National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for direct normal irradiance

  1. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    TRENDS IN DIRECT NORMAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE IN OREGON FROM 1979-2003 Laura Riihimaki Frank Vignola of trends in direct normal irradiance from three sites around Oregon over a period of 25 years. An overall. This article studies the trends in direct normal beam irradiance at three locations in Oregon. These sites have

  3. A method for estimating direct normal solar irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janjai, Serm

    2010-09-15

    In order to investigate a potential use of concentrating solar power technologies and select an optimum site for these technologies, it is necessary to obtain information on the geographical distribution of direct normal solar irradiation over an area of interest. In this work, we have developed a method for estimating direct normal irradiation from satellite data for a tropical environment. The method starts with the estimation of global irradiation on a horizontal surface from MTSAT-1R satellite data and other ground-based ancillary data. Then a satellite-based diffuse fraction model was developed and used to estimate the diffuse component of the satellite-derived global irradiation. Based on this estimated global and diffuse irradiation and the solar radiation incident angle, the direct normal irradiation was finally calculated. To evaluate its performance, the method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation at seven pyrheliometer stations in Thailand. It was found that values of monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation from the measurements and those estimated from the proposed method are in reasonable agreement, with a root mean square difference of 16% and a mean bias of -1.6%, with respect to mean measured values. After the validation, this method was used to estimate the monthly average hourly direct normal irradiation over Thailand by using MTSAT-1R satellite data for the period from June 2005 to December 2008. Results from the calculation were displayed as hourly and yearly irradiation maps. These maps reveal that the direct normal irradiation in Thailand was strongly affected by the tropical monsoons and local topography of the country. (author)

  4. DIRECT NORMAL IRRADIANCE FOR CSP BASED ON SATELLITE IMAGES OF METEOSAT SECOND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    DIRECT NORMAL IRRADIANCE FOR CSP BASED ON SATELLITE IMAGES OF METEOSAT SECOND GENERATION A. Hammer1). As for concentrating solar power (CSP) the frequency distribution of DNI is of special importance, special attention

  5. Evaluation of a new model to calculate direct normal irradiance based on satellite images of Meteosat Second Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Evaluation of a new model to calculate direct normal irradiance based on satellite images irradiance DNI from MSG data. For this we apply the Heliosat method to extract cloudiness from the satellite of the irradiance is introduced to calculate DNI. The clear sky irradiance is mainly determined by the aerosol

  6. Analyzing the Contribution of Aerosols to an Observed Increase in Direct Normal Irradiance in Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riihimaki, Laura D.; Vignola, F.; Long, Charles N.

    2009-01-22

    Annual average total irradiance increases by 1-2% per decade at three mon- itoring stations in Oregon over the period from 1980 to 2007. Direct normal irradiance measurements increase by 5% per decade over the same time pe- riod. The measurements show no sign of a dimming before 1990. The impact of high concentrations of stratospheric aerosols following the volcanic erup- tions of El Chich¶on and Mt. Pinatubo are clearly seen in the measurements. Removing these years from the annual average all-sky time series reduces the trends in both total and direct normal irradiance. Clear-sky periods from this long direct normal time series are used in conjunction with radiative trans- fer calculations to test whether part of the increase could be caused by an- thropogenic aerosols. All three sites show relatively low clear-sky measure- ments before the eruption of El Chich¶on in 1982, suggesting higher aerosol loads during this period. After removing the periods most strongly impacted by volcanic eruptions, two of the sites show statistically signi¯cant increases in clear-sky direct normal irradiance from 1987 to 2007. Radiative transfer calculations of the impact of volcanic aerosols and tropospheric water vapor indicate that only about 20% of that clear-sky increase between background aerosol periods before and after the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo can be explained by these two factors. Thus, a statistically signi¯cant clear-sky trend remains between 1987 and 2007 that is consistent with the hypothesis that at least some of the increase in surface irradiance could be caused by a reduction of anthropogenic aerosols. D

  7. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    4 2.1 Irradiance Data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24 Figure 4.3: Irradiance Instruments Figure 4.4: Training8 Figure 4.1: Irradiance Input Graph . . . . . . . . .

  8. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A. E. Ruano, “Prediction of the solar radiation evolutionin ground- level solar irradiance prediction on similar

  9. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    global solar radiation data,” Solar Energy, vol. 81, no. 6,solar energy, to achieve economically viability and competitiveness [12, 13, 14]. 2.1 Irradiance Data

  10. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    16 3.2 Push Programming Language . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Genetic Programming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .16 3.1.3normalized data, Genetic Programming would become a powerful

  11. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  12. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  13. Directions to the Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon The Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dauxois, Thierry

    Directions to the Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon The Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon is located in Gerland, a neighborhood in the southern part of Lyon, not far from the Rhône river and the Halle Tony. How to get to l'ENS-Lyon ... #12;· From Lyon-Saint Exupéry (Satolas) airport Every 20 min, a shuttle

  14. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling irradiance

  15. IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES AT EXTENDED SINKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    IRRADIATION GROWTH IN ZIRCONIUM AT LOW TEMPERATURES BY DIRECT ATHERMAL DEPOSITION OF VACANCIES, which can contribute to the observed growth strains. 1. Introduction Irradiation growth of zirconium

  16. Insolation data manual and direct normal solar radiation data manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1990-07-01

    The Insolation Data Manual presents monthly averaged data which describes the availability of solar radiation at 248 National Weather Service (NWS) stations, principally in the United States. Monthly and annual average daily insolation and temperature values have been computed from a base of 24--25 years of data, generally from 1952--1975, and listed for each location. Insolation values represent monthly average daily totals of global radiation on a horizontal surface and are depicted using the three units of measurement: kJ/m{sup 2} per day, Btu/ft{sup 2} per day and langleys per day. Average daily maximum, minimum and monthly temperatures are provided for most locations in both Celsius and Fahrenheit. Heating and cooling degree-days were computed relative to a base of 18.3 C (65 F). For each station, global {bar K}{sub T} (cloudiness index) values were calculated on a monthly and annual basis. Global {bar K}{sub T} is an index of cloudiness and indicates fractional transmittance of horizontal radiation, from the top of the atmosphere to the earth's surface. The second section of this volume presents long-term monthly and annual averages of direct normal solar radiation for 235 NWS stations, including a discussion of the basic derivation process. This effort is in response to a generally recognized need for reliable direct normal data and the recent availability of 23 years of hourly averages for 235 stations. The relative inaccessibility of these data on microfiche further justifies reproducing at least the long-term averages in a useful format. In addition to a definition of terms and an overview of the ADIPA model, a discussion of model validation results is presented.

  17. CPSC 505 Assignment 5 Solutions a) The direct irradiance on plane 1 is E0 cos . A fraction, , of E2, the total irradiance on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodham, Robert J.

    CPSC 505 Assignment 5 Solutions a) The direct irradiance on plane 1 is E0 cos . A fraction, , of E2, the total irradiance on plane 2, is reflected. Exactly half of this contributes via inter-reflection to E1, the total irradiance on plane 1. Thus, E1 = E0 cos + 1/2 E2 Similarly, the direct irradiance on plane 2

  18. Direct and indirect effects of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Rong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a model system to study the direct effect, the bystander effect and the combinational effect of alpha-particle irradiations of human prostate tumor cells, toward the goal of ...

  19. Laser irradiance scaling in polar direct drive implosions on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, T. J.; Krasheninnikova, N. S.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Baumgaertel, J. A.; Cobble, J. A.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Kline, J. L.; Montgomery, D. S.; et al

    2015-09-17

    Polar-direct-drive experiments conducted at the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses, Fusion Sci. Technol. 54, 361 (2008)] performed at laser irradiance between 1 and 2×1015 W/cm2 exhibit increased hard x-ray emission, decreased neutron yield, and reduced areal density as the irradiance is increased. Experimental x-ray images at the higher irradiances show x-ray emission at the equator, as well as degraded symmetry, that is not predicted in hydrodynamic simulations using flux-limited energy transport, but that appear when non-local electron transport together with a model to account for cross beam energy transfer (CBET) is utilized. The reduction in laser power for equatorialmore »beams required in the simulations to reproduce the effects of CBET on the observed symmetry also reproduces the yield degradation consistent with experimental data.« less

  20. Quantifying Aerosol Direct Effects from Broadband Irradiance and Spectral Aerosol Optical Depth Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Creekmore, Torreon N.; Joseph, Everette; Long, Charles N.; Li, Siwei

    2014-05-16

    We outline a methodology using broadband and spectral irradiances to quantify aerosol direct effects on the surface diffuse shortwave (SW) irradiance. Best Estimate Flux data span a 13 year timeframe at the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program’s Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. Screened clear-sky irradiances and aerosol optical depth (AOD), for solar zenith angles ? 65°, are used to estimate clear-sky diffuse irradiances. We validate against detected clear-sky observations from SGP’s Basic Radiation System (BRS). BRS diffuse irradiances were in accordance with estimates, producing a root-mean-square error and mean bias errors of 4.0 W/m2 and -1.4 W/m2, respectively. Absolute differences show 99% of estimates within ±10 W/m2 (10%) of the mean BRS observations. Clear-sky diffuse estimates are used to derive quantitative estimates of aerosol radiative effects, represented as the aerosol diffuse irradiance (ADI). ADI is the contribution of diffuse SW to global SW, attributable to scattering of atmospheric transmission by natural plus anthropogenic aerosols. Estimated slope for the ADI as a function of AOD indicates an increase of ~22 W/m2 in diffuse SW for every 0.1 increase in AOD. Such significant increases in the diffuse fraction could possibly increase photosynthesis. Annual mean ADI is 28.2 W/m2, and heavy aerosol loading at SGP provides up to a maximum increase of 120 W/m2 in diffuse SW over background conditions. With regard to seasonal variation, the mean diffuse forcings are 17.2, 33.3, 39.0, and 23.6 W/m2 for winter, spring, summer, and fall, respectively.

  1. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    guideline for Solar Power Forecasting Performance . . 46 viof forecasting techniques for solar power production with noand A. Pavlovski, “Solar power forecasting performance

  2. Intra-hour Direct Normal Irradiance solar forecasting using genetic programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queener, Benjamin Daniel

    2012-01-01

    model performance,” Solar Energy, vol. 55, no. 2, pp. 125–global solar radiation,” Solar Energy, vol. 78, no. 6, pp.solar radiation data,” Solar Energy, vol. 81, no. 6, pp.

  3. Direct Cost or F & A? This matrix indicates when selected items of cost will normally be treated as a direct cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Paul R.

    , and line charges · General purpose non-capital equipment (ex. computers costing less than $2500Direct Cost or F & A? This matrix indicates when selected items of cost will normally be treated as a direct cost (charged to a sponsored account) or an indirect cost (part of F&A costs) under "like

  4. SU-E-T-501: Normal Tissue Toxicities of Pulsed Low Dose Rate Radiotherapy and Conventional Radiotherapy: An in Vivo Total Body Irradiation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cvetkovic, D; Zhang, P; Wang, B; Chen, L; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Pulsed low dose rate radiotherapy (PLDR) is a re-irradiation technique for therapy of recurrent cancers. We have previously shown a significant difference in the weight and survival time between the mice treated with conventional radiotherapy (CRT) and PLDR using total body irradiation (TBI). The purpose of this study was to investigate the in vivo effects of PLDR on normal mouse tissues.Materials and Methods: Twenty two male BALB/c nude mice, 4 months of age, were randomly assigned into a PLDR group (n=10), a CRT group (n=10), and a non-irradiated control group (n=2). The Siemens Artiste accelerator with 6 MV photon beams was used. The mice received a total of 18Gy in 3 fractions with a 20day interval. The CRT group received the 6Gy dose continuously at a dose rate of 300 MU/min. The PLDR group was irradiated with 0.2Gyx20 pulses with a 3min interval between the pulses. The mice were weighed thrice weekly and sacrificed 2 weeks after the last treatment. Brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, gastrointestinal, urinary and reproductive organs, and sternal bone marrow were removed, formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded and stained with H and E. Morphological changes were observed under a microscope. Results: Histopathological examination revealed atrophy in several irradiated organs. The degree of atrophy was mild to moderate in the PLDR group, but severe in the CRT group. The most pronounced morphological abnormalities were in the immune and hematopoietic systems, namely spleen and bone marrow. Brain hemorrhage was seen in the CRT group, but not in the PLDR group. Conclusions: Our results showed that PLDR induced less toxicity in the normal mouse tissues than conventional radiotherapy for the same dose and regimen. Considering that PLDR produces equivalent tumor control as conventional radiotherapy, it would be a good modality for treatment of recurrent cancers.

  5. Three-dimensional symmetry analysis of a direct-drive irradiation scheme for the laser megajoule facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramis, R., E-mail: rafael.ramis@upm.es [E.T.S.I. Aeronáuticos, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, P. Cardenal Cisneros 3, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Temporal, M. [Centre de Mathématiques et de Leurs Applications, ENS Cachan and CNRS, 61 Av. du President Wilson, F-94235 Cachan Cedex (France); Canaud, B.; Brandon, V. [CEA, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

    2014-08-15

    The symmetry of a Direct-Drive (DD) irradiation scheme has been analyzed by means of three-dimensional (3D) simulations carried out by the code MULTI (R. Ramis et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 475 (1988)) that includes hydrodynamics, heat transport, and 3D laser ray-tracing. The implosion phase of a target irradiated by the Laser Megajoule (LMJ) facility in the context of the Shock Ignition scheme has been considered. The LMJ facility has been designed for Indirect-Drive, and by this reason that the irradiation scheme must be modified when used for DD. Thus, to improve the implosion uniformity to acceptable levels, the beam centerlines should be realigned and the beam power balance should be adjusted. Several alternatives with different levels of complexity are presented and discussed.

  6. Design and Construction of Experiment for Direct Electron Irradiation of Uranyl Sulfate Solution: Bubble Formation and Thermal Hydraulics Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chemerisov, Sergey; Gromov, Roman; Makarashvili, Vakho; Heltemes, Thad; Sun, Zaijing; Wardle, Kent E.; Bailey, James; Quigley, Kevin; Stepinski, Dominique; Vandegrift, George

    2014-10-01

    Argonne is assisting SHINE Medical Technologies in developing SHINE, a system for producing fission-product 99Mo using a D/T-accelerator to produce fission in a non-critical target solution of aqueous uranyl sulfate. We have developed an experimental setup for studying thermal-hydraulics and bubble formation in the uranyl sulfate solution to simulate conditions expected in the SHINE target solution during irradiation. A direct electron beam from the linac accelerator will be used to irradiate a 20 L solution (sector of the solution vessel). Because the solution will undergo radiolytic decomposition, we will be able to study bubble formation and dynamics and effects of convection and temperature on bubble behavior. These experiments will serve as a verification/ validation tool for the thermal-hydraulic model. Utilization of the direct electron beam for irradiation allows homogeneous heating of a large solution volume and simplifies observation of the bubble dynamics simultaneously with thermal-hydraulic data collection, which will complement data collected during operation of the miniSHINE experiment. Irradiation will be conducted using a 30-40 MeV electron beam from the high-power linac accelerator. The total electron-beam power will be 20 kW, which will yield a power density on the order of 1 kW/L. The solution volume will be cooled on the front and back surfaces and central tube to mimic the geometry of the proposed SHINE solution vessel. Also, multiple thermocouples will be inserted into the solution vessel to map thermal profiles. The experimental design is now complete, and installation and testing are in progress.

  7. Probing nanoantenna-directed photothermal destruction of tumors using noninvasive laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Maltzahn, Geoffrey

    Plasmonic nanomaterials have tremendous potential to improve the tumor specificity of traditional cancer ablation practices, yet little effort has been directed toward quantitatively understanding their photothermal energy ...

  8. Directly-irradiated Two-zone Solar Thermochemical Reactor for H2O/CO2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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Directives

  9. Direct synthesis of sp-bonded carbon chains on graphite surface by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, A.; Rybachuk, M.; Lu, Q.-B.; Duley, W. W.

    2007-09-24

    Microscopic phase transformation from graphite to sp-bonded carbon chains (carbyne) and nanodiamond has been induced by femtosecond laser pulses on graphite surface. UV/surface enhanced Raman scattering spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectra displayed the local synthesis of carbyne in the melt zone while nanocrystalline diamond and trans-polyacetylene chains form in the edge area of gentle ablation. These results evidence possible direct 'writing' of variable chemical bonded carbons by femtosecond laser pulses for carbon-based applications.

  10. Origins of ion irradiation-induced Ga nanoparticle motion on GaAs surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, M.; Wu, J. H.; Chen, H. Y.; Thornton, K.; Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Sofferman, D. L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, Adelphi University, Garden City, New York 11530-0701 (United States); Beskin, I. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1040 (United States)

    2013-08-12

    We have examined the origins of ion irradiation-induced nanoparticle (NP) motion. Focused-ion-beam irradiation of GaAs surfaces induces random walks of Ga NPs, which are biased in the direction opposite to that of ion beam scanning. Although the instantaneous NP velocities are constant, the NP drift velocities are dependent on the off-normal irradiation angle, likely due to a difference in surface non-stoichiometry induced by the irradiation angle dependence of the sputtering yield. It is hypothesized that the random walks are initiated by ion irradiation-induced thermal fluctuations, with biasing driven by anisotropic mass transport.

  11. SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L. Erickson1, Carlos F. M. Coimbra2 and Alberto E. Cerpa1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    SDI: Solar Dome Instrument for Solar Irradiance Monitoring Tao Liu1, Ankur U. Kamthe1, Varick L data for ground solar irradiance (direct normal and global irradiance) is a major obstacle for the de- velopment of adequate policies to promote and take advan- tage of existing solar technologies. Although

  12. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; et al

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agentsmore »are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.« less

  13. Immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells in two steps by direct targeting of senescence barriers does not require gross genomic alterations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbe, James C.; Vrba, Lukas; Sputova, Klara; Fuchs, Laura; Novak, Petr; Brothman, Arthur R.; Jackson, Mark; Chin, Koei; LaBarge, Mark A.; Watts, George; Futscher, Bernard W.; Stampfer, Martha R.

    2014-10-29

    Telomerase reactivation and immortalization are critical for human carcinoma progression. However, little is known about the mechanisms controlling this crucial step, due in part to the paucity of experimentally tractable model systems that can examine human epithelial cell immortalization as it might occur in vivo. We achieved efficient non-clonal immortalization of normal human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) by directly targeting the 2 main senescence barriers encountered by cultured HMEC. The stress-associated stasis barrier was bypassed using shRNA to p16INK4; replicative senescence due to critically shortened telomeres was bypassed in post-stasis HMEC by c-MYC transduction. Thus, 2 pathologically relevant oncogenic agents are sufficient to immortally transform normal HMEC. The resultant non-clonal immortalized lines exhibited normal karyotypes. Most human carcinomas contain genomically unstable cells, with widespread instability first observed in vivo in pre-malignant stages; in vitro, instability is seen as finite cells with critically shortened telomeres approach replicative senescence. Our results support our hypotheses that: (1) telomere-dysfunction induced genomic instability in pre-malignant finite cells may generate the errors required for telomerase reactivation and immortalization, as well as many additional “passenger” errors carried forward into resulting carcinomas; (2) genomic instability during cancer progression is needed to generate errors that overcome tumor suppressive barriers, but not required per se; bypassing the senescence barriers by direct targeting eliminated a need for genomic errors to generate immortalization. Achieving efficient HMEC immortalization, in the absence of “passenger” genomic errors, should facilitate examination of telomerase regulation during human carcinoma progression, and exploration of agents that could prevent immortalization.

  14. Directed polymer in random media in two dimensions: Numerical study of the aging dynamics Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, Unite Propre du CNRS, Associee a` l'Ecole Normale Superieure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrat, Alain

    Directed polymer in random media in two dimensions: Numerical study of the aging dynamics A. Barrat dynamics of a directed polymer in random media, in 1 1 dimensions. Through temperature quench. INTRODUCTION The study of directed polymers in random media has trig- gered a lot of interest and of works

  15. Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    User

    NORMAL DlSTRlBUTION TABLE. Entries represent the area under the standardized normal distribution from -w to z, Pr(Z

  16. Direct

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  17. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferencesPlatinum FuelEnergy InnovationDirections

  18. ROVIBRATIONALLY RESOLVED DIRECT PHOTODISSOCIATION THROUGH THE LYMAN AND WERNER TRANSITIONS OF H{sub 2} FOR FUV/X-RAY-IRRADIATED ENVIRONMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gay, C. D.; Porter, R. L.; Stancil, P. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Center for Simulational Physics, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Abel, N. P. [Math, Computers, Geology, and Physics Department, University of Cincinnati, Clermont Campus, Batavia, OH 45103 (United States); Ferland, G. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Shaw, G. [Centre for Excellence in Basic Sciences, UM-DAE, Vidhyanagari Campus, Mumbai-400098 (India); Van Hoof, P. A. M. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, 1180 Brussels (Belgium); Williams, R. J. R., E-mail: cgay1383@gmail.com, E-mail: ryanlporter@gmail.com, E-mail: stancil@physast.uga.edu, E-mail: npabel2@gmail.com, E-mail: gary@pa.uky.edu, E-mail: gargishaw@gmail.com, E-mail: p.vanhoof@oma.be, E-mail: robin.williams@awe.co.uk [AWE plc, Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-10

    Using ab initio potential curves and dipole transition moments, cross-section calculations were performed for the direct continuum photodissociation of H{sub 2} through the B{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u} <- X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g} (Lyman) and C{sup 1}{Pi}{sub u} <- X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g} (Werner) transitions. Partial cross-sections were obtained for wavelengths from 100 A to the dissociation threshold between the upper electronic state and each of the 301 bound rovibrational levels v''J'' within the ground electronic state. The resulting cross-sections are incorporated into three representative classes of interstellar gas models: diffuse clouds, photon-dominated regions, and X-ray-dominated regions (XDRs). The models, which used the CLOUDY plasma/molecular spectra simulation code, demonstrate that direct photodissociation is comparable to fluorescent dissociation (or spontaneous radiative dissociation, the Solomon process) as an H{sub 2} destruction mechanism in intense far-ultraviolet or X-ray-irradiated gas. In particular, changes in H{sub 2} rotational column densities are found to be as large as 20% in the XDR model with the inclusion of direct photodissociation. The photodestruction rate from some high-lying rovibrational levels can be enhanced by pumping from H Ly{beta} due to a wavelength coincidence with cross-section resonances resulting from quasi-bound levels of the upper electronic states. Given the relatively large size of the photodissociation data set, a strategy is described to create truncated, but reliable, cross-section data consistent with the wavelength resolving power of typical observations.

  19. IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS & FACILITIES AT BNL: BLIP & NSLS II Peter Wanderer Superconducting MagnetV). Simultaneous irradiation and isotope production by increasing beam energy, placing irradiation target ahead of isotope production target · 117 Mev 140, 160, 180, 202 MeV · Irradiation at room temperature Alternative

  20. Direct observation of the structural and electronic changes of Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} during electron irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F. [Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Iddir, Hakim [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Abraham, Daniel P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chemical Sciences and Engineering, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This study focuses on the effects of electron beam induced irradiation to the layered oxide Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3}. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy are used to characterize structural and electronic transitions in the material during irradiation, with a focus on changes in Mn valence and O content. This truly in situ irradiation allows for specific particle tracking, dose quantification, and real-time observation, while demonstrating many parallels to the oxide's structure evolution observed during electrochemical cycling. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that typical imaging conditions are not severe enough to induce damage to the pristine oxide.

  1. Asymptotic normalization coefficients (nuclear vertex constants) for $p+^7Be\\to ^8B$ and the direct $^7Be(p,?)^8B$ astrophysical S-factors at solar energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. B. Igamov; R. Yarmukhamedov

    2008-04-01

    A new analysis of the precise experimental astrophysical S-factors for the direct capture $^7Be(p,\\gamma)$ $^8B$ reaction [A.J.Junghans et al.Phys.Rev. C 68 (2003) 065803 and L.T. Baby et al. Phys.Rev. C 67 (2003) 065805] is carried out based on the modified two - body potential approach in which the direct astrophysical S-factor, $ {\\rm S_{17}(E)}$, is expressed in terms of the asymptotic normalization constants for $p+^7Be\\to ^8B$ and two additional conditions are involved to verify the peripheral character of the reaction under consideration. The Woods-Saxon potential form is used for the bound ($p+^7Be$)- state wave function and for the $p^7Be$- scattering wave function. New estimates are obtained for the $^{\\glqq}$indirectly measured\\grqq values of the asymptotic normalization constants (the nuclear vertex constants) for the $p+^7Be\\to ^8B$ and $S_{17}(E)$ at E$\\le$ 115 keV, including $E$=0. These values of $S_{17}(E)$ and asymptotic normalization constants have been used for getting information about the $^{\\glqq}$indirectly measured\\grqq values of the $s$ wave average scattering length and the $p$ wave effective range parameters for $p^7Be$- scattering.

  2. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    1993-07-04

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  3. ARM Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR): irradiances

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Hodges, Gary

    The multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) takes spectral measurements of direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. These measurements are at nominal wavelengths of 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm. The measurements are made at a user-specified time interval, usually about one minute or less. The sampling rate for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility MFRSRs is 20 seconds. From such measurements, one may infer the atmosphere's optical depth at the wavelengths mentioned above. In turn, these optical depths may be used to derive information about the column abundances of ozone and water vapor (Michalsky et al. 1995), as well as aerosol (Michalsky et al. 1994) and other atmospheric constituents. A silicon detector is also part of the MFRSR. This detector provides a measure of the broadband direct normal, diffuse horizontal and total horizontal solar irradiances. A MFRSR head that is mounted to look vertically downward can measure upwelling spectral irradiances. In the ARM system, this instrument is called a multifilter radiometer (MFR). At the Southern Great Plains (SGP) there are two MFRs; one mounted at the 10-m height and the other at 25 m. At the North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites, the MFRs are mounted at 10 m. MFRSR heads are also used to measure normal incidence radiation by mounting on a solar tracking device. These are referred to as normal incidence multi-filter radiometers (NIMFRs) and are located at the SGP and NSA sites. Another specialized use for the MFRSR is the narrow field of view (NFOV) instrument located at SGP. The NFOV is a ground-based radiometer (MFRSR head) that looks straight up.

  4. Selective irradiation of the vascular endothelium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuller, Bradley W

    2007-01-01

    We developed a unique methodology to selectively irradiate the vascular endothelium in vivo to better understand the role of vascular damage in causing normal tissue radiation side-effects.The relationship between vascular ...

  5. X. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN DIFFUSE AND GLOBAL IRRADIANCE For numerous applications, particularly those

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    33 X. CORRELATIONS BETWEEN DIFFUSE AND GLOBAL IRRADIANCE For numerous applications, particularly these components, values for direct beam and diffuse irradiance are usu- ally unavailable. However, considerable in

  6. Intensity modulated radiotherapy and 3D conformal radiotherapy for whole breast irradiation: a comparative dosimetric study and introduction of a novel qualitative index for plan evaluation, the normal tissue index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yim, Jackie; Suttie, Clare; Bromley, Regina; Morgia, Marita; Lamoury, Gillian

    2015-09-15

    We report on a retrospective dosimetric study, comparing 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy (hIMRT). We evaluated plans based on their planning target volume coverage, dose homogeneity, dose to organs at risk (OARs) and exposure of normal tissue to radiation. The Homogeneity Index (HI) was used to assess the dose homogeneity in the target region, and we describe a new index, the normal tissue index (NTI), to assess the dose in the normal tissue inside the tangent treatment portal. Plans were generated for 25 early-stage breast cancer patients, using a hIMRT technique. These were compared with the 3DCRT plans of the treatment previously received by the patients. Plan quality was evaluated using the HI, NTI and dose to OARs. The hIMRT technique was significantly more homogenous than the 3DCRT technique, while maintaining target coverage. The hIMRT technique was also superior at minimising the amount of tissue receiving D{sub 105%} and above (P < 0.0001). The ipsilateral lung and contralateral breast maximum were significantly lower in the hIMRT plans (P < 0.05 and P < 0.005), but the 3DCRT technique achieved a lower mean heart dose in left-sided breast cancer patients (P < 0.05). Hybrid intensity modulated radiotherapy plans achieved improved dose homogeneity compared to the 3DCRT plans and superior outcome with regard to dose to normal tissues. We propose that the addition of both HI and NTI in evaluating the quality of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) breast plans provides clinically relevant comparators which more accurately reflect the new paradigm of treatment goals and outcomes in the era of breast IMRT.

  7. Figure 11 shows the reference irradiance spectrum proposed by Thuillier et al Figure 12 shows the Kitt Peak absolute irradiance spectrum smoothed using a 0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurucz, Robert L.

    Figure 11 shows the reference irradiance spectrum proposed by Thuillier et al (2004). Figure 12 shows the Kitt Peak absolute irradiance spectrum smoothed using a 0.5 nm triangular bandpass irradiance spectrum subjectively normalized to the Thuillier et al irradiance spectrum. I recommend

  8. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1997-06-10

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3{prime} noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  9. Normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  10. Normal, Not Paracompact Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.

    1982-07-01

    We describe some recently constructed counterexamples in general topology, including a normal, nonmetrizable Moore space, a normal para-Lindelof, not paracompact space, and a normal, screenable, not paracompact space....

  11. Reflected and Transmitted Irradiance from Area Sources using Vertex Tracing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Reflected and Transmitted Irradiance from Area Sources using Vertex Tracing Michael M. Stark irradiance analytically from polygonal luminaires in polygonal environments has proven effective for direct- ally used edge-based solutions to the irradiance integral; our previous work pre- sented a vertex

  12. Unified irradiance equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preisendorfer, Rudolph W

    1957-01-01

    dealt vdth a pair of irradiance functions representing twoHjC^.n^)^ which i s the irradiance a t time t on a unit areaCalifornia UNIFIED IRRADIANCE EQUATIONS R. W. Preisendorfer

  13. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discoverydiffuse

  14. Measurement and Modeling of Shortwave Irradiance Components in Cloud-Free Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement and Modeling of Shortwave Irradiance Components in Cloud-Free Atmospheres Rangasayi to classify the earth-atmospheric solar radiation into several components - direct solar surface irradiance (Edirect), diffuse-sky downward surface irradiance (Ediffuse), total surface irradiance, and upwelling flux

  15. COMBINING SOLAR IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS AND VARIOUS SATELLITE-DERIVED PRODUCTS TO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    COMBINING SOLAR IRRADIANCE MEASUREMENTS AND VARIOUS SATELLITE-DERIVED PRODUCTS TO A SITE power plants depend strongly on the availability of beam irradiance. Direct solar irradiance is highly-series. In this paper, a satellite- retrieval for beam irradiance from the new generation is introduced and inter

  16. Gamma-ray irradiated polymer optical waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, C.-C.; Wei, T.-Y.; Chang, C.-Y.; Wang, W.-S.; Wei, Y.-Y.

    2008-01-14

    Optical waveguides fabricated by gamma-ray irradiation on polymer through a gold mask are presented. The gamma-ray induced index change is found almost linearly dependent on the dose of the irradiation. And the measured propagation losses are low enough for practical application. Due to the high penetrability of gamma ray, uniform refractive index change in depth can be easily achieved. Moreover, due to large-area printing, the uniformity of waveguide made by gamma-ray irradiation is much better than that by e-beam direct writing.

  17. Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Lyapunov Exponents and Uniform Weak Normally Repelling Invariant Sets Paul Leonard Salceanu and Hal repelling in directions normal to the boundary in which M resides provided all normal Lyapunov exponents that Lyapunov exponents can be used to establish the requisite repelling properties for both discrete

  18. Improving Thermal Model Prediction Through Statistical Analysis of Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Data from AGR Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Binh T. Pham; Grant L. Hawkes; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2012-10-01

    As part of the Research and Development program for Next Generation High Temperature Reactors (HTR), a series of irradiation tests, designated as Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR), have been defined to support development and qualification of fuel design, fabrication process, and fuel performance under normal operation and accident conditions. The AGR tests employ fuel compacts placed in a graphite cylinder shrouded by a steel capsule and instrumented with thermocouples (TC) embedded in graphite blocks enabling temperature control. The data representing the crucial test fuel conditions (e.g., temperature, neutron fast fluence, and burnup) while impossible to obtain from direct measurements are calculated by physics and thermal models. The irradiation and post-irradiation examination (PIE) experimental data are used in model calibration effort to reduce the inherent uncertainty of simulation results. This paper is focused on fuel temperature predicted by the ABAQUS code’s finite element-based thermal models. The work follows up on a previous study, in which several statistical analysis methods were adapted, implemented in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS), and applied for improving qualification of AGR-1 thermocouple data. The present work exercises the idea that the abnormal trends of measured data observed from statistical analysis may be caused by either measuring instrument deterioration or physical mechanisms in capsules that may have shifted the system thermal response. As an example, the uneven reduction of the control gas gap in Capsule 5 revealed by the capsule metrology measurements in PIE helps justify the reduction in TC readings instead of TC drift. This in turn prompts modification of thermal model to better fit with experimental data, thus help increase confidence, and in other word reduce model uncertainties in thermal simulation results of the AGR-1 test.

  19. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  20. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  1. Inferred influence of nutrient availability on the relationship between Sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence and incident irradiance in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Dan

    fluorescence and incident irradiance in the Bering Sea Christina Schallenberg,1 Marlon R. Lewis,1 Dan E. Kelley fluorescence and incident solar irradiance as a potential diagnostic of the nutritional status of phytoplankton normalized to the absorption of light by pigments were analyzed as a function of irradiance to describe

  2. Irradiation Creep in Graphite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ubic, Rick; Butt, Darryl; Windes, William

    2014-03-13

    An understanding of the underlying mechanisms of irradiation creep in graphite material is required to correctly interpret experimental data, explain micromechanical modeling results, and predict whole-core behavior. This project will focus on experimental microscopic data to demonstrate the mechanism of irradiation creep. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy should be able to image both the dislocations in graphite and the irradiation-induced interstitial clusters that pin those dislocations. The team will first prepare and characterize nanoscale samples of virgin nuclear graphite in a transmission electron microscope. Additional samples will be irradiated to varying degrees at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) facility and similarly characterized. Researchers will record microstructures and crystal defects and suggest a mechanism for irradiation creep based on the results. In addition, the purchase of a tensile holder for a transmission electron microscope will allow, for the first time, in situ observation of creep behavior on the microstructure and crystallographic defects.

