Gas Industry is to constantly improve the reservoir management capabilities by using production optimization strategies that can positively impact the so-called net-present value (NPV) of a given project. In order to achieve this goal the industry is faced with the difficult task of maximizing hydrocarbon production and minimizing unwanted fluids, such as water, while sustaining or even enhancing the reservoir recovery factor by handling properly the fluids at surface facilities. A key element in this process is the understanding of the interactions between subsurface and subsurface dynamics in order to provide insightful production strategies which honor reservoir management surface facility constraints. The implementation of the ideal situation of fully coupling surface/subsurface has been hindered by the required computational efforts involved in the process. Consequently, various types of partially coupling that require less computational efforts are practically implemented. Due to importance of coupling surface and subsurface model on production optimization and taking the advantage of advancing computational performance, this research explores the concept of surface and subsurface model couplings and production optimization. The research aims at demonstrating the role of coupling of surface and subsurface model on production optimization under simple production constraint (i.e. production and injection pressure limit). The normal production prediction runs with various reservoir description (homogeneous-low permeability, homogeneous-high permeability, and heterogeneous permeability) and different fluid properties (dead-oil PVT and lived-oil PVT) were performed in order to understand the effect of coupling level, and coupling scheme with different reservoir descriptions and fluid properties on production and injection rate prediction. The result shows that for dead-oil PVT, the production rate from different coupling schemes in homogeneous and heterogeneous reservoir is less sensitive than lived-oil PVT cases. For lived-oil PVT, the production rate from different coupling schemes in homogeneous high permeability and heterogeneous permeability are more sensitive than homogeneous low permeability. The production optimization on water flooding under production and injection constraint cases is considered here also.

Iemcholvilert, Sevaphol

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Source Release Modeling for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A source release model was developed to determine the release of contaminants into the shallow subsurface, as part of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) evaluation at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's (INEEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). The output of the source release model is used as input to the subsurface transport and biotic uptake models. The model allowed separating the waste into areas that match the actual disposal units. This allows quantitative evaluation of the relative contribution to the total risk and allows evaluation of selective remediation of the disposal units within the SDA.

Becker, Bruce Harley

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

From continuum Fokker-Planck models to discrete kinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Two theoretical formalisms are widely used in modeling mechanochemical systems such as protein motors: continuum Fokker-Planck models and discrete kinetic models. Both have advantages and disadvantages. Here we present a ‘‘finite volume’ ’ procedure to solve Fokker-Planck equations. The procedure relates the continuum equations to a discrete mechanochemical kinetic model while retaining many of the features of the continuum formulation. The resulting numerical algorithm is a generalization of the algorithm developed previously by Fricks, Wang, and Elston through relaxing the local linearization approximation of the potential functions, and a more accurate treatment of chemical transitions. The new algorithm dramatically reduces the number of numerical cells required for a prescribed accuracy. The kinetic models constructed in this fashion retain some features of the continuum potentials, so that the algorithm provides a systematic and consistent treatment of mechanical-chemical responses such as load-velocity relations, which are difficult to capture with a priori kinetic models. Several numerical examples are given to illustrate the performance of the method.

Jianhua Xing; Hongyun Wang; George Oster

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Discrete-element modeling of particulate aerosol flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiple-time step computational approach is presented for efficient discrete-element modeling of aerosol flows containing adhesive solid particles. Adhesive aerosol particulates are found in numerous dust and smoke contamination problems, including smoke particle transport in the lungs, particle clogging of heat exchangers in construction vehicles, industrial nanoparticle transport and filtration systems, and dust fouling of electronic systems and MEMS components. Dust fouling of equipment is of particular concern for potential human occupation on dusty planets, such as Mars. The discrete-element method presented in this paper can be used for prediction of aggregate structure and breakup, for prediction of the effect of aggregate formation on the bulk fluid flow, and for prediction of the effects of small-scale flow features (e.g., due to surface roughness or MEMS patterning) on the aggregate formation. After presentation of the overall computational structure, the forces and torques acting on the particles resulting from fluid motion, particle-particle collision, and adhesion under van der Waals forces are reviewed. The effect of various parameters of normal collision and adhesion of two particles are examined in detail. The method is then used to examine aggregate formation and particle clogging in pipe and channel flow.

Marshall, J.S. [School of Engineering, University of Vermont, 33 Colchecter Avenue, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)], E-mail: jeffm@cems.uvm.edu

2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

280

BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves  

BSA 12-36: Oil Accumulation in Plant Leaves. BNL Reference Number: BSA 12-36. Patent Status: Non-Provisional filed on July 2, 2013. Summary

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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281

Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accumulator Ring Commissioning Latest Step for Spallation Neutron Source BNL SNS Homepage The following is from a press release issued by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. OAK RIDGE,...

282

Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) power supply  

SciTech Connect

The Positron Accumulator Ring (PAR) consists of 8 dipole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized via one 12-pulse dc power supply. The power supply consists of four phase controlled half-wave wye group converters. Each of the two half-wave converters are connected through an interphase transformer to obtain a full-wave converter with 120{degrees} conduction. The input voltage for these two half-wave converters are 180{degrees} apart. The two full-wave converters are connected in parallel through a third interphase transformer. This type of connection of the converters not only provides the required output current, it also improves the input power factor of the power supply. The output of the wye group converters is filtered through a passive L-R-C filter to reduce the ripple content of the output current. At low current values of the power supply the current ripple is high, thus a large filter is needed, which adds to the cost of the power supply, however at high output current levels, the current ripple is less severe. The large size of the filter can be reduced by adding an anti-parallel rectifier diode(D1) to the output of the power supply. A freewheeling diode(D2) is connected before the choke to circulate the current once the power supply is turned off. In order to measure the current in the magnet a high precision, low drift, zero flux current transductor is used. This transductor senses the magnet current which provides a feedback signal to control the gating of the converter`s thyristors. A true 14 bit Digital to Analog Converter (DAC) is programmed by the control computer for the required current value, providing a reference for the current regulator. Fast correction of the line transients is provided by a relatively fast voltage loop controlled by a high gain slow response current loop.

Fathizadeh, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The original goal is to devise computational methods for improving the resolution of subsurface seismic images. Initially the research emphasis was primarily on developing methods for efficient ray- theoretic modeling of acoustic waves in triangulated representations of media and on efficient means of modeling waves that travel sub- horizontally in horizontally layered media. Subsequent directions included new efficient methods for imaging the Earth`s subsurface (specifically, 3-D migration via the McClellan transformation, and squeezing dip movement (DMO) for depth-variable velocity), demonstrations of the importance of taking P-wave anisotrophy into account in migration and DMO, the development of algorithms for doing migration and DMO in heterogeneous, anisotropic media, and the development of a methodology for the all-important step of deriving the anisotrophy parameters necessary for imaging of P-wave data.

Larner, K.L.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Exact method for determining subsurface radioactivity depth profiles from gamma spectroscopy measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Subsurface radioactivity may be due to transport of radionuclides from a contaminated surface into the solid volume, as occurs for radioactive fallout deposited on soil, or from fast neutron activation of a solid volume, as occurs in concrete blocks used for radiation shielding. For purposes including fate and transport studies of radionuclides in the environment, decommissioning and decontamination of radiation facilities, and nuclear forensics, an in situ, nondestructive method for ascertaining the subsurface distribution of radioactivity is desired. The method developed here obtains a polynomial expression for the radioactivity depth profile, using a small set of gamma-ray count rates measured by a collimated detector directed towards the surface at a variety of angles with respect to the surface normal. To demonstrate its capabilities, this polynomial method is applied to the simple case where the radioactivity is maximal at the surface and decreases exponentially with depth below the surface, and to the ...

Van Siclen, Clinton DeW

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Historical Perspective on Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area (SCFA) Success: Counting the Things That Really Count  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area, (SCFA) is committed to, and has been accountable for, identifying and providing solutions for the most pressing subsurface contamination problems in the DOE Complex. The SCFA program is a DOE end user focused and problem driven organization that provides the best technical solutions for the highest priority problems. This paper will discuss in some detail specific examples of the most successful, innovative technical solutions and the DOE sites where they were deployed or demonstrated. These solutions exhibited outstanding performance in FY 2000/2001 and appear poised to achieve significant success in saving end users money and time. They also provide a reduction in risk to the environment, workers, and the public while expediting environmental clean up of the sites.

Wright, J. A. Jr.; Middleman, L. I.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Changes in the subsurface stratification of the Sun with the 11-year activity cycle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the changes of the Sun's subsurface stratification inferred from helioseismology data. Using SOHO/MDI (SOlar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager) data for the last 9 years and, more precisely, the temporal variation of f-mode frequencies, we have computed the variation of the radius of subsurface layers of the Sun by applying helioseismic inversions. We have found a variability of the ``helioseismic'' radius in antiphase with the solar activity, with the strongest variations of the stratification being just below the surface around 0.995$R_{\\odot}$. Besides, the radius of the deeper layers of the Sun, between 0.975$R_{\\odot}$ and 0.99$R_{\\odot}$ changes in phase with the 11-year cycle.

Sandrine Lefebvre; Alexander Kosovichev

2005-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

287

Insulated conductor temperature limited heater for subsurface heating coupled in a three-phase WYE configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes a first heater, a second heater, and a third heater placed in an opening in the subsurface formation. Each heater includes: an electrical conductor; an insulation layer at least partially surrounding the electrical conductor; and an electrically conductive sheath at least partially surrounding the insulation layer. The electrical conductor is electrically coupled to the sheath at a lower end portion of the heater. The lower end portion is the portion of the heater distal from a surface of the opening. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are electrically coupled at the lower end portions of the heaters. The first heater, the second heater, and the third heater are configured to be electrically coupled in a three-phase wye configuration.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Sandberg, Chester Ledlie (Palo Alto, CA)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

288

300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (IFRC) Field Site Management Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has established the 300 Area Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge (300 Area IFRC) on the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) within the Office of Science. The project is funded by the Environmental Remediation Sciences Division (ERSD). The purpose of the project is to conduct research at the 300 IFRC to investigate multi-scale mass transfer processes associated with a subsurface uranium plume impacting both the vadose zone and groundwater. The management approach for the 300 Area IFRC requires that a Field Site Management Plan be developed. This is an update of the plan to reflect the installation of the well network and other changes.

Freshley, Mark D.

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

Characterization and monitoring of subsurface processes using parallel computing and electrical resistivity imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This newsletter discusses recent advancement in subsurface resistivity characterization and monitoring capabilities. The BC Cribs field desiccation treatability test resistivity monitoring data is use an example to demonstrate near-real time 3D subsurface imaging capabilities. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) is a method of imaging the electrical resistivity distribution of the subsurface. An ERT data collection system consists of an array of electrodes, deployed on the ground surface or within boreholes, that are connected to a control unit which can access each electrode independently (Figure 1). A single measurement is collected by injecting current across a pair of current injection electrodes (source and sink), and measuring the resulting potential generated across a pair of potential measurement electrodes (positive and negative). An ERT data set is generated by collecting many such measurements using strategically selected current and potential electrode pairs. This data set is then processed using an inversion algorithm, which reconstructs an estimate (or image) of the electrical conductivity (i.e. the inverse of resistivity) distribution that gave rise to the measured data.

Johnson, Timothy C.; Truex, Michael J.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Marble, Justin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Characterization of microbial communities in subsurface nuclear blast cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This US Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this programâ??s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser; Ken Czerwinski; Charles E. Russell; Mavrik Zavarin

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

294

Characterization of Microbial Communities in Subsurface Nuclear Blast Cavities of the Nevada Test Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Remediation Sciences Project (ERSP) was designed to test fundamental hypotheses concerning the existence and nature of indigenous microbial populations of Nevada Test Site subsurface nuclear test/detonation cavities. Now called Subsurface Biogeochemical Research (SBR), this program’s Exploratory Research (ER) element, which funded this research, is designed to support high risk, high potential reward projects. Here, five cavities (GASCON, CHANCELLOR, NASH, ALEMAN, and ALMENDRO) and one tunnel (U12N) were sampled using bailers or pumps. Molecular and cultivation-based techniques revealed bacterial signatures at five sites (CHANCELLOR may be lifeless). SSU rRNA gene libraries contained diverse and divergent microbial sequences affiliated with known metal- and sulfur-cycling microorganisms, organic compound degraders, microorganisms from deep mines, and bacteria involved in selenate reduction and arsenite oxidation. Close relatives of Desulforudis audaxviator, a microorganism thought to subsist in the terrestrial deep subsurface on H2 and SO42- produced by radiochemical reactions, was detected in the tunnel waters. NTS-specific media formulations were used to culture and quantify nitrate-, sulfate-, iron-reducing, fermentative, and methanogenic microorganisms. Given that redox manipulations mediated by microorganisms can impact the mobility of DOE contaminants, our results should have implications for management strategies at this and other DOE sites.

Duane P. Moser, Jim Bruckner, Jen Fisher, Ken Czerwinski, Charles E. Russell, and Mavrik Zavarin

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Mineral Dissolution and Secondary Precipitation on Quartz Sand in Simulated Hanford Tank Solutions Affecting Subsurface Porosity  

SciTech Connect

Highly alkaline nuclear waste solutions have been released from underground nuclear waste storage tanks and pipelines into the vadose zone at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Hanford Site in Washington, causing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. High pH caustic NaNO3 solutions with and without dissolved Al were reacted with quartz sand through flow-through columns stepwise at 45, 51, and 89°C to simulate possible reactions between leaked nuclear waste solution and primary subsurface mineral. Upon reaction, Si was released from the dissolution of quartz sand, and nitrate-cancrinite [Na8Si6Al6O24(NO3)2] precipitated on the quartz surface as a secondary mineral phase. Both steady-state dissolution and precipitation kinetics were quantified, and quartz dissolution apparent activation energy was determined. Mineral alteration through dissolution and precipitation processes results in pore volume and structure changes in the subsurface porous media. In this study, the column porosity increased up to 40.3% in the pure dissolution column when no dissolved Al was present in the leachate, whereas up to a 26.5% porosity decrease was found in columns where both dissolution and precipitation were observed because of the presence of Al in the input solution. The porosity change was also confirmed by calculation using the dissolution and precipitation rates and mineral volume changes.

Wang, Guohui; Um, Wooyong

2012-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

296

Qualitative risk assessment of subsurface barriers in applications supporting retrieval of SST waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a brief, qualitative assessment of risks associated with the potential use of impermeable surface barriers installed around and beneath Hanford Site single-shell tanks (SSTs) to support the retrieval of wastes from those tanks. These risks are compared to qualitative assessment of costs and risks associated with a case in which barriers are not used. A quantitative assessment of costs and risks associated with these two cases will be prepared and documented in a companion report. The companion report will compare quantitatively the costs and risks of several retrieval options with varying parameters, such as effectiveness of retrieval, effectiveness of subsurface barriers, and the use of surface barriers. For ease of comparison of qualitative risks, a case in which impermeable subsurface barriers are used in conjunction with another technology to remove tank waste is referred, to in this report as the Barrier Case. A case in which waste removal technologies are used without employing a subsurface barrier is referred to as the No Barrier Case. The technologies associated with each case are described in the following sections.

Treat, R.L. [ENSERCH Environmental Corp. (United States)

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Use of Underwater Gliders for Acoustic Data Retrieval from Subsurface Oceanographic Instrumentation and Bidirectional Communication in the Deep Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many fixed oceanographic instruments and observing systems are deployed in the water column or on the seafloor for extended periods of time without any expression at the sea surface. To routinely communicate with such subsurface instruments in the ...

Uwe Send; Lloyd Regier; Brent Jones

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Evaluation of a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) over the Contiguous United States at Regional–Local Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents a comprehensive evaluation on a Conjunctive Surface–Subsurface Process Model (CSSP) in predicting soil temperature–moisture distributions, terrestrial hydrology variations, and land–atmosphere exchanges against various in situ ...

Xing Yuan; Xin-Zhong Liang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Estimation of Subsurface Temperature Anomaly in the North Atlantic Using a Self-Organizing Map Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-organizing map (SOM) neural network was developed from Argo gridded datasets in order to estimate a subsurface temperature anomaly (STA) from remote sensing data. The SOM maps were trained using anomalies of sea surface temperature (SST), ...

Xiangbai Wu; Xiao-Hai Yan; Young-Heon Jo; W. Timothy Liu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Continuum discretization methods in a composite-particle scattering off a nucleus: the benchmark calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The direct comparison of two different continuum discretization methods towards the solution of a composite particle scattering off a nucleus is presented. The first approach -- the Continumm-Discretized Coupled Channel method -- is based on the differential equation formalism, while the second one -- the Wave-Packet Continuum Discretization method -- uses the integral equation formulation for the composite-particle scattering problem. As benchmark calculations we have chosen the deuteron off \

O. A. Rubtsova; V. I. Kukulin; A. M. Moro

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fractured reservoir discrete feature network technologies. Final report, March 7, 1996 to September 30, 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research conducted for the Fractured Reservoir Discrete Feature Network Technologies Project. The five areas studied are development of hierarchical fracture models; fractured reservoir compartmentalization, block size, and tributary volume analysis; development and demonstration of fractured reservoir discrete feature data analysis tools; development of tools for data integration and reservoir simulation through application of discrete feature network technologies for tertiary oil production; quantitative evaluation of the economic value of this analysis approach.

