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1

Cultural Influences on the Discipline of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the history of humankind, people have engaged in activities we associate in some way with chemistry. But people have done so within a framework of their own culture, not within a Western science cultural framework in which the discipline of chemistry exists. To understand the cultural framework of chemistry taught in universities today, we need to step out of the comfort of our own scientific culture we live in today. In other words, the cultural influences on chemistry are found by looking at alternative cultures. I am following the old adage, “If you want to learn about water, don’t ask a fish.” History is a convenient vehicle to help us understand cultural influences. Because our scientific culture today has strong Greek roots, let me first explore Aristotle’s ideas about matter and then follow those ideas when they are placed in a different culture, Arabic culture, for instance. We shall then see what gets lost in translation between Greek and Arabic cultures. This discovery will shed light on some cultural influences on today’s chemistry and will have direct implications for the instruction of students. Greek Culture Aristotle’s ideas about matter rejected an atomic-like model of matter in favour of a continuum model. His model is summarized by Figure 1, representing the four elements, which when combined in various proportions produce different qualities of matter.

Dr. Glen; S. Aikenhead

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry,

3

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Y Z Y Z Yaghi, Omar M. (Omar M. Yaghi) - Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley Yaliraki, Sophia N. (Sophia N. Yaliraki) - Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London Yang, Chen (Chen Yang) - Departments of Chemistry & Physics, Purdue University Yang, De-Ping (De-Ping Yang) - Department of Physics, College of the Holy Cross Yang, In-Sang (In-Sang Yang) - Department of Physics, Ewha Womans University Yang, Jian (Jian Yang) - Department of Bioengineering, University of Texas at Arlington Yang, Peidong (Peidong Yang) - Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley Yang, Zheng (Zheng Yang) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Univeristy of Illinois at Chicago Yao, Daoxin (Daoxin Yao) - Department of Physics, Boston University

4

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Sabo, John (John Sabo) - School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University Sachdev, Subir -Department of Physics, Harvard Universit(achdev, Subir -Department of Physics, Harvard Universi)ty Sadoway, Donald Robert (Donald Robert Sadoway) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Saikin, Semion (Semion Saikin) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Salapaka, Murti V. (Murti V. Salapaka) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University Sanchez, Erik (Erik Sanchez) - Department of Physics, Portland State University Sandoghdar, Vahid (Vahid Sandoghdar) - Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ)

5

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Rabani, Eran (Eran Rabani) - School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University Rabani, Eran (Eran Rabani) - School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University Rabson, David A. (David A. Rabson) - Department of Physics, University of South Florida Radhakrishnan, Ravi (Ravi Radhakrishnan) - Department of Bioengineering, University of Pennsylvania Raghavan, Srinivasa (Srinivasa Raghavan) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park Ramesh, R. (R. Ramesh) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Ramsak, Anton (Anton Ramsak) - Department of Theoretical Physics, Jozef Stefan Institute Rangan, Chitra (Chitra Rangan) - Department of Physics, University of Windsor

6

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

P Q R S P Q R S T U V W X Y Z O'Hern, Corey S. (Corey S. O'Hern) - Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Yale University O'Keeffe, Michael (Michael O'Keeffe) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University Ocko, Ben (Ben Ocko) - Department of Physics, Brookhaven National Laboratory Odom, Teri W. (Teri W. Odom) - Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University Oganov, Artem R. (Artem R. Oganov) - Departments of Geosciences & Physics and Astronomy, SUNY at Stony Brook Oh, Se-Jung (Se-Jung Oh) - School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University Ohio State University, Fontana Corrosion Cente(hio State University, Fontana Corrosion Cent)er Okamoto, Koichi (Koichi Okamoto) - Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology

7

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

U V W X Y Z U V W X Y Z Tafreshi, Hooman Vahedi (Hooman Vahedi Tafreshi) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Commonwealth University Taillefer, Louis (Louis Taillefer) - Département de physique, Université de Sherbrooke Takada, Yasutami (Yasutami Takada) - Department of Physics, University of Tokyo Tal, Oren (Oren Tal) - Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman (Muhammad Anisuzzaman Talukder) - Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology Tan, Xiaobo (Xiaobo Tan) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University Tang, Ben Zhong (Ben Zhong Tang) - Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

8

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Padture, Nitin P. (Nitin P. Padture) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Ohio State University Paiella, Roberto (Roberto Paiella) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Boston University Paik Suh, Myunghyun (Myunghyun Paik Suh) - Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University Painter, Oskar (Oskar Painter) - Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technology Palevski, Alexander (Alexander Palevski) - School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University Pan, Xiaoqing (Xiaoqing Pan) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan Panagiotopoulos, Athanassios Z.(Athanassios Z.Panagiotopoulos).- Department of Chemical Engineering, Princeton University

9

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zabaras, Nicholas J. (Nicholas J. Zabaras) - Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University Zaccarelli, Emanuela (Emanuela Zaccarelli) - Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma "La Sapienza" Zachariah, Michael R. (Michael R. Zachariah) - Departments of Chemistry & Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota Zaidi, S. M. Javaid (S. M. Javaid Zaidi) - Department of Chemical Engineering, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Zarestky, Jerel (Jerel Zarestky) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Zbib, Hussein M. (Hussein M. Zbib) - School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University Zbigniew, Postawa (Postawa Zbigniew) - Instytut Fizyki, Uniwersytet Jagiellonski Zehnder, Alan (Alan Zehnder) - Department of Theoretical and Applied

10

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z MacDonald, Noel C. (Noel C. MacDonald) - Materials Department, University of California at Santa Barbara Maggs, Anthony (Anthony Maggs) - Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, École Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles Mahadevan, L. (L. Mahadevan) - School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University Mahmoodi, Hamid (Hamid Mahmoodi) - School of Engineering and Computer Science, San Francisco State University Majós, Antonio Badía (Antonio Badía Majós) - Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza Mallouk, Thomas E.(Thomas E.Mallouk).- Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Malovichko, Galina (Galina Malovichko) - Department of Physics, Montana State University

11

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Galbraith, Aysa Akad (Aysa Akad Galbraith) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University Gall, Daniel (Daniel Gall) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Gallas, Márcia Russman (Márcia Russman Gallas) - Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Gallivan, Martha A. (Martha A. Gallivan) - School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology Gangloff, Richard P. (Richard P. Gangloff) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia Gao, Hongjun (Hongjun Gao) - Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences Gao, Song (Song Gao) - College of Chemistry, Peking University

12

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

R S R S T U V W X Y Z Qi, Limin (Limin Qi) - College of Chemistry, Peking University Qiao, Pizhong (Pizhong Qiao) - Department of Civil Engineering, University of Akron Qin, Lu-Chang (Lu-Chang Qin) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Qin, Qinghua (Qinghua Qin) - College of Engineering and Computer Science, Australian National University Qin, Xiaorong (Xiaorong Qin) - Department of Physics, University of Guelph Qiu, XiaoHui (XiaoHui Qiu) - National Center for Nanoscience and Technology, China Quirion, Guy (Guy Quirion) - Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography, Memorial University of Newfoundland Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

13

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wadley, Haydn (Haydn Wadley) - Intelligent Processing of Materials Laboratory & Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Virginia Walker, Michael B. (Michael B. Walker) - Department of Physics, University of Toronto Wallin, Mats (Mats Wallin) - Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden Wallraff, Andreas (Andreas Wallraff) - Departement Physik, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ) Wan, Xin-hua (Xin-hua Wan) - Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University Wang, Deli (Deli Wang) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at San Diego Wang, Gwo-Ching (Gwo-Ching Wang) - Department of Physics, Applied

14

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kafesaki, Maria (Maria Kafesaki) - Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas Kanatzidis, Mercouri G (Mercouri G Kanatzidis) - Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University Kane, Charles (Charles Kane) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania Kanicki, Jerzy (Jerzy Kanicki) - Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan Kantor, Yacov (Yacov Kantor) - School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel Aviv University Kantorovich, Lev (Lev Kantorovich) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London Kapanidis, Achillefs N. (Achillefs N. Kapanidis) - Department of Physics, University of Oxford Kaplan, Ted (Ted Kaplan) - Computer Science and Mathematics

15

THE COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 and the cluster chemistry by the The nickel and platinumL. Muetterties Department of Chemistry, Lawrence Berkeleyphenomenon in metal surface chemistry. Ultra high vacuw:n

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND METAL COMPLEXES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecular coordination chemistry of CH3NC has been reported.features of this surface chemistry. ACKNOw"LEDGMENTS The1980 Catalysis~ COORDINATION CHEMISTRY OF METAL SURFACES AND

Muetterties, E.L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Surface chemistry driven actuation in nanoporous gold  

SciTech Connect

Although actuation in biological systems is exclusively powered by chemical energy, this concept has not been realized in man-made actuator technologies, as these rely on generating heat or electricity first. Here, we demonstrate that surface-chemistry driven actuation can be realized in high surface area materials such as nanoporous gold. For example, we achieve reversible strain amplitudes in the order of a few tenths of a percent by alternating exposure of nanoporous Au to ozone and carbon monoxide. The effect can be explained by adsorbate-induced changes of the surface stress, and can be used to convert chemical energy directly into a mechanical response thus opening the door to surface-chemistry driven actuator and sensor technologies.

Biener, J; Wittstock, A; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Biener, M M; Zielasek, V; Kramer, D; Viswanath, R N; Weissmuller, J; Baumer, M; Hamza, A V

2008-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

18

Chemistry of bimetallic and alloys surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have continued our work on elucidating the underlying principles that govern chemical reactions occurring on bimetallic and alloy surfaces. Our goal is to aid in the atomic level explanation of the reactivity and selectivity of alloy and bimetallic cluster catalysts and to provide a fundamental basis for the design of new catalysts with improved performance. Our approach is to use a battery of surface science methods to obtain fundamental data on the thermochemistry and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of molecules on extensively characterized, single-crystal bimetallic surfaces. We measure changes in chemisorption bond strength, adsorption site distributions, and hydrocarbon fragment stability and reactivity and correlate these results with the geometric and electronic structure of the metal atoms on the surface. Often, our aim is to carefully design experiments that isolate the several factors (e.g., ensemble and ligand effects) that control surface chemistry and catalysis on bimetallic and alloy surfaces in order to better understand the importance of each contribution. In the past 18 months, we have continued to study how alkali promoters strongly affect the reactions of hydrocarbons on Pt and Ni surfaces by altering the electronic structure and inducing significant site-blocking effects. We have shown that bismuth coadsorption provides benchmark data on ensemble sizes required for chemical reactions on Pt and Ni surfaces. Surface alloys of Sn/Pt are being used for detailed probing of ensemble sizes and also reactive site requirements. 22 refs.

Koel, B.E.

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

19

Probing surface chemistry using 'Operando' and 'Ultrafast' soft...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Probing surface chemistry using 'Operando' and 'Ultrafast' soft x-ray spectroscopies Wednesday, December 18, 2013 - 3:00pm SLAC, Redtail Hawk Conference Room 108A Hirohito...

20

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Chemistry Print Chemical science at the ALS encompasses a broad range of approaches and specializations, including surfaces/interfaces, catalysis, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, and physical chemistry. By one estimate, nearly 80% of all chemical reactions in nature and in human technology take place at boundaries between phases, i.e., at surfaces or interfaces. Atomic- and molecular-scale studies are needed to develop a thorough understanding of the relationships between surface properties and parameters relevant to potential applications and devices. Catalysts play a central role in processes relevant to energy, the environment, and biology. Researchers are working to develop cheaper and smarter catalysts that are fine tuned to accelerate reactions that, for example, drive fuel-refinement, sweep toxins from emissions, or convert starch to sugar.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Surface Chemistry: Ozone Reaction with Nicotine Sorbed to Model Materials Speaker(s): Hugo Destaillats Date: May 19, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 During this seminar,...

22

Interfacial Chemistry on Building Surfaces - Connections with...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

smoke", and their potential health effects. The second example illustrates how soiling and weathering of exterior building surfaces can lead to a significant loss of their...

23

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of this project is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. The nature of the adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecular-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

Marks, T.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Chemistry of bimetallic and alloy surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent research accomplishments included: a method for estimating surface reaction energetics, and application to ethylene decomposition on Pt(111); carbon Auger line shapes for adsorption/decomposition of ethylene on Ni(100) and C-C bonding in ''carbidic'' layers on metals; surface structure of Sn deposited on Pt(111) and Pt(100); chemisorption of CO, H[sub 2], O[sub 2] on ordered Sn/Pt(111) surface alloys; effects of K adatoms on H[sub 2] adsorption on Pt(111); effects of adsorbed K, O, and H on CO adsorption on Pt(111); hydrocarbon trapping, condensation on Pt(111); effects of C on cyclohexane dehydrogenation on Pt(111) surfaces; and SnPt(111) catalysis of benzene production from acetylene under uhv conditions.

Koel, B.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Density Functional Theory in Surface Chemistry and Catalysis  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in the understanding of reactivity trends for chemistry at transition metal surfaces have enabled in silico design of heterogeneous catalysts in a few cases. Current status of the field is discussed with an emphasis on the role of coupling between theory and experiment and future challenges.

Norskov, Jens

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

26

Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis (SEE) Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Activities: Research Activities: Electrocatalysis 1. Pt monolayer Electrocatalysts for O2 reduction: atomic-level synthesis, Electronic properties of Pt monolayers on single crystals and nanoparticles, Pt-support interactions; Structure-activity correlations; Pd alloy electrocatalysts; In situ spectroscopic studies of the O2 reduction intermediates; Kinetic analyses of the O2 reduction reaction. Pt monolayer cathode electrocatalyst structure activity stability fuel cell test 2. Pt submonolayer on Ru (PtRu20) Electrocatalysts: H2, CO and reformate H2 oxidation; Pt content is 1/10 of that in commercial catalysts, high CO tolerance; Oxidation of Methanol and Ethanol; Adsorbate-Surface Interactions. Pt submonolayer anode electrocatalyst The first Pt monolayer-level electrocatalyst

27

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Availability Technology Negotiable Licensing Insensitive Extrudable Explosive Express Licensing Metal aminoboranes Express Licensing Nanocrystalsol-gel...

28

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Express Licensing Energy Efficient Synthesis Of Boranes Express Licensing Fabrication Of Multilayered Thin Films Via Spin-Assembly Express Licensing...

29

Gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar cloud cores with a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to surface chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AIM: We have recently developed a microscopic Monte Carlo approach to study surface chemistry on interstellar grains and the morphology of ice mantles. The method is designed to eliminate the problems inherent in the rate-equation formalism to surface chemistry. Here we report the first use of this method in a chemical model of cold interstellar cloud cores that includes both gas-phase and surface chemistry. The surface chemical network consists of a small number of diffusive reactions that can produce molecular oxygen, water, carbon dioxide, formaldehyde, methanol and assorted radicals. METHOD: The simulation is started by running a gas-phase model including accretion onto grains but no surface chemistry or evaporation. The starting surface consists of either flat or rough olivine. We introduce the surface chemistry of the three species H, O and CO in an iterative manner using our stochastic technique. Under the conditions of the simulation, only atomic hydrogen can evaporate to a significant extent. Although it has little effect on other gas-phase species, the evaporation of atomic hydrogen changes its gas-phase abundance, which in turn changes the flux of atomic hydrogen onto grains. The effect on the surface chemistry is treated until convergence occurs. We neglect all non-thermal desorptive processes. RESULTS: We determine the mantle abundances of assorted molecules as a function of time through 2x10^5 yr. Our method also allows determination of the abundance of each molecule in specific monolayers. The mantle results can be compared with observations of water, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and methanol ices in the sources W33A and Elias 16. Other than a slight underproduction of mantle CO, our results are in very good agreement with observations.

Q. Chang; H. M. Cuppen; E. Herbst

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Industrial Chemistry Top Journals Journal of the American Chemical Society Angewandte Chemie & Angewandte Chemie, international edition in English Chemical Communications Chemical...

31

Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electron Source Breakthrough Research on Platinum-Nickel Alloys Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Catalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum...

32

Seventh BES (Basic Energy Sciences) catalysis and surface chemistry research conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research programs on catalysis and surface chemistry are presented. A total of fifty-seven topics are included. Areas of research include heterogeneous catalysis; catalysis in hydrogenation, desulfurization, gasification, and redox reactions; studies of surface properties and surface active sites; catalyst supports; chemical activation, deactivation; selectivity, chemical preparation; molecular structure studies; sorption and dissociation. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Surface Chemistry and Activity of SOFC Cathode Materials as Thin ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, the surface properties of oxides in SOFC conditions are poorly understood. To build correlations between surface characteristics and properties, films ...

34

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our program is to define those modes of interaction that take place between organometallic molecules and inorganic surfaces and, ultimately, to correlate various molecule-surface structures with catalytic properties.

Marks, T.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Photografting and the Control of Surface Chemistry in Three ...  

and could be monitored visually by fluorescence measurements following fluorescent labeling of the grafted ... efficient, and versatile surface functionalization. In

36

NREL: Research Participant Program - Research and Deployment Disciplines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research and Deployment Disciplines Research and Deployment Disciplines Participants in NREL programs are able to study a variety of disciplines within the Lab's research centers: National Bioenergy Center Biochemical engineering, microbiology, molecular biology, chemistry, and chemical engineering related to biomass and derived products. Energy Sciences Bioscience, chemical and materials science, computational science, physics, chemistry, and biological sciences. Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Physics, mechanical engineering (heat transfer emphasis), and architectural engineering. Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research Hydrogen technologies and analysis. Materials and Computational Sciences Center Physics, materials science, chemistry, electrical engineering, and basic and applied research using high-performance computing and applied

37

Electron induced surface chemistry at the Cs/sapphire interface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electron induced etching of sapphire in the presence of Cs has been studied using a variety of surface analytical techniques. We find that this process occurs on both the (0001) and (1102) orientations of sapphire. Monolayer amounts of Al and sub-oxides of Al are thermally desorbed from the surface at temperatures as low as 1000 K when the surface is irradiated with electrons in the presence of Cs. Etching is highly dependent on Cs coverage with the (0001) and (1102) surfaces requiring 2.0 {times} 10{sup 14} and 3.4 {times} 10{sup 14} atoms/cm{sup 2} to support etching, respectively. Adsorption profiles demonstrate that these coverages correspond to initial saturation of the surface with Cs. Electron damage of the surface in the absence of Cs also produces desorption of Al and sub-oxides of Al indicating a possible mechanism for etching. The impact of etching on the surface is to increase the adsorption capacity on the (0001) surface while decreasing both initial adsorption probability and capacity on the (1102) surface.

Zavadil, K.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ing, J.L. [AEA Technology, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis. Progress report, February 1, 1991--January 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The long-range goal of this project is to elucidate and understand the surface chemistry and catalytic properties of well-defined, highly-reactive organometallic molecules (principally based upon abundant actinide, lanthanide, and early transition elements) adsorbed on metal oxides and halides. The nature of the adsorbed species is probed by a battery of chemical and physicochemical techniques, to understand the nature of the molecular-surface coordination chemistry and how this can give rise to extremely high catalytic activity. A complementary objective is to delineate the scope and mechanisms of the heterogeneous catalytic reactions, as well as to relate them both conceptually and functionally to model systems generated in solution.

Marks, T.J.

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical modification of nanocrystal surfaces is fundamentally important to their assembly, their implementation in biology and medicine, and greatly impacts their electrical and optical properties. However, it remains a major challenge owing to a lack of analytical tools to directly determine nanoparticle surface structure. Early nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) studies of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (1) and tri-n-octylphosphine (2), suggested these coordinating solvents are datively bound to the particle surface. However, assigning the broad NMR resonances of surface-bound ligands is complicated by significant concentrations of phosphorus-containing impurities in commercial sources of 1, and XPS provides only limited information about the nature of the phosphorus containing molecules in the sample. More recent reports have shown the surface ligands of CdSe nanocrystals prepared in technical grade 1, and in the presence of alkylphosphonic acids, include phosphonic and phosphinic acids. These studies do not, however, distinguish whether these ligands are bound datively, as neutral, L-type ligands, or by X-type interaction of an anionic phosphonate/phosphinate moiety with a surface Cd{sup 2+} ion. Answering this question would help clarify why ligand exchange with such particles does not proceed generally as expected based on a L-type ligand model. By using reagents with reactive silicon-chalcogen and silicon-chlorine bonds to cleave the ligands from the nanocrystal surface, we show that our CdSe and CdSe/ZnS core-shell nanocrystal surfaces are likely terminated by X-type binding of alkylphosphonate ligands to a layer of Cd{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} ions, rather than by dative interactions. Further, we provide spectroscopic evidence that 1 and 2 are not coordinated to our purified nanocrystals.

Owen, Jonathan; Park, Jungwon; Trudeau, Paul-Emile; Alivisatos, A. Paul

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

40

Major Successes of Theory-and-Experiment-Combined Studies in Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Catalysis.  

SciTech Connect

Experimental discoveries followed by theoretical interpretations that pave the way of further advances by experimentalists is a developing pattern in modern surface chemistry and catalysis. The revolution of modern surface science started with the development of surface-sensitive techniques such as LEED, XPS, AES, ISS and SIMS, in which the close collaboration between experimentalists and theorists led to the quantitative determination of surface structure and composition. The experimental discovery of the chemical activity of surface defects and the trends in the reactivity of transitional metals followed by the explanations from the theoretical studies led to the molecular level understanding of active sites in catalysis. The molecular level knowledge, in turn, provided a guide for experiments to search for new generation of catalysts. These and many other examples of successes in experiment-and-theory-combined studies demonstrate the importance of the collaboration between experimentalists and theorists in the development of modern surface science.

Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

2009-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Correlation between surface chemistry and ion energy dependence of the etch yield in multicomponent oxides etching  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of surface chemistry in plasma etching of multicomponent oxides was investigated through measurements of the ion energy dependence of the etch yield. Using pulsed-laser-deposited Ca{sub x}Ba{sub (1-x)}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (CBN) and SrTiO{sub 3} thin films as examples, it was found that the etching energy threshold shifts toward values larger or smaller than the sputtering threshold depending on whether or not ion-assisted chemical etching is the dominant etching pathway and whether surface chemistry is enhancing or inhibiting desorption of the film atoms. In the case of CBN films etched in an inductively coupled Cl{sub 2} plasma, it is found that the chlorine uptake is inhibiting the etching reaction, with the desorption of nonvolatile NbCl{sub 2} and BaCl{sub 2} compounds being the rate-limiting step.

Berube, P.-M.; Poirier, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Stafford, L. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7 (Canada); Ndione, P. F.; Chaker, M.; Morandotti, R. [INRS-EMT, 1650 Boulevard Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec J3X 1S2 (Canada)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Title Chemistry of NOx on TiO2 surfaces studied by ambient pressure XPS: products, effect of UV irradiation, water and coadsorbed K+ Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Rosseler, Olivier, Mohamad Sleiman, Nahuel V. Montesinos, Andrey Shavorskiy, Valerie Keller, Nicolas Keller, Marta I. Litter, Hendrik Bluhm, Miquel Salmeron, and Hugo Destaillats Journal J. Phys. Chem. Lett. Volume 4 Start Page 536 Issue 3 Pagination 536-541 Date Published 01/2013 Abstract Self-cleaning surfaces containing TiO2 nanoparticles have been postulated to efficiently remove NOx from the atmosphere. However, UV irradiation of NOx adsorbed on TiO2 also was shown to form harmful gas-phase byproducts such as HONO and N2O that may limit their depolluting potential. Ambient pressure XPS was used to study surface and gas-phase species formed during adsorption of NO2 on TiO2 and subsequent UV irradiation at λ = 365 nm. It is shown here that NO3-, adsorbed on TiO2 as a byproduct of NO2 disproportionation, was quantitatively converted to surface NO2 and other reduced nitrogenated species under UV irradiation in the absence of moisture. When water vapor was present, a faster NO3- conversion occurred, leading to a net loss of surface-bound nitrogenated species. Strongly adsorbed NO3- in the vicinity of coadsorbed K+ cations was stable under UV light, leading to an efficient capture of nitrogenated compounds.

43

Chemistry of bimetallic and alloys surfaces. Progress report, June 1, 1990--November 30, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have continued our work on elucidating the underlying principles that govern chemical reactions occurring on bimetallic and alloy surfaces. Our goal is to aid in the atomic level explanation of the reactivity and selectivity of alloy and bimetallic cluster catalysts and to provide a fundamental basis for the design of new catalysts with improved performance. Our approach is to use a battery of surface science methods to obtain fundamental data on the thermochemistry and kinetics of the adsorption and reaction of molecules on extensively characterized, single-crystal bimetallic surfaces. We measure changes in chemisorption bond strength, adsorption site distributions, and hydrocarbon fragment stability and reactivity and correlate these results with the geometric and electronic structure of the metal atoms on the surface. Often, our aim is to carefully design experiments that isolate the several factors (e.g., ensemble and ligand effects) that control surface chemistry and catalysis on bimetallic and alloy surfaces in order to better understand the importance of each contribution. In the past 18 months, we have continued to study how alkali promoters strongly affect the reactions of hydrocarbons on Pt and Ni surfaces by altering the electronic structure and inducing significant site-blocking effects. We have shown that bismuth coadsorption provides benchmark data on ensemble sizes required for chemical reactions on Pt and Ni surfaces. Surface alloys of Sn/Pt are being used for detailed probing of ensemble sizes and also reactive site requirements. 22 refs.

Koel, B.E.

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

44

Effects of extreme pressure additive chemistry on rolling element bearing surface durability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lubricant additives have been known to affect rolling element bearing surface durability for many years. Tapered roller bearings were used in fatigue testing of lubricants formulated with gear oil type additive systems. These systems have sulfur- and phosphoruscontaining compounds used for gear protection as well as bearing lubrication. Several variations of a commercially available base additive formulation were tested having modified sulfur components. The variations represent a range of ''active'' extreme pressure (EP) chemistries. The bearing fatigue test results were compared with respect to EP formulation and test conditions. Inner ring near-surface material in selected test bearings was evaluated on two scales: the micrometer scale using optical metallography and the nanometer scale using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Focused-ion beam (FIB) techniques were used for TEM specimen preparation. Imaging and chemical analysis of the bearing samples revealed near-surface material and tribofilm characteristics. These results are discussed with respect to the relative fatigue lives.

Evans, Ryan D. [Timken Company; Nixon, H. P. [Timken Company; Darragh, Craig V. [Timken Company; Howe, Jane Y [ORNL; Coffey, Dorothy W [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Investigation of IAQ-Relevant Surface Chemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VOCs emitted by reactions of HVAC filters with ozone usingChemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials HugoChemistry and Emissions on HVAC Filter Materials Authors:

Destaillats, Hugo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The effect of mineral surface chemistry on the biodegradation of petroleum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The implementation of intrinsic bioremediation for the cleanup of petroleum contaminated subsurface sites requires an understanding of how mineral surface and organic matter sorption affects contaminant bioavailability. This experiment quantified the biodegradation of a crude oil in soils with different characteristics including mineral surface chemistry, organic matter content, and surface area in order to determine the impact of soil chemistry on bioavailability and biodegradability of petroleum. Two soils used in this study were; a Vertisol, dominated by the permanenty-charged phyllosilicate smectite,; and, an aquifer sand, dominated by pH-dependent charged iron oxides (1.8% Fe). The Vertisol is 62% clay, has an organic matter content of 1.5% and an external surface area of 52 m 2/g. The aquifer sand is 85% sand. has a very low organic matter content (0.02%) and an external surface area of 8 m2/g. Biodegradation of the light crude oil was quantified in flasks containing soil slurries that varied in soil type while controlling for soil surface area, soil-to sollution ratio, oil loading, microbial inoculation and environmental conditions. Duplicate flasks at two different surface areas (186 M2 and 372 m') were extracted at 0, 7, 21, 36, and 56 days and analyzed for specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), saturate hydrocarbons, gross composition of the extracted petroleum and heterotrophic plate counts. The results were compared to soil-free samples and uninoculated controls. A nutrient solution sorption study was performed to determine-nine the possible impact of nutrient sorption on the biodegradation of petroleum in the two soils. The overall extent of biodegradation was substantially greater in the sand treatments than in the Vertisol treatments after normalizing based on the amount of available surface area. The high surface area (372 M2) sand treatment degraded faster than the low surface area (186 M2) sand treatment whereas the opposite was true for the Vertisol. The observed differences in biodegradation between the two soils are the result of differences in organic contaminant bioavailability and microbial population dynamics. Differences in rnicropore structure, mineral surface sorption, and organic matter content are likely responsible for the differences in contaminant bioavailability and biodegradability.

Allan, Katherine Ann

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Assessment of Noble Metal Chemical Addition (NMCA) Effects on BWR Coolant Chemistry and Product Transport on Fuel Surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) provides protection of system materials from stress corrosion cracking and mitigates a radiation problem that results from the use of hydrogen water chemistry in boiling water reactors (BWRs), but NMCA has been associated with fuel surface spallation and enhanced Zircaloy corrosion. This report evaluates the effects of NMCA on the reactor water chemistry, explores possible mechanisms that may account for these effects, and recommends further research to further clarif...

2004-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Tuning the Surface Structure and Optical Properties of CdSe Clusters Using Coordination Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of nonstoichiometric CdSe clusters with lowest energy electronic absorptions between 409 and 420 nm has been prepared from cadmium 1-naphthoate, 2-naphthoate, 4-thiomethyl-1-naphthaote, and 1-naphthalene thiolate complexes and diphenylphosphine selenide (DPPSe). Pair distribution function analysis of X-ray diffraction data, ligand exchange experiments, and NMR molecular weight analyses suggest the nanocrystal core changes minimally among these clusters despite significant changes to their absorption and luminescence spectra. Photoluminescence excitation spectra obtained at 77 K reveal an energy transfer process between the surface-trapped excited state and the naphthalene-containing ligands that leads to ligand phosphorescence. A Dexter energy transfer mechanism is proposed to explain the observation of ligand phosphorescence on excitation of the cluster. These compounds demonstrate that cluster absorption and trap luminescence can be controlled with surface coordination chemistry.

Cossairt, Brandi M.; Juhas, Pavol; Billinge, Simon J.L.; Owen, Jonathan S. (Columbia)

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the greatest societal challenges over the next decade is the production of cheap, renewable energy for the 10 billion people that inhabit the earth. This will require the development of various energy sources which will likely include fuels derived from methane, coal, and biomass and alternatives sources such as solar, wind and nuclear energy. One approach will be to synthesize gasoline and other fuels from simpler hydrocarbons such as CO derived from methane or other U.S. based sources such as coal. Syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) can be readily converted into higher molecular weight hydrocarbons through Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch (FT) synthesis involves the adsorption and the activation of CO and H{sub 2}, the subsequent propagation steps including hydrogenation and carbon-carbon coupling, followed by chain termination reactions. The current commercial catalysts are supported Co and Co-alloys particles. This project set out with the following objectives in mind: (1) understand the reaction mechanisms that control FT kinetics, (2) predict how the intrinsic metal-adsorbate bond affects the sequence of elementary steps in FT, (3) establish the effects of the reaction environment on catalytic activity and selectivity, (4) construct a first-principles based algorithm that can incorporate the detailed atomic surface structure and simulate the kinetics for the myriad of elementary pathways that make up FT chemistry, and (5) suggest a set of optimal features such as alloy composition and spatial configuration, oxide support, distribution of defect sites. As part of this effort we devoted a significant portion of time to develop an ab initio based kinetic Monte Carlo simulation which can be used to follow FT surface chemistry over different transition metal and alloy surfaces defined by the user. Over the life of this program, we have used theory and have developed and applied stochastic Monte Carlo simulations in order to establish the fundamental catalytic processes that control FT synthesis, thus enabling us to accomplish the first 4 of these objectives. In addition, we were able to begin to suggest the design features of these materials, the final task of the proposed effort. The following report details the specific findings and proposes recommendations. The support from DOE NETL was used to fund a portion of a postdoctoral and a graduate student's salaries. The postdoctoral fellow (Dr. Qingfeng Ge) who was working on this project was hired as an Assistant Professor in chemistry at the Southern Illinois University.

Matthew Neurock

2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Effects of Surface Chemistry on the Properties of Proteins Confined in Nano-porous Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The entrapment of proteins using the sol-gel route provides a means to retain its native properties and artificially reproduce the molecular crowding and confinement experienced by proteins in the cell allowing investigation of the physico-chemical and structural properties of biomolecules at the biotic/abiotic interface. The biomolecules are spatially separated and 'caged' in the gel structure but solutes can freely permeate the matrix. Thus, properties such as the folding of ensembles of individual molecules can be examined in the absence of aggregation effects that can occur in solution studies. Green fluorescent protein from Aequorea coerulescens was used as a model protein to examine the unfolding/re-folding properties of protein in silica gels. The recombinant protein was isolated and purified from Escherichia coli extracts by cell lysis, three-phase partitioning, dialysis, and anion exchange chromatography. The purity of the protein was greater than 90% as judged by SDS PAGE gel analysis. Sol-gels were synthesized using tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) in combination with, methyltrimethoxyorthosilane (MTMOS), ethyltrimethoxyorthosilane (ETMOS), 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), and 3-glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS). The acid induced denaturation and renaturation of GFP was analyzed by UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies. No renaturation was observed in gels that were made with TMOS only, and in the presence of APTES, MTMOS, and ETMOS. However, in gels that were made with GPTMS, the CD and UV-visible spectra indicated that the protein had refolded. The fluorescence emission spectrum indicated that approximately 20% of fluorescence had returned. This study highlights the importance of the surface chemistry of the silica gels for the refolding properties of the entrapped GFP. Future studies will investigate the effect of surface chemistry on the thermal and solvent stability of the entrapped protein.