  3. Directives Tools

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Useful links and resources for Directives Writers, Directives Point of Contact (DPCs), Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and Draft Directive Reviewers.

  4. Handbook of normal frames and coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bozhidar Z. Iliev

    2006-10-01

    The main subject of the book is an up-to-date and in-depth survey of the theory of normal frames and coordinates in differential geometry. The book can be used as a reference manual, review of the existing results and introduction to some new ideas and developments. In the book can be found practically all existing essential results and methods concerning normal frames and coordinates. Most of the results are represented in full detail with full, in some cases new, proofs. All classical results are expanded and generalized in various directions. Theorems of existence, uniqueness and, possibly, holonomicity of the normal frames and coordinates are proved; mostly, the proofs are constructive and some their parts can be used independently for other tasks. Besides published results, their extensions and generalizations, the book contains completely new results which appear for the first time.

  5. NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Eric

    NORMALITY OF NILPOTENT VARIETIES IN E6 ERIC SOMMERS ABSTRACT. We determine which nilpotent orbits for a careful reading of the paper leading to its improvement. 1 #12;2 ERIC SOMMERS Our proof is direct

  6. Normal Conducting CLIC Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jensen, E

    2006-01-01

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi-lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super-conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 30-40 MV/m to obtain centre-of-mass collision energies of 0.5-1 TeV, the CLIC study aims to use a normal-conducting system based on two-beam technology with gradients of 150 MV/m. It is generally accepted that this change in technology is not only necessary but the only viable choice for a cost-effective multi-TeV collider. The CLIC study group is studying the technology issues of such a machine, and is in particular developing state-of-the-art 30 GHz molybdenum-iris accelerating structures and power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The accelerating structure has a new geometry which includes fully-profiled RF surfaces optimised to minimize surface fields, and hybri...

  7. Asymptotic normalization coefficients, spectroscopic factors, and direct radiative capture rates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Tribble, Robert E.

    2001-01-01

    , but in such cases, several of the assumptions underlying traditional DWBA treatments are questionable. II. ANC?s AND SPECTROSCOPIC FACTORS The overlap function of the bound state wave functions for particles A, p, and B, where B5(Ap) is the bound state function.... The summation over lB and jB is carried out over the values allowed by angular momentum and parity conser- vation in the virtual process B?A1p . The overlap function is the projection of the state wB onto the two-body channel wAwp . This projection...

  8. Solar: monthly and annual average direct normal (DNI) GIS data...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Download Carribean Islands Central America DNI GIS Mexico NREL GEF SWERA UNEP atmospheric water v... solar Additional Info Field Value Source www.nrel.gov Author National Renewable...

  9. Normal Conducting CLIC Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Erk

    2006-01-03

    The CLIC (Compact Linear Collider) multi-lateral study group based at CERN is studying the technology for an electron-positron linear collider with a centre-of-mass energy up to 5 TeV. In contrast to the International Linear Collider (ILC) study which has chosen to use super-conducting cavities with accelerating gradients in the range of 30-40 MV/m to obtain centre-of-mass collision energies of 0.5-1 TeV, the CLIC study aims to use a normal-conducting system based on two-beam technology with gradients of 150 MV/m. It is generally accepted that this change in technology is not only necessary but the only viable choice for a cost-effective multi-TeV collider. The CLIC study group is studying the technology issues of such a machine, and is in particular developing state-of-the-art 30 GHz molybdenum-iris accelerating structures and power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The accelerating structure has a new geometry which includes fully-profiled RF surfaces optimised to minimize surface fields, and hybrid damping using both iris slots and radial waveguides. A newly-developed structure-optimisation procedure has been used to simultaneously balance surface fields, power flow, short and long-range transverse wakefields, RF-to-beam efficiency and the ratio of luminosity to input power. The slotted irises allow a simple structure fabrication by high-precision high-speed 3D milling of just four pieces, and an even easier bolted assembly in a vacuum chamber.

  10. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Heliosat procedure for irradiance Estimates from Satellitethe pro duction of solar irradiance and daylight illuminancesatellite based solar irradiance modelling - The SOLIS clear

  11. IRRADIATION OF 3- SUBSTITUTED-2-PHENYLOXAZIRIDINES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Splitter, Janet S.; Calvin, Melvin.

    2008-01-01

    1 . These oxaziridines from irradiation of the corresponding1). A complication in the irradiation of the ozaziridines isof imine formed in the irradiation of the oxaziridines. (

  12. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel

    2010-01-14

    was revealed by Raman spectroscopy study of irradiated carbon buckypapers. The deviations from linear relationship were observed for the samples irradiated to very high fluence values. Annealing of irradiated samples was able to reduce the value of ID/IG ratio...

  13. Bhutan Solar Resources - Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bhutan Solar Resources GIS data for Bhutan's direct normal irradiance (DNI), global horizontal irradianc, and latitude tilt. Data and Resources Bhutan Direct normal irradianceZIP...

  14. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS (REVISION 1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2013-09-13

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Revision 1 adds a comparison with results of a study of tritium exposed EPDM. The amount of gas produced by the gamma irradiation was found to be equivalent to about 280 days exposure to initially pure tritium gas at one atmosphere. The glass transition temperature of the tritium exposed EPDM rose about 10 ?C. over 280 days, while no glass transition temperature change was observed for gamma irradiated EPDM. This means that gamma irradiation in deuterium cannot be used as a surrogate for tritium exposure.

  15. EFFECTS OF GAMMA IRRADIATION ON EPDM ELASTOMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E.

    2011-09-22

    Two formulations of EPDM elastomer, one substituting a UV stabilizer for the normal antioxidant in this polymer, and the other the normal formulation, were synthesized and samples of each were exposed to gamma irradiation in initially pure deuterium gas to compare their radiation stability. Stainless steel containers having rupture disks were designed for this task. After 130 MRad dose of cobalt-60 radiation in the SRNL Gamma Irradiation Facility, a significant amount of gas was created by radiolysis; however the composition indicated by mass spectroscopy indicated an unexpected increase in the total amount deuterium in both formulations. The irradiated samples retained their ductility in a bend test. No change of sample weight, dimensions, or density was observed. No change of the glass transition temperature as measured by dynamic mechanical analysis was observed, and most of the other dynamic mechanical properties remained unchanged. There appeared to be an increase in the storage modulus of the irradiated samples containing the UV stabilizer above the glass transition, which may indicate hardening of the material by radiation damage. Polymeric materials become damaged by exposure over time to ionizing radiation. Despite the limited lifetime, polymers have unique engineering material properties and polymers continue to be used in tritium handling systems. In tritium handling systems, polymers are employed mainly in joining applications such as valve sealing surfaces (eg. Stem tips, valve packing, and O-rings). Because of the continued need to employ polymers in tritium systems, over the past several years, programs at the Savannah River National Laboratory have been studying the effect of tritium on various polymers of interest. In these studies, samples of materials of interest to the SRS Tritium Facilities (ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMW-PE), polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE, Teflon{reg_sign}), Vespel{reg_sign} polyimide, and the elastomer ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM)) have been exposed in closed containers to tritium gas initially at 1 atmosphere pressure. These studies have demonstrated the degradation of properties when exposed to tritium gas. Also, the radiolytic production of significant amounts of hydrogen has been observed for UHMW-PE and EPDM. The study documented in this report exposes two similar formulations of EPDM elastomer to gamma irradiation in a closed container backfilled with deuterium. Deuterium is chemically identical to protium and tritium, but allows the identification of protium that is radiolytically produced from the samples. The goal of this program is to compare and contrast the response of EPDM exposure to two different types of ionizing radiation in a similar chemical environment.

  16. Formation of long-range ordered quantum dots arrays in amorphous matrix by ion beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buljan, M.; Bogdanovic-Radovic, I.; Karlusic, M.; Desnica, U. V.; Radic, N.; Dubcek, P.; Drazic, G.; Salamon, K.; Bernstorff, S.; Holy, V.

    2009-08-10

    We demonstrate the production of a well ordered three-dimensional array of Ge quantum dots in amorphous silica matrix. The ordering is achieved by ion beam irradiation and annealing of a multilayer film. Structural analysis shows that quantum dots nucleate along the direction of the ion beam used for irradiation, while the mutual distance of the quantum dots is determined by the diffusion properties of the multilayer material rather than the distances between traces of ions that are used for irradiation.

  17. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1996-01-09

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form. The method comprises: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 4 figs.

  18. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1996-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to moderate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  19. The spectral irradiance traceability chain at PTB

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sperfeld, P.; Pape, S.; Nevas, S.

    2013-05-10

    Spectral irradiance is a fundamental radiometric unit. Its application to measurement results requires qualified traceability to basic units of the international system of units (Systeme international d'unites, SI). The Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is amongst other national metrological institutes (NMIs) responsible for the realization, maintenance and dissemination of various radiometric and photometric units based on and traceable to national standards. The unit of spectral irradiance is realized and represented by a blackbody-radiator as the national primary standard of the PTB. Based on Planck's radiation law, the irradiance is calculated and realized for any wavelength taking into account the exact knowledge of the radiation temperature and the geometrical parameters. Using a double-monochromator-based spectroradiometer system, secondary standard lamps can be calibrated by direct comparison to the blackbody-radiator (substitution method). These secondary standard lamps are then used at the PTB to calibrate standard lamps of customers. The customers themselves use these so-called transfer standards to calibrate their working standard lamps. These working standards are then used to calibrate own spectroradiometers or sources. This rather complex calibration chain is a common procedural method that for the customers generally leads to satisfying measurement results on site. Nevertheless, the standard lamps in use have to fulfill highest requirements concerning stability and reproducibility. Only this allows achieving comparably low transfer measurement uncertainties, which occur at each calibration step. Thus, the PTB is constantly investigating the improvement and further development of transfer standards and measurement methods for various spectral regions. The realization and dissemination of the spectral irradiance using the blackbody-radiator at the PTB is accomplished with worldwide approved minimized measurement uncertainties confirmed by international intercomparisons among NMIs. Ultimately, the spectral irradiance can be realized with expanded measurement uncertainties of far less than 1 % over a wide spectral range. Thus, for customers with high demands on low measurement uncertainties, it is possible to calibrate their working standards directly against the blackbody-radiator, taking into account the higher necessary effort. In special cases it is possible to calibrate the customer's spectroradiometric facilities directly in front of the blackbody-radiator. In the context of the European Metrology Research Project Traceability for surface spectral solar ultraviolet radiation, the traceability chain will be improved and adapted.

  20. Cutaneous fusariosis developing in a post-irradiation site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01

    developing in a post-irradiation site WeiWei Dai DO 1 ,irradiated site. Irradiation led to atrophy, contraction,radiotherapy. Following irradiation, which had eradicated

  1. Direct conversion of algal biomass to biofuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deng, Shuguang; Patil, Prafulla D; Gude, Veera Gnaneswar

    2014-10-14

    A method and system for providing direct conversion of algal biomass. Optionally, the method and system can be used to directly convert dry algal biomass to biodiesels under microwave irradiation by combining the reaction and combining steps. Alternatively, wet algae can be directly processed and converted to fatty acid methyl esters, which have the major components of biodiesels, by reacting with methanol at predetermined pressure and temperature ranges.

  2. ContentsContents3399the normal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents3399the normal distribution 1. The normal distribution 2. The normal approximation to the binomial distribution 3. Sums and differences of random variables Learning outcomes In a previous Workbook of a continuous random variables: the normal distribution. The probabilities of the normal distribution have

  3. Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Don

    Chapter 6 Continuous Distribution: The Normal Distribution 6.1 Introduction 6.2 Properties of a Normal Distribution 6.3 The Standard Normal Distribution 6.4 Applications of Normal Distribution 6.5 The Central Limit Theorem 6.6 The Normal Approximation to the Binomial Distribution Definition. A continuous

  4. Effect of electron beam irradiation and sugar content on kinetics of microbial survival 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez Gonzalez, Oscar

    2006-10-30

    The killing effectiveness of electron beam irradiation has not been completely characterized. The type of microorganisms and the composition of food have a direct effect on the efficiency of this technology. The objectives ...

  5. cole normale suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallette, Bruno

    école normale supérieure de Lyon ENS Lyon Electron quantum optics P. Degiovanni (ENS Lyon) C T. Martin(CPT Marseille) T. Jonckheere J. Rech C. Wahl #12;ENS Lyon A message from G. Fève Gwendal. #12;ENS Lyon ENS Lyon Outline · Introduction and motivation · Single electron coherence · Relaxation

  6. Irradiance or luminosity changes?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabatino Sofia; Linghuai H. Li

    2000-10-20

    Whereas a variation of the solar luminosity, L, will inevitably cause a similar change of the total solar irradiance, S, the opposite is not true. In fact, the bulk of the days to months variations of S can be explained entirely in terms of the passage of active regions across the solar disk. In this case, L remains essentially unchanged. For the total irradiance variation observed over the solar cycle, the issue is more uncertain. One view explains this modulation primarily as a combined action of active regions and magnetic network. These components would be superposed to an otherwise unchanging photosphere. the other view suggests that the activity cycle modulation of S is primarily produced by a variation of L (both in terms of R and T_{eff}) caused by structural reajustments of the interior of the Sun induced by a changing magnetic field. We will present evidence in support of this second interpretation, and a model for it. We will also present the S variations over the last 5 centuries implied by our model.

  7. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, M.B.; Efstratiadis, A.

    1998-11-03

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3` noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries. 19 figs.

  8. Method for construction of normalized cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Soares, Marcelo B. (New York, NY); Efstratiadis, Argiris (Englewood, NJ)

    1998-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a directional cDNA library constructed in a vector that allows propagation in single-stranded circle form comprising: (a) propagating the directional cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating fragments complementary to the 3' noncoding sequence of the single-stranded circles in the library to produce partial duplexes; (c) purifying the partial duplexes; (d) melting and reassociating the purified partial duplexes to appropriate Cot; and (e) purifying the unassociated single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. This invention also provides normalized cDNA libraries generated by the above-described method and uses of the generated libraries.

  9. SPERMATOGONIAL STEM CELL RENEWAL FOLLOWING IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    continuou-: lnw-l. -vel -,-irradiation for 15 wk, the curvesUnder Continuous Irradiation Cell Cycle Parameter (hr) >J. I. , Pathology of Irradiation, WiTiams and hiHins,

  10. MFR PAPER 1135 Irradiation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the feasibility of combining low-dose ionizing radiation of shrimp with tur- meric and salt as a preservativeMFR PAPER 1135 Irradiation of shrimp extends their storage life. Low Level Ionizing Radiation are eliminated effectively and selectively by low-level doses of irradiation, thereby resulting in extension

  11. Calibrating Pyrgeometers Outdoors Independent from the Reference Value of the Atmospheric Longwave Irradiance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reda, I.; Hickey, J. R.; Grobner, J.; Andreas, A.; Stoffel, T.

    2006-08-01

    In this article, we describe a method for the calibration of thermopile pyrgeometers in the absence of a reference for measurement of atmospheric longwave irradiance. This is referred to as the incoming longwave irradiance in this article. The method is based on an indoor calibration using a low-temperature blackbody source to obtain the calibration coefficients that determine the pyrgeometer's radiation characteristics. From these coefficients the outgoing irradiance of the pyrgeometer can be calculated. The pyrgeometer is then installed outdoors on an aluminum plate that is connected to a circulating temperature bath. By adjusting the temperature bath to the approximate value of the effective sky temperature, the pyrgeometer's body temperature is lowered changing the pyrgeometer's thermopile output. If the incoming longwave irradiance is stable, the slope of the outgoing irradiance versus the pyrgeometer's thermopile output is the outdoor net irradiance responsivity (RSnet), independent of the absolute value of the atmospheric longwave irradiance. The indoor calibration coefficients and the outdoor RSnet are then used in the pyrgeometer equation to calculate the incoming longwave irradiance. To evaluate this method, the calculated irradiance using the derived coefficients was compared to the irradiance measured using a pyrgeometer with direct traceability to the World Infrared Standard Group (WISG). This is maintained at the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Switzerland. Based on results from four pyrgeometers calibrations, this method suggests measurement agreement with the WISG to within +/- 3 W/m2 for all sky conditions.

  12. Irradiated Materials Examination and Testing Facility (IMET)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in a laboratory hood or modified glove boxes in the SPL. Applications Physical and mechanical properties testing Examination of irradiated materials Irradiated specimen storage...

  13. Spectral solar irradiance before and during a Harmattan dust spell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adeyefa, Z.D. [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria)] [Federal Univ. of Technology, Akure (Nigeria); Holmgren, B. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)

    1996-09-01

    Measurements of the ground-level spectral distributions of the direct, diffuse and global solar irradiance between 300 and 1100 nm were made at Akure (7.15{degree}N, 5.5{degree}E), Nigeria, in December 1991 before and during a Harmattan dust spell employing a spectroradiometer (LICOR LI-1800) with 6 nm resolution. The direct spectral solar irradiance which was initially reduced before the dust storm was further attenuated by about 50% after the spell. Estimated values of the Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} indicated an increase of about 146% of this parameter while the Angstrom wavelength-exponent {alpha} decreased by about 65% within the 2-day study period. The spectral diffuse-to-direct and diffuse-to-global ratios suggest that the main cause of the significant reduction in solar irradiance at the surface was the scattering by the aerosol which led to an increase in the diffuse component. The global irradiance though reduced, was less sensitive to changing Harmattan conditions. It is recommended that solar energy devices that use radiation from Sun and sky be used under fluctuating Harmattan conditions. There are some deviations from the Angstrom formula under very turbid Harmattan conditions which could be explained by the relative increase of the particle sizes. 31 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DNI Direct normal irradiance DOE Department of Energy GHI Global horizontal irradiance ISIS Integrated Surface Irradiance Study MIDC Measurement and Instrumentation Data Center...

  15. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  16. Power Normal Distribution Debasis Kundu1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Power Normal Distribution Debasis Kundu1 and Rameshwar D. Gupta2 Abstract Recently Gupta and Gupta [10] proposed the power normal distribution for which normal distribution is a special case. The power normal distribution is a skewed distri- bution, whose support is the whole real line. Our main aim

  17. Cascaded target normal sheath acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W. P.; Shen, B. F.; Zhang, X. M.; Wang, X. F.; Xu, J. C.; Zhao, X. Y.; Yu, Y. H.; Yi, L. Q.; Shi, Y.; Zhang, L. G.; Xu, T. J.; Xu, Z. Z.

    2013-11-15

    A cascaded target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) scheme is proposed to simultaneously increase energy and improve energy spread of a laser-produced mono-energetic proton beam. An optimum condition that uses the maximum sheath field to accelerate the center of the proton beam is theoretically found and verified by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An initial 10 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 21 MeV with energy spread decreased from 5% to 2% under the optimum condition during the process of the cascaded TNSA. The scheme opens a way to scale proton energy lineally with laser energy.

  18. Direct writing of continuous and discontinuous sub-wavelength periodic surface structures on single-crystalline silicon using femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Sahoo, Chakradhar; Narayana Rao, Desai, E-mail: dnrsp@uohyd.ernet.in, E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad 500046 (India)

    2014-06-02

    Laser-induced ripples or uniform arrays of continuous near sub-wavelength or discontinuous deep sub-wavelength structures are formed on single-crystalline silicon (Si) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Si wafers at normal incidence in air and by immersing them in dimethyl sulfoxide using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ?110 fs pulse duration and ?800?nm wavelength. Morphology studies of laser written surfaces reveal that sub-wavelength features are oriented perpendicular to laser polarization, while their morphology and spatial periodicity depend on the surrounding dielectric medium. The formation mechanism of the sub-wavelength features is explained by interference of incident laser with surface plasmon polaritons. This work proves the feasibility of fs laser direct writing technique for the fabrication of sub-wavelength features, which could help in fabrication of advanced electro-optic devices.

  19. Status of the NGNP fuel experiment AGR-2 irradiated in the advanced test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2014-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy's Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also undergo on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and sup

  20. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  1. Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krasheninnikov, Arkady V.

    Chapter 1 Irradiation-induced phenomena in carbon nanotubes To appear in "Chemistry of Carbon@acclab.helsinki.fi 1 #12;2CHAPTER 1. IRRADIATION-INDUCED PHENOMENA IN CARBON NANOTUBES #12;Contents 1 Irradiation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Interaction of energetic particles with solid targets . . . . . . . . 6 1.2.1 Ion irradiation

  2. Effect of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neurite outgrowth in primary rat cortical neurons following ischemic insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Dong-Hee [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medical Science, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Kim, Ji-Hye; Kim, Moon Young [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Jeong Hoon [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Neurology, Department of Medicine, National University Hospital, National University Health System (Singapore); Lee, Jongmin, E-mail: leej@kuh.ac.kr [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of) [Center for Neuroscience Research, SMART Institute of Advanced Biomedical Science, Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 710 nm wavelength light (LED) has a protective effect in the stroke animal model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We determined the effects of LED irradiation in vitro stroke model. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment promotes the neurite outgrowth through MAPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The level of synaptic markers significantly increased with LED treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer LED treatment protects cell death in the in vitro stroke model. -- Abstract: Objective: We previously reported that 710 nm Light-emitting Diode (LED) has a protective effect through cellular immunity activation in the stroke animal model. However, whether LED directly protects neurons suffering from neurodegeneration was entirely unknown. Therefore, we sought to determine the effects of 710 nm visible light irradiation on neuronal protection and neuronal outgrowth in an in vitro stroke model. Materials and methods: Primary cultured rat cortical neurons were exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation and normal conditions. An LED array with a peak wavelength of 710 nm was placed beneath the covered culture dishes with the room light turned off and were irradiated accordingly. LED treatments (4 min at 4 J/cm{sup 2} and 50 mW/cm{sup 2}) were given once to four times within 8 h at 2 h intervals for 7 days. Mean neurite density, mean neurite diameter, and total fiber length were also measured after microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunostaining using the Axio Vision program. Synaptic marker expression and MAPK activation were confirmed by Western blotting. Results: Images captured after MAP2 immunocytochemistry showed significant (p < 0.05) enhancement of post-ischemic neurite outgrowth with LED treatment once and twice a day. MAPK activation was enhanced by LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells. The levels of synaptic markers such as PSD 95, GAP 43, and synaptophysin significantly increased with LED treatment in both OGD-exposed and normal cells (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our data suggest that LED treatment may promote synaptogenesis through MAPK activation and subsequently protect cell death in the in vitro stroke model.

  3. Solar irradiance forecasting at multiple time horizons and novel methods to evaluate uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Solar irradiance data . . . . . . . . . . . . .Irradiance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Forecasting Solar Irradiance With GOES-West Satellite

  4. Charge Collection Efficiency Simulations of Irradiated Silicon Strip Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Peltola

    2014-11-25

    During the scheduled high luminosity upgrade of LHC, the world's largest particle physics accelerator at CERN, the position sensitive silicon detectors installed in the vertex and tracking part of the CMS experiment will face more intense radiation environment than the present system was designed for. Thus, to upgrade the tracker to required performance level, comprehensive measurements and simulations studies have already been carried out. Essential information of the performance of an irradiated silicon detector is obtained by monitoring its charge collection efficiency (CCE). From the evolution of CCE with fluence, it is possible to directly observe the effect of the radiation induced defects to the ability of the detector to collect charge carriers generated by traversing minimum ionizing particles (mip). In this paper the numerically simulated CCE and CCE loss between the strips of irradiated silicon strip detectors are presented. The simulations based on Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD framework were performed before and after irradiation for fluences up to $1.5\\times10^{15}$ $\\textrm{n}_{\\textrm{eq}}$cm$^{-2}$ for the n-on-p sensors. A two level and non-uniform three level defect models were applied for the proton irradiation simulations and two level model for neutrons. The results are presented together with the measurements of strip detectors irradiated by different particles and fluences and show considerable agreement for both CCE and its position dependency.

  5. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan-Ji Yang; Jing-Bin Lu; Yu-Sa Wang; Yong Chen; Yu-Peng Xu; Wei-Wei Cui; Wei Li; Zheng-Wei Li; Mao-Shun Li; Xiao-Yan Liu; Juan Wang; Da-Wei Han; Tian-Xiang Chen; Cheng-Kui Li; Jia Huo; Wei Hu; Yi Zhang; Bo Lu; Yue Zhu; Ke-Yan Ma; Di Wu; Yan Liu; Zi-Liang Zhang; Guo-He Yin; Yu Wang

    2014-04-19

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  6. Proton irradiation effect on SCDs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Yan-Ji; Wang, Yu-Sa; Chen, Yong; Xu, Yu-Peng; Cui, Wei-Wei; Li, Wei; Li, Zheng-Wei; Li, Mao-Shun; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Juan; Han, Da-Wei; Chen, Tian-Xiang; Li, Cheng-Kui; Huo, Jia; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Yi; Lu, Bo; Zhu, Yue; Ma, Ke-Yan; Wu, Di; Liu, Yan; Zhang, Zi-Liang; Yin, Guo-He; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    The Low Energy X-ray Telescope is a main payload on the Hard X-ray Modulation Telescope satellite. The swept charge device is selected for the Low Energy X-ray Telescope. As swept charge devices are sensitive to proton irradiation, irradiation test was carried out on the HI-13 accelerator at the China Institute of Atomic Energy. The beam energy was measured to be 10 MeV at the SCD. The proton fluence delivered to the SCD was $3\\times10^{8}\\mathrm{protons}/\\mathrm{cm}^{2}$ over two hours. It is concluded that the proton irradiation affects both the dark current and the charge transfer inefficiency of the SCD through comparing the performance both before and after the irradiation. The energy resolution of the proton-irradiated SCD is 212 eV@5.9 keV at $-60\\,^{\\circ}\\mathrm{C}$, while it before irradiated is 134 eV. Moreover, better performance can be reached by lowering the operating temperature of the SCD on orbit.

  7. Directives Help

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

  8. AGR-2 IRRADIATION TEST FINAL AS-RUN REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise, Collin

    2014-07-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  9. Final Report on MEGAPIE Target Irradiation and Post-Irradiation Examination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yong, Dai

    2015-06-30

    Megawatt pilot experiment (MEGAPIE) was successfully performed in 2006. One of the important goals of MEGAPIE is to understand the behaviour of structural materials of the target components exposed to high fluxes of high-energy protons and spallation neutrons in flowing LBE (liquid lead-bismuth eutectic) environment by conducting post-irradiation examination (PIE). The PIE includes four major parts: non-destructive test, radiochemical analysis of production and distribution of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE, analysis of LBE corrosion effects on structural materials, T91 and SS 316L steels, and mechanical testing of the T91 and SS 316L steels irradiated in the lower part of the target. The non-destructive test (NDT) including visual inspection and ultrasonic measurement was performed in the proton beam window area of the T91 calotte of the LBE container, the most intensively irradiated part of the MEGAPIE target. The visual inspection showed no visible failure and the ultrasonic measurement demonstrated no detectable change in thickness in the beam window area. Gamma mapping was also performed in the proton beam window area of the AlMg3 safety-container. The gamma mapping results were used to evaluate the accumulated proton fluence distribution profile, the input data for determining irradiation parameters. Radiochemical analysis of radionuclides produced by spallation reaction in LBE is to improve the understanding of the production and distribution of radionuclides in the target. The results demonstrate that the radionuclides of noble metals, 207Bi, 194Hg/Au are rather homogeneously distributed within the target, while radionuclides of electropositive elements are found to be deposited on the steel-LBE interface. The corrosion effect of LBE on the structural components under intensive irradiation was investigated by metallography. The results show that no evident corrosion damages. However, unexpected deep cracks were found in the EBW (electron beam weld) of the LBE container in the intensive irradiation zone of the target, which should be formed during irradiation. In the SS 316L steel of the flow guide tube, inclusions or precipitates enriched with O, Si, S, Ca, Ti and Mn were observed. Many of them are very long, up to a few mm, and located on grain boundaries along the extrusion direction of the tube. The degradation of the mechanical properties of the T91 and SS 316L steels has been investigated by conducting tensile tests on the specimens extracted from the T91 and SS 316L components in the intensive irradiation region. The results obtained from the proton beam window of the T91 calotte exhibit a good ductility of T91 steel after irradiation at 6-7 dpa (displacement per atom) in contact with flowing LBE.

  10. Turing's normal numbers: towards randomness Veronica Becher

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    presumably in 1938 Alan Turing gave an algorithm that produces real numbers normal to every integer base- putable normal numbers, and this result should be attributed to Alan Turing. His manuscript entitled "A

  11. Irradiation Alters MMP-2/TIMP-2 System and Collagen Type IV Degradation in Brain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Won Hee; Warrington, Junie P.; Sonntag, William E.; Lee, Yong Woo

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption is one of the major consequences of radiation-induced normal tissue injury in the central nervous system. We examined the effects of whole-brain irradiation on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)/tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) and extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation in the brain. Methods and Materials: Animals received either whole-brain irradiation (a single dose of 10 Gy {gamma}-rays or a fractionated dose of 40 Gy {gamma}-rays, total) or sham-irradiation and were maintained for 4, 8, and 24 h following irradiation. mRNA expression levels of MMPs and TIMPs in the brain were analyzed by real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The functional activity of MMPs was measured by in situ zymography, and degradation of ECM was visualized by collagen type IV immunofluorescent staining. Results: A significant increase in mRNA expression levels of MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 was observed in irradiated brains compared to that in sham-irradiated controls. In situ zymography revealed a strong gelatinolytic activity in the brain 24 h postirradiation, and the enhanced gelatinolytic activity mediated by irradiation was significantly attenuated in the presence of anti-MMP-2 antibody. A significant reduction in collagen type IV immunoreactivity was also detected in the brain at 24 h after irradiation. In contrast, the levels of collagen type IV were not significantly changed at 4 and 8 h after irradiation compared with the sham-irradiated controls. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates for the first time that radiation induces an imbalance between MMP-2 and TIMP-2 levels and suggests that degradation of collagen type IV, a major ECM component of BBB basement membrane, may have a role in the pathogenesis of brain injury.

  12. High Resolution Irradiance Spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert L. Kurucz

    2006-05-01

    The FTS scans that made up the Kitt Peak Solar Flux Atlas by Kurucz, Furenlid, Brault, and Testerman (1984) have been re-reduced. An approximate telluric atmospheric model was determined for each FTS scan. Large-scale features produced by O3 and O2 dimer were computed and divided out. The solar continuum level was found by fitting a smooth curve to high points in each scan. The scans were normalized to the fitted continuum to produce a residual flux spectrum for each FTS scan. The telluric line spectrum was computed using HITRAN and other line data for H2O, O2, and CO2. The line parameters were adjusted for an approximate match to the observed spectra. The scans were divided by the computed telluric spectra to produce residual irradiance spectra. Artifacts from wavelength mismatches, deep lines, etc, were removed by hand and replaced by linear interpolation. Overlapping scans were fitted together to make a continuous spectrum from 300 to 1000 nm. All the above steps were iterative. The monochromatic error varies from 0.1 to 1.0 percent. The residual spectrum was calibrated two different ways: First by normalizing it to the continuum of theoretical solar model ASUN (Kurucz 1992), and second, by degrading the spectrum to the resolution of the observed irradiance (Thuillier et al. 2004) to determine a normalization function that was then applied to the high resolution spectrum.

  13. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katoh, Yutai; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Kiggans, Jim; Cetiner, Nesrin; McDuffee, Joel

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  14. Occlusion-Aware Hessians for Error Control in Irradiance Caching /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarzhaupt, Jorge Andres

    2013-01-01

    5.2 Derivation of the Irradiance Hessian . . 5.3of the translational irradiance gradient. . . . . .1.1.1 Occlusion-Aware Irradiance Hessian . . . . . . . .

  15. High-frequency irradiance fluctuations and geographic smoothing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Arias-Castro, Ery

    2012-01-01

    of the variability of irradiance and PV power time series1997. Study of areal solar irradiance for analyzing areally-High-frequency irradiance fluctuations and geographic

  16. Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite Utilizing Heavy Ion-Irradiation- Tritium Related Material Research -Irradiation Effect on Isotropic Graphite...

  17. Nonlinear broadband photoluminescence of graphene induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wei-Tao

    2011-01-01

    by femtosecond laser irradiation Wei-Tao Liu, 1 S. W. Wu, 2USA Upon femtosecond laser irradiation, a bright, broadbandthe experimental etup. laser irradiation, strong PL signals

  18. Is irradiation important for the secular evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Ritter

    2008-03-14

    It is argued that irradiation in low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) caused by accretion-generated X-rays can not only change the optical appearance of LMXBs but also their outburst properties and possibly also their long-term evolution. Irradiation during an outburst of the outer parts of the accretion disc in a transient LMXB leads to drastic changes in the outburst properties. As far as the secular evolution of such systems is concerned, these changes can result in enhanced loss of mass and angular momentum from the system and, most important, in neutron star LMXBs in a much less efficient use of the transferred matter to spin up the neutron star to a ms-pulsar. Irradiation of the donor star can destabilize mass transfer and lead to irradiation-driven mass transfer cycles, i.e. to a secular evolution which differs drastically from an evolution in which irradiation is ignored. It is argued that irradiation-driven mass transfer cycles cannot occur in systems which are transient because of disc instabilities, i.e. in particular in long-period LMXBs with a giant donor. It is furthermore shown that for irradiating either the disc or the donor star, direct irradiation alone is insufficient. Rather, indirect irradiation via scattered accretion luminosity must play an important role in transient LMXBs and is, in fact, necessary to destabilize mass transfer in short-period systems by irradiating the donor star. Whether and to what extent irradiation in LMXBs does change their secular evolution depends on a number of unsolved problems which are briefly discussed at the end of this article.