Dershowitz, William S.; Einstein, Herbert H.; LaPoint, Paul R.; Eiben, Thorsten; Wadleigh, Eugene; Ivanova, Violeta

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Space-time discontinuous Galerkin discretization of rotating shallow water equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A space-time discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization is presented for the (rotating) shallow water equations over varying topography. We formulate the space-time DG finite element discretization in an efficient and conservative discretization. The ... Keywords: 35Q35, 65N30, 75S05, 76B15, 76M10, Bores, Discontinuous Galerkin methods, Finite element methods, Moving grid, Numerical dissipation, Potential vorticity, Shallow water equations

V. R. Ambati; O. Bokhove

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ...  

Graph-Theoretic Analysis of Discrete-Phase-Space States for ... Data collected from devices and human condition may be used to forewarn of critical events such as

304

DISCRETE-FREQUENCY AND BROADBAND NOISE RADIATION FROM DIESEL ENGINE COOLING FANS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This effort focuses on measuring and predicting the discrete-frequency and broadband noise radiated by diesel engine cooling fans. Unsteady forces developed by the interaction of… (more)

Kim, Geon-Seok

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A discrete variable representation for electron-hydrogen atom scattering  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A discrete variable representation (DVR) suitable for treating the quantum scattering of a low energy electron from a hydrogen atom is presented. The benefits of DVR techniques (e.g. the removal of the requirement of calculating multidimensional potential energy matrix elements and the availability of iterative sparse matrix diagonalization/inversion algorithms) have for many years been applied successfully to studies of quantum molecular scattering. Unfortunately, the presence of a Coulomb singularity at the electrically unshielded center of a hydrogen atom requires high radial grid point densities in this region of the scattering coordinate, while the presence of finite kinetic energy in the asymptotic scattering electron also requires a sufficiently large radial grid point density at moderate distances from the nucleus. The constraints imposed by these two length scales have made application of current DVR methods to this scattering event difficult.

Gaucher, L.F.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Compression algorithm for discrete light-cone quantization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We adapt the compression algorithm of Weinstein, Auerbach, and Chandra from eigenvectors of spin lattice Hamiltonians to eigenvectors of light-front field-theoretic Hamiltonians. The latter are approximated by the standard discrete light-cone quantization technique, which provides a matrix representation of the Hamiltonian eigenvalue problem. The eigenvectors are represented as singular value decompositions of two-dimensional arrays, indexed by transverse and longitudinal momenta, and compressed by truncation of the decomposition. The Hamiltonian is represented by a rank-four tensor that is decomposed as a sum of contributions factorized into direct products of separate matrices for transverse and longitudinal interactions. The algorithm is applied to a model theory, to illustrate its use.

Xiao Pu; Sophia S. Chabysheva; John R. Hiller

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

307

Public key Steganography Using Discrete Cross-Coupled Chaotic Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By cross-coupling two logistic maps a novel method is proposed for the public key steganography in JPEG image. Chaotic maps entail high complexity in the used algorithm for embedding secret data in a medium. In this paper, discrete cross- coupled chaotic maps are used to specifying the location of the different parts of the secret data in the image. Modifying JPEG format during compressing and decompressing, and also using public key enhanced difficulty of the algorithm. Simulation results show that in addition to excessive capacity, this method has high robustness and resistance against hackers and can be applicable in secret communication. Also the PSNR value is high compared to the other works.

Sodeif Ahadpour; Mahdiyeh Majidpour; Yaser Sadra

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Derivation of new 3D discrete ordinate equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Sn equations have been the workhorse of deterministic radiation transport calculations for many years. Here we derive two new angular discretizations of the 3D transport equation. The first set of equations, derived using Lagrange interpolation and collocation, retains the classical Sn structure, with the main difference being how the scattering source is calculated. Because of the formal similarity with the classical S n equations, it should be possible to modify existing computer codes to take advantage of the new formulation. In addition, the new S n-like equations correctly capture delta function scattering. The second set of equations, derived using a Galerkin technique, does not retain the classical Sn structure because the streaming term is not diagonal. However, these equations can be cast into a form similar to existing methods developed to reduce ray effects. Numerical investigation of both sets of equations is under way. (authors)

Ahrens, C. D. [Colorado School of Mines, Dept. of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Program in Nuclear Science and Engineering, Golden, CO 80401-1887 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Discrete pulse modulation strategies for high-frequency inverter systems  

SciTech Connect

High-performance high-frequency inverter systems for UPS applications represent a demanding application that cannot be easily realized using conventional hard-switched PWM inverter topologies. Adoption of typical soft-switched inverters such as the resonant dc link inverter require the use of discrete pulse modulation strategies. New controller structures are necessary to cope with stringent voltage regulation and distortion constraints in the presence of unbalanced and nonlinear loads. This paper presents a controller that utilizes load current feed-forward strategy with a cost function current regulator to achieve excellent transient performance characteristics. Voltage regulation is ensured using a synchronous frame regulator. Detailed simulation and experimental results verifying the concepts are presented. Although this paper focuses on soft-switching inverters, the control concepts can be applied to conventional hard-switching inverters as well.

Venkataramanan, G. (Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Divan, D.M. (Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering); Jahns, T.M. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

The effect of reservoir heterogeneity on gas production from hydrate accumulations in the permafrost  

SciTech Connect

The quantity of hydrocarbon gases trapped in natural hydrate accumulations is enormous, leading to significant interest in the evaluation of their potential as an energy source. Large volumes of gas can be readily produced at high rates for long times from methane hydrate accumulations in the permafrost by means of depressurization-induced dissociation combined with conventional technologies and horizontal or vertical well configurations. Initial studies on the possibility of natural gas production from permafrost hydrates assumed homogeneity in intrinsic reservoir properties and in the initial condition of the hydrate-bearing layers (either due to the coarseness of the model or due to simplifications in the definition of the system). These results showed great promise for gas recovery from Class 1, 2, and 3 systems in the permafrost. This work examines the consequences of inevitable heterogeneity in intrinsic properties, such as in the porosity of the hydrate-bearing formation, or heterogeneity in the initial state of hydrate saturation. Heterogeneous configurations are generated through multiple methods: (1) through defining heterogeneous layers via existing well-log data, (2) through randomized initialization of reservoir properties and initial conditions, and (3) through the use of geostatistical methods to create heterogeneous fields that extrapolate from the limited data available from cores and well-log data. These extrapolations use available information and established geophysical methods to capture a range of deposit properties and hydrate configurations. The results show that some forms of heterogeneity, such as horizontal stratification, can assist in production of hydrate-derived gas. However, more heterogeneous structures can lead to complex physical behavior within the deposit and near the wellbore that may obstruct the flow of fluids to the well, necessitating revised production strategies. The need for fine discretization is crucial in all cases to capture dynamic behavior during production.

Reagan, M. T.; Kowalsky, M B.; Moridis, G. J.; Silpngarmlert, S.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

The application of discrete event simulation and system dynamics in the logistics and supply chain context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete event simulation (DES) and system dynamics (SD) are two modelling approaches widely used as decision support tools in logistics and supply chain management (LSCM). A widely held belief exists that SD is mostly used to model problems at a strategic ... Keywords: Comparison of methods, Discrete-event simulation, Logistics and supply chain management, Simulation modelling, System dynamics

Antuela A. Tako; Stewart Robinson

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Discrete Event Concept as a Paradigm for the “Perception-Based Diagnosis” of Sachem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sachem is an extensive large-scale real time knowledge-based system designed to monitor and diagnose blast furnaces. This paper aims at illustrating the way the concept of discrete event allowed the definition of a “perception-based diagnosis” ... Keywords: artificial intelligence, discrete event systems, fault diagnosis, knowledge-based systems, monitored control systems

Marc Le Goc; Claudia Frydman

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain corrections via an adaptive quadtree mesh discretization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid gravity and gravity gradiometry terrain corrections via an adaptive quadtree mesh discretization Kristofer Davis1,2 M. Andy Kass1 Yaoguo Li1 1 Center for Gravity, Electrical, and Magnetic Studies of gravity gradiometry surveys utilising an adaptive quadtree mesh discretization. The data- and terrain

314

Utilization of Discretization method on the diagnosis of optic nerve disease  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optic nerve disease is an important disease that appears commonly in public. In this paper, we propose a hybrid diagnostic system based on discretization (quantization) method and classification algorithms including C4.5 decision tree classifier, ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, C4.5 decision tree classifier, Discretization method, Hybrid systems, Least square support vector machine, Optic nerve disease, VEP signals

Kemal Polat; Sad?k Kara; Ay?egül Güven; Salih Güne?

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Non-Abelian Groups in Optimization of Decision Diagrams Representations of Discrete Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to the reduction of decision diagram (DD) representations of discrete functions by using the non-Abelian groups and Fourier DDs on these groups. The number of levels in a DD can be reduced through decomposition of the domain group ... Keywords: Fourier transform, decision diagrams, discrete functions, non-Abelian groups

Radomir S. Stankovi?

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Discrete spectrum distribution of the Landau Operator Perturbed by an Expanding Electric Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under a perturbation by a decaying electric potential, the Landau Hamiltonian acquires some discrete eigenvalues between the Landau levels. We study the perturbation by an "expanding" electric potential $V(t^{-1}x)$, $t>0$, and derive a quasi-classical formula for the counting function of the discrete spectrum as $t\\to \\infty$.

Grigori Rozenblum; Alexander V. Sobolev

2007-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Discrete spectrum distribution of the Landau Operator Perturbed by an Expanding Electric Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Under a perturbation by a decaying electric potential, the Landau Hamiltonian acquires some discrete eigenvalues between the Landau levels. We study the perturbation by an "expanding" electric potential $V(t^{-1}x)$, $t>0$, and derive a quasi-classical formula for the counting function of the discrete spectrum as $t\\to \\infty$.

Rozenblum, Grigori

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Verification of initial-state opacity in security applications of discrete event systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we formulate and analyze methodologies for verifying the notion of initial-state opacity in discrete event systems that are modeled as non-deterministic finite automata with partial observation on their transitions. A system is initial-state ... Keywords: Discrete event system, Formal methods in security analysis, Initial state estimation, Initial state estimator, Tracking in sensor network

Anooshiravan Saboori, Christoforos N. Hadjicostis

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Translation-invariant two-dimensional discrete wavelet transform on graphics processing units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT) is used in several signal and image processing applications. Due to the computational expense various approaches have been proposed. One approach is using graphics processing units (GPUs) as stream processors to speed ... Keywords: GPU, algorithme à trous, image processing, parallel discrete wavelet transform, shader

Dietmar Wippig; Bernd Klauer

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Discrete event modeling through a multi-formalism approach, from a user-oriented perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The hierarchy of formalism presented in this paper is part of an on going work in the development of a broad hierarchy of DEVS based formalisms. We introduce a hierarchy of formalisms with different temporal restrictions targeted to the discrete event ... Keywords: DEVS modeling methodology, discrete event modeling, multi-formalisms approach

Hernán P. Dacharry; Norbert Giambiasi

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Discrete Differential Forms for $(1+1)$-Dimensional Cosmological Space-Times  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we describe applications of the numerical method of discrete differential forms in computational general relativity (GR). In particular, we consider the initial value problem for vacuum space-times that admit plane gravitational waves. ... Keywords: discrete differential forms, polarized gowdy, translationally symmetric space-time

Ronny Richter; Jörg Frauendiener

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Empirical evaluation of conservative and optimistic discrete event execution on cloud and VM platforms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Virtual machine (VM) technologies, especially those offered via Cloud platforms, present new dimensions with respect to performance and cost in executing parallel discrete event simulation (PDES) applications. Due to the introduction of overall cost ... Keywords: cloud computing, conservative simulation, optimistic simulation, parallel discrete event simulation, performance study, virtual machine

Srikanth B. Yoginath, Kalyan S. Perumalla

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

On fluidization of discrete event models: observation and control of continuous Petri nets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a preliminary overview, this work provides first a broad tutorial on the fluidization of discrete event dynamic models, an efficient technique for dealing with the classical state explosion problem. Even if named as continuous or fluid, the ... Keywords: Discrete event systems, Fluidization, Petri nets, Piecewise affine systems, System theory, Untimed and timed models

Manuel Silva; Jorge Júlvez; Cristian Mahulea; C. Renato Vázquez

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Well Posedness of the Initial Value Problem for Vertically Discretized Hydrostatic Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically discretized linearized hydrostatic equations in hybrid coordinates are considered. The matrix of vertical structure, which depends on vertical discretization and determines the classification of the obtained system of time-dependent partial ... Keywords: initial value problems, numerical weather prediction, oscillatory matrices, well posedness

Andrei Bourchtein; Vladimir Kadychnikov

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Sparse Grid SpaceTime Discretization Scheme for Parabolic Problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Sparse Grid Space­Time Discretization Scheme for Parabolic Problems Michael Griebel, Daniel Oeltz Abstract In this paper we consider the discretization in space and time of parabolic di#erential equations. This holds in many applications due to the smoothing properties of the propagator of the parabolic PDE (heat

Bartels, Soeren

326

Matching pursuit by undecimated discrete wavelet transform for non-stationary time series of arbitrary length  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe how to formulate a matching pursuit algorithm which successively approximates a periodic non-stationary time series with orthogonal projections onto elements of a suitable dictionary. We discuss how to construct such dictionaries derived ... Keywords: Discrete wavelet transform, matching pursuit, undecimated discrete wavelet transform

A. T. Walden; A. Contreras Cristan

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Predictability of event occurrences in partially-observed discrete-event systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the problem of predicting occurrences of a significant event in a partially-observed discrete-event system. The predictability of occurrences of an event in a system is defined in the context of formal languages. The predictability ... Keywords: Diagnosis, Discrete-event systems, Prediction

Sahika Genc; Stéphane Lafortune

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Modeling and simulation of crowd using cellular discrete event systems theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we discuss how Cellular Discrete Event System Specification (Cell-DEVS) theory can be used in modeling and simulation of the crowd. We will show that the efficient cell update mechanism of Cell-DEVS allows for more efficient entity-based ... Keywords: cellular discrete event systems, crowd, pedestrian

Ronnie Farrell, Mohammad Moallemi, Sixuan Wang, Wang Xiang, Gabriel Wainer

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Timed Discrete Event Control of Parallel Production Lines with Continuous Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this contribution we present an approach to formulate and solve certain scheduling tasks for hybrid systems using timed discrete event control methods. To demonstrate our approach, we consider a cyclically operated plant with parallel reactors using ... Keywords: Discrete event control, Hybrid systems, Multirate timed automata, Parallel production lines, Scheduling, Verification

Stephanie Geist; Dmitry Gromov; Jörg Raisch

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

An algorithm for discrete booleans with applications to finite element modeling of complex systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we describe a robust algorithm for three-dimensional boolean operations between boundary representation objects whose geometry is given by discrete (faceted) data. The algorithm presents a new approach for computing the intersection graph ... Keywords: Boolean, Discrete, Mesh, Remeshing, Sizing sources, Triangulation

B. Kaan Karamete; Saikat Dey; Eric L. Mestreau; Romain Aubry; Felipe A. Bulat-Jara

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Three-phase heaters with common overburden sections for heating subsurface formations  

SciTech Connect

A heating system for a subsurface formation is described. The heating system includes three substantially u-shaped heaters with first end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to a single, three-phase wye transformer and second end portions of the heaters being electrically coupled to each other and/or to ground. The three heaters may enter the formation through a first common wellbore and exit the formation through a second common wellbore so that the magnetic fields of the three heaters at least partially cancel out in the common wellbores.

Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

332

Subsurface evaluation of the geopressured-geothermal Chloe Prospect, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 123 square mile area approximately 10 miles east of Lake Charles, Louisiana, has been studied to assess its potential geopressured-geothermal resources. Subsurface information was used to study the structure and stratigraphy of the area as they related to the development of geopressured aquifers. The Middle Frio Hackberry wedge was found to contain the geopressured-geothermal reservoir sand, as well as the shales responsible for the origin and sealing of the geopressured strata. The major reservoir within the wedge is the Hackberry massive A sand.