Garrett, Latasha M [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

A Comprehensive Study of Surface Chemistry for Application to Engine NOx Aftertreatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work focuses on developing a scientific understanding of the processes associated with NO{sub x} trap operation. NO{sub x} traps are the most advanced technology for achieving future emissions standards with diesel engines. Successful development of NO{sub x} traps will allow widespread use of diesel engines in light-duty vehicles, reducing oil imports by as much as 60%. Diesel engines have a high efficiency and low maintenance that makes them the ideal choice for transportation applications. Use of diesel engines in all light-duty vehicles would reduce oil consumption in the USA by 30% and oil imports by 60%, considerably improving our energy security. For heavy trucks, there is no viable alternative to diesel engines. Only diesel engines can provide the necessary high efficiency and long life. These benefits are offset by high emission of pollutants. Diesel engines have high emissions of NO{sub x} and particulate matter. Over the last 20 years, EPA has been reducing allowable emissions from diesel engines, and NO{sub x} emissions are scheduled to be cut by a factor of 10 over the next 7 years. The target NO{sub x} emissions for year 2010 is 0.20 g/hp-hr. This value is well below 1 g/hp-hr, which has been identified by one of the authors (Pitz [1]) as the minimum possible NO{sub x} emissions that can be obtained in a diesel engine with satisfactory combustion and without exhaust aftertreatment. An 80% efficient aftertreatment system is therefore necessary for achieving the 2010 NO{sub x} emissions regulation. Achieving this level of diesel aftertreatment efficiency is a daunting task, and one that will require a strong research effort. Manufacturing diesel after treatment systems with 80% efficiency for model year 2010 is an extremely difficult task. Our advanced analysis tools (computational chemistry linked with fluid mechanics and heat transfer) can be used to analyze and optimize NO{sub x} traps, which are the system of choice for diesel engine aftertreatment. NO{sub x} adsorbing catalysts operate by adsorbing the NO{sub x} in the exhaust stream during regular engine operation. After a period of time (1 minute), the catalyst saturates and has to be regenerated. Regeneration is achieved by injecting a reductant (typically fuel, although hydrogen or ammonia can also be used) into the catalyst. The adsorbed NO{sub x} desorbs under rich conditions, and then reacts with the reductant, producing molecular nitrogen, water and carbon dioxide. The regeneration cycle typically lasts about 2 seconds. After the regeneration cycle, the catalyst is ready for a new adsorption cycle. Intermittent regeneration of the catalytic surfaces is a complex process, and much of the basic science behind this process is not understood. Unsolved scientific problems include the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for surface chemistry; the analysis of sulfur poisoning of the catalyst surfaces and the phenomenon of thermal aging of the catalyst materials. The adsorption and regeneration processes are dependent on gaseous flow rate, surface chemical kinetics and converter geometry. A comprehensive study of this process is of great importance to achieve the desired system efficiency for NO{sub x} reduction. The possibilities and future market opportunities are enormous. This project supports the DOE mission by improving national security through reduced dependence on foreign oil. This work also provides an opportunity for enhancing our surface chemistry analysis capabilities, which have great applicability to missile reentry, fuel cells, and sensors for chemical warfare agents and explosives detection. In addition to this, we will help the US industry remain competitive and will help clean up the environment.

Aceves, S M; Piggot, T; Pitz, W; Mundy, C; Kuo, W; Havstad, M

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

52

Transition metal oxides deposited on rhodium and platinum: Surface chemistry and catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The surface chemistry and catalytic reactivity of transition metal oxides deposited on Rh and Pt substrates has been examined in order to establish the role of oxide-metal interactions in influencing catalytic activity. The oxides investigated included titanium oxide (TiOx), vanadium oxide (VOx), iron oxide (FeOx), zirconium oxide (ZrOx), niobium oxide (NbOx), tantalum oxide (TaOx), and tungsten oxide (WOx). The techniques used to characterize the sample included AES, XPS, LEED, TPD, ISS, and STM. After characterization of the surface in UHV, the sample was enclosed in an atmospheric reaction cell to measure the influence of the oxide deposits on the catalytic activity of the pure metal for CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation. The oxide deposits were found to strongly enhance the reactivity of the Rh foil. The rates of methane formation were promoted by up to 15 fold with the maximum in rate enhancement occurring at oxide coverages of approximately 0.5 ML. TiOx TaOx, and NbOx were the most effective promoters and were stable in the highest oxidation states during both reactions (compared to VOx, WOx, and FeOx). The trend in promoter effectiveness was attributed to the direct relationship between oxidation state and Lewis acidity. Bonding at the metal oxide/metal interface between the oxygen end of adsorbed CO and the Lewis acidic oxide was postulated to facilitate C-O bond dissociation and subsequent hydrogenation. 192 refs.

Boffa, A.B. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Materials Sciences Div.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Surface chemistry of coated lithium manganese nickel oxide thin film cathodes studied by XPS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of coating high voltage LiMn1.5Ni0.5O4 spinel cathode thin films with three metal oxide thin layers is discussed. The changes in surface chemistry of the electrodes are measured by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. ZnO is found to decompose during the first charge whereas Al2O3 and ZrO2 are stable for more than 100 cycles. ZrO2, however, importantly limits the available Li storage capacity of the electrochemical reaction due to poorer kinetics. Al2O3 offers the best results in term of capacity retention. Upon cycling, the evidence of a signal at 75.4 eV in the Al2p binding energy spectrum indicates the partial conversion of Al2O3 into Al2O2F2. Moreover, the continuous formation of PEO , esters and LixPOyFz compounds on the surface of the electrodes is found for all coating materials.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL; Dudney, Nancy J [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Correlation between surface chemistry, density and band gap in nanocrystalline WO3 thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline WO3 thin films were produced by sputter-deposition by varying the ratio of argon to oxygen in the reactive gas mixture during deposition. The surface chemistry, physical characteristics, and optical properties of nanocrystalline WO3 films were evaluated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and spectrophotometric measurements. The effect of ultra-microstructure was significant on the optical properties of WO3 films. The XPS analyses indicate the formation of stoichiometric WO3 with tungsten existing in fully oxidized valence state (W6+). However, WO3 films grown at high oxygen concentration (>60%) in the sputtering gas mixture were over stoichiometric with excess oxygen. XRR simulations, which are based on isotropic WO3 film - SiO2 interface - Si substrate model, indicate that the density of WO3 films is sensitive to the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The spectral transmission of the films increased with the increasing oxygen. The band gap of these films increases from 2.78 eV to 3.25 eV with increasing oxygen. A direct correlation between the film-density and band gap in nanocrystalline WO3 films is established based on the observed results.

Vemuri, Venkata Rama Ses; Engelhard, Mark H.; Ramana, C.V.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Thermal chemistry of copper(I)-N,N '-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The surface chemistry of copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate on Cu(110) single-crystal surfaces has been characterized under ultrahigh vacuum by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A series of thermal stepwise conversions were identified, starting with the partial dissociative adsorption of the copper acetamidinate dimers into a mixture of monomers and dimers on the surface. An early dissociation of a C-N bond leads to the production of N-sec-butylacetamidine, which is detected in TPD experiments in three temperature regimes, the last one centered around 480 K. Butene, and a small amount of butane, is also detected above approximately 500 K, and hydrogen production, an indication of dehydrogenation of surface fragments, is observed at 460, 550 and 670 K. In total, only about 10% of the initial copper(I)-N,N'-di-sec-butylacetamidinate adsorbed monolayer decomposes, and only about {approx}3% of carbon is left behind on the surface after heating to high temperatures. The implications of this surface chemistry to the design of chemical film growth processes using copper acetamidinates as precursors are discussed.

Ma Qiang; Zaera, Francisco; Gordon, Roy G. [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Browse by Discipline -- Subject Pathways for the E-print Network -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Browse by Discipline These pages contain links to thousands of servers, sites, and documents contributed by individual authors that contain e-print information in discipline areas of interest to the Department of Energy's research activities. These resources are organized into discipline-specific categories as indicated below. To view these resources and sites, simply select a discipline, browse the entries listed in alphabetical order, and click on any entry to leave the discipline you selected and enter a specific website. Use the "Back" button to return to the E-print Discipline you exited from. Biology and Medicine Biotechnology Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Chemistry Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Engineering Environmental Management and Restoration Technologies

57

Surface Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Supported Zerovalent Iron Nanoparticles in the Remediation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tanks at the Hanford Site in Washington state, a Department of Energy nuclear weapons production for Creative Work in Fluorine Chemistry. He is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement processes in aqueous systems, and new experimental techniques make it possible to probe these frame- works

58

Discipline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... In this way, a positive model is provided for ... Protect the rights of the child and others ... aggressive behavior, such as walking away, ignoring, working ...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

59

Supported organometallic complexes: Surface chemistry, spectroscopy, and catalysis. Progress report, March 15, 1988--July 14, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of our program is to define those modes of interaction that take place between organometallic molecules and inorganic surfaces and, ultimately, to correlate various molecule-surface structures with catalytic properties.

Marks, T.J.

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

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E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro (Giacomo Mauro D'Ariano) - Istituto Nazionale di Fisicadella Materia & Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita' di Pavia Dahlberg, E. Dan (E. Dan Dahlberg) - School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota Dai, Pengcheng (Pengcheng Dai) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee Dal Corso, Andrea (Andrea Dal Corso) - Condensed Matter Sector, Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA) Dal Corso, Francesco (Francesco Dal Corso) - Department of Mechanical and Structural Engineering, Università di Trento Dalal, Vikram (Vikram Dalal) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, Blanche (Blanche Dalloz-Dubrujeaud) - Polytech

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E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Eades, Alwyn (Alwyn Eades) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Lehigh University Eagar, Thomas W. (Thomas W. Eagar) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Economou, Demetre J. (Demetre J. Economou) - Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Houston Edwards, Sam (Sam Edwards) - Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge Ehrman, Sheryl H. (Sheryl H. Ehrman) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park Einstein, Theodore L. (Theodore L. Einstein) - Department of Physics, University of Maryland at College Park Eisenberg, Eli (Eli Eisenberg) - School of Physics and Astronomy,

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K L M N O P Q R S K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Jacobs, Heiko O. (Heiko O. Jacobs) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Minnesota Jaeger, Heinrich M. (Heinrich M. Jaeger) - Department of Physics, University of Chicago Jakli, Antal (Antal Jakli) - Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University Jalali. Bahram (UniJalali. Bahram - Electrical Engineering Department) - Electrical Engineering Department, University of California at Los Angeles Jaszczak, John A. (John A. Jaszczak) - Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University Javey, Ali (Ali Javey) - Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley Jayaraman, Arthi (Arthi Jayaraman) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Bachtold, Adrian (Adrian Bachtold) - Centro de investigación en nanociencia y nanotecnología CIN2, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona Balandin, Alexander(AlexanderBalandin)r- Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California at Riverside Bales, Barney (Barney Bales) - Center for Supramolecular Studies & Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Northridge Ballarini, Roberto (Roberto Ballarini) - Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota Balmain, Keith G. (Keith G. Balmain) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Toronto Balzar, Davor (Davor Balzar) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Denver

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D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Cabral, Marco (Marco Cabral) - Instituto de Matemática, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro Çagin, Tahir (Tahir Çagin) - Materials and Process Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology Cahay, Marc (Marc Cahay) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Cincinnati Cahill, David G. (David G. Cahill) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Cai, Wei (Wei Cai) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University Caldarelli, Guido (Guido Caldarelli) - Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Roma "La Sapienza" Camesano, Terri (Terri Camesano) - Department of Chemical Engineering, Worcester Polytechnic Institute

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G H I J K L M N O P Q R S G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Fahmy, Tarek (Tarek Fahmy) - Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University Faidley, LeAnn (LeAnn Faidley) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iowa State University Fair, Richard (Richard Fair) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University Falcon, Eric (Eric Falcon) - Laboratoire de Physique, Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot Falcon, Eric (Eric Falcon) - Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes, Université Paris 7 - Denis Diderot Faller, Roland (Roland Faller) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis Fatemi, Ali (Ali Fatemi) - Department of Mechanical, Industrial and

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I J K L M N O P Q R S I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Haas, Stephan (Stephan Haas) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southern California Hague, Jim (Jim Hague) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Open University Hall, Christopher (Christopher Hall) - Centre for Materials Science and Engineering, University of Edinburgh Halloran, John (John Halloran) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan Ham, Donhee (Donhee Ham) - Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University Hammel, Chris (Chris Hammel) - Condensed Matter and Thermal Physics, Los Alamos National Laboratory Hammerstrom, Dan (Dan Hammerstrom) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Portland State University

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L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z LaBean, Thomas H. (Thomas H. LaBean) - Department of Computer Science, Duke University Lacoste, David (David Lacoste) - Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie Théorique, École Supérieure de Physique et Chimie Industrielles Lai, S.K. Department of Physics, National Central Universit(ai, S.K. Department of Physics, National Central Universi)ty Lakes, Roderic (Roderic Lakes) - Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin at Madison Lakhtakia, Akhlesh (Akhlesh Lakhtakia) - Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, Pennsylvania State University Landis, Chad M.(Chad M.Landis).- Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Texas at Austin Landman, Uzi (Uzi Landman) - School of Physics, Georgia Institute of

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O P Q R S O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Nadgorny, Boris (Boris Nadgorny) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Wayne State University Nadgorny, Edward M.(Edward M.Nadgorny).- Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University Nair, Sankar (Sankar Nair) - School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology Nairn, John A. (John A. Nairn) - Department of Wood Science and Engineering, Oregon State University Nakamura, Toshio (Toshio Nakamura) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, SUNY at Stony Brook Narayan, Jagdish (Jagdish Narayan) - Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University Narayan, Ramani (Ramani Narayan) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Michigan State University

69

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

J K L M N O P Q R S J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Iba, Yukito (Yukito Iba) - Institute of Statistical Mathematics (Japan) Ichiki, Kengo (Kengo Ichiki) - National Institute for Nanotechnology & Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alberta Idzerda, Yves (Yves Idzerda) - Magnetic Nanostructure Growth and Characterization Facility & Department of Physics, Montana State University Iglesia, Enrique (Enrique Iglesia) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Iglesias, José Roberto (José Roberto Iglesias) - Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul Ihn, Thomas (Thomas Ihn) - Departement Physik, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ) Imamoglu, Atac (Atac Imamoglu) - Departement Physik, Eidgenössische

70

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W X Y Z W X Y Z Vahala, Kerry J. -Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technolog(ahala, Kerry J. -Department of Applied Physics and Materials Science, California Institute of Technolo)gy Vakni, David (David Vakni) - Ames Laboratory van de Walle, Axel (Axel van de Walle) - Division of Engineering, Brown University van der Wal, Caspar H. (Caspar H. van der Wal) - Zernike Institute for Advanced Materials & Department of Physics, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen Van Driel, Henry M. (Henry M. Van Driel) - Department of Physics, University of Toronto van Duin, Adri (Adri van Duin) - Materials and Molecules Simulation Center, California Institute of Technology Van Harlingen, Dale J. (Dale J. Van Harlingen) - Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

71

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Materials Science Materials Science Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abécassis, Benjamin (Benjamin Abécassis) - Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université de Paris-Sud 11 Ackland, Graeme (Graeme Ackland) - Centre for Materials Science and Engineering & School of Physics, University of Edinburgh Adams, James B (James B Adams) - Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, Arizona State University Adams, Philip W. (Philip W. Adams) - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University Adeyeye, Adekunle (Adekunle Adeyeye) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National University of Singapore Agrawal, Dinesh (Dinesh Agrawal) - Microwave Processing and

72

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware Xiong, Qihua (Qihua Xiong) - Schools of Electrical and Electronic Engineering & Physical and Mathematical Sciences,Nanyang...

73

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Chemistry...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Ugalde, Jesus M. (Jesus M. Ugalde) - Polymer Science and Technology Department, University of the Basque Country Umantsev, Alexander (Alexander Umantsev) - Department of Natural...

74

TEOS-based SiO{sub 2} chemical vapor deposition: Reaction kinetics and related surface chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a comprehensive understanding of thermal TEOS (tetracthylorthosificate, Si(OCH{sub 2}CH{sub 3}){sub 4}) surface chemistry at CVD (chemical vapor deposition) temperatures and pressures. This was accomplished by examining how TEOS reaction rate are influenced by factors critical to the heterogeneous reaction. This includes determining the TEOS pressure dependence, testing if reaction by-products inhibit TEOS decomposition, identifying reaction sites on the surface, and establishing the reaction sites coverage dependencies. We evaluated the pressure dependencies and by-product inhibition with GCMS. The experiments in a cold-wall research reactor revealed that the TEOS surface reaction at 1000K (1) was first-order with respect to TEOS pressure (0.10 to 1.50Torr) and (2) was not inhibited by surface reaction by-products (ethylene, ethanol, and water). Reactivities of surface sites and their coverage dependencies were compared with FTIR. Our experiments demonstrated that two-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 2}) rings on the SiO{sub 2} surface were consumed almost instantaneously when exposed to TEOS. Our FTIR experiments also revealed that TEOS decomposition was zero-order with respect to coverages of hydroxyl groups and (by indirect evidence) three-membered siloxane ((Si-O){sub 3}) rings. This type of site-independent reactivity is consistent with TEOS reacting with hydroxyl groups and (Si-O){sub 3} rings via a common rate-determining step at 1000K. With respect to deposition uniformity, our results predict that deposition rates will be insensitive to the relative coverages of (Si-O){sub 3} rings and hydroxyls on SiO{sub 2} as well as the re-adsorbed by-products of the surface reaction. Therefore, it is likely that nonuniform SiO{sub 2} depositions from TEOS reactions are due to depletion of TEOS in the gas-phase and/or thermal gradients.

Bartram, M.E.; Moffat, H.K.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Stability of carbon fiber surface chemistry under temperature and its influence on interfacial adhesion with polymer matrices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The thermal stability of the surface chemistry of a surface treated carbon fiber was investigated by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Within a range of temperatures from room temperature to 400 C, the only surface functionalities that decomposed were carboxylic acids and dangling nitrogen containing functionalities like amines, amides or nitriles. Significant amounts of water were desorbed as well. This study enabled the testing of the coherence our the fitting of the C(1s), O(1s) and N(1s) peaks. Particularly, when considering the fitting of in the O(1s) peak, carboxylic acids were shown to be included in a single component peak centered at a binding energy of 532.1 eV. The reaction of the carbon fiber surface and an acrylate resin at high temperature, because of the decomposition of carboxylic acids, was highlighted by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. The thermal history of the composite material during its manufacture appeared to be a major influence on the nature of the interactions generated at the fiber-matrix interface and the resulting mechanical properties.

Vautard, Frederic [ORNL; Grappe, Hippolyte A [ORNL; Ozcan, Soydan [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Chemistry of bimetallic and alloy surfaces. Progress report, June 1, 1990--September 11, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent research accomplishments included: a method for estimating surface reaction energetics, and application to ethylene decomposition on Pt(111); carbon Auger line shapes for adsorption/decomposition of ethylene on Ni(100) and C-C bonding in ``carbidic`` layers on metals; surface structure of Sn deposited on Pt(111) and Pt(100); chemisorption of CO, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} on ordered Sn/Pt(111) surface alloys; effects of K adatoms on H{sub 2} adsorption on Pt(111); effects of adsorbed K, O, and H on CO adsorption on Pt(111); hydrocarbon trapping, condensation on Pt(111); effects of C on cyclohexane dehydrogenation on Pt(111) surfaces; and SnPt(111) catalysis of benzene production from acetylene under uhv conditions.

Koel, B.E.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

77

Antireflection and SiO2 Surface Passivation by Liquid-Phase Chemistry for Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report solar cells with both black Si antireflection and SiO2 surface passivation provided by inexpensive liquid-phase chemistry, rather than by conventional vacuum-based techniques. Preliminary cell efficiency has reached 16.4%. Nanoporous black Si antireflection on crystalline Si by aqueous etching promises low surface reflection for high photon utilization, together with lower manufacturing cost compared to vacuum-based antireflection coating. Ag-nanoparticle-assisted black Si etching and post-etching chemical treatment recently developed at NREL enables excellent control over the pore diameter and pore separation. Performance of black Si solar cells, including open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and blue response, has benefited from these improvements. Prior to this study, our black Si solar cells were all passivated by thermal SiO2 produced in tube furnaces. Although this passivation is effective, it is not yet ideal for ultra-low-cost manufacturing. In this study, we report, for the first time, the integration of black Si with a proprietary liquid-phase deposition (LPD) passivation from Natcore Technology. The Natcore LPD forms a layer of <10-nm SiO2 on top of the black Si surface in a relatively mild chemical bath at room temperature. We demonstrate black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 with a spectrum-weighted average reflection lower than 5%, similar to the more costly thermally grown SiO2 approach. However, LPD SiO2 provides somewhat better surface-passivation quality according to the lifetime analysis by the photo-conductivity decay measurement. Moreover, black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 passivation exhibit higher spectral response at short wavelength compared to those passivated by thermally grown SiO2. With further optimization, the combination of aqueous black Si etching and LPD could provide a pathway for low-cost, high-efficiency crystalline Si solar cells.

Yuan, H. C.; Oh, J.; Zhang, Y.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Flood, D. J.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One of the greatest societal challenges over the next decade is the production of cheap, renewable energy for the 10 billion people that inhabit the earth. This will require the development of various different energy sources potentially including fuels derived from methane, coal, and biomass and alternatives sources such as solar, wind and nuclear energy. One approach will be to synthesize gasoline and other fuels from simpler hydrocarbons such as CO derived from methane or other U.S. based sources such as coal. Syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) can be readily converted into higher molecular weight hydrocarbons through Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis involves the initiation or activation of CO and H{sub 2} bonds, the subsequent propagation steps including hydrogenation and carbon-carbon coupling, followed by chain termination reactions. Commercially viable catalysts include supported Co and Co-alloys. Over the first two years of this project we have used ab initio methods to determine the adsorption energies for all reactants, intermediates, and products along with the overall reaction energies and their corresponding activation barriers over the Co(0001) surface. Over the third year of the project we developed and advanced an ab initio-based kinetic Monte Carlo simulation code to simulate Fischer Tropsch synthesis. This report details our work over the last year which has focused on the derivation of kinetic parameters for the elementary steps involved in FT synthesis from ab initio density functional theoretical calculations and the application of the kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm to simulate the initial rates of reaction for FT over the ideal Co(0001) surface. The results from our simulations over Co(0001) indicate the importance of stepped surfaces for the activation of adsorbed CO. In addition, they demonstrate that the dominant CH{sub x}* surface intermediate under steady state conditions is CH*. This strongly suggests that hydrocarbon coupling occurs through reaction with the adsorbed CH*.

Matthew Neurock; David A. Walthall

2006-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Coupling between bulk- and surface chemistry in suspensions of charged colloids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionic composition and pair-correlations in fluid phases of realistically salt-free charged colloidal sphere suspensions are calculated in the primitive model. We obtain the number densities of all ionic species in suspension, including low-molecular weight microions, and spherical colloidal macroions with acidic surface groups, from a self-consistent solution of a coupled physicochemical set of nonlinear algebraic equations and liquid integral equations. Here, we study suspensions of colloidal spheres with sulfate or silanol surface groups, suspended in demineralized water that is saturated with carbon dioxide under standard atmosphere. The equilibrium densities of all ionic species are coupled via the concentration of hydronium (H3O+) ions, and the only input required for our theoretical scheme are the acidic dissociation constants pKa, and effective sphere diameters of all involved ions. Our method allows for an ab initio calculation of colloidal bare charges and effective charges, at high numerical efficiency. In suspensions with highly charged colloidal spheres, the mean ion densities depend strongly on the distance from the colloidal particles surfaces, resulting in local variations of the pH-value on the sub-micrometer length scale. On the same length scale, our theoretical scheme predicts local deviations from the bulk phase mass-action balances for ion association and dissociation.

Marco Heinen; Thomas Palberg; Hartmut Löwen

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

80

An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the US seeks to develop an energy strategy that reduces the reliance on foreign oil, there is a renewed interest in the research and development of the Fischer Tropsch synthesis for converting syngas into long chain hydrocarbon products. This report investigates some of the basic elementary steps for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over ideal Pt, Ru and carbon-covered Pt and Ru metal surfaces by using ab initio density functional theoretical calculations. We examine in detail the adsorption sites as well as the binding energies for C, CH, CH{sub 2}, CH3 and CH4 on Pt(111), Ru(0001), 2x2-C-Pt(111) and 2x2-C-Ru(0001). The results indicate that the binding energies increase with decreasing the hydrogen in the fragment molecule, i.e. CH{sub 4} < CH{sub 3} < CH{sub 2} < CH < C. More specifically the work analyzes the elementary steps involved in the activation of methane. This is simply the reverse set of steps necessary for the hydrogenation of C to CH{sub 4}. The results indicate that these hydrocarbon intermediates bind more strongly to Ru than Pt. The introduction of co-adsorbed carbon atoms onto both Ru(0001) as well as Pt(111) significantly increased the overall energies as well as the activation barriers for C-H bond activation. The results suggest that Ru may be so active that it initially can initially activate CH4 into CH or C but ultimately it dies because the CH and C intermediates poison the surface and thus kill its activity. Methane can dissociate on Pt but subsequent hydrocarbon coupling reactions act to remove the surface carbon.

Matthew Neurock; Siddharth Chopra

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The surface chemistry of Cu in the presence of CO2 and H2O  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical nature of copper and copper oxide (Cu{sub 2}O) surfaces in the presence of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O at room temperature was investigated using ambient pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The studies reveal that in the presence of 0.1 torr CO{sub 2} several species form on the initially clean Cu, including carbonate CO{sub 3}{sup 2}, CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} and C{sup 0}, while no modifications occur on an oxidized surface. The addition of 0.1 ML Zn to the Cu results in the complete conversion of CO{sub 2}{sup {delta}-} to carbonate. In a mixture of 0.1 torr H{sub 2}O and 0.1 torr CO{sub 2}, new species are formed, including hydroxyl, formate and methoxy, with H{sub 2}O providing the hydrogen needed for the formation of hydrogenated species.

Deng, Xingyi; Verdaguer, Albert; Herranz, Tirma; Weis, Christoph; Bluhm, Hendrik; Salmeron, Miquel

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

82

Antireflection and SiO2 Surface Passivation by Liquid-Phase Chemistry for Efficient Black Silicon Solar Cells: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report solar cells with both black Si antireflection and SiO2 surface passivation provided by inexpensive liquid-phase chemistry, rather than by conventional vacuum-based techniques. Preliminary cell efficiency has reached 16.4%. Nanoporous black Si antireflection on crystalline Si by aqueous etching promises low surface reflection for high photon utilization, together with lower manufacturing cost compared to vacuum-based antireflection coating. Ag-nanoparticle-assisted black Si etching and post-etching chemical treatment recently developed at NREL enables excellent control over the pore diameter and pore separation. Performance of black Si solar cells, including open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, and blue response, has benefited from these improvements. Prior to this study, our black Si solar cells were all passivated by thermal SiO2 produced in tube furnaces. Although this passivation is effective, it is not yet ideal for ultra-low-cost manufacturing. In this study, we report, for the first time, the integration of black Si with a proprietary liquid-phase deposition (LPD) passivation from Natcore Technology. The Natcore LPD forms a layer of solar cells with LPD SiO2 with a spectrum-weighted average reflection lower than 5%, similar to the more costly thermally grown SiO2 approach. However, LPD SiO2 provides somewhat better surface-passivation quality according to the lifetime analysis by the photo-conductivity decay measurement. Moreover, black Si solar cells with LPD SiO2 passivation exhibit higher spectral response at short wavelength compared to those passivated by thermally grown SiO2. With further optimization, the combination of aqueous black Si etching and LPD could provide a pathway for low-cost, high-efficiency crystalline Si solar cells.

Yuan, H. C.; Oh, J.; Zhang, Y.; Kuznetsov, O. A.; Flood, D. J.; Branz, H. M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NERSC HPSS Storage by Scientific Discipline  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage by Scientific Discipline Troubleshooting Optimizing IO performance on the Lustre file system IO Formats Science Databases Sharing Data Transferring Data Unix Groups at...

84

Discipline Policies, Successful Schools, and Racial Justice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

January). How can we improve school discipline? Educationaldisproportionality in school punishment. Urban Review, 34,Eds. ). Preventing School Violence, in Zero Tolerance:

Losen, Daniel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Disciplines | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to NIST standards in these 29 measurement disciplines. Dimensional Angular: Angle Blocks, Optical Polygons, Rotary and Indexing Tables, Optical Wedges, Autocollimators...

86

SC e-journals, Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Chemistry Chemistry Accounts of Chemical Research Accreditation and Quality Assurance ACS Chemical Biology ACS Nano Acta Biotheoretica Acta Materialia Acta Neuropathologica Adsorption Advanced Engineering Materials Advances in Physical Chemistry - OAJ AlChE Journal Amino Acids Analyst Analytica Chimica Acta Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry Analytical Biochemistry Analytical Chemistry Analytical Sciences - OAJ Angewandte Chemie - International Edition Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Annual Review of Biochemistry Annual Review of Biophysics Annual Review of Materials Research Annual Review of Physical Chemistry Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy Applied Geochemistry Applied Radiation and Isotopes Applied Surface Science Applied Thermal Engineering Aquatic Geochemistry

87

Aspects of nitrogen surface chemistry relevant to TiN chemical vapor deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NH{sub 3} is an important component of many chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processes for TiN films, which are used for diffusion barriers and other applications in microelectronic circuits. In this study, the interaction of NH{sub 3} with TiN surfaces is examined with temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and Auger electron spectroscopy. NH{sub 3} has two adsorption states on TiN: a chemisorbed state and a multilayer state. A new method for analyzing TPD spectra in systems with slow pumping speeds yields activation energies for desorption for the two states of 24 kcal/mol and 7.3 kcal/mol, respectively. The sticking probability into the chemisorption state is {approximately}0.06. These results are discussed in the context of TiN CVD. In addition, the high temperature stability of TiN is investigated. TiN decomposes to its elements only after heating to 1300 K, showing that decomposition is unlikely to occur under CVD conditions.

Schulberg, M.T.; Allendorf, M.D.; Outka, D.A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

An Ab Initio Approach Towards Engineering Fischer-Tropsch Surface Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As petroleum prices continue to rise and the United States seeks to reduce its dependency on foreign oil, there is a renewed interest in the research and development of more efficient and alternative energy sources, such as fuel cells. One approach is to utilize processes that can produce long-chain hydrocarbons from other sources. One such reaction is Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is a process by which syngas (CO and H{sub 2}) is converted to higher molecular weight hydrocarbons. The reaction involves a complex set of bond-breaking and bond-making reactions, such as CO and H{sub 2} activation, hydrocarbon hydrogenation reactions, and hydrocarbon coupling reactions. This report details our initial construction of an ab initio based kinetic Monte Carlo code that can be used to begin to simulate Fischer-Tropsch synthesis over model Co(0001) surfaces. The code is based on a stochastic kinetic formalism that allows us to explicitly track the transformation of all reactants, intermediates and products. The intrinsic kinetics for the simulations were derived from the ab initio results that we reported in previous year summaries.

Matthew Neurock

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Sindo N´u~nez-Queija based on joint ITC´u~nez-Queija CWI & TU/e #12;Heavy Tails: Performance Models and Scheduling Disciplines Part I ­ Introduction and Methodology Tales to tell: · traffic measurements and statistical analysis · traffic modeling · heavy

Núñez-Queija, Rudesindo

90

CLUSTER CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry, 11 Wiley Huetterties and C. M.Submitted to the Journal of Organometallic ChemistryCLUSTER CHEMISTRY Earl L. Muetterties TWO-WEEK LOAN COPY May

Muetterties, Earl L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Actinide Chemistry Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise David Gallimore Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Rebecca Chamberlin Actinide Analytical Chemistry Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email Along with the lanthanides, they are often called "the f-elements" because they have valence electrons in the f shell. Actinide chemistry serves a critical role in addressing global threats Project Description At Los Alamos, scientists are using actinide analytical chemistry to identify and quantify the chemical and isotopic composition of materials. Since the Manhattan Project, such work has supported the Laboratory's

92

A UNIFIED MONTE CARLO TREATMENT OF GAS-GRAIN CHEMISTRY FOR LARGE REACTION NETWORKS. II. A MULTIPHASE GAS-SURFACE-LAYERED BULK MODEL  

SciTech Connect

The observed gas-phase molecular inventory of hot cores is believed to be significantly impacted by the products of chemistry in interstellar ices. In this study, we report the construction of a full macroscopic Monte Carlo model of both the gas-phase chemistry and the chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. Our model treats icy grain mantles in a layer-by-layer manner, which incorporates laboratory data on ice desorption correctly. The ice treatment includes a distinction between a reactive ice surface and an inert bulk. The treatment also distinguishes between zeroth- and first-order desorption, and includes the entrapment of volatile species in more refractory ice mantles. We apply the model to the investigation of the chemistry in hot cores, in which a thick ice mantle built up during the previous cold phase of protostellar evolution undergoes surface reactions and is eventually evaporated. For the first time, the impact of a detailed multilayer approach to grain mantle formation on the warm-up chemistry is explored. The use of a multilayer ice structure has a mixed impact on the abundances of organic species formed during the warm-up phase. For example, the abundance of gaseous HCOOCH{sub 3} is lower in the multilayer model than in previous grain models that do not distinguish between layers (so-called two phase models). Other gaseous organic species formed in the warm-up phase are affected slightly. Finally, we find that the entrapment of volatile species in water ice can explain the two-jump behavior of H{sub 2}CO previously found in observations of protostars.

