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1

Waterproof, Louisiana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Waterproof, Louisiana: Energy Resources Waterproof, Louisiana: Energy Resources (Redirected from Waterproof, LA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 31.8048847°, -91.383449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":31.8048847,"lon":-91.383449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

2

August 2012 Who Are Our Dirt Tanks Named After?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 2012 Who Are Our Dirt Tanks Named After? Jornada Experimental Range Maxwell Tank In 2001 as coordinator and pilot. Maxwell Tank was named in her honor in 2002. Although Maxwell enjoys the notoriety of having a dirt tank named after her, she has yet to see her namesake. F. N. Ares F.W. Engholm K

3

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 175 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

75 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Pile (28) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside Security Fence, East of C-360 Building in KPDES Outfall Ditch 002. APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 400 ft...

4

Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Foamed epoxy resin composite waterproofing and heat insulation in hydraulic construction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Laboratory and field tests and work on an experimental-industrial scale confimed the feasibility of using foamed epoxy resin heat insulation and waterproofing for protecting hydraulic engineering structures...

V. I. Sakharov

1969-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, MODELLING UNCONSOLIDATED RUBBLE FORCES ON A CYLINDRICAL STRUCTURE RF. McKenna and S structlJre and unconsolidated ice ridges. The tests were conducted with a 0.32 m diameter structure in unconsolidated ridges are given in McKenna el al. (1995). The tests provide a means of correlating the forces

Bruneau, Steve

7

Analysis of Energy and Soft Dirt in an Urban Untreated Sewage Source Heat Pump System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When using urban untreated sewage as a cool and heat source of heat pump, it is unavoidable to form soft dirt. Based on the method of exergy, an analysis is given of the impact the dirt growth of a tube-shell sewage heat exchanger will have...

Qian, J.; Sun, D.; Li, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Data Summary Report D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to verify that all analytical data collected at the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site for use in developing risk assessment and potential remediation procedures have been validated at the appropriate level. Any discrepancies or reasons why the data should be rejected for this purpose will be addressed. This report documents the data validation procedures used by Environmental Monitoring Section, Exploration Resources, and RUST Environment {ampersand} Infrastructure for Assigning qualifiers.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Bored By Non-Glowing Skin? Ultra-Flexible, Waterproof LED Implants Are What You Seek  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bored By Non-Glowing Skin? Ultra-Flexible, Waterproof LED Implants Are What You Seek By Alasdair Wilkins/io9 Posted 10.19.2010 at 12:15 pm LED Lights Could Be Implanted Under Skin Photo courtesy of iO9 LEDs are, on small scales, the cheapest, most reliable, and most technologically powerful light sources

Rogers, John A.

10

DOE/LX/07-0295 Secondary Document Rubble Area KY-19 Solid Waste...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Document Rubble Area KY-19 Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) Assessment Report SWMUAOC NUMBER: 565 DATE OF ORIGINAL SAR: 091309 DATE OF SAR REVISIONS: NA REGULATORY STATUS:...

11

E-Print Network 3.0 - asteroids rubble piles Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

asteroids (28... of collisional events, and much of its interior may have an unconsolidated rubble-pile structure. The main... Radar Observations of Asteroid 216 Kleopatra...

12

Explanation of Significant Difference (ESD) for the A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (U)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The A-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (731-A/1A) and Rubble Pit (731-2A) (ABRP) operable unit (OU) is located in the northwest portion of Savannah River Site (SRS), approximately 2.4 kilometers (1.5 miles) south of the A/M Area operations. Between 1951 and 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were used to burn paper, plastics, wood, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, and solvents. Combustible materials were burned monthly. After burning was discontinued in 1973, Pits 731-A and 731-1A were also converted to rubble pits and used to dispose of concrete rubble, bricks, tile, asphalt, plastics, metal, wood products, and rubber until about 1978. When the pits were filled to capacity, there were covered with compacted clay-rich native soils and vegetation was established. Pit 731-2A was only used as a rubble pit until 1983 after which the area was backfilled and seeded. Two other potential source areas within the OU were investigated and found to be clean. The water table aquifer (M-Area aquifer) was also investigated.

Morgan, Randall

2000-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

13

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Operable Unit: Final Action (631-16G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located within SRS and is approximately 305 meters west of South Carolina Highway 125.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the Central Shops burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit is listed as a solid waste management unit at the Savannah River Plant. This report describes the remedial action alternative for the pit.

Palmer, E.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G Additonal Sampling and Monitor Well Installation Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal and incineration of potentially hazardous substances, such as metals and organic solvents.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Characterization of the Burma Road Rubble Pit at the Savannah River Site, Aiken, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burma Road Rubble Pit (BRRP) is located at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The BRRP unit consists of two unlined earthen pits dug into surficial soil and filled with various waste materials. It was used from 1973--1983 for the disposal of dry inert rubble such as metal, concrete, lumber, poles, light fixtures, and glass. No record of the disposal of hazardous substances at the BRRP has been found. In 1983, the BRRP was closed by covering it with soil. In September 1988, a Ground Penetrating Radar survey detected three disturbed areas of soil near the BRRP, and a detailed and combined RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation was conducted from November 1993 to February 1994 to determine whether hazardous substances were present in the subsurface, to evaluate the nature and extent of contamination, and to evaluate the risks posed to the SRS facility due to activities conducted at the BRRP site. Metals, semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds, radionuclides and one pesticide (Aldrin) were detected in soil and groundwater samples collected from seventeen BRRP locations. A baseline risk assessment (BRA) was performed quantitatively to evaluate whether chemical and radionuclide concentrations detected in soil and groundwater at the BRRP posed an unacceptable threat to human health and the environment. The exposure scenarios identifiable for the BRRP were for environmental researchers, future residential and occupational land use. The total site noncancer hazard indices were below unity, and cancer risk levels were below 1.0E-06 for the existing and future case environmental researcher scenario. The future case residential and occupational scenarios showed total hazard and risk levels which exceeded US EPA criterion values relative to groundwater scenarios. For the most part, the total carcinogenic risks were within the 1.0E-04 to 1.0E-06 risk range. Only the future adult residential scenario was associated with risks exceeding 1.0E-04.

Ward, K.G.; Frazier, W.L.; McAdams, T.D.; McFalls, S.L.; Rabin, M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Voss, L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)]|[Neptune and Co., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report for Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit (631-16G) - March 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit is located on the west side of SRS. In the early to mid 1980`s, while work was being performed in this area, nine empty, partially buried drums, labeled `du Pont Freon 11`, were found. As a result, Gunsite 720 became one of the original waste units specified in the SRS RCRA Facility Assessment (RFA). The drums were excavated on July 30, 1987 and placed on a pallet at the unit. Both the drums and pallet were removed and disposed of in October 1989. The area around the drums was screened during the excavation and the liquid (rainwater) that collected in the excavated drums was sampled prior to disposal. No evidence of hazardous materials was found. Based on the review of the analytical data and screening techniques used to evaluate all the chemicals of potential concern at Gunsite 720 Rubble Pit Unit, it is recommended that no further remedial action be performed at this unit.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a cutter for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head (72) has a hollow body (76) with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft (74) extends from the hollow body (76). Cutter teeth (78) are mounted on the upper surface of the body (76) and relatively small holes (77) are formed in the body (76) between the cutter teeth (78). Relatively large peripheral flutes (80) around the body (76) allow material to drop below the drill head (72). A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale.

Galloway, Terry R. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

System for producing a uniform rubble bed for in situ processes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and a cutter are disclosed for producing a large cavity filled with a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale or other material, for in situ processing. A raise drill head has a hollow body with a generally circular base and sloping upper surface. A hollow shaft extends from the hollow body. Cutter teeth are mounted on the upper surface of the body and relatively small holes are formed in the body between the cutter teeth. Relatively large peripheral flutes around the body allow material to drop below the drill head. A pilot hole is drilled into the oil shale deposit. The pilot hole is reamed into a large diameter hole by means of a large diameter raise drill head or cutter to produce a cavity filled with rubble. A flushing fluid, such as air, is circulated through the pilot hole during the reaming operation to remove fines through the raise drill, thereby removing sufficient material to create sufficient void space, and allowing the larger particles to fill the cavity and provide a uniform bed of rubblized oil shale. 4 figs.

Galloway, T.R.

1983-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

20

Dirt Dynamics | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory (PNNL) assessed how the addition of small amounts of nanoparticulate goethite to sediment affects biostimulation processes. The study focused on microbial...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Record of Decision Remedial Alternative Selection for the D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (431-D and 431-1D)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The D-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (DBRP) (431-D and 431-1D) Waste Unit is listed as a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) 3004(U) Solid Waste Management Unit/Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) unit in Appendix C of the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for the Savannah River Site (SRS). This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the DBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina.

Palmer, E.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Mason, J.T.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

2 2 Characteristics of U.S. Construction Waste - Two to seven tons of waste (a rough average of 4 pounds of waste per square foot) are generated during the construction of a new single-family detached house. - 15 to 70 pounds of hazardous waste are generated during the construction of a detached, single-family house. Hazardous wastes include paint, caulk, roofing cement, aerosols, solvents, adhesives, oils, and greases. - Each year, U.S. builders produce between 30 and 35 million tons of construction, renovation, and demolition (C&D) waste. - Annual C&D debris accounts for roughly 24% of the municipal solid waste stream. - Wastes include wood (27% of total) and other (73% of total, including cardboard and paper; drywall/plaster; insulation; siding; roofing; metal; concrete, asphalt, masonry, bricks, and dirt rubble; waterproofing materials; and

23

RCRA Facility Investigation/Remedial Investigation Report with Baseline Risk Assessment for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G), Volume 1 Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Burning/Rubble Pits at the Savannah River Site were usually shallow excavations approximately 3 to 4 meters in depth. Operations at the pits consisted of collecting waste on a continuous basis and burning on a monthly basis. The Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631- 6G (BRP6G) was constructed in 1951 as an unlined earthen pit in surficial sediments for disposal of paper, lumber, cans and empty galvanized steel drums. The unit may have received other materials such as plastics, rubber, rags, cardboard, oil, degreasers, or drummed solvents. The BRP6G was operated from 1951 until 1955. After disposal activities ceased, the area was covered with soil. Hazardous substances, if present, may have migrated into the surrounding soil and/or groundwater. Because of this possibility, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated the BRP6G as a Solid Waste Management Unit (SWMU) subject to the Resource Conservation Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process.

NONE

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Results of Water and Sediment Toxicity Tests and Chemical Analyses Conducted at the Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Waste Unit, January 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Central Shops Burning Rubble Pit Operable Unit consists of two inactive rubble pits (631-1G and 631-3G) that have been capped, and one active burning rubble pit (631-2G), where wooden pallets and other non-hazardous debris are periodically burned. The inactive rubble pits may have received hazardous materials, such as asbestos, batteries, and paint cans, as well as non-hazardous materials, such as ash, paper, and glass. In an effort to determine if long term surface water flows of potentially contaminated water from the 631-1G, 631-3G, and 631-2G areas have resulted in an accumulation of chemical constituents at toxic levels in the vicinity of the settling basin and wetlands area, chemical analyses for significant ecological preliminary constituents of concern (pCOCs) were performed on aqueous and sediment samples. In addition, aquatic and sediment toxicity tests were performed in accordance with U.S. EPA methods (U.S. EPA 1989, 1994). Based on the results of the chemical analyses, unfiltered water samples collected from a wetland and settling basins located adjacent to the CSBRP Operable Unit exceed Toxicity Reference Values (TRVs) for aluminum, barium, chromium, copper, iron, lead, and vanadium at one or more of the four locations that were sampled. The water contained very high concentrations of clay particles that were present as suspended solids. A substantial portion of the metals were present as filterable particulates, bound to the clay particles, and were therefore not biologically available. Based on dissolved metal concentrations, the wetland and settling basin exceeded TRVs for aluminum and barium. However, the background reference location also exceeded the TRV for barium, which suggests that this value may be too low, based on local geochemistry. The detection limits for both total and dissolved mercury were higher than the TRV, so it was not possible to determine if the TRV for mercury was exceeded. Dissolved metal levels of chromium, copper, iron, lead and vanadium were below the TRVs. Metal concentrations in the sediment exceeded the TRVs for arsenic, chromium, copper, and mercury but not for antimony and lead. The results of the water toxicity tests indicated no evidence of acute toxicity in any of the samples. The results of the chronic toxicity tests indicated possible reproductive impairment at two locations. However, the results appear to be anomalous, since the toxicity was unrelated to concentration, and because the concentrations of pCOCs were similar in the toxic and the non-toxic samples. The results of the sediment toxicity tests indicated significant mortality in all but one sample, including the background reference sediment. When the results of the CSBRP sediment toxicity tests were statistically compared to the result from the background reference sediment, there was no significant mortality. These results suggest that the surface water and sediment at the CSBRP Operable Unit are not toxic to the biota that inhabit the wetland and the settling basin.

Specht, W.L.

1999-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

25

THE DIRT ON DRY MERGERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope, we analyze the mid-infrared (3-70 {mu}m) spectral energy distributions of dry merger candidates in the Booetes field of the NOAO Deep Wide-Field Survey. These candidates were selected by previous authors to be luminous, red, early-type galaxies with morphological evidence of recent tidal interactions. We find that a significant fraction of these candidates exhibit 8 and 24 {mu}m excesses compared to expectations for old stellar populations. We estimate that a quarter of dry merger candidates have mid-infrared-derived star formation rates greater than {approx}1 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. This represents a 'frosting' on top of a large old stellar population, and has been seen in previous studies of elliptical galaxies. Further, the dry merger candidates include a higher fraction of star-forming galaxies relative to a control sample without tidal features. We therefore conclude that the star formation in these massive ellipticals is likely triggered by merger activity. Our data suggest that the mergers responsible for the observed tidal features were not completely dry, and may be minor mergers involving a gas-rich dwarf galaxy.

Desai, Vandana; Soifer, B. T. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Dey, Arjun [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85726-6732 (United States); Cohen, Emma [California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Le Floc'h, Emeric, E-mail: desai@ipac.caltech.edu [AIM, CNRS, Universite Paris Diderot, Bat. 709, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Statement of basis/proposed plan for the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit (631-6G). Revision 1, Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this plan is to describe the preferred alternative for addressing the Central Shops Burning/Rubble Pit 631-6G (BRP6G) located at SRS, in northwestern Barnwell County, South Carolina and to provide an opportunity for public input into the remedial action selection process. Arsenic, beryllium, iron, and octachloro-dibenzo-p-dioxin isomers (OCDD) concentrations in the pit soil are at levels consistent with those found in the background. Therefore, the only contamination attributable to actions in BRP6G is PCB-1254. After the risk contributions of these chemicals are eliminated, the only remaining risk attributable to the pit soil is from PCB-1254 (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} via ingestion of vegetables grown on-site). The maximum concentration of PCB-1254 detected in the pit was 0.115 mg/kg, approximately 10% of the residential action level for PCBs of 1 mg/kg. Based on the results of the remedial investigation and the BRA, it is proposed that No Action be performed for the BRP6G. Considering the low levels of residual contamination present principally below 1.2 meters (4 feet) within the pit and the associated risks (about 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}6}) within the lower level of EPA`s target risk range, action is not warranted for this unit.

Palmer, E.

1996-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

27

Digital cleaning and dirt layer visualization of an oil painting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrate a new digital cleaning technique which uses a neural network that is trained to learn the transformation from dirty to clean segments of a painting image. The inputs and...

Palomero, Cherry May T; Soriano, Maricor N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

MANZANITA Fall 2009 Getting the Dirt on Roots  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;2 nitrogen and phosphorous, and water from the soil to support their photosynthetic activities. Fungi lack

Bruns, Tom

29

RUBBLE-PILE RESHAPING REPRODUCES OVERALL ASTEROID SHAPES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There have been attempts in the past to fit the observed bulk shapes (axial ratios) of asteroids to theoretical equilibrium figures for fluids, but these attempts have not been successful in many cases, evidently because asteroids are not fluid bodies. So far, however, the observed distribution of asteroid macroscopic shapes has never been attributed to a common cause. Here, we show that a general mechanism exists, capable of producing the observed shape distribution. We base our approach on the idea that aggregates of coherent blocks held together mostly by gravity (gravitational aggregates) can change their shape under the action of external factors, such as minor collisions, that break the interlocking of the constituent blocks, thus allowing them to asymptotically evolve toward fluid equilibrium. We show by numerical simulations that this behavior can produce a shape distribution compatible with the observations. Our results are shown to be consistent with a simple interpretation based on the topology of the potential energy field for rotating bodies. Also, they suggest that most asteroids have an internal structure that is at least partially fragmented, consistent with constraints derived from large asteroids (diameters >100 km) with satellites.

Tanga, P.; Comito, C.; Walsh, K. J.; Delbo, M. [UMR 6202 Cassiopee, University of Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Paolicchi, P. [Dipartimento di fisica, Universita di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Hestroffer, D. [Institut de Mecanique Celeste et de Calcul des Ephemerides (IMCCE), CNRS, Observatoire de Paris, 75014 Paris (France); Cellino, A.; Dell'Oro, A. [INAF/Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Via Osservatorio 20, 10122 Pino Torinese (Italy); Richardson, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States)

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

ESTIMATE OF RADIUM-226 CONCENTRATIONS IN RUBBLED PCB WAREHOUSE...  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

THE NIAGARA FALLS STORAGE SITE MAY 1987 Prepared for UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE Under Contract No. DE-AC05-810R20722 By Bechtel National, Inc....

31

Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

From Pushing Paper to Pushing Dirt - Canada's Largest LLRW Cleanup Gets Underway - 13111  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Port Hope Project is the larger of the two projects in the Port Hope Area Initiative (PHAI), Canada's largest low level radioactive waste (LLRW) cleanup. With a budget of approximately $1 billion, the Port Hope Project includes a broad and complex range of remedial elements from a state of the art water treatment plant, an engineered waste management facility, municipal solid waste removal, remediation of 18 major sites within the Municipality of Port Hope (MPH), sediment dredging and dewatering, an investigation of 4,800 properties (many of these homes) to identify LLRW and remediation of approximately 450 of these properties. This paper discusses the status of the Port Hope Project in terms of designs completed and regulatory approvals received, and sets out the scope and schedule for the remaining studies, engineering designs and remediation contracts. (authors)

Veen, Walter van [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada); Lawrence, Dave [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)] [Public Works and Government Services Canada, Port Hope, Ontario (Canada)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 17 OCTOBER 2010 | DOI: 10.1038/NMAT2879 Waterproof AlInGaP optoelectronics on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

InGaP optoelectronics on stretchable substrates with applications in biomedicine and robotics Rak-Hwan Kim1 , Dae opportunities for optoelectronic devices. A ll established forms of inorganic light-emitting diodes (LEDs restricting the ways in which these devices can be used. Research in organic optoelectronic materials

Rogers, John A.

34

A standard unit for monitoring recruitment of fishes to coral reef rubble  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

settled fishes, including cryptic, secretive and small species, to be quickly and fairly completely (>83. Over time, however, the netting resulted in substantial algal growth that was associated that settler estimates are more affected by microhabitat changes from algal growth than by predation. During

Kramer, Donald L.

35

Out of the Rubble and Towards a Sustainable Future: The Greening of Greensburg, Kansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vision of persistent local leaders, the framing of sustainability as an opportunity with an energy efficiency focus, community pride and resilience, and a clean slate rebuilding effort with substantial available funding. While Greensburgs future...

White, Stacey Swearingen

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

36

Final RFI/RI Report Burma Road Rubble Pit (231-4F). Volume 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site is located in Aiken, Barnwell, and Allendale counties, in South Carolina. Certain activities at the SRS require operating or post closure permits issued in accordance with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Augmented Reality for Underwater Abdelkader Bellarbi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Swimming pool Two internal modules compose the Waterproof case which contains the tablet; Waterproof in the Swimming pool modules compose the DOLPHYN: Waterproof case which contains the tablet; Waterproof electronic

Boyer, Edmond

38

Insulation Workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Insulation workers apply insulation materials on objects and buildings for thermal insulation and/or waterproofing.

R. Riala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

UNIT NUMBER SWMU 148 UNIT NAME  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concrete rubble fpr dam and road statlilization. This concrete rubble originates f:rom many locations, one of which was the PGDP. WASTE DESCRIPTION: Concrete -concrete block...

40

Controlling Raccoon Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,andcoveritlightlywith siftedsoil.Coverthetrappanwithapieceoftissue or canvas before sifting dirt over it to prevent dirt fromgettingunderneathandlockingthetrapopen. Digasmallhole,about6inchesdeepand3inches across,ataslantjustbehindthetrap.Raccoonsare attracted to a dirt hole set...,andcoveritlightlywith siftedsoil.Coverthetrappanwithapieceoftissue or canvas before sifting dirt over it to prevent dirt fromgettingunderneathandlockingthetrapopen. Digasmallhole,about6inchesdeepand3inches across,ataslantjustbehindthetrap.Raccoonsare attracted to a dirt hole set...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Record of decision remedial alternative selection for the F-area burning/rubble pits (231-F, 231-1F, and 231-2F)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This decision document presents the selected remedial alternative for the FBRP located at the SRS in Aiken, South Carolina. The selected alternative was developed in accordance with CERCLA, as amended, and to the extent practicable, the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan. This decision is based on the Administrative Record File for this specific RCRA/CERCLA unit.

Palmer, E.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

F-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (231-F, 231-1F, {ampersand} 231-2F) Corrective Measures Study/Feasibility Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate various technologies that can be used to remediate the soil contamination attributed to the FBRP source unit.Section 1 of this report gives the background of this facility. Section 2 discusses the remedial action objectives and the general response actions for each medium of interest. The technology types and process options are identified and evaluated for each medium of interest. A selection and evaluation of representative technologies is included. Section 3 describes the rationale for combining technologies into alternatives. Section 4 gives a detailed analysis of each alternative as well as a comparative analysis of these alternatives.

Palmer, E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Working in the Cleanroom | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

The Dirt on the Cleanroom The Dirt on the Cleanroom In this short video, take a look inside the GE Global Research cleanroom and meet the team working in this 28,000-square-foot...

44

Notes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... makers of glue and size, of pottery, stoneware, and glass, of:gunpowder -and pyrotechnic compositions, of waterproof goods and insulating materials. Extensive as this list is, it ...

1882-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

Microsoft Word - SAR 493  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3, created 11702 PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTSITE INSPECTION REPORT AND AOCSWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: 493 (SWMU 493a and SWMU 493b) UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble Piles near...

46

Microsoft Word - SAR 517  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 22602 PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENTSITE INSPECTION REPORT AND AOCSWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT UNIT NUMBER: 517 UNIT NAME: Rubble and Debris Erosion Control Fill Area DATE: 21802...

47

Microsoft Word - S11889_Strategy-Final.docx  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

rubble chimney extended approximately 356 ft above the shot point (Hazleton-Nuclear Science Corporation 1965). The water table beneath the site (near surface ground zero and...

48

Published in the Proc. of the 11th Nat. Conf. on Machines and Mechanisms, Dec. 18-19, IIT Delhi,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to remove water and dirt particles from the carpet. It is driven by an electric motor and can move in any on the carpet to remove dirt particles and water from the carpet surface. The plank follows a straight-line path to remove excess wool and water from the carpet surface. The edge of plank follows a closed path containing

Saha, Subir Kumar

49

Demonstration of uniform retorting of oil shale beds with void contrasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work during the past year addressed uniform retorting in a rubble bed with void contrasts. Specific objective were to:understand the effects of particle size distribution, particle shape and void on gas flow through oil shale rubble; overcome the non-uniform distribution of void on the laboratory scale by appropriately varying the particle size in order to maintain a uniform retorting front; and, develop a small-scale explosive blasting technique to provide low-void oil shale rubble (<25 volume percent) for future laboratory void contrast experiments. The experimental objective of demonstrating that a uniform retorting front could be achieved in an anisotropic rubble bed has been accomplished. The local yield of retort L-46 was comparable to the yield obtained if the rubble bed was one-dimensional. 9 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Bickel, T.C.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Uniform retorting of an anisotropic shale bed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ oil shale retorts have typically been designed for the fracturing event to produce a rubble bed having uniform cross-sectional rubble properties. This uniform rubble bed approach strived to produce constant void fraction and particle size distribution within all regions of the rubble bed. Ideally, these isotropic rubble beds have uniform flow of oxidants, retorting and combustion products. However, edge effects during the blast event typically produce channeling at the retort walls during processing, reducing the rubble sweep and the local yield. Second generation in situ retorts are addressing uniform retorting within the rubble bed rather than the uniformity of rubble bed properties. Here, the blast design produces and anisotropic rubble bed with varying particle size distribution and void fraction normal to the direction of flow. This paper describes a laboratory experiment in which a highly-instrumented, 100 kg bed of shale with zones of differing particle size and void was retorted. Shale particle size and void were varied over the retort cross-section so that a retorting front would move at a constant velocity downward through the rubble bed. The bed was designed using data from numerous pressure drop measurements on uniform shale beds of varying shale particle size distribution and void. Retorting of the bed showed a uniform retorting front and a yield comparable with that achieved in isotropic shale beds. We present thermal data and offgas, oil and shale analyses (allowing material and energy balance closures) and compare these data to previous vertical retorting experiments on uniform and non-uniform beds of shale. This experiment verifies that uniform retorting fronts can be achieved in correctly designed anisotropic beds of shale and validates the concept of uniform retorting in order increase the oil recovery in second generation retorts. 20 refs., 17 figs., 4 tabs.

Bickel, T.C.; Cook, D.W.; Engler, B.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Insulation Workers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Insulation workers install or spray insulation on pipes, boilers, walls, roofs, floors, etc. to improve thermal insulation or waterproofing. Most thermal insulation is now composed of man-made mineral ... rock wo...

R. Riala

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Aerogel Package for Fused Fibre Couplers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fused fibre couplers were encapsulated in hydrophobic aerogel. This provides an epoxy-free all-silica package that is low-loss, waterproof, supports the whole coupler waist and is...