Kurth, R.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Simulation on Discrete Fracture Network Using Flexible Voronoi Gridding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fractured reservoirs are generally simulated using Warren and Root26 dual-porosity (DP) approach. The main assumption of this approach is that the geometry of fractures are uniformly distributed and interconnected in reservoirs. This may be true for many cases of naturally fractured reservoirs. However, for a large scale and disconnected fractured reservoirs, DP is often not applicable. Due to the latter case, it is necessary to have more sophisticated simulation studies which allow the fracture to be geometry explicitly represented into the static model using Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) approach. Most work on DFN grid model up to recently has been done with Delaunay tessellations. This research proposes an alternative technique to discretize the two-dimensional DFN using Voronoi diagrams, nevertheless applying the same DFN principles outlined in previous work. Through complicated procedures to generate DFN model, grid system based on Voronoi polygons has been developed. The procedure will force Voronoi edges follow the exact geometry of fractures. Furthermore, implementing the Voronoi diagrams allows the use of fewer polygons than the traditional Local Grid Refinement (LGR). And most importantly, due to the nature of the Voronoi polygons or locally orthogonal grids, the transmissibility calculations can be simplified and are more accurate than corner point formulation for non-square grid blocks. Finally, the main and most important goal of this study is to develop a black-oil Control Volume Finite Difference (CVFD) reservoir simulator that allows us to model DFN more realistically. One of the features of the developed simulator is the capability to model individual fractures with non-uniform aperture distribution, such as log-normally distributed apertures as shown using X-Ray CT scanner measurements. Prior to using the DFN simulator to model reservoirs with fractures and their apertures distribution, the simulator was validated against commercial simulators. The simulator provides results in close agreement with those of a reference finite-difference simulator in cases where direct comparisons are possible. Several simulations of synthetic DFN were presented to demonstrate the robustness of the Voronoi diagrams to represent fracture networks and its aperture distributions. In summary, the simulation of the DFN using the proposed approaches is capable to model both fractured and unfractured systems. However, the DFN model with Voronoi grids requires more efforts on building the grid model compared to other methods. Numerically, simulations of fractured systems are very challenging.

Syihab, Zuher

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Modeling Forest Cover Influences on Snow Accumulation, Sublimation, and Melt  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive, physically based model of snow accumulation, redistribution, sublimation, and melt for open and forested catchments was assembled, based on algorithms derived from hydrological process research in Russia and Canada. The model was ...

A. N. Gelfan; J. W. Pomeroy; L. S. Kuchment

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Essays on matching, marriage and human capital accumulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the link between human capital accumulation and the functioning of marriage markets. The first chapter studies the effect of marriage market conditions on pre-marital investment. After showing how a ...

Lafortune, Jeanne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

The deep water gas charged accumulator and its possible replacements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Blowout preventers are designed to shut in a well under pressure so that formation fluids that have moved into the wellbore can be contained and circulated out while continuous control of the well is maintained. Control Systems for the BOPs are of necessity highly efficient hydraulic systems. The objective is to operate functions, such as closing rams, on the BOP stack in as short a time as possible. Supplying enough volume of pressured hydraulic fluid to operate those emergency functions is essential. To have the necessary quantity of control fluid under pressure requires storing this fluid in accumulators. These accumulators operate by the expansion and compression of nitrogen gas that is separated from hydraulic fluid by either rubber bladders or pistons. Accumulators are used both on the surface and at the seafloor. As long as you use accumulators on the surface or in relatively shallow waters, you may not have a problem with the volume of hydraulic fluid capacity of gas charged accumulators. The problem may arise when the wellhead is at water depth of more than 3500 ft. In deep water drilling, the accumulators should be placed on the subsea blowout preventer stack to reduce hydraulic response times and provide a hydraulic power supply in case of interruption of surface communication. Accumulators are also used in subsea production control systems to provide local storage that allows smaller line sizes in control umbilicals. Hydraulic fluid capacity of an accumulator drops to 15% of its capacity on the surface and even less, depending on the water depth. A large number of accumulators are needed to perform BOP functions that could have been done by just a few of them on the surface or at relatively shallow water depth. Gas inside gas charged accumulators does not behave like an ideal gas as we go to very deep water, due to high hydrostatic pressure at that water depth. The higher the ambient pressure, the more the gas behaves like a real gas rather than an ideal gas and the lower the fluid capacity of the accumulators. Compressed gas has energy in it, and can release this energy at the time desired, thatÂ?s why it is used in accumulators. Now, we have to look for something that is able to store energy, but unlike the nitrogen, its functionality must not be affected by the increasing hydrostatic pressure of water as a function of water depth. Springs and heavy weights will be discussed as two options to replace nitrogen in accumulators. Efficient deep water accumulators would reduce the number of accumulators required in deepwater and cut the cost of the project. With the advent of such efficient accumulators, we can hope that one of the numerous problems of deepwater drilling has been solved and we can think of drilling in even deeper waters.

Mir Rajabi, Mehdi

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

GYRAC?D?O: Relativistic plasma accumulator and ion accelerator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plasma heating and relativistic plasma accumulation are realized in the GYRAC?D?O installation. Relativistic plasma accumulation is a result of plasma heating under synchrotron gyromagnetic autoresonance (SGA) and subsequent throwing of the SGA plasma into the central region of the magnetic mirror trap in the regime of the SGA?pulse packet. The optimum of the initial plasma pulsed injection is found. The obtained plasma is e?vortex filled with ions. Major parameters of the plasma are as follows: n ? 8 × 109 cm?3: average energy of electrons W?200 keV; lifetime ??40 ms. The problem of the plasma ejection out of the trap after the accumulation cycle completion is discussed. It is shown that effective plasma ejection and ion acceleration are possible in case of a relatively dense plasma which is feasible only in the accumulation regime.

V. V. Andreev; A. A. Apraksin; A. M. Umnov

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Comparison of FASST and SNTHERM in Three Snow Accumulation Regimes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical experiments of snow accumulation and depletion were carried out as well as surface energy fluxes over four Cold Land Processes Experiment (CLPX) sites in Colorado using the Snow Thermal model (SNTHERM) and the Fast All-Season Soil ...

Susan Frankenstein; Anne Sawyer; Julie Koeberle

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

A Model for Probability Nowcasts of Accumulated Precipitation Using Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new model for making probability forecasts of accumulated spot precipitation from weather radar data is presented. The model selects a source region upwind of the forecast spot. All pixels (horizontal size 2 × 2 km2) within the source region ...

Tage Andersson; Karl-Ivar Ivarsson

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Calcium accumulation in relation to fluoride pollution in plants  

SciTech Connect

By use of radioactive Ca/sup 45/ it has been established that the presence of fluoride on leaves leads to accumulation of calcium at the same point and that this calcium migrates by itself towards the sites of fluoride accumulation. It was demonstrated also that the calcium concentration in tissues plays an important role in the development of necrosis. If leaves have been subjected to pretreatment with calcium, fluoride applied to leaves does not induce necrotic lesions.

Garree, J.P.; Chopin, S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Metrics for Availability Analysis Using a Discrete Event Simulation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The system performance metric 'availability' is a central concept with respect to the concerns of a plant's operators and owners, yet it can be abstract enough to resist explanation at system levels. Hence, there is a need for a system-level metric more closely aligned with a plant's (or, more generally, a system's) raison d'etre. Historically, availability of repairable systems - intrinsic, operational, or otherwise - has been defined as a ratio of times. This paper introduces a new concept of availability, called endogenous availability, defined in terms of a ratio of quantities of product yield. Endogenous availability can be evaluated using a discrete event simulation analysis methodology. A simulation example shows that endogenous availability reduces to conventional availability in a simple series system with different processing rates and without intermediate storage capacity, but diverges from conventional availability when storage capacity is progressively increased. It is shown that conventional availability tends to be conservative when a design includes features, such as in - process storage, that partially decouple the components of a larger system.

Schryver, Jack C [ORNL; Nutaro, James J [ORNL; Haire, Marvin Jonathan [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Discrete Momentum Mechanics and Faster Than Light Transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a new mechanics will be studied which is based on the hypothesis that the change of linear momentum of a particle happens as a discrete pulses. By using this hypothesis and by considering Newton's relation between energy and momentum, and the law of mass and energy conservation as a priori, the Einstein dispersion relation can be derived as a zero approximation without using Lorentz transformations. Other terms will be derived as a corrections to this relation. It will be shown that the effect of the corrections will be smaller and smaller with the increase of momentum. The work will offer an explanation of why the velocity of light seems to be constant regardless of the velocity of the source, and under which condition this will be changed. Also a prediction is made that faster than light transition could happen theoretically under certain conditions, and a nonzero mass photon can exist in nature. The work is purely classical in the sense that it doesn't involve any uncertainty relations.

Munir Al-Hashimi

2004-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

343

Reduction of B-Integral Accumulation in Lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulsed laser is provided wherein the B-integral accumulated in the laser pulse is reduced using a semiconductor wafer. A laser pulse is generated by a laser pulse source. The laser pulse passes through a semiconductor wafer that has a negative nonlinear index of refraction. Thus, the laser pulse accumulates a negative B-integral. The laser pulse is then fed into a laser amplification medium, which has a positive nonlinear index of refraction. The laser pulse may make a plurality of passes through the laser amplification medium and accumulate a positive B-integral during a positive non-linear phase change. The semiconductor and laser pulse wavelength are chosen such that the negative B-integral accumulated in the semiconductor wafer substantially cancels the positive B-integral accumulated in the laser amplification medium. There may be additional accumulation of positive B-integral if the laser pulse passes through additional optical mediums such as a lens or glass plates. Thus , the effects of self-phase modulation in the laser pulse are substantially reduced.

Meyerhofer, David D.; Konoplev, Oleg A.

1998-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Hydrogen on and in Selected Overlayer Near-Surface Alloys and the Effect of Subsurface Hydrogen on the Reactivity of Alloy Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction of hydrogen with the closepacked facets of seventeen transition metals overlaid with 1 ML of five transition metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd) has been studied using periodic self-consistent (GGA-PW91) density functional theory (DFT) calculations. For noble metal overlayers (Au, Ag, and Cu), hydrogen at the hostmetal/ overlayer interface (subsurface hydrogen) is more stable than subsurface hydrogen in the pure host. For certain Au and Ag overlayers, subsurface hydrogen is more stable than surface hydrogen in the same system. The presence of subsurface hydrogen was found to have a significant effect on the electronic structure of the overlayer, resulting in its modified surface reactivity.

Kandoi, Shampa; Ferrin, Peter A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Chemical contaminants on DOE lands and selection of contaminant mixtures for subsurface science research  

SciTech Connect

This report identifies individual contaminants and contaminant mixtures that have been measured in the ground at 91 waste sites at 18 US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex. The inventory of chemicals and mixtures was used to identify generic chemical mixtures to be used by DOE's Subsurface Science Program in basic research on the subsurface geochemical and microbiological behavior of mixed contaminants (DOE 1990a and b). The generic mixtures contain specific radionuclides, metals, organic ligands, organic solvents, fuel hydrocarbons, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in various binary and ternary combinations. The mixtures are representative of in-ground contaminant associations at DOE facilities that are likely to exhibit complex geochemical behavior as a result of intercontaminant reactions and/or microbiologic activity stimulated by organic substances. Use of the generic mixtures will focus research on important mixed contaminants that are likely to be long-term problems at DOE sites and that will require cleanup or remediation. The report provides information on the frequency of associations among different chemicals and compound classes at DOE waste sites that require remediation.

Riley, R.G.; Zachara, J.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Surface and subsurface cleanup protocol for radionuclides, Gunnison, Colorado, UMTRA project processing site. Final [report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface soil cleanup protocols for the Gunnison, Colorado, processing sits are summarized as follows: In accordance with EPA-promulgated land cleanup standards (40 CFR 192), in situ Ra-226 is to be cleaned up based on bulk concentrations not exceeding 5 and 15 pCi/g in 15-cm surface and subsurface depth increments, averaged over 100-m{sup 2} grid blocks, where the parent Ra-226 concentrations are greater than, or in secular equilibrium with, the Th-230 parent. A bulk interpretation of these EPA standards has been accepted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and while the concentration of the finer-sized soil fraction less than a No. 4 mesh sieve contains the higher concentration of radioactivity, the bulk approach in effect integrates the total sample radioactivity over the entire sample mass. In locations where Th-230 has differentially migrated in subsoil relative to Ra-226, a Th-230 cleanup protocol has been developed in accordance with Supplemental Standard provisions of 40 CFR 192 for NRC/Colorado Department of Health (CDH) approval for timely implementation. Detailed elements of the protocol are contained in Appendix A, Generic Protocol from Thorium-230 Cleanup/Verification at UMTRA Project Processing Sites. The cleanup of other radionuclides or nonradiological hazards that pose a significant threat to the public and the environment will be determined and implemented in accordance with pathway analysis to assess impacts and the implications of ALARA specified in 40 CFR 192 relative to supplemental standards.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Overview of research and development in subsurface fate and transport modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is responsible for the remediation of over 450 different subsurface-contaminated sites. Contaminant plumes at these sites range in volume from several to millions of cubic yards. The concentration of contaminants also ranges over several orders of magnitude. Contaminants include hazardous wastes such as heavy metals and organic chemicals, radioactive waste including tritium, uranium, and thorium, and mixed waste, which is a combination of hazardous and radioactive wastes. The physical form of the contaminants includes solutes, nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs), and vapor phase contaminants such as volatilized organic chemicals and radon. The subject of contaminant fate and transport modeling is multi-disciplinary, involving hydrology, geology, microbiology, chemistry, applied mathematics, computer science, and other areas of expertise. It is an issue of great significance in the United States and around the world. As such, many organizations have substantial programs in this area. In gathering data to prepare this report, a survey was performed of research and development work that is funded by US government agencies to improve the understanding and mechanistic modeling of processes that control contaminant movement through subsurface systems. Government agencies which fund programs that contain fate and transport modeling components include the Environmental Protection Agency, Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Department of Agriculture, Department of Energy, National Science Foundation, Department of Defense, United States Geological Survey, and National Institutes of Health.

Sullivan, T.M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chehata, M. [Science Applications Internationa Corp. (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Cone Penetrometer for Subsurface Heavy Metals Detection. Semiannual report, November 1, 1996--March 31, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and subsurface contamination of soils by heavy metals, including Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn, and Cd, has become an area of concern for many industrial and government organizations (1). Conventional sampling and analysis techniques for soil provide a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity for individual analytes. However, obtaining a representative sampling and analysis from a particular site using conventional techniques is time consuming and costly (2). Additionally, conventional methods are difficult to implement in the field for in situ and/or real-time applications. Therefore, there is a need for characterization and monitoring techniques for heavy metals in soils which allow cost-effective, rapid, in situ measurements. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been used to successfully measure metals content in a variety of matrices (3-15) including soil (16,17). Under the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Technology Center (FETC) Industry Program, Science {ampersand} Engineering Associates (SEA) is developing a subsurface cone penetrometer (CPT) probe for heavy metals detection that employs LIBS (18). The LIES-CPT unit is to be applied to in situ, real-time sampling and analysis of heavy metals in soil. As part of its contract with DOE FETC, SEA is scheduled to field test its LIBS-CPT system in September 1997.

Grisanti, Ames A.; Timpe, Ronald C.; Foster, H.J.; Eylands, Kurt E.; Crocker, Charlene R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

COUPLING STATE-OF-THE-SCIENCE SUBSURFACE SIMULATION WITH ADVANCED USER INTERFACE AND PARALLEL VISUALIZATION: SBIR Phase I Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a Phase I report on a project to significantly enhance existing subsurface simulation software using leadership-class computing resources, allowing researchers to solve problems with greater speed and accuracy. Subsurface computer simulation is used for monitoring the behavior of contaminants around nuclear waste disposal and storage areas, groundwater flow, environmental remediation, carbon sequestration, methane hydrate production, and geothermal energy reservoir analysis. The Phase I project was a collaborative effort between Thunderhead Engineering (project lead and developers of a commercial pre- and post-processor for the TOUGH2 simulator) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (developers of the TOUGH2 simulator for subsurface flow). The Phase I project successfully identified the technical approaches to be implemented in Phase II.

Hardeman, B.; Swenson, D.; Finsterle, S.; Zhou, Q.

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Automated laser scatter detection of surface and subsurface defects in Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon Nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramics are currently a primary material of choice to replace conventional materials in many structural applications because of their oxidation resistance and desirable mechanical and thermal properties at elevated temperatures. However, surface or near-subsurface defects, such as cracks, voids, or inclusions, significantly affect component lifetimes. These defects are currently difficult to detect, so a technique is desired for the rapid automated detection and quantification of both surface and subsurface defects. To address this issue, the authors have developed an automated system based on the detection of scattered laser light which provides a 2-D map of surface or subsurface defects. This system has been used for the analysis of flexure bars and button-head tensile rods of several Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} materials. Mechanical properties of these bars have also been determined and compared with the laser scatter results.