Vasyunin, A. I. [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States); Herbst, Eric, E-mail: anton.vasyunin@gmail.com, E-mail: eh2ef@virginia.edu [Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy, and Physics, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)] [Departments of Chemistry, Astronomy, and Physics, The University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. Nuclear Analytical Chemistry Portal. ... see all Nuclear Analytical Chemistry news ... ...

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Engineering Fundamentals - Chemistry, Version 3.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry module of Engineering Fundamentals is intended to provide a basic overview of this topic for individuals, from all engineering disciplines, beginning their career in the nuclear power industry.The Chemistry module covers basic terms and concepts as well as their applications in nuclear power plants. This course will help new engineers understand some of the basic processes and equipment that are critical to the operation of nuclear power plants, how their job might affect ...

2012-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

95

NWChem and Actinide Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION ACTINIDE CHEMISTRY MEETS COMPUTATION Capturing how contaminants migrate across groundwater-surface water inter- faces is a challenge that researchers at the Department of Energy's EMSL-the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory-are rising to. This challenge, a top priority for waste cleanup efforts at the Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, and other parts of the DOE weapons complex, is being addressed using NWChem, a computational chemistry package developed at EMSL that is designed to run on high-performance parallel supercomputers, such as EMSL's Chinook. NWChem is enabling breakthrough discoveries in actinide behavior and chemistry, in part because it allows researchers to accurately model the dynamical formation, speciation, and redox chemistry of actinide complexes in realistic complex mo-

96

Medicinal chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medicinal chemistry Name: Jason A Stamm Age: NA Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I am a senior chemistry major interested in going to grad school, specifically for...

97

Final Technical Report for DOE Grant, number DE-FG02-05ER15701; Probing Surface Chemistry Under Catalytic Conditions: Olefin Hydrogenation,Cyclization and Functionalization.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specific goal of this work was to understanding the catalytic reactions pathways for the synthesis of vinyl acetate over Pd, Au and PdAu alloys. A combination of both experimental methods (X-ray and Auger spectroscopies, low-energy ion scattering (LEIS), low-energy electron diffraction (LEED) and theory (Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and Monte Carlo methods under various different reactions) were used to track the surface chemistry and the influence of alloying. The surface intermediates involved in the various reactions were characterized using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy and LEED to identify the nature of the surface species and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) to follow the decomposition pathways and measure heats of adsorption. These results along with those from density functional theoretical calculations were used determine the kinetics for elementary steps. The results from this work showed that the reaction proceeds via the Samanos mechanism over Pd surfaces whereby the ethylene directly couples with acetate to form an acetoxyethyl intermediate that subsequently undergoes a beta-hydride elimination to form the vinyl acetate monomer. The presence of Au was found to modify the adsorption energies and surface coverages of important surface intermediates including acetate, ethylidyne and ethylene which ultimately influences the critical C-H activation and coupling steps. By controlling the surface alloy composition or structure one can begin to control the steps that control the rate and even the mechanism.

Neurock, Matthew

2011-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

The type discipline of behavioral separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We introduce the concept of behavioral separation as a general principle for disciplining interference in higher-order imperative concurrent programs, and present a type-based approach that systematically develops the concept in the context of an ML-like ... Keywords: behavioral types, concurrency, higher order programming, interference, separation

Luís Caires; João C. Seco

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Exoplanet Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characteristic chemistry of terrestrial planets and, in particular, of giant planets rich and poor in He and H2 are described.

Lodders, Katharina

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Computational Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and numerical tools to quantify uncertainties for computational quantum chemistry. ... Results appear in the issue of The Journal of Chemical Physics. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiotracer Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer Chemistry Radiotracer chemistry is focused on the short lived positron emitters. New radiotracer chemistry and molecular targeting strategies are being developed to increase the complexity and diversity of molecular probes (small molecules and plant hormones) for imaging applications. We emphasize C-11 chemistry because the substitution of stable carbon with carbon-11 provides the opportunity to measure and quantify the distribution and kinetics of physiologically relevant substrates and signaling molecules without altering the biological properties of the parent molecule. Recent accomplishments include the development of miniaturized automated systems for the production of C-11 precursor molecules, the synthesis of C-11 labeled azaleic acid and the radiolabeling of auxin for studies of their movement and metabolism in the whole plant in vivo.

102

Agility at scale: economic governance, measured improvement, and disciplined delivery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Agility without discipline cannot scale, and discipline without agility cannot compete. Agile methods are now mainstream. Software enterprises are adopting these practices in broad, comprehensive delivery contexts. There have been many successes, and ...

Alan W. Brown, Scott Ambler, Walker Royce

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Does Competition for Capital Discipline Governments? Decentralization, Globalization and Corruption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many political economists believe that competition among countries—or regions within them—to attract mobile capital should discipline their governments, rendering them less corrupt and more friendly toward business. This argument surfaces repeatedly in debates over both political decentralization and globalization. We argue that it is based on an assumption— countries or regions start out identical—that is quite unrealistic. We reexamine the standard model that predicts a disciplining effect of capital mobility, and show that if units are sufficiently heterogeneous exactly the opposite prediction often follows. If some units are exogenously much more attractive to investors than others (and competition for capital is intense), the only equilibrium under capital mobility will involve polarization. Initially disadvantaged units will actually be more corrupt, more starved of capital, and slower to grow if capital is mobile than if it is not. By contrast, exogenously attractive units will do more to woo investors, suck capital out of their lower productivity counterparts, and grow faster. We suggest this may help explain the disappointing results of liberalizing capital flows within the Russian federation and in sub-Saharan Africa.

Hongbin Cai A; Daniel Treisman B

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial chemistry and chemoecology are linked together to realize a modern and sustainable chemistry

Peter Saling; Peter Saling

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Bank Security Prices and Market Discipline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, policymakers and bank regulators have been warming up to the idea of leveraging market forces to enhance banking supervision.This is partly motivated by the growing complexity of large banking organizations and by concerns about limiting the cost of bank supervision as well as avoiding unduly extending the bank safety net (see Kwan 2002). In order for market discipline to work, the market prices of banking securities must contain accurate and timely information about bank risk. Researchers in banking have been studying this issue for quite some time.This Economic Letter reviews the empirical evidence on the informativeness of bank security prices, focusing on the two most obvious sources of market information—stock and

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A common-view disciplined oscillator  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a common-view disciplined oscillator (CVDO) that locks to a reference time scale through the use of common-view global positioning system (GPS) satellite measurements. The CVDO employs a proportional-integral-derivative controller that obtains near real-time common-view GPS measurements from the internet and provides steering corrections to a local oscillator. A CVDO can be locked to any time scale that makes real-time common-view data available and can serve as a high-accuracy, self-calibrating frequency and time standard. Measurement results are presented where a CVDO is locked to UTC(NIST), the coordinated universal time scale maintained at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Boulder, Colorado.

Lombardi, Michael A. [Time and Frequency Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); Dahlen, Aaron P. [Loran Support Unit, United States Coast Guard (USCG), Wildwood, New Jersey 08260 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

107

NEWTON's Chemistry Videos  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Videos Do you have a great chemistry videos? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Videos: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources The Periodic Table of Videos The University...

108

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. NewNew Science, Green Chemistry and Environmental Health.abstract.html 5. American Chemistry Council. 2003. Guide to

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

NEWTON's Chemistry References  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry References Do you have a great chemistry reference link? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Reference Links: Steve Marsden's Chemistry Resources Steve Marsden's...

110

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

State University O'Neil, Joe (Joe O'Neil) - Department of Chemistry, University of Manitoba Odom, Teri W. (Teri W. Odom) - Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University Oka,...

111

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney (Xiaoliang Sunney Xie) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Xing, Bengang (Bengang Xing) - Division of Chemistry and Biological...

112

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Y. Whitney (Y. Whitney Yin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin Young, Tom Kurtzman (Tom Kurtzman Young) - Department of Chemistry, Lehman...

113

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry » Synthetic and Mechanistic Synthetic and Mechanistic publications Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Get Expertise Dave Thorn Chemistry Program Manager Email Josh Smith Chemistry Communications Email "Research into alternative forms of energy, of which biofuels is a key component, is one of the major national security imperatives of this century. Energy security is vital to our future national security and the efficient functioning of our market economy." -LANL Director Charles McMillan Harshini Mukundan, Hongzhi Xie, Aaron S. Anderson, W. Kevin Grace, John E. Shively, and Basil I. Swanson, "Optimizing a waveguide-based sandwich immunoassay for tumor biomarkers: Evaluating fluorescent labels and functional surfaces," Bioconjugate Chemistry 20(2), 222-230 (2009).

114

DOE O 3750.1 Chg 6, Work Force Discipline  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order provides guidance and procedures and states responsibilities for maintaining work force discipline in DOE. Chg 1, dated 3-11-85; Chg 2, dated ...

1983-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

Educational Chemistry Games  

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Chemistry Games Do you have a great chemistry game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org's Chemistry Games Nobelprize.org,...

116

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Overview: Chemistry Department Overview: While the subjects of chemical research in the Chemistry Department are diverse, several predominant themes span traditional research fields and research groups. These themes include: artificial photosynthesis, charge transfer for energy conversion, chemistry with ionizing radiation, catalysis and surface science, nanoscience, combustion, and nuclear chemistry. Artificial Photosynthesis This program addresses major issues hindering progress in photoinduced catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, water splitting, and small molecule activation using an integrated experimental and theoretical approach that offers fundamental insights into the underlying photochemical processes. One thrust investigates factors controlling reductive half-reactions. Among these are: (1) searching for visible-light absorbers to couple with electron transfer and/or catalytic processes; (2) avoiding high-energy intermediates through multi-electron, multi-proton processes; (3) using earth-abundant metals, or metal complexes that have bio-inspired or non-innocent ligands to achieve low-energy pathways via second-coordination sphere interactions or redox leveling; (4) adopting water as the target solvent and the source of protons and electrons; and (5) immobilizing catalysts on electrode or semiconductor surfaces for better turnover rates and frequencies. Another thrust investigates water oxidation, focusing on photoelectrolysis processes occurring in band-gap-narrowed semiconductor and catalyst components by: (i) tuning semiconductors to control their light-harvesting and charge-separation abilities; (ii) developing viable catalysts for the four-electron water oxidation process; (iii) immobilizing the homogenous catalysts and metal oxide catalysts on electrodes and/or metal-oxide nanoparticles; and (iv) exploring the interfacial water-decomposition reactions using carriers generated by visible-light irradiation with the goal of understanding semiconductorccatalystcwater charge transport.

117

Nanoscale Surface Modifications I  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with a microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition technique utilizing methane/hydrogen/nitrogen chemistry. The surface modifications are characterized by ...

118

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Rabani, Eran (Eran Rabani) - School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University Rabani, Eran (Eran Rabani) - School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University Rader, Stephen (Stephen Rader) - Chemistry Program, University of Northern British Columbia Raftery, Dan (Dan Raftery) - Department of Chemistry, Purdue University Raghavan, Srinivasa (Srinivasa Raghavan) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Maryland at College Park Raines, Ronald T. (Ronald T. Raines) - Departments of Biochemistry & Chemistry, University of Wisconsin at Madison Rainier, Jon D. (Jon D. Rainier) - Department of Chemistry, University of Utah RajanBabu, T. V. "Babu" (T. V. "Babu" RajanBabu) - Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University

119

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Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W X Y Z W X Y Z Van Duyne, Richard P.(Richard P.Van Duyne).- Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University Vardi, Amichay (Amichay Vardi) - Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University Velev, Orlin D. (Orlin D. Velev) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University Venkataraman, Dhandapani "DV" (Dhandapani "DV" Venkataraman) - Department of Chemistry, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Venkataraman, Latha (Latha Venkataraman) - Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University Vertes, Akos (Akos Vertes) - Department of Chemistry, George Washington University Vicic, David A. (David A. Vicic) - Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa Viola, Ronald (Ronald Viola) - Department of Chemistry, University

120

2011 Organometallic Chemistry (July 10-15, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, RI)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organometallic chemistry has played and will continue to play a significant role in helping us understand the way bonds are made or broken in the presence of a transition metal complex. Current challenges range from the efficient exploitation of energy resources to the creative use of natural and artificial enzymes. Most of the new advances in the area are due to our extended understanding of processes at a molecular level due to new mechanistic studies, techniques to detect reaction intermediates and theory. The conference will bring the most recent advances in the field including nanocatalysis, surface organometallic chemistry, characterization techniques, new chemical reactivity and theoretical approaches along with applications to organic synthesis and the discovery of new materials. The Conference will bring together a collection of investigators who are at the forefront of their field, and will provide opportunities for junior scientists and graduate students to present their work in poster format and exchange ideas with leaders in the field. Six outstanding posters will be selected for short talks. The collegial atmosphere of this Conference, with programmed discussion sessions as well as opportunities for informal gatherings in the afternoons and evenings, provides an avenue for scientists from different disciplines to brainstorm and promotes cross-disciplinary collaborations in the various research areas represented. Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows should also consider participating in the Gordon Research Seminar on Organometallic Chemistry (July 9-10, same location) which is specially designed to promote interaction and discussion between junior scientists.

Dr. Emilio Bunel

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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121

AVIRIS Canopy Chemistry Data (ACCP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Canopy Chemistry Data Canopy Chemistry Data The ORNL DAAC has added a data set to its holdings from the Accelerated Canopy Chemistry Program (ACCP). The new data set is entitled "Site AVIRIS Images, 1992 (ACCP)." ACCP was an investigation to determine the theoretical and empirical basis for remote sensing of nitrogen and lignin concentrations in vegetation canopies of various ecosystems in the United States. Ten AVIRIS image scenes over selected ACCP sites were acquired in 1992. Pixels that coincided with ACCP field sites were extracted, and surface reflectance values were calculated. The purpose of the data set was to measure spectra of naturally occurring canopies where the chemical constituents were measured. The ORNL DAAC also holds ACCP data related to leaf chemistry, seedling

122

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Cai, Long (Long Cai) - Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Cairo, Christopher W. (Christopher W. Cairo) - Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta Calhoun, David H. (David H. Calhoun) - Department of Chemistry, City College, City University of New York Callis, Patrik R. (Patrik R. Callis) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Montana State University Cammers, Arthur (Arthur Cammers) - Department of Chemistry, University of Kentucky Campbell, Charles T. (Charles T. Campbell) - Department of Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Campbell, Robert E. (Robert E. Campbell) - Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta Cantor, Robert S. (Robert S. Cantor) - Department of Chemistry,

123

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z d'Alarcao, Marc (Marc d'Alarcao) - Department of Chemistry, Tufts University Daggett, Valerie (Valerie Daggett) - Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Dai, Hongjie (Hongjie Dai) - Department of Chemistry, Stanford University Daniel, Susan (Susan Daniel) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University Dantus, Marcos (Marcos Dantus) - Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University Davis, Ben G. (Ben G. Davis) - Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford Davis, H. Floyd (H. Floyd Davis) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University de Lijser, Peter (Peter de Lijser) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University, Fullerton

124

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

M N O P Q R S M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Lagalante, Anthony F. (Anthony F. Lagalante) - Department of Chemistry, Villanova University Latturner, Susan (Susan Latturner) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Laude, David A.(David A.Laude).- Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Texas at Austin Lawson, Catherine L. (Catherine L. Lawson) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University Lazaridis, Themis (Themis Lazaridis) - Department of Chemistry, City College, City University of New York Le Roy, Robert J. (Robert J. Le Roy) - Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo Leatherbarrow, Robin J. (Robin J. Leatherbarrow) - Department of Chemistry, Imperial College, London Lectka, Thomas (Thomas Lectka) - Department of Chemistry, Johns

125

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary Chemical physics: The standing of a mature discipline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License

Eduardo A Castro; Eduardo A Castro

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

2011 Dynamics at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference (August 7-12, 2011, Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island)  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 Gordon Conference on Dynamics at Surfaces is the 32nd anniversary of a meeting held every two years that is attended by leading researchers in the area of experimental and theoretical dynamics at liquid and solid surfaces. The conference focuses on the dynamics of the interaction of molecules with either liquid or solid surfaces, the dynamics of the outermost layer of liquid and solid surfaces and the dynamics at the liquid-solid interface. Specific topics that are featured include state-to-state scattering dynamics, chemical reaction dynamics, non-adiabatic effects in reactive and inelastic scattering of molecules from surfaces, single molecule dynamics at surfaces, surface photochemistry, ultrafast dynamics at surfaces, and dynamics at water interfaces. The conference brings together investigators from a variety of scientific disciplines including chemistry, physics, materials science, geology, biophysics, and astronomy.

Greg Sitz

2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

127

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ALS Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

128

ALS Chemistry Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Lab Print ALS Chemistry Labs The ALS Chemistry Labs are located in the User Support Building (15-130) and in Building 6 (6-2233)*. These spaces are dedicated for...

129

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MILESTONES IN SOIL CHEMISTRY Donald L. Sparks An array of pioneering research, dealing with various aspects of soil chemistry, has appeared in Soil Science for the past 90 years. In this review, two papers others that he published in Soil Science established the importance of variable or pH- dependent surface

Sparks, Donald L.

130

Chemistry Applications at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Chemistry Applications Gaussian 09 Gaussian 09 is a connected series of programs for performing semi-empirical, density functional theory and ab initio molecular orbital...

131

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Department Seminar Schedule Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 This page shows future Chemistry Department seminars and those that have taken place within the past six...

132

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

19. P. Anastas, J. Warner. 1998. Green Chemistry: Theory andto Advance New Science, Green Chemistry and EnvironmentalChronicle Extra: Guide to Green Jobs. Field with a Future.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zachariah, Michael R. (Michael R. Zachariah) - Departments of Chemistry & Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota Zakarian, Armen (Armen Zakarian) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Zare, Richard N. (Richard N. Zare) - Department of Chemistry, Stanford University Zargarian, Davit (Davit Zargarian) - Département de Chimie, Université de Montréal Zeiri, Yehuda (Yehuda Zeiri) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Zewail, Ahmed (Ahmed Zewail) - Arthur Amos Noyes Laboratory of Chemical Physics, California Institute of Technology Zhang, John Z.H. (John Z.H. Zhang) - Department of Chemistry, New York University Zhang, Qi (Qi Zhang) - Atmospheric Science Research Center, State University of New York, Albany,

134

Applied Health Technology – a New Research Discipline at Blekinge Institute of Technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Since spring 2008 is Applied Health Technology a new research discipline at Blekinge Institute of Technology. The discipline has been developed in collaboration between the… (more)

Olander, Ewy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W X Y Z W X Y Z Walker, Suzanne (Suzanne Walker) - Departments of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics & Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Wallace, Bonnie Ann (Bonnie Ann Wallace) - School of Crystallography, Birkbeck College, University of London Wallace, Mark (Mark Wallace) - Department of Chemistry, University of Oxford Walsh, Patrick J. (Patrick J. Walsh) - Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania Walter, Nils G. (Nils G. Walter) - Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan Wan, Xin-hua (Xin-hua Wan) - Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University Wang, Guan-Wu (Guan-Wu Wang) - Department of Chemistry, University of Science and Technology of China Wang, Jianbo (Jianbo Wang) - College of Chemistry, Peking University

136

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kahn, Kalju (Kalju Kahn) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California at Santa Barbara Kais, Sabre (Sabre Kais) - Birck Nanotechnology Center & Department of Chemistry, Purdue University Kaiser, Ralf I. (Ralf I. Kaiser) - Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa Kalodimos, Charalampos "Babis" (Charalampos "Babis" Kalodimos) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University Kambhampati, Patanjali (Patanjali Kambhampati) - Department of Chemistry, McGill University Kaminsky, Werner (Werner Kaminsky) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Kan, Lou-sing (Lou-sing Kan) - Institute of Chemistry, Academia

137

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Gao, Song (Song Gao) - College of Chemistry, Peking University Garfunkel, Eric (Eric Garfunkel) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Rutgers University Garrison, Barbara J.(Barbara J.Garrison).- Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Gascon, Jose A. (Jose A. Gascon) - Department of Chemistry, University of Connecticut Gates, Kent. S. (Kent. S. Gates) - Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia Geissler, Phillip (Phillip Geissler) - Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley Gelb, Michael (Michael Gelb) - Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Gellman, Andrew J. (Andrew J. Gellman) - Department of Chemical

138

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Abdou, Hanan E. (Hanan E. Abdou) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Agmon, Noam (Noam Agmon) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Agrafiotis, Dimitris K. (Dimitris K. Agrafiotis) - Molecular Design and Informatics Group, Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development Alabugin, Igor (Igor Alabugin) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Florida State University Alavi, Ali (Ali Alavi) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Allen, Heather C.(Heather C.Allen).- Department of Chemistry, Ohio State University Amar, François G. (François G. Amar) - Department of Chemistry, University of Maine Anderson, James B. (James B. Anderson) - Department of Chemistry,

139

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Federal Interagency Chemistry Representatives (FICR) Meeting 2013 - A Federal Green Chemistry Forum. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

140

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

G H I J K L M N O P Q R S G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Fackler, John P. (John P. Fackler) - Department of Chemistry, Texas A&M University Faeder, Jim (Jim Faeder) - Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science Farantos, Stavros C. (Stavros C. Farantos) - Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas & Department of Chemistry, University of Crete Farrar, Christian (Christian Farrar) - NMR Athinoula A. Martinos Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University Farrar, James M. (James M. Farrar) - Department of Chemistry, University of Rochester Fayer, Michael D. (Michael D. Fayer) - Department of Chemistry, Stanford University Feig, Andrew (Andrew Feig) - Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University Fenteany, Gabriel (Gabriel Fenteany) - Department of Chemistry,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Palffy-Muhoray, Peter (Peter Palffy-Muhoray) - Liquid Crystal Institute, Kent State University Papoian, Garegin A. (Garegin A. Papoian) - Department of Chemistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Parent, J. Scott (J. Scott Parent) - Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University (Kingston) Park, Hongkun (Hongkun Park) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Park, Jong-Sang (Jong-Sang Park) - School of Chemistry, Seoul National University Park, Joon Taik (Joon Taik Park) - Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Parker, Carl (Carl Parker) - Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Patrick, David L. (David L. Patrick) - Department of Chemistry,

142

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K L M N O P Q R S K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Jackson, Sophie (Sophie Jackson) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Jacobsen, Eric N. (Eric N. Jacobsen) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University Jacobson, Matthew P. (Matthew P. Jacobson) - Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California at San Francisco Jardim, Wilson de Figueiredo (Wilson de Figueiredo Jardim) - Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas Jasperse, Craig P. (Craig P. Jasperse) - Department of Chemistry, Minnesota State University Moorhead Jayaraman, Sivaguru (Sivaguru Jayaraman) - Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, North Dakota State University Jelinek, Raz (Raz Jelinek) - Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion

143

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z MacMillan, Andrew (Andrew MacMillan) - Department of Biochemistry, University of Alberta MacMillan, David W. C. (David W. C. MacMillan) - Department of Chemistry, Princeton University Macmillan, Derek (Derek Macmillan) - Department of Chemistry, University College London Magee, Joseph W. (Joseph W. Magee) - Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology Magliery, Thomas J. (Thomas J. Magliery) - Departments of Chemistry & Biochemistry, Ohio State University Maier, John Paul (John Paul Maier) - Department of Chemistry, Universität Basel Majda, Marcin (Marcin Majda) - Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley Makri, Nancy (Nancy Makri) - Departments of Chemistry & Physics,

144

Chemistry of glass-ceramic to metal bonding for header applications. I. Effect of treatments on Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276 metallic surfaces  

SciTech Connect

Auger electron spectroscopy and depth Auger profiling were used to study the surfaces of Inconel 718 and Hastelloy C-276. The metal surfaces were processed in the same manner as is presently being used in the manufacturing of glass-ceramic headers. At each step in the process, samples were studied with Auger spectroscopy to determine their resultant elemental surface composition and film thickness. In addition, the effect of a final plasma cleaning operation on the metal surface was examined. The results show that the type and concentration of surface species and the thickness of the surface oxides are dependent on the processing technique.

Kramer, D P; Craven, S M; Schneider, R E; Moddeman, W E; Brohard, D W

1984-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

145

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fission...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Talanquer, Vicente A. (Vicente A. Talanquer) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona Taylor, Peter (Peter Taylor) - Department of Mathematics and...

146

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Biological Chemistry, Nanyang Technological University Xiong, Qihua (Qihua Xiong) - Schools of Electrical and Electronic Engineering & Physical and Mathematical Sciences,Nanyang...

147

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmenta...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Fleming, Graham R. (Graham R. Fleming) - Department of Chemistry, University of California at Berkeley Foltz, Jeremy D. (Jeremy D. Foltz) - Department of Agricultural and Applied...

148

The International Year of Chemistry 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemistry our life our future The International Year of Chemistry 2011 Analytical Chemistry Related associations Marketing ...

149

Does the discipline of preprocessor annotations matter?: a controlled experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The C preprocessor (CPP) is a simple and language-independent tool, widely used to implement variable software systems using conditional compilation (i.e., by including or excluding annotated code). Although CPP provides powerful means ... Keywords: c preprocessor, controlled experiment, disciplined annotations, program comprehension, variability

Sandro Schulze, Jörg Liebig, Janet Siegmund, Sven Apel

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

RCDA: Architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose to view architecting as a risk- and cost management discipline. This point of view helps architects identify the key concerns to address in their decision making, by providing a simple, relatively objective way to assess architectural significance. ... Keywords: Cost management, Risk Management, Software architecture

Eltjo R. Poort; Hans Van Vliet

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

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Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

U V W X Y Z U V W X Y Z Taber, Douglass (Douglass Taber) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Delaware Takada, Shoji (Shoji Takada) - Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University Talanquer, Vicente A. (Vicente A. Talanquer) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona Tan, Weihong (Weihong Tan) - Department of Chemistry, University of Florida Tang, Ben Zhong (Ben Zhong Tang) - Department of Chemistry, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Taralp, Alpay (Alpay Taralp) - Faculty of Engineering and Natural Sciences, Sabanci University Tchumper, Gregory S. (Gregory S. Tchumper) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Mississippi Tew, Gregory N. (Gregory N. Tew) - Department of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts at Amherst

152

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E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ealick, Stephen E. (Stephen E. Ealick) - Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University Earl, David J. (David J. Earl) - Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University East, Allan L. L. (Allan L. L. East) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Regina Eisenthal, Kenneth B. (Kenneth B. Eisenthal) - Department of Chemistry, Columbia University Eldridge, R. Bruce (R. Bruce Eldridge) - Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin Ellison, Barney (Barney Ellison) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder Elrod, Matthew J. (Matthew J. Elrod) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Oberlin College

153

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S S T U V W X Y Z Salaita, Khalid (Khalid Salaita) - Department of Chemistry, Emory University Sandoghdar, Vahid (Vahid Sandoghdar) - Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule Zürich (ETHZ) Sanner, Michel (Michel Sanner) - Department of Molecular Biology, Scripps Research Institute Sanov, Andrei (Andrei Sanov) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arizona SantaLucia Jr., John (John SantaLucia Jr.) - Department of Chemistry, Wayne State University Santos, Webster L. (Webster L. Santos) - Department of Chemistry, Virginia Tech Sarret, Géraldine (Géraldine Sarret) - Laboratoire de Géophysique Interne et Tectonophysique, Observatoire de Grenoble, Université Joseph Fourier Sattler, Klaus (Klaus Sattler) - Department of Physics and

154

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O P Q R S O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Narevicius, Edvardas (Edvardas Narevicius) - Department of Chemical Physics, Weizmann Institute of Science Nazar, Linda F. (Linda F. Nazar) - Department of Chemistry, University of Waterloo Nazarenko, Alexander (Alexander Nazarenko) - Department of Chemistry, Buffalo State College Nelsen, Steve (Steve Nelsen) - Department of Chemistry, University of Wisconsin at Madison Nelson, Peter Hugo (Peter Hugo Nelson) - Physical Sciences, Benedictine University Nelson, Scott (Scott Nelson) - Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh Nerukh, Dmitry (Dmitry Nerukh) - Non-linearity and Complexity Research Group (NCRG), Aston University Nesnas, Nasri (Nasri Nesnas) - Department of Chemistry, Florida Institute of Technology Neumark, Daniel M. (Daniel M. Neumark) - Lawrence Berkeley National

155

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1970). tpresent address: Chemistry Department, University ofSept. 1970); Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report, 1969,S. G. Thompson, in Nuclear Chemistry Division Annual Report

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Computational Chemistry | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHARE Computational Chemistry Computational Chemistry at ORNL uses principles of computer science and mathematics and the results of theoretical physics and chemistry to...

157

Appendix C Analytical Chemistry Data  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analytical Chemistry Data This page intentionally left blank Contents Section Analytical Data for Deleted Contaminants of Concern ............................................................. C1.O Mol~tezuma Creek Hardness Dat Surface Water Copper Data Summa ................ CI-9 Surface Water Radium-228 Dat Surface Water Radon-222 Data Summary ....................... ....................................... . . . . . . . . . . . C l - I 2 Alluvial Ground Water Aln~noniuu~ as Nitrogen Data Summary ....................... . . . ................................ Cl-15 Alluvial Ground Water Cobalt Data Summary ........... Alluvial Ground Water Copper Data Sumrl Alluvial Ground Water Lead Data Su~nmary ................................. C1-19 Alluvial Ground Water Lead-210 Data Sutl~rnary

158

Green Chemistry and Workers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

public/private investment in green chemistry research andinvestment in cleaner chemical technologies, known collectively as greenGREEN CHEMISTRY AND WORKERS / most hazardous chemicals on the market (closing the safety gap) will spur investment

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical chemistry websites, humor, Material Safety Data Sheets,Patent Information, and references. Analytical Chemistry Databases and Links Analytical Chemistry acid analysis Analytical Chemistry aocs applicants april articles atomic)FluorometryDiffer

160

Fuel Chemistry Preprints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Papers are presented under the following symposia titles: advances in fuel cell research; biorefineries - renewable fuels and chemicals; chemistry of fuels and emerging fuel technologies; fuel processing for hydrogen production; membranes for energy and fuel applications; new progress in C1 chemistry; research challenges for the hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage; SciMix fuel chemistry; and ultraclean transportation fuels.

NONE

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

IN-PACKAGE CHEMISTRY ABSTRACTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for Postclosure Waste Form Modeling'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173246]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as a function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model, which uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model, which is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials, and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed (CDSP) waste packages containing high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor diffusing into the waste package, and (2) seepage water entering the waste package as a liquid from the drift. (1) Vapor-Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H{sub 2}O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Liquid-Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package.

E. Thomas

2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Geosciences --  

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B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Baer, Roi (Roi Baer) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Baik, Mu-Hyun (Mu-Hyun Baik) - School of Informatics & Department of Chemistry, Indiana University Baker, David (David Baker) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Baltisberger, Jay H. (Jay H. Baltisberger) - Department of Chemistry, Berea College Bang, Duhee (Duhee Bang) - Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University Bao, Xinhe (Xinhe Bao) - State Key Laboratory of Catalysis, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics Barash, Danny (Danny Barash) - Department of Computer Science, Ben Gurion University Barbas III, Carlos F. (Carlos F. Barbas III) - Departments of

163

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J K L M N O P Q R S J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Iglesia, Enrique (Enrique Iglesia) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Ihee, Hyotcherl (Hyotcherl Ihee) - Department of Chemistry, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Ishii, Yoshitaka (Yoshitaka Ishii) - Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Chicago Ismagilov, Rustem F. (Rustem F. Ismagilov) - Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Iyengar, Srinivasan S. (Srinivasan S. Iyengar) - Department of Chemistry, Indiana University Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique CNRS, Physico-Chimie

164

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H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ha, Taekjip (Taekjip Ha) - Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Haas, Yehuda (Yehuda Haas) - Institute of Chemistry, Hebrew University of Jerusalem Hagadorn, John R. (John R. Hagadorn) - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado at Boulder Hahn, David W. (David W. Hahn) - Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida Haller, Gary L. (Gary L. Haller) - Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, Yale University Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon (Sharon Hammes-Schiffer) - Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University Han, Jeong Woo (Jeong Woo Han) - Laboratory for Electrochemical Interfaces, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)

165

The Role of Mineral Aerosol in Tropospheric Chemistry in East Asia—A Model Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A detailed gas-phase chemistry mechanism is combined with dust surface uptake processes to explore possible impacts of mineral dust on tropospheric chemistry. The formations of sulfate and nitrate on dust are studied along with the dust effects ...

Yang Zhang; Gregory R. Carmichael

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Cermic Chemistry.qrk  

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Chemistry Manufacturing Technologies The Manufacturing Science and Technology Center develops both aque- ous and non-aqueous chemical synthesis routes to generate highly controlled...

168

Chemistry Dept. Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Facilities As a research organization within a National Laboratory, the Chemistry Department operates research facilities that are available to other researchers as...

169

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.govnewsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

170

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

American Academy of Arts and Sciences In Memoriam: Carol Creutz Women @ Energy: Joanna Fowler Electrocatalysis Pays Tribute to BNL Scientist Radoslav Adzic All Chemistry...