Xiao, Limin; Grogan, Michael; England, Richard; Wadsworth, William; Birks, Tim

53

G:\\ESS\\248 RCRA\\SWMU Report Cor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 UNIT NAME: Yard Rubble Pile and Crushate Storage Area DATE: 011901 REGULATORY STATUS: SWMU LOCATION: SWMU 465 is located inside the plant security fence, west of C-333 Cascade...

54

NAM 2013 at St Andrews  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......it diminishes visibility, particularly during landing, and breathing it in is unhealthy. Astronauts...suggest that rubble and dust on asteroids and comets may transmit the effects of a landing much farther than previously thought. Ben Rozitis......

Sue Bowler

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

UNIT NUMBER:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

56

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 46 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: 2000 ft southwest of curve on Kentucky Highway 473- near east end of Mitchell Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: About 100 ft...

57

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

1 UNIT NAME Rubble oile 45 REGULATORY STATUS AOC LOCATION: West end of Mitche Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 2000 ft long, ft thick 4 ft wide FUNCTION: Control erosion on face of dam...

58

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9 UNIT NAME Rubble Dile 43 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: West end of Happy Ho ow Lake APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long by 4 ft wide -concrete 4-6 in thickness FUNCTION:...

59

REGULATORY STATUS: AOC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

184 UNIT NAME: Concrete Rubble pile 129) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security south of C-611 Water Treatment Plant. Estimated to be less than 5 cubic feet....

60

UNIT NUMBER  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Illinois Illinois SITE: Argonne-E PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Argonne-E - Low Level Waste - LLW-Contaminated Rubble/Debris WASTE STREAM CODE: 01133 STREAM NAME:LLW-Contaminated Rubble/Debris MPC NAME:Asphalt Debris TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 400.000 Future Volume Avg: 50.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: STATE: Illinois SITE: Argonne-E PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Mixed Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Argonne-E - Mixed Low Level Waste - MLLW-Contaminated D&D Rubble/Debris (Metals) WASTE STREAM CODE: 01134 STREAM NAME:MLLW-Contaminated D&D Rubble/Debris (Metals) MPC NAME:Elemental Hazardous Metals TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 49.110 Future Volume Avg: 64.900

62

10 Years ON: From the Lab to the Real World in 10 Years | GE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofuels Research at GE's Brazil Technology Center 2-3-10-v Crowdsourcing Software Platform Wins Award 2-1-10-v-working-at-ge-research The Dirt on the Cleanroom...

63

Crowdsourcing Software Award | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GE Unveils High-Tech Superhero, GENIUS MAN MunichinteriorV 10 Years ON: From the Lab to the Real World in 10 Years 2-1-10-v-working-at-ge-research The Dirt on the Cleanroom...

64

GE Innovation and Manufacturing in Europe | GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Wins Award 1-2-38-v-software-reliability-engineering A Stochastic Process-Based Look at Software Reliability 2-1-10-v-working-at-ge-research The Dirt on the Cleanroom...

65

Washing off intensification of cotton and wool fabrics by ultrasounds  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Wet textile washing processes were set up for wool and cotton fabrics to evaluate the potential of ultrasound transducers (US) in improving dirt removal. The samples were contaminated with an emulsion of carbon soot in vegetable oil and aged for three hours in fan oven. Before washing, the fabrics were soaked for 3min in a standard detergent solution and subsequently washed in a water bath. The dirt removal was evaluated through colorimetric measurements. The total color differences ?E of the samples were measured with respect to an uncontaminated fabric, before and after each washing cycle. The percentage of ?E variation obtained was calculated and correlated to the dirt removal. The results showed that the US transducers enhanced the dirt removal and temperature was the parameter most influencing the US efficiency on the cleaning process. Better results were obtained at a lower process temperature.

R. Peila; G. Actis Grande; M. Giansetti; S. Rehman; S. Sicardi; G. Rovero

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Petroleum Chemicals: Bulk Detergents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... One of the largest users of detergents is the textile industry. For example, raw wool, either used alone or blended with synthetic fibres, must be ... , either used alone or blended with synthetic fibres, must be scoured to remove dirt and ...

H. B. MILNER

1964-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Kharia-English Lexicon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rough, kh?a See khan?a roughen; M id : become rough; rough,make s.th. (e.g. dirt for planting) rough, roughen ( tr ); Mid : become rough, roughen ( itr ) < S. rukh??- rough rupi

Peterson, John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CLASIC Hits the Dirt-and the Air-in Oklahoma Bookmark and Share Dr. Jerry Elwood describes how the field campaigns in Oklahoma are contributing to the Department of Energy's...

69

#AskEnergySaver: Insulation | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

problems or not, it is a good idea to cover any exposed dirt with a membrane (6-mil polyethylene sheeting will do) before you do anything else. This will make it easier and nicer...

70

ON NEBRASKA'S NORTHERN border, the Missouri River rhythmically drains the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a trio of men wearing grins as wide as children on Christmas morning brush away dust and dirt from what marine predator, the mosasaur. With dozens of 3-inch-long, flesh-chopping teeth arming its 3-feet

Farritor, Shane

71

BULLETIN OF THE UNITED ,STATES FISH COMJ~ISL~IOM.465 V d . JIV, No. 30. Washington, D.C. Oct. 1, 1884.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, it seemed at first impossi- ble, in a clieuiical way, to breathe the (`breath of God " into our scien- tific for several hours, so that little stones and other impurities nmy settle to the bottom. All particles of dirt

72

Forthcoming Events  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Magnetic Recorder. FEATURES AND SPECIFICATIONS l. CRS-1 automatically...with either ioniza-tion or thermal conductivity detectors...12) 14-17. Electrical Insulation, conf., Hershey, Pa...be pre-printed to your specifications. Acid, water, dirt, grease...

1962-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

73

Superhydrophobic and Superoleophobic Nanocellulose Aerogel Membranes as Bioinspired Cargo Carriers on Water and Oil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Superhydrophobic and Superoleophobic Nanocellulose Aerogel Membranes as Bioinspired Cargo Carriers on Water and Oil ... We foresee applications including buoyant, gas permeable, dirt-repellent coatings for miniature sensors and other devices floating on generic liquid surfaces. ...

Hua Jin; Marjo Kettunen; Ari Laiho; Hanna Pynnnen; Jouni Paltakari; Abraham Marmur; Olli Ikkala; Robin H. A. Ras

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

74

Social Structure as an Embodied Experience  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and repair such discordance, she will face the threat of traumatization. Furthermore, those who disrupt the conventional-institutional organization or channeling of experience take on the character of dirt and thereby represent a dirty Other...

Chouinard, James Babson

2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

75

The prehistoric diet and subsistence of the lower Pecos region, as reflected in coprolites from Baker Cave, Val Verde County, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

121 126 130 139 140 142 143 143 153 155 156 TABLE OF CONTENTS continued CHAPTER IV. MACROREMAINS (continued) Miscellaneous Insects. . . . . . . . . . Shell. Dirt/Sand/Rocks. . Section Summary. V. NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS. Human Dietary... 121 126 130 139 140 142 143 143 153 155 156 TABLE OF CONTENTS continued CHAPTER IV. MACROREMAINS (continued) Miscellaneous Insects. . . . . . . . . . Shell. Dirt/Sand/Rocks. . Section Summary. V. NUTRITIONAL ANALYSIS. Human Dietary...

Sobolik, Kristin Dee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

76

Shingle system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A barrier, such as a PV module, is secured to a base by a support to create a shingle assembly with a venting region defined between the barrier and base for temperature regulation. Water resistant junctions may be formed between the bases of adjacent shingle assemblies of an array of shingle assemblies. The base may include an insulation layer underlying a water barrier. The base may also include a waterproofing element; the width and height of the barrier may be shorter than the width and height of the waterproofing element.

Dinwoodie, Thomas L. (Piedmont, CA)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Application of laboratory results to the design of a high yield VMIS oil shale retort  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In situ oil shale retorts have typically been designed to process a rubble bed having uniform cross-sectional rubble properties. Edge effects during rock fragmentation commonly produce increased void at the perimeter of these low-void retorts. Previous laboratory and field results have demonstrated this void variation normal to the direction of flow causes non-uniform retort front velocities that result in significantly lower oil yield. It is unlikely that process control parameters (e.g., multiple injection points, steam, etc.) can provide any significant yield improvement in these non-uniform retorts. Any large improvement would come from modified rubblization concepts. This paper describes a modification to the retort blast design to achieve a uniform retorting front velocity in rubble with non-uniform properties (void fraction and particle size). This concept requires the creation of an anisotropic rubble bed with varying particle size and void fraction normal to the direction of flow. The unavoidable increased void at the retort perimeter is offset by modifying the ratio of the effective particle size of the rubble in the central to the perimeter regions of the retort. The results of laboratory-scale pressure drop and retorting experiments with an empirical blast design technique are used to describe how a high-yield, second generation in situ retort would be designed. 12 refs., 7 figs.

Bickel, T.C.; Ricketts, T.E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Biol 2605 Marine Life of Nova Scotia -Syllabus Instructor: Dave Keith: email -keithdm@dal.ca. Office: Biol 4050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biol 2605 Marine Life of Nova Scotia - Syllabus Instructor: Dave Keith: email - keithdm Centre ­ Students should wear sneakers or (preferably) hiking/waterproof boots on field trips (water Textbooks: 1. Marine Biology 8th Edition (Castro and Huber) - Recommended & available from in- structor 2

Iverson, Sara

79

National Wildlife Health Center Wildlife Health Bulletin 2013-07  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

island in the Bering Sea, reported these birds immediately to the University of Alaska's Marine Advisory on Saint Lawrence Island rely almost exclusively on the subsistence harvest of many marine species handling any birds found sick or dead. Wear waterproof or disposable gloves, and do not touch your face

80

The Fukushima Disaster and Japans Nuclear Plant Vulnerability in Comparative Perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Off-site power can be severed by a variety of events, such as terrorism, tornadoes, hurricanes, and other disasters. ... Figure 1 plots base plant elevation, seawall height, emergency power system elevation, and waterproofing of backup power systems for nuclear plants according to country. ...

Phillip Y. Lipscy; Kenji E. Kushida; Trevor Incerti

2013-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Species richness and selenium accumulation of plants in soils with elevated concentration of selenium and salinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies were conducted in soils with elevated concentrations of Se and salinity at Kesterson, California. Biomass distribution, species richness, and selenium accumulation of plants were examined for two sites where 15 cm of surface soil was removed and replaced with fill dirt in the fall of 1989, and two sites were native soil cover. The Se concentrations in the top 15 cm of fill dirt ranged from undetectable to 36 ng g-1. For the native soil sites, Se levels ranged from 75 to 550 ng g-1. Soil Se concentrations below 15 cm ranged from 300 to 700 ng g-1 and were comparable between the fill dirt and the native soil sites. At least 20 different plant species were brought into the two fill dirt sites with the top soil. Avena fatua L., Bassia hyssopifolia Kuntze Rev. Gen. Pl., Centaurea solstitialis L., Erysimum officianale L., Franseria acanthicarpa Cav. Icon., and Melilotus indica (L.) All. contributed over 60% of the total biomass. Only 5 species were found in the native soil sites, and salt grass (Distichlis spicata L.) was the predominant species and accounted for over 80% of the total biomass. Between 1989 and 1990, two years after the surface soil replacement, the two fill dirt sites had a 70% reduction in species richness. Plant tissue selenium concentrations were found to be quite variable between plant species and between sites of sampling. At the fill dirt sites, the plant species with deep root systems accumulated greater amounts of selenium than the shallow-rooted species. The soil selenium concentration of the field soil had no negative effect on pollen fertility, seed set, and seed germination for the plant species examined. However, seedling growth was impaired by the soil selenium concentrations. This suggests that a selection pressure of soil Se concentration may have been imposed on plant species such as M. indica in an early stage of its life cycle.

Huang, Z.Z.; Wu, L. (Department of Environmental Horticulture, University of California, Davis (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Deodorizing and Decolorizing of Degras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in water and not saponifiable by alkalies, cholesterin is easily emulsified, a property on which is based 6 the usual method of wool scouring. Wool Grease however, is easily soluble in naptha and other volatile solvents. This Wool Grease amounts to 6... of impurities, consisting of the wool grease, suint, and dirt. Unless feeed from dirt, dust, burrs, etc., the wool cannot be spun or woven successfully, and it will not dye evenly if all the natural oil and grease is not removed. A scouring process is there...

Grignard, Emily E.

1913-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

83

Places to Lie: Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?follows?the?format?of?the?MLA?Handbook,?Sixth?Edition. 2 slave history. Initially, I began my stories in the same manner as these authors. I knew that I wanted to create one story ab out a sundown town, a place where blacks are unwelcome after sunset, another about Martin Luther King?s relati onships... this involves the dirt black of her daughter?s skin or the dirt on her floors. The titled suggestion to bleach everything includes Zeldona, who seems to need a mental cleanse of her own. This short story idea came about while browsing James Loewen?s Sundown...

Seward, Trenee

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

84

Effects of saw projection and seed roll density on the performance of a cottonseed linter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ton of' Cot, t, onseed Kilowatt-hours Required per 100 Pound s of l, int, Tons of First Cut Cottonseed per 24 Hours Pounds of Lint Removed per 2&l Hour:; Based on (5~r 0- 1 lul ose Cont, ent Including all Dirt f om Lint Beater Cellulose Cont... Ton of' Cot, t, onseed Kilowatt-hours Required per 100 Pound s of l, int, Tons of First Cut Cottonseed per 24 Hours Pounds of Lint Removed per 2&l Hour:; Based on (5~r 0- 1 lul ose Cont, ent Including all Dirt f om Lint Beater Cellulose Cont...

Luedtke, Charles G

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

85

Controlling Pocket Gopher Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the main runway, remove the probe and insert the recommended doses of bait material. Close the opening with grass or paper and cover it with dirt to keep out light and air. Do not cover the bait with soil. Determine the over- all extent... the surface opening with grass or heavy paper and cover with dirt. A relatively simple way to find sur- screw. A 4-inch nipple screwed into the ?T? com- pletes the foot rest. 3. Dig down with a trowel or shovel to locate the runway. The traps should...

Texas Wildlife Services

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Simulating regoliths in microgravity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......the surfaces of asteroids and comets are covered by granular materials...meteorite impact or a spacecraft landing, may be very different depending...miscellaneous|methods: laboratory|comets: general|minor planets...meteorite impact or a spacecraft landing, on one side of a small rubble-pile......

N. Murdoch; B. Rozitis; S. F. Green; P. Michel; T.-L. de Lophem; W. Losert

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A&G Volume 54 Issue 4, Full Issue  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......visibility, particularly during landing, and breathing it in is unhealthy...rubble and dust on asteroids and comets may transmit the effects of a landing much farther than previously...subsequently shown that many of these landing sites actually sampled a geochemically......

A&G Volume 54 Issue 4; Full Issue

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Late-Glacial Deposits on the Chalk of South-East England  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Folkestone and the Medway Valley, that the climate of...widely, most notably the West European and Alpine snail...open sea to the south-west, the climate of zone...zone I b) of north-west Europe. The Late-glacial...fine-grained rubble found in dry valleys in the Cretaceous Chalk...

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Engineering Ethics Richard A. Burgess, M.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Ethics Richard A. Burgess, M.A. Texas Tech T-STEM Center and Deputy Director, National Institute for Engineering Ethics Summer 2012 #12;STEM includes Engineering · No single profession impacts the Rubble: An Introduction to Post-Disaster Engineering and Ethics by Sara Pfatteicher #12;Constraint

Gelfond, Michael

90

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale. Report of Investigations/1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil-shale rocks and dust. Three areas were examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil-shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil-shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Fire and explosion hazards of oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Bureau of Mines publication presents the results of investigations into the fire and explosion hazards of oil shale rocks and dust. Three areas have been examined: the explosibility and ignitability of oil shale dust clouds, the fire hazards of oil shale dust layers on hot surfaces, and the ignitability and extinguishment of oil shale rubble piles. 10 refs., 54 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The twentieth oil shale symposium proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This book contains 20 selections. Some of the titles are: The technical contributions of John Ward Smith in oil shale research; Oil shale rubble fires: ignition and extinguishment; Fragmentation of eastern oil shale for in situ recovery; A study of thermal properties of Chinese oil shale; and Natural invasion of native plants on retorted oil shale.

Gary, J.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Calibration studies of the Hayes Coastal Engineering Laboratory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the 3D Wave Basin with the newly-installed 48 paddle Rexroth wave generator at 0.5 and 1.0 meter water depths using wired and wireless capacitance wave gauges. These tests measured characteristics of the generated waves and reflection from the rubble...

Thurlow, Aimee Rebecca

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

94

GEOL 106 Writing: Mass Wasting -KEY Name _______________________  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

they fail, whereas unconsolidated slopes usually fail at less steep angles. 2) What is angle of repose? Angle of repose is the steepest angle that unconsolidated material naturally rests. 3) How does angle spilled over this dam, it quickly began to erode the unconsolidated rubble, causing the dam

Kirby, Carl S.

95

GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 5: Mass Wasting Name ___KEY______________ Lab section: Monday or Tuesday (circle one)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Once water spilled over this dam, it quickly began to erode the unconsolidated rubble, causing the dam that unconsolidated material naturally rests. Very wet sediment angle before much mass movement occurs? In unconsolidated material, the steeper the slope, the greater the risk

Kirby, Carl S.

96

Transmission of ocular media in labrid fishes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of the reef from the very shallow reef flats to deep slopes, feeding on a variety of...of the reef from the very shallow reef flats to deep slopes, feeding on a variety of...open water column; Rf, reef at; Ro, rocky outcrops or rubble; sh, shallow water...

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Carbonate facies and biostratigraphy of the middle Magdalena, Hueco Mountains, west Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pennsylvanian strata. The overlying middle Magdalene becomes increasingly resistant above the carbonate rubbles, and consists mostly of phylloid algal deposits interbedded with associated skeletal wackestones and packstones. This stratigraphic succession.... Terminology. 3 7 9 13 13 17 20 23 23 26 28 LITHOLOGY 32 Introduction Lithofacies Preface D~l F Characterization. Interpretation. Foram Calcarenite Facies Characterization. Interpretation. Skeletal Wackestone Facies Characterization...

Lambert, Lance Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

98

Advanced Materials for Aircraft Engine Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...strength and long creep lives, as-HIP material...cycle fatigue (LCF) lives. LCF is a failure...landing for an aircraft turbine engine). A classic...ductility and fatigue life. Examination ofLCF-tested...the atomizer, and residual dirt from gas supply lines and...

DANIEL G. BACKMAN; JAMES C. WILLIAMS

1992-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

99

Degradation of Nonylphenol Ethoxylates during the Composting of Sludges from Wool Scour Effluents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After the scouring process, only a portion of the wax and dirt (?30%) removed from the wool is recovered from the scour liquor in the recovery loops. ... While there is a steady trend toward the use of the more readily biodegradable alcohol ethoxylates, one of the main classes of detergents still used in aqueous wool scours are the nonylphenol ethoxylates (NPE). ...

F. William Jones; David J. Westmoreland

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

100

A spatially dependent model for washing wool  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We analytically model the transport of dirt in the industrial washing of wool using the advectiondiffusion equation in two dimensions. Separation of variables leads to a SturmLiouville problem where the analytic solution reveals how contamination is distributed both along and down the wool and indicates the operating parameter regimes that optimise the cleaning efficiency.

J.F. Caunce; S.I. Barry; G.N. Mercer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Media Transatlantic IV March 29 31, 2012, University of Paderborn, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Media Transatlantic IV March 29 ­ 31, 2012, University of Paderborn, Germany Traffic Aiming to bring together media scholars from the United States, Canada, and Germany, the conference continues Schabacher (University of Siegen, Germany): Traffic as 'Dirt Experience'. Harold Innis' Tracing of Media. 04

Paderborn, Universität

102

Working on Deck In commercial fis hing, the handling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the how may v.ell cau,e hack pre~...ure to hrcak the v.ater pump. h . Keer Jour \\c\\\\d clean' dirt} uc) a man ha, takcn a hau lall anu hurt hi hack. knocked a hole in h" ...c.alp. or torplcu 0\\ crhllaru bc

103

Tuning RED for Web Traffic* Mikkel Christiansen,**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

139 Tuning RED for Web Traffic* Mikkel Christiansen,** Kevin Jeffay, David Ott, F. Donelson Smith http://www.cs.unc.edu/Research/dirt Abstract We study the effects of RED on the performance of Web -- response time for HTTP request-response pairs. We empirically evaluate RED across a range of parameter

Jeffay, Kevin

104

Tuning RED for Web Traffic * Mikkel Christiansen, ** Kevin Jeffay, David Ott, F. Donelson Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

139 Tuning RED for Web Traffic * Mikkel Christiansen, ** Kevin Jeffay, David Ott, F. Donelson Smith http://www.cs.unc.edu/Research/dirt Abstract We study the effects of RED on the performance of Web --- response time for HTTP request­response pairs. We empirically evaluate RED across a range of parameter

Jeffay, Kevin

105

Overheating of Electric Motors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... due to dirt or other foreign matter obstructing the ventilating pipes, ducts and passages of motors. Mention is made of the lagging effect which waste materials may have on the ... . Mention is made of the lagging effect which waste materials may have on the motor casing, and useful suggestions are given for the improvement and maintenance of ventilation. Since ...

1942-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

EPA/Corps of Engineers Definition of "Fill Material" Rule Today the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

evaluating the impacts of mountaintop mining in Appalachia and recommending additional environmental the environmental review of proposed new coal mining operations under the Clean Water Act and surface mining regulating the dirt and rock from mountaintop mining placed in streams. · The Department of Interior

US Army Corps of Engineers

107

The Epigraphic Survey The 1983-84 season of the Epi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-borne dust, minimize erosion, and support the walls and consolidate their foundations. The same concerns led with the skilled masons and plasterers of the Antiquities Organization's Qurna Restoration Section. The holes were carefully cleaned of dirt and debris, and crumbling sandstone sur- faces were consolidated with resin before

Scherer, Norbert F.

108

version September 15, 1996, 10:31 P.M. MASSACHVSETTS INSTITVTE OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 and 2.2 of SCIP. 1. Tutorial exercises Tutorial Exercise 1 Give combinations of cars and cdrs a 400­mile car chase over dirt roads and through corn fields, they finally caught up with the notorious'' and ``defecting.'' If the two players cooperate, they each do moderately well; if they both defect, they each do

Meyer, Albert R.

109

version September 15, 1996, 10:31 P.M. MASSACHVSETTS INSTITVTE OF TECHNOLOGY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.1 and 2.2 of SCIP. 1. Tutorial exercises Tutorial Exercise 1 Give combinations of cars and cdrs moment. After a 400-mile car chase over dirt roads and through corn #12;elds, they #12;nally caught up involves two \\game players", and each has a choice between \\cooperating" and \\defecting." If the two

Meyer, Albert R.

110

Influx Measurements of Extraterrestrial Material  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dirt is reduced as it leaves the Earth's surface. In June 1966 Arnold and his colleagues were successful in a stratospheric balloon flight (20). Here a silicone-oil-coated 10-m2 mesh was sus-pended 6000 feet (1800 m) below a balloon...

David W. Parkin; David Tilles

1968-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Position sensor for linear synchronous motors employing halbach arrays  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A position sensor suitable for use in linear synchronous motor (LSM) drive systems employing Halbach arrays to create their magnetic fields is described. The system has several advantages over previously employed ones, especially in its simplicity and its freedom from being affected by weather conditions, accumulated dirt, or electrical interference from the LSM system itself.

Post, Richard Freeman

2014-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

Aerial Object Tracking from an Airborne Platform* Andreas Nussberger1, Helmut Grabner1 and Luc Van Gool1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from ground clutter, clouds or dirt on the lens, a hierarchical multi-layer filter pipeline is applied there are procedures that every airspace user has to follow. For a controlled airspace there is also air traffic a given aircraft there are transponder based technologies available to make an aircraft visible to others

Grabner, Helmut

113

House renewal, enhancement University continues with planning to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and reinvest in under- graduate life through its House renewal project. Page 5 `Dirt' cheap energy HarvardInside &ONLINE House renewal, enhancement University continues with planning to reinvigorate and Arabic, the Pforzheimer HouseresidentconductedresearchinChinaandEgypt for his senior thesis on Sino

114

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE NEW INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS IN SWISS LEGISLATION ON RADON PROTECTION IN DWELLINGS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......is to be given to the remediation of new builds that fail...prevent the entry of water, water steam and radon. It...direct contact with the ground or with a dirt-floor...Proportionality of radon remediation The switch from a limit......

Martha Palacios (Gruson); Fabio Barazza; Christophe Murith; Salome Ryf

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Letter to the Editor Does filter media type really affect BRS?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and dirt on filters are ozone removal rates. Zhao et al. (2007), studied ozone removal by HVAC filtersLetter to the Editor Does filter media type really affect BRS? Dear Editor, Buchanan et al., (2008: the correlation between high outdoor ozone with the simultaneous use of polyester- synthetic filters and higher

Siegel, Jeffrey

116

Science in Mainland China: A Tourist's Impressions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dirt-track racing with motor-cycles. Staff conditions...couLrse, to study the fundamental prop-erties of plasma...research on the life cycle of various insect pests...either an electric or a diesel engine). The plough was attached...

C. H. G. Oldham

1965-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

DNA-Level Diversity and Relatedness of Helicobacter pylori Strains in Shantytown Families in Peru and Transmission in a Developing-Country Setting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...which was developed with data from industrialized countries...E. Berg, unpublished data). We suggest that only...Dirt floor 21 (33.9) Electricity 61 (98.4) Food consumption...of cheetahs and other big cats. J. Bacteriol...Epidemiology Molecular Sequence Data Peru epidemiology Random...