Steckenrider, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Discrete Ordinate Quadrature Selection for Reactor-based Eigenvalue Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we analyze the effect of various quadrature sets on the eigenvalues of several reactor-based problems, including a two-dimensional (2D) fuel pin, a 2D lattice of fuel pins, and a three-dimensional (3D) reactor core problem. While many quadrature sets have been applied to neutral particle discrete ordinate transport calculations, the Level Symmetric (LS) and the Gauss-Chebyshev product (GC) sets are the most widely used in production-level reactor simulations. Other quadrature sets, such as Quadruple Range (QR) sets, have been shown to be more accurate in shielding applications. In this paper, we compare the LS, GC, QR, and the recently developed linear-discontinuous finite element (LDFE) sets, as well as give a brief overview of other proposed quadrature sets. We show that, for a given number of angles, the QR sets are more accurate than the LS and GC in all types of reactor problems analyzed (2D and 3D). We also show that the LDFE sets are more accurate than the LS and GC sets for these problems. We conclude that, for problems where tens to hundreds of quadrature points (directions) per octant are appropriate, QR sets should regularly be used because they have similar integration properties as the LS and GC sets, have no noticeable impact on the speed of convergence of the solution when compared with other quadrature sets, and yield more accurate results. We note that, for very high-order scattering problems, the QR sets exactly integrate fewer angular flux moments over the unit sphere than the GC sets. The effects of those inexact integrations have yet to be analyzed. We also note that the LDFE sets only exactly integrate the zeroth and first angular flux moments. Pin power comparisons and analyses are not included in this paper and are left for future work.

Jarrell, Joshua J [ORNL; Evans, Thomas M [ORNL; Davidson, Gregory G [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

A covariant causal set approach to discrete quantum gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A covariant causal set (c-causet) is a causal set that is invariant under labeling. Such causets are well-behaved and have a rigid geometry that is determined by a sequence of positive integers called the shell sequence. We first consider the microscopic picture. In this picture, the vertices of a c-causet have integer labels that are unique up to a label isomorphism. This labeling enables us to define a natural metric $d(a,b)$ between time-like separated vertices $a$ and $b$. The time metric $d(a,b)$ results in a natural definition of a geodesic from $a$ to $b$. It turns out that there can be $n\\ge 1$ such geodesics. Letting $a$ be the origin (the big bang), we define the curvature $K(b)$ of $b$ to be $n-1$. Assuming that particles tend to move along geodesics, $K(b)$ gives the tendency that vertex $b$ is occupied. In this way, the mass distribution is determined by the geometry of the c-causet. We next consider the macroscopic picture which describes the growth process of c-causets. We propose that this process is governed by a quantum dynamics given by complex amplitudes. At present, these amplitudes are unknown. But if they can be found, they will determine the (approximate) geometry of the c-causet describing our particular universe. As an illustration, we present a simple example of an amplitude process that may have physical relevance. We also give a discrete analogue of Einstein's field equations.

Stan Gudder

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Results from a discrete fracture network model of a Hot Dry Rock system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work described represents a move towards better representations of the natural fracture system. The discrete fracture network model used during the study was the NAPSAC code (Grindrod et al, 1992). The goals of the work were to investigate the application of discrete fracture network models to Hot Dry Rock systems, increase the understanding of the basic thermal extraction process and more specifically the understanding of the Rosemanowes Phase 2B system. The aim in applying the work to the Rosemanowes site was to use the discrete fracture network approach to integrate a diverse set of field measurements into as simple a model as possible.

Lanyon, G.W.; Batchelor, A.S.; Ledingham, P.

1993-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

354

Discrete-time GeoX/G/1 queue with unreliable server and multiple adaptive delayed vacations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider a discrete-time Geo^X/G/1 queue with unreliable server and multiple adaptive delayed vacations policy in which the vacation time, service time, repair time and the delayed time all follow arbitrary discrete distribution. By ... Keywords: Discrete-time queueing model, Multiple adaptive delayed vacation, Stochastic decomposition, Transient and steady-state distributions, Unreliable, primary, secondary

Yinghui Tang; Xi Yun; Shujuan Huang

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory of Contemporary Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory ofBerkeley The Knowledge-Led Accumulation Regime: A Theory ofKorea) Abstract The knowledge-led accumulation regime (KLAR)

Kim, Hyungkee

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Electrical resistivity for detecting subsurface non-aqueous phase liquids: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

Soils and groundwater have been contaminated by hazardous substances at many places in the United States and many other countries. The contaminants are commonly either petroleum products or industrial solvents with very low solubility in water. These contaminants are usually called non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs). The cost of cleaning up the affected sites in the United States is estimated to be of the order of 100 billion dollars. In spite of the expenditure of several billion dollars during the last 15 years, to date, very few, if any major contaminated site has been restored. The presence of NAPL pools in the subsurface is believed to be the main cause for the failure of previous cleanup activities. Due to their relatively low water solubility, and depending on their volume, it takes tens or even hundreds of years to deplete the NAPL sources if they are not removed from the subsurface. The intrinsic electrical resistivity of most NAPLs is typically in the range of 10{sup 7} to 10{sup 12}{Omega}-m, which is several orders of magnitude higher than that of groundwater containing dissolved solids (usually in the range of a few {Omega}-m to a few thousand {Omega}-m). Although a dry soil is very resistive, the electrical resistivity of a wet soil is on the order of 100 {Omega}-m and is dependent on the extent of water saturation. For a given soil, the electrical resistivity increases with decrease of water saturation. Therefore, if part of the pore water is replaced by a NAPL, the electrical resistivity will increase. At many NAPL sites, both the vadose and phreatic zones can be partially occupied by NAPL pools. It is the great contrast in electrical resistivity between the NAPLs and groundwater that may render the method to be effective in detecting subsurface NAPLs at contaminated sites. The following experiments were conducted to investigate the change of the electrical resistivity of porous media when diesel fuel (NAPL) replaces part of the water.

Lee, K.H.; Shan, C.; Javandel, I.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

FREE TRANSLATIONAL OSCILLATIONS OF ICY BODIES WITH A SUBSURFACE OCEAN USING A VARIATIONAL APPROACH  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the influence of the interior structure of an icy body with an internal ocean on the relative translational motions of its solid constituents. We consider an isolated body differentiated into three homogeneous layers with spherical symmetry: an external ice-I layer, a subsurface ammonia-water ocean, and a rocky inner core. This composition represents icy bodies such as Europa, Titania, Oberon, and Triton, as well as Pluto, Eris, Sedna, and 2004 DW. We construct the equations of motion by assuming that the solid constituents are rigid and that the ocean is an ideal fluid, the internal motion being characterized by the relative translations of the solids and the induced flow in the fluid. Then we determine the dynamics of the icy body using the methods of analytical mechanics, that is, we compute the kinetic energy and the gravitational potential energy, and obtain the Lagrangian function. The resulting solution of the Lagrange equations shows that the solid layers perform translational oscillations of different amplitudes with respect to the barycenter of the body. We derive the dependence of the frequency of the free oscillations of the system on the characteristics of each layer, expressing the period of the oscillations as a function of the densities and masses of the ocean and the rocky inner core, and the mass of the icy body. We apply these results to previously developed subsurface models and obtain numerical values for the period and the ratio between the amplitudes of the translational oscillations of the solid components. The features obtained are quite different from the cases of Earth and Mercury. Our analytical formulas satisfactorily explain the source of these differences. When models of the same icy body, compatible with the existence of an internal ocean, differ in the thickness of the ice-I layer, their associated periods experience a relative variation of at least 10%. In particular, the different models for Titania and Oberon exhibit a larger variation of about 37% and 30%. This indicates an absolute difference of the order of three and two hours, respectively. This suggests that the free period of the internal oscillations might provide a new procedure to constrain the internal structure of icy bodies with a subsurface ocean.

Escapa, A.; Fukushima, T. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Ohsawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

AN EVALUATION OF HANFORD SITE TANK FARM SUBSURFACE CONTAMINATION FY2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Tank Farm Vadose Zone (TFVZ) Project conducts activities to characterize and analyze the long-term environmental and human health impacts from tank waste releases to the vadose zone. The project also implements interim measures to mitigate impacts, and plans the remediation of waste releases from tank farms and associated facilities. The scope of this document is to report data needs that are important to estimating long-term human health and environmental risks. The scope does not include technologies needed to remediate contaminated soils and facilities, technologies needed to close tank farms, or management and regulatory decisions that will impact remediation and closure. This document is an update of ''A Summary and Evaluation of Hanford Site Tank Farm Subsurface Contamination''. That 1998 document summarized knowledge of subsurface contamination beneath the tank farms at the time. It included a preliminary conceptual model for migration of tank wastes through the vadose zone and an assessment of data and analysis gaps needed to update the conceptual model. This document provides a status of the data and analysis gaps previously defined and discussion of the gaps and needs that currently exist to support the stated mission of the TFVZ Project. The first data-gaps document provided the basis for TFVZ Project activities over the previous eight years. Fourteen of the nineteen knowledge gaps identified in the previous document have been investigated to the point that the project defines the current status as acceptable. In the process of filling these gaps, significant accomplishments were made in field work and characterization, laboratory investigations, modeling, and implementation of interim measures. The current data gaps are organized in groups that reflect Components of the tank farm vadose zone conceptual model: inventory, release, recharge, geohydrology, geochemistry, and modeling. The inventory and release components address residual wastes that will remain in the tanks and tank-farm infrastructure after closure and potential losses from leaks during waste retrieval. Recharge addresses the impacts of current conditions in the tank farms (i.e. gravel covers that affect infiltration and recharge) as well as the impacts of surface barriers. The geohydrology and geochemistry components address the extent of the existing subsurface contaminant inventory and drivers and pathways for contaminants to be transported through the vadose zone and groundwater. Geochemistry addresses the mobility of key reactive contaminants such as uranium. Modeling addresses conceptual models and how they are simulated in computers. The data gaps will be used to provide input to planning (including the upcoming C Farm Data Quality Objective meetings scheduled this year).

MANN, F.M.

2007-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

ReproducedfromVadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VadoseZoneJournal.PublishedbySoilScienceSocietyofAmerica.Allcopyrightsreserved. Colloid Transport in the Subsurface: Past, Present, and Future Challenges John F. McCarthy* and Larry D between wells and septic fieldssection on colloid transport within a more general perspective) for individual homes, subsurface systems. The focus will be on the transport of colloidal were based on empirical

McCarthy, John F.

360

Discretization of continuous ECG based risk metrics using asymmetric and warped entropy measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate several entropy based approaches to finding cut points for discretizing continuous ECG-based risk metrics. We describe two existing approaches, Shannon entropy and asymmetric entropy, and one new approach, ...

Singh, Anima

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Electromagnetic wave scattering by discrete random media with remote sensing applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The scattering of electromagnetic waves in medium with randomly distributed discrete scatterers is studied. Analytical and numerical solutions to several problems with implications for the active and passive remote sensing ...

Ao, Chi On, 1970-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Plenary lecture 7: fuzzy identification problem for the stationary discrete extremal fuzzy dynamic system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work deals with the problem of the Stationary Discrete Extremal Fuzzy Dynamic System (SDEFDS) identification and briefly discusses the results developed by G. Sirbiladze. The fuzzy process with possibilistic uncertainty, the source of which is expert ...

Gia Sirbiladze

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Analytic Approximation of Discrete Field Samples with Weighted Sums and the Gridless Computation of Field Derivatives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Objective analysis by weighted sums of discrete observations is equivalent to the approximation of the distribution of an observed parameter by a function which is also analytic, provided that the weighting function is both analytic and positive ...

F. Caracena

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Finite volume discretization of equations describing nonlinear diffusion in Li-Ion batteries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical modeling of electrochemical process in Li-Ion battery is an emerging topic of great practical interest. In this work we present a Finite Volume discretization of electrochemical diffusive processes occurring during the operation of Li-Ion batteries. ...

P. Popov; Y. Vutov; S. Margenov; O. Iliev

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Randomness and determinism in the interplay between the continuum and the discrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper provides a conceptual analysis of the role of the mathematical continuum versus the discrete in the understanding of randomness as a notion with a physical meaning or origin. The presentation is ‘informal’ as we will not ...

Francis Bailly; Giuseppe Longo

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Spectrum of Non-Local Discrete Schroedinger Operators with a delta-Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The behaviour of the spectral edges (embedded eigenvalues and resonances) is discussed at the two ends of the continuous spectrum of non-local discrete Schr\\"odinger operators with a $\\delta$-potential. These operators arise by replacing the discrete Laplacian by a strictly increasing $C^1$-function of the discrete Laplacian. The dependence of the results on this function and the lattice dimension are explicitly derived. It is found that while in the case of the discrete Schr\\"odinger operator these behaviours are the same no matter which end of the continuous spectrum is considered, an asymmetry occurs for the non-local cases. A classification with respect to the spectral edge behaviour is also offered.

Fumio Hiroshima; József L?rinczi

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

367

Discrete Packet Analysis for Improved Atmospheric Rejection on Modulated Laser Signals  

SciTech Connect

This slide-show discusses how the method of discrete packet analysis improves atmospheric compensation for quasi-CW fluorescence detection methods. This is key to improving remote sensing capabilities.

O'Neill, M., McKenna, I., DiBenedetto, J., Capelle, G., Trainham, R.

2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

A Discrete Gust Model for Use in the Design of Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Discrete gust models, although idealizations of actual atmospheric conditions, are useful for engineering design. For fatigue design, these models must be representative of the conditions a structure or vehicle will experience on a continuous ...

Walter Frost; Robert E. Turner

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Software evaluation and selection: an evaluation and selection methodology for discrete-event simulation software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For large international companies with their own simulation team it is often hard to select new discrete event simulation software. Often, preferences and application areas between countries differ, and simulation software already in use influences the ...

Tamrat W. Tewoldeberhan; Alexander Verbraeck; Edwin Valentin; Gilles Bardonnet

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluating capacity and expansion opportunities at tank farm: a decision support system using discrete event simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a discrete event simulation based Decision Support System to evaluate tank farm operations. The Decision Support System was developed in order to reduce capital expenditures and assist in decision making for assessing the impact of ...

Bikram Sharda; Adriana Vazquez

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Intrinsic energy localization through discrete gap breathers in one-dimensional diatomic granular crystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a systematic study of the existence and stability of discrete breathers that are spatially localized in the bulk of a one-dimensional chain of compressed elastic beads that interact via Hertzian contact. The ...

Theocharis, G.

372

Generalized Adjoint for Physical Processes with Parameterized Discontinuities. Part IV: Problems in Time Discretization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is shown analytically and graphically that when parameterized on/off switches are triggered at discrete time levels by a threshold condition in a numerical model, the model solution is not continuously dependent on the initial state. ...

Qin Xu

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 14, 2005 ... On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control. Aharon Ben-Tal (abental ***at*** ie.technion.ac.il) Stephen Boyd (boyd ***at*** ...

374

System implementation issues of dynamic discrete disaster decision simulation system (D4S2): phase I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation has many advantages in modeling complex systems to facilitate decision making. In this research, an integrated computer system will be developed which incorporates an agent-based discrete event simulator, a geographic information system, a ...

Shengnan Wu; Larry J. Shuman; Bopaya Bidanda; Matthew Kelley; Bryan Lawson; Ken Sochats; Carey D. Balaban

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Configurations de lagrangiens, domaines fondamentaux et sous-groupes discrets de PU(2,1).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??L'objet de cette thèse est l'étude de sous-groupes discrets de PU(2,1), groupe des isométries holomorphes de l'espace hyperbolique complexe de dimension (complexe) 2. On s'intéresse… (more)

Paupert, Julien

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Computational intelligence methods: joint use in discrete event simulation model of logistics processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the paper is to present the concept of using selected computational intelligence methods in conjunction with discrete event simulation (DES) models of chosen logistics processes. A review of the recent literature in the scope of applications ...

Marek Karkula; Lech Bukowski

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Accuracy and Potential Economic Value of Categorical and Probabilistic Forecasts of Discrete Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and the potential economic value of categorical and probabilistic forecasts of discrete events are discussed. Accuracy is assessed applying known measures of forecast accuracy, and the potential economic value is measured by a ...

Roberto Buizza

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Trajectory-Tracking Scheme in Lagrangian Form for Solving Linear Advection Problems: Interface Spatial Discretization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A previous Lagrangian linear advection scheme (trajectory-tracking scheme) is modified to achieve local mass conservation in this paper, which is more favorable to climate modeling. The discretized tracer parcels are volumes with interfaces ...

Li Dong; Bin Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Spherical Harmonics Discrete Ordinate Method for Three-Dimensional Atmospheric Radiative Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new algorithm for modeling radiative transfer in inhomogeneous three-dimensional media is described. The spherical harmonics discrete ordinate method uses a spherical harmonic angular representation to reduce memory use and time computing the ...