171

Forensic Database Chemistry & Toxicology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A free online commercial chemistry and biology reference tool that searches ... Rashida Weathers DEA Mid-Atlantic Laboratory Director 301.583.3200. ...

2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Chemistry Dept. Research Programs  

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Research Programs in the Chemistry Department Artificial Photosynthesis Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Gas Phase Molecular Dynamics Electron- and Photo-Induced Processes for...

173

Chemistry Department Operations  

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Procedures (c). Laser Safety Information: (d). Chemistry Department Laser Safety Guidelines Operational Work Planning (a). Training waiver (b). Staff Shop Posting Local...

174

In-Package Chemistry Abstraction  

SciTech Connect

This report was developed in accordance with the requirements in ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of the in-package chemistry model is to predict the bulk chemistry inside of a breached waste package and to provide simplified expressions of that chemistry as function of time after breach to Total Systems Performance Assessment for the License Application (TSPA-LA). The scope of this report is to describe the development and validation of the in-package chemistry model. The in-package model is a combination of two models, a batch reactor model that uses the EQ3/6 geochemistry-modeling tool, and a surface complexation model that is applied to the results of the batch reactor model. The batch reactor model considers chemical interactions of water with the waste package materials and the waste form for commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) waste packages and codisposed waste packages that contain both high-level waste glass (HLWG) and DOE spent fuel. The surface complexation model includes the impact of fluid-surface interactions (i.e., surface complexation) on the resulting fluid composition. The model examines two types of water influx: (1) the condensation of water vapor that diffuses into the waste package, and (2) seepage water that enters the waste package from the drift as a liquid. (1) Vapor Influx Case: The condensation of vapor onto the waste package internals is simulated as pure H2O and enters at a rate determined by the water vapor pressure for representative temperature and relative humidity conditions. (2) Water Influx Case: The water entering a waste package from the drift is simulated as typical groundwater and enters at a rate determined by the amount of seepage available to flow through openings in a breached waste package. TSPA-LA uses the vapor influx case for the nominal scenario for simulations where the waste package has been breached but the drip shield remains intact, so all of the seepage flow is diverted from the waste package. The chemistry from the vapor influx case is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion, and to determine the degradation rates for the waste forms. TSPA-LA uses the water influx case for the seismic scenario, where the waste package has been breached and the drip shield has been damaged such that seepage flow is actually directed into the waste package. The chemistry from the water influx case that is a function of the flow rate is used to determine the stability of colloids and the solubility of radionuclides available for transport by diffusion and advection, and to determine the degradation rates for the CSNF and HLW glass. TSPA-LA does not use this model for the igneous scenario. Outputs from the in-package chemistry model implemented inside TSPA-LA include pH, ionic strength, and total carbonate concentration. These inputs to TSPA-LA will be linked to the following principle factors: dissolution rates of the CSNF and HLWG, dissolved concentrations of radionuclides, and colloid generation.

E. Thomas

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary At the crossroads of biomacromolecular research: highlighting the interdisciplinary nature of the field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Due to their complexity and wide-ranging utility, biomacromolecular research is an especially interdisciplinary branch of chemistry. It is my goal that the Biomacromolecules subject area of Chemistry Central Journal will parallel this richness and diversity. In this inaugural commentary, I attempt to set the stage for achieving this by highlighting several areas where biomacromolecular research overlaps more traditional chemistry sub-disciplines. Specifically, it is discussed how Materials Science and Biotechnology, Analytical Chemistry, Cell Biology and Chemical Theory are each integral to modern biomacromolecular research. Investigators with reports in any of these areas, or any other dealing with biomacromolecules, are encouraged to submit their research papers to Chemistry Central Journal. Background Chemistry, often referred to as the central science, is critical to a fundamental understanding of the world around us. Chemical concepts have traditionally been central to the

Dennis R Livesay; Dennis R Livesay

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Al-Ghadhban, Samir (Samir Al-Ghadhban) - Electrical Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Andersen, Torben Ole (Torben Ole Andersen) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Anderson, Larry G.(Larry G.Anderson).- Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado at Denver Anderson, Scott L. (Scott L. Anderson) - Department of Chemistry, University of Utah Andreasen, Søren Juhl (Søren Juhl Andreasen) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Arno, Gehrer (Gehrer Arno) - Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Technical University Graz Artuso, Florinda (Florinda Artuso) - Unit for Environment and Energy Modeling, ENEA

177

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

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D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Cabeza, Roberto (Roberto Cabeza) - Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, Duke University Cabrera, Javier (Javier Cabrera) - Department of Statistics, Rutgers University Caflisch, Amedeo (Amedeo Caflisch) - Department of Biochemistry, Universität Zürich Cai, Long (Long Cai) - Division of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology Caillaud, Marina (Marina Caillaud) - Biology Department, Ithaca College Cairo, Christopher W. (Christopher W. Cairo) - Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta Cajal Medrano, Ramón (Ramón Cajal Medrano) - Facultad de Ciencias Marinas, Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Calabrese, Ronald (Ronald Calabrese) - Department of Biology, Emory

178

Major Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities for Materials Research and Related Disciplines Major Materials Facilities Committee Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources National Research Council NATIONAL ACADEMY PRESS Washington, DC 1984 NOTICE: The project that is the subject of this report was approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council, whose members are drawn from the councils of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine. The members of the committee responsible for the report were chosen for their special competences and with regard for appropriate balance. This report has been reviewed by a group other than the authors according to procedures approved by a Report Review Committee con- sisting of members of the National Academy of Sciences, the National

179

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Chemistry Department Seminar Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars Archive of Chemistry Department Seminars See also: recent Department seminars Friday, July 27, 2012 "Precise Design of Donor-Acceptor Interface based on Microphase Segregated Nanostructure" Sadayuki Asaoka, Kyoto Institute of Technology Hosted by Dr. John Miller 11:00 AM, Room 300, Chemistry Bldg. 555 Thursday, April 26, 2012 ""NOx Catalysis from the Bottom Up"" Dr. William F. Schneider, Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Notre Dame Hosted by Ping Liu 11:00 AM, Hamilton Seminar Room, Bldg. 555 Friday, April 13, 2012 "High-energy resolution x-ray emission spectroscopy for catalysis and materials chemistry" Olga Safonova, Swiss Light Source & Energy Dept. at Paul Scherrer Institute Hosted by Dario Stacchiola

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The Entire Chemistry Archive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives Chemistry Archives, Since November 1991 Table of Contents: When entropy = 0, does atomic motion stop? When H2O and methanol mix Heavy element names Radon Bee's wax CFC's and ozone depletion Solar cells and Phosphorous vs Chlorophyll B Aromaticity Hypercolor t-shirt Bonds for tie dye Soda POP General chemistry questions Tyndall Effect Silicon chips Molecules and cancer Acetylene safety Picric acid Buckyballs Piezoelectric Weak pennies Extracting fats Anti-oxidants Batteries & chemicals Hydrogen, can it be an isotope? Can soda conduct electricity? pH What is the biggest molecule? Smallest molecule Metallic zinc as catalyst Bond order in carbon bonds Packing of crystal structure Advantages, disadvantages of chloroform Coloring oil Free-radicals Acid-Base reaction

182

Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This report, which describes formal cycle chemistry improvement programs at nine utilities, will assist utilities in achieving significant operation and maintenance cost reductions.

1997-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Synthetic and Mechanistic Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

work was published in the international edition of the chemistry journal Angewandte Chemie. http:www.lanl.gov newsroomnews-releases2012November11.26-hanson-catalysis.php...

184

BNL Chemistry Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Dept. Bldg. 555A Brookhaven National Lab P.O. Box 5000 Upton, NY 11973-5000 Ph: (631)344-4301 Fax: (631)344-5815 Radoslav Adzic, Vyacheslov Volcov, Lijun Wu, Wei An, Jia...

185

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Y Z Y Z Xi, Weimin (Weimin Xi) - Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin at Madison Xia, Xuhua (Xuhua Xia) - Department of Biology, University of Ottawa Xia, Yu "Brandon" (Yu "Brandon" Xia) - Bioinformatics Program and Department of Chemistry, Boston University Xiang, Jenny Qiuyun (Jenny Qiuyun Xiang) - Department of Plant Biology, North Carolina State University Xiang, Kevin Y. (Kevin Y. Xiang) - Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Xing, Jianhua (Jianhua Xing) - Department of Biological Sciences, Virginia Tech Xiong, Yue (Yue Xiong) - Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center & Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of North Carolina at

186

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --  

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Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pagani, Mark (Mark Pagani) - Department of Geology and Geophysics, Yale University Pahnke, Katharina (Katharina Pahnke) - Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia University Palmer, Paul (Paul Palmer) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Palmer, Robert D. (Robert D. Palmer) - Atmospheric Radar Research Center & School of Meteorology, University of Oklahoma Pan, Feifei (Feifei Pan) - Department of Geography, University of North Texas Pan, Laura (Laura Pan) - Atmospheric Chemistry Division, National Center for Atmospheric Research Pan, Zaitao (Zaitao Pan) - Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Saint Louis University Panagiotakopulu, Eva (Eva Panagiotakopulu) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh

187

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

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S S T U V W X Y Z Ra, Jong Beom (Jong Beom Ra) - Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Raaum, Ryan (Ryan Raaum) - Department of Anthropology, Lehman College, City University of New York Rabinowitz, Joshua D. (Joshua D. Rabinowitz) - Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics & Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University Rabosky, Daniel L. (Daniel L. Rabosky) - Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Michigan Racaniello, Vincent (Vincent Racaniello) - Department of Microbiology, Columbia University Rader, Stephen (Stephen Rader) - Chemistry Program, University of Northern British Columbia Radhakrishnan, Ravi (Ravi Radhakrishnan) - Department of

188

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Mathematics --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Paik Suh, Myunghyun (Myunghyun Paik Suh) - Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University Pedersen, Henrik C. (Henrik C. Pedersen) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Perloff, Jeffrey M. (Jeffrey M. Perloff) - Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics, University of California at Berkeley Petit, Nicolas -(Nicolas -Petit)-- Centre Automatique et Systèmes, Ecole des Mines de Paris Pillai, Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna (Jayakrishnan Radhakrishna Pillai) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Pitsch, Heinz (Heinz Pitsch) - Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University Popov, Branko N. (Branko N. Popov) - Center for Electrochemical Engineering & Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South

189

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wade, Juli (Juli Wade) - Department of Zoology, Michigan State University Wadsworth, Patricia (Patricia Wadsworth) - Department of Biology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst Wagenaar, Daniel (Daniel Wagenaar) - Division of Biological Sciences, University of California at San Diego Wager, Tor D. (Tor D. Wager) - Department of Psychology, University of Colorado at Boulder Wagner, Andreas (Andreas Wagner) - Department of Biochemistry, Universität Zürich Wagner, Anthony (Anthony Wagner) - Department of Psychology, Stanford University Wagner, Doris (Doris Wagner) - Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania Wagner, Gerhard (Gerhard Wagner) - Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard University Wagner, Oliver (Oliver Wagner) - Department of Life Sciences,

190

Surface Chemistry of Titanium Dental Implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Structural Competition and Phase Transformations in Binary Ti-Nb Alloys for Biomedical Applications · Structure and Fracture Resistance of Armored Fish Scales.

191

Surface Electrochemistry and Electrocatalysis (SEE) Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Recent Accomplishments Recent Accomplishments 1. Oxygen Reduction Reaction on Pt monolayer electrocatalysts Tuning the PtML activity with core -shell interaction Increasing PtML activity by reducing O-BE Increasing stability and activity by alloying cores Electrochemical deposition of NPs Hollow cores Tetrahedral Pd nanocrystals Nitride-stabilized core-shell nanoparticles 2. Electrocatalysts for anodic oxidation of ethanol and methanol Optimizing ternary catalysts for ethanol oxidation to CO2 and making Ir capable of C-C bond splitting in ethanol oxidation Tensile strain for increasing activity of PtML for oxidation of ethanol and methanol 3. Electrocatalysts for H2 oxidation and evolution reactions Synthesis of single crystalline Ru@Pt core-shell nanoparticles Clusters: The ultimate low metal content electrocatalysts

192

Guide to Chemistry Dept  

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Guide to the Chemistry Building Guide to the Chemistry Building The main Chemistry building (Building 555) has been designed to make adequate facilities available for research and to provide an informal atmosphere for free exchange among Department members. There are public areas, shared laboratories, shared office space, and privately assigned places. A newcomer to the building should become familiar with locations of the key areas. Stairs and Elevators - Building 555 The central main staircase and a passenger elevator are for personnel traffic only. Each wing has a staircase. There is a rear staircase for traffic directly to service areas. The building has a freight elevator at the rear core. Flammable material, chemicals, solvents, gas cylinders, etc. can be transported in the freight elevator but not in the passenger elevator. Do not ride with gas cylinders or dewars charged with cryogens as the presence of these in a confined space introduces a suffocation hazard.

193

“Greening Up” Cross-Coupling Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

today. Insofar as green chemistry is concerned, however,Handbook of organopalladium chemistry for organic synthesis.Hanefeld U (2007) Green chemistry and catalysis. Wiley-VCH,

Lipshutz, Bruce H.; Abela, Alexander R.; Boškovi?, Žarko V.; Nishikata, Takashi; Duplais, Christophe; Krasovskiy, Arkady

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Nuclear Chemistry at BNL 1947-66  

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Chemistry in the Chemistry Department. The National Laboratories were spawned from the Manhattan Project. Not coincidentally, nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics burgeoned...

195

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biotechnology --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kaduk, Joerg (Joerg Kaduk) - Department of Geography, University of Leicester Kah, Linda (Linda Kah) - Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of Tennessee Kahl, Jonathan D. W. (Jonathan D. W. Kahl) - Department of Mathematical Sciences, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Kalinichev, Andrey G. (Andrey G. Kalinichev) - Departments of Chemistry and Geological Sciences, Michigan State University, Kame, Nobuki (Nobuki Kame) - Earthquake Research Institute, University of Tokyo Kaminski, Edouard (Edouard Kaminski) - Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris Kaminski, Michael A. (Michael A. Kaminski) - Department Earth Sciences, University College London Kammer, Thomas (Thomas Kammer) - Department of Geology and

196

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

K L M N O P Q R S K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Jablonski, David (David Jablonski) - Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago Jack, Katharine M. (Katharine M. Jack) - Department of Anthropology, Tulane University Jackman, Todd (Todd Jackman) - Biology Department, Villanova University Jackson, Carl (Carl Jackson) - School of Psychology, University of Birmingham Jackson, David (David Jackson) - Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Jackson, Kate (Kate Jackson) - Department of Biology, Whitman College Jackson, Meyer B. (Meyer B. Jackson) - Neuroscience Training Program & Department of Physiology, University of Wisconsin at Madison Jackson, Sophie (Sophie Jackson) - Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge Jackson, Trachette L. (Trachette L. Jackson) - Department of

197

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Environmental  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Management and Restoration Technologies Management and Restoration Technologies Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Achenbach, Laurie A. (Laurie A. Achenbach) - Department of Microbiology, Southern Illinois University Alvarez, Pedro J. (Pedro J. Alvarez) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa (Lisa Alvarez-Cohen) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Anderson, Larry G.(Larry G.Anderson).- Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado at Denver Arhonditsis, George B. (George B. Arhonditsis) - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef" (Yossi "Yosef" Ashkenazy) - Department of

198

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Multidisciplinary  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Multidisciplinary Databases and Resources Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Aboufadel, Edward F. (Edward F. Aboufadel) - Department of Mathematics, Grand Valley State University Adida, Elodie (Elodie Adida) - School of Business Administration, University of California at Riverside Aerts, Diederik (Diederik Aerts) - Leo Apostel Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel Allain, Rhett (Rhett Allain) - Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University Allen, Gale (Gale Allen) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Technology, Minnesota State University Mankato Anderson, Robert M. (Robert M. Anderson) - Department of Mathematics, University of California at Berkeley

199

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: -- Energy,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z D' Silva, Patrick (Patrick D' Silva) - Department of Biochemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore D'Août, Kristiaan (Kristiaan D'Août) - Department of Biology, Universiteit Antwerpen D'haeseleer, Patrik (Patrik D'haeseleer) - Biology and Biotechnology Research Program, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Daggett, Valerie (Valerie Daggett) - Department of Medicinal Chemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Dahlquist, Kam D. (Kam D. Dahlquist) - Biology Department, Loyola Marymount University Dailey, Michael E. (Michael E. Dailey) - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Iowa Daley, Monica A. (Monica A. Daley) - Structure and Motion Laboratory, Royal Veterinary College, University of London

200

Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNALS Home / Chemistry / Chemistry (general) Angewandte Chemie International Edition See Also: Angewandte Chemie Copyright © 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim View all previous titles

Jo, Moon-Ho

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Chemistry implications of climate change  

SciTech Connect

Since preindustrial times, the concentrations of a number of key greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}) and the nitric oxides (N{sub 2}O) have increased. Additionally, the concentrations of anthropogenic aerosols have also increased during the same time period. Increasing concentrations of greenhouse gases are expected to increase temperature, while the aerosols tend to have a net cooling effect. Taking both of these effects into account, the current best scientific estimate is that the global average surface temperature is expected to increase by 2{degrees}C between the years 1990 to 2100. A climate change if this magnitude will both directly and indirectly impact atmospheric chemistry. For example, many important tropospheric reactions have a temperature dependence (either Arrhenius or otherwise). Thus, if temperature increase, reaction rates will also increase.

Atherton, C.S.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Keeping up with detergent chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The detergent industry is highly competitive, mostly recession proof, and, thanks to chemistry, always changing ever so slightly. It has been years, however, since cleaning chemistry has been the driving force in detergent innovation. Instead, the environm

203

Integrated Solutions in Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paths best traveled Choose from a portfolio of comprehensive, interlinked, intuitive and accessible chemistry resources Paths best traveled Choose from a comprehensive portfolio of interlinked, intuitive and accessible resources www.info.sciencedirect.com/solutions www.elsevier.com/chemistrysolutions ELSEVIER’S

unknown authors

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Black and White Sociology: Segregation of the Discipline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea that theories of race, racial segregation and racism have played a central role in the development of sociology and that black and white sociologies have formed because of this condition is not new and has been in circulation among sociologists for some time. While a number of sociologists have examined how race has shaped the discipline, only a few have attempted to examine and define black sociology and white sociology. Despite the initial efforts of some, the two sociologies remain vague, undeveloped concepts, and thus open to skepticism and denunciation. No systematic historical-intellectual investigation of black sociology or white sociology exists and, subsequently, no in-depth comparative analysis of the two exists. Therefore, through a comparative-historical analysis and exercise in the sociology of knowledge, this work seeks to provide a more precise history and theory of black sociology and white sociology. This study argues that black sociology and white sociology represent two distinct intellectual perspectives---sets of ideas---and social practices shaped by past perspectives and practices and social-historical contexts, which are largely racially- defined. More specifically, I will demonstrate that black sociology and white sociology develop out of two approaches of thought and action primarily influenced by race, a black tradition of ideas and practices and a white tradition of thought and practices. To map these two traditions, I begin with a review and analysis of works that have discussed (directly or indirectly) black and white sociology and black and white sociologists. Next, I turn to a more focused analysis on the sociological perspectives and practices of W.E.B. Du Bois and Robert Park, examining the ideas and practices that shape each sociologist's thought and actions. I identify ways that Park incorporates and advances earlier ideas and practices of whites, and, conversely, how Du Bois incorporates and advances earlier perspectives and practices of blacks. Lastly, I point out how Du Bois' ideas and methods, shaped by an earlier black tradition, now informs what is described as black sociology, and how Park's ideas and methods, shaped by an earlier white tradition, now informs what is described as white sociology.

Elias, Sean

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending April 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Chemistry Division conducts basic and applied chemical research on projects important to DOE`s missions in sciences, energy technologies, advanced materials, and waste management/environmental restoration; it also conducts complementary research for other sponsors. The research are arranged according to: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, chemistry of advanced inorganic materials, structure and dynamics of advanced polymeric materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, chemical and structural principles in solvent extraction, surface science related to heterogeneous catalysis, photolytic transformations of hazardous organics, DNA sequencing and mapping, and special topics.

Poutsma, M.L.; Ferris, L.M.; Mesmer, R.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Chemistry Department Directory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry Staff Directory Chemistry Staff Directory Last Name, First Phone E-mail Note: All listed phone extensions are in the format of (631) 344-xxxx. Adzic, Radoslav 4522 adzic@bnl.gov Akimov, Alexey No Entry akimov@bnl.gov An, Wei 4317 weian@bnl.gov Anselmini, James 4399 anselmini@bnl.gov Baber, Ashleigh 4317 ababer@bnl.gov Badiei, Yosra 4360 ybadiei@bnl.gov Bak, Seong Min BAK 3663 smbak@bnl.gov Bakalis, Jin No Entry jbakalis@bnl.gov Bird, Matthew 4331 mbird@bnl.gov Cabelli, Diane 4361 cabelli@bnl.gov Camillone III, Nicholas 4412 nicholas@bnl.gov Chen, Jingguang 2655 jgchen@bnl.gov Chen, Wei-Fu 4360 wfchen@bnl.gov Concepcion, Javier 4369 jconcepc@bnl.gov Cook, Andrew 4782 acook@bnl.gov Cumming, James 4338 cumming@bnl.gov Duan, Lele 4357 lduan@bnl.gov Ertem, Mehmed No Entry mzertem@bnl.gov

207

Electrical Engineering is a diverse discipline encompassing computer and information systems, controls, lasers,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Concepts in rotating machinery analysis. Direct energy conversion. Prerequisite: EE 330. 390 Special70 ELECTRICAL Electrical Engineering is a diverse discipline encompassing computer and information environmental engineering and manufacturing to semiconductors and telecommunications. The Electrical Engineering

Rohs, Remo

208

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Henry Taube and Coordination Chemistry Resources with Additional Information Henry Taube Chuck Painter/Stanford News Service Henry Taube, a Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Chemistry, Emeritus, at Stanford University, received the 1983 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his work on the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions, especially in metal complexes" Taube 'received a doctorate from the University of California-Berkeley in 1940 and was an instructor there from 1940-41. "I became deeply interested in chemistry soon after I came to Berkeley," Taube recalled. ... He joined the Cornell University faculty in 1941, becoming a naturalized United States citizen in 1942, and then moved in 1946 to the University of Chicago where he remained until 1961. A year later he joined the Stanford faculty as professor of chemistry, a position he held until 1986, when he became professor emeritus. ...

209

NUCLEAR CHEMISTRY ANNUAL REPORT 1970  

SciTech Connect

Papers are presented for the following topics: (1) Nuclear Structure and Nuclear Properties - (a) Nuclear Spectroscopy and Radioactivity; (b) Nuclear Reactions and Scattering; (c) Nuclear Theory; and (d) Fission. (2) Chemical and Atomic Physics - (a) Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy; and (b) Hyperfine Interactions. (3) Physical, Inorganic, and Analytical Chemistry - (a) X-Ray Crystallography; (b) Physical and Inorganic Chemistry; (c) Radiation Chemistry; and (d) Chemical Engineering. (4) Instrumentation and Systems Development.

Authors, Various

1971-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

VIDEOS: History of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2007 ... Topic Summary: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry, ACS. Collection of brief videos on the discoveries of several heavy elements

211

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

212

Shooting device for free-surface impact studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The hydrodynamics of free-surface impacts are of great interest to scientists across many disciplines including ocean engineering, fluids mechanics, and biology. This thesis focuses on designing a mechanism to shoot small ...

Daigh, Sara L. (Sarah Louise), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art chemistry programs help to ensure the continued operation of open cooling water systems while mitigating corrosion and fouling mechanisms. This document, Open Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline, prepared by a committee of industry experts, reflects field and laboratory data on corrosion and fouling issues of open cooling systems.BackgroundService Water System Chemical Addition Guideline (Electric Power Research Institute ...

2012-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

214

Role and Discipline Relationships in a Transdisciplinary Biomedical Team: Structuration, Values Override and Context Scaffolding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Though accepted that "team science" is needed to tackle and conquer the health problems that are plaguing our society significant empirical evidence of team mechanisms and functional dynamics is still lacking in abundance. Through grounded methods the relationship between scientific disciplines and team roles was observed in a United States National Institutes of Health-funded (NIH) research consortium. Interviews and the Organizational Culture Assessment Instrument (OCAI) were employed.. Findings show strong role and discipline idiosyncrasies that when viewed separately provide different insights into team functioning and change receptivity. When considered simultaneously, value-latent characteristics emerged showing self-perceived contributions to the team. This micro/meso analysis suggests that individual participation in team level interactions can inform the structuration of roles and disciplines in an attempt to tackle macro level problems.

Lotrecchiano, Gaetano R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Chemistry Department Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Administration Administration A. Harris, Chair (631) 344-4301 alexh@bnl.gov G. Hall, Deputy Chair (631) 344-4376 gehall@bnl.gov S. McAlary, Deputy BES Manager (631) 344-4305 mcalary2@bnl.gov J. Petterson, Senior Administrative Assistant (631) 344-4302 jpetter@bnl.gov Administrative Support Includes budgeting, procurement activities, foreign/domestic travel, seminars and general administrative concerns. Guest Appointments and Personnel matters should be referred to the Department's Senior Administrative Assistant. L. Sallustio (631) 344-4303 lsallust@bnl.gov Building and Stockroom Maintain the Chemistry Department stockroom and provide technical and building support to the staff. Information on the BNL Chemical Management Inventory system is available through the stockroom. Click here to view

216

Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. A 3-D chemistry-transport model has been applied to the Mexico City metropolitan area to investigate the origin of elevated levels of non-fossil (NF) carbonaceous aerosols observed in this highly urbanized region. High time resolution measurements of the fine aerosol concentration and composition, and 12 or 24 h integrated 14 C measurements of aerosol modern carbon have been performed in and near Mexico City during the March 2006 MILAGRO field experiment. The non-fossil carbon fraction (fNF), which is lower than the measured modern fraction (fM) due to the elevated 14 C in the atmosphere caused by nuclear bomb testing, is estimated from the measured fM and the source-dependent information on modern carbon enrichment. The fNF contained in PM1 total carbon analyzed by a US team (f TC

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Silane discharge ion chemistry  

SciTech Connect

Silane dc, rf, and dc proximity discharges have been studied using mass spectroscopic measurements of the positive ions as a detailed diagnostic for the type of discharge used to produce hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar photovoltaic cells. The properties and quality of these films depends in a very complex way upon the interactions of the many reactive neutral and ion species in the discharge. Qualitative models of the ion chemical processes in these discharges have been developed from experimental measurements. Knowledge of the ion-molecule and electron-molecule collision cross sections is important to any attempt at understanding silane discharge chemistry. Consequently, the electron impact ionization cross sections for silane and disilane have been measured and for comparison purposes also for methane and ethane. In addition, the rate coefficients for charge exchange reactions of He , Ne , and Ar with silane, disilane, methane, and ethane have been measured as these are important to understanding discharges in inert gas-silane mixtures. A detailed quantitative model of the cathode sheath region of a silane dc discharge has been developed by extending the best recent calculation of the electron motion in the sheath to a self-consistent form which includes the ion motion. This model is used with comparison of silane dc discharge data to diagnose the ion chemistry occurring in the sheath region of silane dc discharge. The understanding of the discharge ion chemical processes that have been gained in this study represent an important step toward understanding the chemical and physical processes leading to film growth.

Chatham, R.H. III

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Nanomaterials Chemistry Group - CSD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links CSD CSD Organization Contact List Search Other Links Selected Research and Development Projects The Nanomaterials Chemistry Group at Chemical Sciences Division, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory conducts fundamental research related to synthesis and characterization of nanoscopic materials as well as ionic liquids for fundamental investigation of separation and catalysis processes. This group also conducts the applied research related to the applications of nanomaterials in advanced scintillators for radiation sensing, catalysts for fuel cells, radioactive tracers for medical imaging, novel electrodes for energy storage, and sensing devices for biological agents. Extensive synthesis capabilities exist within the group for preparation of mesoporous materials (oxides and carbons), low-dimensional materials (e.g., quantum dots and nanowires), sol-gel materials, inorganic and hybrid monoliths (e.g., membranes), and nanocatalysts. Solvothermal, ionothermal, templating synthesis, chemical vapor deposition (CVD), and atomic layer deposition (ALD) methods are extensively utilized in the group for tailored synthesis of nanostructured materials. An array of techniques for characterizing physical and chemical properties related to separation and catalysis are in place or are currently being developed. This research program also takes advantage of the unique resources at ORNL such as small-angle x-ray scattering, small-angle neutron scattering at the High Flux Isotope Reactor and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS), structural analysis by a variety of electron microscopes (SEM, TEM, STEM, HRTEM) and powdered X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. A wide variety of other facilities for routine and novel techniques are also utilized including the Center for Nanophase Materials Science. Computational chemistry tools are employed to understand experimental results related to separation and other interfacial chemical processes and design better nanomaterials and ionic liquids. Commonly used methods include first principles density functional theory (DFT) and mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) techniques.

219

Identification and Testing of Amines for Steam Generator Chemistry and Deposit Control, Part 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes a multi-year laboratory investigative program on optimization of water chemistry to reduce steam generator (SG) fouling. This work has demonstrated that surface chemistry significantly affects SG fouling. Furthermore, the investigation identified and demonstrated an amine additive that is a significant SG fouling inhibitor.

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes Chemistry and Material Sciences Codes at NERSC April 6, 2011 & ast edited: 2012-02-24 15:12:59...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

BNL Center for Radiation Chemistry Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Department | Photo- and Radiation Chemistry | Group Members Welcome to the Brookhaven National Laboratory Center for Radiation Chemistry Research LEAF Logo CRCR Logo Graphic Pop-up...

222

Sandia National Laboratories: Careers: Chemistry & Chemical Engineerin...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Chemistry research photo Sandia's Combustion Research Facility pioneered the use of chemical-imaging tools, such as laser diagnostics, for...

223

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Materials, Chemistry and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials, Chemistry and Energy Sciences Two people holding a solar cell outdoors Materials, chemistry and energy sciences are central to many of today's most critical technical...

224

Nuclear chemistry. Annual report, 1974  

SciTech Connect

The 1974 Nuclear Chemistry Annual Report contains information on research in the following areas: nuclear science (nuclear spectroscopy and radioactivity, nuclear reactions and scattering, nuclear theory); chemical and atomic physics (heavy ion-induced atomic reactions, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy and hyperfine interactions); physical, inorganic, and analytical chemistry (x-ray crystallography, physical and inorganic chemistry, geochemistry); and instrumentation. Thesis abstracts, 1974 publication titles, and an author index are also included. Papers having a significant amount of information are listed separately by title. (RWR)

Conzett, H.E.; Edelstein, N.M.; Tsang, C.F. (eds.)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Electrical Engineering (EE) is a diverse discipline encompassing computer and information systems, controls,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and multiply excited systems. Concepts in rotating machinery analysis. Direct energy conversion. Prerequisite70 electrical Electrical Engineering (EE) is a diverse discipline encompassing computer information processing. ProgrAmS AVAilAble · ElectricalEngineering Bachelor of Science 131 units · Computer

Rohs, Remo

226

Electrical Engineering (EE) is a diverse discipline encompassing computer and information systems, controls,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in singly and multiply excited systems. Concepts in rotating machinery analysis. Direct energy conversion70 electrical Electrical Engineering (EE) is a diverse discipline encompassing computer information processing. ProgrAmS AVAilAble · ElectricalEngineering Bachelor of Science 131 units · Computer

Rohs, Remo

227

Computational Mechanics: A Core Discipline in Com-putational Science and Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational Mechanics: A Core Discipline in Com- putational Science and Engineering Theoretical and Applied Mechanics (TAM) is the branch of applied science concerned with the study of mechanical phenomena area that affects our lives, security, and well being. Computational Mechanics (CM) is that sub

Thompson, Lonny L.

228

The NU Transportation Center Icarus Society presents.... "Airline Capacity Discipline: Where and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The NU Transportation Center Icarus Society presents.... "Airline Capacity Discipline: Where and to What Extent? Aaron J. Gellman Professor of Transportation Northwestern University Transportation Center and Kellogg School of Management Thursday Nov. 29, 2012 3:00 pm Location: Transportation Center Chambers Hall

Bustamante, Fabián E.

229

Surface Induced Magnetism in Quantum Dots  

SciTech Connect

The study of nanometer sized semiconductor crystallites, also known as quantum dots (QDs), has seen rapid advancements in recent years in scientific disciplines ranging from chemistry, physics, biology, materials science, and engineering. QD materials of CdSe, ZnSe, InP, as well as many others, can be prepared in the size range of 1-10 nm producing uniform, nearly monodisperse materials that are typically coated with organic molecules [1-3]. The strength of charge carrier confinement, which dictates the size-dependent properties, in these QDs depends on the nature of the material and can be correlated to the Bohr radius for the system of interest. For instance, the Bohr radius for CdSe is {approx} 5 nm, while in the more covalent structure of InP, the Bohr radius approaches {approx} 10 nm. The study of CdSe QDs has been particularly extensive during the last decade because they exhibit unique and tunable optical properties and are readily synthesized with high-crystallinity and narrow size dispersions. Although the core electronic properties of CdSe are explained in terms of the quantum confinement model, experimental efforts to elucidate the surface structure of these materials have been limited. Typically, colloidal CdSe QDs are coated with an organic surfactant, which typically consists of an organo-phosphine, -thiol, or -amine, that has the function of energetically relaxing defect states via coordination to partially coordinated surface atoms. The organic surfactant also acts to enhance carrier confinement and prevent agglomeration of the particles. Chemically, it has been shown that the bonding of the surfactant to the CdSe QD occurs through Cd atoms resulting cleavage of the Se atoms and formation of a Cd-rich (i.e. non-stoichiometric) particle [5].