Phabiola M. Herrera; Melissa Mendez; Billie Velapati; Livia Santiva?z; Jacqueline Balqui; S. Alison Finger; Jonathan Sherman; Mirko Zimic; Lilia Cabrera; Jose Watanabe; Carlos Rodrguez; Robert H. Gilman; Douglas E. Berg

2008-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

118

36 BOSTONIA Fall 2010 PHOTOGRAPH BY ASIA KEPKA to make the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to optimize the conver- sion and allow it to turn coal, coke, and other carbon-based fuel into pipeline Ways to Get There Getting the Dirt Out A new and improved way to turn coal into clean fuel 1 BY ART-sided industrial building. In the shadow of Brayton, the largest coal burning plant in New England, it looks like

Spence, Harlan Ernest

119

Characterisation, Modification & Mathematical Modelling of Sudsing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the surface energy/interfacial tension between a hydrophobic phase (e.g. fatty soils, dirt or grease interfacial tension reduces the energy penalty for creating additional interphase surface under mechanical to the multi-phase disper- sion it produces: the volume (e.g. foamability/stability), appearance (e.g. bubble

Cox, Simon

120

Trapping Coyotes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coyotes cause millions of dollars of damage yearly to livestock and crops in Texas. The leaflet explains coyote habits and the types of trap set, such as scent posts, dirt holes, and trail and carcass sets. The variety of traps available and how...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Clean Water Act at 40: The Successes and The Challenges Keynote Address  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- poor and had no sanitation facilities. My father was ostracized by the contractor community for paying million to provide sanitation for the colonias, the settlements of poor Mexican immigrants and the highest to pick up Mexican workers--"wetbacks" as they were then known. Their settlements were dirt-poor and water

Wolfe, Patrick J.

122

Wave induced residual pore-water pressures in sandbeds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for her help in typing and proofreading the text, and especially for her undying moral support during our stay in College Station. ACKNOWLED6NENTS The author is grateful to Drs. John B. Herbich and Wayne A. Dunlap for their advice and guidance... Size Analysis for Glass Beads . . . . . . . . 24 Waterproof Housing for Pressure Transducers 27 10 Experiment 1 Experiment 2 Experiment 3 Experiment 4 Experiment 5 Experiment 6 32 33 34 35 36 37 12 13 Effect of Residual Pore...

DeVries, Jack Walter

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

123

Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

70-108B One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 December 2, 1997 Key Words: Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells, humidification, gas distribution, direct liquid water injection, interdigitated flow fields. * Corresponding... of the catalyst layers were made of waterproof, carbon fiber cloths. Liquid water was injected by two metering pumps into two heated stainless steel coils, where it was preheated to the cell operating temperatures, and then directly into the gas streams...

Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Nguyen, Trung Van

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The TMI defueling project fuel debris removal system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Three Mile Island (TMI) unit 2 pressurized water reactor loss-of-coolant accident on March 28, 1979, presented the nuclear community with many challenging remediation problems. A plethora of techniques, systems, and tools have been employed for the recovery and packaging of the postaccident configuration of the reactor core. Of particular difficulty was the removal of the fuel debris located beneath the lower core support structure. Fuel debris located beneath the lower core support structure was the result of rapid cooling of the previously molten UO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}, causing formation of a ceramic like rubble. Approximately 19,100 kg of this rubble settled beneath the lower core support structure and onto the lower head of the reactor containment vessel. The development and implementation of a debris collection system based on the air lift principle proved to be an effective method for gathering the fuel debris from beneath the lower core support structure.

Burge, B. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Gas seal for an in situ oil shale retort and method of forming thermal barrier  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas seal is provided in an access drift excavated in a subterranean formation containing oil shale. The access drift is adjacent an in situ oil shale retort and is in gas communication with the fragmented permeable mass of formation particles containing oil shale formed in the in situ oil shale retort. The mass of formation particles extends into the access drift, forming a rubble pile of formation particles having a face approximately at the angle of repose of fragmented formation. The gas seal includes a temperature barrier which includes a layer of heat insulating material disposed on the face of the rubble pile of formation particles and additionally includes a gas barrier. The gas barrier is a gas-tight bulkhead installed across the access drift at a location in the access drift spaced apart from the temperature barrier.

Burton, III, Robert S. (Mesa, CO)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Remaining Sites Verification Package for the 100-B-18, 184-B Powerhouse Debris Pile, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2007-020  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 100-B-18 Powerhouse Debris Pile contained miscellaneous demolition waste from the decommissioning activities of the 184-B Powerhouse. The debris covered an area roughly 15 m by 30 m and included materials such as concrete blocks, mixed aggregate/concrete slabs, stone rubble, asphalt rubble, traces of tar/coal, broken fluorescent lights, brick chimney remnants, and rubber hoses. In accordance with this evaluation, the verification sampling results support a reclassification of this site to Interim Closed Out. The results of verification sampling show that residual contaminant concentrations do not preclude any future uses and allow for unrestricted use of shallow zone soils. The results also demonstrate that residual contaminant concentrations are protective of groundwater and the Columbia River.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Idaho Idaho SITE: Argonne-W PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office % of Stream Argonne-W - Low Level Waste - Phyto-Remediation Residuals WASTE STREAM CODE: 01181 STREAM NAME:Phyto-Remediation Residuals MPC NAME:Debris W aste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 1.800 Future Volume Avg: 0.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: % of Stream Argonne-W - Low Level Waste - LLW Contaminated Rubble/Debris WASTE STREAM CODE: 04081 STREAM NAME:LLW Contaminated Rubble/Debris MPC NAME:Debris W aste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 0.000 Future Volume Avg: 40.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: STATE: Idaho SITE: Argonne-W PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Mixed Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Chicago Operations Office

128

Eliminating the possibility at Chernobyl 4 of recriticality with positive feedback  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have recently published an article in which we discuss means by which plutonium and other fissile material stored underground could reach criticality with positive feedback and therefore explosive potential. The Chernobyl rubble involving hundreds of tons of material is similar in some respects to the systems analyzed in the paper, and the practices there to control criticality may well increase the probability of a second event at Chernobyl 4. This paper explores the Chernobyl situation and remedial actions are recommended.

Bowman, C.D.

1996-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

129

Builders of a Nation: Womens Experiences in Postwar Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? 45 Builders of a Nation: Womens Experiences in Postwar Germany Barbara Brennan The German women who survived the Second World War are often characterized by the familiar images of long lines of women digging the country out from... underneath the rubble. However, their contributions to the rebuilding of Germany reach much further than the act of physically rebuilding the country. The sacrifices required of them for the survival their families and themselves were tremendous...

Brennan, Barbara

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Remnants of Ritual: A discussion of burial practices and material remains of Pompeian tombs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a kiln, and fragments of tiles and pottery. She also writes that the structure collapsed most likely due to unintentional burning, after which the worshippers dug a pit into the collapsed rubble to deposit a burnt offering. Here, along... of their feasts likely remained. The examination of charred remains from burial pits at a Gallo- Roman cemetery at Faulqeumont in Moselle, France, may give us insight into material deposits around 1st century Roman graves. The graves were mostly pits, with a...

Geller, Jennifer

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Processes Influencing the Diversity of Middle Permian Brachiopods in the Bell Canyon Formation of the Delaware Basin (West Texas, Guadalupe Mountains National Park)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be recessive; thin-bedded to medium bedded, no sedimentary structure observed, usually iron- stained, chert nodules or layers, can weather to platy or wavy usually between 2 and 10 cm, but can also be up to 15 cm or a thin as 1 cm, usually... to wavy laminations, normally graded, or structureless, chert in nodules and layers, commonly petroliferous, weathers platy, rubbly, slabby, or massive, grainy areas of fossils not necessarily lens shape or in stringers, occasionally...

Fall, Leigh Margaret

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

132

Heterogeneity and Depositional Variability of Reef Sand Aprons: Integrated Field and Modeling of the Dynamics of Holocene Aranuka Atoll, Republic of Kiribati, Equatorial Pacific  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Environment, 2007). These factors include bottom shear stress, wind shear stress, wave radiation stress, flooding and drying, barometric pressure gradient, momentum dispersion, evaporation, and sources and sinks (DHI Water and Environment, 2007). Three..., and which include a range of grain sizes, from coral-algal boulders and rubble to sand. Bathymetrically above and platformward of the spur and groove system, a pavement of encrusting coralline red algae forms the reef crest (James, 1983; comparable...

Wasserman, Hannah

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Geologic history of the Pettet Zone of the Sligo formation at Lisbon Field, Claiborne Parish, Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and eroded rubble deposits at the top of each shoal denotes upward shoaling to the point of emergence. Basinward of the shoals were the open marine, diverse skeletal mudstones and wackestones, and an open marine lagoon was present shoreward of the shoals... showing skeletal limestones and shales and representative sedimentary structures. . . . . . . . . 16 18 Legend for sedimentary structure symbols in Pettet rock properties plots (Figures 9-11). 9 Pettet rock properties of the TP 11-7 core. . 10...

Ford, James Patrick

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

692: Categorical Exclusion Determination 692: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002692: Categorical Exclusion Determination Drill One Exploratory Hole On Lease Tract C-WM-17 by Golden Eagle Uranium CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B1.3 Date: 06/02/2010 Location(s): Montrose County, Colorado Office(s): Legacy Management Golden Eagle Uranium (LLC) proposes to drill one 5-inch-diameter exploratory borehole on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lease tract C-WM-17, located in western Montrose County, Colorado. The drilling would be completed by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig capable of boring to 1,000 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The proposed location of the drill hole is in a previously disturbed area and is adjacent to a two-track dirt road. Access to the site would be on existing dirt roads. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

135

Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-024..doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 PostingNo.: DOE-ID-INL-12-024 SECTION A. Project Title: Rigby Bus Lot Northwest Entrance SECTION B. Project Description: The purpose of the proposed action is to provide an additional bus entrance to the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot. A portion of chain link fencing (running east to west) on the northwest corner of the Rigby Park and Ride Bus Lot would be relocated to allow an opening off of the City of Rigby dirt access road so that buses may enter the Rigby Park and Ride Lot from the northwest. The existing fence material would then be placed across the City of Rigby dirt access road (running north and south). The new entrance would be for buses only. Approximately 4 to 6 buses would use this entrance. No personnel vehicles will have access. Buses would start using the new

136

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 6 Project Information Project Title: Repair flowline at 83-AX-4 Date: 2-17-2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Bernard Winfrey Project Overview 1. What are the environmental Repair a flowline leak and test the line at 83-AX-4. Dug up pipeline, will backfill with clean fi ll dirt. Oil impacts? contaminated soil will be hauled to the east side landfarm and clean dirt will be brought in from section 20. 2. What is the legal location? 83-AX-4, N43 17'40.5" w. 10612'46.0" 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 2 days 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, Backhoe with operator and one to three workers. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

137

U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Envkonmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

- - 19-10 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management National Envkonmental Policy Act Environmental Checklist Project/Activity: Drill one exploratory hole on L.T. c-WM-17 by Golden Eagle Uranium A. Brief Project! Activity Descl'iptioll Golden Eagle Uranium (LLC) proposes to drill one 5-inch-diameter exploratory borehole on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lease tract C-WM-17, located in western Montrose County, Colorado. The drilling would be completed by a truck-mounted rotary drill rig capable of boring to 1,000 feet (ft) below ground surface (bgs). The proposed location of the drill hole is in a previously disturbed area and is adjacent to a two-track dirt road. Access to the site would be on existing dirt roads. The drilling would be completed dry to an estimated depth of 550 ft bgs. Once data are collected, the hole

138

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Project lnfonnation Project Title: C-EA 3. Dirt work in the specified areas that have been previously and substantially disturbed Date: 617/2011 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview 1 . Brief project description [include anything that could impact the environment] 2. Legallocation 3. Duration of the project 4. Major equipment to be used C-EA 3. Dirt work in the specified areas that have been previously and substantially disturbed: ex 81.3 Includes previously-bladed areas immediately within "only" the following facilities as defined by the May 2010 Aerial Photos: B-1-3 B-1-1 0 B-2-10 T-1-11 B-1-20 T-2-34 T-5-3 South Terminal Car Wash (SG2) SG4 ESS&H Bldg. Lower Production Office and Shop Bldg

139

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 77 -13-SX-3 Date: 2-8-1 0 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring 77-SX-3 per procedure. 1. What are the environmental impacts? The duration of this project will be 3-4 days. 2. What is the leg al location? 3. What is the duration of the project? The equipment to be used will be Backhoe, welder, tiller dump truck. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig , We will take oil contaminated dirt to the Eastside landfarm and backfill with d ean fill dirt from sec. 20. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

140

Categorical Exclusion for Access Road  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Access Road Access Road Improvements along the Pinnacle Peak- Prescott 230-kV Transmission Line between Structures 16813 and 170/1 Yavapai County. Arizona * RECORD OF CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION A. Proposed Action: Western proposes to improve access roads along a portion of the Pinnacle Peak to Prescott 230-kV Transmission Line (Structures 168/3 and 170/1). which are currently impassable. to maintain worker safety and the reliability of the bulk electric system. Western plans to blade and grade the existing access road where it enters and leaves three washes so that Western's maintenance vehicles can drive across the washes. We will remove dirt from the road prism by starting at wash edges and pulling dirt up slope in order to create ramps with grades suitable for our equipment.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Characterization of in situ oil shale retorts prior to ignition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and system for characterizing a vertical modified in situ oil shale retort prior to ignition of the retort. The retort is formed by mining a void at the bottom of a proposed retort in an oil shale deposit. The deposit is then sequentially blasted into the void to form a plurality of layers of rubble. A plurality of units each including a tracer gas cannister are installed at the upper level of each rubble layer prior to blasting to form the next layer. Each of the units includes a receiver that is responsive to a coded electromagnetic (EM) signal to release gas from the associated cannister into the rubble. Coded EM signals are transmitted to the receivers to selectively release gas from the cannisters. The released gas flows through the retort to an outlet line connected to the floor of the retort. The time of arrival of the gas at a detector unit in the outlet line relative to the time of release of gas from the cannisters is monitored. This information enables the retort to be characterized prior to ignition.

Turner, Thomas F. (Laramie, WY); Moore, Dennis F. (Laramie, WY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NUMERICAL MODELING OF THE DISRUPTION OF COMET D/1993 F2 SHOEMAKER-LEVY 9 REPRESENTING THE PROGENITOR BY A GRAVITATIONALLY BOUND ASSEMBLAGE OF RANDOMLY SHAPED POLYHEDRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We advance the modeling of rubble-pile solid bodies by re-examining the tidal breakup of comet Shoemaker-Levy 9, an event that occurred during a 1.33 R encounter with Jupiter in 1992 July. Tidal disruption of the comet nucleus led to a chain of sub-nuclei {approx}100-1000 m diameter; these went on to collide with the planet two years later. They were intensively studied prior to and during the collisions, making SL9 the best natural benchmark for physical models of small-body disruption. For the first time in the study of this event, we use numerical codes treating rubble piles as collections of polyhedra. This introduces forces of dilatation and friction, and inelastic response. As in our previous studies we conclude that the progenitor must have been a rubble pile, and we obtain approximately the same pre-breakup diameter ({approx}1.5 km) in our best fits to the data. We find that the inclusion of realistic fragment shapes leads to grain locking and dilatancy, so that even in the absence of friction or other dissipation we find that disruption is overall more difficult than in our spheres-based simulations. We constrain the comet's bulk density at {rho}{sub bulk} {approx} 300-400 kg m{sup -3}, half that of our spheres-based predictions and consistent with recent estimates derived from spacecraft observations.

Movshovitz, Naor; Asphaug, Erik; Korycansky, Donald, E-mail: nmovshov@ucsc.edu [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

143

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. July 1983-September 1989 (Citations from World Textile Abstracts). Report for July 1983-September 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents. Effluents that contain dyes are discussed in a separate bibliography. Recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents are discussed. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. (This updated bibliography contains 322 citations, 22 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: Excluding dyes. (Latest citations from World Textile abstracts). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile industry effluents exclusive of dyes. Topics include the recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic fiber manufacture and wool scouring processes are emphasized. Effluents that contain dyes are discusssed in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Yield Optimization of Nitrogen Vacancy Centers in Diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/nmg2870 . 21 3-7 The minimum implantation time to prevent graphitization versus temperature for various doses of 2 MeV nitrogen implantation 22 x FIGURE... is feasible and allows removal of most dirt, some amorphous carbon, and graphite on surface without eroding the diamond. The bond strength of diamond also allows heating in vacuum to high temperature up to 1700C and can be baked in air up to 700C...

Chen, Jeson

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Extend the Operating Life of Your Motor  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Certain components of motors degrade with time and operating stress. Electrical insulation weakens over time with exposure to voltage unbalance, over and undervoltage, voltage disturbances, and temperature. Contact between moving surfaces causes wear. Wear is affected by dirt, moisture, and corrosive fumes and is greatly accelerated when lubricant is misapplied, becomes overheated or contaminated, or is not replaced at regular intervals. When any components are degraded beyond the point of economical repair or replacement, the motors economic life ends.

148

Analysis of lipophilic compounds of tea coated on the surface of clay teapots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The surface of a clay teapot tends to be coated with a waterproof film after constant use for tea preparation. The waterproof films of two kinds of teapots (zisha and zhuni) used for preparing oolong tea and old oolong tea were extracted and subjected to gas chromatographymass spectrometry analysis. The results showed that comparable constituents were detected in these films; they were primarily fatty acids and linear hydrocarbons that were particularly rich in palmitic acid and stearic acid. To explore the source of these two abundant fatty acids, the fatty acid compositions of fresh tea leaves, granules, infusion, and vapor of infusion were analyzed by gas chromatography. Fresh tea leaves were rich in palmitic acid (C-16:0), unsaturated linolenic acid (C-18:3), linoleic acid (C-18:2), and oleic acid (C-18:1), which were presumably from the phospholipid membrane. During the process of manufacturing oolong tea, the three unsaturated fatty acids may be substantially degraded or oxidized to stearic acid (C-18:0), which was enriched with palmitic acid in the tea granules and in the infusion. The vapor of the tea infusion is primarily composed of palmitic acid and stearic acid. Thus, the coated films of teapots mostly originated from the lipophilic compounds of the tea infusions.

Tse-Yu Chung; Ping-Chung Kuo; Zih-Hui Liao; Yu-En Shih; Mei-Ling Cheng; Chia-Chang Wu; Jason T.C. Tzen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Retrofit Ventilation Strategies in Multifamily Buildings Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Foundation Retrofits Foundation Retrofits Building America Webinar November 30, 2011 Kohta Ueno Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 2 Background Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 3 Background  Space conditioning energy use for basements  Known moisture-safe solutions (previous research)  Persistent bulk water (leakage) issues  Retrofits of existing foundations  Especially uneven wall (rubble stone) foundations  "Hybrid" insulation and bulk water control assemblies Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 4 Foundations w. bulk water issues  Severe and rapid damage to interior insulation and finishes due to bulk water intrusion Hybrid Foundation Retrofits 5 Insulation Location Choices * Retrofits: interior insulation is often the only

150

Remaining Sites Verification Package for 132-H-1, 116-H Reactor Stack Burial Site, Waste Site Reclassification Form 2006-053  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 132-H-1 waste site includes the 116-H exhaust stack burial trench and the buried stack foundation (which contains an embedded vertical 15-cm (6-in) condensate drain line). The 116-H reactor exhaust stack and foundation were decommissioned and demolished using explosives in 1983, with the rubble buried in situ beneath clean fill at least 1 m (3.3 ft) thick. Residual concentrations support future land uses that can be represented by a rural-residential scenario and pose no threat to groundwater or the Columbia River based on RESRAD modeling.

L. M. Dittmer

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Thermal Removal Of Tritium From Concrete And Soil To Reduce Groundwater Impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Legacy heavy-water moderator operations at the Savannah River Site (SRS) have resulted in the contamination of equipment pads, building slabs, and surrounding soil with tritium. At the time of discovery the tritium had impacted the shallow (< 3-m) groundwater at the facility. While tritium was present in the groundwater, characterization efforts determined that a significant source remained in a concrete slab at the surface and within the associated vadose zone soils. To prevent continued long-term impacts to the shallow groundwater a CERCLA non-time critical removal action for these source materials was conducted to reduce the leaching of tritium from the vadose zone soils and concrete slabs. In order to minimize transportation and disposal costs, an on-site thermal treatment process was designed, tested, and implemented. The on-site treatment consisted of thermal detritiation of the concrete rubble and soil. During this process concrete rubble was heated to a temperature of 815 deg C (1,500 deg F) resulting in the dehydration and removal of water bound tritium. During heating, tritium contaminated soil was used to provide thermal insulation during which it's temperature exceeded 100 deg C (212 deg F), causing drying and removal of tritium. The thermal treatment process volatiles the water bound tritium and releases it to the atmosphere. The released tritium was considered insignificant based upon Clean Air Act Compliance Package (CAP88) analysis and did not exceed exposure thresholds. A treatability study evaluated the effectiveness of this thermal configuration and viability as a decontamination method for tritium in concrete and soil materials. Post treatment sampling confirmed the effectiveness at reducing tritium to acceptable waste site specific levels. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funding three additional treatment cells were assembled utilizing commercial heating equipment and common construction materials. This provided a total of four units to batch treat concrete rubble and soil. Post treatment sampling verified that the activity in the treated soil and concrete met the treatment standards for each medium which allowed the treated concrete rubble and soil to be disposed of on site as backfill. During testing and operations a total of 1,261-m{sup 3} (1,650-yd{sup 3}) of contaminated concrete and soils were treated with an actual incurred cost of $3,980,000. This represents a unit treatment cost of $3,156/m{sup 3} ($2,412/yd{sup 3}). In 2011 the project was recognized with an e-Star Sustainability Award by DOE's Office of Environmental Management.

Jackson, Dennis G.; Blount, Gerald C.; Wells, Leslie H.; Cardoso-Neto, Joao E.; Kmetz, Thomas F.; Reed, Misty L.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

152

Coalbed methane production enhancement by underground coal gasification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sub-surface of the Netherlands is generally underlain by coal-bearing Carboniferous strata at greater depths (at many places over 1,500 m). These coal seams are generally thinner than 3 meter, occur in groups (5--15) within several hundred meters and are often fairly continuous over many square kilometers. In many cases they have endured complex burial history, influencing their methane saturation. In certain particular geological settings, a high, maximum coalbed methane saturation, may be expected. Carboniferous/Permian coals in the Tianjin-region (China) show many similarities concerning geological settings, rank and composition. Economical coalbed methane production at greater depths is often obstructed by the (very) low permeabilities of the coal seams as with increasing depth the deformation of the coal reduces both its macro-porosity (the cleat system) and microporosity. Experiments in abandoned underground mines, as well as after underground coal gasification tests indicate ways to improve the prospects for coalbed methane production in originally tight coal reservoirs. High permeability areas can be created by the application of underground coal gasification of one of the coal seams of a multi-seam cycle with some 200 meter of coal bearing strata. The gasification of one of the coal seams transforms that seam over a certain area into a highly permeable bed, consisting of coal residues, ash and (thermally altered) roof rubble. Additionally, roof collapse and subsidence will destabilize the overburden. In conjunction this will permit a better coalbed methane production from the remaining surrounding parts of the coal seams. Moreover, the effects of subsidence will influence the stress patterns around the gasified seam and this improves the permeability over certain distances in the coal seams above and below. In this paper the effects of the combined underground coal gasification and coalbed methane production technique are regarded for a single injection well. Known geotechnical aspects are combined with results from laboratory experiments on compaction of thermally treated rubble. An axi-symmetric numerical model is used to determine the effects induced by the gasified coal seam. The calculation includes the rubble formation, rubble compaction and induced stress effects in the overlying strata. Subsequently the stress effects are related to changes in coal permeability, based on experimental results of McKee et al.

Hettema, M.H.H.; Wolf, K.H.A.A.; Neumann, B.V.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

153

Federal Facility Agreement progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The (SRS) Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) was made effective by the US. Environmental Protection Agency Region IV (EPA) on August 16, 1993. To meet the reporting requirements in Section XXV of the Agreement, the FFA Progress Report was developed. The FFA Progress Report is the first of a series of quarterly progress reports to be prepared by the SRS. As such this report describes the information and action taken to September 30, 1993 on the SRS units identified for investigation and remediation in the Agreement. This includes; rubble pits, runoff basins, retention basin, seepage basin, burning pits, H-Area Tank 16, and spill areas.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Losses of Moisture and Plant Food By Percolation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This does not refer to the grain hut to the entire plant. Barley requires from 262 to 774. pounds of water to proouce one pound dry matter, and red clover from 249 to 453 pounds. 1.'he qu:mtity estimated by different investi gators varies., but we can...; known as "black waxy land"; very good soil; pro duce~ t bale cotton aml 35 bushels corn; cotton and corn chiefly grown; no fertilizer used; soil packs, dries into clods; does not wash, and dirt clocs not wash onto it; cultivated 30 to 40 years...

Fraps, G. S.

1914-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Keep Food Safe When Cooking Outdoors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. If there is no source of clean water on site, bring your own. If necessary, use paper towels, towelettes, or hand sanitizers to clean your hands. Although hand sanitizers can reduce germs, they will be less effective if your hands have visible dirt on them. Other... ways to keep germs from spreading: ? Wash your hands before and after touching raw meat, poultry, or seafood. ? Wash work surfaces and cutting boards with hot, soapy water, and sanitize them before and after grilling. You can make a sanitizing...

Anding, Jenna

2008-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

156

Physical differences between normal and belly wool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the length of five unstretched grease-wool locks from each of the nine regions. Each lock was then hand scoured in carbon tetra- chloride and the lengths of 20 ind1vidual stretched fibers from each lock, for a total of 100 from each region, were measured... and Mary J. Brandon. 1922. A method of determining grease and dirt in wool. U. S. D. A. Bul. 1100. 33 Von Bergen, W. , and Herbert R. Mauersberger. 1948. Sorting, scouring and carbonizing; American Wool Handbook. (2nd ed. ). Textile Book Publishers, Inc...