K. Franklin Evans

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Model-driven design and implementation of discrete event control for a machine tool control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Symposium on Computer-Aided Control System Design. [7] E. M.of machine tool control system Mode Control Supervisor (MCS)of a discrete event control system depends entirely on the

Liu, Y.; Li, W.; Yamazaki, K.; Fujishima, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Algebraic multigrid for stabilized finite element discretizations of the Navier Stokes equation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A multilevel method for the solution of systems of equations generated by stabilized Finite Element discretizations of the Euler and Navier Stokes equations on generalized unstructured grids is described. The method is ...

Okusanya, Tolulope Olawale, 1972 -

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

A New Look at the Discrete Ordinate Method for Radiative Transfer Calculations in Anisotropically Scattering Atmospheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The difficulties inherent in the conventional numerical implementation of the discrete ordinate method (following Chandrasekhar's prescription) for solving the radiative transfer equation are discussed. A matrix formulation is developed to ...

Knut Stamnes; Roy A. Swanson

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Analysis of Discrete Shallow-Water Models on Geodesic Delaunay Grids with C-Type Staggering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The properties of C-grid staggered spatial discretizations of the shallow-water equations on regular Delaunay triangulations on the sphere are analyzed. Mass-conserving schemes that also conserve either energy or potential enstrophy are derived, ...

Luca Bonaventura; Todd Ringler

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Synthesis of quantized feedback control software for discrete time linear hybrid systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an algorithm that given a Discrete Time Linear Hybrid System${\\cal H}$ returns a correct-by-construction software implementation K for a (near time optimal) robust quantized feedback controller for ${\\cal H}$ along with ...

Federico Mari; Igor Melatti; Ivano Salvo; Enrico Tronci

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Phase Space Volume Conservation under Space and Time Discretization Schemes for the Shallow-Water Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Applying concepts of analytical mechanics to numerical discretization techniques for geophysical flows has recently been proposed. So far, mostly the role of the conservation laws for energy- and vorticity-based quantities has been discussed, but ...

Matthias Sommer; Sebastian Reich

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase transformation and biomass accumulation associatedMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedof new mineral phases and biomass. Word count: 5496 (text) +

Li, L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Subsurface geology of the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Raft River Valley occupies an upper Cenozoic structural basin filled with nearly 1600 m of fluvial silt, sand, and gravel. Rapid facies and thickness changes, steep initial dips (30 0C), and alteration make correlation of basin-fill depositional units very difficult. Hydrothermal alteration products in the form of clays and zeolites, and deposition of secondary calcite and silica increase with depth. The abundance of near-vertical open fractures also increases with depth, allowing greater movement of hydrothermal fluids near the base of the Cenozoic basin fill.

388

Addendum to the CAIP for CAU 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

513-ADD 513-ADD ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447: PROJECT SHOAL AREA, NEVADA SUBSURFACE SITE DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada Controlled Copy No.: Revision No.: 1 March 1999 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Available to the public from - U.S. Department of Commerce National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 (703) 487-4650 Available electronically at http://www.doe.gov/bridge. Available to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors in paper from - U.S. Department of Energy Office of Scientific and Technical Information P.O. Box 62 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0062 (423) 576-8401 ADDENDUM TO THE CORRECTIVE ACTION INVESTIGATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 447:

389

Technical issues associated with in situ vitrification of the INEL Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) has been identified as an alternative technology for remediation of the Acid Pit and Transuranic Pits and Trenches (TRU-PTs) that are present at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA). However, a number of technical issues exist that must be resolved before ISV can be considered applicable to these waste sites. To assist in the ISV technology evaluation, an ISV Steering Committee was formed to identify, prioritize, and develop closure roadmaps for technical issues associated with ISV application at the INEL SDA. The activities of the ISV Steering Committee are summarized in three volumes of this report. This document, Volume 1, identifies the systematic approach used to identify and prioritize the ISV technical issues, and briefly discusses the methodology that will be employed to resolve these issues.

Stoots, C.M.; Bates, S.O.; Callow, R.A.; Campbell, K.A.; Farnsworth, R.K.; Gratson, G.K.; McKellar, M.G.; Nickelson, D.F.; Slater, C.E.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area: Monitored Natural Attenuation (MNA)--Programmatic, Technical, and Regulatory Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural attenuation processes are commonly used for remediation of contaminated sites. A variety of natural processes occur without human intervention at all sites to varying rates and degrees of effectiveness to attenuate (decrease) the mass, toxicity, mobility, volume, or concentration of organic and inorganic contaminants in soil, groundwater, and surface water systems. The objective of this review is to identify potential technical investments to be incorporated in the Subsurface Contaminant Focus Area Strategic Plan for monitored natural attenuation. When implemented, the technical investments will help evaluate and implement monitored natural attenuation as a remediation option at DOE sites. The outcome of this review is a set of conclusions and general recommendations regarding research needs, programmatic guidance, and stakeholder issues pertaining to monitored natural attenuation for the DOE complex.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

391

Application of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) for controlling subsurface fire area: Indian context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In bord and pillar method of mining, the panels are sealed off after depillaring. Depending upon the site specific condition, 40 to 45 % coal are left in depillared panel as stook, loose coal left in goaf, hard coal on floor and roof of the panel. The left out coals in goaf area start oxidation, and this leads to spontaneous heating in side sealed off area. For assessment of fire in underground coal mines, thermo-compositional monitoring plays an important role. This paper presents scientific relevance and selective criteria for use of inert gas for control of subsurface fire. Finally the paper discusses spontaneous heating problem in sealed off area and application of inertisation technology by using CO, to prevent and control sealed off fire at Haripur Colliery, Kenda Area, ECL, India.

Mohalik, N.K.; Singh, V.K.; Singh, R.V.K. [Central Institute of Mining & Fuel Research, Dhanbad (India)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

Subsurface Bio-Immobilization of Plutonium: Experiment and Model Validation Study  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to conduct a concurrent experimental and modeling study centered on the interactions of Shewanella algae BrY with plutonium and uranium species and phases. The most important objective of this research is to investigate the long-term stability of bioprecipitated immobilized actinide phases under changing redox conditions in biologically active systems. The long-term stability of bio-immobilized actinides (e.g. by bio-reduction) is a key criteria that defines the utility and effectiveness of a remediation/containment strategy for subsurface actinide contaminants. Plutonium, which is the focus of this project, is the key contaminant of concern at several DOE sites.

Reed, Donald; Rittmann, Bruce

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Subsurface and seismic investigation of the geopressured-geothermal potential of south Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Specific sites (areas) for geopressured-geothermal energy potential have been evaluated: (1) Abbeville Area, (2) Chloe Area, (3) Turtle Bayou Field-Kent Bayou Field Area and (4) Lirette-Chauvin-Lake Boudreaux Area. To arrive at geologic conclusions concerning the geopressured-geothermal energy potential of each area, the following factors have been considered in this study: (1) depth of geopressured sands, (2) geopressured sand volumes, (3) porosities, (4) permeabilities, (5) temperatures, (6) salinities, (7) dissolved gas content, (8) structure - especially as it relates to continuity of reservoirs, and (9) petroleum prodution - espeially if the geopressured fluids are driving mechanisms for current petroleum prodution. To evaluate these parameters the most useful source of information has been petroleum well logs which most commonly are a continuous depth survey of the spontaneous potential (SP) and the electrical resistivity of the subsurface formations. A separate thesis for each of the above four areas was processed separately.

Kinsland, G.L.; Paine, W.R.; Duhon, M.P.; Dungan, J.R.; Kurth, R.J.; Moore, D.R.; Lyons, W.S.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 447: Project Shoal Area, Nevada Subsurface Site  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) describes the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) continued environmental investigation of the subsurface Project Shoal Area (PSA) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 447. The PSA is located in the Sand Springs Mountains in Churchill County, Nevada, about 48 kilometers (km) (30 miles [mi]) southeast of Fallon, Nevada. Project Shoal was part of the Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the US' ability to detect, identify, and locate underground nuclear detonations. The test consisted of detonating a 12-kiloton nuclear device deep underground in granitic rock to determine whether seismic waves produced by an underground nuclear test could be differentiated from seismic waves produced by a naturally occurring earthquake. The test was a joint effort conducted by the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the US Department of Defense (DoD) in October 1963 (AEC, 1964).

DOE /NV

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

DEMONSTRATiON OF A SUBSURFACE CONTAINMENT SYSTEM FOR INSTALLATION AT DOE WASTE SITES  

SciTech Connect

Between 1952 and 1970, DOE buried mixed waste in pits and trenches that now have special cleanup needs. The disposal practices used decades ago left these landfills and other trenches, pits, and disposal sites filled with three million cubic meters of buried waste. This waste is becoming harmful to human safety and health. Today's cleanup and waste removal is time-consuming and expensive with some sites scheduled to complete cleanup by 2006 or later. An interim solution to the DOE buried waste problem is to encapsulate and hydraulically isolate the waste with a geomembrane barrier and monitor the performance of the barrier over its 50-yr lifetime. The installed containment barriers would isolate the buried waste and protect groundwater from pollutants until final remediations are completed. The DOE has awarded a contract to RAHCO International, Inc.; of Spokane, Washington; to design, develop, and test a novel subsurface barrier installation system, referred to as a Subsurface Containment System (SCS). The installed containment barrier consists of commercially available geomembrane materials that isolates the underground waste, similar to the way a swimming pools hold water, without disrupting hazardous material that was buried decades ago. The barrier protects soil and groundwater from contamination and effectively meets environmental cleanup standards while reducing risks, schedules, and costs. Constructing the subsurface containment barrier uses a combination of conventional and specialized equipment and a unique continuous construction process. This innovative equipment and construction method can construct a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 30-ft-deep barrier at construction rates to 12 Wday (8 hr/day operation). Life cycle costs including RCRA cover and long-term monitoring range from approximately $380 to $590/cu yd of waste contained or $100 to $160/sq ft of placed barrier based upon the subsurface geology surrounding the waste. Project objectives for Phase I were to validate the SCS construction equipment and process, evaluate the system performance, validate the barrier constructability, and assess the barrier effectiveness. The objectives for Phase 11, which is a full-scale demonstration at a DOE site, are to perform an extensive characterization of the test site, to demonstrate the equipment and the installation process under site-specific performance and regulatory requirements, to validate the operational performance of the equipment, and to perform long-term verification of the barrier using monitoring wells. To date, significant progress has been made to establish the technical and economical feasibility of the SCS. This report describes the SCS conventional and specialized equipment, barrier materials, and construction process. It presents results of the specialized equipment Factory Test, the SCS Control Test and the SCS Advance Control Test at the RAHCO facility. Provided herein are the system performance capabilities and an estimated construction cost and schedule for a 1000-ft-long X 34-ft-wide X 29-ft-deep containment barrier at the DOE Oak Ridge Bear Creek Burial Grounds are also provided.

Thomas J. Crocker; Verna M. Carpenter

2003-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

396

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site's 300 Area in southeastern Washington State was investigated by analyzing 21 samples recovered from depths that ranged from 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 non-chimeric Bacterial and Archaeal 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that contain a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units, defined at the 97% identity level). Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (based upon Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic transition zone, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The Bacterial community in the oxic Hanford and Ringold Formations contained members of 9 major well-recognized phyla as well 30 as unusually high proportions of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by low OTU richness and a very high preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The study has greatly expanded the intralineage phylogenetic diversity within some major divisions. These subsurface sediments have been shown to contain a large number of phylogenetically novel microbes, with substantial heterogeneities between sediment samples from the same geological formation.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Matching method and exact solvability of discrete PT-symmetric square wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrete PT-symmetric square wells are studied. Their wave functions are found proportional to classical Tshebyshev polynomials of complex argument. The compact secular equations for energies are derived giving the real spectra in certain intervals of non-Hermiticity strengths Z. It is amusing to notice that although the known square well re-emerges in the usual continuum limit, a twice as rich, upside-down symmetric spectrum is exhibited by all its present discretized predecessors.

Miloslav Znojil

2006-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

398

Discrete Sampling Test Plan for the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit  

SciTech Connect

The Discrete Groundwater Sampling Project is conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) on behalf of CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company. The project is focused on delivering groundwater samples from proscribed horizons within select groundwater wells residing in the 200-BP-5 Operable Unit (200-BP-5 OU) on the Hanford Site. This document provides the scope, schedule, methodology, and other details of the PNNL discrete sampling effort.

Sweeney, Mark D.

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

399

Exponential stability preservation in discrete-time analogues of artificial neural networks with distributed delays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates that there is a discrete-time analogue which does not require any restriction on the size of the time-step in order to preserve the exponential stability of an artificial neural network with distributed delays. The analysis exploits ... Keywords: 34K28, 39A11, 39A12, 92B20, Discrete-time analogues, Distributed delays, Exponential stability, Halanay inequalities, Lyapunov sequences

Sannay Mohamad

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A general, coupled, nonisothermal multiphase flow, reactive transport, and porous medium alteration simulator, Version 2 user's guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na{sub 2}O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks.

DH Bacon; MD White; BP McGrail

2000-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

PESTICIDE ACCUMULATION RATES IN A MANAGED MARSH ALONG LAKE ERIE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

column chromatographic separation and analysis with gas chromatography. Soils in both watersheds have low dedicated to orchards and concurrent increase in residential and road area. The increase in grain size. The pesticide accumulation rates were calculated and indicate an airborne source for HCHs and endrin

Gottgens, Hans

402

Using circular programs to deforest in accumulating parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Functional languages allow a modular programming style by function composition, which however can lead to inefficient runtime behavior due to production and consumption of intermediate results.We present a new mechanizable transformation technique for ... Keywords: accumulating parameters, circular programs, deforestation, intermediate data structures, lazy composition, lazy evaluation, multiple traversals, program transformation, tupling

Janis Voigtländer

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Loss-free method of charging accumulator rings  

SciTech Connect

A method for the production of high current pulses of heavy ions having an atomic weight greater than 100. Also a linear accelerator based apparatus for carrying out said method. Pulses formed by the method of the subject invention are suitable for storage in a storage ring. The accumulated pulses may be used in inertial fusion apparatus.

Maschke, Alfred W. (East Moriches, NY)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

Alleman, R.T. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (US); Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (US)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quantifying and relating land-surface and subsurface variability in permafrost environments using lidar and surface geophsical datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The complexity of permafrost dynamics and its critical impact on climate feedbacks warrant continued development of advanced high-latitude terrestrial ecosystem characterization and monitoring approaches. In this study, we explore the value of remote sensing and surface geophysical data for characterizing land surface and subsurface properties and their linkages in an Alaskan Coastal Plain ecosystem. We base our study on data collected at the end of the 2011 growing season in the Barrow Environmental Observatory, where a nested suite of measurements were collected within a polygon-dominated region including: surface ground penetrating radar, electromagnetic, and electrical resistance tomography data; thaw depth, soil temperature and moisture content, soil texture, soil carbon and nitrogen content, and major and trace cations. Previously-collected lidar data were also available for the study. Analysis of the datasets, individually and in combination, revealed the utility of the methods for characterizing critical land-surface and subsurface properties and associated spatial zonation. Lidar analysis was performed to extract geomorphic metrics (such as slope, curvature, and directed distance of polygons), which potentially indicate drainage potential and permafrost deformation state. Cluster analysis of these lidar-obtained attributes suggested that the land surface can be grouped into three spatially coherent zones, each having a dominant geomorphic expression including: a high centered polygon zone, a low centered polygon zone and a transitional zone. Comparison of the geophysical attributes from radar, electrical resistance tomography, and electromagnetic data with point measurements suggests that the surface geophysical data can provide very high-resolution information about subsurface properties that affect ecosystem feedbacks to climate, such as thaw depth and moisture content. Cluster analysis suggested that the geophysical attributes also varied spatially in a systematic way, suggesting the presence of three laterally distinct subsurface zones. Analysis of zone-based subsurface point measurements suggests that the geophysically-defined zones have unique distributions of hydrological, thermal, and geochemical properties and that the subsurface (geophysically-based) and land-surface (lidar-based) zonation is consistent. Although the close linkage between land surface (polygonal geomorphology) and subsurface (active layer) variability revealed through our study is not surprising, to our knowledge this is the first study to document such relationships using high resolution and non-invasive approaches. This study suggests the potential of using coincident lidar and surface geophysical measurements to quantify land surface and subsurface properties (respectively) and their linkages, which are likely to play a role in terrestrial ecosystem evolution and feedbacks to climate. These findings open the way for future research focused on using combined geophysical and remote sensing datasets to estimate subsurface and land-surface properties in high resolution and over large regions as is needed for process understanding and numerical model initialization in high latitude terrestrial ecosystems.