Meulenberg, R W; Lee, J I

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

230

Advanced Chemistry Basins Model  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to: (1) Develop a database of additional and better maturity indicators for paleo-heat flow calibration; (2) Develop maturation models capable of predicting the chemical composition of hydrocarbons produced by a specific kerogen as a function of maturity, heating rate, etc.; assemble a compositional kinetic database of representative kerogens; (3) Develop a 4 phase equation of state-flash model that can define the physical properties (viscosity, density, etc.) of the products of kerogen maturation, and phase transitions that occur along secondary migration pathways; (4) Build a conventional basin model and incorporate new maturity indicators and data bases in a user-friendly way; (5) Develop an algorithm which combines the volume change and viscosities of the compositional maturation model to predict the chemistry of the hydrocarbons that will be expelled from the kerogen to the secondary migration pathways; (6) Develop an algorithm that predicts the flow of hydrocarbons along secondary migration pathways, accounts for mixing of miscible hydrocarbon components along the pathway, and calculates the phase fractionation that will occur as the hydrocarbons move upward down the geothermal and fluid pressure gradients in the basin; and (7) Integrate the above components into a functional model implemented on a PC or low cost workstation.

Blanco, Mario; Cathles, Lawrence; Manhardt, Paul; Meulbroek, Peter; Tang, Yongchun

2003-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

An Improved Raindrop Chemistry Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer allowing size-fractional chemical analysis of raindrops has been described previously by the authors. Modifications to this raindrop chemistry spectrometer now allow improved performance in windy conditions. Instrument ...

Stuart G. Bradley; Stephen J. Adams; C. David Stow; Stephen J. de Mora

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The chemical products made in a cyclotron target are a combined result of the chemical effects of the nuclear transformation that made the radioactive atom and the bulk radiolysis in the target. This review uses some well-known examples to understand how hot atom chemistry explains the primary products from a nuclear reaction and then how radiation chemistry is exploited to set up the optimal product for radiosynthesis. It also addresses the chemical effects of nuclear decay. There are important principles that are common to hot atom chemistry and radiopharmaceutical chemistry. Both emphasize short-lived radionuclides and manipulation of high specific activity nuclides. Furthermore, they both rely on radiochromatographic separation for identification of no-carrieradded products.

Krohn, Kenneth A.; Moerlein, Stephen M.; Link, Jeanne M.; Welch, Michael J. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States); Washington University, Department of Radiology, Division of Radiological Sciences, 510 South Kingshighway, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

233

Understanding the Changes of Stratospheric Water Vapor in Coupled Chemistry–Climate Model Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past and future climate simulations from the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry–Climate Model (GEOS CCM), with specified boundary conditions for sea surface temperature, sea ice, and trace gas emissions, have been analyzed to assess trends ...

Luke Oman; Darryn W. Waugh; Steven Pawson; Richard S. Stolarski; J. Eric Nielsen

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Three-Dimensional Coupled Chemistry–Climate Model Simulation of Past Stratospheric Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled chemistry–climate model is integrated for the period March 1979–January 2000 with sea surface temperatures and sea ice amounts specified from observations. Greenhouse gas concentrations and halogen loading are also taken from ...

John Austin

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Modification of heterogeneous chemistry by complex substrate morphology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Chemistry in many environmental systems is determined at some stage by heterogeneous reaction with a surface. Typically the surface exists as a dispersion or matrix of particulate matter or pores, and a determination of the heterogeneous chemistry of the system must address the extent to which the complexity of the environmental surface affects the reaction rates. Reactions that are of current interest are the series of chlorine nitrate reactions important in polar ozone depletion. The authors have applied surface spectroscopic techniques developed at LANL to address the chemistry of chlorine nitrate reactions on porous nitric and sulfuric acid ice surfaces as a model study of the measurement of complex, heterogeneous reaction rates. The result of the study is an experimental determination of the surface coverage of one adsorbed reagent and a mechanism of reactivity based on the dependence of this coverage on temperature and vapor pressure. The resulting mechanism allows the first comprehensive modeling of chlorine nitrate reaction probability data from several laboratories.

Henson, B.F.; Buelow, S.J.; Robinson, J.M.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

236

2010 Tetrapyrroles, Chemistry & Biology of Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles Gordon Conference is to bring together researchers from diverse disciplines that otherwise would not interact. By bringing biologists, chemists, engineers and clinicians with a common interest in tetrapyrroles the conference provides a forum for cross-disciplinary ideas and collaboration. The perspective provided by biologists, chemists, and clinicians working in fields such as newly discovered defects in human porphyrin metabolism, the myriad of strategies for light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms, novel tetrapyrroles that serve as auxiliary chromophores or enzyme cofactors, synthetic strategies in the design of novel tetrapyrrole scaffolds, and tetrapyrrole based cell signaling and regulatory systems, makes this conference unique in the field. Over the years the growing evidence for the role of tetrapyrroles and their reactive intermediates in cell signaling and regulation has been of increasing importance at this conference. The 2010 conference on Chemistry & Biology of Tetrapyrroles will focus on many of these new frontiers as outlined in the preliminary program listed. Speakers will emphasize unpublished results and new findings in the field. The oral sessions will be followed by the highly interactive afternoon poster sessions. The poster sessions provide all conferees with the opportunity to present their latest research and to exchange ideas in a more informal setting. As in the past, this opportunity will continue during the nightly social gathering that takes place in the poster hall following the evening lectures. All conferees are encouraged to submit and present posters. At the conference the best poster in the areas of biology, chemistry and medicine will be selected by a panel of previous conference chairs.

Angela Wilks

2010-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Z Z Zaki, Mohammed Javeed (Mohammed Javeed Zaki) - Department of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Zand, Robert (Robert Zand) - Macromolecular Science and Engineering Center & Department of Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan Zandstra, Peter W. (Peter W. Zandstra) - Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto Zhang, Aidong (Aidong Zhang) - Department of Computer Science and Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo Zhang, David Yu (David Yu Zhang) - Department of Bioengineering, Rice University Zhang, Michael Q.(Michael Q.Zhang).- Watson School of Biological Sciences, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Zhang, Yang (Yang Zhang) - Departments of Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics & Biological Chemistry, University of Michigan

238

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary Molecular biology: Self-sustaining chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Molecular biology is an established interdisciplinary field within biology that deals fundamentally with the function of any nucleic acid in the cellular context. The molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal focusses on the genetically determined chemistry and biochemistry occuring in the cell. How can thousands of chemical reactions interact smoothly to maintain the life of cells, even in a variable environment? How is this self-sustaining system achieved? These are questions that should be answered in the light of molecular biology and evolution, but with the application of biophysical, physico-chemical, analytical and preparative technologies. As the Section Editor for the molecular biology section in Chemistry Central Journal, I hope to receive manuscripts that present new approaches aimed at better answering and shedding light upon these fascinating questions related to the chemistry of livings cells. Molecular biology in Chemistry Central Journal At the outset, let me pose two important questions: Why

Paul Wrede

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Role of inorganic chemistry on nuclear energy examined Inorganic chemistry can provide insight and improve technical issues...

240

Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

Wise, J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Pyrochemical separations chemistry of plutonium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recovery and purification of plutonium involves interesting chemistry. Currently in use are several high temperature processes based on redox reactions. These processes include direct oxide reduction which uses calcium to reduce the oxide to the free metal and electrorefining which is used as a final purification step. The chemical research group at Rocky Flats is currently investigating the use of an aluminum/magnesium alloy to remove the ionic plutonium from the salts used in the above named processes. The results of this study along with an overview of pyrochemical plutonium processing chemistry will be presented.

Bynum, R.V.; Navratil, J.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

CHEMISTRY 213B: Introductory Physical Chemistry I. General Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and applications 9.4 Lecture 21. Chemical equilibrium 11 February 25 - March 1: STUDY BREAK Lecture 22. Chemical Chemistry. Supplementary Texts 1. P. A. Rock, Chemical Thermodynamics. 2. Gordon M. Barrow, Physical of gases 2 Lecture 3. Empirical properties of liquids and solids 5 Lecture 4. Molecular basis: Kinetic

Ronis, David M.

243

Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I). Johannes Ull~.ich, in Bio-Organic Chc! mistry Qiinrtcr-sodium E. A. Shneour, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly2, Edwige Tyszkiewicz, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Qnarterly

Various

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Monday, 25 February 2013 15:59 Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are...

245

Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

813chemistry 03282013 Boron chemistry reported in Chemical Reviews Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly A ball-and-stick structural model of...

246

THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

characterization of aerosols." in Nature. Aim. and MethodsLAWRENCE THE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY T. NovakovTHE ROLE OF SOOT IN AEROSOL CHEMISTRY* T. Novakov Lawrence

Novakov, T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Policy Department of Chemistry Michigan Technological University This document describes the rules and regulations concerning the acquisition, provision, maintenance, and use of the computing established by: · Michigan Internet Provider, MERIT: (http://www.merit.edu/) · MTU Computer Advisory Committee

Honrath, Richard E.

248

Water formation on bare grains: When the chemistry on dust impacts interstellar gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context. Water together with O2 are important gas phase ingredients to cool dense gas in order to form stars. On dust grains, H2 O is an important constituent of the icy mantle in which a complex chemistry is taking place, as revealed by hot core observations. The formation of water can occur on dust grain surfaces, and can impact gas phase composition. Aims. The formation of molecules such as OH, H2 O, HO2, H2 O2, as well as their deuterated forms and O2 and O3 is studied in order to assess how the chemistry varies in different astrophysical environments, and how the gas phase is affected by grain surface chemistry. Methods. We use Monte Carlo simulations to follow the formation of molecules on bare grains as well as the fraction of molecules released into the gas phase. We consider a surface reaction network, based on gas phase reactions, as well as UV photo-dissociation of the chemical species. Results. We show that grain surface chemistry has a strong impact on gas phase chemistry, and that this chemistry...

Cazaux, S; Marseille, M; Spaans, M; Caselli, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Chemistry Monitoring and Control for Fuel Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water chemistry has been identified as a known or potential contributing cause in recent corrosion-induced fuel failures and anomalies such as fuel crud spallation and enhanced nodular corrosion. The 2004 revision of the BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines (EPRI report 1008192) addressed these concerns by recommending tighter chemistry control limits and additional monitoring for contaminants and additives that can have an adverse effect on fuel cladding corrosion. The revision focused on chemistry control fo...

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

250

Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Annual Report 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual report describes the research and staff accomplishments in 2000 for the EMSL Interfacial Chemistry and Engineering Directorate.

Grate, Jay W.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Cycle Chemistry Instrumentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effective monitoring of the purity of water and steam is an integral part of any productive cycle chemistry monitoring program. The Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry guidelines identified a group of core monitoring parameters that are considered the minimum requirements. Meeting these requirements is part of EPRI's cycle chemistry benchmarking criteria for HRSGs. In addition to the core parameters, many chemistry parameters might need to be ...

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

252

Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

253

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ivaco Rolling Mills LP, Chemistry Laboratory. NVLAP Lab Code: 200143-0. Address and Contact Information: Highway 17 ...

2013-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

254

Surface Chemical Dynamics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Chemical Dynamics Surface Chemical Dynamics The goal of the Surface Chemical Dynamics Program is to elucidate the underlying physical processes that determine the products (selectivity) and yield (efficiency) of chemical transformations relevant to energy-related chemistry on catalytic and nanostructured surfaces. Achieving this end requires understanding the evolution of the reactant-molecule/surface complex as molecules adsorb, bonds dissociate, surface species diffuse, new bonds form and products desorb. The pathways and time scales of these processes are ultimately determined by a multidimensional potential energy surface that is a function of the geometric and electronic structures of the surface and the reactant, product, intermediate and transition-state molecular and atomic species.

255

Modeling biochemical pathways using an artificial chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial chemistries are candidates for methodologies that model and design biochemical systems. If artificial chemistries can deal with such systems in beneficial ways, they may facilitate activities in the new area of biomolecular engineering. In ... Keywords: Artificial chemistry, biochemical pathways, biomolecular engineering, modularity, reasoning, scalability

Kazuto Tominaga; Yoshikazu Suzuki; Keiji Kobayashi; Tooru Watanabe; Kazumasa Koizumi; Koji Kishi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

X Y Z X Y Z Wang, Zhi "Luke" (Zhi "Luke" Wang) - Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Fresno Wania, Frank (Frank Wania) - Departments of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto Wells, Scott A. (Scott A. Wells) - Department of Civil Engineering and Environmental Sciences, Portland State University Wilde, Gene (Gene Wilde) - Department of Biological Sciences, Texas Tech University Wildenschild, Dorthe (Dorthe Wildenschild) - School of Chemical, Biological, and Environmental Engineering, Oregon State University Wilkinson, Mark (Mark Wilkinson) - School of GeoSciences, University of Edinburgh Woltemade, Christopher J. (Christopher J. Woltemade) - Department of Geography-Earth Science, Shippensburg University

257

Chemistry and Materials Science, 1990--1991. [Second annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2-year (FY 1990-91) contains 49 technical articles in ten sections: research sampler, metals and alloys, energetic materials, chemistry and physics of advanced materials, bonding and reactions at surfaces and interfaces, superconductivity, energy R and D, waste processing and management, characterization and analysis, and facilities and instrumentation. Two more sections list department personnel, their publications etc., consultants, and summary of department budgets. The articles are processed separately for the data base. (DLC)

Sugihara, T.T.; Bruner, J.M.; McElroy, L.A. [eds.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Penn State Multi-Discipline Tribology Group and Energy Institute Studies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of the current research activities on fuels and lubricants in the Multi-discipline Tribology group and the engine test group in the Combustion Laboratory of the Pennsylvania State University. The progress areas discussed in this summary include those found in Table 1. Table 1. RESEARCH AREAS: Diesel Engine Emission Reduction; Oxygenated Fuels; Improved Friction Fuels; Vegetable Oil Lubricants; Extended Drain Lubricants; Effect of Chemical Structure on Friction and Wear. The research is of interest either directly or indirectly to the goal of this workshop, diesel engine emissions reduction. The current projects at Penn State in the areas listed above will be discussed.

Perez, Joseph

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

259

Chemistry-nuclear chemistry division. Progress report, October 1979-September 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, element migration and fixation, inorganic chemistry, isotope separation and analysis, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, muonic x rays, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Group Members  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Radiation Chemistry Group and Radiation Chemistry Group Chemistry Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory Staff Diane E. Cabelli Redox chemistry of high oxidation state transition-metal complexes, particularly CuIII, MnIII/MnIV; Superoxide chemistry in aqueous solutions: dismutation of superoxide radical; copper-zinc superoxide dismutase and model compounds. Andrew R. Cook Excited state structure, dynamics and electron transfer reactions of a variety of organic radicals in both low temperature matrices and room temperature solutions using radiation chemistry techniques. Robert A. Crowell Ultrafast reaction phenomena. Etsuko Fujita Photochemistry of transition-metal complexes, small molecule activation by high- and low-oxidation state metal complexes; and biomimetic chemistry of porphyrins and enzymes.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

(Chemistry of the global atmosphere)  

SciTech Connect

The traveler attended the conference The Chemistry of the Global Atmosphere,'' and presented a paper on the anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) to the atmosphere. The conference included meetings of the International Global Atmospheric Chemistry (IGAC) programme, a core project of the International Geosphere/Biosphere Programme (IGBP) and the traveler participated in meetings on the IGAC project Development of Global Emissions Inventories'' and agreed to coordinate the working group on CO{sub 2}. Papers presented at the conference focused on the latest developments in analytical methods, modeling and understanding of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, NMHCs, CFCs, and aerosols.

Marland, G.

1990-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

262

NUMERICAL VERIFICATION OF EQUILIBRIUM CHEMISTRY  

SciTech Connect

A numerical tool is in an advanced state of development to compute the equilibrium compositions of phases and their proportions in multi-component systems of importance to the nuclear industry. The resulting software is being conceived for direct integration into large multi-physics fuel performance codes, particularly for providing boundary conditions in heat and mass transport modules. However, any numerical errors produced in equilibrium chemistry computations will be propagated in subsequent heat and mass transport calculations, thus falsely predicting nuclear fuel behaviour. The necessity for a reliable method to numerically verify chemical equilibrium computations is emphasized by the requirement to handle the very large number of elements necessary to capture the entire fission product inventory. A simple, reliable and comprehensive numerical verification method is presented which can be invoked by any equilibrium chemistry solver for quality assurance purposes.

Piro, Markus [Royal Military College of Canada; Lewis, Brent [Royal Military College of Canada; Thompson, Dr. William T. [Royal Military College of Canada; Simunovic, Srdjan [ORNL; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cold Controlled Chemistry Roman Krems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Possible applications of cold controlled chemistry #12; #¢¡ ©£¡ ! # %¢ ¥¤6#¢¡§¦ # ¤¨¤§! # ¤§¦ Centrifugal processes remains a significant challenge..." Paul Brumer, DAMOP 2007, Bulletin of the APS #12;Thermal gas is difficult to control #12;Low temperature gas under external fieldE #12;E BLow temperature gas

Krems, Roman

264

The HAMMONIA Chemistry Climate Model: Sensitivity of the Mesopause Region to the 11-Year Solar Cycle and CO2 Doubling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces the three-dimensional Hamburg Model of the Neutral and Ionized Atmosphere (HAMMONIA), which treats atmospheric dynamics, radiation, and chemistry interactively for the height range from the earth’s surface to the ...

H. Schmidt; G. P. Brasseur; M. Charron; E. Manzini; M. A. Giorgetta; T. Diehl; V. I. Fomichev; D. Kinnison; D. Marsh; S. Walters

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

8, 27712793, 2008 Sea surface wind  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ACPD 8, 2771­2793, 2008 Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar Y. Hu et al. Title.0 License. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Sea surface wind speed estimation from space;ACPD 8, 2771­2793, 2008 Sea surface wind speed estimation from space-based lidar Y. Hu et al. Title

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

266

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

U V W X Y Z U V W X Y Z Takada, Shoji (Shoji Takada) - Department of Biophysics, Kyoto University Tan, Weihong (Weihong Tan) - Department of Chemistry, University of Florida Tavernarakis, Nektarios (Nektarios Tavernarakis) - Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Foundation of Research and Technology, Hellas Tawfik, Dan S. (Dan S. Tawfik) - Department of Biological Chemistry, Weizmann Institute of Science Taylor, Jerry (Jerry Taylor) - Division of Animal Sciences, University of Missouri-Columbia Teichmann, Sarah (Sarah Teichmann) - Laboratory of Molecular Biology, MRC Tesler, Glenn (Glenn Tesler) - Department of Mathematics, University of California at San Diego Thiel, Teresa (Teresa Thiel) - Department of Biology, University of Missouri-St. Louis Thirumalai, Devarajan (Devarajan Thirumalai) - Institute for

267

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Energy Storage,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kadanoff, Leo P. (Leo P. Kadanoff) - James Franck Institute & Department of Physics, University of Chicago Kafesaki, Maria (Maria Kafesaki) - Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser, Foundation for Research and Technology Hellas Kahng, Byungnam (Byungnam Kahng) - School of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University Kais, Sabre (Sabre Kais) - Birck Nanotechnology Center & Department of Chemistry, Purdue University Kaiser, David (David Kaiser) - Program in Science, Technology, and Society & Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Kaiser, Ralf I. (Ralf I. Kaiser) - Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa Kaiser, Robin (Robin Kaiser) - Institut Non Linéaire de Nice,

268

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Energy Storage,  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Energy Storage, Conversion and Utilization Go to Research Groups Preprints Provided by Individual Scientists: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Al-Ghadhban, Samir (Samir Al-Ghadhban) - Electrical Engineering Department, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Andersen, Torben Ole (Torben Ole Andersen) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Anderson, Larry G.(Larry G.Anderson).- Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado at Denver Anderson, Scott L. (Scott L. Anderson) - Department of Chemistry, University of Utah Andreasen, Søren Juhl (Søren Juhl Andreasen) - Department of Energy Technology, Aalborg University Arno, Gehrer (Gehrer Arno) - Institute for Thermal Turbomachinery and Machine Dynamics, Technical University Graz

269

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ultrafast lasers have been used to enable multiplex CARS spectroscopy with a clear sensitivity advantages over conventional Raman spectroscopy ...

2012-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... supported experiments to examine the repeatability of pre-flashover fire patterns generated by short-duration fires from natural gas, gasoline, and ...

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

271

Chemistry Central Journal Commentary Relevance of chemistry to white biotechnology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. White biotechnology is a fast emerging area that concerns itself with the use of biotechnological approaches in the production of bulk and fine chemicals, biofuels, and agricultural products. It is a truly multidisciplinary area and further progress depends critically on the role of chemists. This article outlines the emerging contours of white biotechnology and encourages chemists to take up some of the challenges that this area has thrown up. It is curious how new terms in science get coined: some terms appeal to the imagination of a large set of people and then a new area starts. Often, at the beginning of this process, people are not necessarily clear as to what the area includes or excludes. Increasingly, these 'new ' areas attract people from different disciplines. A cross-fertilization of ideas and the pursuit of targets using tools from various existing areas hasten the development of the new

Munishwar N Gupta; Smita Raghava

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Advancing manufacturing through computational chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The capabilities of nanotechnology and computational chemistry are reaching a point of convergence. New computer hardware and novel computational methods have created opportunities to test proposed nanometer-scale devices, investigate molecular manufacturing and model and predict properties of new materials. Experimental methods are also beginning to provide new capabilities that make the possibility of manufacturing various devices with atomic precision tangible. In this paper, we will discuss some of the novel computational methods we have used in molecular dynamics simulations of polymer processes, neural network predictions of new materials, and simulations of proposed nano-bearings and fluid dynamics in nano- sized devices.

Noid, D.W.; Sumpter, B.G.; Tuzun, R.E.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Lithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in A. Nazri, G.Pistoia (Eds. ), Lithium batteries, Science &structure materials in lithium cells, for a lower limitLithium Insertion Chemistry of Some Iron Vanadates Sébastien

Patoux, Sebastien; Richardson, Thomas J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

This handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. This volume contains the following modules: reactor water chemistry (effects of radiation on water chemistry, chemistry parameters), principles of water treatment (purpose; treatment processes [ion exchange]; dissolved gases, suspended solids, and pH control; water purity), and hazards of chemicals and gases (corrosives [acids, alkalies], toxic compounds, compressed gases, flammable/combustible liquids).

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Detection Science Chemistry for Measurement and Detection Science Research into alternative forms of energy, especially energy security, is one of the major national...

276

Symposium on high temperature and materials chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains the written proceedings of the Symposium on High Temperature and Materials Chemistry held in Berkeley, California on October 24--25, 1989. The Symposium was sponsored by the Materials and Chemical Sciences Division of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and by the College of Chemistry of the University of California at Berkeley to discuss directions, trends, and accomplishments in the field of high temperature and materials chemistry. Its purpose was to provide a snapshot of high temperature and materials chemistry and, in so doing, to define status and directions.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The materials uploaded are meant to serve as final report on the funds provided by DOE-BES to help sponsor the 2005 American Conference on Theoretical Chemistry.

Carter, Emily A

2006-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

278

The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 20, 2007 ... In 17 chapters, The Chemistry and Technology of Magnesia covers a wide variety of topics that range from history to economic geology, mining, ...

279

Chemistry of Addition-Type Polyimides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...of polyimides are shown in 6and Fig. 5The basic chemistry of the PE series of imide oligomers is illustrated

280

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Charge Carrier Chemistry in Nanoscopic Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Defect chemistry is explored in space charge zones with emphasis on mesoscopic situations. After a general overview two representative

282

Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intro Chem and MatSci Apps Introduction to Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26, 2012 L ast edited: 2013-05-28 15:53:12...

283

BNL Photo- and Radiation Chemistry Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

chemistry, and photophysics; energy transduction by electron-transfer reactions; and energy storage through chemical transformations. Theoretical and experimental efforts are...

284

WEB: The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 2, 2008 ... The American Chemical Society's website "The Living Textbook of Nuclear Chemistry" provides 12 videos related to the history of nuclear ...

285

Radiation Chemistry and Photochemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the nuclear fuel cycle. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions of ionizing radiation and photons with ionic liquids is strongly needed. However, the radiation chemistry...

286

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Replacement - Nuclear Facility (CMRR-NF SEIS) | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing...

287

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Materials Project: Combining Quantum Chemistry Calculations with Supercomputing Centers for New Materials Discovery Speaker(s): Anubhav Jain Date: December 18, 2012 - 12:00pm...

288

Mimicking the Moon's surface in the basement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mimicking the Moon's surface Mimicking the Moon's surface Mimicking the Moon's surface in the basement The table-top simulation helped confirm that the Moon is inherently dry. August 4, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203 Email "It's the first completion of Recovery Act work at the Lab, and I'm

289

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin from by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method.

Miller, Jan D. (1886 Atkin Ave., Salt Lake City, UT 84106); Yi, Ye (2875 E. Wander Way, Salt Lake City, UT 84117); Yu, Qiang (224 University Village, Salt Lake City, UT 84108)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Surface chemistry control for selective fossil resin flotation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A froth flotation method is disclosed for separating fine particles of fossil resin by use of frothing reagents which include an aliphatic organic compound having a polar group and containing not more than four carbon atoms. Butanol is an effective frothing reagent in this method. 12 figs.

Miller, J.D.; Yi, Y.; Yu, Q.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fabricating RNA Microarrays with RNA-DNA Surface Ligation Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.; Roth, R.; George, D.; Eletr, S.; Albrecht, G.; Vermaas, E.; Williams, S. R.; Moon, K.; Burcham, T

292

Control of pyrite surface chemistry in physical coal cleaning  

SciTech Connect

Several pyrite depressants have been evaluated for their effectiveness in depressing coal pyrite. A novel reagent, NVT, has been synthesized and shown to be selective for the separation of coal from coal pyrite by froth flotation. This organic reagent contains no sulfur group in its structure and exhibits a stronger affinity toward pyrite than toward coal. The effects of a number of parameters such as pH, reagent concentration and flotation time on flotation response were investigated in a microflotation cell and a bench-scale Denver flotation cell. The reagent has demonstrated good performance at relatively low concentrations when compared to the commercially available sulfur-based pyrite depressants. 8 figs.

Luttrell, G.H.; Yoon, R.H.; Zachwieja, J.B.; Lagno, M.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Effect of Gold Nanorod Surface Chemistry on Cellular Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gold nanorods (GNRs) stabilized with cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) and GNR functionalized via a ligand exchange method with either thiolated polyethylene glycol (PEG5000) or mercaptohexadecanoic acid (MHDA) were ...

Grabinski, Christin

294

American Chemical Society Division of Colloid and Surface Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was concentrated by ultrafiltration using an Amicon YM-10 cell membrane, buffer exchanged against 10% ACN and 0L by ultrafiltration using an Amicon stirred cell concentrator with a YM-10 membrane, and the buffer was exchanged evaporator to remove ACN, and then concentrated to 30 mL by ultrafiltration using an Amicon stirred cell

Wagner, Oliver

295

Koel applies science of surface chemistry to fusion research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

To study the interactions of lithium under conditions similar to what might be found in a fusion reactor, lithium on a sample of TZM molybdenum, which is an alloy of molybdenum,...

296

Reaction chemistry and ligand exchange at cadmium selenide nanocrystal surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results in etching of the CdSe particles, as evidenced by ain quantum yield of the CdSe/ZnS core-shell samples. (a)312. The reaction of 7 with CdSe/ZnS core-shell particles

Owen, Jonathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Coupled chemistry/climate issues  

SciTech Connect

Driven by both natural and anthropogenic causes, the distributions of trace chemical species in the atmosphere has altered the natural state of the chemical distribution and, the authors believe, the climate system. A clear example of this change and its effect on climate is through tropospheric ozone. Evidence shows that over the last decade tropospheric ozone has increased, probably caused by increasing concentrations and emissions of CH{sub 4}, CO, NO{sub x}, and NMHCs (nonmethane hydrocarbons). Tropospheric ozone is photochemically produced when nitrogen oxides react in the presence of carbon monoxide, methane, non-methane hydrocarbons and sunlight. The chemistry of ozone and NO{sub x} is also closely associated with the hydroxyl radical (OH), which governs the atmospheric lifetime of a number of species, including CH{sub 4} and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), which are major greenhouse gases and which affect the chemical balance of the stratosphere. Increases in the concentrations of CO and CH{sub 4} can lead to decreased concentrations of OH and a positive feedback on the atmospheric lifetimes of CO and methane. The same would occur for other greenhouse gases and for some of the important reactions which form aerosols in the troposphere. This would further enhance the concentrations of the gases and accelerate the radiative effects from these greenhouse species, strongly affecting climate and the accurate prediction of climate. It is believed that warmer climates will also increase the amount of water in the atmosphere, thereby providing another chemistry feedback on OH.

Rotman, D.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Global Climate Research Div.; Wuebbles, D.J. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Quantum Chemistry at Finite Temperature  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this article, we present emerging fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. We discuss its recent developments on both experimental and theoretical fronts. First, we describe several experimental investigations related to the temperature effects on the structures, electronic spectra, or bond rupture forces for molecules. These include the analysis of the temperature impact on the pathway shifts for the protein unfolding by atomic force microscopy (AFM), the temperature dependence of the absorption spectra of electrons in solvents, and the temperature influence over the intermolecular forces measured by the AFM. On the theoretical side, we review advancements made by the author in the coming fields of quantum chemistry at finite temperature. Starting from the Bloch equation, we have derived the sets of hierarchy equations for the reduced density operators in both canonical and grand canonical ensembles. They provide a law according to which the reduced density operators vary in temperature for the identical and interacting many-body systems. By taking the independent particle approximation, we have solved the equations in the case of a grand canonical ensemble, and obtained an energy eigenequation for the molecular orbitals at finite temperature. The explicit expression for the temperature-dependent Fock operator is also given. They form a mathematical foundation for the examination of the molecular electronic structures and their interplay with finite temperature. Moreover, we clarify the physics concerning the temperature effects on the electronic structures or processes of the molecules, which is crucial for both theoretical understanding and computation. Finally, ....

Liqiang Wei

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

299

Onderwerpscodes Chemie -Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry -Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie -Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry -  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Onderwerpscodes Chemie - Farmacie / Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy, 2009, April1 Rubrieken Chemie - Farmacie: Subject headings Chemistry - Pharmacy Gang . kast - Aisle . bookcase 01 Algemeen 01 chemie 05 Physical chemistry 10.08 - 06 Chemische binding 06 Chemical bonding 10.13 - 07 Anorganische

Galis, Frietson

300

Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division. Progress report, October 1980-September 1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes major progress in the research and development programs pursued by the Chemistry-Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory during FY 1981. Topics covered include advanced analytical methods, atmospheric chemistry and transport, biochemistry, biomedical research, medical radioisotopes research, element migration and fixation, nuclear waste isolation research, inorganic and structural chemistry, isotope separation, analysis and applications, the newly established Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Center, atomic and molecular collisions, molecular spectroscopy, nuclear cosmochemistry, nuclear structure and reactions, pion charge exchange, radiochemical separations, theoretical chemistry, and unclassified weapons research.

Ryan, R.R. (comp.)

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. June through August 1963  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1. G. K. Radda, in Bio -Organic Chemistry Quarterly Report,1963. 2. G. K. Radda, in Bio-Organic Chemistry QuarterlyBassham and Martha Kirk, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT - MARCH THROUGH MAY 1961  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

H. Morimoto, and A. Orme, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly1949, 55. P. R. Hammond, in Bio-Organic Chemistry QuarterlyPhysiol. Edward Markham, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Chemistry courses as the turning point for premedical students  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

009-9165-3 ORIGINAL PAPER Chemistry courses as the turningnegative experiences in chemistry courses are a major factorTo determine if chemistry courses have a similar effect at a

Barr, Donald A.; Matsui, John; Wanat, Stanley F.; Gonzalez, Maria Elena

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

showcase the power of chemistry in creating novel materials.J. R. Journal of Physical Chemistry 1996, 100, 7212-7219.781-783. Lobana, T. S. In The chemistry of organophosphorous

Liu, Haitao

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

2012 Short Course Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships held at the 103rd AOCS Annual Meeting and Expo. 2012 Short Course Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships Olive Oil Chemistry and Sensory Relationships Saturday, April 28 -Sunday, A

306

The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines Statistical Tests of Agreement between Observation and Hypothesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines Statistical of Economics and Political Science and The Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related, The London School of Economics and Political Science, The Suntory and Toyota International Centres

Masci, Frank

307

From Theory to Application: Extreme Fire, Resilience, Restoration, and Education in Social-Ecological Disciplines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conceptual and theoretical advancements have been developed in recent years to break down the assumptions and traditional boundaries that establish seemingly independent disciplines, and the research outlined in this dissertation aspires to build on these advancements to provide innovative solutions to a broad array of modern problems in social-ecological. I used a variety of techniques to address challenges ranging from disconnections between theory and application, perceived versus realized roles of prescribed fire in resprouting shrublands, and the need for broader participation in research as part of undergraduate education. The chapters in this dissertation serve as a case-study approach across multiple scientific disciplines that overcome the traditions and assumptions that conflict with our ability to develop innovative solutions to modern social-ecological problems. First, I bridge theoretical and applied concepts by showing how recent theoretical advancements in resilience can be integrated into a predictive framework for environmental managers. Second, experimental data from multiple experiments were collected in two ecological regions of Texas to assess the potential for using extreme fire, in isolation and in combination with herbicide, as a novel intervention approach in resprouting shrublands of the southern Great Plains. The findings from these experiments demonstrate the importance of moving past traditional assumptions of when prescribed fire should be applied to demonstrate new patterns of woody plant responses to the applications of “more extreme” prescribed fires while not causing undesirable invasions by exotic grasses and exotic insects. Finally, I initiated a PhD instructed course on undergraduate research that sought to increase undergraduate participation while lowering the costs of conducting research. This chapter shows how traditional approaches of supporting undergraduate research are incapable of meeting the broader goals established by society and reveal a novel approach that can provide an additional pathway for supporting undergraduate student participation at large, research-based universities. Ultimately, this research suggests that our capacity to enhance services in social-ecological systems ultimately hinges upon the integration of theoretical and applied concepts that drive policy and governance and overcoming the assumptions and traditions that limit their integration.