  19. Photoinduced currents in pristine and ion irradiated kapton-H polyimide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Anu, E-mail: sharmaanu81@gmail.com; Sridharbabu, Y., E-mail: sharmaanu81@gmail.com; Quamara, J. K., E-mail: sharmaanu81@gmail.com [Physics Department, SGTB Khalsa college, Delhi University, Delhi (India); Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology, Kurukshetra-136119 (India); Echelon Group of Institutions, Faridabad (India)

    2014-10-15

    The photoinduced currents in pristine and ion irradiated kapton-H polyimide have been investigated for different applied electric fields at 200°C. Particularly the effect of illumination intensity on the maximum current obtained as a result of photoinduced polarization has been studied. Samples were irradiated by using PELLETRON facility, IUAC, New Delhi. The photo-carrier charge generation depends directly on intensity of illumination. The samples irradiated at higher fluence show a decrease in the peak current with intensity of illumination. The secondary radiation induced crystallinity (SRIC) is responsible for the increase in maximum photoinduced currents generated with intensity of illumination.

  20. Investigation of The Synergistic Influence of Irradiation Temperature and Atomic Displacement Rate on the Microstructural Evolution of Ion-Irradiated Model Austenitic Alloy Fe-15Cr-16Ni

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okita, Taira; Iwai, Takeo; Sekimura, Naoto; Garner, Francis A.

    2002-03-31

    A comprehensive experimental investigation of microstructural evolution has been conducted on Fe-15Cr-16Ni irradiated with 4.0 MeV nickel ions in the High Fluence Irradiation Facility of the University of Tokyo. Irradiations proceeded to dose levels ranging from ~0.2 to ~26 dpa at temperatures of 300, 400 and 500 degrees C at displacement rates of 1 x 10^-4, 4 x 10^-4 and 1 x 10^-3 dpa/sec. This experiment is one of two companion experiments directed toward the study of the dependence of void swelling on displacement rate. The other experiment proceeded at seven different but lower dpa rates in FFTF-MOTA at ~400 degrees C. In both experiments the swelling was found at every irradiation condition studied to monotonically increase with decreases in dpa rate. The microstructural evolution under ion irradiation was found to be very sensitive to the displacement rate at all three temperatures. The earliest and most sensitive component of microstructure to both temperature and especially displacement rate was found to be the Frank loops. The second most sensitive component was found to be the void microstructure, which co-evolves with the loop and dislocation microstructure. These data support the prediction that void swelling will probably be higher in lower-flux fusion devices and PWRs at a given irradiation temperature when compared to irradiations conducted at higher dpa rates in fast reactors.

  1. Facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven W.; Eppeldauer, George P.; Lykke, Keith R

    2006-11-10

    Detectors have historically been calibrated for spectral power responsivity at the National Institute of Standards and Technology by using a lamp-monochromator system to tune the wavelength of the excitation source. Silicon detectors can be calibrated in the visible spectral region with combined standard uncertainties at the 0.1% level. However,uncertainties increase dramatically when measuring an instrument's spectral irradiance or radiance responsivity. We describe what we believe to be a new laser-based facility for spectral irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations using uniform sources (SIRCUS) that was developed to calibrate instruments directly in irradiance or radiance mode with uncertainties approaching or exceeding those available for spectral power responsivity calibrations. In SIRCUS, the emission from high-power, tunable lasers is introduced into an integrating sphere using optical fibers, producing uniform, quasi-Lambertian, high-radiant-flux sources. Reference standard irradiance detectors, calibrated directly against national primary standards for spectral power responsivity and aperture area measurement,are used to determine the irradiance at a reference plane. Knowing the measurement geometry, the source radiance can be readily determined as well. The radiometric properties of the SIRCUS source coupled with state-of-the-art transfer standard radiometers whose responsivities are directly traceable to primary national radiometric scales result in typical combined standard uncertainties in irradiance and radiance responsivity calibrations of less than 0.1%. The details of the facility and its effect on primary national radiometric scales are discussed.

  2. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  3. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  4. UK Irradiated Materials Archive Steve Roberts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UK Irradiated Materials Archive Steve Roberts University of Oxford MRF meeting ­ CCFE - 7th July 2015 #12;UK Irradiated Materials Archive Background · Establishment of National Nuclear User Facility exposure · Materials well suited for use in future university-based research programmes #12;UK Irradiated

  5. SIPS: Solar Irradiance Prediction System Stefan Achleitner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    SIPS: Solar Irradiance Prediction System Stefan Achleitner Computer Science and Engineering the variability and dynamics are the largest. We propose SIPS, Solar Irradiance Prediction System, a novel sensing infrastructure using wireless sensor networks (WSNs) to enable sensing of solar irradiance for solar power

  6. Vol. [VOL], No. [ISS]: 111 Irradiance Rigs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Vol. [VOL], No. [ISS]: 1­11 Irradiance Rigs Hong Yuan UMass Amherst, Disney Interactive Studios that conveys their placement in the environment. Irradiance Volumes [Greger et al. 98] were designed specifically for this problem. The spatially varying irradiance in a volume is explicitly computed

  7. Lung autophagic response following exposure of mice to whole body irradiation, with and without amifostine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zois, Christos E.; Giatromanolaki, Alexandra; Kainulainen, Heikki; Botaitis, Sotirios; Torvinen, Sira; Simopoulos, Constantinos; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Sivridis, Efthimios; Koukourakis, Michael I.

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} We investigated the effect 6 Gy of WBI on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. {yields} Irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. {yields} The membrane bound LC3A-II protein levels increased in the cytosolic fraction (not in the pellet), contrasting the patterns noted after starvation-induced autophagy. {yields} Administration of amifostine, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings, suggesting protection of the normal autophagic function. -- Abstract: Purpose: The effect of ionizing irradiation on the autophagic response of normal tissues is largely unexplored. Abnormal autophagic function may interfere the protein quality control leading to cell degeneration and dysfunction. This study investigates its effect on the autophagic machinery of normal mouse lung. Methods and materials: Mice were exposed to 6 Gy of whole body {gamma}-radiation and sacrificed at various time points. The expression of MAP1LC3A/LC3A/Atg8, beclin-1, p62/sequestosome-1 and of the Bnip3 proteins was analyzed. Results: Following irradiation, the LC3A-I and LC3A-II protein levels increased significantly at 72 h and 7 days. Strikingly, LC3A-II protein was increased (5.6-fold at 7 days; p < 0.001) only in the cytosolic fraction, but remained unchanged in the membrane fraction. The p62 protein, was significantly increased in both supernatant and pellet fraction (p < 0.001), suggesting an autophagosome turnover deregulation. These findings contrast the patterns of starvation-induced autophagy up-regulation. Beclin-1 levels remained unchanged. The Bnip3 protein was significantly increased at 8 h, but it sharply decreased at 72 h (p < 0.05). Administration of amifostine (200 mg/kg), 30 min before irradiation, reversed all the LC3A and p62 findings on blots, suggesting restoration of the normal autophagic function. The LC3A and Beclin1 mRNA levels significantly declined following irradiation (p < 0.01), whereas Bnip3 levels increased. Conclusions: It is suggested that irradiation induces dysfunction of the autophagic machinery in normal lung, characterized by decreased transcription of the LC3A/Beclin-1 mRNA and accumulation of the LC3A, and p62 proteins. Whether this is due to defective maturation or to aberrant degradation of the autophagosomes requires further investigation.

  8. DRIVING DIRECTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n eDPFJ.D.DRIVING DIRECTIONS

  9. Direct Frisk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDirac ChargeSolarDirect

  10. Mechanism of Irradiation Assisted Cracking of Core Components in Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Was; Michael Atzmon; Lumin Wang

    2003-04-28

    The overall goal of the project is to determine the mechanism of irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC). IASCC has been linked to hardening, microstructural and microchemical changes during irradiation. Unfortunately, all of these changes occur simultaneously and at similar rates during irradiation, making attribution of IASCC to any one of these features nearly impossible to determine. The strategy set forth in this project is to develop means to separate microstructural from microchemical changes to evaluate each separately for their effect on IASCC. In the first part, post irradiation annealing (PIA) treatments are used to anneal the irradiated microstructure, leaving only radiation induced segregation (RIS) for evaluation for its contribution to IASCC. The second part of the strategy is to use low temperature irradiation to produce a radiation damage dislocation loop microstructure without radiation induced segregation in order to evaluate the effect of the dislocation microstructure alone. A radiation annealing model was developed based on the elimination of dislocation loops by vacancy absorption. Results showed that there were indeed, time-temperature annealing combinations that leave the radiation induced segregation profile largely unaltered while the dislocation microstructure is significantly reduced. Proton irradiation of 304 stainless steel irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons to 1.0 or 2.5 dpa resulted in grain boundary depletion of chromium and enrichment of nickel and a radiation damaged microstructure. Post irradiation annealing at temperatures of 500 ? 600°C for times of up to 45 min. removed the dislocation microstructure to a greater degree with increasing temperatures, or times at temperature, while leaving the radiation induced segregation profile relatively unaltered. Constant extension rate tensile (CERT) experiments in 288°C water containing 2 ppm O2 and with a conductivity of 0.2 mS/cm and at a strain rate of 3 x 10-7 s-1 showed that the IASCC susceptibility, as measured by the crack length per unit strain, decreased with very short anneals and was almost completely removed by an anneal at 500°C for 45 min. This annealing treatment removed about 15% of the dislocation microstructure and the irradiation hardening, but did not affect the grain boundary chromium depletion or nickel segregation, nor did it affect the grain boundary content of other minor impurities. These results indicate that RIS is not the sole controlling feature of IASCC in irradiated stainless steels in normal water chemistry. The isolation of the irradiated microstructure was approached using low temperature irradiation or combinations of low and high temperature irradiations to achieve a stable, irradiated microstructure without RIS. Experiments were successful in achieving a high degree of irradiation hardening without any evidence of RIS of either major or minor elements. The low temperature irradiations to doses up to 0.3 dpa at T<75°C were also very successful in producing hardening to levels considerably above that for irradiations conducted under nominal conditions of 1 dpa at 360°C. However, the microstructure consisted of an extremely fine dispersion of defect clusters of sizes that are not resolvable by either transmission electron microscopy (TEM) or small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS). The microstructure was not stable at the 288°C IASCC test temperature and resulted in rapid reduction of hardening and presumably, annealing of the defect clusters at this temperature as well. Nevertheless, the annealing studies showed that treatments that resulted in significant decreases in the hardening produced small changes in the dislocation microstructure that were confined to the elimination of the finest of loops (~1 nm). These results substantiate the importance of the very fine defect microstructure in the IASCC process. The results of this program provide the first definitive evidence that RIS is not the sole controlling factor in the irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stain

  11. Appearance Normalization of Histology Slides Jared Vicorya

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and intensity normalization of digitized histology slides stained with two different agents. In comparison to adjustment of faded slides are given, and the effectiveness of the method in aiding statistical classification is shown. Keywords: appearance normalization, histology 1. Introduction Stains are often used

  12. Normalizing the causality between time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, X San

    2015-01-01

    Recently, a rigorous yet concise formula has been derived to evaluate the information flow, and hence the causality in a quantitative sense, between time series. To assess the importance of a resulting causality, it needs to be normalized. The normalization is achieved through distinguishing three types of fundamental mechanisms that govern the marginal entropy change of the flow recipient. A normalized or relative flow measures its importance relative to other mechanisms. In analyzing realistic series, both absolute and relative information flows need to be taken into account, since the normalizers for a pair of reverse flows belong to two different entropy balances; it is quite normal that two identical flows may differ a lot in relative importance in their respective balances. We have reproduced these results with several autoregressive models. We have also shown applications to a climate change problem and a financial analysis problem. For the former, reconfirmed is the role of the Indian Ocean Dipole as ...

  13. Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D. R.; Wilcox, S. M.

    2009-03-01

    This report evaluates the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer.

  14. Pharmacological enhancement of memory or cognition in normal subjects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Gary; Cox, Conor D.; Gall, Christine M.

    2014-01-01

    enhancement in normal subjects Demeter, E. , and Sarter,enhancement in normal subjects Katche, C. , Goldin, A. ,enhancement in normal subjects by an ampakine (CX717) in

  15. RERTR-13 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; D. M. Wachs; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme

    2012-09-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-13 was designed to assess performance of different types of neutron absorbers that can be potentially used as burnable poisons in the low enriched uranium-molybdenum based dispersion and monolithic fuels.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-13 experiment through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analysis results, thermal analysis results and hydraulic testing results.

  16. AGR 3/4 Irradiation Test Final As Run Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise P.

    2015-06-01

    Several fuel and material irradiation experiments have been planned for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Reactor Technologies Technology Development Office Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program (referred to as the INL ART TDO/AGR fuel program hereafter), which supports the development and qualification of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The goals of these experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination and safety testing (INL 05/2015). AGR-3/4 combined the third and fourth in this series of planned experiments to test TRISO coated low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide fuel. This combined experiment was intended to support the refinement of fission product transport models and to assess the effects of sweep gas impurities on fuel performance and fission product transport by irradiating designed-to-fail fuel particles and by measuring subsequent fission metal transport in fuel-compact matrix material and fuel-element graphite. The AGR 3/4 fuel test was successful in irradiating the fuel compacts to the burnup and fast fluence target ranges, considering the experiment was terminated short of its initial 400 EFPD target (Collin 2015). Out of the 48 AGR-3/4 compacts, 42 achieved the specified burnup of at least 6% fissions per initial heavy-metal atom (FIMA). Three capsules had a maximum fuel compact average burnup < 10% FIMA, one more than originally specified, and the maximum fuel compact average burnup was <19% FIMA for the remaining capsules, as specified. Fast neutron fluence fell in the expected range of 1.0 to 5.5×1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for all compacts. In addition, the AGR-3/4 experiment was globally successful in keeping the temperature in the twelve capsules relatively flat in a range of temperatures suitable for the measurement of fission product diffusion in compact matrix and structural graphite materials.

  17. Experimental and Computer Simulation Study of Radioactivity of Materials Irradiated by Intermediate Energy Protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. E. Titarenko; O. V. Shvedov; V. F. Batyaev; E. I. Karpikhin; V. M. Zhivun; R. D. Mulambetov; S. G. Mashnik; R. E. Prael; W. B. Wilson

    1999-08-23

    The results of measurements and computer simulations of radioactivities and dose rates as functions of decay time are presented for Pb-nat and Bi-209 irradiated by 1.5-GeV protons, Co-59, Cu-63, and Cu-65 irradiated by 0.13- and 1.2-GeV protons, and Th-232 and U-nat irradiated by 0.1- and 0.8-GeV protons. The activities and dose rates are measured by direct high-precision gamma spectrometry. The irradiations were made using external beams extracted from the ITEP U-10 proton synchrotron. Simulations made using the LCS and CINDER'90 code systems are compared with measurements.

  18. Formation of TiO{sub 2} nanorods by ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, X. D.; Ren, F., E-mail: fren@whu.edu.cn; Cai, G. X.; Hong, M. Q.; Xiao, X. H.; Wu, W.; Liu, Y. C.; Li, W. Q.; Ying, J. J.; Jiang, C. Z. [School of Physics and Technology, Center for Ion Beam Application and Center for Electron Microscopy, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2014-05-14

    Ion beam irradiation is a powerful method to fabricate and tailor the nanostructured surface of materials. Nanorods on the surface of single crystal rutile TiO{sub 2} were formed by N{sup +} ion irradiation. The dependence of nanorod morphology on ion fluence and energy was elaborated. With increasing ion fluence, nanopores grow in one direction perpendicular to the surface and burst finally to form nanorods. The length of nanorods increases with increasing ion energy under same fluence. The development of the nanorod structure is originated from the formation of the nanopores while N{sub 2} bubbles and aggregation of vacancies were responsible for the formation of nanopores and nanorods. Combining C{sup +} ion irradiation and post-irradiation annealing experiments, two qualitative models are proposed to explain the formation mechanism of these nanorods.

  19. Transmission electron microscopy of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum: effects of irradiation on material microstructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baranwal, R. and Burke, M.G.

    2003-03-03

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) molybdenum has been characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to determine the effects of irradiation on material microstructure. This work describes the results-to-date from TEM characterization of unirradiated and irradiated ODS molybdenum. The general microstructure of the unirradiated material consists of fine molybdenum grains (< 5 {micro}m average grain size) with numerous low angle boundaries and isolated dislocation networks. 'Ribbon'-like lanthanum oxides are aligned along the working direction of the product form and are frequently associated with grain boundaries, serving to inhibit grain boundary and dislocation movement. In addition to the 'ribbons', discrete lanthanum oxide particles have also been detected. After irradiation, the material is characterized by the presence of nonuniformly distributed large ({approx} 20 to 100 nm in diameter), multi-faceted voids, while the molybdenum grain size and oxide morphology appear to be unaffected by irradiation.

  20. Dysfunction of irradiated thymus for the development of helper T cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amagai, T.; Kina, T.; Hirokawa, K.; Nishikawa, S.; Imanishi, J.; Katsura, Y.

    1987-07-15

    The development of cytotoxic T cells and helper T cells in an intact or irradiated thymus was investigated. C57BL/6 (H-2b, Thy-1.2) mice were whole body-irradiated, or were irradiated with shielding over either the thymus or right leg and tail, and were transferred with 1.5 X 10(7) bone marrow cells from B10.Thy-1.1 mice (H-2b, Thy-1.1). At various days after reconstitution, thymus cells from the recipient mice were harvested and a peanut agglutinin low-binding population was isolated. This population was further treated with anti-Thy-1.2 plus complement to remove host-derived cells and was assayed for the frequency of cytotoxic T cell precursors (CTLp) and for the activity of helper T cells (Th). In the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated mice, Th activity reached normal control level by day 25, whereas CTLp frequency remained at a very low level during these days. In the thymus of whole body-irradiated mice, generation of CTLp was highly accelerated while that of Th was retarded, the period required for reconstitution being 25 days and more than 42 days for CTLp and Th, respectively. Preferential development of CTLp was also seen in right leg- and tail-shielded (L-T-shielded) and irradiated recipients. Histological observation indicated that Ia+ nonlymphoid cells were well preserved in the thymus of thymus-shielded and irradiated recipients, whereas in L-T-shielded and irradiated recipients, such cells in the medulla were markedly reduced in number. These results suggest strongly that the generation of Th but not CTLp is dependent on radiosensitive thymic component(s), and that such components may represent Ia+ cells themselves in the medulla or some microenvironment related to Ia+ cells.

  1. Asymptotic normalization coefficients for 14N+p -> O-15 and the astrophysical S factor for N-14(p, gamma)O-15 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Bem, P.; Brown, BA; Burjan, V.; Gagliardi, Carl A.; Kroha, V.; Novak, J.; Nunes, FM; Paskor, S.; Pirlepesov, F.; Simeckova, E.; Tribble, Robert E.; Vincour, J.

    2003-01-01

    The N-14(p,gamma)O-15 reaction, which controls energy production in the CNO cycle, has contributions from both resonance and direct captures to the ground and excited states. The overall normalization of the direct captures ...

  2. Carbon nanotube formation by laser direct writing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.-T.; Su, H.-C.; Tsai, C.-M.; Liu, K.-L.; Chen, G.-D.; Huang, R.-H.; Yew, T.-R.

    2008-07-14

    This letter presents carbon nanotube (CNT) formation by laser direct writing using 248 nm KrF excimer pulsed laser in air at room temperature, which was applied to irradiate amorphous carbon (a-C) assisted by Ni catalysts underneath for the transformation of carbon species into CNTs. The CNTs were synthesized under appropriate combination of laser energy density and a-C thickness. The growth mechanism and key parameters to determine the success of CNT formation were also discussed. The demonstration of the CNT growth by laser direct writing in air at room temperature opens an opportunity of in-position CNT formation at low temperatures.

  3. Advanced Numerical Weather Prediction Techniques for Solar Irradiance Forecasting : : Statistical, Data-Assimilation, and Ensemble Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick James

    2013-01-01

    of numerical weather prediction solar irradiance forecastsof numerical weather prediction solar irradiance forecastsnumerical weather prediction model for solar irradiance

  4. 100 E. Normal Street Kirksville, MO 63501

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    . Curran Prendergast Repertoire The 2015 Midwest Band Conductors' Symposium" and address to: Dr. Curran Prendergast, 100 East Normal St. Kirksville, MO 63501.truman.edu/mbcs Clinicians: Dr. Paul Popiel, Director of Bands, University of Kansas Dr. Curran

  5. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization a program can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness

  6. Irradiation preservation of seafood: Literature review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molton, P.M.

    1987-10-01

    The application of gamma-irradiation for extending the shelf life of seafood has been of interest for many years. This report reviews a number of studies on seafood irradiation conducted over the past several years. Topics covered include seafood irradiation techniques and dosages, species applicability and differences, the effects of packaging on seafood preservation, and changes in organoleptic acceptability as a result of irradiation. Particular attention is given to radiation effects (likely and unlikely) of concern to the public. These include the potential for generation of toxic chemical products, botulinum toxin production, and other health concerns. No scientifically defensible evidence of any kind was found for any harmful effect of irradiation of seafoods at the doses being considered (less than 300 krad), and all indications are that irradiation is an acceptable and needed additional tool for seafood preservation. 49 refs., 14 figs., 14 tabs.

  7. (Irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessels)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, W.R.

    1990-09-24

    The traveler served as a member of the two-man US Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored team who visited the Prometey Complex in Leningrad to assess the potential for expanded cooperative research concerning integrity of the primary pressure boundary in commercial light-water reactors. The emphasis was on irradiation embrittlement, structural analysis, and fracture mechanics research for reactor pressure vessels. At the irradiation seminar in Cologne, presentations were made by German, French, Finnish, Russian, and US delegations concerning many aspects of irradiation of pressure vessel steels. The traveler made presentations on mechanisms of irradiation embrittlement and on important aspects of the Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program results of irradiated fracture mechanics tests.

  8. NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, M. L.; Fleissner, William G.; Reed, G. M.

    1976-07-01

    BULLETIN OF THE AMERICAN MATHEMATICAL SOCIETY Volume 82, Number 4, July 1976 NORMALITY VERSUS COUNTABLE PARACOMPACTNESS IN PERFECT SPACES BY M. L. WAGE, W. G. FLEISSNER, AND G. M. REED Communicated March 5, 1976 Introduction. The purpose... of this announcement is to present, in a unified fashion, solutions to long outstanding questions concerning the relationship between countable paracompactness and normality conditions in perfect spaces. Each section of this paper is the contribution of a single...

  9. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are extremely similar. The design of the experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  10. A Method of Correcting for Tilt From Horizontal in Downwelling Shortwave Irradiance Measurements on Moving Platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Charles N.; Bucholtz, Anthony; Jonsson, Haf; Schmid, Beat; Vogelmann, A. M.; Wood, John

    2010-04-14

    Significant errors occur in downwelling shortwave irradiance measurements made on moving platforms due to tilt from horizontal because, when the sun is not completely blocked by overhead cloud, the downwelling shortwave irradiance has a prominent directional component from the direct sun. A-priori knowledge of the partitioning between the direct and diffuse components of the total shortwave irradiance is needed to properly apply a correction for tilt. This partitioning information can be adequately provided using a newly available commercial radiometer that produces reasonable measurements of the total and diffuse shortwave irradiance, and by subtraction the direct shortwave irradiance, with no moving parts and regardless of azimuthal orientation. We have developed methodologies for determining the constant pitch and roll offsets of the radiometers for aircraft applications, and for applying a tilt correction to the total shortwave irradiance data. Results suggest that the methodology is for tilt up to +/-10°, with 90% of the data corrected to within 10 Wm-2 at least for clear-sky data. Without a proper tilt correction, even data limited to 5° of tilt as is typical current practice still exhibits large errors, greater than 100 Wm-2 in some cases. Given the low cost, low weight, and low power consumption of the SPN1 total and diffuse radiometer, opportunities previously excluded for moving platform measurements such as small Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and solar powered buoys now become feasible using our methodology. The increase in measurement accuracy is important, given current concerns over long-term climate variability and change especially over the 70% of the Earth’s surface covered by ocean where long-term records of these measurements are sorely needed and must be made on ships and buoys.

  11. Enterprise Assessments, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Irradiated...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of the Safety-Significant Ventilation Systems at the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory Operated by UT-Battelle for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Office of Science The...

  12. Irradiation test of electrical insulation materials performed at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Irradiation test of electrical insulation materials performed at NCBJ, Poland RESMM12- 10 #12;Outlet · EuCARD insulators certification irradiation requirements · Selection of the irradiation source for the sample irradiation purpose · Irradiation cryostat and set-up at NCBJ, Swierk, POLAND

  13. Solar spectral irradiance changes during cycle 24

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marchenko, S. V.; DeLand, M. T.

    2014-07-10

    We use solar spectra obtained by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on board the Aura satellite to detect and follow long-term (years) and short-term (weeks) changes in the solar spectral irradiance (SSI) in the 265-500 nm spectral range. During solar Cycle 24, in the relatively line-free regions the SSI changed by ?0.6% ± 0.2% around 265 nm. These changes gradually diminish to 0.15% ± 0.20% at 500 nm. All strong spectral lines and blends, with the notable exception of the upper Balmer lines, vary in unison with the solar 'continuum'. Besides the lines with strong chromospheric components, the most involved species include Fe I blends and all prominent CH, NH, and CN spectral bands. Following the general trend seen in the solar 'continuum', the variability of spectral lines also decreases toward longer wavelengths. The long-term solar cycle SSI changes are closely, to within the quoted 0.1%-0.2% uncertainties, matched by the appropriately adjusted short-term SSI variations derived from the 27 day rotational modulation cycles. This further strengthens and broadens the prevailing notion about the general scalability of the UV SSI variability to the emissivity changes in the Mg II 280 nm doublet on timescales from weeks to years. We also detect subtle deviations from this general rule: the prominent spectral lines and blends at ? ? 350 nm show slightly more pronounced 27 day SSI changes when compared to the long-term (years) trends. We merge the solar data from Cycle 21 with the current Cycle 24 OMI and GOME-2 observations and provide normalized SSI variations for the 170-795 nm spectral region.

  14. Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials Atul N-directing agents in the synthesis of microporous materials. The method relies on the exposure of the sample. This method is applicable in making new materials from organic­inorganic pre- cursors and holds promise

  15. ELSEVIER Journal of Nuclear Materials 244 (1997) 295-304 The formation of bubbles in Zr alloys under Kr ion irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    1997-01-01

    by absorbing excess vacancies. The vacancy loops represent an alternative route to voids for the evolution materials under irradiation. In particular, the defect migra- tion energies in the {c) and (a} directions

  16. Cavity morphology in a Ni based superalloy under heavy ion irradiation with hot pre-injected helium. II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, He; Yao, Zhongwen, E-mail: yaoz@me.queensu.ca; Daymond, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen's University Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 (Canada); Kirk, Marquis A. [Material Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    In the current investigation, TEM in-situ heavy ion (1?MeV Kr{sup 2+}) irradiation with helium pre-injected at elevated temperature (400?°C) was conducted to simulate in-reactor neutron irradiation induced damage in CANDU spacer material Inconel X-750, in an effort to understand the effects of helium on irradiation induced cavity microstructures. Three different quantities of helium, 400 appm, 1000 appm, and 5000 appm, were pre-injected directly into TEM foils at 400?°C. The samples containing helium were then irradiated in-situ with 1?MeV Kr{sup 2+} at 400?°C to a final dose of 5.4 dpa (displacement per atom). Cavities were formed from the helium injection solely and the cavity density and size increased with increasing helium dosage. In contrast to previous heavy ion irradiations with cold pre-injected helium, heterogeneous nucleation of cavities was observed. During the ensuing heavy ion irradiation, dynamical observation showed noticeable size increase in cavities which nucleated close to the grain boundaries. A “bubble-void” transformation was observed after Kr{sup 2+} irradiation to high dose (5.4?dpa) in samples containing 1000 appm and 5000 appm helium. Cavity distribution was found to be consistent with in-reactor neutron irradiation induced cavity microstructures. This implies that the distribution of helium is greatly dependent on the injection temperature, and helium pre-injection at high temperature is preferred for simulating the migration of the transmutation produced helium.

  17. Status of the Norwegian thorium light water reactor (LWR) fuel development and irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drera, S.S.; Bjork, K.I.; Kelly, J.F.; Asphjell, O. [Thor Energy AS: Sommerrogaten 13-15, Oslo, NO255 (Norway)

    2013-07-01

    Thorium based fuels offer several benefits compared to uranium based fuels and should thus be an attractive alternative to conventional fuel types. In order for thorium based fuel to be licensed for use in current LWRs, material properties must be well known for fresh as well as irradiated fuel, and accurate prediction of fuel behavior must be possible to make for both normal operation and transient scenarios. Important parameters are known for fresh material but the behaviour of the fuel under irradiation is unknown particularly for low Th content. The irradiation campaign aims to widen the experience base to irradiated (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuel and (Th,U)O{sub 2} with low Th content and to confirm existing data for fresh fuel. The assumptions with respect to improved in-core fuel performance are confirmed by our preliminary irradiation test results, and our fuel manufacture trials so far indicate that both (Th,U)O{sub 2} and (Th,Pu)O{sub 2} fuels can be fabricated with existing technologies, which are possible to upscale to commercial volumes.

  18. Dose Rate Calibration of a Commercial Beta-Particle Irradiator Used In Archeological and Geological Dating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernal, S.M. (Univ. of Michigan)

    2004-10-31

    The 801E Multiple Sample Irradiator, manufactured by Daybreak Nuclear Systems, is capable of exposing up to 30 samples to beta radiation by placing each sample one by one directly beneath a heavily shielded ceramic Sr-90/Y-90 source and opening a specially designed shutter. Daybreak Nuclear Systems does not provide the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y dose rate to the sample because of variations of up to 20% in the nominal activity of the beta sources (separately manufactured by AEA Technology). Thus it is left to the end user to determine. Here aluminum oxide doped with carbon (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C), in the form of Landauer's Luxel{trademark}, was irradiated to different known doses using a calibrated {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta particle irradiator, and the OSL signal monitored after each irradiation to generate a calibration curve. Comparison of the OSL Signal from the unknown 801E Irradiator dose with the calibration curve enabled the dose and therefore dose rate to be determined. The timing accuracy of the 801E Irradiator was also evaluated and found to be +/- 0.5 seconds. The dose rate of the beta source was found to be 0.147 +/- 0.007 Gy/s.

  19. The Thermal Regulation of Gravitational Instabilities in Protoplanetary Disks. IV. Simulations with Envelope Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kai Cai; Richard H. Durisen; Aaron C. Boley; Megan K. Pickett; Annie C. Mejia

    2007-10-17

    It is generally thought that protoplanetary disks embedded in envelopes are more massive and thus more susceptible to gravitational instabilities (GIs) than exposed disks. We present three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics simulations of protoplanetary disks with the presence of envelope irradiation. For a disk with a radius of 40 AU and a mass of 0.07 Msun around a young star of 0.5 Msun, envelope irradiation tends to weaken and even suppress GIs as the irradiating flux is increased. The global mass transport induced by GIs is dominated by lower-order modes, and irradiation preferentially suppresses higher-order modes. As a result, gravitational torques and mass inflow rates are actually increased by mild irradiation. None of the simulations produce dense clumps or rapid cooling by convection, arguing against direct formation of giant planets by disk instability, at least in irradiated disks. However, dense gas rings and radial mass concentrations are produced, and these might be conducive to accelerated planetary core formation. Preliminary results from a simulation of a massive embedded disk with physical characteristics similar to one of the disks in the embedded source L1551 IRS5 indicate a long radiative cooling time and no fragmentation. The GIs in this disk are dominated by global two and three-armed modes.

  20. Structured Penumbral Irradiance Computation George Drettakis, Eugene Fiume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Structured Penumbral Irradiance Computation George Drettakis, Eugene Fiume Abstract-- A definitive understanding of irradiance behavior in penumbral regions has been hard to come by, mainly due irradiance varies non-monotonically are characterized empirically, and numerical tests are performed

  1. The influence of mixed and phase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lubin D.; Vogelmann A.

    2011-10-13

    The influence of mixed-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program. An Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD, Inc.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in one-minute averages throughout April-May 2008 from the ARM Climate Research Facility's North Slope of Alaska (NSA) site at Barrow. This study examines spectral irradiance measurements made under single-layer, overcast cloud decks having geometric thickness < 3000 m. Cloud optical depth is retrieved from irradiance in the interval 1022-1033 nm. The contrasting surface radiative influences of mixed-phase clouds and liquid-water clouds are discerned using irradiances in the 1.6-{micro}m window. Compared with liquid-water clouds, mixed-phase clouds during the Arctic spring cause a greater reduction of shortwave irradiance at the surface. At fixed conservative-scattering optical depth (constant optical depth for wavelengths {lambda} < 1100 nm), the presence of ice water in cloud reduces the near-IR surface irradiance by an additional several watts-per-meter-squared. This additional reduction, or supplemental ice absorption, is typically {approx}5 W m{sup -2} near solar noon over Barrow, and decreases with increasing solar zenith angle. However, for some cloud decks this additional absorption can be as large as 8-10 W m{sup -2}.

  2. Computing Instantaneous Frequency by normalizing Hilbert Transform

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Huang, Norden E.

    2005-05-31

    This invention presents Normalized Amplitude Hilbert Transform (NAHT) and Normalized Hilbert Transform(NHT), both of which are new methods for computing Instantaneous Frequency. This method is designed specifically to circumvent the limitation set by the Bedorsian and Nuttal Theorems, and to provide a sharp local measure of error when the quadrature and the Hilbert Transform do not agree. Motivation for this method is that straightforward application of the Hilbert Transform followed by taking the derivative of the phase-angle as the Instantaneous Frequency (IF) leads to a common mistake made up to this date. In order to make the Hilbert Transform method work, the data has to obey certain restrictions.

  3. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  4. Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods...

  5. Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from In-Reactor Permeation Experiment Post Irradiation Examination of Stainless Steel Cladding from In-Reactor Permeation...

  6. RERTR-7 Irradiation Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Perez; M. A. Lillo; G. S. Chang; G. A. Roth; N. E. Woolstenhulme; D. M. Wachs

    2011-12-01

    The Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiment RERTR-7A, was designed to test several modified fuel designs to target fission densities representative of a peak low enriched uranium (LEU) burnup in excess of 90% U-235 at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a peak surface heat flux of approximately 300 W/cm2. The RERTR-7B experiment was designed as a high power test of 'second generation' dispersion fuels at peak experiment power sufficient to generate a surface heat flux on the order of 230 W/cm2.1 The following report summarizes the life of the RERTR-7A and RERTR-7B experiments through end of irradiation, including as-run neutronic analyses, thermal analyses and hydraulic testing results.