Richardson, O. L

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Judging Wool and Mohair.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of clean wool left in a lot after scouring esprej~ as a percentage of the original weight. The shrinkage of fine-wool in Texas is 56 percent. I example, if you had a 10-pound fleece of ail 56 percent, or 5.6 pounds, would be grc;lfe J dirt and 44... percent, or 4.4 pounds, woultl be rlr wool. The 4.4 pounds of clean wool ~\\.oultl referred to as the yield ancl would be tlefil~ctl the number of pounds of clean wool left in a of wool after scouring, and expressed as ;I ])err! age of the original...

Gray, J. A.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effluent treatment in the textile industry: excluding dyes. January 1983-January 1989 (Citations from World Textile Abstracts). Report for January 1983-January 1989  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography contains citations concerning the treatment and reuse of textile-industry effluents. Effluents that contain dyes are discussed in a separate bibliography. Recovery of lubricants, lye, sizing agents, polyvinyl alcohol, zinc, dirt, and heat from textile effluents are discussed. Air and water pollution control technology that is effective in treating textile effluents is discussed. Effluents from synthetic-fiber manufacture and wool-scouring processes are emphasized. (This updated bibliography contains 300 citations, 84 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Not Available

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Swine Investigations in Texas, 1888-1957.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- nl Ea~eriment Station on swine was a compar- 2 . n of the value of ear corn (in the shuck) with 2 mely ground ear corn (corn, cob and shuck 2 [ether) as a feed for hogs. Unground ear corn 2 .Iqe much better results. (TAES Ann. Report 3 $5.) 3 3... not in- crease its efficiency as a feed." The sorghum grain in these tests was self-fed, free choice, (Kan. Circ. 41-H-2.) Is it a good practice to feed fattening pigs whole I sorghum grain on the ground or dirt floor? 1 more time to chew the whole...

Patterson, C. M.; Sorensen, A. M. Jr.; Hale, Fred

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Children and lead: new findings and concerns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An editorial dealing with lead in the environment and its health risks to children is presented. Young children are particularly vulnerable to lead exposure. Through hand-to-mouth activities, such as thumb sucking, nail biting, or eating with dirty hands, lead in house dust and garden soil readily enters their bodies. Children with pica are exposed to more lead because they eat such items as paint chips, broken plaster, and dirt. Moreover, intestinal lead absorption is greater in children than in adults. The author recommends a concerted effort to reduce undue lead absorption in children. (JMT)

Lin-Fu, J.S.

1982-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The Hydrostatic Mooring System. Quarterly Report for the Period April-June 2000  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The following topics are summarized for the 2nd quarter of 2000: (1) We amended the structural design of the buoy, moving the horizontal bulkhead from the bottom to the top of the buoy. (2) We designed the main bearing using Hilman Rollers. We discarded a parallel design using Lubron slide bearings due to concerns about keeping dirt out of the sliding surfaces. (3) We performed a preliminary failure tree risk analysis for the system as required by ABS. (4) We made various drawings of the system and sub-components.

Korsgaard, Jens

2000-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Drying Fruits and Vegetables at Home.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

all fresh produce thoroughly to re move any dirt or spray. Sort and discard any defective food. Decay, bruises or mold on any piece may affect an entire batch of food being dried. Peel, pit and/or cut the food into uniform sized pieces. A stainless.... (See charts on pages 6 to 9 for specific times .) ? Set the dmtainer of sulfur beside the stacked trays. 2 Ignite the sulfur. Do not leave burned matches in the container; they may keep the sulfur from burning completely. Because of the flame...

Putnam, Peggy H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Hatching Eggs in the Classroom: A Teacher's Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the egg by gently rubbing the soiled surface with fine sandpaper. Examine the egg carefully to make sure that what appears to be dirt is not a stain. Never wash an egg with water. Storage Time A good rule of thumb is to set the eggs in the incubator... if the tempera- ture is too high. If the temperature is too low, embryos will die. In either case, hatchability decreases. Relative humidity in the storage room should be approximately 75 percent. When eggs are exposed to excessive humidity, condensation forms...

Powers, Trey G.; Cartwright, A. Lee

1995-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

164

Loaded Transducer Fpr Downhole Drilling Component  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust transmission element for transmitting information between downhole tools, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The transmission element maintains reliable connectivity between transmission elements, thereby providing an uninterrupted flow of information between drill string components. A transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe. To close gaps present between transmission elements, transmission elements may be biased with a "spring force," urging them closer together.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT)

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

Texas Rice, Volume VI, Number 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by processing these crops is produced more efficiently than the ethanol produced by corn. Water hyacinth, a weed that chokes waterways if left to grow uncontrolled, is even more energy efficient as a biomass feedstock, Holtzapple said. In the MixAlco process..., the biomass feedstock, with added mi- croorganisms from sources such as dirt, compost piles and swamps, is treated with lime and then fer- mented to form organic salts. Wa- ter is removed and then the mixture is heated to form ketones, such as acetone, which...

166

MHK Technologies/Tidal Lagoons | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tidal Lagoons Tidal Lagoons < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Lagoons.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Electric Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Dandong City *MHK Projects/Swansea Bay Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description idal Lagoons are situated a mile or more offshore in high tidal range areas, and use a rubble mound impoundment structure and low-head hydroelectric bulb turbines. Shallow tidal flats provide the most economical sites. Multi-cell Tidal Lagoons provide higher load factors (about 62%) and have the flexibility to shape the output curve in order to dispatch power in response to demand price signals. The impoundment structure is a conventional rubble mound breakwater (loose rock, concrete, and marine sheetpiles are among the types of appropriate materials for the impoundment structure), with ordinary performance specifications and is built from the most economical materials. The barrage is much shorter than an impoundment structure with the same output capacity, but the barrage is a much larger structure. The offshore tidal generator uses conventional low-head hydroelectric generation equipment and control systems. The equipment consists of a mixed-flow reversible bulb turbine, a generator, and the control system. Manufacturers/suppliers include Alstom, GE, Kvaerner, Siemens, Voith, Sulzer, and others.

167

Comparison of the Acceptability of Various Oil Shale Processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While oil shale has the potential to provide a substantial fraction of our nation's liquid fuels for many decades, cost and environmental acceptability are significant issues to be addressed. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) examined a variety of oil shale processes between the mid 1960s and the mid 1990s, starting with retorting of rubble chimneys created from nuclear explosions [1] and ending with in-situ retorting of deep, large volumes of oil shale [2]. In between, it examined modified-in-situ combustion retorting of rubble blocks created by conventional mining and blasting [3,4], in-situ retorting by radio-frequency energy [5], aboveground combustion retorting [6], and aboveground processing by hot-solids recycle (HRS) [7,8]. This paper reviews various types of processes in both generic and specific forms and outlines some of the tradeoffs for large-scale development activities. Particular attention is given to hot-recycled-solids processes that maximize yield and minimize oil shale residence time during processing and true in-situ processes that generate oil over several years that is more similar to natural petroleum.

Burnham, A K; McConaghy, J R

2006-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

Process of breaking and rendering permeable a subterranean rock mass  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The process of the present invention involves the following steps: producing, as by hydrofracing, a substantially horizontal fracture in the subterranean rock mass to be processed; emplacing an explosive charge in the mass in spaced juxtaposed position to the fracture; enlarging the fracture to create a void space thereat, an initial lifting of the overburden, and to provide a free face juxtaposed to and arranged to cooperate with the emplaced explosive charge; and exploding the charge against the free face for fragmenting the rock and to distribute the space, thus providing fractured, pervious, rubble-ized rock in an enclosed subterranean chamber. Firing of the charge provides a further lifting of the overburden, an enlargement of the chamber and a larger void space to distribute throughout the rubble-ized rock within the chamber. In some forms of the invention an explosive charge is used to produce a transitory enlargement of the fracture, and the juxtaposed emplaced charge is fired during the critical period of enlargement of the fracture.

Lekas, Mitchell A. (Concord, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Kentucky Kentucky SITE: Paducah PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: Low Level Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Oak Ridge Operations Office % of Stream Paducah - Low Level Waste - LLW Rubble/Debris WASTE STREAM CODE: 00438 STREAM NAME:LLW Rubble/Debris MPC NAME:Debris W aste TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : Future Volume Avg: Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 LLW Debris Isotopes Neptunium-237 Avg Concentration: 1.0000E+000 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:2.4000E+001 pCi/g Technetium-99 Avg Concentration: 5.0000E+001 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:1.4210E+003 pCi/g Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: 5.0000E+001 pCi/g Low Limit Concent:0.0000E+000 pCi/g Upper Limit Concent:9.7800E+002 pCi/g Uranium-235 Avg Concentration: 7.0000E-001 wt%

170

Just Say No to Carbon Emissions (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Learn about three efforts our grandchildren may thank us for: cheap solar energy, bringing energy efficiency to China, and learning how to store carbon deep underground. Can solar energy be dirt cheap? We're all potentially billionaires when it comes to solar energy. The trick is learning how to convert sunlight to electricity using cheap and plentiful materials. Ramamoorthy Ramesh, an innovative materials scientist at Berkeley Lab, will discuss how he and other researchers are working to make photovoltaic cells using the most abundant elements in the Earth's crust -- materials that are literally as common as dirt. Energy efficiency in China: Nan Zhou is a researcher with Berkeley Labs China Energy Group. She will speak about Chinas energy use and the policies that have been implemented to increase energy efficiency and reduce CO2 emission growth. Her work focuses on building China's capacity to evaluate, adopt and implement low-carbon development strategies. Zhou has an architecture degree from China, and a Master and Ph.D. in Engineering from Japan. Understanding geologic carbon sequestration: Even with continued growth of renewable energy sources such as wind and solar, fossil fuels will likely remain cheap and plentiful for decades to come. Geologist Curt Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Lab's Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will discuss a strategy to reduce carbon emissions from coal and natural gas. It involves pumping compressed CO2 captured from large stationary sources into underground rock formations that can store it for geological time scales.

Ramesh, Ramamoorthy; Zhou, Nan; Oldenburg, Curt

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

171

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5 5 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Repair flowline 100 feet North of 71-3-SX-3 Date: 2-16-2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Rick Mclaughlin Project Overview Emergency Repair tor a "owline leak north of 71-3-SX-3. Dug up pipeline, repaired line and backfilled with 1. What are the environmental impacts? clean fill dirt. Oil contaminated soH was hauled to the east side landfarm and dean dirt was brought in from section 20. 2 What 1s the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? North of 71-3-SX-3. N43 1 7'53 6~ W. 10611'49.3" 4. What major equipment will be used Approximately 4 hours if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? Backhoe with operator and one wor1

172

Educational Material Science Games  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Material Science Games Material Science Games Do you have a great material science game? Please click our Ideas page. Featured Games: >KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials KS2 Bitsize BBC - Materials Sponsored by the BBC, K2S Bitsize offers tons of free online science games including a section on materials. Learn about the changes in materials, changing states, heat, rocks, soils, solids, liquids, gases, and much more. Science Kids - Properties of Materials Science Kids - Properties of Materials Learn about the properties of materials as you experiment with a variety of objects in this great science activity for kids. Discover the interesting characteristics of materials; are they flexible, waterproof, strong or transparent? Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools Characteristics of Materials - BBC Schools

173

NREL: Awards and Honors - R&D 100 Award Winners from 1999 through 1982  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL R&D 100 Award Winners from 1999 through 1982 NREL R&D 100 Award Winners from 1999 through 1982 1999 Advanced Direct-Contact Condenser: A new way of condensing steam that enables geothermal electric plants to generate more electricity more cheaply. 1999 Siemens Solar St-Family of Solar (CIS) Modules: The first large-area solar electric modules made from the promising thin-film material of copper indium diselenide. 1998 UNI-SOLAR Triple-Junction Amorphous-Silicon Solar-Electric Modules: Thin, flexible, waterproof roof shingles that efficiently produce electricity from sunlight. 1998 "Vermont" High-Throughput Gasifier: Turns wood chips into a clean gas for use in fuel cells or gas turbines to produce electricity. 1997 "PV Optics" Software Light-Trapping Model for Solar Cells: Software

174

Woodmont Enterprises LLC | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Woodmont Woodmont Enterprises LLC America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 703 likes Woodmont Enterprises LLC Oak Ridge National Laboratory Woodmont Enterprises LLC has historically developed a polymer-based solution to protect other companies' coatings that are topcoat solutions placed onto oriented strand board (OSB) - a construction material made of wooden strips compressed and bonded together with wax and resin. Our validation partner with topcoat solutions has strong active channelized sales today with needs of protecting their product during transport. Our primary focus has been to identify a price that would allow immediate client adoption of our waterproofing coating solution. Woodmont has been working with other polymer-based coatings that were costly. We were introduced to the technology transfer initiative out of Oak

175

User:Aaronbeach | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aaronbeach Aaronbeach Jump to: navigation, search File:Aaron beach1.jpg Name Aaron Beach Location Denver, Colorado Edits 3 Friends User Edits Jweers 12301 Aaron grew up in Denver, Colorado where he played a lot of sports and worked in construction as a waterproofer and an electrician. He attended Northwestern University from 2002-2006, where he studied Computer Science. During this time, he received research grants from Northwestern University, Motorola, and the Ford Motor Company (mostly to research vehicular networks). He began his PhD study at the University of Colorado in 2006. He was a visiting research specialist at the National Center for Atmospheric Research during the summer of 2007. In 2008 he received an NSF GK-12 fellowship and started a company with his adviser, focused on Mobile Social

176

MHK Technologies/Bluetec | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluetec Bluetec < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Bluetec.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bluewater Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Bluetec platform is a unified floating support structure which can hold any type of turbines in any waterdepth It offers waterproof housing for vulnerable systems above the waterline unique in the tidal industry Power cables are connected dry rather than under water reducing risks and costs significantly The Bluetec structure is much lighter than the gravity based designs requiring less tonnage steel per MW The device itself is floating and therefore installation can be executed with widely available vessels without the need for expensive floating cranes or jack ups

177

Water Bugs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Bugs Bugs Nature Bulletin No. 221-A March 12, 1966 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation WATER BUGS It is fascinating to lie in a boat or on a log at the edge of the water and watch the drama that unfolds among the small water animals. Among the star performers in small streams and ponds are the Water Bugs. These are aquatic members of that large group of insects called the "true bugs", most of which live on land. Moreover, unlike many other types of water insects, they do not have gills but get their oxygen directly from the air. Those that do go beneath the surface usually carry an oxygen supply with them in the form of a shiny glistening sheath of air imprisoned among a covering of fine waterproof hairs. The common water insect known to small boys at the "Whirligig Bug" is not a water bug but a beetle.

178

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

MA-City-Taunton MA-City-Taunton Location: City Taunton MA American Recovery and Reinvestment Act: Proposed Action or Project Description 1) Energy efficiency and conservation strategy, 2) energy efficiency lighting retrofits of Martin Middle School to high-efficiency lighting with automated controls, 3) building retrofits/renovation of a section of roof at Martin Middle School with a new waterproof membrane insulation and installation of a vegetative roofing system, 4) installation of outdoor lighting control system in school district, and 5) installation of a roof-top solar photovoltaic system (10 kW). Conditions: None Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: A9, A11, B1.32, B2.5, B5.1 *-For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, see Subpart D of 10 CFR10 21

179

CX-003848: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

848: Categorical Exclusion Determination 848: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003848: Categorical Exclusion Determination San Diego Center for Algae Biotechnology CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 08/30/2010 Location(s): San Diego, California Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office Federal and cost share funds will be used for three tasks. The first task will involve renovating the Bonner Hall Algal Culture Growth Facility. All remodeling will be done in a current facility on the University's campus. Some internal walls will be removed and new ones built to create an enclosed algal growth room and a separate algal characterization laboratory. Also, new waterproof floors, a heap-filter system, and new outlets will be added. The second task will running the algal bioreactors,

180

Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Energy-Efficient Roofs Energy-Efficient Roofs Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs April 24, 2012 - 4:29pm Addthis Tips: Energy-Efficient Roofs If you've ever stood on a roof on a hot summer day, you know how hot it can get. The heat from your roof makes your air conditioner work even harder to keep your home cool. Cool Roofs If you are building a new home, decide during planning whether you want a cool roof, and if you want to convert an existing roof, you can: Retrofit the roof with specialized heat-reflective material. Re-cover the roof with a new waterproofing surface (such as tile coating). Replace the roof with a cool one. A cool roof uses material that is designed to reflect more sunlight and absorb less heat than a standard roof. Cool roofs can be made of a highly reflective type of paint, a sheet covering, or highly reflective tiles or

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Fabrication of hydrophobic, electrically conductive and flame-resistant carbon aerogels by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we reported miscellaneous carbon aerogels prepared by pyrolysis of regenerated cellulose aerogels that were fabricated by dissolution in a mild NaOH/PEG solution, freeze?thaw treatment, regeneration, and freeze drying. The as-prepared carbon aerogels were subsequently characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), nitrogen adsorption measurements, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, and water contact angle (WCA) tests. The results showed that the carbon aerogels with pore diameters of 1?60nm maintained interconnected three-dimensional (3D) network after the pyrolysis, and showed type?IV adsorption isotherm. The pyrolysis process leaded to the decomposition of oxygen-containing functional groups, the destruction of cellulose crystalline structure, and the formation of highly disordered amorphous graphite. Moreover, the carbon aerogels also had strong hydrophobicity, electrical conductivity and flame retardance, which held great potential in the fields of waterproof, electronic devices and fireproofing.

Caichao Wan; Yun Lu; Yue Jiao; Chunde Jin; Qingfeng Sun; Jian Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Turbine set with a generator feeding a network of constant frequency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a turbine set with an axial flow which is traversed by water and which is coupled to a generator feeding a network of constant frequency, the flow turbine is a propeller turbine with nonadjustable blades. The stator winding of the generator is connected to the network by means of a frequency-controllable converter, in particular a direct converter. The speed of rotation of the turbine set is controllable continuously according to the power to be delivered. In the case of an asynchronous design of the generator, it is advisable to provide the stator with a waterproof jacket on the inside and to flange it into the turbine tube, since the rotor with its cage winding is swept by water.

Spirk, F.

1983-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

183

Underwater manipulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is provided for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer .+-.45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer .+-.10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

Schrum, Phillip B. (Clairton, PA); Cohen, George H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Underwater manipulator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Self-contained, waterproof, water-submersible, remote-controlled apparatus is described for manipulating a device, such as an ultrasonic transducer for measuring crack propagation on an underwater specimen undergoing shock testing. The subject manipulator includes metal bellows for transmittal of angular motions without the use of rotating shaft seals or O-rings. Inside the manipulator, a first stepper motor controls angular movement. In the preferred embodiment, the bellows permit the first stepper motor to move an ultrasonic transducer [plus minus]45 degrees in a first plane and a second bellows permit a second stepper motor to move the transducer [plus minus]10 degrees in a second plane orthogonal to the first. In addition, an XY motor-driven table provides XY motion.

Schrum, P.B.; Cohen, G.H.

1993-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Development of processing techniques for advanced thermal protection materials. Annual progress report, 1 June 1994-31 May 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this work has been in the development and characterization of materials for high temperature applications. Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) are constantly being tested, and evaluated for increased thermal shock resistance, high temperature dimensional stability, and tolerance to environmental effects. Materials development was carried out through the use of many different instruments and methods, ranging from extensive elemental analysis to physical attributes testing. The six main focus areas include: (1) protective coatings for carbon/carbon composites; (2) TPS material characterization; (3) improved waterproofing for TPS; (4) modified ceramic insulation for bone implants; (5) improved durability ceramic insulation blankets; and (6) ultra-high temperature ceramics. This report describes the progress made in these research areas during this contract period.

Selvaduray, G.S.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Woodmont Enterprises LLC | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Woodmont Woodmont Enterprises LLC America's Next Top Energy Innovator Challenge 703 likes Woodmont Enterprises LLC Oak Ridge National Laboratory Woodmont Enterprises LLC has historically developed a polymer-based solution to protect other companies' coatings that are topcoat solutions placed onto oriented strand board (OSB) - a construction material made of wooden strips compressed and bonded together with wax and resin. Our validation partner with topcoat solutions has strong active channelized sales today with needs of protecting their product during transport. Our primary focus has been to identify a price that would allow immediate client adoption of our waterproofing coating solution. Woodmont has been working with other polymer-based coatings that were costly. We were introduced to the technology transfer initiative out of Oak

188

Progress on a New Integrated 3-D UCG Simulator and its Initial Application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive simulator is being developed for underground coal gasification (UCG), with the capability to support site selection, design, hazard analyses, operations, and monitoring (Nitao et al., 2010). UCG is computationally challenging because it involves tightly-coupled multi-physical/chemical processes, with vastly different timescales. This new capability will predict cavity growth, product gas composition and rate, and the interaction with the host environment, accounting for site characteristics, injection gas composition and rate, and associated water-well extraction rates. Progress on the new simulator includes completion and system integration of a wall model, a rock spalling model, a cavity boundary tracking model, a one-dimensional cavity gas reactive transport model, a rudimentary rubble heat, mass, and reaction model, and coupling with a pre-existing hydrology simulator. An existing geomechanical simulator was enhanced to model cavity collapse and overburden subsidence. A commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code is being evaluated to model cavity gas flow and combustion in two and three dimensions. Although the simulator is midway in its development, it was applied to modeling the Hoe Creek III field test (Stephens, 1981) conducted in the 1970s, in order to evaluate and demonstrate the simulator's basic capabilities, gain experience, and guide future development. Furthermore, it is consistent with our philosophy of incremental, spiral software development, which helps in identifying and resolving potential problems early in the process. The simulation accounts for two coal seams, two injection points, and air and oxygen phases. Approximate extent and shape of cavity growth showed reasonable agreement with interpreted field data. Product gas composition and carbon consumed could not be simultaneously matched for a given set of parameter values due to the rudimentary rubble model currently used, although they can be matched using separate parameter sets. This result is not surprising and confirms plans for a more sophisticated rubble model as our next step, as well as adding geomechanical collapse modeling and higher accuracy cavity gas reactive transport models. The results are very encouraging and demonstrate that our approach is sound.

Nitao, J J; Camp, D W; Buscheck, T A; White, J A; Burton, G C; Wagoner, J L; Chen, M

2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

189

Property:Past Pertinent Test Experience | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Past Pertinent Test Experience Past Pertinent Test Experience Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Past Pertinent Test Experience Property Type Text Pages using the property "Past Pertinent Test Experience" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Rubble mounds, stepped-seawalls, recurved seawalls, floating breakwaters, pile-supported structures have been tested on the flumes 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Generalized breakwater deterioration R&D study, Lajes, Azores, Kamumalapau, Kodiak, Alaska breakwater stability study 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Used for testing sandbag configurations, CORE-LOC units, shoreline stability designs, etc. 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Studies done for Yaquina, WA, RIB floating breakwater, generalized Core-Loc stability tests, Cresent City, CA, generalized dolos structural tests, jetty stability

190

CX-010313: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3: Categorical Exclusion Determination 3: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010313: Categorical Exclusion Determination Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 04/25/2013 Location(s): South Carolina Offices(s): Savannah River Operations Office Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. CX-010313.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-009066: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010140: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009110

191

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/ MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. The monitoring wells will be screened in the Upper or Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone (ULLAZ or LLLAZ). B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

192

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) Solid Waste Management (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Program Info State Kansas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Health and Environment This act aims to establish and maintain a cooperative state and local program of planning and technical and financial assistance for comprehensive solid waste management. No person shall construct, alter or operate a solid waste processing facility or a solid waste disposal area of a solid waste management system, except for clean rubble disposal sites, without first obtaining a permit from the secretary. Every person desiring to obtain a permit shall make application for such a permit on forms

193

The mission of the Remediation of Mercury and Industrial  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Remediation of Mercury and Industrial Contaminants Applied Field Research Initiative is to control the flux of contaminants in soil and water environments for the purpose of protecting surface water, groundwater, and ecological receptors. For more information, contact: Eric Pierce Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS 6038 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 pierceem@ornl.gov (865) 574-9968 Kurt Gerdes DOE-EM Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation kurt.gerdes@em.doe.gov (301) 903-7289 Sediment Biota Groundwater Flow Fluctuating Water Table Hg in building structures and rubble Waterborne mercury (mercury being transported via water being released from the facilities to the creeks) Hg currently present in the creek and sediments along the base of the creek

194

Department of Environmental Protection ATTN: Mr. Frank Cosolito  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3, 1981 3, 1981 Department of Environmental Protection ATTN: Mr. Frank Cosolito 380 Scotch Road Trenton, NJ 08628 Office of Economic Development City Hall ATTN: Mr. Paul Byrne, Director 280 Grove Street Jersey City, NJ 07302 Jersey City Division of Health ATTN: Walter Lezynski, Health Officer City Hall 280 Grove Street Jersey City, NJ 07302 Honorable Gerald McCann, Mayor City Hall 280 Grove Street Jersey City, NJ 07302 Mr. Sol Goldman 660 Madison Avenue New York, NY 10000 Gentlemen: RADIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE KELLEX SITE - PIERPONT PROPERTY Remedial action (decontamination) activities at the former Kellex site Jersey City, NJ, were initiated in July 1979 and completed in January f980. About one thousand 55-gallon drums of slightly radioactive soil and rubble

195

Effect of boron and gadolinium concentration on the calculated neutron multiplication factor of U(3)O/sub 2/ fuel pins in optimum geometries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The KENO-Va improved Monte Carlo criticality program is used to calculate the neutron multiplication factor for TMI-U2 fuel compositions in a variety of configurations and to display parametric regions giving rise to maximum reactivity contributions. The lattice pitch of UO/sub 2/ fuel pins producing a maximum k/sub eff/ is determined as a function of boron concentrations in the coolant for infinite and finite systems. The characteristics of U/sub 3/O/sub 8/-coolant mixtures of interest to modeling the rubble region of the core are presented. Several disrupted core configurations are calculated and comparisons made. The results should be useful to proposed defueling of the TMI-U2 reactor.