Twidwell, Dirac

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry George A. Olah, Carbocation and Hydrocarbon Chemistry Resources with Additional Information · Patents George A. Olah Courtesy Rand Larson, Morningstar Productions George Olah received the 1994 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for his contribution to carbocation chemistry" and his 'role in the chemistry of hydrocarbons. In particular, he developed superacids ... that are much stronger than ordinary acids, are non-nucleophilic, and are fluid at low temperatures. In such media ... carbocations are stable and their physical properties ... can be observed, thus allowing details of their structures to be determined. Besides trivalent ions ... Olah demonstrated the existence of higher coordinate carbocations ... . These species do not violate the octet rule, but involve 2-electron 3-center bonding. '1

309

LA-2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

2271 2271 CHEMISTRY-GENERAL TID-4500, 14th Ed. LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA LOS ALAMOS NEW MEXICO REPORT WRITTEN: August 1958 REPORT DISTRIBUTED: March 17, 1959 COMPRESSIBILITY FACTORS AND FUGACITY COEFFICIENTS CALCULATED FROM THE BEATTIE-BRIDGEMAN EQUATION OF STATE FOR HYDROGEN, NITROGEN, OXYGEN, CARBON DIOXIDE, AMMONIA, METHANE, AND HELIUM by C. E. Holley, J r . W. J. Worlton R. K. Zeigler » * This report expresses the opinions of the author or authors and does not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. Contract W-7405-ENG. 36 with the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States

310

Radiation Chemistry of Ionic Liquids  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquids Liquids James F. Wishart, Alison M. Funston, and Tomasz Szreder in "Molten Salts XIV" Mantz, R. A., et al., Eds.; The Electrochemical Society, Pennington, NJ, (2006) pp. 802-813. [Information about the volume (look just above this link)] Abstract: Ionic liquids have potentially important applications in nuclear fuel and waste processing, energy production, improving the efficiency and safety of industrial chemical processes, and pollution prevention. Successful use of ionic liquids in radiation-filled environments will require an understanding of ionic liquid radiation chemistry. For example, characterizing the primary steps of ionic liquid radiolysis will reveal radiolytic degradation pathways and suggest ways to prevent them or mitigate their effects on the properties of the material

311

UCRL-11359 UC-4 Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1359 1359 UC-4 Chemistry TID-45 (27th Ed ) UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA Lawrence Radiation Laboratory Berkeley, California AEC Contract No. W-7405-eng-48 PROPOSED MOLECULAR BEAM DETERMINATION OF ENERGY PARTITION IN THE PHOTO DISSOCIATION OF POLYATOMIC MOLECULES Richard N. Zare and Dudley R. Herschba.ch January 29, 1.964 DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference

312

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chemistry Of Thermal And Nonthermal Springs In The Vicinity Of Lassen Volcanic National Park Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Chemistry...

313

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate October 5, 2011 - 6:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON,...

314

EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico EA-1404: Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science Laboratory, Carlsbad, New Mexico SUMMARY This EA...

315

Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Project at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Computational Chemistry for Better Fuel Cells Key Challenges: Rational development of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs). Fundamental scientific...

316

Jefferson Lab Science Series - Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids) Dinosaur Extinctions and Giant Asteroids Chemistry - It's More Than Puffs and Bangs Dr. Joe Schwarcz - McGill Office for Chemistry and...

317

Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Training at NERSC...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 or 510-486-8611 Home For Users Training & Tutorials Training Events Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June...

318

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate twentieth century transient model investigation: Trends in short-lived species and climate responses Title Coupled aerosol-chemistry-climate...

319

NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences...

320

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Study of Heterogeneouse Processes Related to the Chemistry of Tropospheric Oxidants and Aerosols  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the studies was to elucidate the heterogeneous chemistry of tropospheric aerosols. Experiments were designed to measure both specifically needed parameters, and to obtain systematic data required to build a fundamental understanding of the nature of gas-surface physical and chemical interactions

Davidovits, Paul; Worsnop, D R; Jayne, J T; Colb, C E

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress is reported in the following fields: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, elecrochemistry, catalysis, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemistry of hazardous chemicals, and thermal energy storage.

Not Available

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION Nuclear & Particle Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT ORGANIZATION Nuclear & Particle Physics Associate Laboratory Director Berndt Mueller Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Associate Laboratory Director James Misewich Financial Support Angela Wefer Department Chair Alexander L. Harris Gregory Hall, Deputy Chair Jean Petterson, Sr. Administrative Assistant Quality Assurance Rep. Charles Gortakowski *Assoc. Laser Safety Officer (Jack Preses) Berndt Mueller Training Coordinator/ Records Management (Linda Sallustio) Dept. Systems Support & Cyber Security POC Mahendra Kahanda Berndt Mueller Basic Energy Sciences (BES) Nuclear & Particle Physics Neutrino & Nuclear Chemistry Minfang Yeh Gas-Phase Molecular Dynamics Gregory Hall Electron and Photo-

324

Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

DOE fundamentals handbook: Chemistry. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry Handbook was developed to assist nuclear facility operating contractors in providing operators, maintenance personnel, and the technical staff with the necessary fundamentals training to ensure a basic understanding of chemistry. The handbook includes information on the atomic structure of matter; chemical bonding; chemical equations; chemical interactions involved with corrosion processes; water chemistry control, including the principles of water treatment; the hazards of chemicals and gases, and basic gaseous diffusion processes. This information will provide personnel with a foundation for understanding the chemical properties of materials and the way these properties can impose limitations on the operation of equipment and systems.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Q R S Q R S T U V W X Y Z Pachter, Lior (Lior Pachter) - Department of Mathematics, University of California at Berkeley Page Jr., C. David (C. David Page Jr.) - Departments of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics & Computer Sciences, University of Wisconsin Pande, Vijay S. (Vijay S. Pande) - Departments of Chemistry & Structural Biology, Stanford University Park, Je-Kyun (Je-Kyun Park) - Department of Bio and Brain Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Park, Sheldon (Sheldon Park) - Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, State University of New York at Buffalo Pasquali, Samuela (Samuela Pasquali) - Laboratoire de Biochimie Théorique, Université Denis Diderot Paris 7 Pe'er, Dana (Dana Pe'er) - Department of Biological Sciences,

327

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W X Y Z W X Y Z Wall, Dennis P. (Dennis P. Wall) - Center for Biomedical Informatics, Harvard University Walter, Nils G. (Nils G. Walter) - Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan Wang, Jeff Tza-Huei (Jeff Tza-Huei Wang) - Departments of Biomedical Engineering & Mechanical Engineering, Johns Hopkins University Wang, Li-San (Li-San Wang) - Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Wang, Lusheng (Lusheng Wang) - Department of Computer Science, City University of Hong Kong Weale, Michael E. (Michael E. Weale) - Centre for Genetic Anthropology & Department of Biology, University College London Weller, Jennifer Walsh (Jennifer Walsh Weller) - Bioinformatics Program, University of North Carolina at Charlotte Weng, Zhiping (Zhiping Weng) - Center for Advanced Genomic

328

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kagami, Maiko (Maiko Kagami) - Department of Environmental Science, Toho University Kalinichev, Andrey G. (Andrey G. Kalinichev) - Departments of Chemistry and Geological Sciences, Michigan State University, Kasher, Roni (Roni Kasher) - Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Zuckerberg Institute for Water Research, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research Kelly, John J. (John J. Kelly) - Department of Biology, Loyola University Chicago Kemner, Ken (Ken Kemner) - Biosciences Division, Argonne National Laboratory Kern, Michel (Michel Kern) - INRIA Paris-Rocquencourt Kilpatrick, Peter K. (Peter K. Kilpatrick) - Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, North Carolina State University Go back to Individual Researchers

329

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Babu, M. Madan (M. Madan Babu) - Laboratory of Molecular Biology, MRC Badger, Jonathan (Jonathan Badger) - Institute for Genomic Research, Rockville Bailey, Timothy L. (Timothy L. Bailey) - Institute for Molecular Bioscience, University of Queensland Baker, Barbara (Barbara Baker) - Department of Plant and Microbial Biology, University of California at Berkeley Baker, David (David Baker) - Center for Nanotechnology and NanoTechnology & Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington at Seattle Baltimore, David (David Baltimore) - Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology Bang, Duhee (Duhee Bang) - Department of Chemistry, Yonsei University Banta, Scott (Scott Banta) - Department of Chemical Engineering,

330

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Plasma Physics  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Achenbach, Laurie A. (Laurie A. Achenbach) - Department of Microbiology, Southern Illinois University Alvarez, Pedro J. (Pedro J. Alvarez) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Rice University Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa (Lisa Alvarez-Cohen) - Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California at Berkeley Anderson, Larry G.(Larry G.Anderson).- Department of Chemistry, University of Colorado at Denver Arhonditsis, George B. (George B. Arhonditsis) - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto at Scarborough Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef" (Yossi "Yosef" Ashkenazy) - Department of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics, Jacob Blaustein Institutes for

331

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Biology and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

S S T U V W X Y Z Schechter, David S. (David S. Schechter) - Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A&M University Schramm, Laurier L. (Laurier L. Schramm) - Chemistry Department, University of Calgary Shaw, John (John Shaw) - Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Alberta Go back to Individual Researchers Collections: A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Stanford University - Department of Energy Resources Engineering, Reservoir Simulation Research Stanford University - Department of Energy Resources Engineering, SUPRI-HW: Advanced Wells Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute -SUPRI-D Innovation in Well Testing Stanford University Petroleum Research Institute, SUPRI-A Group

332

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fission and  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Aboufadel, Edward F. (Edward F. Aboufadel) - Department of Mathematics, Grand Valley State University Adida, Elodie (Elodie Adida) - School of Business Administration, University of California at Riverside Aerts, Diederik (Diederik Aerts) - Leo Apostel Centre, Vrije Universiteit Brussel Allain, Rhett (Rhett Allain) - Department of Chemistry and Physics, Southeastern Louisiana University Allen, Gale (Gale Allen) - Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Technology, Minnesota State University Mankato Anderson, Robert M. (Robert M. Anderson) - Department of Mathematics, University of California at Berkeley Aragon, Cecilia R. (Cecilia R. Aragon) - Department of Human Centered Design and Engineering, University of Washington at Seattle

333

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B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Baigrie, Brian S. (Brian S. Baigrie) - Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology, University of Toronto Balashov, Yuri V. (Yuri V. Balashov) - Department of Philosophy, University of Georgia Baldwin, John T. (John T. Baldwin) - Department of Mathematics, Statistics, and Computer Science, University of Illinois at Chicago Balster, Nicholas J. (Nicholas J. Balster) - Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin at Madison Baltisberger, Jay H. (Jay H. Baltisberger) - Department of Chemistry, Berea College Bao, Lei (Lei Bao) - Department of Physics, Ohio State University Barrett, Jeffrey A. (Jeffrey A. Barrett) - Department of Logic and Philosophy of Science, University of California, Irvine

334

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H I J K L M N O P Q R S H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Georgiadis, Rosina M. (Rosina M. Georgiadis) - Department of Chemistry, Boston University Georgiou, George (George Georgiou) - Departments of Biomedical Engineering, & Chemical Engineering, University of Texas at Austin Gerstein, Mark (Mark Gerstein) - Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University Gieg, Lisa (Lisa Gieg) - Department of Biological Sciences, University of Calgary Gifford, David K. (David K. Gifford) - Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory & Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Gill, Kulvinder (Kulvinder Gill) - Department of Crop and Soil Sciences, Washington State University

335

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L M N O P Q R S L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Kaessmann, Henrik (Henrik Kaessmann) - Centre Integratif de Genomique, Universite de Lausanne Kapanidis, Achillefs N. (Achillefs N. Kapanidis) - Department of Physics, University of Oxford Kaplan, Tommy (Tommy Kaplan) - Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Karpen, Gary (Gary Karpen) - Department of Genome Biology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Karplus, Kevin (Kevin Karplus) - Department of Biomolecular Engineering, University of California at Santa Cruz Kavcic, Aleksandar (Aleksandar Kavcic) - Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Hawai’i at Manoa Keinan, Ehud (Ehud Keinan) - Department of Chemistry, Technion, Israel Institute of Technology Khalil, Ahmad S. (Ahmad S. Khalil) - Department of Biomedical

336

Browse by Discipline -- E-print Network Subject Pathways: Fossil Fuels --  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

N O P Q R S N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Ma, Bin (Bin Ma) - School of Computer Science, University of Waterloo Ma, Ping (Ping Ma) - Department of Statistics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign MacCallum, Bob (Bob MacCallum) - Stockholm Bioinformatics Center, Stockholms Universitet Macmillan, Derek (Derek Macmillan) - Department of Chemistry, University College London Magwene, Paul M, (Paul M, Magwene) - Department of Biology, Duke University Majoros, Bill (Bill Majoros) - Institute for Genome Sciences and Policy, Duke University Maranas, Costas (Costas Maranas) - Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo (Leonardo Mariño-Ramírez) - Computational Biology Branch, National Center for Biotechnology Information

337

Plasma chemistry in wire chambers  

SciTech Connect

The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

Wise, J.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

CRYSTAL CHEMISTRY OF HYDROUS MINERALS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen has long been appreciated for its role in geological processes of the Earth's crust. However, its role in Earth's deep interior has been neglected in most geophysical thinking. Yet it is now believed that most of our planet's hydrogen may be locked up in high pressure phases of hydrous silicate minerals within the Earth's mantle. This rocky interior (approximately 7/8 of Earth's volume) is conjectured to contain 1-2 orders of magnitude more water than the more obvious oceans (the ''hydrosphere'') and atmosphere. This project is aimed at using the capability of neutron scattering from hydrogen to study the crystal chemistry and stability of hydrogen-bearing minerals at high pressures and temperatures. At the most basic level this is a study of the atomic position and hydrogen bond itself. We have conducted experimental runs on hydrous minerals under high pressure and high temperature conditions. The crystallographic structure of hydrous minerals at extreme conditions and its structural stability, and hydrogen bond at high P-T conditions are the fundamental questions to be addressed. The behavior of the hydrous minerals in the deep interior of the Earth has been discussed.

Y. ZHAO; ET AL

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Contained radiological analytical chemistry module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system which provides analytical determination of a plurality of water chemistry parameters with respect to water samples subject to radiological contamination. The system includes a water sample analyzer disposed within a containment and comprising a sampling section for providing predetermined volumes of samples for analysis; a flow control section for controlling the flow through the system; and a gas analysis section for analyzing samples provided by the sampling system. The sampling section includes a controllable multiple port valve for, in one position, metering out sample of a predetermined volume and for, in a second position, delivering the material sample for analysis. The flow control section includes a regulator valve for reducing the pressure in a portion of the system to provide a low pressure region, and measurement devices located in the low pressure region for measuring sample parameters such as pH and conductivity, at low pressure. The gas analysis section which is of independent utility provides for isolating a small water sample and extracting the dissolved gases therefrom into a small expansion volume wherein the gas pressure and thermoconductivity of the extracted gas are measured.

Barney, David M. (Scotia, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Simplifying Chemistry for Computational Efficiency in Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simplifying Chemistry for Computational Efficiency in Combustion Calculations Speaker(s): Shaheen Tonse Date: February 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of...

342

Accelerators and Other Sources for Radiation Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and Other Sources for the Study of Radiation Chemistry James F. Wishart Adv. Chem. Ser. 254, Ch. 3, pp. 35-50 Abstract: This chapter is intended as a guide to aid in...

343

Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

... as mentioned above. Download Mathematics for Chemistry with Symbolic Computation version 4.0, February 12th, 2013, for Maple 16 as a 6.7 MB zip file.

344

* Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 in the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds. * Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Processing agricultural algae algal analytical aocs articles biomass biotechnology By-product Utilization courses detergents division division

345

Updated September 2012 Chemistry Degree Requirements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

approved courses at the 400-level in Chemistry, Geology and Physics Option 2) One approved course GEOL 471** Aqueous Geochemistry GEOL 472** Isotope Geochemistry GEOL 473** Courses not offered AY 12 ** contact the Geology department for course offerings #12;

Cina, Jeff

346

Strategic thinking in chemistry and materials  

SciTech Connect

Science and technology challenges facing the Chemistry and Materials program relate to the fundamental problem of addressing the critical needs to improve our understanding of how nuclear weapons function and age, while experiencing increased pressures to compensate for a decreasing technology base. Chemistry and materials expertise is an enabling capability embedded within every aspect of nuclear weapons design, testing, production, surveillance and dismantlement. Requirements to capture an enduring chemistry and materials technology base from throughout the integrated contractor complex have promoted a highly visible obligation on the weapons research and development program. The only successful response to this challenge must come from direct improvements in effectiveness and efficiency accomplished through improved understanding. Strategic thinking has generated the following three overarching focus areas for the chemistry and materials competency: As-built Materials Characterization and Performance; Materials Aging; and, Materials Synthesis and Processing.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comprehensive new soybean reference book, a volume from the AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds, disseminates key soybean oilseed information. Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry P

348

Stragegies to Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Based on Monitoring and Analysis of CO2 in the Near-Surface Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in volcanic and geothermal areas. Appl. Geochem. , 13, 543–1977. Chemistry and Geothermal Systems. Academic Press, Newfor detecting hidden geothermal systems by near-surface gas

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Environmental Chemistry of Arsenic: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Arsenic is an element of significant interest to energy companies because of its occurrence in coal ash and its potential for release and migration in groundwater. This report summarizes technical information on the environmental chemistry of arsenic assembled from an extensive literature review. In particular, the report provides an in-depth look at the three most important sets of geochemical reactions relevant to understanding the environmental chemistry of arsenic -- precipitation-dissolution, reduct...

2000-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 SRF Materials: Fundamental studies of interfacial oxidation chemistry of niobium Lance Cooley - FNAL Mike Pellin, Jim Norem - ANL Steve Sibener - UC John Zasadzinski, Thomas Prolier - IIT f ANL/FNAL/UC Collaboration meeting 27 Nov 2007 May 2007 SRF Materials Workshop @ FNAL energized 2 collaborations being reported here * Atomic layer deposition of conformal coatings onto cavities (Pellin, Zasadzinski, Prolier, Norem, Antoine/Wu/Cooley) - Directly probe surface superconductivity (SC) via 1.5 K STM + XPS surface composition - Nb oxidation layer proximity effects! - ALD Al 2 O 3 coated cavity first, for oxidation control; multilayer- coated cavity later - A new philosophy: build up, not etch down - First annealing results reveal oxidation vs

351

Chemistry and cooling in metal-free and metal-poor gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize four of the most important areas of uncertainty in the study of the chemistry and cooling of gas with zero or very low metallicity. These are: i) the importance and effects of HD cooling in primordial gas; ii) the importance of metal-line and dust cooling in low metallicity gas; iii) the impact of the large uncertainties that exist in the rate coefficients of several key reactions involved in the formation of H2; and iv) the effectiveness of grain surface chemistry at high redshifts.

Glover, S C O

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Chemistry and cooling in metal-free and metal-poor gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I summarize four of the most important areas of uncertainty in the study of the chemistry and cooling of gas with zero or very low metallicity. These are: i) the importance and effects of HD cooling in primordial gas; ii) the importance of metal-line and dust cooling in low metallicity gas; iii) the impact of the large uncertainties that exist in the rate coefficients of several key reactions involved in the formation of H2; and iv) the effectiveness of grain surface chemistry at high redshifts.

S. C. O. Glover

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

2012 RADIATION CHEMISTRY GORDON RESEARCH CONFERENCE AND GORDON RESEARCH SEMINAR, JULY 28, - AUGUST 3, 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of this conference is to catalyze the interchange of new ideas and recent discoveries within the basic radiation sciences of physics, chemistry, and biology, and to facilitate translating this knowledge to applications in medicine and industry. The 9 topics for the GRC are: "�From Energy Absorption to Disease", "�Biodosimetry after a Radiological Incident," "�Track Structure and Low Energy Electrons," "Free Radical Processes in DNA and Proteins," "Irradiated Polymers for Industrial/ Medical Applications," "Space Radiation Chemistry/Biology," "Nuclear Power and Waste Management," "Nanoparticles and Surface Interfaces", and the "Young Investigator" session.

y LaVerne

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

354

Effects of Surface Wetness on the Evolution and Vertical Transport of Submicron Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulations have been carried out with a numerical model describing air chemistry, aerosol microphysics, and turbulent mixing, in order to study the behavior of fine sulfate particles in the atmospheric surface layer over wet surfaces. ...

I. Y. Lee; M. L. Wesely

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

An Exploration of Catalytic Chemistry on Au/Ni(111)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project explored the catalytic oxidation chemistry that can be effected on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy. A Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is a Ni(111) surface on which less than 60% of the Ni atoms are replaced at random positions by Au atoms. The alloy is produced by vapor deposition of a small amount of Au onto Ni single crystals. The Au atoms do not result in an epitaxial Au overlayer or in the condensation of the Au into droplets. Instead, Au atoms displace and then replace Ni atoms on a Ni(111) surface, even though Au is immiscible in bulk Ni. The two dimensional structure of the clean Ni surface is preserved. This alloy is found to stabilize an adsorbed peroxo-like O2 species that is shown to be the critical reactant in the low temperature catalytic oxidation of CO and that is suspected to be the critical reactant in other oxidation reactions. This investigation revealed a new, practically important catalyst for CO oxidation that has since been patented.

Sylvia T. Ceyer

2011-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Enseignement-apprentissage d'une discipline linguistique et non-linguistique à l'école primaire : analyse de l'action conjointe professeurs-élèves dans des classes primaires bilingues en Thaïlande.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Notre thèse vise à étudier et caractériser les situations didactiques mises en oeuvre pour l'enseignement de l'anglais, une discipline linguistique, et des sciences, une discipline… (more)

Kewara, Punwalai

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Manhattan Project: Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, Met Lab, 1942-1944  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Glenn T. Seaborg looks through a microscope at the world's first sample of pure plutonium, Met Lab, August 20, 1942. SEABORG AND PLUTONIUM CHEMISTRY Glenn T. Seaborg looks through a microscope at the world's first sample of pure plutonium, Met Lab, August 20, 1942. SEABORG AND PLUTONIUM CHEMISTRY (Met Lab, 1942-1944) Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Production Reactor (Pile) Design, 1942 DuPont and Hanford, 1942 CP-1 Goes Critical, December 2, 1942 Seaborg and Plutonium Chemistry, 1942-1944 Final Reactor Design and X-10, 1942-1943 Hanford Becomes Operational, 1943-1944 While the Met Lab labored to make headway on pile (reactor) design, Glenn T. Seaborg (right) and his coworkers were trying to learn enough about transuranium chemistry to ensure that plutonium could be chemically separated from the uranium that would be irradiated in a production pile. Using lanthanum fluoride as a carrier, Seaborg isolated a weighable sample of plutonium in August 1942. At the same time, Isadore Perlman and William J. Knox explored the peroxide method of separation; John E. Willard studied various materials to determine which best adsorbed (gathered on its surface) plutonium; Theodore T. Magel and Daniel K. Koshland, Jr., researched solvent-extraction processes; and Harrison S. Brown and Orville F. Hill performed experiments into volatility reactions. Basic research on plutonium's chemistry continued as did work on radiation and fission products.

359

PAH chemistry and IR emission from circumstellar disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. The chemistry of, and infrared (IR) emission from, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in disks around Herbig Ae/Be and T Tauri stars are investigated. The equilibrium distribution of the PAHs over all accessible charge/hydrogenation states depends on the size and shape of the PAHs and on the physical properties of the star and surrounding disk. Methods. A chemistry model is created to calculate this equilibrium distribution. Destruction of PAHs by ultraviolet (UV) photons, possibly in multi-photon absorption events, is taken into account. The chemistry model is coupled to a radiative transfer code to provide the physical parameters and to combine the PAH emission with the spectral energy distribution (SED) from the star+disk system. Results. Normally hydrogenated PAHs in Herbig Ae/Be disks account for most of the observed PAH emission, with neutral and positively ionized species contributing in roughly equal amounts. Close to the midplane, the PAHs are more strongly hydrogenated and negatively ionized, but these species do not contribute to the overall emission because of the low UV/optical flux deep inside the disk. PAHs of 50 carbon atoms are destroyed out to 100 AU in the disk's surface layer, and the resulting spatial extent of the emission does not agree well with observations. Rather, PAHs of about 100 carbon atoms or more are predicted to cause most of the observed emission. The emission is extended on a scale similar to that of the size of the disk. Furthermore, the emission from T Tauri disks is much weaker and concentrated more towards the central star than that from Herbig Ae/Be disks. Positively ionized PAHs are predicted to be largely absent in T Tauri disks because of the weaker radiation field.

R. Visser; V. C. Geers; C. P. Dullemond; J. -C. Augereau; K. M. Pontoppidan; E. F. van Dishoeck

2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

360

From the portfolio to the diagram : architectural discourse and the transformation of the discipline of architecture in America, 1918-1943  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation is an historical inquiry into the concomitant transformations of architectural discourse and the discipline of architecture in America. It proceeds on the theoretical assumption that the documents produced ...

Pae, Hy?ng-min.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Categorical Exclusion 4497: Lithium Wet Chemistry Project  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

8/2012 07:36 8/2012 07:36 8655749041 ENVIRONMENTAL COMPL U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Detennination Form Proposed Action Tills: Lithium W@t Chemistry Project (4597) Program or Fi~ld Oftke: Y-12 Site Office L&cationfs) (CiWLCount:r/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County; Tennessee Proposed Action Description: PAGE 03/04 r: :;: :: !: s .a : brnl, i ~ y. : $ ~-rtl~il : t·:~::;J The proposed action is to develop a small lithium wet chemistry operation for the following purposes: (1) to capture wet chemistry operations, (2) to provide processing path for Lithium materials such as machine dust, (3) to provide lithium based materials, and (4) to produce the littlium hydroxide needed to support production. CategQrj~l Exclusion(s) Applied

362

Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.  

SciTech Connect

Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Chemistry of Low Mass Substellar Objects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Brown dwarfs" is the collective name for objects more massive than giant planets such as Jupiter but less massive than M dwarf stars. This review gives a brief description of the classification and chemistry of low mass dwarfs. The current spectral classification of stars includes L and T dwarfs that encompass the coolest known stars and substellar objects. The relatively low atmospheric temperatures and high total pressures in substellar dwarfs lead to molecular gas and condensate chemistry. The chemistry of elements such as C, N, O, Ti, V, Fe, Cr, and the alkali elements play a dominant role in shaping the optical and infrared spectra of the "failed" stars. Chemical diagnostics for the subclassifications are described.

Katharina Lodders; Bruce Fegley, Jr

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Chemistry of atmospheric aerosol particles and their resulting warm cloud-nucleation properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CCN activation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 5241-precipitation, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 9, 3223-particles. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2009, 9, A. P.

Moore, Meagan Julia Kerry

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Research and ecology semiannual progress report, January--June 1972. Chemistry research and development  

SciTech Connect

Research progress is reported in the following areas: chemistry research and development, chemistry instrumentation, process chemistry, chemical technology, and environmental research. (DHM)

Thompson, M.A.

1973-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

366

Unique QA/QC requirements for analytical chemistry at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the missions of group NMT-1 (Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Analytical Chemistry) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide analysis of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials to address the stockpile stewardship needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Trace to high levels of various constituents are measured using traditional analytical methods and state-of-the-art instrumental methods. The capabilities include Pu and U assay, wet chemistry, plasma spectroscopy, mass spectrometry radiochemistry, X-ray fluorescence, anion and cation analysis, special standards preparation, surface analysis, and gas analysis. The authors are currently developing and implementing a plan to independently assess the quality of the analytical data produced by NMT-1. Nuclear materials of a matrix similar to the client`s samples but having different concentration levels of analytes that are representative of the client`s samples will be used. Well-characterized, stable, homogeneous materials have been identified as possible candidates for single-blind quality control (QC) samples. These materials include Pu metal, Pu oxide, U metal, U oxide, and U-Pu mixed oxide (MOX) with varying degrees of purity. These single-blind samples will be periodically distributed along with regular client samples to be analyzed by the aforementioned analytical methods.

Tandon, L.; Gautier, M.A.; Hammond, C.F.; Porterfield, D.R. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

Unique QA/QC requirements for analytical chemistry at LANL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the missions of group NMT-1 (Nuclear Materials Technology Division/Analytical Chemistry) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to provide analysis of both radioactive and nonradioactive materials to address the stockpile stewardship needs of the US Department of Energy (DOE). Trace to high levels of various constituents are measured using traditional analytical methods and state-of-the-art instrumental methods. Capabilities include Pu and U assay, wet chemistry, plasma spectroscopy, mass spectrometry radiochemistry, x-ray fluorescence, anion and cation analysis, special standards preparation, surface analysis, and gas analysis. The authors are currently developing and implementing a plan to independently assess the quality of the analytical data produced by NMT-1. Nuclear materials of a matrix similar to the client`s samples but having different concentration levels of analytes that are representative of the client`s samples will be used. Well-characterized, stable, homogeneous materials have been identified as possible candidates for single-blind quality control (QC) samples. These materials include Pu metal, Pu oxide, uranium metal, uranium oxide, and uranium-plutonium mixed oxide with varying degrees of purity. These single-blind samples will be periodically distributed along with regular client samples to be analyzed by the above mentioned analytical methods.

Tandon, L.; Gautier, M.A.; Hammond, C.F.; Porterfield, D.R.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Gas Phase Moleculer Dynamics (GPMD) Group | Chemistry Department |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Members Group Members Greg Hall (Group Leader) Chemical dynamics of unimolecular and bimolecular reactions. High resolution spectroscopic probes of collisional energy transfer processes. Elastic and inelastic interactions responsible for pressure broadening, saturation relaxation and depolarization. Non-adiabatic reactions and multiple surface interactions. Vector correlations and angular momentum polarization probes of chemical dynamics. Applied laser spectroscopy. Trevor Sears (PI) Use of frequency comb techniques for precision spectroscopic measurements in chemical systems. Development of new high resolution and high sensitivity spectroscopic techniques. Free radical spectroscopy relevant to combustion chemistry. Characterization of collisional phenomena and their effects on spectroscopic lineshapes, pressure broadening and sub-Doppler measurements. Hyperfine spectroscopy of 207PbF for potential e-EDM measurements

369

Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS) Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combined atmospheric chemistry-meteorology experiment, the Dynamics and Chemistry of the Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS), was carried out during the summer of 1985 over the eastern Pacific Ocean using the NCAR Electra aircraft. The objectives ...

D. H. Lenschow; I. R. Paluch; A. R. Bandy; R. Pearson Jr.; S. R. Kawa; C. J. Weaver; B. J. Huebert; J. G. Kay; D. C. Thornton; A. R. Driedger III

1988-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

5.301 Chemistry Laboratory Techniques, January IAP 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course is an intensive introduction to the techniques of experimental chemistry and gives first year students an opportunity to learn and master the basic chemistry lab techniques for carrying out experiments. Students ...

Tabacco, Sarah

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ultrasonic Chemistry: A Survey and Energy Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemicals, Petroleum and Natural Gas Target of EPRI's Energy Delivery & Utilization Division supports Strategic Science & Technology, a program aimed at anticipating future needs and determining future directions. A study of sonochemistry (chemistry resulting from applying ultrasound to chemical reaction systems) assessed this field's progress relative to utility and process industry needs.

1998-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Complex Chemistry of William H. Green  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Population (billions) Global Energy Demand (1971-2030) 1750-2050 #12;Electricity: Coal, Nuclear? · 20th Century View: ­ Complex reacting mixtures are too hard to model... ­ ...so do many pilot plant us to handle complexity. ­ Quantum chemistry allows us to predict kinetic parameters. ­ To cost

Barton, Paul I.

373

Factor groups, semidirect product and quantum chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we prove some general theorems about representations of finite groups arising from the semidirect product of groups and we show how these results can be used for standard applications of group theory in quantum chemistry. This approach is illustrated by the dihedral group.

Marco A. S. Trindade

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

A Three-Dimensional Cloud Chemistry Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A cloud chemistry model is formulated in term of continuity equations for chemical species in the aqueous and aqueous phases within the cloud. The model includes scavenging of SO2, HNO3, HN3, H2O3, and sulphate aerosol particles. Calculations ...