  7. Changes in delta-Plutonium due to self-irradiation aging observed by Continuous in-situ X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saw, C K; Chung, B W; Wall, M A

    2007-01-05

    The aging in plutonium is predominantly caused by its internal self-irradiation. The self-irradiation in Pu-239 is by the decay process of transmuting the Pu atom into uranium atom and emitting an {alpha}-particle. Most of the lattice damage comes from the uranium recoil resulting in Frenkel-type defects consisting of vacancies and self-interstitial atoms, helium in-growth and defect clusters and possibly even though it is not yet observed, the generation of voids. As part of the stockpile stewardship, it is important to understand the changes in the structure and microstructures and their correlations to the physical properties. Changes in the physical properties have a direct relationship to the quality of the structure, in terms of formation of defects and defect clustering, accumulation of voids, grain boundaries, phase changes and etc. which can adversely affect the stability of the material. These changes are very difficult to monitor because of the high activity of the sample, high atomic number making x-ray and synchrotron probe into the bulk very difficult (neutron probe is not feasible) and the long life time which normally requires decades to measure. In this paper we describe the development of an in-situ in-house transmission x-ray diffraction (XRD) experimental technique used to monitor the structural changes in these materials. This technique calls for a very thin sample of less that 2 mm and to accelerate the aging process due to self-irradiation, spiked alloy of 7.5 weight percent of Pu-238 is used. This is equivalent to roughly 17 times the normal rate of aging. Current results suggest that over a period of 2.8 equivalent years, an increase of 0.5% in unit cell parameter is observed. The increase appears to be an abrupt jump at about 1.1 equivalent years, brought about by the collapsing of the atoms from the interstitials to the lattice sites. Further data analysis is on the way.

  8. Janus Experiments: Data from Mouse Irradiation Experiments 1972 - 1989

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Janus Experiments, carried out at Argonne National Laboratory from 1972 to 1989 and supported by grants from the US Department of Energy, investigated the effects of neutron and gamma radiation on mouse tissues primarily from B6CF1 mice. 49,000 mice were irradiated: Death records were recorded for 42,000 mice; gross pathologies were recorded for 39,000 mice; and paraffin embedded tissues were preserved for most mice. Mouse record details type and source of radiation [gamma, neutrons]; dose and dose rate [including life span irradiation]; type and presence/absence of radioprotector treatment; tissue/animal morphology and pathology. Protracted low dose rate treatments, short term higher dose rate treatments, variable dose rates with a same total dose, etc. in some cases in conjunction with radioprotectors, were administered. Normal tissues, tumors, metastases were preserved. Standard tissues saved were : lung, liver, spleen, kidney, heart, any with gross lesions (including mammary glands, Harderian gland with eye, adrenal gland, gut, ovaries or testes, brain and pituitary, bone). Data are searchable and specimens can be obtained by request.

  9. Normal butane/iso-butane separation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volles, W.K.; Cusher, N.A.

    1986-08-26

    This patent describes an improved pressure swing adsorption process for the separation of iso-butane from normal butane in an adsorption system having at least three adsorbent beds, each bed of which undergoes, on a cyclic basis and a processing sequence comprising: introducing a feed gas mixture of iso-butane and normal butane at an upper adsorption pressure to the feed end of the bed capable of selectively adsorbing normal butane as the more selectivity adsorbable component of the gas mixture. The iso-butane as the less readily adsorbable component passes through the bed and is discharged from the discharge end. The feed gas introduction is continued as a normal butane adsorption front is formed in the bed and passes through the bed from the feed end and breaks through at the discharge end of the bed, a portion of the iso-butane effluent stream thus discharged being diverted for passage as purge gas to another bed in the system; and countercurrently depressurizing the bed with release of gas from the feed end.

  10. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler­Style Course­Of­Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  11. Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    Termination Checking with Types Strong Normalization for Mendler-Style Course-Of-Value Recursion can be separated into two parts: As the first step, partial correctness is established by verifying that a program matches its specification; then, termination is shown to obtain full correctness. For practical

  12. Irradiation test on FD-SOI Readout ASIC of Pair-monitor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yutaro Sato; Hirokazu Ikeda; Akiya Miyamoto; Yosuke Takubo; Toshiaki Tauchi; Hitoshi Yamamoto

    2010-06-22

    We fabricated a readout ASIC with the fully depleted silicon-on-insulator (FD-SOI) technology for the pair-monitor. The pair-monitor is a silicon pixel device that measures the beam profile of the international linear collider. It utilizes the directional distribution of a large number of electron-positron pairs created by collision of bunches, and is required to tolerate radiation dose of about a few Mrad/year. The irradiation might cause the buried oxide layer of SOI to accumulate charges which interfere with intended functions. We thus performed extensive irradiation tests on the prototype ASIC, and the results are described in this paper.

  13. Experimental and Computer Simulation Study of Radionuclide Production in Heavy Materials Irradiated by Intermediate Energy Protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. E. Titarenko; O. V. Shvedov; V. F. Batyaev; E. I. Karpikhin; V. M. Zhivun; R. D. Mulambetov; A. N. Sosnin; S. G. Mashnik; R. E. Prael; T. A. Gabriel; M. Blann

    1999-08-19

    The results of measurements and computer simulations are presented for the yields of residual product nuclei in thin targets: U-nat irradiated by 0.1, 0.8, 1.2, and 1.6 GeV and Tc-99 irradiated by 0.2, 0.8, 1.0, 1.4, and 1.6 GeV protons. The yields were measured at ITEP by direct high-precision gamma spectrometry. About 820 cross sections are presented and used in comparison between measured yields and simulations by the LAHET, INUCL, CEM95, HETC, CASCADE, YIELDX, and ALICE codes.

  14. Highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies for piecewise Eckart potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skakala, Jozef; 10.1103/PhysRevD.81.125023

    2010-01-01

    Highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies are very often of the form omega_n = (offset) + i n (gap). We investigate the genericity of this phenomenon by considering a model potential that is piecewise Eckart (piecewise Poeschl-Teller), and developing an analytic "quantization condition" for the highly-damped quasi-normal frequencies. We find that this omega_n = (offset) + i n (gap) behaviour is generic but not universal, with the controlling feature being whether or not the ratio of the rates of exponential falloff in the two asymptotic directions is a rational number. These observations are of direct relevance to any physical situation where highly-damped quasi-normal modes (damped modes) are important --- in particular (but not limited to) to black hole physics, both theoretical and observational.

  15. Solid state laser disk amplifer architecture: the normal-incidence stack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dane, C. Brent; Albrecht, Georg F.; Rotter, Mark D.

    2005-01-25

    Normal incidence stack architecture coupled with the development of diode array pumping enables the power/energy per disk to be increased, a reduction in beam distortions by orders of magnitude, a beam propagation no longer restricted to only one direction of polarization, and the laser becomes so much more amendable to robust packaging.

  16. The Irradiance Volume Gene Greger , Peter Shirley y, Philip M. Hubbard z, Donald P. Greenberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirley, Peter

    The Irradiance Volume Gene Greger , Peter Shirley y, Philip M. Hubbard z, Donald P. Greenberg quantity irradiance. We call this representation the irradiance volume. Although irradiance. The irradiance volume supports the reconstruction of believable approximations to the illumination in situations

  17. Irradiation of insulators for Workshop on Accelerator Magnet, Superconductor, Design and Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Irradiation of insulators for EuCARD Workshop on Accelerator Magnet, Superconductor, Design #12;Outline WAMSDO ­ 14.11.2011 CERN · Motivation of launching EUCARD irradiation task · Irradiation methodology · Post irradiation tests ­ Electrical ­ Thermal ­ Mechanical · Irradiation cryostat · Conclusions

  18. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  19. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

  20. Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short Standing Wave Structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Status of High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Short...

  1. Irradiation effects on Charpy impact and tensile properties of low upper-shelf welds, HSSI series 2 and 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G. )

    1991-08-01

    When reactor pressure vessel steels exhibit Charpy V-notch impact upper-shelf energy levels of less than 68 J (50 ft-lb), the requirements of Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 50, Appendix G, are not met. The regulations require, as an option, that a fracture mechanics analysis be performed that conservatively demonstrates adequate safety margins for continued operation. Under conditions where large prefracture crack-tip plastic zones are present, linear-elastic fracture mechanics concepts are not applicable, and the use of elastic-plastic fracture mechanics concepts has been recommended by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. A number of Babcock and Wilcox Company-fabricated reactor vessels in commercial pressurized water reactor plants include welds with both relatively low initial Charpy upper-shelf energies and high copper concentrations, which make them highly sensitive to neutron irradiation. As a result, the Charpy upper-shelf energies of many welds are expected to fall below 68 J (50 ft-lb) prior to reaching design life. The Heavy-Section Steel Irradiation Program conducted the Second and Third Irradiation Series to investigate the effects of irradiation on the ductile fracture toughness of seven commercially fabricated, low upper-shelf welds. This report represents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization, which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity the different welds.

  2. Semi-analytic results for quasi-normal frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skakala, Jozef

    2010-01-01

    The last decade has seen considerable interest in the quasi-normal frequencies [QNFs] of black holes (and even wormholes), both asymptotically flat and with cosmological horizons. There is wide agreement that the QNFs are often of the form omega_n = (offset) + i n (gap), though some authors have encountered situations where this behaviour seems to fail. To get a better understanding of the general situation we consider a semi-analytic model based on a piecewise Eckart (Poeschl--Teller) potential, allowing for different heights and different rates of exponential falloff in the two asymptotic directions. This model is sufficiently general to capture and display key features of the black hole QNFs while simultaneously being analytically tractable, at least for asymptotically large imaginary parts of the QNFs. We shall derive an appropriate "quantization condition" for the asymptotic QNFs, and extract as much analytic information as possible. In particular, we shall explicitly verify that the (offset)+ i n (gap) ...

  3. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is significantly different from the first two experiments, though the control and monitoring systems are very similar. The purpose and design of this experiment will be discussed followed by its progress and status to date.

  4. Mechanism of genotoxicity induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mechanism of genotoxicity induced by targeted cytoplasmic irradiation M Hong1,2 , A Xu1,3 , H Zhou1 irradiation should not be ignored in radiation risk estimation. Although targeted cytoplasmic irradiation has precision was used to study mechanisms involved in mediating the genotoxic effects in irradiated human

  5. Estimating solar irradiance using a geostationary satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquhart, Bryan Glenn

    2011-01-01

    from meteorological satellite data. Solar Energy 37, 31–39.specific irradiance data. Solar Energy 60, 89–96. Perez R. ,16 independent data banks. Solar Energy 80, 468–478 Kasten

  6. Neutron Irradiation Resistance of RAFM Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaganidze, Ermile; Dafferner, Bernhard; Aktaa, Jarir

    2008-07-01

    The neutron irradiation resistance of the reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel EUROFER97 and international reference steels (F82H-mod, OPTIFER-Ia, GA3X and MANET-I) have been investigated after irradiation in the Petten High Flux Reactor up to 16.3 dpa at different irradiation temperatures (250-450 deg. C). The embrittlement behavior and hardening are investigated by instrumented Charpy-V tests with sub-size specimens. Neutron irradiation-induced embrittlement and hardening of EUROFER97 was studied under different heat treatment conditions. Embrittlement and hardening of as-delivered EUROFER97 steel are comparable to those of reference steels. Heat treatment of EUROFER97 at a higher austenitizing temperature substantially improves the embrittlement behaviour at low irradiation temperatures. Analysis of embrittlement vs. hardening behavior of RAFM steels within a proper model in terms of the parameter C={delta}DBTT/{delta}{sigma} indicates hardening-dominated embrittlement at irradiation temperatures below 350 deg. C with 0.17 {<=} C {<=} 0.53 deg. C/MPa. Scattering of C at irradiation temperatures above 400 deg. C indicates non hardening embrittlement. A role of He in a process of embrittlement is investigated in EUROFER97 based steels, that are doped with different contents of natural B and the separated {sup 10}B-isotope (0.008-0.112 wt.%). Testing on small scale fracture mechanical specimens for determination of quasi-static fracture toughness will be also presented in a view of future irradiation campaigns. (authors)

  7. Gamma irradiation effects in W films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claro, Luiz H.; Santos, Ingrid A.; Silva, Cassia F.

    2013-05-06

    Using the van Der Pauw methodology, the surface resistivity of irradiated tungsten films deposited on Silicon substrate was measured. The films were exposed to {gamma} radiation using a isotopic {sup 60}Co source in three irradiation stages attaining 40.35 kGy in total dose. The obtained results for superficial resistivity display a time annealing features and their values are proportional to the total dose.

  8. Indirect detection of radiation sources through direct detection of radiolysis products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farmer, Joseph C. (Tracy, CA); Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-04-20

    A system for indirectly detecting a radiation source by directly detecting radiolytic products. The radiation source emits radiation and the radiation produces the radiolytic products. A fluid is positioned to receive the radiation from the radiation source. When the fluid is irradiated, radiolytic products are produced. By directly detecting the radiolytic products, the radiation source is detected.

  9. Irradiated Nuclear Fuel Management: Resource Versus Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, Kenneth L.; Lumetta, Gregg J.; Vienna, John D.

    2013-01-01

    Management of irradiated fuel is an important component of commercial nuclear power production. Although it is broadly agreed that the disposition of some fraction of the fuel in geological repositories will be necessary, there is a range of options that can be considered that affect exactly what fraction of material will be disposed in that manner. Furthermore, until geological repositories are available to accept commercial irradiated fuel, these materials must be safely stored. Temporary storage of irradiated fuel has traditionally been conducted in storage pools, and this is still true for freshly discharged fuel. Criticality control technologies have led to greater efficiencies in packing of irradiated fuel into storage pools. With continued delays in establishing permanent repositories, utilities have begun to move some of the irradiated fuel inventory into dry storage. Fuel cycle options being considered worldwide include the once-through fuel cycle, limited recycle in which U and Pu are recycled back to power reactors as mixed oxide fuel, and advance partitioning and transmutation schemes designed to reduce the long term hazards associated with geological disposal from millions of years to a few hundred years. Each of these options introduces specific challenges in terms of the waste forms required to safely immobilize the hazardous components of irradiated fuel.

  10. Long-Term Effects of {sup 56}Fe Irradiation on Spatial Memory of Mice: Role of Sex and Apolipoprotein E Isoform

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villasana, Laura E.; Benice, Theodore S. [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Raber, Jacob, E-mail: raberj@ohsu.ed [Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Division of Neuroscience, Oregon Primate Research Center, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland, OR (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the effects of cranial {sup 56}Fe irradiation on the spatial memory of mice in the water maze are sex and apolipoprotein E (apoE) isoform dependent and whether radiation-induced changes in spatial memory are associated with changes in the dendritic marker microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2) and the presynaptic marker synaptophysin. Methods and Materials: Two-month-old male and female mice expressing human apoE3 or apoE4 received either a 3-Gy dose of cranial {sup 56}Fe irradiation (600 MeV/amu) or sham irradiation. Mice were tested in a water maze task 13 months later to assess effects of irradiation on spatial memory retention. After behavioral testing, the brain tissues of these mice were analyzed for synaptophysin and MAP-2 immunoreactivity. Results: After irradiation, spatial memory retention of apoE3 female, but not male, mice was impaired. A general genotype deficit in spatial memory was observed in sham-irradiated apoE4 mice. Strikingly, irradiation prevented this genotype deficit in apoE4 male mice. A similar but nonsignificant trend was observed in apoE4 female mice. Although there was no change in MAP-2 immunoreactivity after irradiation, synaptophysin immunoreactivity was increased in irradiated female mice, independent of genotype. Conclusions: The effects of {sup 56}Fe irradiation on the spatial memory retention of mice are critically influenced by sex, and the direction of these effects is influenced by apoE isoform. Although in female mice synaptophysin immunoreactivity provides a sensitive marker for effects of irradiation, it cannot explain the apoE genotype-dependent effects of irradiation on the spatial memory retention of the mice.

  11. Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teskey, Robert O.

    Summary Pinus taeda L. stomata respond slowly to changes in irradiance. Because incident irradiance on a leaf varies constantly, the rate of change in stomatal conductance to fluc- tuating irradiance may have with very different irradiance patterns, assuming that rates of stomatal opening and closing were similar

  12. Directives Quarterly Updates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly.

  13. Effects of irradiation temperature on Charpy and tensile properties of high-copper, low upper-shelf, submerged-arc welds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, R.K.; Berggren, R.G.

    1992-12-31

    This paper presents analyses of the Charpy impact and tensile test data, including adjustments for irradiation temperature and fluence normalization which make possible comparison of the irradiation sensitivity of the different welds. Analyses revealed dependence of yield and ultimate strength on irradiation temperature {minus}0.8 MPA/{degrees}C, respectively. Similarly, the Charpy impact energy changes due to irradiation temperature were {minus}0.5{degrees}C/{degrees}C for transition shift and {minus}0.05 J/{degrees}C for upper-shelf energy decrease. After adjustment to an irradiation temperature of 288{degrees}C and normalization to a fluence of 8 {times} 10{sup 18} neutrons/cm{sup 2} percentage increases in yield strength due to irradiation ranged from about 21 to 35% while those for ultimate strength ranged from about 13 to 20%. The Charpy transition temperature shifts ranged from 59 to 123{degrees}C while the postirradiation upper-shelf energies ranged from 58 to 79 J.

  14. AGR-2 irradiation test final as-run report, Rev. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collin, Blaise

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities; (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing; and, (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  15. AGR-2 Irradiation Test Final As-Run Report, Rev 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-08-01

    This document presents the as-run analysis of the AGR-2 irradiation experiment. AGR-2 is the second of the planned irradiations for the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program. Funding for this program is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy as part of the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technical Development Office (TDO) program. The objectives of the AGR-2 experiment are to: (a) Irradiate UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Fuel attributes are based on results obtained from the AGR-1 test and other project activities. (b) Provide irradiated fuel samples for post-irradiation experiment (PIE) and safety testing. (c) Support the development of an understanding of the relationship between fuel fabrication processes, fuel product properties, and irradiation performance. The primary objective of the test was to irradiate both UCO and UO2 TRISO (tri-structural isotropic) fuel produced from prototypic scale equipment to obtain normal operation and accident condition fuel performance data. The UCO compacts were subjected to a range of burnups and temperatures typical of anticipated prismatic reactor service conditions in three capsules. The test train also includes compacts containing UO2 particles produced independently by the United States, South Africa, and France in three separate capsules. The range of burnups and temperatures in these capsules were typical of anticipated pebble bed reactor service conditions. The results discussed in this report pertain only to U.S. produced fuel. In order to achieve the test objectives, the AGR-2 experiment was irradiated in the B-12 position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for a total irradiation duration of 559.2 effective full power days (EFPD). Irradiation began on June 22, 2010, and ended on October 16, 2013, spanning 12 ATR power cycles and approximately three and a half calendar years. The test contained six independently controlled and monitored capsules. Each U.S. capsule contained 12 compacts of either UCO or UO2 AGR coated fuel. No fuel particles failed during the AGR-2 irradiation. Final burnup values on a per compact basis ranged from 7.26 to 13.15% FIMA (fissions per initial heavy-metal atom) for UCO fuel, and 9.01 to 10.69% FIMA for UO2 fuel, while fast fluence values ranged from 1.94 to 3.47´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UCO fuel, and from 3.05 to 3.53´1025 n/m2 (E >0.18 MeV) for UO2 fuel. Time-average volume-average (TAVA) temperatures on a capsule basis at the end of irradiation ranged from 987°C in Capsule 6 to 1296°C in Capsule 2 for UCO, and from 996 to 1062°C in UO2-fueled Capsule 3. By the end of the irradiation, all of the installed thermocouples (TCs) had failed. Fission product release-to-birth (R/B) ratios were quite low. In the UCO capsules, R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-6 with the exception of the hotter Capsule 2, in which the R/Bs reached 2´10-6. In the UO2 capsule (Capsule 3), the R/B values during the first three cycles were below 10-7. R/B values for all following cycles are not reliable due to gas flow and cross talk issues.

  16. Normal force controlled rheology for thermoreversible gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosi Mao; Thibaut Divoux; Patrick Snabre

    2015-08-07

    A wide range of thermoreversible gels are prepared by cooling down to ambient temperature hot aqueous solutions of polymers. During the sol-gel transition, such soft solids may experience a volume contraction leading to experimental issues regarding rheological measurements such as the stress-induced release of solvent, and the partial loss of contact between the sample and the shear cell. In this article, we revisit the formation of thermoreversible gels through a series of benchmark experiments conducted on agar gels in a plate-plate geometry. Monitoring the gelation with a constant gap results in an artificial drift of the gel elastic modulus $G'$ because of the sample contraction. We show that maintaining a constant normal force equals to zero instead of a constant gap allows $G'$ to reach a plateau as the gap variation compensates the sample contraction. The latter method provides a way to measure more reliably the gel linear properties with either rough or smooth boundary conditions, and allows us to quantify the sample contraction. Furthermore, we also unravel two subtle artifacts associated with metallic boundary conditions that may impact rheological measurements during the early stage of the gelation. We show that the slow oxidation of the plate by the solution and/or the presence of an oil layer around the sample, that is traditionally used to prevent evaporation, may both lead to a premature and artificial growth of $G'$ which should not be misinterpreted as the formation of a pre-gel. Finally, we illustrate the relevance of the controlled normal force protocol, by investigating the influence of thermal history on the mechanical properties of agar gels. Our work offers an extensive review of the artifacts associated with the rheology of thermoreversible gels and paves the way for a more systematic use of normal force controlled rheology.

  17. Microstructural evolution in NF616 (P92) and Fee9Cre0.1C-model alloy under heavy ion irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    .V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction High chromium (9e12 wt.%) ferritic-martensitic (FeM) steels]. Normalized and tempered 9e12 wt.% FeM steels typically exhibit the tempered martensite structure reactor Heavy ion irradiation In situ technique Transmission electron microscopy Ferritic-martensitic

  18. Local asymptotic normality in quantum statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Anna Jencova

    2007-05-24

    The theory of local asymptotic normality for quantum statistical experiments is developed in the spirit of the classical result from mathematical statistics due to Le Cam. Roughly speaking, local asymptotic normality means that the family varphi_{\\theta_{0}+ u/\\sqrt{n}}^{n} consisting of joint states of n identically prepared quantum systems approaches in a statistical sense a family of Gaussian state phi_{u} of an algebra of canonical commutation relations. The convergence holds for all "local parameters" u\\in R^{m} such that theta=theta_{0}+ u/sqrt{n} parametrizes a neighborhood of a fixed point theta_{0}\\in Theta\\subset R^{m}. In order to prove the result we define weak and strong convergence of quantum statistical experiments which extend to the asymptotic framework the notion of quantum sufficiency introduces by Petz. Along the way we introduce the concept of canonical state of a statistical experiment, and investigate the relation between the two notions of convergence. For reader's convenience and completeness we review the relevant results of the classical as well as the quantum theory.

  19. Fermion Quasi-normal modes of the Kerr Black-Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. A. Carlson; A. S. Cornell; B. Jordan

    2012-01-27

    In this paper we study the fermion quasi-normal modes of a 4-dimensional rotating black-hole using the WKB(J) (to third and sixth order) and the AIM semi-analytic methods in the massless Dirac fermion sector. These semi-analytic approximations are computed in a pedagogical manner with comparisons made to the numerical values of the quasi-normal mode frequencies presented in the literature. It was found that The WKB(J) method and AIM show good agreement with direct numerical solutions for low values of the overtone number $n$ and angular quantum number l.

  20. Analysis of clear hour solar irradiation for seven Canadian stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, J.; Sahami, K.

    1995-12-31

    Hourly global and diffuse irradiation and corresponding surface meteorological data have been analyzed for the seven Canadian stations at Edmonton, Goose Bay, Montreal, Port Hardy, Resolute, Toronto, and Winnipeg. The variation of the most probable clear hour values of clearness index k{sub t}, diffuse index k{sub d}, direct beam index k{sub b}, and Angstrom turbidity coefficient {beta} with solar elevation, atmospheric precipitable water, and snow depth are obtained. Values of these quantities are presented which are consistent with the attenuation and scattering of solar radiation by the atmosphere which is expected. The most probable values of {beta} tend to be lower than the average values of {beta} recently reported by Gueymard. The data indicate a drift in the calibration of the instruments used for measurements of the irradiation data for the stations at Goose Bay and Resolute. The data for the other five stations indicate that the instrument calibration is maintained over the years of the data. 4 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Method for monitoring irradiated fuel using Cerenkov radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dowdy, E.J.; Nicholson, N.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1980-05-21

    A method is provided for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in a water-filled storage pond wherein the intensity of the Cerenkov radiation emitted from the water in the vicinity of the nuclear fuel is measured. This intensity is then compared with the expected intensity for nuclear fuel having a corresponding degree of irradiation exposure and time period after removal from a reactor core. Where the nuclear fuel inventory is located in an assembly having fuel pins or rods with intervening voids, the Cerenkov light intensity measurement is taken at selected bright sports corresponding to the water-filled interstices of the assembly in the water storage, the water-filled interstices acting as Cerenkov light channels so as to reduce cross-talk. On-line digital analysis of an analog video signal is possible, or video tapes may be used for later measurement using a video editor and an electrometer. Direct measurement of the Cerenkov radiation intensity also is possible using spot photometers pointed at the assembly.

  2. Evolving Density and Static Mechanical Properties in Plutonium from Self-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chung, B W; Thompson, S R; Lema, K E; Hiromoto, D S; Ebbinghaus, B B

    2008-07-31

    Plutonium, because of its self-irradiation by alpha decay, ages by means of lattice damage and helium in-growth. These integrated aging effects result in microstructural and physical property changes. Because these effects would normally require decades to measure, studies are underway to assess the effects of extended aging on the physical properties of plutonium alloys by incorporating roughly 7.5 weight % of highly specific activity isotope {sup 238}Pu into the {sup 239}Pu metal to accelerate the aging process. This paper presents updated results of self-irradiation effects on {sup 238}Pu-enriched alloys measured by immersion density, dilatometry, and tensile tests. After nearly 90 equivalent years of aging, both the immersion density and dilatometry show that the enriched alloys continue to decreased in density by {approx}0.002% per year, without void swelling. Quasi-static tensile measurements show that the aging process increases the strength of plutonium alloys.

  3. Effect of neutron irradiation on vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braski, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Neutron-irradiated vanadium alloys were evaluated for their susceptibility to irradiation hardening, helium embrittlement, swelling, and residual radioactivity, and the results were compared with those for the austenitic and ferritic stainless steels. The VANSTAR-7 and V-15Cr-5Ti alloys showed the greatest hardening between 400 and 600/sup 0/C while V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti had lower values that were comparable to those of ferritic steels. The V-15Cr-5Ti and VANSTAR-7 alloys were susceptible to helium embrittlement caused by the combination of weakened grain boundaries and irradiation-hardened grain matrices. Specimen fractures were entirely intergranular in the most severe instances of embrittlement. The V-3Ti-1Si and V-20Ti alloys were more resistant to helium embrittlement. Except for VANSTAR-7 irradiated to 40 dpa at 520/sup 0/C, all of the vanadium alloys exhibited low swelling that was similar to the ferritic steels. Swelling was greater in specimens that were preimplanted with helium using the tritium trick. The vanadium alloys clearly exhibit lower residual radioactivity after irradiation than the ferrous alloys.

  4. Review of recent irradiation-creep results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coghlan, W.A.

    1982-05-01

    Materials deform faster under stress in the presence of irradiation by a process known as irradiation creep. This phenomenon is important to reactor design and has been the subject of a large number of experimental and theoretical investigations. The purpose of this work is to review the recent experimental results to obtain a summary of these results and to determine those research areas that require additional information. The investigations have been classified into four subgroups based on the different experimental methods used. These four are: (1) irradiation creep using stress relaxation methods, (2) creep measurements using pressurized tubes, (3) irradiation creep from constant applied load, and (4) irradiation creep experiments using accelerated particles. The similarity and the differences of the results from these methods are discussed and a summary of important results and suggested areas for research is presented. In brief, the important results relate to the dependence of creep on swelling, temperature, stress state and alloying additions. In each of these areas new results have been presented and new questions have arisen which require further research to answer. 65 references.

  5. Advanced Numerical Weather Prediction Techniques for Solar Irradiance Forecasting : : Statistical, Data-Assimilation, and Ensemble Forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick James

    2013-01-01

    weather prediction solar irradiance forecasts in the US.2013: Review of solar irradiance forecasting methods and asatellite-derived irradiances: Description and validation.

  6. Modeling Total Solar Irradiance Variations Using Automated Classification Software on Mount Wilson Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulrich, R. K.; Parker, D.; Bertello, L.; Boyden, J.

    2010-01-01

    Star: Solar and Stellar Irradiance Variations, IAU Colloq.4 Modeling Total Solar Irradiance Variations Using Automatedcorrelated with total solar irradiance (TSI) to yield a set

  7. A high-resolution, cloud-assimilating numerical weather prediction model for solar irradiance forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Collier, Craig; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of the WRF model solar irradiance forecasts in Andalusia (Beyer, H. , 2009.    Irradiance forecasting for the power dependent probabilistic irradiance  forecasts for coastal 

  8. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Hemker, T. Hoff, Short-term irradiance variability: StationLorenzo, D. Alvira, E. Izco, From irradiance to output power46 High Frequency Irradiance Fluctuations and Geographic

  9. Surface finishing of die and tool steels via plasma-based electron beam irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Z; WANG, ZHIGANG; Yamazaki, Kazuo; Sano, S

    2006-01-01

    large-area electron beam irradiation, Precision Engineeringof craters. 5. PBEB irradiation process improves corrosionthe case study, PBEB irradiation would be a new potential

  10. THE EFFECTS OF TEMPERATURE AND IMPURITIES ON THE ATOMIC DISPLACEMENT ENERGY DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drosd, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    ENERGY DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION Robert Michael DrosdTemperature Changes in I~1 Irradiations. ExperimentalCharged Particle S~osium Irradiations, in Proceedings of a

  11. Low Concentration Photovoltaic Systems (LCPV), where solar irradiance is concentrated by a factor of 1-10, present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    1 Abstract-- Low Concentration Photovoltaic Systems (LCPV), where solar irradiance is concentrated--concentrating photovoltaic, solar radiation durability, lifetime and degradation science, reliability. NOMENCLATURE LCPV: low modern society. As a direct method for harnessing the sun's energy, photovoltaic systems have a large

  12. Overview Report: Normal and Emergency Operation Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greitzer, Frank L.

    2011-05-01

    This is an overview report to document and illustrate methods used in a project entitled “Normal and Emergency Operations Visualization” for a utility company, conducted in 2009-2010 timeframe with funding from the utility company and the U.S. Department of Energy. The original final report (about 180 pages) for the project is not available for distribution because it alludes to findings that assessed the design of an operational system that contained proprietary information; this abridged version contains descriptions of methods and some findings to illustrate the approach used, while avoiding discussion of sensitive or proprietary information. The client has approved this abridged version of the report for unlimited distribution to give researchers and collaborators the benefit of reviewing the research concepts and methods that were applied in this study.

  13. Asymptotic normalization coefficients from ab initio calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenneth M. Nollett; R. B. Wiringa

    2011-04-14

    We present calculations of asymptotic normalization coefficients (ANCs) for one-nucleon removals from nuclear states of mass numbers 3 to 9. Our ANCs were computed from variational Monte Carlo solutions to the many-body Schroedinger equation with the combined Argonne v18 two-nucleon and Urbana IX three-nucleon potentials. Instead of computing explicit overlap integrals, we applied a Green's function method that is insensitive to the difficulties of constructing and Monte Carlo sampling the long-range tails of the variational wave functions. This method also allows computation of the ANC at the physical separation energy, even when it differs from the separation energy for the Hamiltonian. We compare our results, which for most nuclei are the first ab initio calculations of ANCs, with existing experimental and theoretical results and discuss further possible applications of the technique.

  14. Stone-Cech remainder which make continuous images normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-07-01

    from a normal space X onto a regular space Y , then there are a space Z and a perfect map bf : Z —» Y extending / such that X C Z C ßX . If / is a continuous surjection from normal X onto Tychonov Y and ßX\\X is sequential, then Y is normal. More... generally, if / is a continuous surjection from normal X onto regular Y and ßX\\X has the property that countably compact subsets are closed (this property is called C-closed), then Y is normal. There is an example of a normal space X such that ßX\\X is C...

  15. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  16. Horizontal modular dry irradiated fuel storage system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Larry E. (Los Gatos, CA); McInnes, Ian D. (San Jose, CA); Massey, John V. (San Jose, CA)

    1988-01-01

    A horizontal, modular, dry, irradiated fuel storage system (10) includes a thin-walled canister (12) for containing irradiated fuel assemblies (20), which canister (12) can be positioned in a transfer cask (14) and transported in a horizontal manner from a fuel storage pool (18), to an intermediate-term storage facility. The storage system (10) includes a plurality of dry storage modules (26) which accept the canister (12) from the transfer cask (14) and provide for appropriate shielding about the canister (12). Each module (26) also provides for air cooling of the canister (12) to remove the decay heat of the irradiated fuel assemblies (20). The modules (26) can be interlocked so that each module (26) gains additional shielding from the next adjacent module (26). Hydraulic rams (30) are provided for inserting and removing the canisters (12) from the modules (26).

  17. Departmental Directives Program - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program and Conforming Changes to DOE O 252.1, Technical Standards Program Redline of DOE O 251.1D - First Draft Comment Response Report...