Thomas, J.T.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Quantitative analysis of inclusion distributions in hot pressed silicon carbide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Depth of penetration measurements in hot pressed SiC have exhibited significant variability that may be influenced by microstructural defects. To obtain a better understanding regarding the role of microstructural defects under highly dynamic conditions; fragments of hot pressed SiC plates subjected to impact tests were examined. Two types of inclusion defects were identified, carbonaceous and an aluminum-iron-oxide phase. A disproportionate number of large inclusions were found on the rubble, indicating that the inclusion defects were a part of the fragmentation process. Distribution functions were plotted to compare the inclusion populations. Fragments from the superior performing sample had an inclusion population consisting of more numerous but smaller inclusions. One possible explanation for this result is that the superior sample withstood a greater stress before failure, causing a greater number of smaller inclusions to participate in fragmentation than in the weaker sample.

Michael Paul Bakas

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Laser-matter Interaction with Submerged Samples  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the long-term goal in mind of investigating if one could possibly design a 'universal solid-sample comminution technique' for debris and rubble, we have studied pulsed-laser ablation of solid samples that were contained within a surrounding fluid. Using pulses with fluences between 2 J and 0.3 J, wavelengths of 351 and 527 nm, and samples of rock, concrete, and red brick, each submerged in water, we have observed conditions in which {micro}m-scale particles can be preferentially generated in a controlled manner, during the laser ablation process. Others have studied laser peening of metals, where their attention has been to the substrate. Our study uses non-metallic substrates and analyzes the particles that are ablated from the process. The immediate impact of our investigation is that laser-comminution portion of a new systems concept for chemical analysis has been verified as feasible.

Mariella, R; Rubenchik, A; Norton, M; Donohue, G; Roberts, K

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

198

Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental monitoring report. Calendar year 1983  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1983, an environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site, a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York presently used for the storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air, uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediments, and external gamma exposure rates. Radiation doses to the public are also calculated. Environmental samples collected are analyzed to determine compliance with applicable standards. Comparison of 1983 monitoring results with 1982 results shows a significant decrease in radon levels at almost every monitoring location. External gamma exposure rates also showed a general decrease. 9 references, 10 figures, 11 tables

Not Available

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Seagate Crystal Reports - RADCM  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Colorado Colorado SITE: GrJuncOff PROGRAM: EM WASTE TYPE: 11e(2) Byproduct Waste OPERATIONS OFFICE: Idaho Operations Office % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Soil WASTE STREAM CODE: 01091 STREAM NAME:RRM Contaminated Soil MPC NAME:Soil TOTAL CURIES: Approved Volume : 30.000 Future Volume Avg: 0.000 Future Volume Lower Limit: Future Volume Upper Limit: 100.000 RRM Contaminated Soil Isotopes Radium-226 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-234 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-238 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Thorium-230 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: Uranium-235 Avg Concentration: Low Limit Concent: Upper Limit Concent: % of Stream GrJuncOff - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Rubble/Debris

200

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Additional Characterization and Well Installations at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility Savannah River Site Aiken/Aiken/South Carolina Six wells will be drilled to depths ranging from approximately 100 to 200 feet to characterize the distal portion of the volatile organic compound (VOC) plume down-gradient of the A-Area Burning Rubble Pits/Miscellaneous Chemical Basin/Metals Burning Pit Operable Unit (ABRP/MCB/ MBP OU) airlift recirculation well system. The monitoring wells will be screened in the Upper or Lower Lost Lake Aquifer Zone (ULLAZ or LLLAZ). B3.1 - Site characterization and environmental monitoring Andrew R. Grainger Digitally signed by Andrew R. Grainger DN: cn=Andrew R. Grainger, o=DOE-SR, ou=EQMD, email=drew.grainger@srs.gov, c=US

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Parker Dam to Gila 161-kV Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacement at Structure 0/7 Parker Dam to Gila 161-kV Transmission Line, Cross Arm Replacement at Structure 0/7 Program or Field Office:Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Regional Office Location(s) (Citv/County/State): San Bernardino County, California Proposed Action Description: Submit by E -mail Western proposes to conduct cross arm replacements at a single wood H-frame structure located on the existing Parker Dam to Gila 161-kV transmission line. Structure 0/7 is located on private lands in Township 2 North, Range 27 East, Section 4, San Bernardino County, California, about 12 miles northeast of Parker, Arizona. The wood cross arms on structure 0/7 will be replaced in-kind. Access to the structure will be via existing dirt roads. The existing spur road from

202

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

9 9 Project Information Project Title: Restoration of 73 SX 1 OH DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring this location 73 SX 10H. What are the environmental Date: 3/3/2010 Contractor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. We 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marker. 3. What is the duration of the project? Flush flowline and remove it.Then we will till the location and plant with native grasses. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig, 3-4 days etc.)? The equipment to be used will be a backhoe, tiller, dumptruck, and welder.

203

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

283 283 Project Information Project Title: Restoration of61 -36-SX-10 DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Ove rview We will be restoring this location 61 -36-SX-10. What are the environmental Da te: 2-9-2010 Cont rac tor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. We 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marl

204

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 28, 2009 July 28, 2009 Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) Over the past few weeks, my husband and I have been shopping for a new patio door. We currently have a sliding glass door that we have always hated-full exposure to winds from the west and to open fields behind our house mean that we always have dirt and dust getting in through that door, not to mention cold air in the winter and heat in the summer. The final straw was a warped and squeaky track, no doubt aggravated by our dog's constant indecision over whether he wants to be inside or outside (oh, the dilemma!). July 27, 2009 Induction Lighting: An Old Lighting Technology Made New Again Induction lighting is one of the best kept secrets in energy-efficient lighting. Simply stated, induction lighting is essentially a fluorescent

205

ARM - SGP Rural Driving Hazards  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rural Driving Hazards Rural Driving Hazards SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Rural Driving Hazards The rural location of the Southern Great Plains (SGP) site facilities requires that visitors travel on unpaved, dirt and gravel, roads. Visitors should be aware of the driving hazards this presents by taking the following precautions: Proceed cautiously: Many rural roads have unmarked and blind intersections. Slow down: Sanded and gravel raods can cause a vehicle to swerve. Maintain a safe following distance: During the dry season, vehicles

206

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

D D Project lnfonnation Project Title: Emergency flowline repair 78-sx-34 & 68-66-sx-34 Date: 12-29-09 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: RickM. Project Overview We dug up the line where the oil was coming out of the ground and had to put 2 clamps on to seal the leak. 1. What are the environmental impacts? The contaminated dirt was hauled to the land farm and after the line was tested we backfilled the hole. this job took 5 hrs. to complete and required a backhoe and two hands. this leak was 100 yards south of well No. 2. What is the legal location? 68-66-sx-34. 3. What is the duration of the project? 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

207

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2 2 Project Information Project Title: 17 -AX-11 Restoration Date: DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jim Bell Project Overview The environmental impacts should be minimal . Using Best Management Practies for erosion prevention; 1. What are the environmental impacts? we will dig out all unused pipeing and electrical wire and get rid of the concrete pad on the location. this will require the use of a backhoe, blade ,dozer and farm tractor. Containeated siol will be trensferred to the 2. What is the legal location? landfarm and clean fill dirt will be used for replacement. We will restore the location back to the origanal 3. What is the duration of the project? contour and reseed it. This should take around 4 days to complete. 4. What major equipment will be used

208

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration 72-12-SX-1 0 Date: 2/26/2010 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring 71-12-SX1 0. This will include digging 5ft down and cutting well head off and placing 1. What are the environmental impacts? OHM. We will haul contaminated soils to the Eastside landfarm and record in log book. We will replace all dirt hauled off with clean fill from sec.20. 2. What is the legal location? 71-12 SX10 3. What is the duration of the project? Approximately 3-4 days 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig , drilling rig , Backhoe with operator, welder, tiller and one worker. etc.)? The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA

209

EMSL: Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages

Science Science FAQ Search EMSL Home About EMSL Science Capabilities User Access Publications News Contacts Back Pause Slideshow Slide 1 Next Biofuel breakdown A collaborative study shows that Enterobacter lignolyticus SCF1 can multitask quite successfully: degrade lignin as both a food source and for breathing - the first soil bacterium to demonstrate this dual capability. Research Highlights Watch a virtual tour of EMSL The hidden ties that bind EMSL scientists took advantage of advanced instrumental capabilities, a specially designed experimental cell and theoretical modeling to successfully deduce the how molecules of carboxylic acid- a common organic acid found in nature - bind to ceria nanoparticle surfaces. Research Highlights Watch a virtual tour of EMSL Ditch the dirt

210

American Recovery & Reinvestment Act Newsletter - Issue 13  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Recovery and Reinvestment Act Newsletter d Volume 2, No. 3 d March 2010 Recovery and Reinvestment Act Newsletter d Volume 2, No. 3 d March 2010 Fusion Researchers Gather to Say Goodbye to Pioneering Facility TSTA building saw early advances in nuclear fusion  Fusion Researchers Gather to Say Goodbye to Pioneering Facility ...1  Offi cials Brief Stakeholders on Progress .......................................2  Paul Bellesen is Thrilled to Trade Sun for Dirt ..................................3  'Chem Plant' Decontamination and Decommissioning Advances at Idaho Site .................................4  Demolition Efforts Under Way at ORNL's 2000 Complex ...........5  The Recovery Act Effect .............6  Cleanout Boxes Removal Complete at Hanford Tank Farms ................7  Over 116,000 Tons of Contaminated

211

Early Cook County Roads -- Part Two  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Two Two Nature Bulletin No. 739 January 18, 1964 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor EARLY COOK COUNTY ROADS -- PART TWO -- THE PLANK ROAD ERA For ten years after Chicago, with a population of 4,170, was chartered as a city in 1837, its commerce and growth were crippled by wretched transportation to and from the hinterlands. During many periods of each year it was surrounded and isolated by mud. To be sure, there were dirt thoroughfares in all directions, graded and drained as best they could in those days, but not surfaced. No one who has never experienced it can appreciate how gooey and gluey a black prairie soil can be when wet. A wagon's wheels often become solid cylinders of mud as wide as a bass drum.

212

Just the Basics: Particulate Matter  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is Particulate is Particulate Matter? One of the major components of air pollution is particulate matter, or PM. PM refers to airborne particles that include dust, dirt, soot, smoke, and liquid droplets. These particles can range in size from microscopic to large enough to be seen. PM is characterized by its size, with fine particles of less than 2.5 micrometers in size designated as PM 2.5 and coarser particles between 2.5 and 10 micrometers in size designated as PM 10 . PM arises from many sources, including combustion occurring in factories, power plants, cars, trucks, buses, trains, or wood fires; or through simple agitation of existing particulates by tilling of land, quarrying and stone-crushing, and off- road vehicular movement. Of particular interest is PM generated during diesel

213

CX-006645: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006645: Categorical Exclusion Determination T-6-10 Abandonment and Storage Relocation CX(s) Applied: B1.3, B1.22, B5.3 Date: 10/20/2009 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC We will be reclaiming this location, we will dig down approximately 4 feet, cut off pipes and cap them, and haul off dirt from the berms. We will then blade location. The work to be done is to reclaim this location. In preparation for this work we will need to remove the old shipping building and an old set of tank stairs. These will be placed in storage in section 14. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-006645.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-006725: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-006650: Categorical Exclusion Determination

214

Microsoft Word - TR05-27.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Hallam, Nebraska Hallam, Nebraska June 2010 Page 1 2010 Annual Inspection and Status Report for the Hallam, Nebraska, Decommissioned Reactor Site Summary The former Hallam Nuclear Power Facility (HNPF) was inspected on April 28, 2010. The Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) building, the grass-covered mound, and the monitoring wells were all in good shape. The roof of the IHX building was replaced in 2007 and the building was painted in 2008. Dirt and gravel were placed around the base of the IHX building in 2009 to raise the ground surface and eliminate the potential for water to pool near the base of the building. In 2009, inspectors noted that strong winds had moved roof rock from the corners of the upper roof exposing the underlying roofing fabric. In 2009 paver stones were placed in the corners of both the upper and

215

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

216

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Project Information Project Title: C-EA 2. Work on existing well location (within 125' Date: 6/6/2011 from well bore) DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview C-EA 2. Work on existing well location (within 125' from well bore): 1. Brief project description [include P&A of wells was approved in the October 2008 Sitewide Environmental anything that could impact the Assessment (SWEA) [Section 3.1 .1 , Page 11 , Line 1 ]and Finding of No environment] 2. Legal location Significant Impact (FONSI). CX 85.12 3. Duration of the project Includes well workovers, P&A of wells, and associated dirt work, to include 4. Major equipment to be used repair of anchors I piping I flowlines and construction of temporary workover

217

Categorical Exclusion 4565, Waste Management Construction Support  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

FornI FornI Project Title: Waste Management Construction Support (4565) Program or Program Office: Y -12 Site Office Location: Oak Ridge Tennessee Project Description: This work scope is an attempt to cover the general activities that construction would perform in support of Waste Management activities. Work includes construction work performed in support of Waste Management Sustainability and Stewardship projects and programs to include: load waste into containers; open, manipulate containers; empty containers; decommission out-of-service equipment (includes removal of liquids, hazardous, and universal wastes); apply fabric and gravel to ground; transport equipment; transport materials; transport waste; remove vegetation; place barriers; place erosion controls; operate wheeled and tracked equipment; general carpentry. Work will be performed on dirt, vegetated, graveled, or paved surfaces in

218

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

81 - 17890 of 28,905 results. 81 - 17890 of 28,905 results. Download CX-006717: Categorical Exclusion Determination Enhanced Oil Recovery Steam Generator CX(s) Applied: Date: 03/30/2011 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006717-categorical-exclusion-determination Download CX-006693: Categorical Exclusion Determination Dirt Work in the Specified Areas that have been Previously and Substantially Disturbed CX(s) Applied: B1.3 Date: 01/00/1900 Location(s): Casper, Wyoming Office(s): RMOTC http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-006693-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Policy Flash 20012-15 This AL is a reissuance (under the new AL number of 2012-05) of the AL on Meal Costs in Management and Operating Contracts that was originally issued on http://energy.gov/management/downloads/policy-flash-20012-15

219

ARM - Instrument - hsrl  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

govInstrumentshsrl govInstrumentshsrl Documentation HSRL : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports HSRL : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Beneficiary of Recovery Act funding. Instrument Categories Aerosols, Cloud Properties The High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL ) provides calibrated measurements of aerosol optical depth, volume backscatter coefficient, cross section, and depolarization. Measurements are computed from ratios of the particulate scattering to the measured molecular scattering. This provides absolute calibration and makes the calibration insensitive to dirt or precipitation on the output window. A very narrow, angular field-of-view

220

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

;l,[p~ ;l,[p~ Project Information Project Title: Restoration of 54-TPX-1 0 Date: DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview 1. What are the environmental We will be restoring 54-TPX-10. The work to be done will be to dig 5ft below surface cut casing and impacts? install a marker. We will do the same with the flowline. Any contaminated soil will be replaced with clean fill dirt. The contaminated soil will be transferrred to the lanclfarm. The base will be moved to section 14. 2. What is the legal location? We will then blade, till and reseed with native grasses. The equipment to be used will be as follows: 3. What is the duration of the project? Backhoe, Blade, Shovels, Torch, Welder, And Tiller. This project will also require a hotwork permit for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MS_Oil_Studyguide.indd  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL LOOKING DOWN AN OIL WELL Ever wonder what oil looks like underground, down deep, hundreds or thousands of feet below the surface, buried under millions of tons of rock and dirt? If you could look down an oil well and see oil where nature created it, you might be surprised. You wouldn't see a big underground lake, as a lot of people think. Oil doesn't exist in deep, black pools. In fact, an underground oil formation-called an "oil reservoir" -looks very much like any other rock formation. It looks a lot like...well, rock. Oil exists underground as tiny droplets trapped inside the open spaces, called "pores," inside rocks. Th e "pores" and the oil droplets can be seen only through a microscope. Th e droplets cling to the rock, like drops of water cling

222

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 3 Project Information Project Title: T-6-10 abandoment and storage relocation Date: 912812009 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be reclaiming this loc. we will dig down approx. 4ft. cut off pipes and cap them. And haul of dirt from the berms . We will then blade loc. . The worX to be done is to reclaim this location. In preparation for this 1. What are the environmental worX we will need to remove the old shipping building and a old set of tank stairs. These will be placed in storage in section 14. Upon reading SOP: EN.8000.01 reviewed on July 23rd 2009 I believe this falls under impacts? 2. What is the legal location? NEPA exclusion ex 81 .3 and CX 85.3. Which reads: When moving portable buildings to another disturbed

223

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

8 8 Project lnfonnation Project Title: Restoration of 62-42 SX 10 DOE Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Overview We will be restoring this location 62-42 SX-1 0. What are the environmental Date: 2/25/2010 Contractor Code: impacts? We will be removing all oil contaminated soil from location to the landfarm and recording it in the book. W e 2. What is the legal location? will then back fill with clean fill dirt from sec.20. We will remove well head and place a dry hole marker. 3. What is the duration of the project? Flush flowline and remove it. Then we will till the location and plant with native grasses. 4. What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig , 3-4 days etc.)? The equipment to be used will be a backhoe, tiller, dumptruck, and welder.

224

Austin Using Green Innovation to Beat the Utility Blues | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Austin Using Green Innovation to Beat the Utility Blues Austin Using Green Innovation to Beat the Utility Blues Austin Using Green Innovation to Beat the Utility Blues January 17, 2012 - 1:03pm Addthis An aerial view of the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant in Austin, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Austin Water. An aerial view of the Hornsby Bend Biosolids Management Plant in Austin, Texas. | Photo courtesy of Austin Water. Todd G. Allen Project Officer, Golden Field Office What does this project do? New biogas generators harness the methane produced during the production of a soil conditioner called "Dillo Dirt" to power the entire production plant. Sewage treatment has always been a dirty business, dating back to the frontier days when "waste management" meant the guy who followed after the

225

U.S. Department of Energy Categorical Exclusion Determination Form  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DIKE CONSTRUCTION AND DIKE CONSTRUCTION AND MODIFICATIONS (CX-GEN-006) Program or Field Office: Oak Ridge Office, Oak Ridge, Tennessee Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, TN; Berkeley, CA; Menlo Park, CA; Newport News, VA; and other DOE-operated facilities and ancillary areas associated with these sites, programs, and projects Proposed Action Description: The proposed actions would involve construction or modification of new or existing secondary containment structures such as dikes, berms, curbing, diversion structures, weirs, booms, and other barriers which would meet the requirements for secondary containment, as specified in 40 CFR Part 112.7(c), to prevent accidental discharges from reaching navigable water courses. The actions taken would include, but would not be limited to, the following types of actions: excavation of dirt, clay, gravel, rock, etc.;

226

Energy Saver Blog | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 30, 2009 July 30, 2009 What Will You be Buying for an Energy Tax Credit? On Tuesday, Allison talked about her experience shopping for a patio door that met the requirements for a federal tax credit for energy efficiency. She found that it's important to make sure the manufacturer can provide a certification statement verifying that the product meets all requirements for a federal tax credit. What will you be buying for an energy tax credit? July 28, 2009 Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) Over the past few weeks, my husband and I have been shopping for a new patio door. We currently have a sliding glass door that we have always hated-full exposure to winds from the west and to open fields behind our house mean that we always have dirt and dust getting in through that door,

227

Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative September 26, 2013 - 5:50pm Addthis Wind Farm Brings Clean, Affordable Energy to Alaskan Cooperative A train carrying wind turbine components arrives in Alaska. The components were then transported to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association A train carrying wind turbine components arrives in Alaska. The components were then transported to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association Wind turbine blades are transported up the 10-mile-long, narrow dirt road to the Eva Creek Wind Farm site. | Photo courtesy of Golden Valley Electric Association

228

Recovery of valuable chemical feedstocks from waste automotive plastics via pyrolysis processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Each year in North America over 9 million scrap vehicles are shredded to recover approximately 10 million tons of ferrous metal. The process also produces 3 million tons of waste known as automobile shredder residue (ASR) which consists of plastics, rubber, foams, textiles, glass, dirt, rust, etc. This waste is currently landfilled. In this study the authors present the results obtained in three different pyrolysis processes when ASR was used as the pyrolysis feedstock. The pyrolysis processes examined included: (1) a fast pyrolysis process, featuring rapid heat transfer and short residence times. This process produced primarily a gas stream that was rich in C{sub 1} to C{sub 3} hydrocarbons; (2) a screw kiln unit, characterized by slow heating and long residence times. This process produced a liquid stream that was high in aromatics; (3) a bench-scale autoclave reactor which, in the presence of water, produced a pyrolysis liquid containing large quantities of oxygenated hydrocarbons.

Shen, Z.; Day, M.; Cooney, D. [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Environmental Research and Technology

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Evaluation of manure as a feedstock for gas turbines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A preliminary program on evaluation of feedlot manure as a feed stock for gas turbines has been completed. It was determined that manure can be pulverized and fed into a gas turbine combustion system with the manure burning in much the same manner as a liquid or gaseous fuel. Ash and dirt in the manure did not appear to have a significant effect on combustion and were effectively removed by the cyclone filters. The exhaust gases varied from clear to a blue haze. Severe problems were encountered with slagging of the hot refractory walls of the combustor. Development of a suitable combustor will be required before a commercial size system can be designed. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Hamrick, J.T.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Data transmission element for downhole drilling components  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A robust data transmission element for transmitting information between downhole components, such as sections of drill pipe, in the presence of hostile environmental conditions, such as heat, dirt, rocks, mud, fluids, lubricants, and the like. The data transmission element components include a generally U-shaped annular housing, a generally U-shaped magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element such as ferrite, and an insulated conductor. Features on the magnetically conducting, electrically insulating element and the annular housing create a pocket when assembled. The data transmission element is filled with a polymer to retain the components within the annular housing by filling the pocket with the polymer. The polymer can bond with the annular housing and the insulated conductor but preferably not the magnetically conductive, electrically insulating element. A data transmission element is mounted within a recess proximate a mating surface of a downhole drilling component, such as a section of drill pipe.

Hall, David R. (Provo, UT); Hall, Jr., H. Tracy (Provo, UT); Pixton, David S. (Lehi, UT); Dahlgren, Scott (Provo, UT); Fox, Joe (Spanish Fork, UT); Sneddon, Cameron (Provo, UT); Briscoe, Michael (Lehi, UT)

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

231

Capacitive and Solution Resistance Effects on Voltammetric Responses of a Thin Redox Layer Attached to Disk Microelectrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

E*(r,t) is the effective potential across the interface between the metal conductor and its adjacent solution at the distance r from the electrode center: where E is the applied potential; di(r,?t) is the overall current through the elementary ring; dRe(r) is the resistance of the current tube associated with the same ring. ... It shows that the derivative of the overall current (with respect to time) flowing through an electrode surface element (being an infinitesimally thin ring for the disk electrode) is given by the difference between the increment of the capacitive current when the faradaic process is absent (dCdl(r)v) and that flowing (dicap(r,??t)) in the system, related to the elementary time constant (dRe(r)?dCdl(r)) of the surface element. ... Figure 4. Equivalent electric circuit. ...

Christian Amatore; Alexander Oleinick; Irina Svir

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Outdoor Manners  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Outdoor Manners Outdoor Manners Nature Bulletin No. 683-A June 10, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation OUTDOOR MANNERS I AM AN OLD TIME COUNTRY LANE -- just a plain dirt road with a lot of ups and downs, built by the pioneers who settled this region. I was abandoned, thank goodness, after those tin Lizzies began to honk and rattle through the country. They didn't like me and I didn't like them. For more than a century, people went this way on foot, on horseback, and in vehicles drawn by horses or mules. I became well acquainted with many of them and some of their great-grandchildren. They became acquainted with my trees, my wildflowers, the birds and all of my wild creatures. In those days most folks were friendly, neighborly people. They had time to stop, visit, look and listen.