Hubbard, Susan S [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gangodagmage, C [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Dafflon, B [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wainwright, H [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Peterson, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Gusmeroli, A [University of Alaska, Fairbanks; Ulrich, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wu, Yuxin [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Wilson, Cathy [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Rowland, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tweedie, Craig [University of Texas, El Paso; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Recovery Act: Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Web-based CO{sub 2} Subsurface Modeling project focused primarily on extending an existing text-only, command-line driven, isothermal and isobaric, geochemical reaction-transport simulation code, developed and donated by Sienna Geodynamics, into an easier-to-use Web-based application for simulating long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in geologic reservoirs. The Web-based interface developed through this project, publically accessible via URL http://symc.sdsu.edu/, enables rapid prototyping of CO{sub 2} injection scenarios and allows students without advanced knowledge of geochemistry to setup a typical sequestration scenario, invoke a simulation, analyze results, and then vary one or more problem parameters and quickly re-run a simulation to answer what-if questions. symc.sdsu.edu has 2x12 core AMD Opteron™ 6174 2.20GHz processors and 16GB RAM. The Web-based application was used to develop a new computational science course at San Diego State University, COMP 670: Numerical Simulation of CO{sub 2} Sequestration, which was taught during the fall semester of 2012. The purpose of the class was to introduce graduate students to Carbon Capture, Use and Storage (CCUS) through numerical modeling and simulation, and to teach students how to interpret simulation results to make predictions about long-term CO{sub 2} storage capacity in deep brine reservoirs. In addition to the training and education component of the project, significant software development efforts took place. Two computational science doctoral and one geological science masters student, under the direction of the PIs, extended the original code developed by Sienna Geodynamics, named Sym.8. New capabilities were added to Sym.8 to simulate non-isothermal and non-isobaric flows of charged aqueous solutes in porous media, in addition to incorporating HPC support into the code for execution on many-core XSEDE clusters. A successful outcome of this project was the funding and training of three new computational science students and one geological science student in technologies relevant to carbon sequestration and problems involving flow in subsurface media. The three computational science students are currently finishing their doctorial studies on different aspects of modeling CO{sub 2} sequestration, while the geological science student completed his master’s thesis in modeling the thermal response of CO{sub 2} injection in brine and, as a direct result of participation in this project, is now employed at ExxonMobil as a full-time staff geologist.

Paolini, Christopher; Castillo, Jose

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

A fast iterative model for discrete velocity calculations on triangular grids  

SciTech Connect

A fast synthetic type iterative model is proposed to speed up the slow convergence of discrete velocity algorithms for solving linear kinetic equations on triangular lattices. The efficiency of the scheme is verified both theoretically by a discrete Fourier stability analysis and computationally by solving a rarefied gas flow problem. The stability analysis of the discrete kinetic equations yields the spectral radius of the typical and the proposed iterative algorithms and reveal the drastically improved performance of the latter one for any grid resolution. This is the first time that stability analysis of the full discrete kinetic equations related to rarefied gas theory is formulated, providing the detailed dependency of the iteration scheme on the discretization parameters in the phase space. The corresponding characteristics of the model deduced by solving numerically the rarefied gas flow through a duct with triangular cross section are in complete agreement with the theoretical findings. The proposed approach may open a way for fast computation of rarefied gas flows on complex geometries in the whole range of gas rarefaction including the hydrodynamic regime.

Szalmas, Lajos [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, Volos 38334 (Greece); Valougeorgis, Dimitris [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Thessaly, Pedion Areos, Volos 38334 (Greece)], E-mail: diva@mie.uth.gr

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Investigations into methane accumulation in coal storage silos  

SciTech Connect

The ventilation systems of coal storage silos are normally capable of rapidly dispersing any accumulations of methane in the atmosphere above the coal pile surface. However, the results of an investigation which is presented in this report show that hazardous concentrations of methane can accumulate within the coal pile. Methane trapped within the coal pile is released into the atmosphere of the loading gallery when coal is discharged from a silo. If the methane released is of a flammable concentration it is necessary to ventilate the gallery to reduce the risk of an ignition. This report proposes a simple test, which, after further investigations may prove to be an effective method to calculate gallery ventilation requirements.

Kolada, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radiogenic gas accumulation in TRU waste storage drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A field experiment was conducted over a four-year time span to determine the effect of high-activity transuranic (TRU) waste on the atmosphere within TRU waste storage drums typical of those generated in Savannah River Plant operation. Routine gas composition analyses showed that a significant amount of hydrogen can accumulate in drums that contain high alpha activity, and that flammable gas mixtures could form in such drums in spite of the radiolytic consumption of oxygen. According to this study, gas pressure accumulation does not pose a threat to the integrity of the TRU waste containers that are now being stored at the Savannah River Plant. Therefore, the 20-year storage criterion is still viable. However, the continued avoidance of a perfectly gas-tight drum seal (e.g., epoxy, metal welding) is recommended. The test drums will continue to be monitored.

Ryan, J.P.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Effects of physical and geochemical heterogeneities on mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation duringof mineral precipitates and biomass during bioremediation aton mineral transformation and biomass accumulation during

Li, Li

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

FODO/DOUBLET LATTICE FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.  

SciTech Connect

Requirements of minimum beam loss for hand-on maintenance and flexibility for future operations are essential for the lattice design of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. In this paper, we present a hybrid lattice that consists of FODO arcs and doublet straights, emphasizing injection and collimation optimization and flexibility, split tunes for coupling control, sextupole families for chromaticity control, and compatibility to future upgrades.

WEI,J.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; TSOUPAS,N.

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

MICROSCALE METABOLIC, REDOX AND ABIOTIC REACTIONS IN HANFORD 300 AREA SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford 300 Area is a unique site due to periodic hydrologic influence of river water resulting in changes in groundwater elevation and flow direction. This area is also highly subject to uranium remobilization, the source of which is currently believed to be the region at the base of the vadose zone that is subject to period saturation due to the changes in the water levels in the Columbia River. We found that microbial processes and redox and abiotic reactions which operate at the microscale were critical to understanding factors controlling the macroscopic fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface. The combined laboratory and field research showed how microscale conditions control uranium mobility and how biotic, abiotic and redox reactions relate to each other. Our findings extended the current knowledge to examine U(VI) reduction and immobilization using natural 300 Area communities as well as selected model organisms on redox-sensitive and redox-insensitive minerals. Using innovative techniques developed specifically to probe biogeochemical processes at the microscale, our research expanded our current understanding of the roles played by mineral surfaces, bacterial competition, and local biotic, abiotic and redox reaction rates on the reduction and immobilization of uranium.

Beyenal, Haluk [WSU] [WSU; McLEan, Jeff [JCVI] [JCVI; Majors, Paul [PNNL] [PNNL; Fredrickson, Jim [PNNL] [PNNL

2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

A Method Of Evaluating A Subsurface Region Using Gather Sensitive Data Discrimination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of evaluating a subsurface region by separating/enhancing a certain type of seismic event data of interest from an overall set of seismic event data which includes other, different types of seismic event data is disclosed herein. In accordance with one feature, a particular type of gather is generated from the seismic event data such that the gather includes at least a portion of the data which is of interest and at least a portion of the other data. A series of data discrimination lines are incorporated into the gather at positions and directions which are established in the gather in a predetermined way. Using the data discrimination lines, the data of interest which is present in the gather is separated/enhanced with respect to the other data within the gather. The separated data may be used for example in producing a map of the particular subterranean region. In accordance with another feature, the gather is selected such that the incorporated discrimination lines approach a near parallel relationship with one another. Thereby, the data is transformed in a way which causes the discrimination lines to be parallel with one another, resulting in reduced frequency distortion accompanied by improved accuracy in the separation/enhancement of data. In accordance with still another feature, the disclosed data separation/enhancement method is compatible with an iterative approach.

Lazaratos, Spyridon K. (Houston, TX)

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

414

USE OF PERFLUOROCARBON TRACER (PFT) TECHNOLOGY FOR SUBSURFACE BARRIER INTEGRITY VERIFICATION AT THE WALDO TEST SITE.  

SciTech Connect

Testing of perfluorocarbon gas tracers (PFT) on a subsurface barrier with known flaws was conducted at the Waldo Test Site operated by Science and Engineering Associates, Inc (SEA). The tests involved the use of five unique PFTs with a different tracer injected along the interior of each wall of the barrier. A fifth tracer was injected exterior to the barrier to examine the validity of diffusion controlled transport of the PFTs. The PFTs were injected for three days at a nominal flow rate of 15 cm{sup 3}/min and concentrations in the range of a few hundred ppm. Approximately 65 liters of air laced with tracer was injected for each tracer. The tracers were able to accurately detect the presence of the engineered flaws. Two flaws were detected on the north and east walls, and one flaw was detected on the south and west walls. In addition, one non-engineered flaw at the seam between the north and east walls was also detected. The use of multiple tracers provided independent confirmation of the flaws and permitted a distinction between tracers arriving at a monitoring port after being released from a nearby flaw and non-engineered flaws. The PFTs detected the smallest flaw, 0.5 inches in diameter. Visual inspection of the data showed excellent agreement with the known flaw locations and the relative size of the flaws was accurately estimated. Simultaneous with the PFT tests, SEA conducted tests with another gas tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}).

SULLIVAN,T.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

DISTRIBUTION AND RANGE OF RADIONUCLIDE SORPTION COEFFICIENTS IN A SAVANNAH RIVER SITE SUBSURFACE: STOCHASTIC MODELING CONSIDERATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The uncertainty associated with the sorption coefficient, or K{sub d} value, is one of the key uncertainties in estimating risk associated with burying low-level nuclear waste in the subsurface. The objective of this study was to measure >648 K{sub d} values and provide a measure of the range and distribution (normal or log-normal) of radionuclide K{sub d} values appropriate for the E-Area disposal site, within the Savannah River Site, near Aiken South Carolina. The 95% confidence level for the mean K{sub d} was twice the mean in the Aquifer Zone (18-30.5 m depth), equal to the mean for the Upper Vadose Zone (3.3-10 m depth), and half the mean for the Lower Vadose Zone (3.10-18 m depth). The distribution of K{sub d} values was log normal in the Upper Vadose Zone and Aquifer Zone, and normal in the Lower Vadose Zone. To our knowledge, this is the first report of natural radionuclide Kd variability in the literature. Using ranges and distribution coefficients that are specific to the hydrostratigraphic unit improved model accuracy and reduced model uncertainty. Unfortunately, extension of these conclusions to other sites is likely not appropriate given that each site has its own sources of hydrogeological variability. However, this study provides one of the first examples of the development stochastic ranges and distributions of K{sub d} values for a hydrological unit for stochastic modeling.

Kaplan, D.; et. al

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

416

Subsurface Ice and Brine Sampling Using an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher for Life Detection and Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is growing evidence for ice and fluids near the surface of Mars with potential discharge of brines, which may preserve a record of past life on the planet. Proven techniques to sample Mars subsurface will be critical for future NASA astrobiology missions that will search for such records. The required technology studies are underway in the McMurdo Dry valleys, Antarctica, which is serving as a Mars analog. The ice layer on Lake Vida in the dry valleys is estimated to be 20-meter thick where below 16-m depth there is a mix of ice and brine, which has never been sampled directly due to logistical constraints. A novel light weight, low power ultrasonic/sonic driller/corer (USDC) mechanism was developed that overcomes the need for high axial loads required by drilling via conventional techniques. The USDC was modified to produce an Ultrasonic/Sonic Gopher that is being developed to core down to the 20-m depth for in situ analysis and sample collection. Coring ice at-20 o C as in Lake Vida suggests that it is a greater challenge and current efforts are focused on the problems of ice core cutting, ice chip handling and potential ice melt (and refreezing) during drilling. An analytical model and a prototype are being developed with an effort to

Y. Bar-cohen; S. Sherrit; Z. Chang; L. Wessel; X. Bao; P. T. Doran; C. H. Fritsen; F. Kenig; C. P. Mckay; A. Murray; T. Peterson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Electrode Induced Removal and Recovery of Uranium (VI) from Acidic Subsurfaces  

SciTech Connect

The overarching objective of this research is to provide an improved understanding of how aqueous geochemical conditions impact the removal of U and Tc from groundwater and how engineering design may be utilized to optimize removal of these radionuclides. Experiments were designed to address the unique conditions in Area 3 of ORNL while also providing broader insight into the geochemical effectors of the removal rates and extent for U and Tc. The specific tasks of this work were to: 1) quantify the impact of common aqueous geochemical and operational conditions on the rate and extent of U removal and recovery from water, 2) investigate the removal of Tc with polarized graphite electrode, and determine the influence of geochemical and operational conditions on Tc removal and recovery, 3) determine whether U and Tc may be treated simultaneous from Area 3 groundwater, and examine the bench-scale performance of electrode-based treatment, and 4) determine the capacity of graphite electrodes for U(VI) removal and develop a mathematical, kinetic model for the removal of U(VI) from aqueous solution. Overall the body of work suggests that an electrode-based approach for the remediation of acidic subsurface environments, such as those observed in Area 3 of ORNL may be successful for the removal for both U(VI) and Tc. Carbonaceous (graphite) electrode materials are likely to be the least costly means to maximize removal rates and efficiency by maximizing the electrode surface area.

Gregory, Kelvin [Carnegie Mellon University] [Carnegie Mellon University

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

418

The in-situ vitrification of subsurface containment barriers: An overview  

SciTech Connect

In situ vitrification (ISV) is an environmental engineering process in which soil or soil/waste mixtures are melted through the direct application of electrical current and subsequently cooled to a glassy solid. The technology was developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in the 1980s and has been tested on transuranic, mixed-hazardous, and PCB/organic waste similar to that found at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other facilities nationwide. PNL is conducting a wide range of field tests, expanding the scientific basis of ISV, and assessing its extension into new applications. One such project is ISV--Selective Barriers, an investigation into the construction and performance of ISV--generated, vertical and/or horizontal subsurface barriers to ground-water flow and biogenic intrusion. In some situations, it may be impractical or unnecessary to either excavate or vitrify an entire waste site. Vitrified barriers could minimize the diffusive or fluid transport of hazardous components with either a ground-water diversion wall or an in situ, box-like'' structure. During the first year of this project, engineering-scale tests are being conducted between graphite electrodes within a 1.8-m-diameter, 2.4-m-high test cell. Several methods are being tested, including passive metal electrodes, electrode feeding systems, fluxed soil, and fluxed boreholes. In addition, basic data have been collected on the thermal and material properties of ISV melt and solidified glass. 7 refs., 6 figs.

Murphy, M.; Stottlemyre, J.A.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Vertical stratification of subsurface microbial community composition across geological formations at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Microbial diversity in subsurface sediments at the Hanford Site 300 Area near Richland, Washington State (USA) was investigated by analyzing samples recovered from depths of 9 to 52 m. Approximately 8000 near full-length 16S rRNA gene sequences were analyzed across geological strata that include a natural redox transition zone. These strata included the oxic coarse-grained Hanford formation, fine-grained oxic and anoxic Ringold Formation sediments, and the weathered basalt group. We detected 1233 and 120 unique bacterial and archaeal OTUs (Operational Taxonomic Units at the 97% identity level), respectively. Microbial community structure and richness varied substantially across the different geological strata. Bacterial OTU richness (Chao1 estimator) was highest (>700) in the upper Hanford formation, and declined to about 120 at the bottom of the Hanford formation. Just above the Ringold oxic-anoxic interface, richness was about 325 and declined to less than 50 in the deeper reduced zones. The deeper Ringold strata were characterized by a preponderance (ca. 90%) of Proteobacteria. The Bacterial community in the oxic sediments contained not only members of 9 well-recognized phyla but also an unusually high proportion of 3 candidate divisions (GAL15, NC10, and SPAM). Additionally, novel phylogenetic orders were identified within the Delta-proteobacteria, a clade rich in microbes that carry out redox transformations of metals that are important contaminants on the Hanford Site.

Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

420

Microbial Reductive Transformation of Phyllosilicate Fe(III) and U(VI) in Fluvial Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The microbial reduction of Fe(III) and U(VI) were investigated in shallow aquifer sediments collected from subsurface Pleistocene flood deposits near the Hanford Reach of the Columbia River in Washington State. Increases in 0.5 N HCl-extractable Fe(II) were observed in incubated sediments and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy revealed that Fe(III) associated with phyllosilicates and pyroxene was reduced to Fe(II). Aqueous uranium(VI) concentrations decreased in incubated Hanford sediments with the rate and extent being greater in sediment amended with organic carbon. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of bioreduced sediments indicated that 67-77% of the U signal was U(VI), probably as an adsorbed species associated with a new or modified reactive mineral phase. Phylotypes within the Deltaproteobacteria were more common in Hanford sediments incubated with U(VI) than without and in U(VI)-free incubations, members of the Clostridiales were dominant with sulfate-reducing phylotypes more common in the sulfate-amended sediments. These results demonstrate the potential for anaerobic reduction phyllosilicate Fe(III) and sulfate in Hanford unconfined aquifer sediments and biotransformations involving reduction and adsorption leading to decreased aqueous U concentrations.

Lee, Ji-Hoon; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Lin, Xueju; Kennedy, David W.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Konopka, Allan; Moore, Dean A.; Resch, Charles T.; Phillips, Jerry L.