  18. The Specific Heat of Normal, Degenerate Quark Matter: Non-Fermi Liquid Corrections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; H. J. de Vega

    2001-02-26

    In normal degenerate quark matter, the exchange of dynamically screened transverse gluons introduces infrared divergences in the quark self-energies that lead to the breakdown of the Fermi liquid description. If the core of neutron stars are composed of quark matter with a normal component, cooling by direct quark Urca processes may be modified by non-Fermi liquid corrections. We find that while the quasiparticle density of states is finite and non-zero at the Fermi surface, its frequency derivative diverges and results in non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat of the normal, degenerate component of quark matter. We study these non-perturbative non-Fermi liquid corrections to the specific heat and the temperature dependence of the chemical potential and show that these lead to a reduction of the specific heat.

  19. Evaluating calibrations of normal incident pyrheliometers Frank Vignola Fuding Lin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    in Oregon with high quality instruments for solar energy research and to build the Support Network. INTRODUCTION As new solar energy systems are being designed and tested, the accuracy of the solar irradiance

  20. d+d Fusions with Log-normal Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MacKenzie Warrens 1 Cryo-cooled gas mixture of D 2 + 3 He was released from the gas jet 90-180J pulse from the Texas Pettawatt Laser irradiated the D 2 clusters Coulomb...

  1. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  2. Understanding the Irradiation Behavior of Zirconium Carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motta, Arthur; Sridharan, Kumar; Morgan, Dane; Szlufarska, Izabela

    2013-10-11

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuels in deep-burn TRISO fuel. Zirconium carbide possesses a cubic B1-type crystal structure with a high melting point, exceptional hardness, and good thermal and electrical conductivities. The use of ZrC as part of the TRISO fuel requires a thorough understanding of its irradiation response. However, the radiation effects on ZrC are still poorly understood. The majority of the existing research is focused on the radiation damage phenomena at higher temperatures (>450{degree}C) where many fundamental aspects of defect production and kinetics cannot be easily distinguished. Little is known about basic defect formation, clustering, and evolution of ZrC under irradiation, although some atomistic simulation and phenomenological studies have been performed. Such detailed information is needed to construct a model describing the microstructural evolution in fast-neutron irradiated materials that will be of great technological importance for the development of ZrC- based fuel. The goal of the proposed project is to gain fundamental understanding of the radiation-induced defect formation in zirconium carbide and irradiation response (ZrC) by using a combination of state-of-the-art experimental methods and atomistic modeling. This project will combine (1) in situ ion irradiation at a specialized facility at a national laboratory, (2) controlled temperature proton irradiation on bulk samples, and (3) atomistic modeling to gain a fundamental understanding of defect formation in ZrC. The proposed project will cover the irradiation temperatures from cryogenic temperature to as high as 800{degree}C, and dose ranges from 0.1 to 100 dpa. The examination of this wide range of temperatures and doses allows us to obtain an experimental data set that can be effectively used to exercise and benchmark the computer calculations of defect properties. Combining the examination of radiation-induced microstructures mapped spatially and temporally, microstructural evolution during post-irradiation annealing, and atomistic modeling of defect formation and transport energetics will provide new, critical understanding about property changes in ZrC. The behavior of materials under irradiation is determined by the balance between damage production, defect clustering, and lattice response. In order to predict those effects at high temperatures so targeted testing can be expanded and extrapolated beyond the known database, it is necessary to determine the defect energetics and mobilities as these control damage accumulation and annealing. In particular, low-temperature irradiations are invaluable for determining the regions of defect mobility. Computer simulation techniques are particularly useful for identifying basic defect properties, especially if closely coupled with a well-constructed and complete experimental database. The close coupling of calculation and experiment in this project will provide mutual benchmarking and allow us to glean a deeper understanding of the irradiation response of ZrC, which can then be applied to the prediction of its behavior in reactor conditions.

  3. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1A, Directives System, dated 1-30-98.

  4. FY 2013 Summary Report: Post-Irradiation Examination of Zircaloy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FY13SumRprtPostIrradiationExaminatZircaloy4Samples.pdf More Documents & Publications Neutron Irradiation of Hydrided Cladding Material in HFIR Summary of Initial Activities FY14...

  5. Microwave-induced spin currents in ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal bilayer system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Agrawal, Milan, E-mail: magrawal@physik.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Graduate School Materials Science in Mainz, Gottlieb-Daimler-Strasse 47, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Serga, Alexander A.; Lauer, Viktor; Papaioannou, Evangelos Th.; Hillebrands, Burkard; Vasyuchka, Vitaliy I. [Fachbereich Physik and Landesforschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Technische Universität Kaiserslautern, 67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2014-09-01

    A microwave technique is employed to simultaneously examine the spin pumping and the spin Seebeck effect processes in a YIG|Pt bilayer system. The experimental results show that for these two processes, the spin current flows in opposite directions. The temporal dynamics of the longitudinal spin Seebeck effect exhibits that the effect depends on the diffusion of bulk thermal-magnons in the thermal gradient in the ferromagnetic-insulator|normal-metal system.

  6. Two tests for multivariate normality based on the characteristic function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcones, Miguel A.

    Two tests for multivariate normality based on the characteristic function Miguel A. Arcones-mail:arcones@math.binghamton.edu April 10, 2007 Abstract We present two tests for multivariate normality. The presented tests are based on the L´evy characterization of the normal distribution and on the BHEP tests. The tests are affine

  7. Fractal Fluctuations and Statistical Normal Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Selvam

    2008-05-22

    Dynamical systems in nature exhibit selfsimilar fractal fluctuations and the corresponding power spectra follow inverse power law form signifying long-range space-time correlations identified as self-organized criticality. The physics of self-organized criticality is not yet identified. The Gaussian probability distribution used widely for analysis and description of large data sets underestimates the probabilities of occurrence of extreme events such as stock market crashes, earthquakes, heavy rainfall, etc. The assumptions underlying the normal distribution such as fixed mean and standard deviation, independence of data, are not valid for real world fractal data sets exhibiting a scale-free power law distribution with fat tails. A general systems theory for fractals visualizes the emergence of successively larger scale fluctuations to result from the space-time integration of enclosed smaller scale fluctuations. The model predicts a universal inverse power law incorporating the golden mean for fractal fluctuations and for the corresponding power spectra, i.e., the variance spectrum represents the probabilities, a signature of quantum systems. Fractal fluctuations therefore exhibit quantum-like chaos. The model predicted inverse power law is very close to the Gaussian distribution for small-scale fluctuations, but exhibits a fat long tail for large-scale fluctuations. Extensive data sets of Dow Jones index, Human DNA, Takifugu rubripes (Puffer fish) DNA are analysed to show that the space/time data sets are close to the model predicted power law distribution.

  8. Parametric resonance of a two-dimensional electron gas under bichromatic irradiation Christian Joas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von Oppen, Felix

    Parametric resonance of a two-dimensional electron gas under bichromatic irradiation Christian Joas driving ac fields (bichromatic irradiation). Compared to the case of monochromatic irradiation, which's theorem, gives rise to new qualitative effects specific to bichromatic irradiation. Namely, when

  9. Directional recoil rates for WIMP direct detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alenazi, Moqbil S.; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E Rm 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    New techniques for the laboratory direct detection of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are sensitive to the recoil direction of the struck nuclei. We compute and compare the directional recoil rates dR/dcos{theta} (where {theta} is the angle measured from a reference direction in the sky) for several WIMP velocity distributions including the standard dark halo and anisotropic models such as Sikivie's late-infall halo model and logarithmic-ellipsoidal models. Since some detectors may be unable to distinguish the beginning of the recoil track from its end (lack of head-tail discrimination), we introduce a folded directional recoil rate dR/d|cos{theta}|, where |cos{theta}| does not distinguish the head from the tail of the track. We compute the CS{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} exposures required to distinguish a signal from an isotropic background noise, and find that dR/d|cos{theta}| is effective for the standard dark halo and some but not all anisotropic models.

  10. The radioactive Substances (Irradiated Material) Exemption Order 1962 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Keith

    1962-01-01

    STATUTORY INSTRUMENTS 1962 No. 2647 ATOMIC ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE SUBSTANCES The Radioactive Substances (Irradiated Material) Exemption Order 1962

  11. APPLICATION OF PHASE-FIELD MODELING TO IRRADIATION EFFECTS IN...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DEFECTS; FLUCTUATIONS; IRRADIATION; KINETICS; NUCLEATION; RADIATIONS; SIMULATION; THERMODYNAMICS Microstructure evolution; Theory Word Cloud More Like This Full Text Journal...

  12. Continuous wave laser irradiation of explosives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGrane, Shawn D.; Moore, David S.

    2010-12-01

    Quantitative measurements of the levels of continuous wave (CW) laser light that can be safely applied to bare explosives during contact operations were obtained at 532 nm, 785 nm, and 1550 nm wavelengths. A thermal camera was used to record the temperature of explosive pressed pellets and single crystals while they were irradiated using a measured laser power and laser spot size. A visible light image of the sample surface was obtained before and after the laser irradiation. Laser irradiation thresholds were obtained for the onset of any visible change to the explosive sample and for the onset of any visible chemical reaction. Deflagration to detonation transitions were not observed using any of these CW laser wavelengths on single crystals or pressed pellets in the unconfined geometry tested. Except for the photochemistry of DAAF, TATB and PBX 9502, all reactions appeared to be thermal using a 532 nm wavelength laser. For a 1550 nm wavelength laser, no photochemistry was evident, but the laser power thresholds for thermal damage in some of the materials were significantly lower than for the 532 nm laser wavelength. No reactions were observed in any of the studied explosives using the available 300 mW laser at 785 nm wavelength. Tables of laser irradiance damage and reaction thresholds are presented for pressed pellets of PBX9501, PBX9502, Composition B, HMX, TATB, RDX, DAAF, PETN, and TNT and single crystals of RDX, HMX, and PETN for each of the laser wavelengths.

  13. Safety Issues for Hg irradiation Experiment siting -

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    1 SC/RP Safety Issues for Hg irradiation Experiment siting - Activation of air and components water retention Activation of air by 40 pulses of 2E13 p corresponds to approx. 1 yr of operation in EHN1. Lack of beam dump leads to unnecessary activation of components and aggravates air activation #12

  14. Low energy electron irradiation of an apple 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brescia, Giovanni Batista

    2002-01-01

    simulation. A software package, MCNP (Monte Carlo N-Particle), was used to simulate an electron beam irradiation with a 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 MeV sources on an apple modeled by interconnecting two spheres. The apple radii were 4.4 cm (perpendicular to its axis...

  15. Spatial disaggregation of satellite-derived irradiance using a high-resolution digital elevation model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruiz-Arias, Jose A.; Tovar-Pescador, Joaquin; Cebecauer, Tomas; Suri, Marcel

    2010-09-15

    Downscaling of the Meteosat-derived solar radiation ({proportional_to}5 km grid resolution) is based on decomposing the global irradiance and correcting the systematic bias of its components using the elevation and horizon shadowing that are derived from the SRTM-3 digital elevation model (3 arc sec resolution). The procedure first applies the elevation correction based on the difference between coarse and high spatial resolution. Global irradiance is split into direct, diffuse circumsolar and diffuse isotropic components using statistical models, and then corrections due to terrain shading and sky-view fraction are applied. The effect of reflected irradiance is analysed only in the theoretical section. The method was applied in the eastern Andalusia, Spain, and the validation was carried out for 22 days on April, July and December 2006 comparing 15-min estimates of the satellite-derived solar irradiance and observations from nine ground stations. Overall, the corrections of the satellite estimates in the studied region strongly reduced the mean bias of the estimates for clear and cloudy days from roughly 2.3% to 0.4%. (author)

  16. Irradiation Embritlement in Alloy HT-­9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano De Caro, Magdalena

    2012-08-27

    HT-9 steel is a candidate structural and cladding material for high temperature lead-bismuth cooled fast reactors. In typical advanced fast reactor designs fuel elements will be irradiated for an extended period of time, reaching up to 5-7 years. Significant displacement damage accumulation in the steel is expected (> 200 dpa) when exposed to dpa-rates of 20-30 dpa{sub Fe}/y and high fast flux (E > 0.1 MeV) {approx}4 x 10{sup 15} n/cm{sup 2}s. Core temperatures could reach 400-560 C, with coolant temperatures at the inlet as low as 250 C, depending on the reactor design. Mechanical behavior in the presence of an intense fast flux and high dose is a concern. In particular, low temperature operation could be limited by irradiation embrittlement. Creep and corrosion effects in liquid metal coolants could set a limit to the upper operating temperature. In this report, we focus on the low temperature operating window limit and describe HT-9 embrittlement experimental findings reported in the literature that could provide supporting information to facilitate the consideration of a Code Case on irradiation effects for this class of steels in fast reactor environments. HT-9 has an extensive database available on irradiation performance, which makes it the best choice as a possible near-term candidate for clad, and ducts in future fast reactors. Still, as it is shown in this report, embrittlement data for very low irradiation temperatures (< 200 C) and very high radiation exposure (> 150 dpa) is scarce. Experimental findings indicate a saturation of DBTT shifts as a function of dose, which could allow for long lifetime cladding operation. However, a strong increase in DBTT shift with decreasing irradiation temperature could compromise operation at low service temperatures. Development of a deep understanding of the physics involved in the radiation damage mechanisms, together with multiscale computer simulation models of irradiation embrittlement will provide the basis to derive trendlines and quantitative engineering predictions.

  17. Recovery of original superconducting properties in ion-irradiated Y sub 1 Ba sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub 7 minus x thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadlamannati, S.; England, P.; Stoffel, N.G.; Ramesh, R.; Ravi, T.S.; Hwang, D.M.; Findikoglu, A.; Li, Q.; Venkatesan, T.; McLean, W.L. )

    1990-11-19

    The changes in the superconducting properties of {ital in} {ital situ} pulsed laser deposited Y{sub 1}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}{sub {minus}{ital x}} thin films caused by irradiation with 200 keV He{sup +} ions are due to both oxygen loss as well as oxygen and cationic displacements induced by the irradiation. This is demonstrated by a study of the recovery of these defects by plasma oxidation and relatively low temperature ({approximately}600 {degree}C) annealing in oxygen. Plasma oxidation of films irradiated to low fluences enables the replacement of oxygen atoms in the lattice, leading to a substantial recovery of {ital T}{sub {ital c}0}, {ital J}{sub {ital c}}, and normal state resistivity. Irradiation-induced oxygen and cationic displacements and other microscopic defects can be further annealed out at relatively low temperatures leading to an almost full recovery of {ital T}{sub {ital c}0}, {ital J}{sub {ital c}}, and normal state resistivity. A transmission electron microscope study of irradiated films shows evidence that they are structurally disordered.

  18. Transmission resonances, quasi-normal modes and quasi-normal frequencies: Key analytic results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boonserm, Petarpa

    2010-01-01

    Exact solutions for transmission amplitudes and transmission probabilities, the existence of transmission resonances, and the closely related study of exact quasi-normal modes [QNMs] and quasi-normal frequencies [QNFs], has had a long and convoluted history - replete with many rediscoveries of previously known results. In this article we shall collect and survey a number of analytic results, and develop several new results, in a form amenable to comparison with the extant literature. In particular we shall discuss the delta-function potential, double-delta-function potential, and asymmetric double-delta-function potential; the step barrier, symmetric rectangular potential barrier, and asymmetric rectangular potential barrier; and then discuss the Eckart potential and its simplifications - the tanh potential and sech^2 potential. The history of the Eckart potential is particularly complicated: Apart from the special case of the Morse potential, other special cases and equivalent reformulations of Eckart's resu...

  19. Irradiation effects in high-density polyethylene Jussi Polvia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Kai

    Irradiation effects in high-density polyethylene Jussi Polvia , Kai Nordlunda a simulations, we have studied the irradiation effects in high density polyethylene. We determined the threshold for the hydrogen atoms in the polyethylene chain. Keywords: molecular dynamics, irradiation, damage threshold

  20. SOLAR IRRADIANCE FORECASTING FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    SOLAR IRRADIANCE FORECASTING FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF SOLAR ENERGY SYSTEMS Detlev Heinemann Oldenburg in irradiance forecasting have been presented more than twenty years ago (Jensenius and Cotton, 1981), when or progress with respect to the development of solar irradiance forecasting methods. Heck and Takle (1987

  1. Influence of surface waves on measured and modeled irradiance profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Influence of surface waves on measured and modeled irradiance profiles J. Ronald V. Zaneveld-parallel assumption. We show that the Gershun equation is valid if the irradiance is averaged over a sufficiently in which horizontal gradients of irradiance in the presence of waves are much larger than vertical

  2. On the relationship between radiance and irradiance: determining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Brien, James F.

    On the relationship between radiance and irradiance: determining the illumination from images between incoming radiance and irradiance. Specifically, we address the question of whether it is possible. This is a fundamental question in computer vision and inverse radiative transfer. We show that the irradiance can

  3. SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECTRAL SOLAR IRRADIANCE AND ITS ENTROPIC EFFECT ON EARTH'S CLIMATE Wei Wu1 , Yangang Liu1 of the spectral solar irradiance (SSI) at the top of the Earth's atmosphere by the Solar Radiation and Climate the total solar irradiance (TSI) at the top of the Earth's atmosphere (TOA) varies little (only about 0

  4. MATERIAL IRRADIATION DAMAGE STUDIES FOR HIGH POWER ACCELERATORS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    MATERIAL IRRADIATION DAMAGE STUDIES FOR HIGH POWER ACCELERATORS* N. Simos# , H. Kirk, L. Trung, H under severe shock and high irradiation exposure. The limitations of solid materials to function as high performance targets and in particular the effects of irradiation on key material properties are assessed

  5. ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oregon, University of

    ATMOSPHERIC TURBIDITY DETERMINATION FROM IRRADIANCE RATIOS Chris Gueymard Frank Vignola Florida irradiance measurements and other atmo- spheric parameters. An error analysis and various tests against cloudless and the diffuse irradiance data are very accurate. Yet, this method is insensitive to errors

  6. A model for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    A model for the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance Zhong-Ping Lee1 Naval] The diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance (Kd) is an important parameter for ocean of downwelling irradiance, J. Geophys. Res., 110, C02016, doi:10.1029/2004JC002275. 1. Introduction [2] Diffuse

  7. UV Irradiation and Humic Acid Mediate Aggregation of Aqueous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    UV Irradiation and Humic Acid Mediate Aggregation of Aqueous Fullerene (nC60) Nanoparticles X I A O by UV irradiation remarkablyincreasednC60 stabilityduetotheincreasednegative surface charge and reduced hindrance effect, it had little influence on the stability of UV-irradiated nC60 in NaCl due to reduced

  8. Vertex-Based Formulations of Irradiance from Polygonal Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertex-Based Formulations of Irradiance from Polygonal Sources Michael M. Stark UUCS-00-012 School of Computing University of Utah Salt Lake City, UT 84112 USA May 29, 2000 Abstract Irradiance at a point-Based Formulations of Irradiance from Polygonal Sources Technical Report UUCS-00-012 Michael M. Stark Department

  9. Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Proton Irradiation Damage Assessment of Carbon Reinforced Composites: 2-D & 3-D Weaved Structures. of thermal expansion (CTE). #12;Positive news regarding 3D Carbon composite kept coming !! Irradiation damage-carbon under heavy irradiation (LHC Phase-I collimator material) Phase 2 Expose 2D & 3D carbon

  10. Ion irradiation effects in natural garnets: Comparison with zircon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utsunomiya, Satoshi

    Ion irradiation effects in natural garnets: Comparison with zircon S. Utsunomiya, L.M. Wang, R ; Z ¼ 8) under ion-beam irradiation was investigated in order to compare its radiation susceptibility transmission electron microscopy during irradiation with 1.0 MeV Kr2þ over the temperature range of 50­1070 K

  11. K.K. Gan 1 Summary of Irradiation Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gan, K. K.

    K.K. Gan 1 Summary of Irradiation Activity September 22, 2010 K.K. Gan The Ohio State University with 300 MeV pions in August VCSEL/PIN Irradiation #12;K.K. Gan TWEPP2010 3 array VCSEL driver Chips Irradiation #12;K.K. Gan TWEPP2010 4 Infinicor SX+: participating institution: SMU

  12. 2nd High-Power Targetry Workshop MATERIAL IRRADIATION STUDIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    2nd High-Power Targetry Workshop MATERIAL IRRADIATION STUDIES FOR HIGH-INTENSITY PROTON BEAM/fracture strength · resilience to irradiation damage · Other than that, we are not asking for much!!!! And another based on non-irradiated material properties may show that it is possible to achieve 2 or even 4 MW

  13. Directives Tools - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferencesPlatinumDirections New
Directives &

  14. Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections &Directions

  15. Sensitivity of ultrasonic nonlinearity to irradiated, annealed, and re-irradiated microstructure changes in RPV steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlack, Katie; Kim, J-Y.; Wall, J.J.; Jacobs, L.J.; Sokolov, Mikhail A

    2014-05-01

    The planned life extension of nuclear reactors throughout the US and abroad will cause reactor vessel and internals materials to be exposed to more neutron irradiation than was originally intended. A nondestructive evaluation (NDE) method to monitor radiation damage would enable safe and cost-effective continued operation of nuclear reactors. Radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels causes microstructural changes that leave the material in an embrittled state. Nonlinear ultrasound is an NDE technique quantified by the measurable acoustic nonlinearity parameter, which is sensitive to microstructural changes in metallic materials such as dislocations, precipitates and their combinations. Recent research has demonstrated the sensitivity of the acoustic nonlinearity parameter to increasing neutron fluence in representative RPV steels. The current work considers nonlinear ultrasonic experiments conducted on similar RPV steel samples that had a combination of irradiation, annealing, re-irradiation, and/or re-annealing to a total neutron fluence of 0.5 5 1019 n/cm2 (E > 1 MeV) at an irradiation temperature of 290 C. The acoustic nonlinearity parameter generally increased with increasing neutron fluence, and consistently decreased from the irradiated to the annealed state over different levels of neutron fluence. Results of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter are compared with those from previous measurements on other RPV steel samples. This comprehensive set of results illustrates the dependence of the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter on neutron fluence, material composition, irradiation temperature and annealing.

  16. Inhalation radiotoxicity of irradiated thorium as a heavy water reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, G.W.R.; Priest, N.D.; Richardson, R.B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The online refueling capability of Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs), and their good neutron economy, allows a relatively high amount of neutron absorption in breeding materials to occur during normal fuel irradiation. This characteristic makes HWRs uniquely suited to the extraction of energy from thorium. In Canada, the toxicity and radiological protection methods dealing with personnel exposure to natural uranium (NU) spent fuel (SF) are well-established, but the corresponding methods for irradiated thorium fuel are not well known. This study uses software to compare the activity and toxicity of irradiated thorium fuel ('thorium SF') against those of NU. Thorium elements, contained in the inner eight elements of a heterogeneous high-burnup bundle having LEU (Low-enriched uranium) in the outer 35 elements, achieve a similar burnup to NU SF during its residence in a reactor, and the radiotoxicity due to fission products was found to be similar. However, due to the creation of such inhalation hazards as U-232 and Th-228, the radiotoxicity of thorium SF was almost double that of NU SF after sufficient time has passed for the decay of shorter-lived fission products. Current radio-protection methods for NU SF exposure are likely inadequate to estimate the internal dose to personnel to thorium SF, and an analysis of thorium in fecal samples is recommended to assess the internal dose from exposure to this fuel. (authors)

  17. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-16

    To establish directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors.

  18. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-16

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1, which establishes requirements for the development, coordination, and sunset review of DOE directives.

  19. Direct Photons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Reygers; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-08-17

    A brief overview of direct-photon measurements in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is given. Direct-photon yields for pT > 4 GeV/c and photon-hadron azimuthal correlations were determined with the aid of an electromagnetic calorimeter. By detecting e+e- pairs from the internal conversion of virtual photons direct-photon yields were measured between 1 photons from a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are expected to contribute significantly to the total direct-photon yield in this range.

  20. Cancellation of Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    Effective immediately the following Department of Energy directive is canceled. DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes, dated 04-14-2009.

  1. Direct-fired biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The direct-fired biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  2. Evolution of surface morphology and electronic structure of few layer graphene after low energy Ar{sup +} ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Harthi, S. H.; Kara'a, A.; Elzain, M. [Physics Department, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al Khod 123 (Oman); Hysen, T. [Department of Physics, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Cochin-22, Kerala (India); Department of Physics, Christian College, Chengannur, Kerala (India); Al-Hinai, A. T. [Department of Chemistry, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 36, Al Khod 123 (Oman); Myint, M. T. Z. [Center of Excellence in Nanotechnology, Asian Institute of Technology, P.O. Box 4, Klong, Luang, Pathumthani 12120 (Thailand)

    2012-11-19

    We report on co-existing dual anisotropy ripple formation, sp bonding transformation, and variation in the delocalized {pi} electron system in 1 keV Ar{sup +} ion irradiated few-layer graphene surfaces. Ripples in directions, perpendicular and parallel to the ion beam were found. The irradiation effect and the transition from the sp{sup 2}-bonding to sp{sup 3}-hybridized state were analyzed from the deconvolution of the C (1s) peak and from the shape of the derivative of the Auger transition spectra. The results suggest a plausible mechanism for tailoring of few-layer graphene electronic band structure with interlayer coupling tuned by the ion irradiation.

  3. Irradiation behaviour of the large grained UO{sub 2} fuel pellet in the transient conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosaka, Yuji; Watanabe, Seiichi; Arakawa, Yasushi

    2007-07-01

    In order to achieve a high duty fuel rod design, it is the key issue to suppress the fission gas release from the view point of the fuel rod inner pressure design. The large grain UO{sub 2} pellet is one of the candidates to meet such a requirement by reducing the fission gas release especially at high power and/or high burnup. We have demonstrated the fuel performance of the large grain pellet in the PWR irradiation conditions, which was fabricated with no additive but with active UO{sub 2} powder through the conventional pelletizing process for the normal grain size pellet. According to the mechanism of the fission gas retention, there may be a concern about the larger gas bubble swelling of the large grain pellet at the power transient conditions which may increase the potential of the PCMI failure. In this paper, we focus on the differences of the dimensional change in comparison among the pellets with the different grain sizes at the power transient conditions. The power ramp tests were carried out on the high burnup fuel rods of normal and large grain pellet with no additive, which had been irradiated in the PWR conditions up to around 60 GWd/t at peak position. The detailed PIE results revealed that the volume increment due to the power ramp clearly showed the dependence on the grain size as well as the fission gas release and suggested that the larger grain with no additive may suppress the gas bubble swelling at the power transient conditions. According to the experimental results, it is concluded that the large grain pellet with no additive does not deteriorate the irradiation performance during the power transient conditions from the view point of the gas bubble swelling. (authors)

  4. Forward and reverse characteristics of irradiated MOSFETs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, A.; Ceschia, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Dalla Betta, G.F.; Soncini, G.; Bellutti, P.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1996-06-01

    pMOSFETs biased with V{sub gs} < V{sub gd} during Co{sup 60} {gamma} irradiation have shown substantial differences between the forward and reverse subthreshold characteristics, induced by a non-uniform charge distribution in the gate oxide. Correspondingly, modest differences have been observed in the over-threshold I-V characteristics. After irradiation, the forward subthreshold curves can shift at higher or lower gate voltages than the reverse ones. The former behavior has been observed in long-channel devices, in agreement with the classical MOS theory and numerical simulations. The latter result has been obtained in short-channel devices, and it has been correlated to a parasitic punch-through conduction mechanism.

  5. Nanodot formation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abere, M. J.; Kang, M.; Goldman, R. S.; Yalisove, S. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chen, C. [Applied Physics Program, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Rittman, D. R. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Phillips, J. D. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Torralva, B. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic, and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States)

    2014-10-20

    The femtosecond laser generation of ZnSe nanoscale features on ZnSe surfaces was studied. Irradiation with multiple exposures produces 10–100?nm agglomerations of nanocrystalline ZnSe while retaining the original single crystal structure of the underlying material. The structure of these nanodots was verified using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The nanodots continue to grow hours after irradiation through a combination of bulk and surface diffusion. We suggest that in nanodot formation the result of ultrafast laser induced point defect formation is more than an order of magnitude below the ZnSe ultrafast melt threshold fluence. This unique mechanism of point defect injection will be discussed.

  6. Dissolution of Irradiated Commercial UO2 Fuels in Ammonium Carbonate and Hydrogen Peroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soderquist, Chuck Z.; Johnsen, Amanda M.; McNamara, Bruce K.; Hanson, Brady D.; Chenault, Jeffrey W.; Carson, Katharine J.; Peper, Shane M.

    2011-01-18

    We propose and test a disposition path for irradiated nuclear fuel using ammonium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide media. We demonstrate on a 13 g scale that >98% of the irradiated fuel dissolves. Subsequent expulsion of carbonate from the dissolver solution precipitates >95% of the plutonium, americium, curium, and substantial amounts of fission products, effectively partitioning the fuel at the dissolution step. Uranium can be easily recovered from solution by any of several means, such as ion exchange, solvent extraction, or direct precipitation. Ammonium carbonate can be evaporated from solution and recovered for re-use, leaving an extremely compact volume of fission products, transactinides, and uranium. Stack emissions are predicted to be less toxic, less radioactive, chemically simpler, and simpler to treat than those from the conventional PUREX process.

  7. Irradiated closed Friedmann brane-worlds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltán Keresztes; Ibolya Képíró

    2006-10-10

    We consider the evolution of a closed Friedmann brane irradiated by a bulk black hole. Both absorption on the brane and transmission across the brane are allowed, the latter representing a generalization over a previously studied model. Without transmission, a critical behaviour could be observed, when the acceleration due to radiation pressure and the deceleration introduced by the increasing self-gravity of the brane roughly compensate each other. We show here that increasing transmission leads to the disappearance of the critical behaviour.

  8. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwellingdownwelling irradiance

  9. Multivariate Non-Normality in the WMAP 1st Year Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Dineen; Peter Coles

    2005-11-29

    The extraction of cosmological parameters from microwave background observations relies on specific assumptions about the statistical properties of the data, in particular that the p-point distributions of temperature fluctuations are jointly-normal. Using a battery of statistical tests, we assess the multivariate Gaussian nature of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 1st year data. The statistics we use fall into three classes which test different aspects of joint-normality: the first set assess the normality of marginal (one-point) distributions using familiar univariate methods; the second involves statistics that directly assess joint-normality; and the third explores the evidence of non-linearity in the relationship between variates. We applied these tests to frequency maps, `foreground-cleaned' assembly maps and all-sky CMB-only maps. The assembly maps are of particular interest as when combined with the kp2 mask, we recreate the region used in the computation of the angular power spectrum. Significant departures from normality were found in all the maps. In particular, the kurtosis coefficient, D'Agostino's statistic and bivariate kurtosis calculated from temperature pairs extracted from all the assembly maps were found to be non-normal at 99% confidence level. We found that the results were unaffected by the size of the Galactic cut and were evident on either hemisphere of the CMB sky. The latter suggests that the non-Gaussianity is not simply related to previous claims of north-south asymmetry or localized abnormalities detected through wavelet techniques.

  10. Departmental Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1983-04-07

    The order establishes the directives system to be used for publishing permanent and temporary directives issued by DOE Headquarters and addressed to Headquarters and/or field elements. Chg 1 dated 3-14-85. Cancels DOE 1321.1A.

  11. Upgrade to the Birmingham Irradiation Facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dervan, P; Hodgson, P; Marin- Reyes; Parker, K; Wilson, J; Baca, M

    2015-01-01

    The Birmingham Irradiation Facility was developed in 2013 at the University of Birmingham using the Medical Physics MC40 cyclotron. It can achieve High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) fluences of 10^15 (1 MeV neutron equivalent (neq)) cm^-2 in 80 s with proton beam currents of 1 ?A and so can evaluate effectively the performance and durability of detector technologies and new components to be used for the HL-LHC. Irradiations of silicon sensors and passive materials can be carried out in a temperature controlled cold box which moves continuously through the homogenous beamspot. This movement is provided by a pre-configured XY-axis Cartesian robot scanning system. In 2014 the cooling system and cold box were upgraded from a recirculating glycol chiller system to a liquid nitrogen evaporative system. The new cooling system achieves a stable temperature of 50 1C in 30 min and aims to maintain sub-0 1C temperatures on the sensors during irradiations. This paper reviews the design, development, commissioning and perform...

  12. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  13. Irradiation response and stability of nanoporous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Engang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wang, Yongqiang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Serrano De Caro, Magdalena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caro, Jose A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zepeda-Ruiz, L [Lawrence Livermore national Laboratory; Bringa, E. [CONICET, Universidad de Cuyo, Argentina; Nastasi, Mike [University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE; Baldwin, Jon K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-28

    Nanoporous materials consist of a regular organic or inorganic framework supporting a regular, porous structure. Pores are by definition roughly in the nanometre range, that is between 0.2 nm and 100 nm. Nanoporous materials can be subdivided into 3 categories (IUPAC): (1) Microporous materials - 0.2-2 nm; (2) Mesoporous materials - 2-50 nm; and (3) Macroporous materials - 50-1000 nm. np-Au foams were successfully synthesized by de-alloying process. np-Au foams remain porous structure after Ne ion irradiation to 1 dpa. Stacking Fault Tetrahedra (SFTs) were observed in RT irradiated np-Au foams under the highest and intermediate fluxes, but not under the lowest flux. SFTs were not observed in LNT irradiated np-Au foams under all fluxes. The vacancy diffusivity in Au at RT is high enough so that the vacancies have enough time to agglomerate and then collapse to form SFTs. The high ion flux creates more damage per unit time; vacancies don't have enough time to diffuse or recombine. As a result, SFTs were formed at high ion fluxes.

  14. Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Normal Conditions of Transport Truck Test of a Surrogate Fuel Assembly. McConnell, Paul E.; Wauneka, Robert; Saltzstein, Sylvia J.; Sorenson, Ken B. Abstract not provided. Sandia...

  15. Log-normal distribution for correlators in lattice QCD?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas DeGrand

    2012-04-20

    Many hadronic correlators used in spectroscopy calculations in lattice QCD simulations appear to show a log-normal distribution at intermediate time separations.

  16. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013 Rocke,...

  17. Flavor dependence of normalization constant for an infrared renormalon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taekoon Lee

    2015-02-09

    An ansatz is proposed for the flavor dependence of the normalization constant for the first IR renormalon in heavy quark pole mass.