233

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Montrose Operations Center Asphalt Overlay Project Montrose Operations Center Asphalt Overlay Project Montrose County, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to conduct routine maintenance activities by installing an asphalt slurry overlay on the parking lots and roadways at Western's Montrose Operations Center in Montrose, Colorado. The slurry seal involves the creation of a mixture of asphalt emulsion and fine crushed aggregate that is spread on the surface of a road. Existing asphalt surfaces would be cleaned to make it free of loose material, dirt, dust, and debris. A tack coat would be applied followed with a v.. inch asphalt slurry seal coat. The final step would be painting pavement markings. Areas to receive the asphalt overlay:

234

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FOR CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION DETERMINATION  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Montrose Operations Center Asphalt Overlay Project Montrose Operations Center Asphalt Overlay Project Montrose County, Colorado A. Brief Description of Proposal: Western Area Power Administration (Western) proposes to conduct routine maintenance activities by installing an asphalt slurry overlay on the parking lots and roadways at Western's Montrose Operations Center in Montrose, Colorado. The slurry seal involves the creation of a mixture of asphalt emulsion and fine crushed aggregate that is spread on the surface of a road. Existing asphalt surfaces would be cleaned to make it free of loose material, dirt, dust, and debris. A tack coat would be applied followed with a \4 inch asphalt slurry seal coat. The final step would be painting pavement markings. Areas to receive the asphalt overlay:

235

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

4 4 Project lnfonnation Project Title: e-EA5. Reclamation of well sites Date: 8/4/2011 DOE Code: Contractor Code: Project Lead: Michael J. Taylor [NCO] Project Overview e-EA 5. Reclamation of wellsites : ex 81.3 and ex 86.1 1. Brief project description [include anything that could impact the Small-scale, short-term cleanup actions including excavation and environment] consolidation of contaminated soils, removal of underground piping, removal of rig anchors or T-bars, drainage control , transport and backfilling of clean soil I fill dirt, and reseeding . The table below is to be completed by the Project Lead and reviewed by the Environmental Specialist and the DOE NEPA Compliance Officer. NOTE: If Change of Scope occurs, Project Lead must submit a new NEPA Compliance Survey and

236

Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 5 Western Area Power Administration, Desert Southwest Region Liberty-Parker #2 230-kV Transmission Line Optical Power Ground Wire Repairs - Continuation Sheet Project Description The scope of work includes digging a trenching and burying a 1.25-inch OPGW conduit. The conduit trench will be about 4 feet deep and 10 inches wide, with warning tape placed above the conduit in the trench. Once the conduit has been placed, the trench will be backfilled with the original surface material. About 5.3 linear miles of trenching will be required, mostly within the existing dirt access road associated with the LIB-PAD #2 transmission line. Four pullboxes will be installed along the route. The pullboxes measure 2 feet by 3 feet by 2 feet and will be installed at least 24 inches below grade. An

237

CX-002480: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

80: Categorical Exclusion Determination 80: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-002480: Categorical Exclusion Determination State Energy Program: 21st Century Energy Grants- AAA Cab Service CX(s) Applied: B5.1 Date: 05/26/2010 Location(s): Phoenix, Arizona Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office The State of Arizona will provide $30,000 in Recovery Act funds to AAA Cab Service to install an above-ground tank at their fueling stating. The location of the station is between the Phoenix airport and the I-10 freeway. The fueling station, above ground storage tank, and new concrete driveway will be located on a dirt lot that has been previously disturbed. The lot is located in a highly industrialized area with some light commercial use. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD

238

Measure Guideline: Water Management at Tub and Shower Assemblies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the high concentrations of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. This guide shows how to install fundamental waterproofing strategies to prevent water related issues at shower and tub areas. When conducting a total gut rehab of a structure or constructing a new home, best practice installation and detailing for effective waterproofing are critically important at bathtub and shower assemblies. Water management issues in a structure may go unrecognized for long periods, so that when they are finally observed, the damage from long-term water exposure is extensive. A gut rehab is often undertaken when a home has experienced a natural disaster or when the homeowners are interested in converting an old, high-energy-use building into a high-quality, efficient structure that meets or exceeds one of the national energy standards, such as ENERGY STAR or LEED for homes. During a gut rehab, bath areas need to be replaced with diligent attention to detail. Employing effective water management practices in the installation and detailing of tub and shower assemblies will minimize or eliminate water issues within the building cavities and on the finished surfaces. A residential tub-and-shower surround or shower-stall assembly is designed to handle a high volume of water - 2.5 gallons per minute, with multiple baths occurring during a typical day. Transitions between dissimilar materials and connections between multiple planes must be installed with care to avoid creating a pathway for water to enter the building assemblies. Due to the high volume of water and the consequential risk of water damage to the home's structure, a comprehensive water management system is imperative to protect the building assemblies underlying the finish surround of tub and shower areas. At each stage of construction, successive trades must take care not to create a defect nor to compound or cover up a previous trade's defect. Covering a defect hides the inevitable point of failure and may even exacerbate the situation.

Dickson, B.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The thermal insulation difference of clothing ensembles on the dry and perspiration manikins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are about a hundred manikin users around the world. Some of them use the manikin such as 'Walter' and 'Tore' to evaluate the comfort of clothing ensembles according to their thermal insulation and moisture resistance. A 'Walter' manikin is made of water and waterproof breathable fabric 'skin', which simulates the characteristics of human perspiration. So evaporation, condensation or sorption and desorption are always accompanied by heat transfer. A 'Tore' manikin only has dry heat exchange by conduction, radiation and convection from the manikin through clothing ensembles to environments. It is an ideal apparatus to measure the thermal insulation of the clothing ensemble and allows evaluation of thermal comfort. This paper compares thermal insulation measured with dry 'Tore' and sweating 'Walter' manikins. Clothing ensembles consisted of permeable and impermeable clothes. The results showed that the clothes covering the 'Walter' manikin absorbed the moisture evaporated from the manikin. When the moisture transferred through the permeable clothing ensembles, heat of condensation could be neglected. But it was observed that heavy condensation occurred if impermeable clothes were tested on the 'Walter' manikin. This resulted in a thermal insulation difference of clothing ensembles on the dry and perspiration manikins. The thermal insulation obtained from the 'Walter' manikin has to be modified when heavy condensation occurs. The modified equation is obtained in this study.

Zhou Xiaohong; Zheng Chunqin; Qiang Yingming; Ingvar Holmr; Chuansi Gao; Kalev Kuklane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Iron-oxidising microbial biofilms as possible causes of increased friction coefficient in intermediate and lower guide vane bearing bushings at a hydroelectric powerplant in Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Increased coefficient of friction led to malfunction of many and destruction of some maintenance-free bushings of intermediate and lower guide vane bearings at a hydroelectric power plant in Brazil. Analysis of surfaces of failed bushings revealed the presence of three types of deposits. The contact zones between bushings and the guide vane axis were covered with a thin black graphite film. The remaining bushing surface was covered by a mix of yellow-red coloured deposits, which contained a large proportion of iron-oxide-rich microbial biofilms, and green-coloured deposits, which consisted largely of copper oxides. Biofilms sampled from both the inside and the outside of the bearings contained 75% iron oxides by weight. The iron oxide deposits produced by these biofilms were identified as the primary cause of increased friction resistance between the bushing surface and the guide vane axis. Iron deposition within biofilms was made possible by the action of iron-reducing bacteria in the anaerobic zone of the reservoir immediately in front of the turbine intakes. These bacteria enriched the anoxic reservoir water with Fe(II) and the relatively small oxygen concentrations in turbine feedwater prevented the complete oxidation of Fe(II) in the penstock. Water-proofing of the bearing seals would prevent water penetration into the bearings and biofilm formation on the bushing surfaces and thus avoid the type of failure observed at this plant.

Ren Peter Schneider; Lucimara R. da Silva; Helder Brando; Liutas Martinaitis Ferreira

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fuel cellsI. Propane on palladium catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For the reaction at low temperatures of a gaseous hydrocarbon as a fuel gas at a negative electrode in a fuel cell, the choice of a suitable catalyst is of the first importance. In the present study, catalysts consisting of palladium reduced by hydrogen and palladium reduced by formate, supported on four types of porous skeleton disks (thin nickel, thick nickel and two types of carbon), were examined. In many cases, the electrodes were given a water-proofing treatment. The specific fuel cell used involved the prepared fuel electrode using gaseous propane, 30% KOH solution, a carbon-black air electrode and a temperature of 5OC We attempt to distinguish the behaviour of propane from that due to hydrogen contained in the electrode, mainly on the basis of the relationship between (a) electrode preparation and treatment and (b) the open-circuit potential behaviour of the fuel electrode. The repetition of small current discharges resulted in open-circuit potentials reaching steady high potentials and in electrodes exhibiting comparatively good dischargeabilities.

M. Fukuda; C.L. Rulfs; P.J. Elving

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

LWA demonstration applications using Illinois coal gasification slag: Phase 2. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this program are to demonstrate the feasibility of producing ultra-lightweight aggregates (ULWA) from solid residues (slag) generated during the gasification of Illinois coals, and to test the products as substitutes for conventional aggregates produced by pyroprocessing of perlite ores. In Phase 1 of this project, Praxis developed a pilotscale production technique and produced a large batch of expanded aggregates from an Illinois coal slag feed. The Phase 2 work focuses on characterization and applications-oriented testing of the expanded slag products as substitutes for conventional ULWAs. Target applications include high-volume uses such as loose fill insulation, insulating concrete, lightweight precast products (blocks), waterproof wallboard, rooftiles, and filtration media. The precast products will be subjected to performance and characterization testing in conjunction with a commercial manufacturer of such products in order to obtain input from a potential user. The production of value-added products from slag will eliminate a solid waste and possibly enhance the overall gasification process economics, especially when the avoided costs of disposal are taken into consideration.

Choudhry, V. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States); Steck, P. [Harvey Cement Products, Inc. (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

243

EI Summary of SIC 22  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Textiles (22) All (20-39) Food (20) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) Textiles (22) All (20-39) Food (20) Apparel (23) Lumber (24) Furniture (25) Paper (26) Printing (27) Chemicals (28) Refineries (29) Rubber (30) Stone, Clay & Glass(32) Primary Metals (33) Fabricated Metals (34) Machinery (35) Electronic Equipment (36) Instruments (38) Miscellaneous Manufacturing (39) This major group includes establishments engaged in performing any of the following operations: (1) preparation of fiber and subsequently manufacturing of yarn, thread, braids, twine, or cordage; (2) manufacturing broadwoven fabrics, narrow woven fabrics, knit fabrics, and carpets and rugs from yarn; (3) dyeing and finishing fiber, yarn, fabrics, and knit apparel; (4) coating, waterproofing, or otherwise treating fabrics; (5) the integrated manufacture of knit apparel and other finished articles from yarn; (6) the manufacture of felt goods, lace goods, nonwoven fabrics, and miscellaneous textiles.

244

Completion Report for Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5: Corrective Action Unit 98: Frenchman Flat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Model Evaluation Well ER-5-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of Nevada Environmental Management Operations at the Nevada National Security Site (formerly known as the Nevada Test Site). The well was drilled in July and August 2012 as part of a model evaluation well program in the Frenchman Flat area of Nye County, Nevada. The primary purpose of the well was to provide detailed geologic, hydrogeologic, chemical, and radiological data that can be used to test and build confidence in the applicability of the Frenchman Flat Corrective Action Unit flow and transport models for their intended purpose. In particular, this well was designed to obtain data to evaluate the uncertainty in model forecasts of contaminant migration from the upgradient underground nuclear test MILK SHAKE, conducted in Emplacement Hole U-5k in 1968, which were considered to be uncertain due to the unknown extent of a basalt lava-flow aquifer present in this area. Well ER-5-5 is expected to provide information to refine the Phase II Frenchman Flat hydrostratigraphic framework model, if necessary, as well as to support future groundwater flow and transport modeling. The 31.1-centimeter (cm) diameter hole was drilled to a total depth of 331.3 meters (m). The completion string, set at the depth of 317.2 m, consists of 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing hanging from 19.4-cm carbon-steel casing. The 16.8-cm stainless-steel casing has one slotted interval open to the basalt lava-flow aquifer and limited intervals of the overlying and underlying alluvial aquifer. A piezometer string was also installed in the annulus between the completion string and the borehole wall. The piezometer is composed of 7.3-cm stainless-steel tubing suspended from 6.0-cm carbon-steel tubing. The piezometer string was landed at 319.2 m, to monitor the basalt lava-flow aquifer. Data collected during and shortly after hole construction include composite drill cuttings samples collected every 3.0 m, various geophysical logs, preliminary water quality measurements, and water-level measurements. The well penetrated 331.3 m of QuaternaryTertiary alluvium, including an intercalated layer of saturated basalt lava rubble. No well development or hydrologic testing was conducted in this well immediately after completion; however, a preliminary water level was measured in the piezometer string at the depth of 283.4 m on September 25, 2012. No tritium above the minimum detection limit of the field instruments was detected in this hole. Future well development, sampling, and hydrologic testing planned for this well will provide more accurate hydrologic information for this site. The stratigraphy, general lithology, and water level were as expected, though the expected basalt lava-flow aquifer is basalt rubble and not the dense, fractured lava as modeled. The lack of tritium transport is likely due to the difference in hydraulic properties of the basalt lava-flow rubble encountered in the well, compared to those of the fractured aquifer used in the flow and transport models.

NSTec Underground Test Area and Boreholes Programs and Operations

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Air Monitoring Leads to Discovery of New Contamination at Radioactive Waste Disposal Site (Area G) at LANL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air monitoring at Area G, the low-level radioactive waste disposal area at Los Alamos National Laboratory, revealed increased air concentrations of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am at one location along the north boundary. This air monitoring location is a couple of meters north of a dirt road used to access the easternmost part of Area G. Air concentrations of {sup 238}Pu were essentially unaffected, which was puzzling because the {sup 238}Pu and {sup 239}Pu are present in the local, slightly contaminated soils. Air concentrations of these radionuclides increased about a factor of ten in early 1995 and remained at those levels until the first quarter of 1996. During the spring of 1996 air concentrations again increased by a factor of about ten. No other radionuclides were elevated and no other Area G stations showed elevations of these radionuclides. After several formal meetings didn't provide an adequate cause for the elevations, a gamma survey was performed and showed a small area of significant contamination just south of the monitor location. We found in February, 1995, a trench for a water line had been dug within a meter of so of the air stations. Then, during early 1996, the dirt road was rerouted such that its new path was directly over the unknown contamination. It appears that the trenching brought contaminated material to the surface and caused the first rise in air concentrations and then the rerouting of the road over the contamination caused the second rise, during 1996. We also found that during 1976 and 1977 contaminated soils from the clean-up of an old processing facility had been spread over the filled pits in the vicinity of the air monitors. These soils were very low in 238Pu which explains why we saw very little {sup 238}Pu in the increased air concentrations. A layer of gravel and sand was spread over the contaminated area. Although air concentrations of {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Am dropped considerably, the y have not returned to pre-1995 levels.

Kraig, D.H.; Conrad, R.C.

1999-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Alternatives for management of wastes generated by the formerly utilized sites remedial action program and supplement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alternatives for disposal or stabilization of the wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) are identified and compared, with emphasis on the long-term aspects. These wastes consist of soil material and rubble containing trace amounts of radionuclides. A detailed pathway analysis for the dose to the maximally exposed individual is carried out using an adaptation of the natural analogue method. Comparisons of the different alternatives, based on the results of the pathway analysis and qualitative cost considerations, indicate that, if the hazard is such that the wastes must be removed and disposed of rather than stabilized in place, disposal by immediate dispersal is preferable to containment, and containment followed by slow planned dispersal is preferable to containment without dispersal. The Supplement presents refinements of work that was reported at the 1982 International Decommissioning Symposium. The new material consists of revisions of the estimates of the predicted potential dose to the maximally exposed individual and a more detailed comparative assessment of the radiological impacts of alternatives for management of wastes generated by the US Department of Energy's Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP).

Gilbert, T.L.; Peterson, J.M.; Vocke, R.W.; Alexander, J.K.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Technical summary of groundwater quality protection program at the Savannah River Site, 1952--1986. Volume 1, Site geohydrology and waste sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides information regarding the status of and groundwater quality at the waste sites at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). Specific information provided for each waste site at SRS includes its location, size, inventory (when known), and history. Many waste sites at SRS are considered to be of little environmental concern because they contain nontoxic or inert material such as construction rubble and debris. Other waste sites, however, either are known to have had an effect on groundwater quality or are suspected of having the potential to affect groundwater. Monitoring wells have been installed at most of these sites; monitoring wells are scheduled for installation at the remaining sites. Results of the groundwater analyses from these monitoring wells, presented in the appendices, are used in the report to help identify potential contaminants of concern, if any, at each waste site. The list of actions proposed for each waste site in Christensen and Gordon`s 1983 report are summarized, and an update is provided for each site. Planned actions for the future are also outlined.

Heffner, J.D. [ed.] [Exploration Resources, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Simulations of Fracture and Fragmentation of Geologic Materials using Combined FEM/DEM Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results are presented from a study investigating the effect of explosive and impact loading on geological media using the Livermore Distinct Element Code (LDEC). LDEC was initially developed to simulate tunnels and other structures in jointed rock masses with large numbers of intact polyhedral blocks. However, underground structures in jointed rock subjected to explosive loading can fail due to both rock motion along preexisting interfaces and fracture of the intact rock mass itself. Many geophysical applications, such as projectile penetration into rock, concrete targets, and boulder fields, require a combination of continuum and discrete methods in order to predict the formation and interaction of the fragments produced. In an effort to model these types of problems, we have implemented Cosserat point theory and cohesive element formulations into the current version of LDEC, thereby allowing for dynamic fracture and combined finite element/discrete element simulations. Results of a large-scale LLNL simulation of an explosive shock wave impacting an elaborate underground facility are also discussed. It is confirmed that persistent joints lead to an underestimation of the impact energy needed to fill the tunnel systems with rubble. Non-persistent joint patterns, which are typical of real geologies, inhibit shear within the surrounding rock mass and significantly increase the load required to collapse a tunnel.

Morris, J P; Rubin, M B; Block, G I; Bonner, M P

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

249

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 425: Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses the action necessary for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 425, Area 9 Main Lake Construction Debris Disposal Area. This CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). This site will be cleaned up under the SAFER process since the volume of waste exceeds the 23 cubic meters (m{sup 3}) (30 cubic yards [yd{sup 3}]) limit established for housekeeping sites. CAU 425 is located on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and consists of one Corrective Action Site (CAS) 09-08-001-TA09, Construction Debris Disposal Area (Figure 1). CAS 09-08-001-TA09 is an area that was used to collect debris from various projects in and around Area 9. The site is located approximately 81 meters (m) (265 feet [ft]) north of Edwards Freeway northeast of Main Lake on the TTR. The site is composed of concrete slabs with metal infrastructure, metal rebar, wooden telephone poles, and concrete rubble from the Hard Target and early Tornado Rocket sled tests. Other items such as wood scraps, plastic pipes, soil, and miscellaneous nonhazardous items have also been identified in the debris pile. It is estimated that this site contains approximately 2280 m{sup 3} (3000 yd{sup 3}) of construction-related debris.

K. B. Campbell

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Research and development on waste management for the Fukushima Daiichi NPS by JAEA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Technologies for waste management of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1NPS) have been investigated. It is expected that the amount of wastes will be considerable. It is considered that F1NPS wastes were contaminated with radionuclides contained in spent fuel and with activation products, therefore the number of nuclides which needs to be considered in evaluating disposal safety is high. As a result, it is possible that the technologies selected will be different from those of the current wastes from nuclear reactors and fuel cycle facilities. The secondary waste from the accumulated water treatment, contaminated rubble and trees were analyzed, and the data obtained was provided for inventory evaluation. Demand on analytical data is strong, and sampling at the site and analysis have been continued. Storage safety of the secondary waste, especially for zeolite and sludge is under investigation. Investigation on conditioning and disposal was initiated, for survey on existing disposal concept assuming that both inventory and waste classification are uncertain. Different from usual methodology, these research and development activities should be conducted side-by-side.

Koma, Yoshikazu; Ashida, Takashi; Meguro, Yoshihiro; Miyamoto, Yasuaki; Sasaki, Toshiki; Yamagishi, Isao; Kameo, Yutaka; Terada, Atsuhiko; Hiyama, T.; Koyama, Tomozo [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Kaminishi, Shuji; Saito; Noriyuki; Denda, Yasutaka [Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc., Muramatsu 4-33, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Niagara Falls Storage Site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Lewiston, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental monitoring program, which began in 1981, was continued during 1989 at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a United States Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, that is currently used for interim storage of radioactive residues, contaminated soils, and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at NFSS measures radon concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. Additionally, several nonradiological parameters are measured in groundwater. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for a hypothetical maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in this report, this hypothetical individual receives an annual external exposure equivalent to approximately 2 percent of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. This exposure is less than a person receives during a one-way flight from New York to Los Angeles (because of the greater amounts of cosmic radiation at higher altitudes). The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of NFSS that results from radioactive materials present at the site is indistinguishable from the dose that the same population receives from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1989 monitoring show that NFSS is in compliance with applicable DOE radiation protection standards. 18 refs., 26 figs., 18 tabs.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Niagara Falls Storage Site, Annual site environmental report, Lewiston, New York, Calendar year 1986: Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 1986, the environmental monitoring program was continued at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) surplus facility located in Niagara County, New York, presently used for the interim storage of radioactive residues and contaminated soils and rubble. The monitoring program is being conducted by Bechtel National, Inc. The monitoring program at the NFSS measures radon gas concentrations in air; external gamma radiation levels; and uranium and radium concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess its potential effect on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, this individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 6% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/yr. By comparison, the incremental dose received from living in a brick house versus a wooden house is 10 mrem/yr above background. The cumulative dose to the population within an 80-km (50-mi) radius of the NFSS that would result from radioactive materials present at the site would be indistinguishable from the dose that the same population would receive from naturally occurring radioactive sources. Results of the 1986 monitoring show that the NFSS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 11 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

L-Area Reactor - 1993 annual - groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in L Area: the L-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (four LAC wells), L-Area Research Wells in the southern portion of the area (outside the fence; three LAW wells), the L-Area Oil and Chemical Basin (four LCO wells), the L-Area Disassembly Basin (two LDB wells), the L-Area Burning/Rubble Pit (four LRP wells), and the L-Area Seepage Basin (four LSB wells). During 1993, tetrachloroethylene was detected above its drinking water standard (DWS) in the LAC, LAW, LCO, and LDB well series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in the LAW, LDB, and LRP series, and tritium was above its DWS in the LAW, LCO, and LSB series. Apparently anomalous elevated levels of the common laboratory contaminant bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate were reported during first quarter in one well each in the LAC series and LCO series, and during third quarter in a different LCO well. Extensive radionuclide analyses were performed during 1993 in the LAC, LAW, and LCO well series. No radionuclides other than tritium were reported above DWS or Flag 2 criteria.

Chase, J.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Formation of planetary debris discs around white dwarfs I: Tidal disruption of an extremely eccentric asteroid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25%-50% of all white dwarfs (WDs) host observable and dynamically active remnant planetary systems based on the presence of close-in circumstellar dust and gas and photospheric metal pollution. Currently-accepted theoretical explanations for the origin of this matter include asteroids that survive the star's giant branch evolution at au-scale distances and are subsequently perturbed onto WD-grazing orbits following stellar mass loss. In this work we investigate the tidal disruption of these highly-eccentric (e > 0.98) asteroids as they approach and tidally disrupt around the WD. We analytically compute the disruption timescale and compare the result with fully self-consistent numerical simulations of rubble piles by using the N-body code PKDGRAV. We find that this timescale is highly dependent on the orbit's pericentre and largely independent of its semimajor axis. We establish that spherical asteroids readily break up and form highly eccentric collisionless rings, which do not accrete onto the WD without add...

Veras, Dimitri; Bonsor, Amy; Gaensicke, Boris T

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Results of the radiological survey at the Sacandaga site Glenville, New York. Waste Management Research and Development Programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Sacandaga site, located on Sacandaga Road, Glenville, New York, was operated by the General Electric Company for the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) between 1947 and 1951. Originally used for the study and development of radar during World War II, the facilities housed later operations involving physics studies and sodium technology development in support of breeder reactor design and other AEC programs. Though not in use since the original equipment was dismantled and removed in the early 1950s, portions of the 51-acre site are known to contain buried rubble from demolished structures used in former operations. At the request of the Office of Naval Reactors through the Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology, a characterization of current radiological conditions over the site was performed between August and October 1989. The survey included the measurement of direct radiation levels (gamma, alpha, and beta-gamma) over all surfaces both inside and outside the building and tunnel, radionuclide analysis of systematic, biased, and auger hole soil samples, and analysis of sediments from underground structures. Gamma logging of auger holes was conducted and removable contamination levels inside the tunnel were determined. Samples of soil and structural materials from within and around an excavated concrete bunker were analyzed to determine concentrations of radionuclides and nonradioactive elemental beryllium.

Foley, R.D.; Cottrell, W.D.; Carrier, R.F.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Seagate Crystal Reports - Cm946  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Annual Projections for Shipping and Receiving (CM-9) Annual Projections for Shipping and Receiving (CM-9) RECEIVING SITE: Commercial and Other DOE Sites WASTE TYPE: 11e(2) Byproduct Waste STATE: Colorado Commercial and Other DOE Sites - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Soil 2051-55(P) Year Shipped (m 3 ) Year 2046-50(P) Shipped (m 3 ) Shipped (m 3 ) Shipped (m 3 ) Year Year Shipped (m 3 ) Year 1998 (A) 1999 (A) 2000 (A) 2001 (P) 2002 (P) 2041-45(P) 2004 (P) 2005 (P) 2021-25(P) 2026-30(P) 2031-35(P) 2036-40(P) 2006 (P) 2011-15(P) 2003 (P) Non-Annualized 2016-20(P) 2008(P) 2009(P) 2010(P) 2061-65(P) 2066-70(P) 2056-60(P) 2007 (P) GrJuncOff 0.000 10.000 0.000 30.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 0.000 Commercial and Other DOE Sites - 11e(2) Byproduct Waste - RRM Contaminated Rubble/Debris

258

Preliminary design of a landfill and revetment on Bikini Island, Republic of the Marshall Islands. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Topsoil on Bikini Island, located 2,500 miles southwest of Hawaii at 113 deg 35 min N, 165 deg 25 min E, was contaminated by radioactive fallout from nuclear weapons tests in the late 1940's and early 1950's. The uptake of this radioactive fallout, primarily cesium-137 in plants, has prevented resettlement of the island by the native population. One alternative solution proposed by the congressionally appointed Bikini Atoll Rehabilitation Committee involves removal of the contaminated topsoil and placement of the excavated material as a landfill on the 2,500-ft-wide reef flat adjacent to the eastern (windward) shore of the island. This paper explores that alternative by first developing an extremal wave climatology offshore of Bikini Island from 21 years (1959-1979) of typhoon data published by the Joint Typhoon Warning Center on Guam. Deepwater wave conditions just offshore of the reef are estimated and transformed to the point of breaking at the edge of the reef. Storm surge is estimated based on these same parameters. Wave setup on the reef flat is estimated based on the simulated breaking conditions. Given an estimate of the elevated water level across the reef caused by storm surge and wave setup, depth limitations and fractional decay are estimated to define wave conditions at the toe of the proposed revetment. A rubble-mound revetment design stable in these conditions, armored by coral limestone quarried from the reef flat, is then formulated and corresponding material quantities estimated.