2012-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

EMSL Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry and Subsurface Science-Science Theme Advisory Panel Meeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report covers the topics of discussion and the recommendations of the panel members. On December 8 and 9, 2010, the Geochemistry, Biogeochemistry, and Subsurface Science (GBSS) Science Theme Advisory Panel (STAP) convened for a more in-depth exploration of the five Science Theme focus areas developed at a similar meeting held in 2009. The goal for the fiscal year (FY) 2011 meeting was to identify potential topical areas for science campaigns, necessary experimental development needs, and scientific members for potential research teams. After a review of the current science in each of the five focus areas, the 2010 STAP discussions successfully led to the identification of one well focused campaign idea in pore-scale modeling and five longer-term potential research campaign ideas that would likely require additional workshops to identify specific research thrusts. These five campaign areas can be grouped into two categories: (1) the application of advanced high-resolution, high mass accuracy experimental techniques to elucidate the interplay between geochemistry and microbial communities in terrestrial ecosystems and (2) coupled computation/experimental investigations of the electron transfer reactions either between mineral surfaces and outer membranes of microbial cells or between the outer and inner membranes of microbial cells.

Brown, Gordon E.; Chaka, Anne; Shuh, David K.; Roden, Eric E.; Werth, Charles J.; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Baer, Donald R.; Bailey, Vanessa L.; Bowden, Mark E.; Grate, Jay W.; Hoyt, David W.; Kuprat, Laura R.; Lea, Alan S.; Mueller, Karl T.; Oostrom, Martinus; Orr, Galya; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Plata, Charity; Robinson, E. W.; Teller, Raymond G.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Hongfei; Wiley, H. S.; Wilkins, Michael J.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Enhanced Remedial Amendment Delivery to Subsurface Using Shear Thinning Fluid and Aqueous Foam  

SciTech Connect

A major issue with in situ subsurface remediation is the ability to achieve an even spatial distribution of remedial amendments to the contamination zones in an aquifer or vadose zone. Delivery of amendment to the aquifer using shear thinning fluid and to the vadose zone using aqueous foam has the potential to enhance the amendment distribution into desired locations and improve the remediation. 2-D saturated flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the enhanced sweeping, contaminant removal, and amendment persistence achieved by shear thinning fluid delivery. Bio-polymer xanthan gum solution was used as the shear thinning fluid. Unsaturated 1-D column and 2-D flow cell experiments were conducted to evaluate the mitigation of contaminant mobilization, amendment uniform distribution enhancement, and lateral delivery improvement by foam delivery. Surfactant sodium lauryl ether sulfate was used as the foaming agent. It was demonstrated that the shear thinning fluid injection enhanced the fluid sweeping over a heterogeneous system and increased the delivery of remedial amendment into low-permeability zones. The persistence of the amendment distributed into the low-perm zones by the shear thinning fluid was prolonged compared to that of amendment distributed by water injection. Foam delivery of amendment was shown to mitigate the mobilization of highly mobile contaminant from sediments under vadose zone conditions. Foam delivery also achieved more uniform amendment distribution in a heterogeneous unsaturated system, and demonstrated remarkable increasing in lateral distribution of the injected liquid compared to direct liquid injection.

Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Oostrom, Martinus; Truex, Michael J.; Shen, Xin; Li, Xiqing

2011-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

423

Suppression of dynamics in coupled discrete systems in interaction with an extended environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the suppression of dynamics and occurrence of quiescent states in an extended system of coupled discrete dynamical systems. This phenomenon is induced by interaction with another similar system with a different and damped dynamics which we call an extended environment. Both the system and the environment are in a feedback loop and their mutual influence leads to suppression of dynamic activity. We illustrate this in the specific case of a system of coupled neurons modelled by a 2-dimensional discrete system called Rulkov maps. A detailed analysis is carried out by considering single units of discrete systems where control to steady states is induced by an external damped system. This is then extended to rings and lattices. As an important application, we also present how the excitation waves produced due to defect neurons can be suppressed by interaction with a system of passive cells.

Snehal M. Shekatkar; G. Ambika

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

424

Analytical transformed harmonic oscillator basis for continuum discretized coupled channels calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for continuum discretization in continuum-discretized coupled-channels calculations is proposed. The method is based on an analytic local-scale transformation of the harmonic-oscillator wave functions proposed for other purposes in a recent work [Karatagladis et al., Phys. Rev. C 71, 064601 (2005)]. The new approach is compared with the standard method of continuum discretization in terms of energy bins for the reactions d+{sup 58}Ni at 80 MeV, {sup 6}Li+{sup 40}Ca at 156 MeV, and {sup 6}He+{sup 208}Pb at 22 MeV and 240 MeV/nucleon. In all cases very good agreement between both approaches is found.

Moro, A. M.; Arias, J. M. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Gomez-Camacho, J. [Departamento de Fisica Atomica, Molecular y Nuclear, Facultad de Fisica, Universidad de Sevilla, Apartado 1065, E-41080 Sevilla (Spain); Centro Nacional de Aceleradores, Avda Thomas A. Edison, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Perez-Bernal, F. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Huelva, E-21071 Huelva (Spain)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

425

Importance of Mobile Genetic Elements and Conjugal Gene Transfer for Subsurface Microbial Community Adaptation to Biotransformation of Metals  

SciTech Connect

Soils used in the present DOE project were obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) through correspondence with FRC Manager David Watson. We obtained a total of six soils sampled at different distances from the surface: (A) Non-contaminated surface soil from Hinds Creek Floodplain (0 mbs (meter below surface)). (B) Mercury-contaminated surface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (0 mbs). (C) Mercury-contaminated subsurface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (0.5 mbs). (D) Mercury-contaminated subsurface soil from Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Floodplain (1.0 mbs). (E) Non-contaminated surface soil from Ish Creek Floodplain (0 mbs). (F) Non-contaminated surface soil from Ish Creek Floodplain (0.5 mbs).

Sorensen, Soren J.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov solution of the discrete ordinates method with flux limiters for 3D radiative transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study introduces a parallel Jacobian-free Newton Krylov (JFNK) general minimal residual (GMRES) solution for the discretized radiative transfer equation (RTE) in 3D, absorbing, emitting and scattering media. For the angular and spatial discretization ... Keywords: Collimated radiation, Discrete ordinates method (DOM) SN, Electromagnetic radiation, Flux limiters, General Minimal Residual (GMRES), Gram-Schmidt, Householder, Jacobian free Newton-Krylov (JFNK), Parallel MPI, Radiative transfer equation (RTE), TVD, Threads

William F. Godoy; Xu Liu

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Technical Protocols for Assessing Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid Mobility in the Subsurface at Manufactured Gas Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) research that has been conducted on dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) mobility at manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites and presents technical protocols for conducting DNAPL mobility assessments at MGP sites using currently available methodologies and/or technologies. The technical protocols address each of the primary zones of the subsurface environment: vadose zone, saturated zone, and bedrock (both competent and fractured). The report a...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

COHOMOLOGIE GALOISIENNE DES CORPS VALU'ES DISCRETS HENSELIENS, d'apr`es K. Kato et S. Bloch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

* *orps valu'e discret hens'elien E de caract'eristique nulle et de caract'eristique r'esi* *duelle p

Colliot-Thelene, Jean-Louis

429

Coincidence of the continuous and discrete p-adic wavelet transforms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that translations and dilations of a p-adic wavelet coincides (up to the multiplication by some root of one) with a vector from the known basis of discrete p-adic wavelets. In this sense the continuous p-adic wavelet transform coincides with the discrete p-adic wavelet transform. The p-adic multiresolution approximation is introduced and relation with the real multiresolution approximation is described. Relation of application of p-adic wavelets to spectral theory of p-adic pseudodifferential operators and the known results about sparsity of matrices of some real integral operators in the bases of multiresolution wavelets is discussed.

S. Albeverio; S. V. Kozyrev

2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

430

L'Hospital-type rules for monotonicity and limits: Discrete case  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assuming that a "derivative" ratio rho:=f'/g' of the ratio r:=f/g of differentiable functions f and g is monotonic (that is, rho is increasing or decreasing), it was shown in previous papers that then r can switch at most once, from decrease to increase or vice versa. In the present paper, "discrete" versions of such l'Hospital-type rules for monotonicity (as well as "discrete" versions of l'Hospital's rules for limits) are obtained, for functions f and g defined on an interval of integers.

Iosif Pinelis

2006-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Discrete Scale Invariance and Other Cooperative Phenomena in Spatially Extended Systems With Threshold Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contents 1 Introduction 5 1.1 Imitation and Synchronisation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 1.2 Fractals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.3 Hierarchical systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.4 1=f-noise . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 1.5 Scale invariance and discrete scale invariance . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.6 Exactly solvable models with discrete scale invariance . . . . . . 14 1.6.1 Potts model on a hierarchical lattice . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 1.6.2 Diffusion on a random lattice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 1.6.3 An experimental hierarchical model . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 1.7 Possible log-periodic signatures in cracking 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2 Hierarchical structures in growth models 27 2.1 Laplacian growth models . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 2.1.1 Numerical results . . .

Anders Johansen; Anders Johansen

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Biolog(TM) ID as compared to 16S ribosomal RNA ID for environmental isolates from the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Dept of Energy (DOE) Subsurface Microbial Culture Collection (SMCC) contains nearly 10,000 strains of microorganisms isolated from terrestrial subsurface environments. Many of the aerobic, gram-negative, chemoheterotrophs isolated from the DOE Savannah River Site (SRS) have previously been identified by phylogenetic analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene nucleotide sequences. These SMCC isolates are currently being examined using Biolog GN Microplates and the Biolog Microstation System in order to gain knowledge of their metabolic capabilities and to compare Biolog IDs with 16S IDs. To accommodate the particular needs of these subsurface isolates, which are often incapable of growing under high-nutrient conditions, Biolog's recommendations for inoculating isolates into Biolog GN Microplates have been altered. The isolates are grown on low nutrient media, sodium thioglycolate (3mM) is added to the culture media to inhibit capsule formation, and a low density of bacteria is inoculated into the microplate. Using these altered inoculation criteria, 60 percent of these SMCC isolates have a Biolog genus ID that matches the 16S rRNA ID. These results indicate that the Biolog System can be a good means of identifying unusual environmental isolates, even when recommended inoculation procedures are altered to accommodate particular isolate needs.

McKinsey, P.C.

2000-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

433

Distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters in fissured volcanogenic bed rocks of the Lake Karachai Area, Chelyabinsk, Southern Urals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present investigation is devoted to the study of the distribution and geochemistry of contaminated subsurface waters, beneath the site of temporary storage of liquid radioactive waste known as Lake Karachai. For this purpose a method of hydrogeochemical logging (HGCL) together with standard hydrogeochemical and geophysical methods of uncased hole logging were used. The distribution of sodium nitrate brine plumes in the subsurface was determined by the physical and physico-chemical properties of these brines and by the petrochemical composition of enclosing rocks and the structural setting of the flow paths. The latter is represented by fractures and large faults in the bedrock of volcanogenic and volcanogenic-sedimentary rocks of intermediate-to-basic composition. The volcanogenic rocks are overlain in some places by a thin cover of unconsolidated sediments, i.e., by loams and relatively impermeable silts. Contaminated waters flow-in accordance with the eluvium bottom relief towards local areas of natural (Mishelyak and Techa rivers) and artificial (Novogomenskii water intake) discharge of subsurface waters. The large Mishelyak fault, southwest of Lake Karachai and under fluvial sediments of the Mishelyak, is assumed to significantly influence the flow pattern of contaminated waters, diverting them from an intake of drinking water.

Solodov, I.N.; Belichkin, V.I.; Zotov, A.V.; Kochkin, B.T. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Drozhko, E.G. [Atomic Energy of Russia (Russian Federation); Glagolev, A.V.; Skokov, A.N. [Russian Federation Committee on Geological and Subsurface Usage (Russian Federation)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Phased Array Approach To Retrieve Gases, Liquids, Or Solids From Subsurface And Subaqueous Geologic Or Man-Made Formations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of enhancing the remediation of contaminated soils and ground water, production of oil and gas, and production of any solid, gas, and/or liquid from subsurface geologic and man-made formations including the steps of estimating the geometric boundaries of the region containing the material to be recovered, drilling a recovery well(s) into subsurface in a strategic location to recover the material of interest, establishing multiple sources of acoustical power in an array about and spaced-apart from the surface or at various depths below the surface in a borehole(s) and/or well(s), directing a volume of acoustical excitation from the sources into the region containing the material to be recovered, the excitation in the form of either controllable sinusoidal, square, pulsed, or various combinations of these three waveforms, and controlling the phasing, frequency, power, duration, and direction of these waveforms from the sources to increase and control the intensity of acoustical excitation in the region of the material to be recovered to enhance. the recovery of said material from the recovery well(s). The invention will augment any technology affecting the removal of materials from the subsurface.

Rynne, Timothy M. (Long Beach, CA); Spadaro, John F. (Huntington Beach, CA); Iovenitti, Joe L. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Dering, John P. (Lakewood, CA); Hill, Donald G. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

435

On the Joint Role of Subtropical Atmospheric Variability and Equatorial Subsurface Heat Content Anomalies in Initiating the Onset of ENSO Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous research has shown that seasonal mean variations in both the subtropical/extratropical sea level pressures over the central North Pacific and the subsurface heat content anomalies in the western equatorial Pacific are significantly ...

Bruce T. Anderson

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

A multi-model study of sea surface temperature and sub-surface density fingerprints of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is an important component of the North Atlantic climate system. Here, we use simulations from ten coupled climate models to calculate patterns of sea surface temperature (SST) and sub-surface ...

Christopher D. Roberts; Freya K. Garry; Laura C. Jackson

437

Networked Acoustic Modems for Real-Time Data Delivery from Distributed Subsurface Instruments in the Coastal Ocean: Initial System Development and Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are reported from field tests of networked acoustic modems used for wireless real-time delivery of oceanographic measurements from a distributed array of subsurface instruments in coastal waters. The network demonstrated consists of ...

Daniel L. Codiga; Joseph A. Rice; Paul A. Baxley

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Estimation of subsurface temperatures in the Tattapani geothermal field, central India from limited volume of magnetotelluric data and borehole thermograms using a constructive back-propagation neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constructive back-propagation code which was designed to run as a single hidden layer, feed-forward neural network (SLFFNN) has been adapted and used to estimate subsurface temperature from a small volume of magnetotelluric (MT) derived ...

Anthony E. Akpan; Mahesh Narayanan; T. Harinarayana

439

Techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides in contaminated subsurface environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy (DOE) facilities within the weapons complex face a daunting challenge of remediating huge below inventories of legacy radioactive and toxic metal waste. More often than not, the scope of the problem is massive, particularly in the high recharge, humid regions east of the Mississippi river, where the off-site migration of contaminants continues to plague soil water, groundwater, and surface water sources. As of 2002, contaminated sites are closing rapidly and many remediation strategies have chosen to leave contaminants in-place. In situ barriers, surface caps, and bioremediation are often the remedial strategies of chose. By choosing to leave contaminants in-place, we must accept the fact that the contaminants will continue to interact with subsurface and surface media. Contaminant interactions with the geosphere are complex and investigating long term changes and interactive processes is imperative to verifying risks. We must be able to understand the consequences of our action or inaction. The focus of this manuscript is to describe recent technical developments for assessing the performance of in situ bioremediation and immobilization of subsurface metals and radionuclides. Research within DOE's NABIR and EMSP programs has been investigating the possibility of using subsurface microorganisms to convert redox sensitive toxic metals and radionuclides (e.g. Cr, U, Tc, Co) into a less soluble, less mobile forms. Much of the research is motivated by the likelihood that subsurface metal-reducing bacteria can be stimulated to effectively alter the redox state of metals and radionuclides so that they are immobilized in situ for long time periods. The approach is difficult, however, since subsurface media and waste constituents are complex with competing electron acceptors and hydrogeological conditions making biostimulation a challenge. Performance assessment of in situ biostimulation strategies is also difficult and typically requires detailed monitoring of coupled hydrological, geochemical/geophysical, and microbial processes. In the following manuscript we will (1) discuss contaminant fate and transport problems in humid regimes, (2) efforts to immobilize metals and radionuclides in situ via bioremediation, and (3) state-of-the-art techniques for assessing the performance of in situ bioreduction and immobilization of metals and radionuclides. These included (a) in situ solution and solid phase monitoring, (b) in situ and laboratory microbial community analysis, (c) noninvasive geophysical methods, and (d) solid phase speciation via high resolution spectroscopy.

Jardine, P.M.; Watson, D.B.; Blake, D.A.; Beard, L.P.; Brooks, S.C.; Carley, J.M.; Criddle, C.S.; Doll, W.E.; Fields, M.W.; Fendorf, S.E.; Geesey, G.G.; Ginder-Vogel, M.; Hubbard, S.S.; Istok, J.D.; Kelly, S.; Kemner, K.M.; Peacock, A.D.; Spalding, B.P.; White, D.C.; Wolf, A.; Wu, W.; Zhou, J.