Andre Tremblay; Henry Leighton

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Microsoft Word - Lipid_Chemistry_Schaich.doc  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LIPID CHEMISTRY 400:505 Spring, XXXX Dr. Karen M. Schaich schaich@aesop.rutgers.edu 732 932-9611 x233 Food Science 315 Class: Mon./Wed 3:30 – 5:30 Office hours: By appointment Schedule of Topics Classes listed are

376

Nanochannel and its application in analytical chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nanochannels method for the separation and detection of analytes plays an important role in the analytical chemistry and is exhibiting the great potential advantages and promising future. In this review we bring together and discuss a number of nanochannels ... Keywords: applications, nanochannels, preparation, separation

Zenglian Yue; Guoqing Zhao; Bin Peng; Shasheng Huang

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Dilution physics modeling: Dissolution/precipitation chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents progress made to date on integrating dilution/precipitation chemistry and new physical models into the TEMPEST thermal-hydraulics computer code. Implementation of dissolution/precipitation chemistry models is necessary for predicting nonhomogeneous, time-dependent, physical/chemical behavior of tank wastes with and without a variety of possible engineered remediation and mitigation activities. Such behavior includes chemical reactions, gas retention, solids resuspension, solids dissolution and generation, solids settling/rising, and convective motion of physical and chemical species. Thus this model development is important from the standpoint of predicting the consequences of various engineered activities, such as mitigation by dilution, retrieval, or pretreatment, that can affect safe operations. The integration of a dissolution/precipitation chemistry module allows the various phase species concentrations to enter into the physical calculations that affect the TEMPEST hydrodynamic flow calculations. The yield strength model of non-Newtonian sludge correlates yield to a power function of solids concentration. Likewise, shear stress is concentration-dependent, and the dissolution/precipitation chemistry calculations develop the species concentration evolution that produces fluid flow resistance changes. Dilution of waste with pure water, molar concentrations of sodium hydroxide, and other chemical streams can be analyzed for the reactive species changes and hydrodynamic flow characteristics.

Onishi, Y.; Reid, H.C.; Trent, D.S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

, . - - ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY AND MEASUREMENT SCIENCE (What Has DOE Done For Analytical Chemistry?) CONF-8904181--1 DE89 009559 W. D. Shults Analytical Chemistry Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory* Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6129 ABSTRACT Over the past forty years, analytical scientists within the DOE complex have had a tremendous impact on the field of analytical chemistry. This paper suggests six "high impact" research/development areas that either originated within or wcce brought to maturity within the DOE laboratories. "High impact" means they lead to new subdisciplines or to new ways of doing business. DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their

379

Effect of Chemistry Modifications and Heat Treatments on the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EFFECT OF CHEMISTRY MODIFICATIONS AND HEAT TREATMENTS. ON THE MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF DS MAR-M200 SUPERALLOY.

380

Surface science and heterogeneous catalysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic reactions studied include hydrocarbon conversion over platinum, the transition metal-catalyzed hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and the photocatalyzed dissociation of water over oxide surfaces. The method of combined surface science and catalytic studies is similar to those used in synthetic organic chemistry. The single-crystal models for the working catalyst are compared with real catalysts by comparing the rates of cyclopropane ring opening on platinum and the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide on rhodium single crystal surface with those on practical commercial catalyst systems. Excellent agreement was obtained for these reactions. This document reviews what was learned about heterogeneous catalysis from these surface science approaches over the past 15 years and present models of the active catalyst surface.

Somorjai, G.A.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines – Revision 6  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised "Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines" to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

382

Historical Aspects of Soil Chemistry Donald L. Sparks1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 Historical Aspects of Soil Chemistry Donald L. Sparks1 The Origins of Agricultural Chemistry: The Forerunner of Soil Chemistry In ancient times Aristotle proposed that plants derive nourishment from is food; the constitution of soils; and the manner in which lands are enriched by manure, or rendered

Sparks, Donald L.

383

Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines - Revision 7  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the-art water chemistry programs reduce equipment corrosion and enhance steam generator reliability. A committee of industry experts prepared these revised PWR Secondary Water Chemistry Guidelines to incorporate the latest field and laboratory data on secondary system corrosion and performance issues. Pressurized water reactor (PWR) operators can use these guidelines to update their secondary water chemistry programs.

2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

384

Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry in parallel PDF calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In parallel calculations of combustion processes with realistic chemistry, the serial in situ adaptive tabulation (ISAT) algorithm [S.B. Pope, Computationally efficient implementation of combustion chemistry using in situ adaptive tabulation, Combustion ... Keywords: 07.05.Mh, 46.15.-x, 47.11.-j, Combustion chemistry, Distribution strategy, ISAT, Load balance, Parallel calculation

Liuyan Lu; Steven R. Lantz; Zhuyin Ren; Stephen B. Pope

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical ApplicationsChapter 11 The Chemistry and Nutrition of Nonnutritive Fats  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications Chapter 11 The Chemistry and Nutrition of Nonnutritive Fats Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry

386

Early Hydrogen Water Chemistry Injection in Boiling Water Reactors: Impact on Fuel Performance and Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early injection of hydrogen during plant startup has been proposed to further mitigate intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) in boiling water reactors (BWRs). To assess the effectiveness of early hydrogen water chemistry (EHWC), laboratory tests were performed under simulated BWR startup conditions at 200-400°F in the absence of radiation with pre-oxidized stainless steel specimens treated with noble metals to simulate plant surfaces. The ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

387

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending July 31, 1981  

SciTech Connect

Research is reported on: chemistry of coal liquefaction, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures, geosciences, high-temperature chemistry and thermodynamics of structural materials, chemistry of TRU elements and compounds, separations chemistry, electrochemistry, nuclear waste chemistry, chemical physics, theoretical chemistry, inorganic chemistry of hydrogen cycles, molten salt systems, and enhanced oil recovery. Separate abstracts were prepared for the sections dealing with coal liquefaction, TRU elements and compounds, separations, nuclear wastes, and enhanced oil recovery. (DLC)

Not Available

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A UNIFIED MICROSCOPIC-MACROSCOPIC MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF GAS-GRAIN CHEMISTRY IN COLD DENSE INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

For the first time, we report a unified microscopic-macroscopic Monte Carlo simulation of gas-grain chemistry in cold interstellar clouds in which both the gas-phase and the grain-surface chemistry are simulated by a stochastic technique. The surface chemistry is simulated with a microscopic Monte Carlo method in which the chemistry occurs on an initially flat surface. The surface chemical network consists of 29 reactions initiated by the accreting species H, O, C, and CO. Four different models are run with diverse but homogeneous physical conditions including temperature, gas density, and diffusion-barrier-to-desorption energy ratio. As time increases, icy interstellar mantles begin to grow. Our approach allows us to determine the morphology of the ice, layer by layer, as a function of time, and to ascertain the environment or environments for individual molecules. Our calculated abundances can be compared with observations of ices and gas-phase species, as well as the results of other models.

Chang Qiang [Department of Chemistry, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Herbst, Eric [Also at Departments of Astronomy and Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22904, USA. (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Chemistry Division annual progress report for period ending January 31, 1986  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report has been indexed by 11 separate chapters. The subjects covered are: coal chemistry, aqueous chemistry at high temperatures and pressures, geochemistry, materials chemistry, chemistry of transuranium elements and compounds, separations chemistry, catalysis, electron spectroscopy, nuclear waste chemistry, heuristic modeling, and special topics. (PLG)

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadronic reactor} (patented and international patents pending), consisting of actual equipment specifically intended for the possible industrial production of the clean energy released by representative cases of controlled intermediate fusions for independent scrutiny by interested colleagues.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The First Experiment at the LCLS The First Experiment at the LCLS Linda Young Named to Head X-ray Science Division $7.9 M in ARRA Funding Brings New Instrumentation to the APS Hard X-ray Nanoprobe Earns an R&D 100 Award Winans of XSD Elected to ACS Fellowship APS News Archives: 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2001 2000 Subscribe to APS News rss feed 2009 Chemistry Nobel to APS Users OCTOBER 7, 2009 Bookmark and Share Clockwise from top left: Ada Yonath, Venkatraman Ramakrishnan, and Thomas Steitz. All three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry published papers on their award-winning work based on data collected at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory. Between them, biochemists Thomas Steitz of Yale University, Ada Yonath of

392

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Chemistry of Cobalt-Platinum Nanocatalysts Print Bimetallic cobalt-platinum (CoPt) nanoparticles are drawing attention in many areas of catalysis as scientists attempt to reduce precious metal content while maintaining optimum catalytic selectivity and reactivity. Cobalt, an important transition metal used for catalytic hydrogenation reactions of CO and CO2 to produce gaseous or liquid hydrocarbons, has a long history of use in the industrial process of producing synthetic fuels. Researchers explored the role of Pt in Co reducing and oxidizing, and found that the catalytic properties of monometallic and bimetallic nanoparticles of Co are closely related to the oxidation state of Co, which informs the prediction of cobalt oxidation states as reaction conditions are altered. This research also suggests the presence of a tetrahedral cobalt oxide that differs from the Co3O4 spinel structure.

393

Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CPCS Overview CPCS Overview Section 2-1-1 Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems Facility The Chemistry and Physics of Complex Systems (CPCS) Facility supports the U.S. Depart- ment of Energy (DOE) mission of fostering fundamental research in the natural sciences to provide the basis for new and improved energy technologies and for understanding and mitigating the environmental impacts of energy use and contaminant releases. This research provides a foundation for understanding interactions of atoms, molecules, and ions with materials and with photons and electrons. Particular emphasis is on interfacial processes. A distinguishing feature of research at national laboratories is their approach to problem- solving. Significant scientific issues are addressed using focused and multidisciplinary

394

Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline: Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Closed Cooling Water Chemistry Guideline addresses the use of chemicals and monitoring methods to mitigate corrosion, fouling, and microbiological growth in the closed cooling-water (CCW) systems of nuclear and fossil-fueled power plants. The chemical additives used for these purposes depend on plant-design characteristics, water quality, operating parameters, and the specifications of the Nuclear Steam Supply System (NSSS) suppliers. The list of chemicals is not as extensive as that ...

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

Bistability in Interstellar Gas-Phase Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an analysis of "bistability" in gas-phase chemical models of dark interstellar clouds. We identify the chemical mechanisms that allow high- and low-ionization solutions to the chemical rate-equations to coexist. We derive simple analytic scaling relations for the gas densities and ionization rates for which the chemistry becomes bistable. We explain why bistability is sensitive to the H3+ dissociative recombination rate coefficient, and why it is damped by gas-grain neutralization.

Gai I. Boger; Amiel Sternberg

2006-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

396

FGD Chemistry and Analytical Methods Handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide a comprehensive guide to sampling, analytical, and physical test methods essential to the operation, maintenance, and understanding of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) system chemistry. EPRI sponsored the preparation of the first version of this multi-volume report in the mid-1980s in response to the needs of electric utility personnel responsible for establishing and operating FGD analytical laboratories. Prompted by the results of research into various nonstanda...

2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

397

Program Operations Plan. Atmospheric Chemistry Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Chemistry Program (ACP) was initiated in 1991 to coordinate DOE`s university and federal-laboratory atmospheric-chemistry research, and to focus these efforts on national and international information requirements in the atmospheric-chemistry field. This Program Operations Plan describes the structure and vision of the effort designed to fulfill these needs, and is divided into two major components. The first of these is a Strategic Plan, which outlines the ACP`s rationale, objectives, and vision, and describes its products that are anticipated over a future ten-year period. Although based on realistic appraisals of goals that are attainable given the financial, material, and intellectual resources of the ACP community, this Strategic Plan does not describe these resources themselves. The second component of the Program Operations Plan, the Implementation Plan, deals directly with these resource considerations. As such it focuses on practical implementation of Strategic-Plan elements at the individual research institutions, the anticipated scientific contributions of these groups, and their coordination within the ACP. In contrast to the Strategic Plan, this Implementation Plan extends only five years into the future.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ammonia chemistry in a flameless jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the nitrogen chemistry in an ammonia (NH{sub 3}) doped flameless jet is investigated using a kinetic reactor network model. The reactor network model is used to explain the main differences in ammonia chemistry for methane (CH{sub 4})-containing fuels and methane-free fuels. The chemical pathways of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) formation and destruction are identified using rate-of-production analysis. The results show that in the case of natural gas, ammonia reacts relatively late at fuel lean condition leading to high NO{sub x} emissions. In the pre-ignition zone, the ammonia chemistry is blocked due to the absence of free radicals which are consumed by methane-methyl radical (CH{sub 3}) conversion. In the case of methane-free gas, the ammonia reacted very rapidly and complete decomposition was reached in the fuel rich region of the jet. In this case the necessary radicals for the ammonia conversion are generated from hydrogen (H{sub 2}) oxidation. (author)

Zieba, Mariusz; Schuster, Anja; Scheffknecht, Guenter [Institute of Process Engineering and Power Plant Technology, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 23, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Brink, Anders; Hupa, Mikko [Process Chemistry Centre, Aabo Akademi University, Biskopsgatan 8, 20500 Aabo (Finland)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Chemistry and Applications of Metal-Organic Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing the synthetic control required for the intentional 3-D arrangement of atoms remains a holy grail in crystal engineering and materials chemistry. The explosive development of metal-organic materials in recent decades has shed light on the above problem. Their properties can be tuned by varying the organic and/or inorganic building units. In addition, their crystallinity makes it possible to determine their structures via the X-ray diffraction method. This dissertation will focus on the chemistry and applications of two kinds of metal-organic materials, namely, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and metal-organic polyhedra (MOP). MOFs are coordination polymers. Their permanent porosity makes them a good “gas sponge”. In the first section, an isoreticular series of MOFs with dendritic hexacarboxylate ligands has been synthesized and characterized structurally. One of the MOFs in this series, PCN-68, has a Langmuir surface area as high as 6033 m2 g-1. The MOFs also possess excellent gas (H2, CH4, and CO2) adsorption capacity. In the second section, a NbO-type MOF, PCN-46, was constructed based on a polyyne-coupled di-isophthalate linker formed in situ. Its lasting porosity was confirmed by N2 adsorption isotherm, and its H2, CH4 and CO2 adsorption capacity was examined at 77 K and 298 K over a wide pressure range (0-110 bar). Unlike MOFs, MOP are discrete porous coordination nanocages. In the third section, a MOP covered with bulky triisopropylsilyl group was synthesized, which exhibits a thermosensitive gate opening property. This material demonstrates a molecular sieving effect at a certain temperature range, which could be used for gas separation purpose. In the last section, a MOP covered with alkyne group was synthesized through kinetic control. The postsynthetic modification via click reaction with azide-terminated polyethylene glycol turned them into metallomicelles, which showed controlled release of an anticancer drug 5-fluorouracil. In summary, two kinds of metal-organic materials have been discussed in this dissertation, with the applications in gas storage, gas separation, and drug delivery. These findings greatly enrich the chemistry and applications of metal-organic materials.

Zhao, Dan

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

2011 Chemical Reactions at Surfaces Gordon Research Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is dedicated to promoting and advancing the fundamental science of interfacial chemistry and physics by providing surface scientists with the foremost venue for presentation and discussion of research occurring at the frontiers of their fields.

Peter Stair

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Overview of actinide chemistry in the WIPP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The year 2009 celebrates 10 years of safe operations at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), the only nuclear waste repository designated to dispose defense-related transuranic (TRU) waste in the United States. Many elements contributed to the success of this one-of-the-kind facility. One of the most important of these is the chemistry of the actinides under WIPP repository conditions. A reliable understanding of the potential release of actinides from the site to the accessible environment is important to the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The environmental chemistry of the major actinides disposed at the WIPP continues to be investigated as part of the ongoing recertification efforts of the WIPP project. This presentation provides an overview of the actinide chemistry for the WIPP repository conditions. The WIPP is a salt-based repository; therefore, the inflow of brine into the repository is minimized, due to the natural tendency of excavated salt to re-seal. Reducing anoxic conditions are expected in WIPP because of microbial activity and metal corrosion processes that consume the oxygen initially present. Should brine be introduced through an intrusion scenario, these same processes will re-establish reducing conditions. In the case of an intrusion scenario involving brine, the solubilization of actinides in brine is considered as a potential source of release to the accessible environment. The following key factors establish the concentrations of dissolved actinides under subsurface conditions: (1) Redox chemistry - The solubility of reduced actinides (III and IV oxidation states) is known to be significantly lower than the oxidized forms (V and/or VI oxidation states). In this context, the reducing conditions in the WIPP and the strong coupling of the chemistry for reduced metals and microbiological processes with actinides are important. (2) Complexation - For the anoxic, reducing and mildly basic brine systems in the WIPP, the most important inorganic complexants are expected to be carbonate/bicarbonate and hydroxide. There are also organic complexants in TRU waste with the potential to strongly influence actinide solubility. (3) Intrinsic and pseudo-actinide colloid formation - Many actinide species in their expected oxidation states tend to form colloids or strongly associate with non actinide colloids present (e.g., microbial, humic and organic). In this context, the relative importance of actinides, based on the TRU waste inventory, with respect to the potential release of actinides from the WIPP, is greater for plutonium and americium, and to less extent for uranium and thorium. The most important oxidation states for WIPP-relevant conditions are III and IV. We will present an update of the literature on WIPP-specific data, and a summary of the ongoing research related to actinide chemistry in the WIPP performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Actinide Chemistry and Repository Science (ACRSP) team located in Carlsbad, NM [Reed 2007, Lucchini 2007, and Reed 2006].

Borkowski, Marian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lucchini, Jean - Francois [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Richmann, Michael K [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reed, Donald T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Khaing, Hnin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swanson, Juliet [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

PWR Activity Transport and Source Term Assessment: Surface Activity Concentrations by Gamma Scanning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurement of surface isotopic concentrations, known as gamma scanning in the United States, is an invaluable tool in assessing variations in shutdown dose rates and the impacts of chemistry and operational changes.

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Cooperative Research in C1 Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

C1 chemistry refers to the conversion of simple carbon-containing materials that contain one carbon atom per molecule into valuable products. The feedstocks for C1 chemistry include natural gas, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methanol and synthesis gas (a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen). Synthesis gas, or syngas, is produced primarily by the reaction of natural gas, which is principally methane, with steam. It can also be produced by gasification of coal, petroleum coke, or biomass. The availability of syngas from coal gasification is expected to increase significantly in the future because of increasing development of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation. Because of the abundance of remote natural gas, the advent of IGCC, and environmental advantages, C1 chemistry is expected to become a major area of interest for the transportation fuel and chemical industries in the relatively near future. The CFFLS will therefore perform a valuable national service by providing science and engineering graduates that are trained in this important area. Syngas is the source of most hydrogen. Approximately 10 trillion standard cubic feet (SCF) of hydrogen are manufactured annually in the world. Most of this hydrogen is currently used for the production of ammonia and in a variety of refining and chemical operations. However, utilization of hydrogen in fuel cells is expected to grow significantly in the next century. Syngas is also the feedstock for all methanol and Fischer-Tropsch plants. Currently, world consumption of methanol is over 25 million tons per year. There are many methanol plants in the U.S. and throughout the world. Methanol and oxygenated transportation fuel products play a significant role in the CFFLS C1 program. Currently, the only commercial Fischer-Tropsch plants are overseas, principally in South Africa (SASOL). However, new plants are being built or planned for a number of locations. One possible location for future F-T plant development in the U.S. is in the Alaskan oil fields.

Gerald P. Huffman

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

404

Boiling Water Reactor Chemistry Performance Monitoring Update--2007 Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful operation of a nuclear plant demands careful monitoring of water chemistry, particularly in BWRs, where control of iron and copper in the reactor coolant is essential. Since the advent of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC), plant operators have successfully applied other chemistry regimes such as noble metal chemical addition (NMCA) and zinc injection to control radiation fields and provide additional mitigation for intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). This report compiles recent BWR p...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radiation Chemistry of Advanced TALSPEAK Flowsheet  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of initial experiments designed to understand the radiation chemistry of an Advanced TALSPEAK process for separating trivalent lanthanides form the actinides. Biphasic aerated samples were irradiated and then analyzed for post-irradiation constituent concentrations and solvent extraction distribution ratios. The effects of irradiation on the TALSPEAK and Advanced TALSPEAK solvents were similar, with very little degradation of the organic phase extractant. Decomposition products were detected, with a major product in common for both solvents. This product may be responsible for the slight increase in distribution ratios for Eu and Am with absorbed dose, however; separation factors were not greatly affected.

Mincher, Bruce; Peterman, Dean; Mcdowell, Rocklan; Olson, Lonnie; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

406

Hydrogen chemisorption on diamond surfaces. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we demonstrated the ability to measure submonolayer quantities of surface hydrogen on insulating glasses. The present study builds on this by examining hydrogen coverages on another insulating material: the technologically important diamond (100) surface. The information to be obtained in the present study will allow us to deduce the correct structures for the diamond (100)-(1X1) and -(2X1) surface phases and provide information on the kinetics of hydrogen desorption from the (100) surface. Such experiments are essential for a complete understanding of hydrogen surface chemistry during the chemical vapor deposition of thin diamond films. This report summarizes progress made in FY93 for measuring surface hydrogen concentrations on the diamond (100) surface. Although the available LDRD resources were insufficient to finish this study in FY93, completion of the study is planned using other resources and this detailed report as a reference.

Daley, R.; Musket, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report, FY 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes progress in the major research and development programs carried out in FY 1983 by the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division. It covers radiochemical diagnostics of weapons tests; weapons radiochemical diagnostics research and development; other unclassified weapons research; stable and radioactive isotope production, separation, and applications (including biomedical applications); element and isotope transport and fixation; actinide and transition metal chemistry; structural chemistry, spectroscopy, and applications; nuclear structure and reactions; irradiation facilities; advanced analytical techniques; development and applications; atmospheric chemistry and transport; and earth and planetary processes.

Heiken, J.H.; Lindberg, H.A. (eds.)

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Laboratory Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility - January 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility - January 2012 January 2012 Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System The Office of Enforcement and Oversight (Independent Oversight), within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted an independent review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research (CMR) Facility safety significant fire suppression system (FSS) vital safety system in conjunction with a scheduled Los Alamos Site Office (LASO) assessment. The purpose of the LASO assessment was to evaluate the

409

Lithium-Ion Batteries: When Mechanics Meets Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Fatigue and Fracture of Thin Films and Nanomaterials. Presentation Title, Lithium-Ion Batteries: When Mechanics Meets Chemistry. Author(s), Joost ...

410

3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. The relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. Characterization of atomic arrangements in crystalline and ...

Sadoway, Donald R.

411

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and UtilizationChapter 7 Lipids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soybeans: Chemistry, Production, Processing, and Utilization Chapter 7 Lipids Food Science Health Nutrition Biochemistry Processing Soybeans eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry Processing Press

412

The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals, Fourth ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Organometallic Chemistry of the Transition Metals by Professor Robert Crabtree is one impressive and compressive book. It is very professionally done.

413

Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Defect Chemistry and Kinetics of Electrons in Ion Conducting Materials – Recent Results and Applications. Author(s), Hans D. Wiemhöfer.

414

Chemistry Division annual progress report, February 29, 1980  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for 12 of the 13 sections of this report. The remaining section, Chemistry In Support of the Nuclear Fuel Cycles, is very brief. (DLC)

Not Available

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Temperatures, heat flow, and water chemistry from drill holes...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

water chemistry from drill holes in the Raft River geothermal system, Cassia County, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Temperatures,...

416

Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology Postdoctoral Research Job Opening  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology Postdoctoral Research Job Opening in Metabolomics of microorganisms of importance for the conversion of solar energy to fuels and biomass. The recipient

Lawson, Catherine L.

417

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and UtilizationChapter 6 Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 6 Processing Processing eChapters Processing AOCS Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 6 Processing from ...

418

Review of the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Los Alamos National Laboratory Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility Fire Suppression Vital Safety System January 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management...

419

Teaching Mathematics to Students of Chemistry with Symbolic - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taking into account both the learning capabilities of students of chemistry and the .... Although some programs have a steeper learning curve than others, any ...

420

Teaching Mathematics to Chemistry Students with Symbolic ... - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Taking into account both the learning capabilities of chemistry students and the .... Although some programs have a steeper learning curve than others, any ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 4 Agronomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Canola: Chemistry, Production, Processing and Utilization Chapter 4 Agronomy Processing eChapters Processing Downloadable pdf of Chapter 4 Agronomy from

422

Molten Salts: Bath Chemistry and Process Design in Aluminum ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ABOUT THE PRESENTERS. Donald R. Sadoway is a professor of materials chemistry in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the ...

423

Chemistry and Physics of Materials Committee - Committee Home ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Chemistry and Physics of Materials Committee is part of the Electronic, Magnetic, and Photonic Materials Division; Structural Materials Division. Our Mission: ...

424

Process Chemistry and Operations Planning for Hanford Waste ...  

Process Chemistry and Operations Planning for Hanford Waste Alternatives L. T. Smith,* R. K. Toghiani, and J. S. Lindner Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET ...

425

Ribbon cutting marks chemistry laboratory upgrades at Northern...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

November 2013 Ribbon cutting marks chemistry laboratory upgrades at Northern New Mexico College Community Connections: Our link to Northern New Mexico Communities Latest...

426

Toward a New U.S. Chemicals Policy: Rebuilding the Foundation to Advance New Science, Green Chemistry, and Environmental Health  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

broad industrial investment in green chemistry has lagged,gap by fueling new investment in green chemistry science,to motivating broad investment in green chemistry. As with

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Available online at www.sciencedirect.com Colloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces 62 (2008) 232237  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it is also essential that these coatings have a highly uniform surface chemistry. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All facilities [5,6], cooling towers [7], marine surfaces [8,9], medical device surfaces [10], to name a few, is essential for taking appropri- ate measures to reduce biofouling. Once a bacterium reaches the vicinity

428

Chemistry and Materials Science Department annual report, 1988--1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of the Chemistry & Materials Science (C&MS) Department. The principal purpose of this report is to provide a concise summary of our scientific and technical accomplishments for fiscal years 1988 and 1989. The report is also tended to become part of the archival record of the Department`s activities. We plan to publish future editions annually. The activities of the Department can be divided into three broad categories. First, C&MS staff are assigned by the matrix system to work directly in a program. These programmatic assignments typically involve short deadlines and critical time schedules. A second category is longer-term research and development in technologies important to Laboratory programs. The focus and direction of this technology-base work are generally determined by programmatic needs. Finally, the Department manages its own research program, mostly long-range in outlook and basic in orientation. These three categories are not mutually exclusive but form a continuum of technical activities. Representative examples of all three are included in this report. The principal subject matter of this report has been divided into six sections: Innovations in Analysis and Characterization, Advanced Materials, Metallurgical Science and Technology, Surfaces and Interfaces, Energetic Materials and Chemical Synthesis, and Energy-Related Research and Development.

Borg, R.J.; Sugihara, T.T.; Cherniak, J.C.; Corey, C.W. [eds.

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen Production Using New Combinatorial Chemistry Derived Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar photoelectrochemical water-splitting has long been viewed as one of the “holy grails” of chemistry because of its potential impact as a clean, renewable method of fuel production. Several known photocatalytic semiconductors can be used; however, the fundamental mechanisms of the process remain poorly understood and no known material has the required properties for cost effective hydrogen production. In order to investigate morphological and compositional variations in metal oxides as they relate to opto-electrochemical properties, we have employed a combinatorial methodology using automated, high-throughput, electrochemical synthesis and screening together with conventional solid-state methods. This report discusses a number of novel, high-throughput instruments developed during this project for the expeditious discovery of improved materials for photoelectrochemical hydrogen production. Also described within this report are results from a variety of materials (primarily tungsten oxide, zinc oxide, molybdenum oxide, copper oxide and titanium dioxide) whose properties were modified and improved by either layering, inter-mixing, or doping with one or more transition metals. Furthermore, the morphologies of certain materials were also modified through the use of structure directing agents (SDA) during synthesis to create mesostructures (features 2-50 nm) that increased surface area and improved rates of hydrogen production.

Jaramillo, Thomas F.; Baeck, Sung-Hyeon; Kleiman-Shwarsctein, Alan; Stucky, Galen D. (PI); McFarland, Eric W. (PI)

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

430

A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A filtered tabulated chemistry model for LES of premixed combustion B. Fiorinaa , R. Vicquelina to turbulent combustion regimes by including subgrid scale wrinkling effects in the flame front propagation Simulation, Turbulent premixed combustion, Tabulated chemistry 1. Introduction Flame ignition and extinction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

431

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Book ReViews Comprehensive Cellulose Chemistry. Volume 1. Fundamentals and Analytical Methods. By D is a valuable and much-needed reference book for both the novice and the practitioner of cellulose chemistry does this significantly reduce the clarity of the book. The section on cellulose structure is extensive

Dantus, Marcos

432

FGD Chemistry and Analytical Methods Handbook, Volumes 1-3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designers and operators of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems need information about the chemistry of the SO2 removal process to evaluate process performance. This authoritative handbook of FGD chemistry can assist utilities in selecting, designing, starting up, and operating SO2 wet scrubbing systems.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Wetting of a Chemically Heterogeneous Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theories for inhomogeneous fluids have focused in recent years on wetting, capillary conden- sation, and solvation forces for model systems where the surface(s) is(are) smooth homogeneous parallel plates, cylinders, or spherical drops. Unfortunately natural systems are more likely to be hetaogeneous both in surt%ce shape and surface chemistry. In this paper we discuss the conse- quences of chemical heterogeneity on wetting. Specifically, a 2-dimensional implementation of a nonlocal density functional theory is solved for a striped surface model. Both the strength and range of the heterogeneity are varied. Contact angles are calculated, and phase transitions (both the wetting transition and a local layering transition) are located. The wetting properties of the surface ase shown to be strongly dependent on the nature of the surface heterogeneity. In addition highly ordered nanoscopic phases are found, and the operational limits for formation of ordered or crystalline phases of nanoscopic extent are discussed.

Frink, L.J.D.; Salinger, A.G.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. December 1962 through February 1963  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contract No. W -7405-eng-48 BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY25, D.C. UCRL- 10743 b BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLYH. K. Lichtenthaler , in Bio -Organic Chemistry Quarterly

Various

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY REPORT. March through 05/1963  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution 1. T. W. Sze, in Bio-Organic Chemistry Quarterlyersonal retention copy, call BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLYContract No. W -7405-eng-48 BIO-ORGANIC CHEMISTRY QUARTERLY

Various

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effects of water chemistry on NF/RO membrane structure and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxane…. ……………… 3.4. Water chemistry: Concentration, pH,4.3.1. Effect of water chemistry on membrane water4.3.2. Effect of water chemistry on EG rejection…………………. …..

Mo, Yibing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Three-Dimensional Polypeptide Architectures Through Tandem Catalysis and Click Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M. ; Hecht, S. Polymer Chemistry 2010, 1, 69-71. North, M. ;Schmidt, M. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics 2005, 206,J. Journal of Organometallic Chemistry 1999, 589, 111-114.

Rhodes, Allison Jane

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation From the Reaction of Hydroxyl Radicals With Aromatic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Pandis S.N. , Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, Firstand Pitts J.N.Jr. , 2000. Chemistry of the upper and lowerPandis S.N. , 1998. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, First

Strollo Gordon, Christen Michelle

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 26 Training: Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications June 15, 2012 by Francesca Verdier (0 Comments) NERSC will present a three-hour training class focussed on Chemistry and Material Sciences applications on Tuesday, June 26, from 9:00 to 12:00 Pacific Time. The first hour of the training is targeted at beginners. We will show you how to get started running material science and chemistry application codes at NERSC. We will demonstrate how to use the preinstalled VASP and Gaussian applications at NERSC efficiently. In the second hour, we will discuss more advanced use cases, such as managing workflows, compiling optimized versions of custom material science and chemistry applications.

440

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School National Nuclear Chemistry Summer School June 17, 2013 11:15AM EDT to July 26, 2013 5:15PM EDT University of Missouri he Division of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology of the American Chemical Society (ACS) is sponsoring two INTENSIVE six-week Summer Schools in Nuclear and Radiochemistry for undergraduates. Funding is provided by the US Department of Energy. AWARDS Fellowships include a stipend of $4000, all tuition and fees, transportation to and from the Summer School location, housing, books, and laboratory supplies. Transferable college credit will be awarded through the ACS accredited chemistry programs at San Jose State University (7 units) or the State University of New York at Stony Brook (6 units). QUALIFICATIONS

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Multivariate Statistical Analysis of Water Chemistry in Evaluating the Origin of Contamination in Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico More Documents & Publications Application of Environmental Isotopes to the Evaluation of the Origin of Contamination in a Desert Arroyo: Many Devils Wash, Shiprock, New Mexico Natural Contamination from the Mancos Shale

442

Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.  