Smith, O.P.; Chu, Y.H.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

7 7 Project Informa t ion Proj ect Title: Restoration South of 54-TPX-1 0 Date : 2-8-1 0 DOE Code : Contractor Code: Project Lead: Jeff Jones Project Ove rview We will be digging contaminated soil out of the ground just to the south of 54-TPX-10. We will be taking all 1. What are the enwonmental 1 mpacts? contaminated soil to the land farm and entering the tot. ats in the log. We will backfill with clean fill dirt from Sec.20. 2. What is the legal location? 3. What is the duration of the project? The dura~Jon should be no longer than 4-6 days T 4 What major equipment will be used if any (work over rig, drilling rig, The equipment to be used is as follows Backhoe. dump truck. Tiller. etc.)? Aller all contaminated soil is removed and fresh fill has been placed we will t\11 the area and seed with native

260

The English Sparrow  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

English Sparrow English Sparrow Nature Bulletin No. 139 January 24, 1948 Forest Preserve District of Cook County William N. Erickson, President Roberts Mann, Supt. of Conservation THE ENGLISH SPARROW The first bird a child sees, most places in the civilized world, is likely to be an English sparrow. In the cities, towns and country, the sparrow is a familiar part of everyday life. Like the cockroach, the rat, the house mouse and the house fly, the English sparrow has followed man over most of the earth, adjusting itself to different climates, foods, enemies and nesting places. Everybody thinks he "knows" the English sparrow. Yet this bird -- common as dirt, unloved and neglected -- is more of a world citizen than most birds and less studied than many rarer birds. It has so few distinctive markings that it is hard to describe, particularly the female, and may fool even skilled bird fans. It is of average size, average shape, average color, and has an average chirp. Furthermore, it is not a sparrow but one of the weaver finches a group of birds that build nests with openings in the side. Moreover, they are not particularly English, being native to Europe, Asia and North Africa, it is the " sparrow" mentioned in the Bible.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

8 - Deinking with Enzymes?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of enzymes has been suggested as an environmentally friendly alternative to complement conventional chemical deinking in the recycling of recovered paper. Enzymes could reduce the demand for chemicals and would lower the process costs and the environmental impact. These enzymes include cellulases, hemicellulases, pectinases, amylases, lipases, esterases and laccases. Among the different enzymes studied, deinking using carbohydrate hydrolases, which have activities in cellulose and hemicellulose hydrolysis, has been widely demonstrated on different secondary fibres. Brightness response to enzyme treatment varies considerably, but it often rivals or surpasses brightnesses obtained with conventional deinking processes. Residual dirt count for enzymatically deinked pulps is also generally lower. Additional benefits include higher freeness and greater paper strength. Results for pulp yield are inconclusive. Extensive research has demonstrated the application of enzymes and their effectiveness. Different mechanisms for ink removal by enzymes have also been proposed. Operating conditions must be optimised for successful deinking. Although the potential of enzyme-based deinking appears good, further research in a few areas is needed to exploit this technology fully.

Pratima Bajpai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

INNOVATIVE INSTRUMENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF THE TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENT FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE GASIFICATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The systematic tests of the gasifier simulator on the ultrasonic vibration application for cleaning method were completed in this reporting period. Within the systematic tests on the ultrasonic vibration application, the ambient temperature and high temperature status condition were tested separately. The sticky dirt on the thermocouple tip was simulated by the cement-covered layer on the thermocouple tip. At the ambient temperature status, four (4) factors were considered as the input factors affecting the response variable of peeling off rate. The input factors include the shape of the cement-covered layer (thickness and length), the ultrasonic vibration output power, and application time. At the high temperature tests, four (4) different environments were considered as the experimental parameters including air flow supply, water and air supply environment, water/air/fine dust particle supply, and air/water/ammonia/fine dust particle supply environment. The factorial design method was used in the experiment design with twelve (12) data sets of readings. Analysis of Variances (ANOVA) was applied to the results from systematic tests. The ANOVA results show that the thickness and length of the cement-covered layer have the significant impact on the peeling off rate of ultrasonic vibration application at the ambient temperature environment. For the high temperature tests, the different environments do not seem to have significant impact on the temperature changes. These results may indicate that the ultrasonic vibration is one of best cleaning methods for the thermocouple tip.

Seong W. Lee

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

DOE Backup Power Working Group Best Practices Handbook for Maintenance and Operation of Engine Generators, Volume II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lubricating oil system provides a means to introduce a lubricant in the form of a film to reduce friction and wear between surfaces that bear against each other as they move.1 The oil film which is established also cools the parts by carrying generated heat away from hot surfaces, cleans and carries dirt or metal wear particles to the filter media, and helps seal the piston to the cylinder during combustion. Most systems are pressure lubricated and distribute oil under pressure to bearings, gears, and power assemblies. Lubricating oil usually reaches main, connecting rod, and camshaft bearings through drilled passages in the cylinder block and crankshaft or through piping and common manifolds.Many parts rely on oil for cooling, so if the lube oil system fails to perform its function the engine will overheat. Metal to metal surfaces not separated by a thin film of oil rapidly build up frictional heat. As the metals reach their melting point, they tend to weld together in spots or streaks. Lube oil system failures can cause significant damage to an engine in a short period of time. Proper maintenance and operation of the lubricating oil system is essential if your engine is to accomplish its mission.

Gross, R.E.

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

264

Mechanical decontamination techniques for floor drain systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unprecedented nature of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) following the 1979 accident has necessitated the development of new techniques to deal with radiation and contamination in the plant. One of these problems was decontamination of floor drain systems, which had become highly contaminated with various forms of dirt and sludge containing high levels of fission products and fuel from the damaged reactor core. The bulk of this contamination is loosely adherent to the drain pipe walls; however, significant amounts of contamination have become incorporated into pipe wall oxide and corrosion layers and embedded in microscopic pits and fissures in the pipe wall material. The need to remove this contamination was recognized early in the TMI-2 cleanup effort. A program consisting of development and laboratory testing of floor drain decontamination techniques was undertaken early in the cleanup with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Based on this initial research, two techniques were judged to show promise for use at TMI-2: a rotating brush hone system and a high-pressure water mole nozzle system. Actual use of these devices to clean floor drains at TMI-2 has yielded mixed decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness that has been obtained is highly dependent on the nature of the contamination in the drain pipe and the combination of decontamination techniques used.

Palau, G.L.; Saigusa, Moriyuki

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft skin thickness-loss from corrosion has been measured using dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging on a flash-heated Boeing 737 fuselage structure. The authors mapped surface temperature differences of 0.2 to 0.6 C for 5 to 14 % thickness losses within corroded lap splices at 0.4 seconds after the heat flash. The procedure mapped surface temperature differences at sites without surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). They established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise using a partially corroded F-18 wing box and several aluminum panels which had thickness losses from milled flat-bottom holes. The authors mapped the lap splice composite thermal inertia, (k{rho}c){sup 1/2}, which characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Corrosion invaded the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine, where they observed ``pillowing`` from volume build-up of corrosion by-products.

Del Grande, N.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Dual-band infrared imaging for quantitative corrosion detection in aging aircraft  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Aircraft skin thickness-loss from corrosion has been measured using dual-band infrared (DBIR) imaging on a flash-heated Boeing 737 fuselage structure. We mapped surface temperature differences of 0.2 to 0.6 {degrees}C for 5 to 14% thickness losses within corroded lap splices at 0.4 seconds after the heat flash. Our procedure mapped surface temperature differences at sites without surface-emissivity clutter (from dirt, dents, tape, markings, ink, sealants, uneven paint, paint stripper, exposed metal and roughness variations). We established the correlation of percent thickness loss with surface temperature rise using a partially corroded F-18 wing box and several aluminum panels which had thickness losses from milled flat-bottom holes. We mapped the lap splice composite thermal inertia, (kpc){sup {1/2}}, which characterized shallow skin defects within the lap splice at early times (<0.3 s) and deeper skin defects within the lap splice at late times (>0.4 s). Corrosion invaded the inside of the Boeing 737 lap splice, beneath the galley and the latrine, where we observed ``pillowing`` from volume build-up of corrosion by-products.

Del Grande, N.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) Give Me My Tax Credit! (Or, How I Almost Bought the Wrong Patio Door) July 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL Over the past few weeks, my husband and I have been shopping for a new patio door. We currently have a sliding glass door that we have always hated-full exposure to winds from the west and to open fields behind our house mean that we always have dirt and dust getting in through that door, not to mention cold air in the winter and heat in the summer. The final straw was a warped and squeaky track, no doubt aggravated by our dog's constant indecision over whether he wants to be inside or outside (oh, the dilemma!). Since sliding glass doors are known to be inefficient (and ours was already

268

Impacts of Sedimentation from Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds of the Allegheny National Forest of Northwestern Pennsylvania  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fritz, Kelley'*, Steven Harris', Harry Edenborn2, and James Sams2. 'Clarion University of Pennsylvania, Clarion, PA 16214, 2National Energy Technology Laboratory, U.S. Dept. Energy, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Impacts a/Sedimentation/rom Oil and Gas Development on Stream Macroinvertebrates in Two Adjacent Watersheds a/the Allegheny National Forest a/Northwestern Pennsylvania - The Allegheny National Forest (ANF), located in northwestern Pennsy Ivania, is a multiuse forest combining commercial development with recreational and conservation activities. As such, portions of the ANF have been heavily logged and are now the subject of widespread oil and gas development. This rapid increase in oil and gas development has led to concerns about sediment runoff from the dirt and gravel roads associated with development and the potential impact on the aquatic biota of the receiving streams. We examined and compared the benthic macroinvertebrate communities in two adjacent watersheds of similar size and topography in the ANF; the Hedgehog Run watershed has no oil and gas development, while the adjacent Grunder Run watershed has extensive oil and gas development. In Hedgehog and Grunder Run, we collected monthly kicknet samples from riffles and glides at two sites from April to October 2010. At the same intervals, we measured standard water quality parameters, including conductivity and turbidity. Preliminary results have indicated much higher turbidity in Grunder Run, but little difference in the diversity and abundance of benthic macro invertebrates inhabiting the two streams.

Fritz, K.; Harris, S.; Edenborn, H.M.; Sams, J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Preliminary site characterization - final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the ecological unit reconnaissance conducted at the F-Area Burning/Rubble Pit(s) RCRA/CERCLA Unit (F-Area BRP) on August 30 and 31, 1993 as part of the RFI/RI baseline risk assessment for the waste unit The baseline risk assessment will assess the potential endangerment to human health and the environment associated with the unit and will be used to evaluate remediation criteria, if needed. The information presented in this report will be used in subsequent stages of the ecological risk assessment to refine the conceptual site model, assist in the selection of contaminants of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and evaluate trophic relationships and other exposure pathways. The unit reconnaissance survey was conducted in accordance with Specification No. E-18272, Rev. 1 dated August 5, 1993, and the Draft {open_quotes}Ecological Risk Assessment Program Plan for Evaluation of Waste Sites on the Savannah River Site{close_quotes}. The objectives of the site reconnaissance were to: Assess the general characteristics of on-unit biological communities including mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, and any aquatic communities present. Determine the location, extent, and characteristics of on-unit ecological resources, such as forested areas and wetlands, that could serve as important wildlife habitat or provide other ecological functions. Identify any overt effects of contamination on biological communities. The field investigations included mapping and describing all wetland and terrestrial habitats; recording wildlife observations of birds, mammals, and reptiles; and investigating ecological resources in nearby downgradient and downstream areas which could be affected by mobile contaminants or future remedial actions. In preparation for the field investigation, existing unit information including aerial photographs and reports were reviewed to help identify and describe ecological resources at the waste unit.

Clark, D.; Smith, L.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Remedial Action Plan and Site Design for Stabilization of the Inactive Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Maybell, Colorado. Remedial action selection report: Attachment 2, Geology report, Final  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [m]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd{sup 3} (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3} (420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}). Information presented in this Final Remedial Action Plan (RAP) and referenced in supporting documents represents the current disposal cell design features and ground water compliance strategy proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) for the Maybell, Colorado, tailings site. Both the disposal cell design and the ground water compliance strategy have changed from those proposed prior to the preliminary final RAP document as a result of prudent site-specific technical evaluations.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Geologic Controls of Hydraulic Conductivity in the Snake River Plain Aquifer At and Near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effective hydraulic conductivity of basalt and interbedded sediment that compose the Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) ranges from about 1.0x10 -2 to 3.2x10 4 feet per day (ft/d). This six-order-of-magnitude range of hydraulic conductivity was estimated from single-well aquifer tests in 114 wells, and is attributed mainly to the physical characteristics and distribution of basalt flows and dikes. Hydraulic conductivity is greatest in thin pahoehoe flows and near-vent volcanic deposits. Hydraulic conductivity is least in flows and deposits cut by dikes. Estimates of hydraulic conductivity at and near the INEEL are similar to those measured in similar volcanic settings in Hawaii. The largest variety of rock types and the greatest range of hydraulic conductivity are in volcanic rift zones, which are characterized by numerous aligned volcanic vents and fissures related to underlying dikes. Three broad categories of hydraulic conductivity corresponding to six general types of geologic controls can be inferred from the distribution of wells and vent corridors. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows probably is increased by localized fissures and coarse mixtures of interbedded sediment, scoria, and basalt rubble. Hydraulic conductivity of basalt flows is decreased locally by abundant alteration minerals of probable hydrothermal origin. Hydraulic conductivity varies as much as six orders of magnitude in a single vent corridor and varies from three to five orders of magnitude within distances of 500 to 1,000 feet. Abrupt changes in hydraulic conductivity over short distances suggest the presence of preferential pathways and local barriers that may greatly affect the movement of ground water and the dispersion of radioactive and chemical wastes downgradient from points of waste disposal.

S. R. Anderson; M. A. Kuntz; L. C. Davis

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

R-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the following locations in R Area: Well cluster P20 east of R Area (one well each in the water table and the McBean formation), the R-Area Acid/Caustic Basin (the four water-table wells of the RAC series), the R-Area Ash Basin/Coal Pile (one well of the RCP series in the Congaree formation and one in the water table), the R-Area Disassembly Basin (the three water-table wells of the RDB series), the R-Area Burning/Rubble Pits (the four water-table wells of the RRP series), and the R-Area Seepage Basins (numerous water-table wells in the RSA, RSB, RSC, RSD, RSE, and RSF series). Lead was the only constituent detected above its 50{mu}g/L standard in any but the seepage basin wells; it exceeded that level in one B well and in 23 of the seepage basin wells. Cadmium exceeded its drinking water standard (DWS) in 30 of the seepage basin wells, as did mercury in 10. Nitrate-nitrite was above DWS once each in two seepage basin wells. Tritium was above DWS in six seepage basin wells, as was gross alpha activity in 22. Nonvolatile beta exceeded its screening standard in 29 wells. Extensive radionuclide analyses were requested during 1993 for the RCP series and most of the seepage basin wells. Strontium-90 in eight wells was the only specific radionuclide other than tritium detected above DWS; it appeared about one-half of the nonvolatile beta activity in those wells.

Not Available

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

P-Area Reactor 1993 annual groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater was sampled and analyzed during 1993 from wells monitoring the water table at the following locations in P Area: well P 24A in the eastern section of P Area, the P-Area Acid/Caustic Basin, the P-Area Coal Pile Runoff Containment Basin, the P-Area Disassembly Basin, the P-Area Burning/Rubble Pit, and the P-Area Seepage Basins. During 1993, pH was above its alkaline standard in well P 24A. Specific conductance was above its standard in one well each from the PAC and PCB series. Lead exceeded its 50 {mu}g/L standard in one well of the PDB series during one quarter. Tetrachloroethylene and trichloroethylene were detected above their final primary drinking water standards in one well of the PRP well series. Tritium was consistently above its DWS in the PDB and PSB series. Also during 1993, radium-228 exceeded the DWS for total radium in three wells of the PAC series and one well of the PCB series; total alpha-emitting radium exceeded the same standard in a different PCB well. These results are fairly consistent with those from previous years. Unlike results from past years, however, no halogenated volatiles other than trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene exceeded DWS in the PRP well series although gas chromatographic volatile organic analyses were performed throughout the year. Some of the regulated units in P Area appear to need additional monitoring by new wells because there are insufficient downgradient wells, sometimes because the original well network, installed prior to regulation, included sidegradient rather than downgradient wells. No monitoring wells had been installed through 1993 at one of the RCRA/CERCLA units named in the Federal Facilities Agreement, the Bingham Pump Outage Pits.

NONE

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Baseline geochemistry of soil and bedrock Tshirege Member of the Bandelier Tuff at MDA-P  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides baseline geochemistry for soils (including fill), and for bedrock within three specific areas that are planned for use in the remediation of Material Disposal Area P (MDA-P) at Technical Area 16 (TA-16). The baseline chemistry includes leachable element concentrations for both soils and bedrock and total element concentrations for all soil samples and for two selected bedrock samples. MDA-P operated from the early 1950s to 1984 as a landfill for rubble and debris generated by the burning of high explosives (HE) at the TA-16 Burning Ground, HE-contaminated equipment and material, barium nitrate sand, building materials, and trash. The aim of this report is to establish causes for recognizable chemical differences between the background and baseline data sets. In many cases, the authors conclude that recognizable differences represent natural enrichments. In other cases, differences are best attributed to analytical problems. But most importantly, the comparison of background and baseline geochemistry demonstrates significant contamination for several elements not only at the two remedial sites near the TA-16 Burning Ground, but also within the entire region of the background study. This contamination is highly localized very near to the surface in soil and fill, and probably also in bedrock; consequently, upper tolerance limits (UTLs) calculated as upper 95% confidence limits of the 95th percentile are of little value and thus are not provided. This report instead provides basic statistical summaries and graphical comparisons for background and baseline samples to guide strategies for remediation of the three sites to be used in the restoration of MDA-P.

Warren, R.G.; McDonald, E.V.; Ryti, R.T.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Design report for the interim waste containment facility at the Niagara Falls Storage Site. [Surplus Facilities Management Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low-level radioactive residues from pitchblende processing and thorium- and radium-contaminated sand, soil, and building rubble are presently stored at the Niagara Falls Storage Site (NFSS) in Lewiston, New York. These residues and wastes derive from past NFSS operations and from similar operations at other sites in the United States conducted during the 1940s by the Manhattan Engineer District (MED) and subsequently by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The US Department of Energy (DOE), successor to MED/AEC, is conducting remedial action at the NFSS under two programs: on-site work under the Surplus Facilities Managemnt Program and off-site cleanup of vicinity properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. On-site remedial action consists of consolidating the residues and wastes within a designated waste containment area and constructing a waste containment facility to prevent contaminant migration. The service life of the system is 25 to 50 years. Near-term remedial action construction activities will not jeopardize or preclude implementation of any other remedial action alternative at a later date. Should DOE decide to extend the service life of the system, the waste containment area would be upgraded to provide a minimum service life of 200 years. This report describes the design for the containment system. Pertinent information on site geology and hydrology and on regional seismicity and meteorology is also provided. Engineering calculations and validated computer modeling studies based on site-specific and conservative parameters confirm the adequacy of the design for its intended purposes of waste containment and environmental protection.

Not Available

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Explosive Contamination from Substrate Surfaces: Differences and Similarities in Contamination Techniques using RDX and C-4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, temperature, humidity, rain, etc. This laboratory study focused on looking at similarities and differences in three different surface contamination techniques that are used when performance testing explosive trace detection equipment in an attempt to determine how effective the techniques are at replicating actual field samples. The three techniques used were dry transfer deposition of solutions using the Transportation Security Laboratory (TSL) patented dry transfer techniques (US patent 6470730), direct deposition of explosive standards, and fingerprinting of actual explosives. Explosives were deposited on the surface of one of five substrates using one of the three different deposition techniques. The process was repeated for each surface type using each contamination technique. The surface types used were: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, and metal obtained from a car hood at a junk yard. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal, oil and dirt. The substrates were photographed using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera to determine the difference in the crystalline structure and surface contamination in an attempt to determine differences and similarities associated with current contamination techniques.

C.J. Miller; T.S. Yoder

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Radioactive air emissions notice of construction HEPA filtered vacuum radioactive air emission units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This notice of construction (NOC) requests a categorical approval for construction and operation of certain portable high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered vacuum radionuclide airborne emission units (HVUs). Approval of this NOC application is intended to allow operation of the HVUs without prior project-specific approval. This NOC does not request replacement or supersedence of any previous agreements/approvals by the Washington State Department of Health for the use of vacuums on the Hanford Site. These previous agreement/approvals include the approved NOCs for the use of EuroClean HEPA vacuums at the T Plant Complex (routine technical meeting 12/10/96) and the Kelly Decontamination System at the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction (PUREX) Plant (routine technical meeting 06/25/96). Also, this NOC does not replace or supersede the agreement reached regarding the use of HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners for routine cleanup activities conducted by the Environmental Restoration Project. Routine cleanup activities are conducted during the surveillance and maintenance of inactive waste sites (Radioactive Area Remedial Action Project) and inactive facilities. HEPA hand-held/shop-vacuum cleaners are used to clean up spot surface contamination areas found during outdoor radiological field surveys, and to clean up localized radiologically contaminated material (e.g., dust, dirt, bird droppings, animal feces, liquids, insects, spider webs, etc.). This agreement, documented in the October 12, 1994 Routine Meeting Minutes, is based on routine cleanup consisting of spot cleanup of low-level contamination provided that, in each case, the source term potential would be below 0.1 millirem per year.

JOHNSON, R.E.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Precision Cleaning Titanium Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean bond surfaces are critical to the operation of diffusion bonded titanium engine components. These components can be contaminated with machining coolant, shop dirt, and fingerprints during normal processing and handling. These contaminants must be removed to achieve acceptable bond quality. As environmental concerns become more important in manufacturing, elimination of the use of hazardous materials is desired. For this reason, another process (not using nitric-hydrofluoric acid solution) to clean titanium parts before bonding was sought. Initial cleaning trials were conducted at Honeywell to screen potential cleaning techniques and chemistries. During the initial cleaning process screening phase, Pratt and Whitney provided Honeywell with machined 3 inch x 3 inch x 1 inch titanium test blocks. These test blocks were machined with a water-based machining coolant and exposed to a normal shop environment and handling. (Honeywell sectioned one of these blocks into smaller samples to be used for additional cleanliness verification analyses.) The sample test blocks were ultrasonically cleaned in alkaline solutions and AUGER analysis was used by Honeywell FM and T to validate their cleanliness. This information enabled selection of final cleaning techniques and solutions to be used for the bonding trials. To validate Honeywell's AUGER data and to verify the cleaning processes in actual situations, additional sample blocks were cleaned (using the chosen processes) and then bonded. The bond quality of the test blocks was analyzed according to Pratt and Whitney's requirements. The Charpy impact testing was performed according to ASTM procedure {number_sign}E-23. Bond quality was determined by examining metallographic samples of the bonded test blocks for porosity along the bondline.

Hand, T.E.; Bohnert, G.W.

2000-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

Smoky ol' town: the significance of Pittsburgh in U.S. air pollution history  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pittsburgh came to be - and came to be dirtybecause of location, location, and location. Two navigable rivers met in the middle of a forest, and combined to form a third river. This was an irresistible meeting point for settlement, trade, and industry. It was an added bonus that this meeting point was at the center of the 'Pittsburgh seam' of coal. While the natural advantages of geography and geology initiated development, Pittsburgh's growth soon attracted man-made transportation networks to import resources from its hinterland and spread finished materials through the Midwest. As the city boomed into an industrial metropolis - the Iron City, the Steel City - through the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the smoke only became worse, and Pittsburgh became known, nationally and even internationally, for its dirt, grime, and filth. For many of the city's workers and businessmen, smoke was a sign of progress and economic success. From small-scale iron production, to the process of refining coal into 'coke,' to the Bessemer steel process, to J.P. Morgan and Andrew Carnegie's creation of the vertically-integrated U.S. Steel corporation, to the pioneering use of 'byproduct' coke ovens, Pittsburgh was home to successive technologies for transforming raw materials into finished or refined goods. Pittsburgh is both singular and representative; its story is at the forefront of pollution history, but the forces, trends, and events the city witnessed were the same in many cities across the nation. So while it is true that A&WMA's headquarters are in Pittsburgh for a reason, it is also true that its membership is spread across the nation and the world. That membership will most likely find something in these four themes from Pittsburgh's history that is representative of their own study. 7 refs., 3 photos.

James Longhurst [Muskingum College, New Concord, OH (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan for Corrective Action Unit 540: Spill Sites Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0, with Errata  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan addresses closure for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 540, Spill Sites, identified in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. Corrective Action Unit 540 consists of the nine following Corrective Action Sites (CASs) located in Areas 12 and 19 of the Nevada Test Site: (1) 12-44-01, ER 12-1, Well Site Release; (2) 12-99-01, Oil Stained Dirt; (3) 19-25-02, Oil Spill; (4) 19-25-04, Oil Spill; (5) 19-25-05, Oil Spill; (6) 19-25-06, Oil Spill; (7) 19-25-07, Oil Spill; (8) 19-25-08, Oil Spills (3); and (9) 19-44-03, U-19bf Drill Site Release. This plan provides the methodology for field activities needed to gather the necessary information for closing each CAS. There is sufficient information and process knowledge from historical documentation and investigations of similar sites regarding the expected nature and extent of potential contaminants to recommend closure of CAU 540 using the SAFER process. The data quality objective process developed for this CAU identified the following expected closure options: (1) investigation and confirmation that no contamination exists above the final action levels (FALs), leading to a no further action declaration; (2) characterization of the nature and extent of contamination, leading to closure in place with use restrictions; or (3) clean closure by remediation and verification. The expected closure options were selected based on available information including contaminants of potential concern (COPC), future land use, and assumed risks. A decision flow process was developed to define an approach necessary to achieve closure. There are two decisions that need to be resolved for closure. Decision I is to conduct an investigation to determine whether COPCs are present in concentrations exceeding the FALs. If COPCs are found to be present above FALs, excavation of the contaminated material will occur with the collection of confirmation samples to ensure removal of contaminants below FALs.