2004-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These devices and techniques were very effective to estimate the movement, location, and concentrations of the solids representing plutonium and are expected to perform well at a larger scale. The operation of the techniques and their measurement accuracies will be discussed as well as the overall results of the accumulated solids test.

Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Subsurface Hybrid Power Options for Oil & Gas Production at Deep Ocean Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investment in deep-sea (deep-ocean) hybrid power systems may enable certain off-shore oil and gas exploration and production. Advanced deep-ocean drilling and production operations, locally powered, may provide commercial access to oil and gas reserves otherwise inaccessible. Further, subsea generation of electrical power has the potential of featuring a low carbon output resulting in improved environmental conditions. Such technology therefore, enhances the energy security of the United States in a green and environmentally friendly manner. The objective of this study is to evaluate alternatives and recommend equipment to develop into hybrid energy conversion and storage systems for deep ocean operations. Such power systems will be located on the ocean floor and will be used to power offshore oil and gas exploration and production operations. Such power systems will be located on the oceans floor, and will be used to supply oil and gas exploration activities, as well as drilling operations required to harvest petroleum reserves. The following conceptual hybrid systems have been identified as candidates for powering sub-surface oil and gas production operations: (1) PWR = Pressurized-Water Nuclear Reactor + Lead-Acid Battery; (2) FC1 = Line for Surface O{sub 2} + Well Head Gas + Reformer + PEMFC + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (3) FC2 = Stored O2 + Well Head Gas + Reformer + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (4) SV1 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Fuel Cell + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (5) SV2 = Submersible Vehicle + Stored O{sub 2} + Engine or Turbine + Lead-Acid & Li-Ion Batteries; (6) SV3 = Submersible Vehicle + Charge at Docking Station + ZEBRA & Li-Ion Batteries; (7) PWR TEG = PWR + Thermoelectric Generator + Lead-Acid Battery; (8) WELL TEG = Thermoelectric Generator + Well Head Waste Heat + Lead-Acid Battery; (9) GRID = Ocean Floor Electrical Grid + Lead-Acid Battery; and (10) DOC = Deep Ocean Current + Lead-Acid Battery.

Farmer, J C; Haut, R; Jahn, G; Goldman, J; Colvin, J; Karpinski, A; Dobley, A; Halfinger, J; Nagley, S; Wolf, K; Shapiro, A; Doucette, P; Hansen, P; Oke, A; Compton, D; Cobb, M; Kopps, R; Chitwood, J; Spence, W; Remacle, P; Noel, C; Vicic, J; Dee, R

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

442

Assessment of subsurface VOCs using a chemical microsensor array. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of laboratory investigations of several performance parameters relevant to surface-acoustic-wave (SAW) chemical sensor arrays for the measurement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in contaminated soil and groundwater. The small size, low cost, sensitivity and selectivity of such instruments promise improvements in the quality and quantity of data used to guide site assessment and restoration efforts. In this investigation, calibrations were performed for 15 different coated SAW sensors. Each sensor was exposed to six VOCs selected to represent three chemical classes of contaminants that are commonly found at waste sites (i.e., aliphatic, aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons). A new pattern recognition method was developed for determining which coated sensors would maximize the selectivity and accuracy of quantitation for a given set of vapor contaminants. Using this method, an optimal subwet of four coated sensors was selected for testing in a prototype microsensor instrument. Additional laboratory experiments were performed with this optimized array to assess the limits of detection and linear response ranges for the representative vapors, as well as the additivity of responses to vapors in binary mixtures, temperature and humidity effects, aging effects, and other performance parameters related to the application of this technology to soil and groundwater VOC monitoring. Results demonstrate that SAW microsensor arrays can identify and quantify specific VOCs at concentrations in the {mu}g/L to mg/L range when present alone or in simple (e.g., binary) mixtures. SAW sensor technology offers a potentially effective alternative to existing field instrumentation for headspace analysis, soil vapor monitoring, and vacuum extraction process monitoring of VOCs in subsurface media.

Batterman, S.A.; Zellers, E.T. [Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (United States). School of Public Health

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Preoperational Subsurface Conditions at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center Service Wastewater Discharge Facility  

SciTech Connect

The Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) Service Wastewater Discharge Facility replaces the existing percolation ponds as a disposal facility for the INTEC Service Waste Stream. A preferred alternative for helping decrease water content in the subsurface near INTEC, closure of the existing ponds is required by the INTEC Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) Record of Decision (ROD) for Waste Area Group 3 Operable Unit 3-13 (DOE-ID 1999a). By August 2002, the replacement facility was constructed approximately 2 miles southwest of INTEC, near the Big Lost River channel. Because groundwater beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is protected under Federal and State of Idaho regulations from degradation due to INEEL activities, preoperational data required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 were collected. These data include preexisting physical, chemical, and biological conditions that could be affected by the discharge; background levels of radioactive and chemical components; pertinent environmental and ecological parameters; and potential pathways for human exposure or environmental impact. This document presents specific data collected in support of DOE Order 5400.1, including: four quarters of groundwater sampling and analysis of chemical and radiological parameters; general facility description; site specific geology, stratigraphy, soils, and hydrology; perched water discussions; and general regulatory requirements. However, in order to avoid duplication of previous information, the reader is directed to other referenced publications for more detailed information. Documents that are not readily available are compiled in this publication as appendices. These documents include well and borehole completion reports, a perched water evaluation letter report, the draft INEEL Wellhead Protection Program Plan, and the Environmental Checklist.

Ansley, Shannon L.

2002-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

444

Sorption of organic carbon compounds to the fine fraction of surface and Subsurface Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transported from the soil surface is stabilized in deeper soil profiles by physicochemical sorption processes. However, it is unclear how different forms of organic carbon (OC) compounds common in soil organic matter interact with soil minerals in the surface (A) and subsurface (B) horizons. We added four compounds (glucose, starch, cinnamic acid and stearic acid) to the silt- and clay-sized fraction (fine fraction) of A and B horizons of eight soils from varying climates (3 temperate, 3 tropical, 1 arctic and 1 sub-arctic). Equilibriumbatch experiments were conducted using 0 to 100 mg C L 1 of 14C-labeled compounds for 8 h. Sorption parameters (maximum sorption capacity, Qmax and binding coefficient, k) calculated by fitting sorption data to the Langmuir equation showed that Qmax of A and B horizons was very similar for all compounds. Both Qmax and k values were related to sorbate properties, with Qmax being lowest for glucose (20 500 mg kg 1), highest for stearic acid (20,000 200,000 mg kg 1), and intermediate for both cinnamic acid (200 4000 mg kg 1) and starch (400 6000 mg kg 1). Simple linear regression analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the sorbents influenced the Qmax of cinnamic acid and stearic acid, but not glucose and starch. The sorbent properties did not show predictive ability for binding coefficient k. By using the fine fraction as sorbent, we found that the mineral fractions of A horizons are equally reactive as the B horizons irrespective of soil organic carbon content.

Jagadamma, Sindhu [ORNL; Mayes, Melanie [ORNL; Zinn, Yuri [Federal University of Lavras, Brazil; Gisladottir, Gudrun [University of Iceland; Ann, Russell [Iowa State University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Efficient parallel architecture for multi-level forward discrete wavelet transform processors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A resource efficient and high-performance architecture for a two-dimensional multi-level discrete wavelet transform processor is presented in this paper. The JPEG2000 standard integer lossless 5-3 filter has been implemented. It achieves optimal hardware ...

Syed Mahfuzul Aziz; Duc Minh Pham

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Solving Hard Satisfiability Problems: A Unified Algorithm Based on Discrete Lagrange Multipliers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present improved strategies in DLM-99-SAT to escape from traps and to select proper parameter sets to use when applied to solve some difficult but satisfiable SAT problems. One of the main issues in DLM-99-SAT is that it has a large ... Keywords: DIMACS benchmarks, discrete Lagrange-multiplier method, first-order search procedure, satisfiability, traps

Zhe Wu; Benjamin W. Wah

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A test for second order stationarity of a time series based on the Discrete Fourier Transform property, we construct a Portmanteau type test statistic for testing stationarity of the time series. It is shown that under the null of stationarity, the test statistic is approximately a chi square distribution

Subba Rao, Suhasini

448

Sequential Monte Carlo for Bayesian sequentially designed experiments for discrete data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present a sequential Monte Carlo algorithm for Bayesian sequential experimental design applied to generalised non-linear models for discrete data. The approach is computationally convenient in that the information of newly observed data ... Keywords: Clinical trials, Generalised linear model, Generalised non-linear model, Sequential Monte Carlo, Sequential design, Target stimulus

Christopher C. Drovandi; James M. Mcgree; Anthony N. Pettitt

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Estimation of Wind-Wave Generation in a Discrete Spectral Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The estimation of wind-wave generation using a new discrete spectral model is compared to Hasselmann et al.'s (1976) parametric model and to models driven primarily by direct transfer of energy from the atmosphere into the surface waves. The main ...

Donald T. Resio

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

A general theory of connectivity and current sheets in coronal magnetic fields anchored to discrete sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general theory of connectivity and current sheets in coronal magnetic fields anchored to discrete are current-free within each domain, and contain singular currents along each of the field's separators. 1 suggested, from reconnection along the single field line lying at the interface of the four resulting flux

Longcope, Dana

451

A GENERAL THEORY OF CONNECTIVITY AND CURRENT SHEETS IN CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ANCHORED TO DISCRETE SOURCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A GENERAL THEORY OF CONNECTIVITY AND CURRENT SHEETS IN CORONAL MAGNETIC FIELDS ANCHORED TO DISCRETE on the flux of each domain. The resulting equilibria are current-free within each domain and contain singular currents along each of the field's separators. Subject headings: MHD -- Sun: corona -- Sun: magnetic fields

Klapper, Isaac

452

The inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the inverse scattering problem for a discrete Sturm-Liouville equation on the entire line with coefficients that stabilize to zero in one direction. We derive a necessary and a sufficient condition on the scattering data so that the inverse problem is uniquely solvable. Bibliography: 23 titles.

Khanmamedov, Agil Kh [Baku State University, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2011-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

453

Optimal control of Cauchy problem for first-order discrete and partial differential inclusions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimization of Cauchy problem for discrete inclusions is reduced to problem with geometric constraints in Hilbert space ¿2 and necessary and sufficient condition for optimality is derived. Both for convex and non-convex partial differential ... Keywords: 49K20, 49K24, Cauchy problem, Set-valued, approximation, improper integral, locally conjugate

E. N. Mahmudov

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

GPU accelerated simulations of 3D deterministic particle transport using discrete ordinates method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), originally developed for real-time, high-definition 3D graphics in computer games, now provides great faculty in solving scientific applications. The basis of particle transport simulation is the time-dependent, multi-group, ... Keywords: CUDA, Discrete ordinates (Sn) method, GPU, Particle transport, Sweep3D

Chunye Gong; Jie Liu; Lihua Chi; Haowei Huang; Jingyue Fang; Zhenghu Gong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Brief paper: Discrete-time drift counteraction stochastic optimal control: Theory and application-motivated examples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop stochastic optimal control results for nonlinear discrete-time systems driven by disturbances modeled by a Markov chain. A characterization and a computational procedure for a control law which maximizes a cost functional, related to expected ... Keywords: Automotive applications, Constrained systems, Dynamic programming, Hybrid electric vehicles, Stochastic control

I. V. Kolmanovsky; L. Lezhnev; T. L. Maizenberg

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Towards a discretely actuated steerable cannula for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have designed, developed, and evaluated the performance of a multi-degree-of-freedom discretely actuated steerable cannula with shape-memory alloy (SMA) actuators. This will enable us to deliver diagnostic as well as therapeutic devices to the target ... Keywords: Medical robots and systems, design and control, human-centered and life-like robotics, mechanics, motion control, smart actuators

Elif Ayvali; Chia-Pin Liang; Mingyen Ho; Yu Chen; Jaydev P Desai

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Implicit--explicit methods based on strong stability preserving multistep time discretizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note we propose and analyze novel implicit-explicit methods based on second order strong stability preserving multistep time discretizations. Several schemes are developed, and a linear stability analysis is performed to study their properties ... Keywords: Advection--diffusion equation, Implicit--explicit methods, Stability, Strong stability preserving methods

Thor Gjesdal

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Dynamic programming for constrained optimal control of discrete-time linear hybrid systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the solution to optimal control problems for constrained discrete-time linear hybrid systems based on quadratic or linear performance criteria. The aim of the paper is twofold. First, we give basic theoretical results on the structure ... Keywords: Dynamic programming, Hybrid systems, Multiparametric programming, Optimal control, Piecewise affine systems

Francesco Borrelli; Mato Baoti?; Alberto Bemporad; Manfred Morari

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

A Tight Lower Bound to the Outage Probability of Discrete-Input Block-Fading Channels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this correspondence, a tight lower bound to the outage probability of discrete-input Nakagami-m block-fading channels is proposed. The approach permits an efficient method for numerical evaluation of the bound, providing an additional tool for system ... Keywords: Block-fading channel, diversity, error probability, outage probability, rate-diversity tradeoff, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)-exponent

K. D. Nguyen; A. Guillen i Fabregas; L. K. Rasmussen

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Development of discrete event system specification (DEVS) building performance models for building energy design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The discrete event system specification (DEVS) is a formalism for describing simulation models in a modular fashion. In this study, it is exploited by forming submodels that allow different professions involved in the building design process to work ... Keywords: DEVS, energy simulation in building design, modular BPS, stochastic occupant models

Huseyin Burak Gunay; Liam O'Brien; Rhys Goldstein; Simon Breslav; Azam Khan

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "discrete subsurface accumulations" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Enhanced discrete differential evolution to determine optimal coordination of directional overcurrent relays in a power system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an enhanced differential evolution technique to solve the optimal coordination of directional overcurrent relays in a power system. The most vital task when installing directional relays on the system is selecting suitable current ... Keywords: directional overcurrent relays (DOCRs), enhanced discrete differential evolution algorithm (EDDEA), pickup current settings (Ip), relay coordination, time dial settings (TDS)

Joymala Moirangthem; Subranshu Sekhar Dash; Bijaya Ketan Panigrahi

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Original article: Using the continuous price as control variate for discretely monitored options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variance reduction is of highest importance in financial simulation. In this study, we present a new and simple variance reduction technique for pricing discretely monitored lookback and barrier options. It is based on using the corresponding continuously ... Keywords: Control variate, Option pricing, Path dependent options, Variance reduction

Kemal Dinçer Dingeç; Wolfgang Hörmann

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Green's function of a finite chain and the discrete Fourier transform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new expression for the Green's function of a finite one-dimensional lattice with nearest neighbor interaction is derived via discrete Fourier transform. Solution of the Heisenberg spin chain with periodic and open boundary conditions is considered as an example. Comparison to Bethe ansatz clarifies the relation between the two approaches.

S. Cojocaru

2007-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

464

Generation and evaluation of orthogonal polynomials in discrete Sobolev spaces II: numerical stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we concern ourselves with the determination and evaluation of polynomials that are orthogonal with respect to a general discrete Sobolev inner product, that is, an ordinary inner product on the real line plus a finite sum of atomic inner ... Keywords: 42C10, 65D20, 65G50, Recurrence relations, Rounding errors, Sobolev orthogonal polynomials

R. Barrio; S. Serrano

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Automated synthesis of discrete-time sigma-delta modulators from system architecture to circuit netlist  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A synthesis tool consisting of coefficient synthesis of architecture, circuit specifications synthesis, and CMOS operational-amplifier (op-amp) synthesis for discrete-time sigma-delta modulators (SDMs) is presented. In circuit specifications synthesis, ... Keywords: Automated synthesis, Behavioral modeling, Geometric programming, Op-amp synthesis, Sigma-delta modulator, Transistor sizing

Shuenn-Yuh Lee; Chih-Yuan Chen; Jia-Hua Hong; Rong-Guey Chang; Mark Po-Hung Lin

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Effects of size, shape, crystal plane and atomic discrete structure on interactions between carbon nanoparticles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding various interaction forces between building blocks is of great importance to their selfassembly. In this paper, the effects of size, crystal plane, shape and atomic discrete structure on interaction potentials between carbon nanoparticles ... Keywords: Hamaker approach, carbon, interaction, molecular dynamics simulation, nanoparticle

Weifu Sun; Qinghua Zeng; Aibing Yu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Threshold Levels for Nonstochastic Skin Effects From Low Energy Discrete Radioactive Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessment of risk from skin contamination by low-energy discrete radioactive particles (DRPs) is difficult because the particles produce nonuniform external radiation exposures. This study, which provides data on the relationship between DRP dose to the skin and biological skin response, can form the technical basis for developing regulations for controlling exposures.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z