  18. Neural Effects of Beta Amyloid in Normal Aging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mormino, Elizabeth Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    age   categories.  Neurobiol  Aging  1997;  18:  351-­?7.  JK,  McIntosh  AR.  Aging  gracefully:  compensatory  B.  The  effect  of  normal  aging  on  the  coupling  of  

  19. Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Used Nuclear Fuel Loading and Structural Performance Under Normal Conditions of Transport - Modeling, Simulation and Experimental Integration RD&D Plan Used Nuclear Fuel Loading...

  20. Evaluation of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide and Silicon Carbide Composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newsome G, Snead L, Hinoki T, Katoh Y, Peters D

    2007-03-26

    The effects of fast neutron irradiation on SiC and SiC composites have been studied. The materials used were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) SiC and SiC/SiC composites reinforced with either Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic{trademark} fibers fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration. Statistically significant numbers of flexural samples were irradiated up to 4.6 x 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E>0.1 MeV) at 300, 500 and 800 C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dimensions and weights of the flexural bars were measured before and after the neutron irradiation. Mechanical properties were evaluated by four point flexural testing. Volume increase was seen for all bend bars following neutron irradiation. Magnitude of swelling depended on irradiation temperature and material, while it was nearly independent of irradiation fluence over the fluence range studied. Flexural strength of CVD SiC increased following irradiation depending on irradiation temperature. Over the temperature range studied, no significant degradation in mechanical properties was seen for composites fabricated with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} Type-S, while composites reinforced with Hi-Nicalon{trademark} or Sylramic fibers showed significant degradation. The effects of irradiation on the Weibull failure statistics are also presented suggesting a reduction in the Weibull modulus upon irradiation. The cause of this potential reduction is not known.

  1. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's

  2. Directives Templates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections

  3. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²? m?² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²? m?² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Finalmore »thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (« less

  4. Individualized Radical Radiotherapy of Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Based on Normal Tissue Dose Constraints: A Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baardwijk, Angela van Bosmans, Geert; Boersma, Liesbeth; Wanders, Stofferinus; Dekker, Andre; Dingemans, Anne Marie C.; Bootsma, Gerben; Geraedts, Wiel; Pitz, Cordula; Simons, Jean; Lambin, Philippe; Ruysscher, Dirk de

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Local recurrence is a major problem after (chemo-)radiation for non-small-cell lung cancer. We hypothesized that for each individual patient, the highest therapeutic ratio could be achieved by increasing total tumor dose (TTD) to the limits of normal tissues, delivered within 5 weeks. We report first results of a prospective feasibility trial. Methods and Materials: Twenty-eight patients with medically inoperable or locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, World Health Organization performance score of 0-1, and reasonable lung function (forced expiratory volume in 1 second > 50%) were analyzed. All patients underwent irradiation using an individualized prescribed TTD based on normal tissue dose constraints (mean lung dose, 19 Gy; maximal spinal cord dose, 54 Gy) up to a maximal TTD of 79.2 Gy in 1.8-Gy fractions twice daily. No concurrent chemoradiation was administered. Toxicity was scored using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events criteria. An {sup 18}F-fluoro-2-deoxy-glucose-positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan was performed to evaluate (metabolic) response 3 months after treatment. Results: Mean delivered dose was 63.0 {+-} 9.8 Gy. The TTD was most often limited by the mean lung dose (32.1%) or spinal cord (28.6%). Acute toxicity generally was mild; only 1 patient experienced Grade 3 cough and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 dysphagia. One patient (3.6%) died of pneumonitis. For late toxicity, 2 patients (7.7%) had Grade 3 cough or dyspnea; none had severe dysphagia. Complete metabolic response was obtained in 44% (11 of 26 patients). With a median follow-up of 13 months, median overall survival was 19.6 months, with a 1-year survival rate of 57.1%. Conclusions: Individualized maximal tolerable dose irradiation based on normal tissue dose constraints is feasible, and initial results are promising.

  5. Investigation into direct conversion with medium energy He-ion beams 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guild-Bingham, Avery A.

    2005-02-17

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Direct Energy Conversion project has identified the fission fragment magnetic collimator reactor (FFMCR) as a promising direct fission fragment conversion concept. The US DOE NERI Proof... of fission fragments which are the highly charged particles released as a result of nuclear fission. Prototypes based on some of those studies were constructed and irradiated in research reactors which experimentally confirmed the basic physics concepts...

  6. DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DIRECTIONAL PROPAGATION CANCELLATION FOR ACOUSTIC COMMUNICATION ALONG THE DRILL STRING Sinan along the drill string to the surface. Normal drilling operations produce in-band acoustic noise at intensities comparable to the transducer output while lossy propagation through the drill string and surface

  7. Normal Basis Multiplication Algorithms for GF(2n ) (Full Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    1 Normal Basis Multiplication Algorithms for GF(2n ) (Full Version) Haining Fan, Duo Liu and Yiqi. fan_haining@yahoo.com Abstract - In this paper, we propose a new normal basis multiplication algorithm for GF(2n ). This algorithm can be used to design not only fast software algorithms but also low

  8. Ordered Spaces all of whose Continuous Images are Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleissner, William G.; Levy, Ronnie

    1989-01-01

    Some spaces, such as compact Hausdorff spaces, have the property that every regular continuous image is normal. In this paper, we look at such spaces. In particular, it is shown that if a normal space has finite Stone-Cech remainder, then every...

  9. N d'ordre: 011 Ecole Normale Suprieure de Lyon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit, Anne

    N d'ordre: 011 Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon Laboratoire de l'Informatique du Parallélisme recherches in Computer Science from Ecole Normale Supérieure de Lyon. Scheduling Pipelined Applications. Yves Robert Professor, ENS Lyon, France M. Denis Trystram Professor, IMAG, Grenoble, France #12

  10. DATA NORMALIZATION : A KEY FOR STRUCTURAL HEALTH MONITORING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farrar, C. R. (Charles R.); Sohn, H. (Hoon); Worden, K.

    2001-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) is the implementation of a damage detection strategy for aerospace, civil and mechanical engineering infrastructure. Typical damage experienced by this infrastructure might be the development of fatigue cracks, degradation of structural connections, or bearing wear in rotating machinery. For SHM strategies that rely on vibration response measurements, the ability to normalize the measured data with respect to varying operational and environmental conditions is essential if one is to avoid false-positive indications of damage. Examples of common normalization procedure include normalizing the response measurements by the measured inputs as is commonly done when extracting modal parameters. When environmental cycles influence the measured data, a temporal normalization scheme may be employed. This paper will summarize various strategies for performing this data normalization task. These strategies fall into two general classes: (1) Those employed when measures of the varying environmental and operational parameters are available; (2) Those employed when such measures are not available. Whenever data normalization is performed, one runs the risk that the damage sensitive features to be extracted from the data will be obscured by the data normalization procedure. This paper will summarize several normalization procedures that have been employed by the authors and issues that have arose when trying to implement them on experimental and numerical data.

  11. Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stark, Dudley

    Oil production models with normal rate curves Dudley Stark School of Mathematical Sciences Queen;Abstract The normal curve has been used to fit the rate of both world and U.S.A. oil production. In this paper we give the first theoretical basis for these curve fittings. It is well known that oil field

  12. New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Bruce Ian

    New Equipartition Results for Normal Mode Energies of Anharmonic Chains B.I. Henry 1 and T. Szeredi 2;3 Date: 26 September 1995 The canonical and micro­canonical distribution of energy among. If the inter­particle potential is an even function then energy is distributed uniformly among the normal modes

  13. Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banded Matrix Fraction Representation of Triangular Input Normal Pairs Andrew P. Mullhaupt #3 if and only if A is triangular and AA #3; + BB #3; = I n , where I n is the identity matrix. Input normal and A is a matrix fraction, A = M 1 N , where M and N are triangular matrices of low bandwidth. For single input

  14. On the normalization of the HBT correlation function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Miskowiec; S. Voloshin

    1998-03-16

    We discuss the question of the normalization of the correlation function and its consistency with the often used form C(p1,p2) = 1+|f(p1,p2)|^2. We suggest an event mixing method which allows one to obtain absolutely normalized correlation functions from experimental data.

  15. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, J.S.

    1999-07-27

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A[prime], B and B[prime] to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation. 13 figs.

  16. Soft-commutated direct current motor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01

    A method and circuit is disclosed for soft-commutation of a direct current (DC) motor. An attenuation circuit is connected through auxiliary brushes A, A', B and B' to the commutator (16) to drain circuit from successive armature coils (15) before the main brushes (27, 28) disconnects from each of the coils (15). This prevents the spark generation that normally occurs in conventional DC motors. The attenuation circuit may also be connected before energization of the coil (15) for a soft turning on operation.

  17. dfield8 Direction Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-05

    dfield8 Direction Fields. • The routine dfield8 is already loaded on all ITaP machines as standard software. To access MAtlAB from any ITaP machine: Start

  18. Art Directable Tornadoes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwivedi, Ravindra

    2011-08-08

    ......................................................................... 25 2. Directional Force ........................................................... 26 3. Vortex Force .................................................................. 26 4. Lattice... ................................................................... 7 7 Tornado in its rope stage before disappearing ........................................... 9 8 Fire vortex and Waterspout ........................................................................ 10 9 Landspout and Gustnado...

  19. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  20. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Mark D. Miller, R.S., M.P.H. The Role control/ handwashing, solid waste disposal, vector control, general safety, sewage disposal, and adequate

  1. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-13

    The order establishes directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. The second draft is being submitted for review owing to extensive revisions to the first draft.

  2. Graphitization of polymer surfaces by scanning ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koval, Yuri [Department of Physics, Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Erwin-Rommel-Str. 1, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2014-10-20

    Graphitization of polymer surfaces was performed by low-energy Ar{sup +} and He{sup +} ion irradiation. A method of scanning irradiation was implemented. It was found that by scanning ion irradiation, a significantly higher electrical conductivity in the graphitized layers can be achieved in comparison with a conventional broad-beam irradiation. The enhancement of the conductance becomes more pronounced for narrower and better collimated ion beams. In order to analyze these results in more detail, the temperature dependence of conductance of the irradiated samples was investigated. The results of measurements are discussed in terms of weak localization corrections to conductance in disordered metals. The observed effects can be explained by enlargement of graphitic patches, which was achieved with the scanning ion irradiation method.

  3. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  4. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  5. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Was, G. S.; Jiao, Z.; Getto, E.; Sun, K.; Monterrosa, A. M.; Maloy, S. A.; Anderoglu, O.; Sencer, B. H.; Hackett, M.

    2014-06-14

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide,more »irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiation and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiation establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiation to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.« less

  6. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on different size scales within bone, as well as the role of sustained irradiation damage. Combining in situ mechanical testing with synchrotron x-ray diffraction imaging and...

  7. Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irradiation Effects on Human Cortical Bone Fracture Behavior Print Human bone is strong but still fallible. To better predict fracturing in bone, researchers need a mechanistic...

  8. Emulation of reactor irradiation damage using ion beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. S. Was; Z. Jiao; E. Beckett; A. M. Monterrosa; O. Anderoglu; B. H. Sencer; M. Hackett

    2014-10-01

    The continued operation of existing light water nuclear reactors and the development of advanced nuclear reactor depend heavily on understanding how damage by radiation to levels degrades materials that serve as the structural components in reactor cores. The first high dose ion irradiation experiments on a ferritic-martensitic steel showing that ion irradiation closely emulates the full radiation damage microstructure created in-reactor are described. Ferritic-martensitic alloy HT9 (heat 84425) in the form of a hexagonal fuel bundle duct (ACO-3) accumulated 155 dpa at an average temperature of 443°C in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). Using invariance theory as a guide, irradiation of the same heat was conducted using self-ions (Fe++) at 5 MeV at a temperature of 460°C and to a dose of 188 displacements per atom. The void swelling was nearly identical between the two irradiations and the size and density of precipitates and loops following ion irradiation are within a factor of two of those for neutron irradiation. The level of agreement across all of the principal microstructure changes between ion and reactor irradiations establishes the capability of tailoring ion irradiations to emulate the reactor-irradiated microstructure.

  9. Molecular weight distributions of irradiated siloxane-based elastomers...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to predict trends for the evolution of the distribution of MWBC of polymers under irradiation. The approach described herein can also discern heterogeneities in radiation...

  10. A New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach HomeA Better Anode Design to Improve Lithium-Ion Batteries PrintA New Solar Irradiance Reference Spectrum

  11. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling irradiance ARM Data

  12. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband diffuse upwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling irradiance ARM

  13. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral total downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARMtotal downwelling irradiance ARM Data

  14. BNL Irradiation and Characterization Studies Summary Report on HP Accelerator Material Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    BNL Irradiation and Characterization Studies Summary Report on HP Accelerator Material Research Reporting on (ONLY): · Irradiation and micro- macro-characterization of Beryllium · Irradiation Damage and Assessment of Graphite · Irradiation and Characterization of Ti-alloys (Ti6Al4V and Gum Metal) · Irradiation

  15. Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Huang; B.R. Maier; T.R. Allen

    2014-10-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for hightemperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 ?C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 ?C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrCx (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

  16. On the effect of x-ray irradiation on the deformation and fracture behavior of human cortical bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barth, Holly D.

    2010-01-01

    effects  of  gamma  irradiation  on  allograft  biology S.   Effects  of  gamma? irradiation  on  the  human bone  after  gamma  irradiation.   J.   Bone  Joint  Surg. ?

  17. Irradiation Programs and Test Plans to Assess High-Fluence Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien

    2015-03-01

    . Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a known issue in current reactors. In a 60 year lifetime, reactor core internals may experience fluence levels up to 15 dpa for boiling water reactors (BWR) and 100+ dpa for pressurized water reactors (PWR). To support a safe operation of our fleet of reactors and maintain their economic viability it is important to be able to predict any evolution of material behaviors as reactors age and therefore fluence accumulated by reactor core component increases. For PWR reactors, the difficulty to predict high fluence behavior comes from the fact that there is not a consensus of the mechanism of IASCC and that little data is available. It is however possible to use the current state of knowledge on the evolution of irradiated microstructure and on the processes that influences IASCC to emit hypotheses. This report identifies several potential changes in microstructure and proposes to identify their potential impact of IASCC. The susceptibility of a component to high fluence IASCC is considered to not only depends on the intrinsic IASCC susceptibility of the component due to radiation effects on the material but to also be related to the evolution of the loading history of the material and interaction with the environment as total fluence increases. Single variation type experiments are proposed to be performed with materials that are representative of PWR condition and with materials irradiated in other conditions. To address the lack of IASCC propagation and initiation data generated with material irradiated in PWR condition, it is proposed to investigate the effect of spectrum and flux rate on the evolution of microstructure. A long term irradiation, aimed to generate a well-controlled irradiation history on a set on selected materials is also proposed for consideration. For BWR, the study of available data permitted to identify an area of concern for long term performance of component. The efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry mitigation technology may decrease as fluence increases for high-stress intensity factors. This report describes a program plan to determine the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry as a function of the stress intensity factor applied and fluence. The use of existing, available, materials and the generation of additional materials via irradiation in a research reactor are considered.

  18. Theory of suppressing avalanche process of carrier in short pulse laser irradiated dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Hongxiang; Zu, Xiaotao; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Xiang, Xia; Sun, Kai; Gao, Fei

    2014-05-28

    A theory for controlling avalanche process of carrier during short pulse laser irradiation is proposed. We show that avalanche process of conduction band electrons (CBEs) is determined by the occupation number of phonons in dielectrics. The theory provides a way to suppress avalanche process and a direct judgment for the contribution of avalanche process and photon ionization process to the generation of CBEs. The obtained temperature dependent rate equation shows that the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics, e.g., fused silica, increase nonlinearly with the decreases of temperature. Present theory predicts a new approach to improve the laser induced damage threshold of dielectrics.

  19. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Constructs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Cornforth

    2012-03-26

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. Specific aims apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. The project includes research complementary to NASA/HRP space radiation project.

  20. Stress-induced patterns in ion-irradiated Silicon: a model based on anisotropic plastic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott A. Norris

    2012-07-24

    We present a model for the effect of stress on thin amorphous films that develop atop ion-irradiated silicon, based on the mechanism of ion-induced anisotropic plastic flow. Using only parameters directly measured or known to high accuracy, the model exhibits remarkably good agreement with the wavelengths of experimentally-observed patterns, and agrees qualitatively with limited data on ripple propagation speed. The predictions of the model are discussed in the context of other mechanisms recently theorized to explain the wavelengths, including extensive comparison with an alternate model of stress.

  1. Heritable Genetic Changes in Cells Recovered From Irradiated 3D Tissue Contracts. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornforth, Michael N.

    2013-05-03

    Combining contemporary cytogenetic methods with DNA CGH microarray technology and chromosome flow-sorting increases substantially the ability to resolve exchange breakpoints associated with interstitial deletions and translocations, allowing the consequences of radiation damage to be directly measured at low doses, while also providing valuable insights into molecular mechanisms of misrepair processes that, in turn, identify appropriate biophysical models of risk at low doses. The aims of this work apply to cells recovered from 3D tissue constructs of human skin and, for the purpose of comparison, the same cells irradiated in traditional 2D cultures. These aims are: to analyze by multi-flour fluorescence in situ hybridization (mFISH) the chromosomes in clonal descendents of individual human fibroblasts that were previously irradiated; to examine irradiated clones from Aim 1 for submicroscopic deletions by subjecting their DNA to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarray analysis; and to flow-sort aberrant chromosomes from clones containing stable radiation-induced translocations and map the breakpoints to within an average resolution of 100 kb using the technique of 'array painting'.

  2. Alloy development for irradiation performance in fusion reactors. Annual report, September 1979-September 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harling, O K; Grant, N J

    1980-12-01

    This report summarizes the research and development work performed during the second year of an M.I.T. project directed toward the development of improved structural alloys for the fusion reactor first wall application. Several new alloys have been produced by rapid solidification. Emphasis in alloy design and production has been placed on producing austenitic Type 316SS with fine dispersions of TiC and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ particles. Results of mechanical and microstructural tests are presented. A number of neutron irradiations have been initiated on samples fabricated from alloys produced in this project. A dual beam, heavy ion and helium ion, irradiation was completed using several alloys and a range of temperatures, damage rates and total doses. Modeling of irradiation phenomena has been continued with emphasis in the last year upon understanding the effect of recoil resolution on relatively stable second phase particles. Work continued to fully characterize the microstructure of several ZrB/sub 2/ doped stainless steels.

  3. Direct Photons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2008-10-21

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum ($p_T$) range. The $p$ + $p$ measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high $p_T$ direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring "almost real" virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass $e^+e^-$ pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  4. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  5. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  6. Optimisation of buildings' solar irradiation availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaempf, Jerome Henri; Montavon, Marylene; Bunyesc, Josep; Robinson, Darren; Bolliger, Raffaele

    2010-04-15

    In order to improve the sustainability of new and existing urban settlements it is desirable to maximise the utilisation of the solar energy incident on the building envelope, whether by passive or active means. To this end we have coupled a multi-objective optimisation algorithm with the backwards ray tracing program RADIANCE which itself uses a cumulative sky model for the computation of incident irradiation (W h/m{sup 2}) in a single simulation. The parameters to optimise are geometric (the height of buildings up to their facade and the height and orientation of roofs), but with the constraint of maintaining an overall built volume, and the objective function is heating season solar irradiation offset by envelope heat losses. This methodology has been applied to a range of urban typologies and produces readily interpretable results. The focus of this work is on the design of new urban forms but the method could equally be applied to examine the relative efficiency of existing urban settlements, by comparison of existing forms with the calculated optima derived from relevant specifications of the building envelope. (author)

  7. Hafnium radioisotope recovery from irradiated tantalum

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, David J. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01

    Hafnium is recovered from irradiated tantalum by: (a) contacting the irradiated tantalum with at least one acid to obtain a solution of dissolved tantalum; (b) combining an aqueous solution of a calcium compound with the solution of dissolved tantalum to obtain a third combined solution; (c) precipitating hafnium, lanthanide, and insoluble calcium complexes from the third combined solution to obtain a first precipitate; (d) contacting the first precipitate of hafnium, lanthanide and calcium complexes with at least one fluoride ion complexing agent to form a fourth solution; (e) selectively adsorbing lanthanides and calcium from the fourth solution by cationic exchange; (f) separating fluoride ion complexing agent product from hafnium in the fourth solution by adding an aqueous solution of ferric chloride to obtain a second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron; (g) dissolving the second precipitate containing the hafnium and iron in acid to obtain an acid solution of hafnium and iron; (h) selectively adsorbing the iron from the acid solution of hafnium and iron by anionic exchange; (i) drying the ion exchanged hafnium solution to obtain hafnium isotopes. Additionally, if needed to remove residue remaining after the product is dried, dissolution in acid followed by cation exchange, then anion exchange, is performed.

  8. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  9. Relative Accuracy of 1-Minute and Daily Total Solar Radiation Data for 12 Global and 4 Direct Beam Solar Radiometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.; Wilcox, S. M.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the relative performance of 12 global and four direct beam solar radiometers deployed at a single site over a 12-month period. Test radiometer irradiances were compared with a reference irradiance consisting of either an absolute cavity radiometer (during calibrations) or a low uncertainty thermopile pyrheliometer (during the evaluation period) for pyrheliometers; and for pyranometers a reference global irradiance computed from the reference pyrheliometer and diffuse irradiance from a shaded pyranometer. One minute averages of 3-second data for 12 months from the test instrument measurements were compared with the computed reference data set. Combined uncertainty in the computed reference irradiance is 1.8% {+-} 0.5%. Total uncertainty in the pyranometer comparisons is {+-}2.5%. We show mean percent difference between reference global irradiance and test pyranometer 1 minute data as a function of zenith angle, and percent differences between daily totals for the reference and test irradiances as a function of day number. We offer no explicit conclusion about the performance of instrument models, as a general array of applications with a wide range of instrumentation and accuracy requirements could be addressed with any of the radiometers.

  10. Directed Quantum Chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efetov, K.B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russia)

    1997-07-01

    Quantum disordered problems with a direction (imaginary vector potential) are discussed and mapped onto a supermatrix {sigma} model. It is argued that the 0D version of the {sigma} model may describe a broad class of phenomena that can be called directed quantum chaos. It is demonstrated by explicit calculations that these problems are equivalent to those of random asymmetric or non-Hermitian matrices. A joint probability of complex eigenvalues is obtained. The fraction of states with real eigenvalues proves to be always finite for time reversal invariant systems. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  11. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  12. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  13. Directions & Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections & Maps Directions

  14. Directions to Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections & MapsDirections

  15. Design Studies for a Multiple Application Thermal Reactor for Irradiation Experiments (MATRIX)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, Michael A.; Gougar, Hans D.; Ryskamp, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density test reactor specializing in fuel and materials irradiation. For more than 45 years, the ATR has provided irradiations of materials and fuels testing along with radioisotope production. Should unforeseen circumstances lead to the decommissioning of ATR, the U.S. Government would be left without a large-scale materials irradiation capability to meet the needs of its nuclear energy and naval reactor missions. In anticipation of this possibility, work was performed under the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) program to investigate test reactor concepts that could satisfy the current missions of the ATR along with an expanded set of secondary missions. A survey was conducted in order to catalogue the anticipated needs of potential customers. Then, concepts were evaluated to fill the role for this reactor, dubbed the Multi-Application Thermal Reactor Irradiation eXperiments (MATRIX). The baseline MATRIX design is expected to be capable of longer cycle lengths than ATR given a particular batch scheme. The volume of test space in In-Pile-Tubes (IPTs) is larger in MATRIX than in ATR with comparable magnitude of neutron flux. Furthermore, MATRIX has more locations of greater volume having high fast neutron flux than ATR. From the analyses performed in this work, it appears that the lead MATRIX design can be designed to meet the anticipated needs of the ATR replacement reactor. However, this design is quite immature, and therefore any requirements currently met must be re-evaluated as the design is developed further.

  16. Ablation experiment and threshold calculation of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Buxiang; Jiang, Gedong; Wang, Wenjun Wang, Kedian; Mei, Xuesong; State Key Laboratory for Manufacturing Systems Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710054

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between an ultra-fast pulse laser and a material's surface has become a research hotspot in recent years. Micromachining of titanium alloy with an ultra-fast pulse laser is a very important research direction, and it has very important theoretical significance and application value in investigating the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by ultra-fast pulse lasers. Irradiated by a picosecond pulse laser with wavelengths of 1064 nm and 532 nm, the surface morphology and feature sizes, including ablation crater width (i.e. diameter), ablation depth, ablation area, ablation volume, single pulse ablation rate, and so forth, of the titanium alloy were studied, and their ablation distributions were obtained. The experimental results show that titanium alloy irradiated by a picosecond pulse infrared laser with a 1064 nm wavelength has better ablation morphology than that of the green picosecond pulse laser with a 532 nm wavelength. The feature sizes are approximately linearly dependent on the laser pulse energy density at low energy density and the monotonic increase in laser pulse energy density. With the increase in energy density, the ablation feature sizes are increased. The rate of increase in the feature sizes slows down gradually once the energy density reaches a certain value, and gradually saturated trends occur at a relatively high energy density. Based on the linear relation between the laser pulse energy density and the crater area of the titanium alloy surface, and the Gaussian distribution of the laser intensity on the cross section, the ablation threshold of titanium alloy irradiated by an ultra-fast pulse laser was calculated to be about 0.109 J/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Statistical Inference for Models with Intractable Normalizing Constants 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jin, Ick Hoon

    2011-06-27

    In this dissertation, we have proposed two new algorithms for statistical inference for models with intractable normalizing constants: the Monte Carlo Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and the Bayesian Stochastic Approximation Monte Carlo algorithm...

  18. The normalization of citation counts based on classification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornmann, Lutz; Barth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    If we want to assess whether the paper in question has had a particularly high or low citation impact compared to other papers, the standard practice in bibliometrics is to normalize citations in respect of the subject category and publication year. A number of proposals for an improved procedure in the normalization of citation impact have been put forward in recent years. Against the background of these proposals this study describes an ideal solution for the normalization of citation impact: in a first step, the reference set for the publication in question is collated by means of a classification scheme, where every publication is associated with a single principal research field or subfield entry (e. g. via Chemical Abstracts sections) and a publication year. In a second step, percentiles of citation counts are calculated for this set and used to assign the normalized citation impact score to the publications (and also to the publication in question).

  19. Testicular function in normal and poor semen quality stallions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan, Tina Michelle

    2006-04-12

    The chromosomal location of endocrine genes was established, and relationships between expression of specific endocrine genes and measures of testis function in normal and poor semen quality stallions was assessed. Consensus ...

  20. Mapping Technology Space by Normalizing Technology Relatedness Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alstott, Jeff; Yan, Bowen; Luo, Jianxi

    2015-01-01

    Technology is a complex system, with technologies relating to each other in a space that can be mapped as a network. The technology relatedness network's structure can reveal properties of technologies and of human behavior, if it can be mapped accurately. Technology networks have been made from patent data, using several measures of relatedness. These measures, however, are influenced by factors of the patenting system that do not reflect technologies or their relatedness. We created technology networks that precisely controlled for these impinging factors and normalized them out, using data from 3.9 million patents. The normalized technology relatedness networks were sparse, with only ~20% of technology domain pairs more related than would be expected by chance. Different measures of technology relatedness became more correlated with each other after normalization, approaching a single dimension of technology relatedness. The normalized network corresponded with human behavior: we analyzed the patenting his...

  1. Electron transport in normal-metal/superconductor junctions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, XZ; Zhao, HW; Hu, Chia-Ren.

    2000-01-01

    On the basis of the Keldysh method of nonequilibrium systems, we develop a theory of electron tunneling in normal-metal-superconductor junctions. By using the tunneling Hamiltonian model (being appropriate for the tight-binding systems...

  2. Converting normal insulators into topological insulators via tuning orbital levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Wu-Jun

    Tuning the spin-orbit coupling strength via foreign element doping and modifying bonding strength via strain engineering are the major routes to convert normal insulators to topological insulators. We here propose an ...

  3. Connection between asymptotic normalization coefficients, subthreshold bound states, and resonances 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhamedzhanov, AM; Tribble, Robert E.

    1999-01-01

    We present here useful relations showing the connection between the asymptotic normalization coefficient (ANC) and the fitting parameters in K- and R-matrix theory methods which are often used when analyzing low energy experimental data. It is shown...

  4. The Effects of Irradiance in Determining the Vertical Distribution of Elk Kelp Pelagophycus porra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fejtek, Stacie Michelle

    2008-01-01

    microscopic stages to higher irradiances appears to be theH. (1996). “Effect of high irradiance on recruitment of theTHESIS The Effects of Irradiance in Determining the Vertical

  5. EFFECT OF EXCIMER LASER IRRADIATION OF BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER ON ITS CHEMICAL BONDING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Y. Lawrence

    EFFECT OF EXCIMER LASER IRRADIATION OF BIODEGRADABLE POLYMER ON ITS CHEMICAL BONDING Paper M1306 profile is favorable for surface treatment. The effects of excimer laser irradiation on the surface irradiation as a hea

  6. A comparison of DNA damage probes in two HMEC lines with X-irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisnewski, Christy L.; Bjornstad, Kathleen A.; Rosen, Christoper J.; Chang, Polly Y.; Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2008-01-01

    IN TWO HMEC LINES WITH X-IRRADIATION CHRISTY L. WISNEWSKI,prior to the experiment. Irradiation Four well LabTek slidesVictoreen probe 154. Following irradiation, slides or dishes

  7. SUBTHRESHOLD DISPLACEMENT DAMAGE IN COPPER-ALUMINUM ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drosd, R.

    2010-01-01

    ALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION R. Drosd, T. Kosel, andALLOYS DURING ELECTRON IRRADIATION R. Drosd, T. Kosel and J.ABSTRACT During electron irradiation at low energies which

  8. Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets Prepared by Polymer-Assisted Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Mitch A.

    2008-01-01

    Heavy-Ion Irradiation of Thulium(III) Oxide Targets PreparedRMS) roughness prior to irradiation is 1.1 nm for a ~250roughness of 2.0 nm after irradiation was measured by atomic

  9. SHORT COMMUNICATION UV microspot irradiator at Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    available for radiation biology research at the Radiological Research Accelerator Facility (RARAF), Columbia: 26 May 2013 Ó Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The Radiological Research Accelerator Facility at Columbia University has recently added a UV microspot irradiator to a microbeam irradiation

  10. IRRADIANCE MAPS APPLIED FOR THE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT OF PV SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    FEDERAL STATE OF SAXONY 1 Institute of Electrical Engineering,University of Applied Sciences (FH energy yield of a PV system,methods based on irradiance maps published by weather services or others of the irradiance data has been done by checking a set of monthly energy yield data of well-running grid

  11. Directed Regression Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Roy, Ben

    Directed Regression Yi-hao Kao Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 yihaokao Stanford, CA 94305 xyan@stanford.edu Abstract When used to guide decisions, linear regression analysis typically involves esti- mation of regression coefficients via ordinary least squares and their subsequent

  12. Deregulation Direct Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    AB 1890 AB1X Aggregator Blue Book CEC CPUC CTC Deregulation Direct Access Divestiture DWR EOB EPAct an initiative on the ballot in response to the energy crisis. www.ftcr.org ESPs that sell electricity generated of peak demand. Investor Owned Utility. A private electric utility (owned by shareholders) regulated

  13. Directed Diffusion Fabio Silva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    nodes can cache, or transform data, and may direct interests based on previously cached data (Section 3 University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA, USA 90089 ¶ Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA 90095 {fabio,johnh,govindan,estrin}@isi.edu February 10, 2004 1

  14. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-08-12

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-05: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Security Systems, dated 11-1-99 and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99. No cancellations.

  15. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-02-24

    This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

  16. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-12

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-04. DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11/1/99. DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99.

  17. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  18. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Daniel M. Harper, M.P.H. A Diverse Environmental Public Health Workforce to Meet the Diverse Environmental Health Challenges on environmental health and to build part nerships in the profession. In pursuit of these goals, we will feature

  19. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Brian Hubbard, M.P.H. Editor the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention (CDC) in every environmental health programs and professionals to antici pate, identify, and respond to adverse envi ronmental

  20. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Daneen Farrow Collier, M.S.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to pro vide up-to-date and relevant informa tion on environmental health the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention (CDC) in every

  1. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT John Sarisky, R.S., M.P.H. Developing Environmental Public Health Leadership Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up to of these goals, we will feature a column from the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers

  2. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Chou, W.

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  3. Fowler-Nordheim characteristics of electron irradiated MOS capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Candelori, A.; Paccagnella, A.; Cammarata, M.; Ghidini, G.; Fuochi, P.G.

    1998-12-01

    MOS capacitors with 8 nm thick oxides have been irradiated by an 8 MeV LINAC electron beam. C-V and I-V measurements have shown a positive trapped charge, higher for irradiation performed under negative gate bias, as a consequence of preferential charge recombination at the cathodic interface. No saturation of the positive trapped charge is measured up to 20 Mrad(Si). Neutral defects induced by irradiation have been studied, by performing positive and negative Fowler-Nordheim injection. The distribution of neutral defects is similar to that of trapped holes, indicating a correlation between trapped holes and neutral defects. Electrical stresses performed after irradiation have shown that the accumulation kinetics of oxide defects is similar in both unirradiated and irradiated devices.

  4. Identifying irradiated flours by photo-stimulated luminescence technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramli, Ros Anita Ahmad; Yasir, Muhamad Samudi; Othman, Zainon; Abdullah, Wan Saffiey Wan

    2014-02-12

    Photo-stimulated luminescence (PSL) technique was used in this study to detect gamma irradiation treatment of five types of flours (corn, rice, tapioca, wheat and glutinous rice) at four different doses 0, 0.2, .05 and 1kGy. The signal level was compared with two threshold values (700 and 5000). With the exception of glutinous rice, all irradiated samples produced a strong signal above the upper threshold (5000 counts/60s). All control samples produced negative result with the signals below the lower threshold (700 counts/60s) suggesting that the samples have not been irradiated. Irradiated glutinous rice samples produced intermediate signals (700 - 5000 counts/60s) which were subsequently confirmed using calibrated PSL. The PSL signals remained stable after 90 days of storage. The findings of this study will be useful to facilitate control of food irradiation application in Malaysia.