Pastor, Laura

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dirt rubble waterproofing" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Corrosion Resistant Cladding by YAG Laser Welding in Underwater Environment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is known that stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) will occur in nickel-base alloys used in Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) and Internals of nuclear power plants. A SCC sensitivity has been evaluated by IHI in each part of RPV and Internals. There are several water level instrumentation nozzles installed in domestic BWR RPV. In water level instrumentation nozzles, 182 type nickel-base alloys were used for the welding joint to RPV. It is estimated the SCC potential is high in this joint because of a higher residual stress than the yield strength (about 400 MPa). This report will describe a preventive maintenance method to these nozzles Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) and welds by a corrosion resistant cladding (CRC) by YAG Laser in underwater environment (without draining a reactor water). There are many kinds of countermeasures for SCC, for example, Induction Heating Stress Improvement (IHSI), Mechanical Stress Improvement Process (MSIP) and so on. A YAG laser CRC is one of them. In this technology a laser beam is used for heat source and irradiated through an optical fiber to a base metal and SCC resistant material is used for welding wires. After cladding the HAZ and welds are coated by the corrosion resistant materials so their surfaces are improved. A CRC by gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) in an air environment had been developed and already applied to a couple of operating plants (16 Nozzles). This method was of course good but it spent much time to perform because of an installation of some water-proof working boxes to make a TIG-weldability environment. CRC by YAG laser welding in underwater environment has superior features comparing to this conventional TIG method as follows. At the viewpoint of underwater environment, (1) an outage term reduction (no drainage water). (2) a radioactive exposure dose reduction for personnel. At that of YAG laser welding, (1) A narrower HAZ. (2) A smaller distortion. (3) A few cladding layers. A YAG laser CRC test in underwater environment was carried out in the different welding position, horizontal, vertical upward and downward. The soundness of cladding layers (about 3 mm) is confirmed in visual and penetration test, and cross section observation. In the application to the actual plants, it is preferable to reduce the start and end point numbers of beads with which a defect is easy to cause. Therefore a special welding equipment for a YAG laser CRC that could weld continuously was developed. (authors)

Tsutomi Kochi; Toshio Kojima; Suemi Hirata; Ichiro Morita; Katsura Ohwaki [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Company Ltd., 1 Shin-Nakaharacho, Isogoku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Concepts and Tests for the Remote-Controlled Dismantling of the Biological Shield and Form work of the KNK Reactor - 13425  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compact sodium-cooled nuclear reactor facility Karlsruhe (KNK), a prototype Fast Breeder, is currently in an advanced stage of dismantling. Complete dismantling is based on 10 partial licensing steps. In the frame of the 9. decommissioning permit, which is currently ongoing, the dismantling of the biological shield is foreseen. The biological shield consists of heavy reinforced concrete with built-in steel fitments, such as form-work of the reactor tank, pipe sleeves, ventilation channels, and measuring devices. Due to the activation of the inner part of the biological shield, dismantling has to be done remote-controlled. During a comprehensive basic design phase a practical dismantling strategy was developed. Necessary equipment and tools were defined. Preliminary tests revealed that hot wire plasma cutting is the most favorable cutting technology due to the geometrical boundary conditions, the varying distance between cutter and material, and the heavy concrete behind the steel form-work. The cutting devices will be operated remotely via a carrier system with an industrial manipulator. The carrier system has expandable claws to adjust to the varying diameter of the reactor shaft during dismantling progress. For design approval of this prototype development, interaction between manipulator and hot wire plasma cutting was tested in a real configuration. For the demolition of the concrete structure, an excavator with appropriate tools, such as a hydraulic hammer, was selected. Other mechanical cutting devices, such as a grinder or rope saw, were eliminated because of concrete containing steel spheres added to increase the shielding factor of the heavy concrete. Dismantling of the biological shield will be done in a ring-wise manner due to static reasons. During the demolition process, the excavator is positioned on its tripod in three concrete recesses made prior to the dismantling of the separate concrete rings. The excavator and the manipulator carrier system will be operated alternately. Main boundary condition for all the newly designed equipment is the decommissioning housing of limited space within the reactor building containment. To allow for a continuous removal of the concrete rubble, an additional opening on the lowest level of the reactor shaft will be made. All equipment and the interaction of the tools have to be tested before use in the controlled area. Therefore a full-scale model of the biological shield will be provided in a mock-up. The tests will be performed in early 2014. The dismantling of the biological shield is scheduled for 2015. (authors)

Neff, Sylvia; Graf, Anja; Petrick, Holger; Rothschmitt, Stefan [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein- Leopoldshafen (Germany)] [WAK Rueckbau- und Entsorgungs- GmbH, P.O.Box 12 63, 76339 Eggenstein- Leopoldshafen (Germany); Klute, Stefan [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany)] [Siempelkamp Nukleartechnik GmbH, Am Taubenfeld 25/1, 69123 Heidelberg (Germany); Stanke, Dieter [Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany)] [Siempelkamp NIS Ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Industriestrasse 13, 63755 Alzenau (Germany)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Neptunium Transport Behavior in the Vicinity of Underground Nuclear Tests at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used short lived {sup 239}Np as a yield tracer and state of the art magnetic sector ICP-MS to measure ultra low levels of {sup 237}Np in a number of 'hot wells' at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The results indicate that {sup 237}Np concentrations at the Almendro, Cambric, Dalhart, Cheshire and Chancellor sites, are in the range of 3 x 10{sup -5} to 7 x 10{sup -2} pCi/L and well below the MCL for alpha emitting radionuclides (15 pCi/L) (EPA, 2009). Thus, while Np transport is believed to occur at the NNSS, activities are expected to be well below the regulatory limits for alpha-emitting radionuclides. We also compared {sup 237}Np concentration data to other radionuclides, including tritium, {sup 14}C, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 99}Tc, {sup 129}I, and plutonium, to evaluate the relative {sup 237}Np transport behavior. Based on isotope ratios relative to published unclassified Radiologic Source Terms (Bowen et al., 1999) and taking into consideration radionuclide distribution between melt glass, rubble and groundwater (IAEA, 1998), {sup 237}Np appears to be substantially less mobile than tritium and other non-sorbing radionuclides, as expected. However, this analysis also suggests that {sup 237}Np mobility is surprisingly similar to that of plutonium. The similar transport behavior of Np and Pu can be explained by one of two possibilities: (1) Np(IV) and Pu(IV) oxidation states dominate under mildly reducing NNSS groundwater conditions resulting in similar transport behavior or (2) apparent Np transport is the result of transport of its parent {sup 241}Pu and {sup 241}Am isotopes and subsequent decay to {sup 237}Np. Finally, measured {sup 237}Np concentrations were compared to recent Hydrologic Source Term (HST) models. The 237Np data collected from three wells in Frenchman Flat (RNM-1, RNM-2S, and UE-5n) are in good agreement with recent HST transport model predictions (Carle et al., 2005). The agreement provides confidence in the results of the predictive model. The comparison to Cheshire HST model predictions (Pawloski et al, 2001) is somewhat ambiguous due to the low concentration resolution of the particle transport model.

Zhao, P; Tinnacher, R M; Zavarin, M; Williams, R W; Kersting, A B

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

284

Characterization Investigation Study: Volume 3, Radiological survey of surface soils  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Feed Materials Production Center was constructed to produce high purity uranium metal for use at various Department of Energy facilities. The waste products from these operations include general uncontaminated scrap and refuse, contaminated and uncontaminated metal scrap, waste oils, low-level radioactive waste, co-contaminated wastes, mixed waste, toxic waste, sludges from water treatment, and fly ash from the steam plant. This material is estimated to total more than 350,000 cubic meters. Other wastes stored in this area include laboratory chemicals and other combustible materials in the burn pit; fine waste stream sediments in the clear well; fly ash and waste oils in the two fly ash areas; lime-alum sludges and boiler plant blowdown in the lime sludge ponds; and nonradioactive sanitary waste, construction rubble, and asbestos in the sanitary landfill. A systematic survey of the surface soils throughout the Waste Storage Area, associated on-site drainages, and the fly ash piles was conducted using a Field Instrument for Detecting Low-Energy Radiation (FIDLER). Uranium is the most prevalent radioactive element in surface soil; U-238 is the principal radionuclide, ranging from 2.2 to 1790 pCi/g in the general Waste Storage Area. The maximum values for the next highest activity concentrations in the same area were 972 pCi/g for Th-230 and 298 pCi/g for U-234. Elevated activity concentrations of Th-230 were found along the K-65 slurry line, the maximum at 3010 pCi/g. U-238 had the highest value of 761 pCi/g in the drainage just south of pit no. 5. The upper fly ash area had the highest radionuclide activity concentrations in the surface soils with the maximum values for U-238 at 8600 pCi/g, U-235 at 2190 pCi/g, U-234 at 11,400 pCi/g, Tc-99 at 594 pCi/g, Ra-226 at 279 pCi/g, and Th-230 at 164 pCi/g.

Solow, A.J.; Phoenix, D.R.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Radiological protection issues arising during and after the Fukushima nuclear reactor accident  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following the Fukushima accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) convened a task group to compile lessons learned from the nuclear reactor accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Japan, with respect to the ICRP system of radiological protection. In this memorandum the members of the task group express their personal views on issues arising during and after the accident, without explicit endorsement of or approval by the ICRP.While the affected people were largely protected against radiation exposure and no one incurred a lethal dose of radiation (or a dose sufficiently large to cause radiation sickness), many radiological protection questions were raised. The following issues were identified: inferring radiation risks (and the misunderstanding of nominal risk coefficients); attributing radiation effects from low dose exposures; quantifying radiation exposure; assessing the importance of internal exposures; managing emergency crises; protecting rescuers and volunteers; responding with medical aid; justifying necessary but disruptive protective actions; transiting from an emergency to an existing situation; rehabilitating evacuated areas; restricting individual doses of members of the public; caring for infants and children; categorising public exposures due to an accident; considering pregnant women and their foetuses and embryos; monitoring public protection; dealing with 'contamination' of territories, rubble and residues and consumer products; recognising the importance of psychological consequences; and fostering the sharing of information.Relevant ICRP Recommendations were scrutinised, lessons were collected and suggestions were compiled.It was concluded that the radiological protection community has an ethical duty to learn from the lessons of Fukushima and resolve any identified challenges. Before another large accident occurs, it should be ensured that inter alia: radiation risk coefficients of potential health effects are properly interpreted; the limitations of epidemiological studies for attributing radiation effects following low exposures are understood; any confusion on protection quantities and units is resolved; the potential hazard from the intake of radionuclides into the body is elucidated; rescuers and volunteers are protected with an ad hoc system; clear recommendations on crisis management and medical care and on recovery and rehabilitation are available; recommendations on public protection levels (including infant, children and pregnant women and their expected offspring) and associated issues are consistent and understandable; updated recommendations on public monitoring policy are available; acceptable (or tolerable) 'contamination' levels are clearly stated and defined; strategies for mitigating the serious psychological consequences arising from radiological accidents are sought; and, last but not least, failures in fostering information sharing on radiological protection policy after an accident need to be addressed with recommendations to minimise such lapses in communication.

Abel J Gonzlez; Makoto Akashi; John D Boice Jr; Masamichi Chino; Toshimitsu Homma; Nobuhito Ishigure; Michiaki Kai; Shizuyo Kusumi; Jai-Ki Lee; Hans-Georg Menzel; Ohtsura Niwa; Kazuo Sakai; Wolfgang Weiss; Shunichi Yamashita; Yoshiharu Yonekura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Remedial action selection report Maybell, Colorado, site. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Maybell uranium mill tailings site is 25 miles (mi) (40 kilometers [km]) west of the town of Craig, Colorado, in Moffat County, in the northwestern part of the state. The unincorporated town of Maybell is 5 road mi (8 km) southwest of the site. The site is 2.5 mi (4 km) northeast of the Yampa River on relatively flat terrain broken by low, flat-topped mesas. U.S. Highway 40 runs east-west 2 mi (3.2 km) south of the site. The designated site covers approximately 110 acres (ac) (45 hectares [ha]) and consists of a concave-shaped tailings pile and rubble from the demolition of the mill buildings buried in the former mill area. The site is situated between Johnson Wash to the east and Rob Pit Mine to the west. Numerous reclaimed and unreclaimed mines are in the immediate vicinity. Aerial photographs (included at the end of this executive summary) show evidence of mining activity around the Maybell site. Contaminated materials at the Maybell processing site include the tailings pile, which has an average depth of 20 feet (ft) (6 meters [ml]) and contains 2.8 million cubic yards (yd{sup 3}) (2.1 million cubic meters [m{sup 3}]) of tailings. The former mill processing area is on the north side of the site and contains 20,000 yd 3 (15,000 m{sup 3}) of contaminated demolition debris. Off-pile contamination is present and includes areas adjacent to the tailings pile, as well as contamination dispersed by wind and surface water flow. The volume of off-pile contamination to be placed in the disposal cell is 550,000 yd{sup 3}(420,000 m{sup 3}). The total volume of contaminated materials to be disposed of as part of the remedial action is estimated to be 3.37 million yd{sup 3} (2.58 million m{sup 3}).

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Effects of Temperature and Humidity on the Characterization of C-4 Explosive Threats  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The amount of time that an explosive is present on the surface of a material is dependent upon the original amount of explosive on the surface, adhesive forces, temperature and humidity, as well as other environmental factors. This laboratory study focused on evaluating RDX crystal morphology changes resulting from variations in temperature and humidity conditions of the sample. The temperature and humidity conditions were controlled using a Tenney THRJ environmental chamber and a Tenney T11RC-1.5 environmental chamber. These chambers allow the temperature and humidity to be held within 3C and 5% RH. The temperature and humidity conditions used for this test series were: 40F/40%RH, ~70F/20%RH (samples left on benchtop), 70F/70%RH, 70F/95%RH, 95F/40%RH, 95F/70%RH, and 95F/95%RH. These temperature and humidity set points were chosen to represent a wide range of conditions that may be found in real world scenarios. C-4 (RDX crystals and binder material) was deposited on the surface of one of six substrates by placing a fingerprint from the explosive block onto the matrix surface. The substrates were chosen to provide a range of items that are commonly used. Six substrate types were used during these tests: 50% cotton/50% polyester as found in T-shirts, 100% cotton with a smooth surface such as that found in a cotton dress shirt, 100% cotton on a rough surface such as that found on canvas or denim, suede leather such as might be found on jackets, purses, or shoes, painted metal obtained from a junked car hood, and a computer diskette. The samples were not pre-cleaned prior to testing and contained sizing agents, and in the case of the metal: oil, dirt, scratches, and rust spots. The substrates were photographed at various stages of testing, using a Zeiss Discover V12 stereoscope with Axiocam ICc1 3 megapixel digital camera, to determine any changes in the crystalline morphology. Some of the samples were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) in an attempt to determine how the explosive was bound to the substrate.

C. J. Miller

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Corrective Action Investigation Plan for Corrective Action Unit 487: Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range, Nevada (Rev. No.: 0, January 2001)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Corrective Action Investigation Plan contains the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's (DOE/NV's) approach to collect the data necessary to evaluate corrective action alternatives (CAAs) appropriate for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 487, Thunderwell Site, Tonopah Test Range (TTR), Nevada, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Corrective Action Unit 487 consists of a single Corrective Action Site (CAS), RG 26-001-RGRV, Thunderwell Site. The site is located in the northwest portion of the TTR, Nevada, approximately five miles northwest of the Area 3 Control Point and closest to the Cactus Flats broad basin. Historically, Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico used CAU 487 in the early to mid-1960s for a series of high explosive tests detonated at the bottom of large cylindrical steel tubes. Historical photographs indicate that debris from these tests and subsequent operations may have been scattered and buried throughout the site. A March 2000 walk-over survey and a July 2000 geophysical survey indicated evidence of buried and surface debris in dirt mounds and areas throughout the site; however, a radiological drive-over survey also performed in July 2000 indicated that no radiological hazards were identified at this site. Based on site history, the scope of this plan is to resolve the problem statement identified during the Data Quality Objectives process that detonation activities at this CAU site may have resulted in the release of contaminants of concern into the surface/subsurface soil including total volatile and total semivolatile organic compounds, total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act metals, radionuclides, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and high explosives. Therefore, the scope of corrective action field investigation will involve excavation, drilling, and extensive soil sampling and analysis activities to determine the extent (if any) of both the lateral and vertical contamination and whether or not any such contamination extends beyond the historical boundaries of the site. The results of this field investigation will support a defensible evaluation of CAAs in the subsequent corrective action decision document.

DOE/NV

2001-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

289

Understanding Contamination; Twenty Years of Simulating Radiological Contamination  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A wide variety of simulated contamination methods have been developed by researchers to reproducibly test radiological decontamination methods. Some twenty years ago a method of non-radioactive contamination simulation was proposed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) that mimicked the character of radioactive cesium and zirconium contamination on stainless steel. It involved baking the contamination into the surface of the stainless steel in order to 'fix' it into a tenacious, tightly bound oxide layer. This type of contamination was particularly applicable to nuclear processing facilities (and nuclear reactors) where oxide growth and exchange of radioactive materials within the oxide layer became the predominant model for material/contaminant interaction. Additional simulation methods and their empirically derived basis (from a nuclear fuel reprocessing facility) are discussed. In the last ten years the INL, working with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and the National Homeland Security Research Center (NHSRC), has continued to develop contamination simulation methodologies. The most notable of these newer methodologies was developed to compare the efficacy of different decontamination technologies against radiological dispersal device (RDD, 'dirty bomb') type of contamination. There are many different scenarios for how RDD contamination may be spread, but the most commonly used one at the INL involves the dispersal of an aqueous solution containing radioactive Cs-137. This method was chosen during the DARPA projects and has continued through the NHSRC series of decontamination trials and also gives a tenacious 'fixed' contamination. Much has been learned about the interaction of cesium contamination with building materials, particularly concrete, throughout these tests. The effects of porosity, cation-exchange capacity of the material and the amount of dirt and debris on the surface are very important factors. The interaction of the contaminant/substrate with the particular decontamination technology is also very important. Results of decontamination testing from hundreds of contaminated coupons have lead to certain conclusions about the contamination and the type of decontamination methods being deployed. A recent addition to the DARPA initiated methodology simulates the deposition of nuclear fallout. This contamination differs from previous tests in that it has been developed and validated purely to simulate a 'loose' type of contamination. This may represent the first time that a radiologically contaminated 'fallout' stimulant has been developed to reproducibly test decontamination methods. While no contaminant/methodology may serve as a complete example of all aspects that could be seen in the field, the study of this family of simulation methods provides insight into the nature of radiological contamination.

Emily Snyder; John Drake; Ryan James

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or clean, building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room into one of three categories: Class 1, Class 2 or Class 3 (a fourth category is a Non-Impacted Class which in the case of Building 2201 only pertained to exterior surfaces of the building.) The majority of the rooms were determined to fall in the less restrictive Class 3 category, however, Rooms 102, 104, 106, and 107 were identified as containing Class 1 and 2 areas. Building 2201 was divided into survey units and surveyed following the requirements of the Final Status Survey Plan for each particular class. As each survey unit was completed and documented, the survey results were evaluated. Each sample (static measurement) with units of counts per minute (cpm) was corrected for the appropriate background and converted to a value with units of dpm/100 cm2. With a surface contamination value in the appropriate units, it was compared to the surface contamination limits, or in this case the derived concentration guideline level (DCGLw). The appropriate statistical test (sign test) was then performed. If the survey unit was statistically determined to be below the DCGLw, then the survey unit passed and the null hypothesis (that the survey unit is above limits) was rejected. If the survey unit was equal to or below the critical value in the sign test, the null hypothesis was not rejected. This process was performed for all survey units within Building 2201. A total of thirty-three Class 1, four Class 2, and one Class 3 survey units were developed, surveyed, and evaluated. All survey units successfully passed the statistical test. Building 2201 meets the release criteria commensurate with the Waste Acceptance Criteria (for radiological purposes) of the U10C landfill permit residing within NNSS boundaries. Based on the thorough statistical sampling and scanning of the buildings interior, Building 2201 may be considered radiologically clean, or free of contamination.

Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Imperative of Health: Public Health and the Regulated Body  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The origins of this book lie in the author's consternation about the limitations of the formal training provided for public health specialists. Deborah Lupton's disappointment about the apparent failure of scholars and researchers in public health and health promotion to avail themselves of recent work in socio-cultural and political theory led her to produce this rich and highly readable critique of public health and health promotion practices, past and present. The book benefits from the author's excellent use of the literature from a variety of disciplines, and is packed with vivid examples from a wide range of contexts, which illustrate her basic argument that `the practices and discourses of public health are not value-free or neutral, but rather are highly political and socially contextual' (p.2). She begins with a brief historical tour of public health practices. Ports of call include: mediaeval responses to epidemics; the Enlightenment and the optimistic belief that once science had revealed the laws of nature which governed disease and epidemics, these could be controlled and removed; the Industrial Revolution and the rise of concerns that the poor health of workers living in dirty and inadequate conditions would limit their productivity; the introduction of vaccination; and the focus on individual and family responsibilities for health in the twentieth century. The chapter draws heavily on social constructionist history and Michel Foucault, and explores the ways in which certain phenomena such as dirt, odour, microbes and ignorance come to be identified as public health problems. She suggests that many of the ideas and practices of public health are religious or moralistic in origin, pointing out that the belief that disease was God's punishment for the sins of humankind `allowed the expression of overtly moralistic statements concerning the relative sinfulness of individuals and certain social groups such as the poor; a tendency that has pervaded public health discourses for centuries' (p.21). This theme recurs throughout the book. She moves on to examine the dominant discourses of contemporary public health. Here, Lupton argues that many of the approaches used in the so-called `new' public health in fact date back centuries. She points out the limitations of what currently passes for theory in health promotion and provides strong critiques of the arguments that health promotion achieves `empowerment' and that, with the help of the disciplines of epidemiology and health economics, it is scientific and rational. Discussing the prevailing discourse of `healthism', in which the pursuit of good health is seen as an end in itself which individuals have a responsibility to pursue, Lupton argues that moral judgements are now made against those who place themselves at risk of disease or develop a medical condition related to lifestyle factors, and that although the state intervenes less obviously than previously, the imperatives of health now mean that many people are subject to control which is mediated by self-surveillance. She then takes up risk discourses and diagnostic testing, concentrating particularly on `internally imposed' risks of developing diseases which are associated with individual behaviour. The discussion highlights discrepancies between official and personal, `expert' and lay viewpoints, for example, differences between scientists' and lay peoples' interpretations of risk. And she shows how there can be dramatic differences between the motivations and experiences of people undergoing diagnostic tests and the official rationales for and interpretations of such tests. Lupton is critical of the way that many public health discourses about risk and diagnostic testing are inappropriately simplified, ignoring as they do political, social and personal psychological perspectives. She argues that they convey a false sense of precision and certainty, and points out that `Because of the seemingly rational and scientific nature of medical advice on self-imposed risk ... there is no external vested interest to b

Vikki Entwistle, NHS Centre for Reviews and Dissemination,

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

NSLS 2009 Activity Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

2009 was an incredibly exciting year for light sources at Brookhaven. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) hosted more than 2,200 visiting researchers, who, along with the about 50 members of our scientific staff, produced a total of 957 publications - about 20 percent of which appeared in premier journals. Covering topics ranging from Alzheimer's disease detection to ethanol-powered fuel cells, a sampling of these findings can be found in this Activity Report. We've also seen the resurfacing of some of our long-time users hard work. I was very proud to hear that two of the three recipients of the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry have ties to the NSLS. Venki Ramakrishnan, a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department and long-time user of the NSLS, now at Cambridge University, and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University, also a long-time NSLS user, shared the prize with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science for their work on the structure and function of the ribosome. In the late 1990s, Ramakrishnan and Steitz used protein crystallography at the NSLS to gather atomic-level images of two ribosome subunits: 30S (Ramakrishnan) and 50S (Steitz). Both laureates solved the high-resolution structures for these subunits based on this data. After struggling with a rough budget for several years, we received excellent funding, and then some, this year. In addition to NSLS operations funding, we received $3 million in funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). We used that additional money for two exciting projects: construction of a full-field x-ray microscope and acquisition of several advanced x-ray detectors. The x-ray microscope will be able to image objects with a targeted spatial resolution of 30 nanometers. This capability will be particularly important for new initiatives in energy research and will prepare our users for the projected 1-nanometer resolution benchmark at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II). The detectors project is expected to increase the throughput of several high-demand beamlines by an order of magnitude as well as enable new classes of experiments. In addition, a huge chunk of ARRA money - $150 million - was put toward accelerating the construction of NSLS-II, which is now taking shape across the street. Now physically much more than just a pile of dirt, NSLS-II was granted Critical Decision 3 status by the Department of Energy (DOE) early last year, giving the official go-ahead for construction. In July, construction began, marked by a groundbreaking ceremony that attracted elected officials, media, and DOE, Battelle, and Stony Brook University representatives from across the state and the country. As progress on NSLS-II continues, we're working with Stony Brook University to identify ways to capitalize on the facility's unique capabilities through the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). Included in this effort is a series of workshops to encourage the development and application of the photon sciences with collaborative research between industries, universities, and national laboratories. We helped host three of these workshops this year, focusing on microelectronics, energy storage, and materials in next-generation energy systems. The conversation and ideas generated at these meetings has been fresh and valuable and we hope to use this model to organize research opportunities in other scientific fields. Also this year: Brookhaven was deemed the lead institution for one of DOE's 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers, focused on understanding the underlying nature of superconductivity in complex materials by using techniques at the NSLS and CFN; DOE awarded a $100,000 supplemental grant to our detector program to continue the development of a new generation of x-ray detectors that use germanium sensors, which, at high energies, are much more efficient than equivalent ones based on silicon; and funding for one of our largest consortia, Case Western Reserve University's Center for Synchrotron Biosciences (CSB), was renewed through the National Inst

Nasta K.; Mona R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z