SciTech Connect

Developing quantum chemistry programs on the coming generation of exascale computers will be a difficult task. The programs will need to be fault-tolerant and minimize the use of global operations. This work explores the use a task-based model that uses a data-centric approach to allocate work to different processes as it applies to quantum chemistry. After introducing the key problems that appear when trying to parallelize a complicated quantum chemistry method such as coupled-cluster theory, we discuss the implications of that model as it pertains to the computational kernel of a coupled-cluster program - matrix multiplication. Also, we discuss the extensions that would required to build a full coupled-cluster program using the task-based model. Current programming models for high-performance computing are fault-intolerant and use global operations. Those properties are unsustainable as computers scale to millions of CPUs; instead one must recognize that these systems will be hierarchical in structure, prone to constant faults, and global operations will be infeasible. The FAST-OS HARE project is introducing a scale-free computing model to address these issues. This model is hierarchical and fault-tolerant by design, allows for the clean overlap of computation and communication, reducing the network load, does not require checkpointing, and avoids the complexity of many HPC runtimes. Development of an algorithm within this model requires a change in focus from imperative programming to a data-centric approach. Quantum chemistry (QC) algorithms, in particular electronic structure methods, are an ideal test bed for this computing model. These methods describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, which determine the properties of the molecule. The computational cost of these methods is high, scaling quartically or higher in the size of the molecule, which is why QC applications are major users of HPC resources. The complexity of these algorithms means that MPI alone is insufficient to achieve parallel scaling; QC developers have been forced to use alternative approaches to achieve scalability and would be receptive to radical shifts in the programming paradigm. Initial work in adapting the simplest QC method, Hartree-Fock, to this the new programming model indicates that the approach is beneficial for QC applications. However, the advantages to being able to scale to exascale computers are greatest for the computationally most expensive algorithms; within QC these are the high-accuracy coupled-cluster (CC) methods. Parallel coupledcluster programs are available, however they are based on the conventional MPI paradigm. Much of the effort is spent handling the complicated data dependencies between the various processors, especially as the size of the problem becomes large. The current paradigm will not survive the move to exascale computers. Here we discuss the initial steps toward designing and implementing a CC method within this model. First, we introduce the general concepts behind a CC method, focusing on the aspects that make these methods difficult to parallelize with conventional techniques. Then we outline what is the computational core of the CC method - a matrix multiply - within the task-based approach that the FAST-OS project is designed to take advantage of. Finally we outline the general setup to implement the simplest CC method in this model, linearized CC doubles (LinCC).

Taube, Andrew Garvin

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Chemistry and spectroscopy of a fireball  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the analysis of streak spectra from the 1956 Redwing-Navajo chord experiment and the 1952 Ivy-King experiment. Column densities of O/sub 3/, HNO/sub 2/, NO/sub 2/, and vibrationally excited O/sub 2/ are inferred from the spectra and related to computed column densities of gamma ray and neutron energy deposition. We also describe a fireball radiation transport, hydrodynamics, and chemistry computer model, which we use to make theoretical predictions of the column densities of molecular absorbers outside of a fireball. Computed results for Navajo and King are compared with the experimental data. We also show a computation of radiant power vs time for a generic 1-Mt fireball. 23 figures, 2 tables.

Zinn, J.; Sutherland, C.D.; Mitchell, C.K.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal Decomposition Chemistry of Amine Borane (U)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Amine boranes potentially can be used as a vehicular hydrogen storage material. (2) Purity of the hydrogen stream is critical for use with a fuel cell. Pure H{sub 2} can be provided by carefully conditioning the fuel (encapsulation, drying, heating rate, impurities). (3) Thermodynamics and kinetics can be controlled by conditioning as well. (4) Regeneration of the spent amine borane fuel is still the greatest challenge to its potential use. (5) Addition of hydrocarbon-substituted amine boranes alter the chemistry dramatically. (6) Decomposition of the substituted amine borane mixed system favors reaction products that are more potentially easier to regenerate the hydrogenated fuel. (7) t-butylamine borane is not the best substituted amine borane to use since it releases isobutane; however, formation of CNBH{sub x} products does occur.

Stowe, A. C.; Feigerle, J.; Smyrl, N. R.; Morrell, J. S.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

446

Shock-induced chemistry in organic materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined 'extreme' environments of high pressure, temperature, and strain rates, encountered under shock loading, offer enormous potential for the discovery of new paradigms in chemical reactivity not possible under more benign conditions. All organic materials are expected to react under these conditions, yet we currently understand very little about the first bond-breaking steps behind the shock front, such as in the shock initiation of explosives, or shock-induced reactivity of other relevant materials. Here, I will present recent experimental results of shock-induced chemistry in a variety of organic materials under sustained shock conditions. A comparison between the reactivity of different structures is given, and a perspective on the kinetics of reaction completion under shock drives.

Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheffield, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Engelke, Ray [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Manner, Virginia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chellappa, Raja [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yoo, Choong - Shik [WASHINGTON STATE UNIV

2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

447

Frontiers of Chemistry for Americium and Curium  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

The discoveries of americium and curium were made only after Seaborg had formulated his actinide concept in order to design the chemistry needed to separate them from irradiated /sup 239/Pu targets. Their discoveries thus furnished the first clear-cut evidence that the series exists and justified Seaborg`s bold assumption that even though Th and Pa appeared to presage a following 6d series, the pattern established by the periodic table after Cs and Ba would be repeated exactly after Fr and Ra. That is to say, a new 5f element rare earth series (the actinides) would follow Ac in the same way the 4f rare earth series (the lanthanides) follows La. The consequences of the resulting half-filled 5f/sup 7/ shell at Cm were originally presented by Seaborg as a test of his hypothesis. Recent research is outlined that substantiates Seaborg`s predictions in new and definitive ways.

Keller, O. L. Jr.

1984-01-00T23:59:59.000Z

448

Chemistry and Materials Science Strategic Plan  

SciTech Connect

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's mission is as clear today as it was in 1952 when the Laboratory was founded--to ensure our country's national security and the safety and reliability of its nuclear deterrent. As a laboratory pursuing applied science in the national interest, we strive to accomplish our mission through excellence in science and technology. We do this while developing and implementing sound and robust business practices in an environment that emphasizes security and ensures our safety and the safety of the community around us. Our mission as a directorate derives directly from the Laboratory's charter. When I accepted the assignment of Associate Director for Chemistry and Materials Science (CMS), I talked to you about the need for strategic balance and excellence in all our endeavors. We also discussed how to take the directorate to the next level. The long-range CMS strategic plan presented here was developed with this purpose in mind. It also aligns with the Lab's institutional long-range science and technology plan and its 10-year facilities and infrastructure site plan. The plan is aimed at ensuring that we fulfill our directorate's two governing principles: (1) delivering on our commitments to Laboratory programs and sponsors, and (2) anticipating change and capitalizing on opportunities through innovation in science and technology. This will require us to attain a new level of creativity, agility, and flexibility as we move forward. Moreover, a new level of engagement in partnerships with other directorates across the Laboratory as well as with universities and other national labs will also be required. The group of managers and staff that I chartered to build a strategic plan identified four organizing themes that define our directorate's work and unite our staff with a set of common goals. The plan presented here explains how we will proceed in each of these four theme areas: (1) Materials properties and performance under extreme conditions--Fundamental investigations of the properties and performance of states of matter under extreme dynamic, environmental, and nanoscale conditions, with an emphasis on materials of interest to Laboratory programs and mission needs. (2) Chemistry under extreme conditions and chemical engineering to support national security programs--Insights into the chemical reactions of energetic materials in the nuclear stockpile through models of molecular response to extreme conditions of temperature and pressure, advancing a new technique for processing energetic materials by using sol-gel chemistry, providing materials for NIF optics, and furthering developments to enhance other high-power lasers. (3) Science supporting national objectives at the intersection of chemistry, materials science, and biology--Multidisciplinary research for developing new technologies to combat chemical and biological terrorism, to monitor changes in the nation's nuclear stockpile, and to enable the development and application of new physical-science-based methodologies and tools for fundamental biology studies and human health applications. (4) Applied nuclear science for human health and national security: Nuclear science research that is used to develop new methods and technologies for detecting and attributing nuclear materials, assisting Laboratory programs that require nuclear and radiochemical expertise in carrying out their missions, discovering new elements in the periodic table, and finding ways of detecting and understanding cellular response to radiation.

Rhodie, K B; Mailhiot, C; Eaglesham, D; Hartmann-Siantar, C L; Turpin, L S; Allen, P G

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Theory and modeling in combustion chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper discusses four important problems in combustion chemistry. In each case, resolution of the problem focuses on a single elementary reaction. Theoretical analysis of this reaction is discussed in some depth, with emphasis on its unusual features. The four combustion problems and their elementary reactions are: (1) Burning velocities, extinction limits, and flammability limits: H+O{sub 2}{leftrightarrow}OH+O, (2) Prompt NO: CH+N{sub 2}{leftrightarrow}HCN+N, (3) the Thermal De-NO{sub x} Process: NH{sub 2}+NO{leftrightarrow}products, and (4) ``Ring`` formation in flames of aliphatic fuels and the importance of resonantly stabilized free radicals: C{sub 3}H{sub 3}{leftrightarrow}products.

Miller, J.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Chemistry in sport: context-based e-learning in chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: This paper details the design and use of a learning resource for independent learning in chemistry. The course presents chemistry in the context of sport and draws upon a number of models of teaching and learning, including the Perry scheme of intellectual development, multiple intelligences (MI) theory, problem/context-based learning (P/CBL), mind mapping, case studies and web-based independent learning. The resource was produced as a website containing the context, content, and the tasks to be completed as part of the assessment. Hyperlinks to additional content and external web-pages were also included. The students ’ response to the learning resource was positive; they enjoyed the course, found the context interesting and the presentation helpful. The assessment marks compared well with those from other modules taken by the same students in the same academic year. [Chem. Educ. Res. Pract., 2006, 7 (3), 195-202

Nicholas M. Potter; Tina L. Overton

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Published and new data for chemical and isotopic samples from wells and springs on Kilauea Volcano and vicinity are presented. These data are used to understand processes that determine the chemistry of dilute meteoric water, mixtures with sea water, and thermal water. Data for well and spring samples of non-thermal water indicate that mixing with sea water and dissolution of rock from weathering are the major processes that determine the composition of dissolved constituents in water. Data from coastal springs demonstrate that there is a large thermal system south of the lower east rift of Kilauea. Samples of thermal water from shallow wells in the lower east rift and vicinity have rather variable chemistry indicating that a number of processes operate in the near surface. Water sampled from the available deep wells is different in composition from the shallow thermal water, indicating that generally there is not a significant component of deep water in the shallow wells. Data for samples from available deep wells show significant gradients in chemistry and steam content of the reservoir fluid. These gradients are interpreted to indicate that the reservoir tapped by the existing wells is an evolving vapor-dominated system.

Janik, C.J.; Nathenson, M.; Scholl, M.A.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Analytical Chemistry Core Capability Assessment - Preliminary Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of 'core capability' can be nebulous one. Even at a fairly specific level, where core capability equals maintaining essential services, it is highly dependent upon the perspective of the requestor. Samples are submitted to analytical services because the requesters do not have the capability to conduct adequate analyses themselves. Some requests are for general chemical information in support of R and D, process control, or process improvement. Many analyses, however, are part of a product certification package and must comply with higher-level customer quality assurance requirements. So which services are essential to that customer - just those for product certification? Does the customer also (indirectly) need services that support process control and improvement? And what is the timeframe? Capability is often expressed in terms of the currently utilized procedures, and most programmatic customers can only plan a few years out, at best. But should core capability consider the long term where new technologies, aging facilities, and personnel replacements must be considered? These questions, and a multitude of others, explain why attempts to gain long-term consensus on the definition of core capability have consistently failed. This preliminary report will not try to define core capability for any specific program or set of programs. Instead, it will try to address the underlying concerns that drive the desire to determine core capability. Essentially, programmatic customers want to be able to call upon analytical chemistry services to provide all the assays they need, and they don't want to pay for analytical chemistry services they don't currently use (or use infrequently). This report will focus on explaining how the current analytical capabilities and methods evolved to serve a variety of needs with a focus on why some analytes have multiple analytical techniques, and what determines the infrastructure for these analyses. This information will be useful in defining a roadmap for what future capability needs to look like.

Barr, Mary E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farish, Thomas J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

453

Chemistry M.S., Ph.D. What can first-year students expect in the Chemistry Graduate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://www.chemistry.ucsc.edu/academics/graduate/ When are graduate applications due for your program? December 15, 2011 Who can I contact for more Theoretical chemistry, molecular dynamics of chemical reactions in liquids and at interfaces Claude F. Bernasconi Kinetic studies of fast reactions, organic reaction mechanisms, acid-base catalysis, proton

Miller, Ethan L.

454

At Rice, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is a dynamic and broad disci-pline that uses principles in mathematics, physics, and chemistry to address the challenges in engineer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surapaneni and Radu Teodorescu Department of Computer Science and Engineering Department of Electrical-based models that are trained at runtime. Compared to static dual modular redundancy (DMR), our system reduces a sim- ple checker that verifies execution of the main processor as in DIVA [5]. Timing speculation has

455

At Rice, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is a dynamic and broad disci-pline that uses principles in mathematics, physics, and chemistry to address the challenges in engineer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. However, the number of trained therapists is being outpaced by the number of individuals who suffer from is with the Department of Electrical Engineer- ing, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089, USA to more challenging fine motor tasks such as stacking checkers, picking up paper clips, and folding

Mellor-Crummey, John

456

At Rice, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is a dynamic and broad disci-pline that uses principles in mathematics, physics, and chemistry to address the challenges in engineer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the forthcoming research training group on the algorithmic synthesis of reactive systems. Joost-Pieter Katoen to the PRISM tool, a model-checker for probabilistic timed systems, developed at the University Birmingham, UK. Furthermore, we plan to connect MODEST to the UPPAAL model checker. Timed Model-Based Testing H. Bohnenkamp, A

Mellor-Crummey, John

457

At Rice, the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) is a dynamic and broad disci-pline that uses principles in mathematics, physics, and chemistry to address the challenges in engineer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

languages in the world have no written tradition For many others, limited literacy, or no electricity let, especially for phones Spelling and grammar checkers Online dictionaries and thesauri Translation software generated this way Upshot: lots of text needed for training... #12;An Crúbadán Web crawler that seeks out

Palem, Krishna V.

458

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil ProcessingChapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Practical Guide to Vegetable Oil Processing Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry Processing eChapters Processing Press Downloadable pdf of Chapter 1 Basic Oil Chemistry from the book ...

459

Don Cook tours Y-12's analytical chemistry labs | National Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Programs, toured Y-12's analytical chemistry labs during a visit to Y-12 National Security Complex yesterday. Y-12's analytical chemistry work is highly technical and...

460

Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry Department |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Group Members Group Members Principal Investigators Jose Rodriguez Catalysis and surface science. Interaction and reaction of molecules with surfaces of metals, oxides, sulfides and carbides. Use of synchrotron-based techniques in surface and materials characterization (core and valence photoemission, x-ray absorption spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction). Modeling of surface reactions. Ping Liu Theoretical description of nanostructures, supported nanostructures, surfaces and their catalytic applications in heterogeneous catalysis and electrocatalysis. Density functional calculations, kinetic modeling and sensitivity analysis are employed to obtain a fundamental understanding of catalytic processes Dario Stacchiola Nano-Catalysis, Model mixed metal oxides, In-situ catalytic reactions at ambient pressures (AP). (Synchrotron PES, AP-XPS, AP-STM, AP-IRRAS, Inverse Catalyst, Nanoparticles, Graphene)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Creating an Interdisciplinary Introductory Chemistry Course without Time-Intensive Curriculum Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cutting edge scientific research increasingly occurs at the interface of disciplines, and equipping students to recognize interdisciplinary connections is essential for preparing the next generation of researchers, health ...

Taylor, Elizabeth Vogel

462

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

463

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

464

Chemistry and line emission of outer protoplanetary disks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The structure and chemistry of protoplanetary disks depends strongly on the nature of the central star around which it has formed. The dust temperature is mainly set by the stellar luminosity, while the chemistry of the upper disk layers depends on the amount of intercepted UV and X-ray flux. We will study the differences in chemistry, thermal sturcture and line emission around Herbig Ae/Be, T Tauri stars and low mass M dwarfs. Predictions will be made for future observations with SOFIA and Herschel.

Inga Kamp; Cornelis P. Dullemond; Michiel Hogerheijde; Jesus Emilio Enriquez

2005-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

465

Shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes  

SciTech Connect

The authors present evidence that the shock-initiation chemistry of nitroarenes is dominated by the intermolecular hydrogen transfer mechanism discussed previously. The acceleration by pressure, kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state kinetic isotope effect, and product distribution are consistent with the bimolecular transition state rather than rate-determining C-N homolysis.GC-MS analysis of samples which were subjected to a shock wave generated by detonation of nitromethane shows that nitrobenzene produces aniline and biphenyl, and o-nitrotoluene forms aniline, toluene, o-toluidine and o-cresol, but not anthranil, benzoxazinone, or cyanocyclopentandiene. In isotopic labeling experiments o-nitrotoluene and TNT show extensive H-D exchange on their methyl groups, and C-N bond rupture is not consistent with the formation of aniline from nitrobenzene or nitrotoluene, nor the formation of o-toluidine from o-nitrotoluene. Recent work incorporating fast TOF mass spectroscopy of samples shocked and quenched by adiabatic expansion shows that the initial chemical reactions in shocked solid nitroaromatic explosives proceed along this path.

Davis, L.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Brower, K.R. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Publications @ Catalysis: Reactivity and Structure Group | Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

List of Publications since 2010 List of Publications since 2010 2013 "Unique properties of ceria nanoparticles supported on metals: Novel inverse ceria/copper catalysts for CO oxidation and the water-gas shift reaction" Senanayake, S.D., Stacchiola, D., and Rodriguez, J.A. Accounts of Chemical Research, 2013. 46(8): p. 1702-1711. "Characterization of metal-oxide catalysts in operando conditions by combining x-ray absorption and raman spectroscopies in the same experiment" Patlolla, A., Baumann, P., Xu, W., Senanayake, S.D., Rodriguez, J.A., and Frenkel, A.I. Topics in Catalysis, 2013. 56(11): p. 896-904. "In situ time-resolved x-ray diffraction study of the synthesis of Mo2C with different carburization agents" Guzman, H.J., Xu, W.Q., Stacchiola, D., Vitale, G., Scott, C.E., Rodriguez, J.A., and Pereira-Almao, P. Canadian Journal of Chemistry-Revue Canadienne De Chimie, 2013. 91(7): p. 573-582.

467

Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes  

SciTech Connect

The project "Plutonium Chemistry in the UREX+ Separation Processes” is led by Dr. Alena Paulenova of Oregon State University under collaboration with Dr. George Vandegrift of ANL and Dr. Ken Czerwinski of the University of Nevada at Las Vegas. The objective of the project is to examine the chemical speciation of plutonium in UREX+ (uranium/tributylphosphate) extraction processes for advanced fuel technology. Researchers will analyze the change in speciation using existing thermodynamics and kinetic computer codes to examine the speciation of plutonium in aqueous and organic phases. They will examine the different oxidation states of plutonium to find the relative distribution between the aqueous and organic phases under various conditions such as different concentrations of nitric acid, total nitrates, or actinide ions. They will also utilize techniques such as X-ray absorbance spectroscopy and small-angle neutron scattering for determining plutonium and uranium speciation in all separation stages. The project started in April 2005 and is scheduled for completion in March 2008.

ALena Paulenova; George F. Vandegrift, III; Kenneth R. Czerwinski

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hiking the valleys of quatum chemistry  

SciTech Connect

This thesis is concerned with both the application and the extension of quantum chemical methods. Each chapter of the thesis represents a paper that has been published in or will be submitted to a scientific journal. The first three chapters of this thesis describe contributions made to chemistry through the use of quantum chemical methods, while the final two chapters illustrate the development of new methods. Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 characterize a study of the electronic structure and magnetic properties of homodinuclear titanium(III) complexes, in order to determine trends related to their potential use as molecular magnets. Chapter 2 focuses on hydride and halide bridging and terminal ligands, while Chapter 3 explores bridging ligands from other groups in the periodic table. Chapter 4 portrays a study of the solvation of glycine. Microsolvation and continuum solvation approaches are investigated in order to study the structures of small glycine-water clusters and determine the energy difference between the zwitterionic and nonionized forms of glycine, the simplest amino acid. Chapters 5 and 6 describe the implementation of analytic gradients, which are required for efficient molecular geometry optimizations, for two open-shell second-order perturbation theory methods. Chapter 5 discusses gradients for unrestricted Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory, and Chapter 6 describes gradients for Z-averaged perturbation theory.

Aikens, Christine Marie

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Nuclear Chemistry Division annual report FY83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the annual reports of the Nuclear Chemistry Division is to provide a timely summary of research activities pursued by members of the Division during the preceding year. Throughout, details are kept to a minimum; readers desiring additional information are encouraged to read the referenced documents or contact the authors. The Introduction presents an overview of the Division's scientific and technical programs. Next is a section of short articles describing recent upgrades of the Division's major facilities, followed by sections highlighting scientific and technical advances. These are grouped under the following sections: nuclear explosives diagnostics; geochemistry and environmental sciences; safeguards technology and radiation effect; and supporting fundamental science. A brief overview introduces each section. Reports on research supported by a particular program are generally grouped together in the same section. The last section lists the scientific, administrative, and technical staff in the Division, along with visitors, consultants, and postdoctoral fellows. It also contains a list of recent publications and presentations. Some contributions to the annual report are classified and only their abstracts are included in this unclassified portion of the report (UCAR-10062-83/1); the full article appears in the classified portion (UCAR-10062-83/2).

Struble, G. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications NERSC training events: Data Transfer and Archiving; Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications February 21, 2011 by Richard Gerber NERSC will present two training events in March: Data Transfer and Archiving March 8, 2011 10:00-12:30 Pacific Time Using Chemistry and Material Sciences Applications at NERSC March 22, 2011 10:00-12:00 Pacific Time Each event will be held concurrently at NERSC's Oakland Scientific Facility and over the web. To register or get more information, please visit our Training Events page. User Announcements Email announcement archive Subscribe via RSS Subscribe Browse by Date January 2014 December 2013 November 2013 October 2013 September 2013 August 2013

471

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2011 Chemistry Nobel Laureate October 5, 2011 - 6:56pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC -- Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today congratulated Daniel Shechtman for winning the 2011 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for the discovery of quasicrystals." "Dr. Schechtman's discovery in 1982 not only led to a new field of quasicrystals, but also forever changed ideas about matter," said Secretary Chu, who is a 1997 Nobel Laureate in Physics. "His important work underscores the impact of basic science research and I congratulate him for this well-deserved recognition." Shechtman is an associate scientist at the Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory, an Iowa State University professor of materials science and

472

Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel Laureates Secretary of Energy Chu Congratulates 2012 Chemistry and Physics Nobel Laureates October 11, 2012 - 11:08am Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 Washington - Secretary of Energy Steven Chu today congratulated Robert J. Lefkowitz and Brian K. Kobilka for winning the 2012 Nobel Prize in Chemistry "for studies of G-protein-coupled receptors" and Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland for winning the 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics for "ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems." Drs. Haroche and Wineland, good friends since the 1980s, have developed methods for manipulating the quantum states of ions and photons that lie at

473

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- University of California Chemistry  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

California Chemistry California Chemistry Building and Radiation Lab - CA 05 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (CHEMISTRY BUILDING AND RADIATION LABORATORY) (CA.05) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: Berkeley , California CA.05-1 Evaluation Year: 1989 CA.05-2 Site Operations: Performed research in areas including nuclear fission and the TTA extraction process. CA.05-3 CA.05-4 Site Disposition: Eliminated - NRC licensed CA.05-2 Radioactive Materials Handled: Yes Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Uranium CA.05-1 CA.05-3 Radiological Survey(s): None Indicated Site Status: Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Also see Documents Related to UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA (CHEMISTRY BUILDING AND

474

Global Chemistry Simulations in the AMMA Multimodel Intercomparison Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present results obtained during the chemistry-transport modeling (CTM) component of the African Monsoon Multi-disciplinary Analysis Multimodel Intercomparison Project (AMMA-MIP) using the recently developed L3JRCv2 emission dataset ...

Jason Edward Williams; Rinus Scheele; Peter van Velthoven; Idir Bouarar; Kathy Law; Béatrice Josse; Vincent-Henri Peuch; Xin Yang; John Pyle; Valérie Thouret; Brice Barret; Cathy Liousse; Frédéric Hourdin; Sophie Szopa; Anne Cozic

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

3.091 Introduction to Solid State Chemistry, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This course explores the basic principles of chemistry and their application to engineering systems. It deals with the relationship between electronic structure, chemical bonding, and atomic order. It also investigates ...

Sadoway, Donald

476

Argonne Chemical Sciences & Engineering - Facilities - Analytical Chemistry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory Analytical Chemistry Laboratory sullivan ACL manager Vivian Sullivan places a plate for alpha spectrometry into the Alpha Analyst instrument. naik Seema Naik prepares an inorganic sample for analysis on the ICP-Optical Emission Spectrometer. lopykinski Susan Lopykinski prepares a sample for mercury analysis on the cold vapor Atomic Absorption instrument. ICP-Mass Spectrometer Analytical Chemist Yifen Tsai prepares a sample for analysis on the high-resolution ICP-Mass Spectrometer. The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at Argonne National Laboratory and specialized analysis for government, academic, and industrial organizations, including other national laboratories and QA/QC programs and audits.

477

Better Switching Through Chemistry in Thin Ferroelectrics | Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

do just that, proving that not just electricity but also a little bit of chemistry can flip the structure and thus the polarity of a ferroelectric film. The researchers studied...

478

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMISTRY: FIVE-SIX-RING FLIP REACTION R. Whitesides, 1 D.reverse its orientation, or “flips,” after activation by aRate constants for the flip reaction were obtained by the

Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of rate coefficients of the flip (both the addition andCHEMISTRY: FIVE-SIX-RING FLIP REACTION Russell Whitesides, 1the ring complex, or “flips” it, was identified. Competition

Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 91st Edition - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

04/7/2011 - Handbook of Chemistry and Physics 91st Edition (2010), W.M. ... is a one-of-a-kind handbook which gives the fundamental data on: units, symbols, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "disciplines surface chemistry" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Nanocrystal/J-aggregate constructs : chemistry, energy transfer, and applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interaction of light with matter is one of the most central subjects to modern chemistry. Two types of materials, semiconductor nanocrystals and J-aggregates of cyanine dyes, have been developed chiefly due to their ...

Walker, Brian J. (Brian Jacob)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus—DYCOMS-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The second Dynamics and Chemistry of Marine Stratocumulus (DYCOMS-II) field study is described. The field program consisted of nine flights in marine stratocumulus west-southwest of San Diego, California. The objective of the program was to ...

Bjorn Stevens; Donald H. Lenschow; Gabor Vali; Hermann Gerber; A. Bandy; B. Blomquist; J-L. Brenguier; C. S. Bretherton; F. Burnet; T. Campos; S. Chai; I. Faloona; D. Friesen; S. Haimov; K. Laursen; D. K. Lilly; S. M. Loehrer; Szymon P. Malinowski; B. Morley; M. D. Petters; D. C. Rogers; L. Russell; V. Savic-Jovcic; J. R. Snider; D. Straub; Marcin J. Szumowski; H. Takagi; D. C. Thornton; M. Tschudi; C. Twohy; M. Wetzel; M. C. van Zanten

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 2 | Sample Preparation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Cynthia Patty | (650) 926-3925 Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 2 Inventory The BioChemMat Lab 2 (BCM 2) at SSRL is dedicated to researcher experiments, including...

484

Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 | Sample Preparation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Cynthia Patty | (650) 926-3925 Biology Chemistry & Material Science Laboratory 1 Inventory The BioChemMat Lab 1 at SSRL is dedicated to researcher experiments, including x-ray...

485

Understanding the Chemistry of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Chemistry of Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Speaker(s): Brian O'Regan Date: January 15, 2009 (All day) Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Michael G Apte...

486

Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book will cover everything you need to know to create fat and oil ingredients that are nutritious, uniquely palatable and satisfying. Deep Frying: Chemistry, Nutrition and Practical Applications, 2nd Edition Food Science acid agricultural analysis a

487

Enriched Stable Isotope Materials and Chemistry | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Chemistry Reductiondistillation of calcium-48 metal valued at over 900,000. An inventory of 2,300 batches of enriched stable isotopes of 53 different Elements with a list...

488

Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS Monograph Series on Oilseeds,Volume 1 Olive Oil in the World Market, Composition, Quality, Oil Seed Extraction Olive Oil: Chemistry and Technology, 2nd Edition Food Science acid agricultural analysis analytical aocs april articles biotechnology c

489

Analytical Chemistry Laboratory: Progress report for FY 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to summarize the activities of the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for fiscal year 1988 (October 1987 through September 1988). The Analytical Chemistry Laboratory is a full-cost recovery service center, with the primary mission of providing a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the scientific and engineering programs at ANL. In addition, the ACL conducts a research program in analytical chemistry, works on instrumental and methods development, and provides analytical services for governmental, educational, and industrial organizations. The ACL handles a wide range of analytical problems, from routine standard analyses to unique problems that require significant development of methods and techniques.

Green, D.W.; Heinrich, R.R.; Graczyk, D.G.; Lindahl, P.C.; Erickson, M.D.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25-28, 2007. Topic: Soot GRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY:on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer isomerizes to reversea possibly important step in graphene layer growth, thus

Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are incorporated into growing graphene layers and hence willGRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY: FIVE-SIX-RING FLIP REACTIONon the zigzag edge of a graphene layer. A new reaction

Whitesides, R.; Domin, D.; Salomon-Ferrer, R.; Lester Jr., W.A.; Frenklach, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

NWChem Delivering High-Performance Computational Chemistry to Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NWChem NWChem Delivering High-Performance Computational Chemistry to Science SCientifiC innovation tHrougH integration www.nwchem-sw.org www.emsl.pnl.gov NWChem  High-Performance Computational Chemistry EMSL  Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2 3 NWChem software » Biomolecules, nanostructures, and solid state » From quantum to classical, and all combinations » Gaussian functions or plane-waves » Scaling from one to thousands of processors » Properties and relativity » Open source NWChem Introduction NWChem is cutting-edge software that offers an extensive array of highly scalable, parallel computational chemistry methods needed to address a wide range of large, challenging scientific questions. As one of the U.S. Department of Energy's premier computational chemistry tools, NWChem is

493

High-Throughput identification of chemistry in life science texts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OSCAR3 is an open extensible system for the automated annotation of chemistry in scientific articles, which can process thousands of articles per hour. This XML annotation supports applications such as interactive browsing and chemically-aware searching, ...

Peter Corbett; Peter Murray-Rust

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Boiling Water Reactor Shutdown Chemistry and Dose Summary: September 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This 2010 update provides an annual report of shutdown radiation dose rates at 46 boiling water reactors (BWRs) that participate in the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) BWR Chemistry Monitoring and Assessment program and supersedes the BWR Radiation Assessment and Control (BRAC) Summary that was issued twice a year. In addition to BRAC dose rates, the report also includes information on operating and shutdown water chemistry and worker outage dose and contamination.

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

495

PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines: Volume 1 Revision 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

State-of-the art water chemistry programs help ensure the continued integrity of reactorcoolant system (RCS) materials of construction and fuel cladding, ensure satisfactorycore performance, and support the industry trend toward reduced radiation fields. These revised PWR Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines, prepared by a committee ofindustry experts, reflect the recent field and laboratory data on primary coolant systemcorrosion and performance issues. PWR operators can use these Guidelines to updatethei...

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

496

The chemistry of high-mass star formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the chemistry of star-forming regions, with an emphasis on the formation of high-mass stars. We first outline the basic molecular processes in dense clouds, their implementation in chemical models, and techniques to measure molecular abundances. Then, recent observational, theoretical and laboratory developments are reviewed on the subjects of hot molecular cores, cosmic-ray ionization, depletion and deuteration, and oxygen chemistry. The paper concludes with a summary of outstanding problems and future opportunities.

Floris F. S. van der Tak

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

497

State of Knowledge on Mercury Chemistry in Power Plant Plumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical transformations may occur in the flue gas plume of coal-fired power plants (CFPP) that convert reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) into gaseous elemental mercury (GEM). Since the chemical form of inorganic Hg determines its solubility in water and therefore its deposition rate, understanding this chemistry has important implications for emission control. This fact sheet summarizes the state-of-knowledge of mercury chemistry, kinetics, and thermodynamics in CFPP plumes.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

498

Compilation of EPRI Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purity of water and steam is central to ensuring fossil plant component availability and reliability. This compilation of the program’s ten (10) key cycle chemistry guidelines and the Integrated Boiler Tube Failure Reduction/Cycle Chemistry Improvement Program provides unique guidance to select and continually optimize feedwater and boiler water treatments. These guidelines will help operators reduce corrosion and deposition and, thereby, achieve and maintain significant operation and maintenance cos...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

499

Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

Jeffery Davis

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

Seminar Announcement Nanoscale High Field Chemistry with the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning January 15, 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEMINAR SEMINAR ANNOUNCMENT Thursday, January 15, 2009 11:00am - 12:00 noon EMSL Boardroom Nanoscale High Field Chemistry With the Atomic Force Microscope and Patterning Marco Rolandi Assistant Professor Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 Facile and affordable processes for the fabrication of nanostructures are fundamental to future endeavors in nanoscale science and engineering. The atomic force microscope was designed primarily for imaging, and has evolved into a versatile tool for nanoscale surface modification. We have developed an AFM based scheme capable of direct writing of glassy carbon nanowires as fast as 1 cm/s. In brief, when a bias is applied across the tip-sample gap a molecular precursor undergoes high field reactions that result in the deposition of a cross- linked product on the surface. In order to gain a