  5. Neutronics and Fuel Performance Evaluation of Accident Tolerant Fuel under Normal Operation Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Wu; Piyush Sabharwall; Jason Hales

    2014-07-01

    This report details the analysis of neutronics and fuel performance analysis for enhanced accident tolerance fuel, with Monte Carlo reactor physics code Serpent and INL’s fuel performance code BISON, respectively. The purpose is to evaluate two of the most promising candidate materials, FeCrAl and Silicon Carbide (SiC), as the fuel cladding under normal operating conditions. Substantial neutron penalty is identified when FeCrAl is used as monolithic cladding for current oxide fuel. From the reactor physics standpoint, application of the FeCrAl alloy as coating layer on surface of zircaloy cladding is possible without increasing fuel enrichment. Meanwhile, SiC brings extra reactivity and the neutron penalty is of no concern. Application of either FeCrAl or SiC could be favorable from the fuel performance standpoint. Detailed comparison between monolithic cladding and hybrid cladding (cladding + coating) is discussed. Hybrid cladding is more practical based on the economics evaluation during the transition from current UO2/zircaloy to Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) system. However, a few issues remain to be resolved, such as the creep behavior of FeCrAl, coating spallation, inter diffusion with zirconium, etc. For SiC, its high thermal conductivity, excellent creep resistance, low thermal neutron absorption cross section, irradiation stability (minimal swelling) make it an excellent candidate materials for future nuclear fuel/cladding system.

  6. Analyzing and simulating the variability of solar irradiance and solar PV powerplants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lave, Matthew S.

    2012-01-01

    Models of diffuse solar radiation, Renew Energ, 33 (2008) [solar irradiance for analyzing areally- totalized PV systems, Sol Energsolar irradiance for analyzing areally- totalized PV systems, Sol Energ

  7. Solar irradiance forecasting at multiple time horizons and novel methods to evaluate uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    From the k(t + 1) predictions, solar irradiance forecastsand M. Cony. Prediction of global solar irradiance based onand A. E. Ruano. Prediction of the solar radiation evolution

  8. A high-resolution, cloud-assimilating numerical weather prediction model for solar irradiance forecasting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathiesen, Patrick; Collier, Craig; Kleissl, Jan

    2013-01-01

    of numerical weather prediction solar irradiance forecasts numerical weather prediction model for solar irradiance weather prediction for intra?day solar  forecasting in the 

  9. Progress Report on Disassembly and Post-Irradiation Experiments for UCSB ATR-2 Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nanstad, Randy K; Odette, G. R.; Robertson, Janet Pawel; Yamamoto, T

    2015-09-01

    The reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in a light-water reactor (LWR) represents the first line of defense against a release of radiation in case of an accident. Thus, regulations that govern the operation of commercial nuclear power plants require conservative margins of fracture toughness, both during normal operation and under accident scenarios. In the unirradiated condition, the RPV has sufficient fracture toughness such that failure is implausible under any postulated condition, including pressurized thermal shock (PTS) in pressurized water reactors (PWR). In the irradiated condition, however, the fracture toughness of the RPV may be severely degraded, with the degree of toughness loss dependent on the radiation sensitivity of the materials. As stated in previous progress reports, the available embrittlement predictive models, e.g. [1], and our present understanding of radiation damage are not fully quantitative, and do not treat all potentially significant variables and issues, particularly considering extension of operation to 80y.

  10. Characteristics of Non-Irradiated and Irradiated Double SOI Integration Type Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asano, Mari; Sekigawa, Daisuke; Honda, Shunsuke; Tobita, Naoshi; Arai, Yasuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Kurachi, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    We are developing monolithic pixel sensors based on a 0.2 $\\mu$m fully-depleted Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) technology for HEP experiment applications. The total ionizing dose (TID) effect is the major issue in the applications for hard radiation environments in HEP experiments. To compensate for TID damage, we have introduced a Double SOI structure which has a Middle Silicon layer (SOI2 layer) in addition. We studied the recovery from TID damage induced by $\\mathrm{^{60}Co}~\\gamma$'s and other characteristics of an Integration-type Double SOI sensor. The Double SOI sensor irradiated to 100 kGy showed a response for IR laser similar to of a non-irradiated sensor when we applied a negative voltage to the SOI2 layer. We conclude that the Double SOI sensor is radiation hard enough to be used in HEP experiments in harsh radiation environments such as at Bell II or ILC.

  11. Breakdown properties of irradiated MOS capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paccagnella, A.; Candelori, A.; Milani, A.; Formigoni, E.; Ghidini, G.; Drera, D.; Pellizzer, F.; Fuochi, P.G.; Lavale, M.

    1996-12-01

    The authors have studied the effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the breakdown properties of different types of MOS capacitors, with thick (200 nm) and thin (down to 8 nm) oxides. In general, no large variations of the average breakdown field, time-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown at constant voltage, or charge-to-breakdown values have been observed after high dose irradiation (20 Mrad(Si) 9 MeV electrons on thin and thick oxides, 17(Si) Mrad Co{sup 60} gamma and 10{sup 14} neutrons/cm{sup 2} only on thick oxides). However, some modifications of the cumulative failure distributions have been observed in few of the oxides tested.

  12. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  13. Optimization parameter design for proton irradiation accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu-Wen An; Hong-Fei Ji; Sheng Wang; Shou-Yan Xu

    2014-11-20

    The proton irradiation accelerator is widely founded for industry application, and should be designed as compact, reliable, and easy operate. A 10 MeV proton beam is designed to be injected into the slow circulation ring with the repetition rate of 0.5 Hz for accumulation and acceleration, and then the beam with the energy of 300MeV will be slowly extracted by third order resonance method. For getting a higher intensity and more uniform beam, the height of the injection bump is carefully optimised during the injection period. Besides, in order to make the extracted beam with a more uniform distribution, a RF Knock-out method is adopted, and the RF kicker's amplitude is well optimised.

  14. Recovery of niobium from irradiated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Virginia T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1994-01-01

    A process for selective separation of niobium from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected form the group consisting of molybdenum, biobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the cationic resin; adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 5.0 to about 6.0; contacting the pH adjusting second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material for a time to selectively separate niobium from the solution and recovering the niobium from the dextran-based material.

  15. Magnetic properties on the surface of FeAl stripes induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiju, H., E-mail: kaiju@es.hokudai.ac.jp; Kondo, K.; Ishibashi, A. [Laboratory of Nano-Structure Physics, Research Institute for Electronic Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0020 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Creative Research Institution Sousei, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 001-0021 (Japan); Watanabe, S. [Center for Advanced Research of Energy and Materials, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8628 (Japan); Yoshimi, K. [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2014-05-07

    We demonstrate the formation of magnetic nanostripes on the surface of Fe{sub 52}Al{sub 48} induced by nanosecond pulsed laser irradiation and investigate their magnetic properties. The magnetic stripe consists of a disordered A2 phase of Fe-Al alloys with Al-oxide along the [110] direction on the (111)-oriented plane. According to the focused magneto-optical Kerr effect measurement, the coercive force of the magnetic stripe obeys the 1/cos?? law, where ? is the field rotation angle estimated from the stripe direction. Also, the jump field can be observed in the magnetic hysteresis loop. These results indicate that the magnetization reversal in the magnetic stripe originates from the domain pinning, showing that the magnetization rotates incoherently.

  16. Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R.S.; Delettrez, J.A.; Edgell, D.H.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Igumenshchev, I.V.; Keck, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Marciante, J.; Marozas, J.a.; Marshall, F.J.; Maximov, A.V.; McKenty, P.W.; Morse, S.F.B.; Myatt, J.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

    2006-06-28

    Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is expected to demonstrate high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next decade and is a leading candidate for inertial fusion energy production. The NIF will initially be configured for x-ray drive and with no beams placed at the target equator to provide a symmetric irradiation of a direct-drive capsule. LLE is developing the “polar-direct-drive” (PDD) approach that repoints beams toward the target equator. Initial 2-D simulations have shown ignition. A unique “Saturn-like” plastic ring around the equator refracts the laser light incident near the equator toward the target, improving the drive uniformity.

  17. SU-D-18A-04: Quantifying the Ability of Tumor Tracking to Spare Normal Tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burger, A; Buzurovic, I; Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Lewis, J; Mishra, P; Seco, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Tumor tracking allows for smaller tissue volumes to be treated, potentially reducing normal tissue damage. However, tumor tracking is a more complex treatment and has little benefit in some scenarios. Here we quantify the benefit of tumor tracking for a range of patients by estimating the dose of radiation to organs at risk and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for both standard and tracking treatment plans. This comparison is performed using both patient 4DCT data and extended Cardiac-Torso (XCAT) digital phantoms. Methods: We use 4DCT data for 10 patients. Additionally, we generate digital phantoms with motion derived from measured patient long tumor trajectories to compare standard and tracking treatment plans. The standard treatment is based on the average intensity projection (AIP) of 4DCT images taken over a breath cycle. The tracking treatment is based on doses calculated on images representing the anatomy at each time point. It is assumed that there are no errors in tracking the target. The NTCP values are calculated based on RTOG guidelines. Results: The mean reduction in the mean dose delivered was 5.5% to the lungs (from 7.3 Gy to 6.9 Gy) and 4.0% to the heart (from 12.5 Gy to 12.0 Gy). The mean reduction in the max dose delivered was 13% to the spinal cord (from 27.6 Gy to 24.0 Gy), 2.5% to the carina (from 31.7 Gy to 30.9 Gy), and 15% to the esophagus (from 69.6 Gy to 58.9 Gy). The mean reduction in the probability of 2nd degree radiation pneumonitis (RP) was 8.7% (3.1% to 2.8%) and the mean reduction in the effective volume was 6.8% (10.8% to 10.2%). Conclusions: Tumor tracking has the potential to reduce irradiation of organs at risk, and consequentially reduce the normal tissue complication probability. The benefits vary based on the clinical scenario. This study is supported by Varian Medical Systems, Inc.

  18. Irradiation effect on deuterium behaviour in low-dose HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shimada, Masashi; Cao, G.; Otsuka, T.; Hara, M.; Kobayashi, M.; Oya, Y.; Hatano, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Tungsten samples were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Oak Ridge National Laboratory at reactor coolant temperatures of 50-70°C to low displacement damage of 0.025 and 0.3 dpa under the framework of the US-Japan TITAN program (2007-2013). After cooling down, the HFIR neutron-irradiated tungsten samples were exposed to deuterium plasmas in the Tritium Plasma Experiment, Idaho National Laboratory at 100, 200 and 500 °C twice at the ion fluence of 5×10²? m?² to reach a total ion fluence of 1×10²? m?² in order to investigate the near surface deuterium retention and saturation via nuclear reaction analysis. Final thermal desorption spectroscopy was performed to elucidate irradiation effect on total deuterium retention. Nuclear reaction analysis results showed that the maximum near surface (<5 µm depth) deuterium concentration increased from 0.5 at % D/W in 0.025 dpa samples to 0.8 at. % D/W in 0.3 dpa samples. The large discrepancy between the total retention via thermal desorption spectroscopy and the near surface retention via nuclear reaction analysis indicated the deuterium was migrated and trapped in bulk (at least 50 µm depth for 0.025 dpa and 35 µm depth for 0.025 dpa) at 500 °C case even in the relatively low ion fluence of 10²? m?².

  19. Dose rate estimates from irradiated light-water-reactor fuel assemblies in air

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lloyd, W.R.; Sheaffer, M.K.; Sutcliffe, W.G.

    1994-01-31

    It is generally considered that irradiated spent fuel is so radioactive (self-protecting) that it can only be moved and processed with specialized equipment and facilities. However, a small, possibly subnational, group acting in secret with no concern for the environment (other than the reduction of signatures) and willing to incur substantial but not lethal radiation doses, could obtain plutonium by stealing and processing irradiated spent fuel that has cooled for several years. In this paper, we estimate the dose rate at various distances and directions from typical pressurized-water reactor (PWR) and boiling-water reactor (BWR) spent-fuel assemblies as a function of cooling time. Our results show that the dose rate is reduced rapidly for the first ten years after exposure in the reactor, and that it is reduced by a factor of {approx}10 (from the one year dose rate) after 15 years. Even for fuel that has cooled for 15 years, a lethal dose (LD50) of 450 rem would be received at 1 m from the center of the fuel assembly after several minutes. However, moving from 1 to 5 m reduces the dose rate by over a factor of 10, and moving from 1 to 10 m reduces the dose rate by about a factor of 50. The dose rates 1 m from the top or bottom of the assembly are considerably less (about 10 and 22%, respectively) than 1 m from the center of the assembly, which is the direction of the maximum dose rate.

  20. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett Lee; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-09-19

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  1. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2007-02-27

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  2. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Stowell, Jesse; Costin, Daniel

    2006-07-11

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  3. Direct drive wind turbine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bywaters, Garrett; Danforth, William; Bevington, Christopher; Jesse, Stowell; Costin, Daniel

    2006-10-10

    A wind turbine is provided that minimizes the size of the drive train and nacelle while maintaining the power electronics and transformer at the top of the tower. The turbine includes a direct drive generator having an integrated disk brake positioned radially inside the stator while minimizing the potential for contamination. The turbine further includes a means for mounting a transformer below the nacelle within the tower.

  4. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  5. Evaluation of Radiometers Deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Wilcox, S.; Stoffel, T.

    2014-02-01

    This study analyzes the performance of various commercially available radiometers used for measuring global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances. These include pyranometers, pyrheliometers, rotating shadowband radiometers, and a pyranometer with fixed internal shading and are all deployed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. Data from 32 global horizontal irradiance and 19 direct normal irradiance radiometers are presented. The radiometers in this study were deployed for one year (from April 1, 2011, through March 31, 2012) and compared to measurements from radiometers with the lowest values of estimated measurement uncertainties for producing reference global horizontal irradiances and direct normal irradiances.

  6. AGC-1 Pre-Irradiation Data Report Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William Windes

    2011-08-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Graphite R&D program is currently measuring irradiated material property changes in several grades of nuclear graphite for predicting their behavior and operating performance within the core of new Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) designs. The Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment consisting of six irradiation capsules will generate this irradiated graphite performance data for NGNP reactor operating conditions. All samples in the experiment will be fully characterized before irradiation, irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and then re-examined to determine the irradiation induced changes to key materials properties in the different graphite grades. The information generated during the AGC experiment will be utilized for NRC licensing of NGNP reactor designs, shared with international collaborators in the Generation IV Information Forum (GIF), and eventually utilized in ASME design code for graphite nuclear applications. This status report will describe the process the NGNP Graphite R&D program has developed to record the AGC1 pre-irradiation examination data.

  7. Dynamic Void Growth and Shrinkage in Mg under Electron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, W. Z. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Zhang, Y. F. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cheng, G. M. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Jian, W. W. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Millett, P. C. [Univ. of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR (United States). Dept. of Mecanical Engineering; Koch, C. C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Mathaudhu, S. N. [U.S. Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Materials Science Division; Zhu, Y. T. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering

    2014-04-30

    We report in-situ atomic-scale investigation of void evolution, including growth, coalescence and shrinkage, under electron irradiation. With increasing irradiation dose, the total volume of voids increased linearly, while nucleation rate of new voids decreased slightly, and the total number of voids decreased. Some voids continued to grow while others shrank to disappear, depending on the nature of their interactions with nearby self-interstitial loops. For the first time, surface diffusion of adatoms was observed largely responsible for the void coalescence and thickening. These findings provide fundamental understanding to help with the design and modeling of irradiation-resistant materials.

  8. Indoor and Outdoor Spectroradiometer Intercomparison for Spectral Irradiance Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habte, A.; Andreas, A.; Ottoson, L.; Gueymard, C.; Fedor, G.; Fowler, S.; Peterson, J.; Naranen, R.; Kobashi, T.; Akiyama, A.; Takagi, S.

    2014-05-01

    This report details the global spectral irradiance intercomparison using spectroradiometers that was organized by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Solar Radiation Research Laboratory. The intercomparison was performed both indoors and outdoors on September 17, 2013. Five laboratories participated in the intercomparison using 10 spectroradiometers, and a coordinated measurement setup and a common platform were employed to compare spectral irradiances under both indoor and outdoor conditions. The intercomparison aimed to understand the performance of the different spectroradiometers and to share knowledge in making spectral irradiance measurements. This intercomparison was the first of its kind in the United States.

  9. Reconstruction of solar irradiance using the Group sunspot number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Balmaceda; N. A. Krivova; S. K. Solanki

    2007-03-07

    We present a reconstruction of total solar irradiance since 1610 to the present based on variations of the surface distribution of the solar magnetic field. The latter is calculated from the historical record of the Group sunspot number using a simple but consistent physical model. Our model successfully reproduces three independent data sets: total solar irradiance measurements available since 1978, total photospheric magnetic flux from 1974 and the open magnetic flux since 1868 (as empirically reconstructed from the geomagnetic aa-index). The model predicts an increase in the total solar irradiance since the Maunder Minimum of about 1.3 \\rm{Wm$^{-2}$}.

  10. Viability of adult rat skin following 13 Mev proton irradiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caraway, Bobby Lamar

    1966-01-01

    alteration resulting from total skin proton irradiation seemed to be dose related. Therefore, since the amount of tissue alteration seems to be dose-dependent, a hypothesis was developed that growth and viability of skin cells removed' by biopsy... rats each were subjected to total-skin proton irradiation of varying doses. The dose varied from 1300 rad in Group I to 200 rad in Group 1V. Two rats from each group served as controls and received no irradiation. Five days and 30 days...

  11. Early Damage Mechanisms in Nuclear Grade Graphite under Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eapen, Dr. Jacob [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Krishna, Dr Ram [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL] [ORNL; Murty, Prof K.L. [North Carolina State University] [North Carolina State University

    2014-01-01

    Using Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy,we delineate the bond and defect structures in nuclear block graphite (NBG-18) under neutron and ion irradiation. The strengthening of the defect (D) peak in the Raman spectra under irradiation is attributed to an increase in the topological, sp2-hybridized defects. Using transmission electron microscopy, we provide evidence for prismatic dislocations as well as a number of basal dislocations dissociating into Shockley partials. The non-vanishing D peak in the Raman spectra, together with a generous number of dislocations, even at low irradiation doses, indicates a dislocation-mediated amorphization process in graphite.

  12. Measurement of thermal conductivity in proton irradiated silicon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marat Khafizov; Clarissa Yablinsky; Todd Allen; David Hurley

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the influence of proton irradiation on thermal conductivity in single crystal silicon. We apply laser based modulated thermoreflectance technique to extract the change in conductivity of the thin layer damaged by proton irradiation. Unlike time domain thermoreflectance techniques that require application of a metal film, we perform our measurement on uncoated samples. This provides greater sensitivity to the change in conductivity of the thin damaged layer. Using sample temperature as a parameter provides a means to deduce the primary defect structures that limit thermal transport. We find that under high temperature irradiation the degradation of thermal conductivity is caused primarily by extended defects.

  13. Concurrent in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hattar, K.; Bufford, D. C.; Buller, D. L.

    2014-08-29

    An in situ ion irradiation transmission electron microscope has been developed and is operational at Sandia National Laboratories. This facility permits high spatial resolution, real time observation of electron transparent samples under ion irradiation, implantation, mechanical loading, corrosive environments, and combinations thereof. This includes the simultaneous implantation of low-energy gas ions (0.8–30 keV) during high-energy heavy ion irradiation (0.8–48 MeV). In addition, initial results in polycrystalline gold foils are provided to demonstrate the range of capabilities.

  14. Irradiation and Bevacizumab in High-Grade Glioma Retreatment Settings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Ganswindt, Ute; Schwarz, Silke Birgit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm; Tonn, Joerg-Christian [Department of Neurosurgery, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Geisler, Julia; Fougere, Christian la [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Ertl, Lorenz; Linn, Jennifer [Department of Neuroradiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Siefert, Axel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany); Belka, Claus, E-mail: claus.belka@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Munich, Munich (Germany)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Reirradiation is a treatment option for recurrent high-grade glioma with proven but limited effectiveness. Therapies directed against vascular endothelial growth factor have been shown to exert certain efficacy in combination with chemotherapy and have been safely tested in combination with radiotherapy in a small cohort of patients. To study the feasibility of reirradiation combined with bevacizumab treatment, the toxicity and treatment outcomes of this approach were analyzed retrospectively. Patients and Methods: After previous treatment with standard radiotherapy (with or without temozolomide) patients with recurrent malignant glioma received bevacizumab (10 mg/kg intravenous) on Day 1 and Day 15 during radiotherapy. Maintenance therapy was selected based on individual considerations, and mainly bevacizumab-containing regimens were chosen. Patients received 36 Gy in 18 fractions. Results: The data of the medical charts of the 30 patients were analyzed retrospectively. All were irradiated in a single institution and received either bevacizumab (n = 20), no additional substance (n = 7), or temozolomide (n = 3). Reirradiation was tolerated well, regardless of the added drug. In 1 patient treated with bevacizumab, a wound dehiscence occurred. Overall survival was significantly better in patients receiving bevacizumab (p = 0.03, log-rank test). In a multivariate proportional hazards Cox model, bevacizumab, Karnovsky performance status, and World Health Organization grade at relapse turned out to be the most important predictors for overall survival. Conclusion: Reirradiation with bevacizumab is a feasible and effective treatment for patients with recurrent high-grade gliomas. A randomized trial is warranted to finally answer the question whether bevacizumab adds substantial benefit to a radiotherapeutic retreatment setting.

  15. Closeness to spheres of hypersurfaces with normal curvature bounded below

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borisenko, A A; Drach, K D

    2013-11-30

    For a Riemannian manifold M{sup n+1} and a compact domain ?? M{sup n+1} bounded by a hypersurface ?? with normal curvature bounded below, estimates are obtained in terms of the distance from O to ?? for the angle between the geodesic line joining a fixed interior point O in ? to a point on ?? and the outward normal to the surface. Estimates for the width of a spherical shell containing such a hypersurface are also presented. Bibliography: 9 titles.

  16. The normalized Laplacian spectrum of subdivisions of a graph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinchen Xie; Zhongzhi Zhang; Francesc Comellas

    2015-10-07

    Determining and analyzing the spectra of graphs is an important and exciting research topic in theoretical computer science. The eigenvalues of the normalized Laplacian of a graph provide information on its structural properties and also on some relevant dynamical aspects, in particular those related to random walks. In this paper, we give the spectra of the normalized Laplacian of iterated subdivisions of simple connected graphs. As an example of application of these results we find the exact values of their multiplicative degree-Kirchhoff index, Kemeny's constant and number of spanning trees.

  17. Directions_Crossroads_Facilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferencesPlatinumDirections New


  18. Direct electroplating on nonconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, D.; Landau, U. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Recently proposed processes for direct electroplating on nonconductive substrates offer numerous advantages. The industrial implementation of such processes is, however, hampered by lack of understanding. Presented here is a model for this class of processes based on three synergistic mechanisms: (i) stepwise propagation through the seed clusters that serve as sequentially activated microelectrodes, (ii) preferential accessibility to current of the sharp edge, and (iii) kinetics-based enhancement due to the fast propagation of an additive-free edge. The model has been computer simulated and verified by experiments of copper electroplating on nonconductive substrates.

  19. Omni-directional railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, M.

    1995-07-25

    A device is disclosed for electromagnetically accelerating projectiles. The invention features two parallel conducting circular plates, a plurality of electrode connections to both upper and lower plates, a support base, and a projectile magazine. A projectile is spring-loaded into a firing position concentrically located between the parallel plates. A voltage source is applied to the plates to cause current to flow in directions defined by selectable, discrete electrode connections on both upper and lower plates. Repulsive Lorentz forces are generated to eject the projectile in a 360 degree range of fire. 4 figs.

  20. Omni-directional railguns

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shahinpoor, Mohsen (9521 Avenida Del Oso NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    1995-01-01

    A device for electromagnetically accelerating projectiles. The invention features two parallel conducting circular plates, a plurality of electrode connections to both upper and lower plates, a support base, and a projectile magazine. A projectile is spring-loaded into a firing position concentrically located between the parallel plates. A voltage source is applied to the plates to cause current to flow in directions defined by selectable, discrete electrode connections on both upper and lower plates. Repulsive Lorentz forces are generated to eject the projectile in a 360 degree range of fire.

  1. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2005-03-18

    The following directives are extended until 3-18-06: DOE N 205.8, Cyber Security Requirements for Wireless Devices and Information Systems, dated 2-11-04; DOE N 205.9, Certification and Accreditation Process for Information Systems Including National Security Systems, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.10, Cyber Security Requirements for Risk Management, dated 02-19-04; DOE N 205.11, Security Requirements for Remote Access to DOE and Applicable Contractor Information Technology Systems, dated 2-19-04. DOE N 205.12, Clearing, Sanitizing, and Destroying Information System Storage Media, Memory Devices, and Other Related Hardware, dated 2-19-04.

  2. Buckman Direct Diversion Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L OBransen PlasmaEnergy, science,Buckman Direct Diversion Project

  3. Direct Federal Financial

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming963 1.969 1.979Coal4Cubic Feet)Cubic1992Thousand9)%YearD e sDirect

  4. Directives Points of Contact

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections

  5. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's home page

  6. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's home

  7. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's

  8. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's

  9. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's home page

  10. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's home page

  11. Directives Quarterly Update

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's home page

  12. UV Direct-Writing of Metals on Polyimide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Jack Hoyd-Gigg; Mccarthy, Aongus; Suyal, Himanshu; Prior, Kevin; Hand, Duncan P

    2008-01-01

    Conductive micro-patterned copper tracks were fabricated by UV direct-writing of a nanoparticle silver seed layer followed by selective electroless copper deposition. Silver ions were first incorporated into a hydrolyzed polyimide surface layer by wet chemical treatment. A photoreactive polymer coating, methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (MPEG) was coated on top of the substrate prior to UV irradiation. Electrons released through the interaction between the MPEG molecules and UV photons allowed the reduction of the silver ions across the MPEG/doped polyimide interface. The resultant silver seed layer has a cluster morphology which is suitable for the initiation of electroless plating. Initial results showed that the deposited copper tracks were in good agreement with the track width on the photomask and laser direct-writing can also fabricate smaller line width metal tracks with good accuracy. The facile fabrication presented here can be carried out in air, at atmospheric pressure, and on contoured surfaces.

  13. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, Muzaffer (Wheaton, IL); McKay, Timothy A. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1998-01-01

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD.

  14. High resolution biomedical imaging system with direct detection of x-rays via a charge coupled device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atac, M.; McKay, T.A.

    1998-04-21

    An imaging system is provided for direct detection of x-rays from an irradiated biological tissue. The imaging system includes an energy source for emitting x-rays toward the biological tissue and a charge coupled device (CCD) located immediately adjacent the biological tissue and arranged transverse to the direction of irradiation along which the x-rays travel. The CCD directly receives and detects the x-rays after passing through the biological tissue. The CCD is divided into a matrix of cells, each of which individually stores a count of x-rays directly detected by the cell. The imaging system further includes a pattern generator electrically coupled to the CCD for reading a count from each cell. A display device is provided for displaying an image representative of the count read by the pattern generator from the cells of the CCD. 13 figs.

  15. Results of crack-arrest tests on irradiated a 508 class 3 steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iskander, S.K.; Milella, P.P.; Pini, M.A.

    1998-02-01

    Ten crack-arrest toughness values for irradiated specimens of A 508 class 3 forging steel have been obtained. The tests were performed according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Standard Test Method for Determining Plane-Strain Crack-Arrest Fracture Toughness, K{sub la} of Ferritic Steels, E 1221-88. None of these values are strictly valid in all five ASTM E 1221-88 validity criteria. However, they are useful when compared to unirradiated crack-arrest specimen toughness values since they show the small (averaging approximately 10{degrees}C) shifts in the mean and lower-bound crack-arrest toughness curves. This confirms that a low copper content in ASTM A 508 class 3 forging material can be expected to result in small shifts of the transition toughness curve. The shifts due to neutron irradiation of the lower bound and mean toughness curves are approximately the same as the Charpy V-notch (CVN) 41-J temperature shift. The nine crack-arrest specimens were irradiated at temperatures varying from 243 to 280{degrees}C, and to a fluence varying from 1.7 to 2.7 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV). The test results were normalized to reference values that correspond to those of CVN specimens irradiated at 284{degrees}C to a fluence of 3.2 x 10{sup 19} neutrons/cm{sup 2} (> 1 MeV) in the same capsule as the crack-arrest specimens. This adjustment resulted in a shift to lower temperatures of all the data, and in particular moved two data points that appeared to lie close to or lower than the American Society of Mechanical Engineers K{sub la} curve to positions that seemed more reasonable with respect to the remaining data. A special fixture was designed, fabricated, and successfully used in the testing. For reasons explained in the text, special blocks to receive the Oak Ridge National Laboratory clip gage were designed, and greater-than-standard crack-mouth opening displacements measured were accounted for. 24 refs., 13 figs., 12 tabs.

  16. AGC-2 Irradiation Data Qualification Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence C. Hull

    2012-07-01

    The Graphite Technology Development Program will run a series of six experiments to quantify the effects of irradiation on nuclear grade graphite. The second Advanced Graphite Creep (AGC) experiment (AGC-2) began with Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 149A on April 12, 2011, and ended with ATR Cycle 151B on May 5, 2012. The purpose of this report is to qualify AGC-2 irradiation monitoring data following INL Management and Control Procedure 2691, Data Qualification. Data that are Qualified meet the requirements for data collection and use as described in the experiment planning and quality assurance documents. Data that do not meet the requirements are Failed. Some data may not quite meet the requirements, but may still provide some useable information. These data are labeled as Trend. No Trend data were identified for the AGC-2 experiment. All thermocouples functioned throughout the AGC-2 experiment. There was one instance where spurious signals or instrument power interruption resulted in a recorded temperature value being well outside physical reality. This value was identified and labeled as Failed data. All other temperature data are Qualified. All helium and argon gas flow data are within expected ranges. Total gas flow was approximately 50 sccm through the capsule. Helium gas flow was briefly increased to 100 sccm during reactor shutdown. All gas flow data are Qualified. At the start of the experiment, moisture in the outflow gas line increased to 200 ppmv then declined to less than 10 ppmv over a period of 5 days. This increase in moisture coincides with the initial heating of the experiment and drying of the system. Moisture slightly exceeded 10 ppmv three other times during the experiment. While these moisture values exceed the 10 ppmv threshold value, the reported measurements are considered accurate and to reflect moisture conditions in the capsule. All moisture data are Qualified. Graphite creep specimens are subjected to one of three loads, 393 lbf, 491 lbf, or 589 lbf. Loads were consistently within 5% of the specified values throughout the experiment. Stack displacement increased consistently throughout the experiment with total displacement ranging from 1 to 1.5 inches. No anomalous values were identified. During reactor outages, a set of pneumatic rams are used to raise the stacks of graphite creep specimens to ensure the specimens have not become stuck within the test train. This stack raising was performed after all cycles when the capsule was in the reactor. All stacks were raised successfully after each cycle. The load and displacement data are Qualified

  17. Remote direct memory access

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Archer, Charles J.; Blocksome, Michael A.

    2012-12-11

    Methods, parallel computers, and computer program products are disclosed for remote direct memory access. Embodiments include transmitting, from an origin DMA engine on an origin compute node to a plurality target DMA engines on target compute nodes, a request to send message, the request to send message specifying a data to be transferred from the origin DMA engine to data storage on each target compute node; receiving, by each target DMA engine on each target compute node, the request to send message; preparing, by each target DMA engine, to store data according to the data storage reference and the data length, including assigning a base storage address for the data storage reference; sending, by one or more of the target DMA engines, an acknowledgment message acknowledging that all the target DMA engines are prepared to receive a data transmission from the origin DMA engine; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, the acknowledgement message from the one or more of the target DMA engines; and transferring, by the origin DMA engine, data to data storage on each of the target compute nodes according to the data storage reference using a single direct put operation.

  18. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  19. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  20. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarantopoulou, E. Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S.; Velentzas, A. D.

    2014-09-14

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm?²) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, ?-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  1. Reinforcing multiwall carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation Martial Duchamp,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tománek, David

    Reinforcing multiwall carbon nanotubes by electron beam irradiation Martial Duchamp,1 Richard August 2010; published online 25 October 2010 We study the effect of electron beam irradiation-slip motion prior to irradiation, indicating presence of extended defects. Upon electron beam irradiation

  2. Optimum Inverter Sizing in Consideration of Irradiance Pattern and PV Incentives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehman, Brad

    Optimum Inverter Sizing in Consideration of Irradiance Pattern and PV Incentives Song Chen* Peng Li is that irradiance levels in real installations only occasionally reach irradiance levels of the STC conditions (1000 some researchers propose that undersized inverters cause considerable energy loss under high irradiance

  3. IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSIO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPER-ALLOYS CHARACTERIZED BY LOW THERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IRRADIATION EFFECTS ON THE PHYSIO-MECHANICAL PROPERTIES OF SUPER-ALLOYS CHARACTERIZED BY LOW and the associated irradiation damage, an experimental study has been undertaken to evaluate the potential- O) are observed in their un-irradiated state. Irradiations were performed using the 200 MeV protons

  4. RESEARCH ARTICLE Broad-band versus narrow-band irradiance for estimating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klimley, A. Peter

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Broad-band versus narrow-band irradiance for estimating latitude by archival tags of irradiance to estimate the latitude of archival tags was evaluated. These tags are placed on fishes in order irradiance with and without a cosine collector and narrow-band irradiance of seven narrow bands with 50

  5. THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE INFLUENCE OF MIXED-PHASE CLOUDS ON SURFACE SHORTWAVE IRRADIANCE DURING THE ARCTIC SPRING Dan-phase stratiform clouds on the surface shortwave irradiance is examined using spectral irradiance measurements from.) spectroradiometer measured downwelling spectral irradiance in the interval 350­2200 nm, in one-minute averages

  6. The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The influence of mixedphase clouds on surface shortwave irradiance during the Arctic spring Dan irradiance is examined using unique spectral shortwave irradiance measurements made during the Indirect spectral irradiance from 350 to 2200 nm in oneminute averages throughout April­May 2008 from the ARM

  7. Accuracy improvement of irradiation data by combining ground and satellite measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Accuracy improvement of irradiation data by combining ground and satellite measurements Jethro-Georg.Beyer@et.hs-magdeburg.de Introduction: · Planning, monitoring and operation of PV systems require accurate irradiation data · Knowledge of the accuracy improves the value of the irradiation data · Options to obtain site-specific irradiance data: 1

  8. Solar irradiance forecasting at multiple time horizons and novel methods to evaluate uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marquez, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Solar irradiance data . . . . . . . . . . . . .Accuracy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Solar Resourcev Uncertainty In Solar Resource: Forecasting

  9. Convex Deep Learning via Normalized Kernels Ozlem Aslan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuurmans, Dale

    Convex Deep Learning via Normalized Kernels ¨Ozlem Aslan Dept of Computing Science University Deep learning has been a long standing pursuit in machine learning, which until recently was hampered meth- ods while expanding the range of representable structures toward deep models. In this paper, we

  10. Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seda, Anthony Karel

    Computation of Normal Logic Programs by Fibring Neural Networks Vladimir Komendantsky1 and Anthony of the integration of fibring neural net- works (a generalization of conventional neural networks) into model by fibring neural networks of semantic immediate consequence operators TP and TP , where TP denotes

  11. RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brody, James P.

    RADIO PROCEDURES DURING NORMAL OPERATING CONDITIONS CALLING AND COMMUNICATING TECHNIQUES The secret are going to say. Many people with radios have a tendency to talk and/or repeat too much. Say what you need until it is second nature. Practicing proper day-to-day radio procedures will make emergency radio

  12. PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutter, Jared

    PAS kinase is required for normal cellular energy balance Huai-Xiang Hao*, Caleb M. Cardon*, Wojtek in a cell-autonomous manner to maintain cellular energy homeostasis and is a potential therapeutic target). The World Health Organization estimates that the current decade will witness a 46% increase in diabetes

  13. Coarser connected topologies and non-normality points

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yengulalp, Lynne Christine

    2009-01-01

    point of the Stone-Cech remainder of a space a non-normality point of the remainder? We will discuss the question in the case that X is a discrete space and then when X is a metric space without isolated points. We show that under certain set...

  14. Extremal unital completely positive normal maps and its symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anilesh Mohari

    2015-07-30

    We consider the convex set of ( unital ) positive ( completely ) maps from a $C^*$ algebra $\\cla$ to a von-Neumann sub-algebra $\\clm$ of $\\clb(\\clh)$, the algebra of bounded linear operators on a Hilbert space $\\clh$ and study its extreme points via its canonical lifting to the convex set of ( unital ) positive ( complete ) normal maps from $\\hat{\\cla}$ to $\\clm$, where $\\hat{\\cla}$ is the universal enveloping von-Neumann algebra over $\\cla$. If $\\cla=\\clm$ and a ( complete ) positive operator $\\tau$ is a unique sum of a normal and a singular ( complete ) positive maps. Furthermore, a unital complete positive map is a unique convex combination of unital normal and singular complete positive maps. We used a duality argument to find a criteria for extremal elements in the convex set of unital completely positive maps having a given faithful normal invariant state. In our investigation, gauge symmetry in Stinespring representation and Kadison theorem on order isomorphism played an important role.

  15. Mixed Inductive/Coinductive Types and Strong Normalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Andreas

    and coinductive types. Most research on inductive types has focused on the iso-style, i. e., there are explicit programming language. Research partially supported by the EU coordination action TYPES (510996). #12;InMixed Inductive/Coinductive Types and Strong Normalization Andreas Abel Department of Computer

  16. Some Properties of Realcompact Subspaces and Coarser Normal Spaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niknejad, Jila

    2009-04-23

    William Fleissner. In 1997 Buzjakova proved that for a pseudocompact space X, there exists an ordinal such that the product of X and that ordinal condenses onto a normal space if and only if X condenses onto a compact space. In the third chapter, we extend...

  17. LARGE-SCALE NORMAL COORDINATE ANALYSIS ON DISTRIBUTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghavan, Padma

    is presented in this paper. This method combines the implicitly restarted Lanczos algorithm with a state) plays an important role in the study of vibrational and thermal properties of various molecular by a collection of fundamental (normal) vibrational modes. These modes correspond to eigenvectors of a matrix

  18. Electromechanical imaging of the myocardium at normal and pathological states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    Electromechanical imaging of the myocardium at normal and pathological states Mathieu Pernot here a method for measuring the electromechanical coupling properties in the myocardium. Our method of the electromechanical wave is found to decrease to approximately 0.66 m/s in the ischemic region. I. INTRODUCTION

  19. Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lutchen, Kenneth

    Computational Model for Forced Expiration from Asymmetric Normal Lungs ADAM G. POLAK 1 losses along the airway branches. Calculations done for succeeding lung volumes result in the semidynamic to the choke points, characteristic differences of lung regional pressures and volumes, and a shape

  20. Jacobi's bound and normal forms computations. A historical survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier, François

    Jacobi's bound and normal forms computations. A historical survey F. Ollivier, LIX UMRS CNRS'evich Pankratiev. Abstract Jacobi is one of the most famous mathematicians of his century. His name is attached of Jacobi's results on ordinary differential equations and the available, published or unpublished material

  1. TESTS FOR NORMALITY BASED ON DENSITY ESTIMATORS OF CONVOLUTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wefelmeyer, Wolfgang

    TESTS FOR NORMALITY BASED ON DENSITY ESTIMATORS OF CONVOLUTIONS ANTON SCHICK, YISHI WANG-type kernel density estimator, goodness-of-fit test. Anton Schick was supported by NSF Grant DMS0906551. 1 #12;2 ANTON SCHICK, YISHI WANG AND WOLFGANG WEFELMEYER Instead of comparing distribution functions, we can

  2. Microwaving of normally opaque and semi-opaque substances

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheinberg, H.; Meek, T.T.; Blake, R.D.

    1990-07-17

    Disclosed is a method of heating small particles using microwave radiation which are not normally capable of being heated by microwaves. The surfaces of the particles are coated with a material which is transparent to microwave radiation in order to cause microwave coupling to the particles and thus accomplish heating of the particles.

  3. Deep Borehole Disposal Remediation Costs for Off-Normal Outcomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finger, John T.; Cochran, John R.; Hardin, Ernest

    2015-08-17

    This memo describes rough-order-of-magnitude (ROM) cost estimates for a set of off-normal (accident) scenarios, as defined for two waste package emplacement method options for deep borehole disposal: drill-string and wireline. It summarizes the different scenarios and the assumptions made for each, with respect to fishing, decontamination, remediation, etc.

  4. Gap Junction Structures. IV. Revealed by Low-irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Timothy S.

    , and negatively stained with uranyl acetate, have been recorded by low-irradiation methods. Our Fourier- averaged with uranyl acetate, showed hexagonal shaped connexons arrayed with approximate mirror symmetry

  5. Carbon Characterization Laboratory Readiness to Receive Irradiated Graphite Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen A. Moore

    2011-05-01

    The Carbon Characterization Laboratory (CCL) is located in Labs C19 and C20 of the Idaho National Laboratory Research Center. The CCL was established under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project to support graphite and ceramic composite research and development activities. The research conducted in this laboratory will support the Advanced Graphite Creep experiments—a major series of material irradiation experiments within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite program. The CCL is designed to characterize and test low activated irradiated materials such as high purity graphite, carbon-carbon composites, silicon-carbide composite, and ceramic materials. The laboratory is fully capable of characterizing material properties for both irradiated and nonirradiated materials. Major infrastructural modifications were undertaken to support this new radiological facility at Idaho National Laboratory. Facility modifications are complete, equipment has been installed, radiological controls and operating procedures have been established and work management documents have been created to place the CCL in readiness to receive irradiated graphite samples.

  6. Crystal Irradiation Stimulation of Enzyme Reactivity: An Explanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George E. Bass

    2007-06-12

    In 1968, Sorin Comorosan first reported a phenomenon wherein irradiation of the substrate of an enzyme reaction, in the crystalline state, for a specific number of seconds could lead to an enhanced aqueous solution reaction rate for the enzyme(up to 30%). Dependence on crystal irradiation time was found to be oscillatory with a fixed period. The basis for this unusual phenomenon has remained a mystery. Previously unreported experimental results are presented which demonstrate, for the LDH / pyruvate reaction, that the identity of the crystalline material irradiated is, largely, inconsequential. It is proposed here that the irradiation procedure drives oscillatory reactions involving atmospheric gases adsorbed on the crystals and that these photoproducts, or related dark-reaction species, when dissolved, function as enzyme cofactors.

  7. Irradiation Stability of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aitkaliyeva, Assel 1985-

    2012-09-28

    Application of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in various fields demands a thorough investigation of their stability under irradiation. Open structure, ability to reorganize and heal defects, and large surface-to-volume ratio of carbon nanotubes affect...

  8. RETHINKING SATELLITE BASED SOLAR IRRADIANCE MODELLING R. W. Mueller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    into the electricity grid, accurate solar irradiance data in a high spatial and temporal resolution are necessary. Solar irra- diance schemes provide these data using weather satellites such as METEOSAT and MSG

  9. Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Lanai high-density irradiance sensor network for characterizing solar resource variability of MW-scale PV system. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Lanai high-density...

  10. Irradiation facilities at the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandberg, V.

    1990-01-01

    The irradiation facilities for testing SSC components and detector systems are described. Very high intensity proton, neutron, and pion fluxes are available with beam kinetic energies of up to 800 MeV. 4 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. MATERIAL IRRADIATION STUDIES BNL AGS/BLIP/Hot Cell FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    BeMet Nickel-Plated Aluminum Mechanical property changes Ductility loss Strength loss/gain Fracture toughness (irradiated) GUM Metal Strengthens but clearly looses the "super-ductility property The type of gum metal

  12. Enhanced structural stability of nanoporous zirconia under irradiation of He

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Tengfei; Huang, Xuejun; Wang, Chenxu; Zhang, Yanwen; Xue, Jianming; Yan, Sha; Wang, Yuguang

    2012-01-01

    This work reports a greatly enhanced tolerance for He irradiation-induced swelling in nanocrystalline zirconia film with interconnected nanoporous structure (hereinafter referred as to NC-C). Compared to bulk yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and another nanocrystalline zirconia film only with discrete nano voids (hereinafter referred as to NC-V), the NC-C film reveals good tolerance for irradiation of high-fluence He. No appreciable surface blistering can be found even at the highest fluence of 6 1017 cm2 in NCC film. From TEM analysis of as-irradiated samples, the enhanced tolerance for volume swelling in NCC film is attributed to the enhanced diffusion mechanism of deposited He via widely distributed nano channels. Furthermore, the growth of grain size is quite small for both nanocrystalline zirconia films after irradiation, which is ascribed to the decreasing of area of grain boundary due to loose structure and low energy of primary knock-on atoms for He ions.

  13. Low-Dose Hyper-Radiosensitivity Is Not a Common Effect in Normal Asynchronous and G2-Phase Fibroblasts of Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S?onina, Dorota; Biesaga, Beata; Janecka, Anna; Kabat, Damian; Bukowska-Strakova, Karolina; Gasi?ska, Anna

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: In our previous study, using the micronucleus assay, a low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity (HRS)-like phenomenon was observed for normal fibroblasts of 2 of the 40 cancer patients investigated. In this article we report, for the first time, the survival response of primary fibroblasts from 25 of these patients to low-dose irradiation and answer the question regarding the effect of G2-phase enrichment on HRS elicitation. Methods and Materials: The clonogenic survival of asynchronous as well as G2-phase enriched fibroblast populations was measured. Separation of G2-phase cells and precise cell counting was performed using a fluorescence-activated cell sorter. Sorted and plated cells were irradiated with single doses (0.1-4 Gy) of 6-MV x-rays. For each patient, at least 4 independent experiments were performed, and the induced-repair model was fitted over the whole data set to confirm the presence of HRS effect. Results: The HRS response was demonstrated for the asynchronous and G2-phase enriched cell populations of 4 patients. For the rest of patients, HRS was not defined in either of the 2 fibroblast populations. Thus, G2-phase enrichment had no effect on HRS elicitation. Conclusions: The fact that low-dose hyper-radiosensitivity is not a common effect in normal human fibroblasts implies that HRS may be of little consequence in late-responding connective tissues with regard to radiation fibrosis.

  14. Irradiation Assisted Grain Boundary Segregation in Steels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Zheng; Faulkner, Roy G.

    2008-07-01

    The understanding of radiation-induced grain boundary segregation (RIS) has considerably improved over the past decade. New models have been introduced and much effort has been devoted to obtaining comprehensive information on segregation from the literature. Analytical techniques have also improved so that chemical analysis of layers 1 nm thick is almost routine. This invited paper will review the major methods used currently for RIS prediction: namely, Rate Theory, Inverse Kirkendall, and Solute Drag approaches. A summary is made of the available data on phosphorus RIS in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This will be discussed in the light of the predictions of the various models in an effort to show which models are the most reliable and easy to use for forecasting P segregation behaviour in steels. A consequence of RIS in RPV steels is a radiation induced shift in the ductile to brittle transition temperature (DBTT). It will be shown how it is possible to relate radiation-induced P segregation levels to DBTT shift. Examples of this exercise will be given for RPV steels and for ferritic steels being considered for first wall fusion applications. Cr RIS in high alloy stainless steels and associated irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) will be briefly discussed. (authors)

  15. Recovery of germanium-68 from irradiated targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Dennis R. (Los Alamos, NM); Jamriska, Sr., David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Hamilton, Virginia T. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01

    A process for selective separation of germanium-68 from proton irradiated molybdenum targets is provided and includes dissolving the molybdenum target in a hydrogen peroxide solution to form a first ion-containing solution, contacting the first ion-containing solution with a cationic resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of molybdenum, niobium, technetium, selenium, vanadium, arsenic, germanium, zirconium and rubidium remain in a second ion-containing solution while ions selected from the group consisting of rubidium, zinc, beryllium, cobalt, iron, manganese, chromium, strontium, yttrium and zirconium are selectively adsorbed by the first resin, adjusting the pH of the second ion-containing solution to within a range of from about 0.7 to about 3.0, adjusting the soluble metal halide concentration in the second ion-containing solution to a level adapted for subsequent separation of germanium, contacting the pH-adjusted, soluble metal halide-containing second ion-containing solution with a dextran-based material whereby germanium ions are separated by the dextran-based material, and recovering the germanium from the dextran-based material, preferably by distillation.

  16. Direct-to-digital holography and holovision

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thomas, Clarence E. (Knoxville, TN); Baylor, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Rasmussen, David A. (Knoxville, TN); Voelkl, Edgar (Oak Ridge, TN); Castracane, James (Albany, NY); Simkulet, Michelle (Latham, NY); Clow, Lawrence (Waterford, NY)

    2000-01-01

    Systems and methods for direct-to-digital holography are described. An apparatus includes a laser; a beamsplitter optically coupled to the laser; a reference beam mirror optically coupled to the beamsplitter; an object optically coupled to the beamsplitter, a focusing lens optically coupled to both the reference beam mirror and the object; and a digital recorder optically coupled to the focusing lens. A reference beam is incident upon the reference beam mirror at a non-normal angle, and the reference beam and an object beam are focused by the focusing lens at a focal plane of the digital recorder to form an image. The systems and methods provide advantages in that computer assisted holographic measurements can be made.

  17. Influence of irradiation upon few-layered graphene using electron-beams and gamma-rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuqing; Feng, Yi, E-mail: fyhfut@163.com; Mo, Fei; Qian, Gang; Chen, Yangming; Yu, Dongbo; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Xuebin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China)

    2014-07-14

    Few-layered graphene (FLG) is irradiated by electron beams and gamma rays. After 100?keV electron irradiation, the edges of FLG start bending, shrinking, and finally generate gaps and carbon onions due to sputtering and knock-on damage mechanism. When the electron beam energy is increased further to 200?keV, FLG suffers rapid and catastrophic destruction. Unlike electron irradiation, Compton effect is the dominant damage mechanism in gamma irradiation. The irradiation results indicate the crystallinity of FLG decreases first, then restores as increasing irradiation doses, additionally, the ratio (O/C) of FLG surface and the relative content of oxygen groups increases after irradiation.

  18. Sodium and potassium levels in the serum of acutely irradiated and non-irradiated rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, David Preston

    1967-01-01

    . The rats were exposed separately for a period of two minutes. The dose rate measurements were determined prior to this study by using lithium fluoride dosimeter s, and were brought up to date by calculation. Twenty-four hours before irradiation, one ml... carbonate 10 drops Magnesium sulfate 25 mgm Manganese sulfate 7. 5 mgm Iron phosphate 500 gm Sodium fluoride 1 mgm Potassium iodide 25 mcgm Potassium phosphate 1 mgm Potassium chloride 10 mgm 10 mgm Copper Sulfate 40 rngm Aluminum potassium s ul...

  19. Lymphocyte depletion in peripheral blood of gamma irradiated rats 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldin, Eric Michael

    1972-01-01

    LYMPHOCYTE DEPLETION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF GAMMA IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis by ERIC MICHAEL GOLDIN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... December 1972 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) LYMPHOCYTE DEPLETION IN PERIPHERAL BLOOD OF GAMMA IRRADIATED RATS A Thesis by ERIC MICHAEL GOLDIN Approved as to sty1e and con ent by: ( hairman of Co it ee) (H of Depar ment...

  20. Thermoluminescence and dielectric response of gamma irradiated muscovite mica

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaur, Sukhnandan, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com; Singh, Surinder, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com; Singh, Lakhwant, E-mail: sukhnandanphy@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar-143005 (India); Lochab, S. P. [Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The effect of gamma radiation dose on the thermoluminescence (TL) and dielectric properties of muscovite mica was studied. TL glow curves exhibited a single peak around 141 {sup 0}C and its activation energy was estimated to be about 0.89 eV. Different dielectric parameters like dielectric constant, dielectric loss and ac conductivity have been calculated in both pristine and gamma irradiated samples. These dielectric parameters have been studied as a function of irradiation dose.

  1. Ion irradiation testing of Improved Accident Tolerant Cladding Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Tesmer, Joseph R. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Maloy, Stuart A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    This report summarizes the results of ion irradiations conducted on two FeCrAl alloys (named as ORNL A&B) for improving the accident tolerance of LWR nuclear fuel cladding. After irradiation with 1.5 MeV protons to ~0.5 to ~1 dpa and 300°C nanoindentations were performed on the cross-sections along the ion range. An increase in hardness was observed in both alloys. Microstructural analysis shows radiation induced defects.

  2. Directed light fabrication

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.K.; Nemec, R.; Milewski, J.; Thoma, D.J.; Cremers, D.; Barbe, M.

    1994-09-01

    Directed Light Fabrication (DLF) is a rapid prototyping process being developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to fabricate metal components. This is done by fusing gas delivered metal powder particles in the focal zone of a laser beam that is, programmed to move along or across the part cross section. Fully dense metal is built up a layer at a time to form the desired part represented by a 3 dimensional solid model from CAD software. Machine ``tool paths`` are created from the solid model that command the movement and processing parameters specific to the DLF process so that the part can be built one layer at a time. The result is a fully dense, near net shape metal part that solidifies under rapid solidification conditions.

  3. Heavy-ion irradiation induced diamond formation in carbonaceous materials.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daulton, T. L.

    1999-01-08

    The basic mechanisms of metastable phase formation produced under highly non-equilibrium thermodynamic conditions within high-energy particle tracks are investigated. In particular, the possible formation of diamond by heavy-ion irradiation of graphite at ambient temperature is examined. This work was motivated, in part, by earlier studies which discovered nanometer-grain polycrystalline diamond aggregates of submicron-size in uranium-rich carbonaceous mineral assemblages of Precambrian age. It was proposed that the radioactive decay of uranium formed diamond in the fission particle tracks produced in the carbonaceous minerals. To test the hypothesis that nanodiamonds can form by ion irradiation, fine-grain polycrystalline graphite sheets were irradiated with 400 MeV Kr ions. The ion irradiated graphite (and unirradiated graphite control) were then subjected to acid dissolution treatments to remove the graphite and isolate any diamonds that were produced. The acid residues were then characterized by analytical and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The acid residues of the ion-irradiated graphite were found to contain ppm concentrations of nanodiamonds, suggesting that ion irradiation of bulk graphite at ambient temperature can produce diamond.

  4. Initiate test loop irradiations of ALSEP process solvent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterman, Dean R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Olson, Lonnie G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McDowell, Rocklan G. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report describes the initial results of the study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the efficacy of the ALSEP process and is written in completion of milestone M3FT-14IN030202. Initial irradiations, up to 100 kGy absorbed dose, of the extraction section of the ALSEP process have been completed. The organic solvent used for these experiments contained 0.05 M TODGA and 0.75 M HEH[EHP] dissolved in n-dodecane. The ALSEP solvent was irradiated while in contact with 3 M nitric acid and the solutions were sparged with compressed air in order to maintain aerated conditions. The irradiated phases were used for the determination of americium and europium distribution ratios as a function of absorbed dose for the extraction and stripping conditions. Analysis of the irradiated phases in order to determine solvent composition as a function of absorbed dose is ongoing. Unfortunately, the failure of analytical equipment necessary for the analysis of the irradiated samples has made the consistent interpretation of the analytical results difficult. Continuing work will include study of the impacts of gamma radiolysis upon the extraction of actinides and lanthanides by the ALSEP solvent and the stripping of the extracted metals from the loaded solvent. The irradiated aqueous and organic phases will be analyzed in order to determine the variation in concentration of solvent components with absorbed gamma dose. Where possible, radiolysis degradation product will be identified.

  5. Irradiation-Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking of Austenitic Stainless Steels and Alloy 690 from Halden Phase-II Irradiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Soppet, W. K.; Dietz Rago, Nancy L.; Shack, W. J.

    2008-09-01

    This work is an ongoing effort at Argonne National Laboratory on the mechanistic study of irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in the core internals of light water reactors.

  6. The effects of tungsten's pre-irradiation surface condition on helium-irradiated morphology

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Garrison, Lauren M.; Kulcinski, Gerald L.

    2015-07-17

    Erosion is a concern associated with the use of tungsten as a plasma-facing component in fusion reactors. To compare the damage progression, polycrystalline tungsten (PCW) and (110) single crystal tungsten (SCW) samples were prepared with (1) a mechanical polish (MP) with roughness values in the range of 0.018–0.020 ?m and (2) an MP and electropolish (MPEP) resulting in roughness values of 0.010–0.020 ?m for PCW and 0.003–0.005 ?m for SCW samples. Samples were irradiated with 30 keV He+ at 1173 K to fluences between 3 × 1021 and 6 × 1022 He/m2. The morphologies that developed after low-fluence bombardment weremore »different for each type of sample—MP SCW, MPEP SCW, MP PCW, and MPEP PCW. At the highest fluence, the SCW MPEP sample lost significantly more mass and developed a different morphology than the MP SCW sample. The PCW samples developed a similar morphology and had similar mass loss at the highest fluence. Surface preparation can have a significant effect on post-irradiation morphology that should be considered for the design of future fusion reactors such as ITER and DEMO.« less

  7. Bioenergy Technologies Office New Directions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    New Directions and New Business Opportunities for BETO Valerie Reed, Acting Director, BETO, U.S. Department of Energy

  8. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

    This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  9. University of Texas Panamerican (UTPA): Solar Radiation Lab (SRL); Edinburg, Texas (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ramos, J.; Andreas, A.

    This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (RSR); Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Maxey, C.; Andreas, A.

    2007-09-12

    This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  11. University of Texas Panamerican (UTPA): Solar Radiation Lab (SRL); Edinburg, Texas (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Ramos, J.; Andreas, A.

    2011-09-01

    This measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location.

  12. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  13. Strong Evidence of Normal Heat Conduction in a one-Dimensional Quantum System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keiji Saito

    2002-12-11

    We investigate how the normal energy transport is realized in one-dimensional quantum systems using a quantum spin system. The direct investigation of local energy distribution under thermal gradient is made using the quantum master equation, and the mixing properties and the convergence of the Green-Kubo formula are investigated when the number of spin increases. We find that the autocorrelation function in the Green-Kubo formula decays as $\\sim t^{-1.5}$ to a finite value which vanishes rapidly with the increase of the system size. As a result, the Green-Kubo formula converges to a finite value in the thermodynamic limit. These facts strongly support the realization of Fourier heat law in a quantum system.

  14. A comparison of normal and worst case cement plant emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodford, J.; Gossman, D.; Johnson, N.

    1996-12-31

    Lone Star Industries, Inc. in Cape Girardeau, Missouri conducted a trial burn in October, 1995. Two metals emissions test days were conducted. One of the test days was a worst case metals spiking day and one of the test days was a normal emissions day. This paper examines and compares the emissions from these two test days. Much has been made of metals emissions from hazardous waste burning cement kilns, but for the most part, this has been due to the worst case metals emissions data that became available from the 1992 BIF compliance testing performed and reported by 24 cement plants. By comparison, very little data exists on normal cement kiln emissions. This paper provides one comparison.

  15. High Power Tests of Normal Conducting Single-Cell Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC; Higashi, Y.; Higo, T.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2007-11-07

    We report the results of the first high power tests of single-cell traveling-wave and standing-wave structures. These tests are part of an experimental and theoretical study of rf breakdown in normal conducting structures at 11.4 GHz. The goal of this study is to determine the gradient potential of normal-conducting rf-powered particle beam accelerators. The test setup consists of reusable mode converters and short test structures and is powered by SLAC's XL-4 klystron. This setup was created for economical testing of different cell geometries, cell materials and preparation techniques with short turn-around time. The mode launchers and structures were manufactured at SLAC and KEK and tested in the SLAC Klystron Test Lab.

  16. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, Maria DeFatima (New York, NY); Soares, Marcelo Bento (New York, NY)

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library.

  17. Procedure for normalization of cDNA libraries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bonaldo, M.D.; Soares, M.B.

    1997-12-30

    This invention provides a method to normalize a cDNA library constructed in a vector capable of being converted to single-stranded circles and capable of producing complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles comprising: (a) converting the cDNA library in single-stranded circles; (b) generating complementary nucleic acid molecules to the single-stranded circles; (c) hybridizing the single-stranded circles converted in step (a) with complementary nucleic acid molecules of step (b) to produce partial duplexes to an appropriate Cot; (e) separating the unhybridized single-stranded circles from the hybridized single-stranded circles, thereby generating a normalized cDNA library. 1 fig.

  18. Multiple direction vibration fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cericola, Fred (Albuquerque, NM); Doggett, James W. (Albuquerque, NM); Ernest, Terry L. (Albuquerque, NM); Priddy, Tommy G. (Rockville, MD)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for simulating a rocket launch environment on a test item undergoing centrifuge testing by subjecting the item simultaneously or separately to vibration along an axis of centripetal force and along an axis perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The apparatus includes a shaker motor supported by centrifuge arms and a right angle fixture pivotally connected to one of the shaker motor mounts. When the shaker motor vibrates along the centripetal force axis, the vibrations are imparted to a first side of the right angle fixture. The vibrations are transmitted 90 degrees around the pivot and are directed to a second side of the right angle fixture which imparts vibrations perpendicular to the centripetal force axis. The test item is in contact with a third side of the right angle fixture and receives both centripetal-force-axis vibrations and perpendicular axis vibrations simultaneously. A test item can be attached to the third side near the flexible coupling or near the air bag to obtain vibrations along the centripetal force axis or transverse to the centripetal force axis.

  19. Surface Tension between Kaon Condensate and Normal Nuclear Matter Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael B. Christiansen; Norman K. Glendenning; Jurgen Schaffner-Bielich

    2000-03-20

    We calculate for the first time the surface tension and curvature coefficient of a first order phase transition between two possible phases of cold nuclear matter, a normal nuclear matter phase in equilibrium with a kaon condensed phase, at densities a few times the saturation density. We find the surface tension is proportional to the difference in energy density between the two phases squared. Furthermore, we show the consequences for the geometrical structures of the mixed phase region in a neutron star.

  20. Qualitative properties of optimal portfolios in log-normal markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zariphopoulou, Thaleia

    ), t (stock allocation) · Value of allocation Xt = 0 t + t dXt = t( dt + dWt) ; = 4 #12;Value function-normal markets (with S. Kallblad) · Completely monotone functions and marginal utilities (with S. Kallblad securities dSt = St dt + St dWt , S0 > 0 dBt = 0 , B0 = 1 · Self-financing strategies 0 t (bond allocation

  1. Universal spectral correlations in ensembles of random normal matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravi Prakash; Akhilesh Pandey

    2014-12-20

    We consider non-gaussian ensembles of random normal matrices with the constraint that the ensembles are invariant under unitary transformations. We show that the level density of eigenvalues exhibits disk to ring transition in the complex plane. We also show that the n-eigenvalue correlation and the spacing distribution are universal and identical to that of complex (Gaussian) Ginibre ensemble. Our results are confirmed by Monte Carlo calculations. We verify the universality for dissipative quantum kicked rotor system.

  2. Deconvolution in Random Effects Models via Normal Mixtures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litton, Nathaniel A.

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation describes a minimum distance method for density estimation when the variable of interest is not directly observed. It is assumed that the underlying target density can be well approximated by a mixture ...

  3. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; et al

    2015-05-11

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beammore »geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D? gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹? to 1.2 10¹?W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.« less

  4. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hohenberger, M. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258879711); Radha, P. B. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Myatt, J. F. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marozas, J. A. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Michel, D. T. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000166894359); Regan, S. P. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Shvydky, A. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Sangster, T. C. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Bates, J. W. [U. S. Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States)] (ORCID:0000000188087240); Betti, R. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Boehly, T. R. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Bonino, M. J. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Casey, D. T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Collins, T. J. B. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Craxton, R. S. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000158858227); Delettrez, J. A. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Edgell, D. H. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Epstein, R. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340628444); Fiksel, G. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Fitzsimmons, P. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Froula, D. H. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Harding, D. R. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Kalantar, D. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Karasik, M. [U. S. Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States); Kessler, T. J. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Knauer, J. P. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Kurz, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lafon, M. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); LaFortune, K. N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacGowan, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mackinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000341604479); McCrory, R. L. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); McKenty, P. W. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Meeker, J. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Lab. for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beam geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D? gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 10¹? to 1.2 10¹?W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.

  5. Polar-direct-drive experiments on the national ignition facilitya)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hohenberger, M.; Radha,, P. B.; Myatt, J. F.; LePape, S.; Marozas,, J. A.; Marshall, F. J.; Michel, D. T.; Regan, S. P.; Seka, W.; Shvydky, A.; et al

    2015-05-01

    To support direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Opt. Eng. 43, 2841 (2004)] in its indirect-drive beam configuration, the polar-direct-drive (PDD) concept [S. Skupsky et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 2763 (2004)] has been proposed. Ignition in PDD geometry requires direct-drive–specific beam smoothing, phase plates, and repointing the NIF beams toward the equator to ensure symmetric target irradiation. First experiments to study the energetics and preheat in PDD implosions at the NIF have been performed. These experiments utilize the NIF in its current configuration, including beammore »geometry, phase plates, and beam smoothing. Room-temperature, 2.2-mm-diam plastic shells filled with D? gas were imploded with total drive energies ranging from ~500 to 750 kJ with peak powers of 120 to 180 TW and peak on-target irradiances at the initial target radius from 8 x 10¹? to 1.2 x 10¹?W/cm². Results from these initial experiments are presented, including measurements of shell trajectory, implosion symmetry, and the level of hot-electron preheat in plastic and Si ablators. Experiments are simulated with the 2-D hydrodynamics code DRACO including a full 3-D ray-trace to model oblique beams, and models for nonlocal electron transport and cross-beam energy transport (CBET). These simulations indicate that CBET affects the shell symmetry and leads to a loss of energy imparted onto the shell, consistent with the experimental data.« less

  6. Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking of HTH Alloy X-750 and Alloy 625

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, W.J.; Lebo, M.R.; Bajaj, R.; Kearns, J.J.; Hoffman, R.C.; Korinko, J.J.

    1994-06-01

    In-reactor testing of bolt-loaded precracked compact tension specimens was performed in 360{degree}C water to determine effect of irradiation on the SCC behavior of HTH Alloy X-750 and direct aged Alloy 625. Out-of-flux and autoclave control specimens provided baseline data. Primary test variables were stress intensity factor, fluence, chemistry, processing history, prestrain. Results for the first series of experiments were presented at a previous conference. Data from two more recent experiments are compared with previous results; they confirm that high irradiation levels significantly reduce SCC resistance in HTH Alloy X-750. Heat-to-heat differences in IASCC were related to differences in boron content, with low boron heats showing improved SCC resistance. The in-reactor SCC performance of Alloy 625 was superior to that for Alloy X-750, as no cracking was observed in any Alloy 625 specimens even though they were tested at very high K{sub 1} and fluence levels. A preliminary SCC usage model developed for Alloy X-750 indicates that in-reactor creep processes, which relax stresses but also increase crack tip strain rates, and radiolysis effects accelerate SCC. Hence, in-reactor SCC damage under high flux conditions may be more severe than that associated with postirradiation tests. In addition, preliminary mechanism studies were performed to determine the cause of IASCC In Alloy X-750.

  7. Chloroquine Engages the Immune System to Eradicate Irradiated Breast Tumors in Mice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratikan, Josephine Anna; Sayre, James William

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: This study used chloroquine to direct radiation-induced tumor cell death pathways to harness the antitumor activity of the immune system. Methods and Materials: Chloroquine given immediately after tumor irradiation increased the cure rate of MCaK breast cancer in C3H mice. Chloroquine blocked radiation-induced autophagy and drove MCaK cells into a more rapid apoptotic and more immunogenic form of cell death. Results: Chloroquine treatment made irradiated tumor vaccines superior at inducing strong interferon gamma-associated immune responses in vivo and protecting mice from further tumor challenge. In vitro, chloroquine slowed antigen uptake and degradation by dendritic cells, although T-cell stimulation was unaffected. Conclusions: This study illustrates a novel approach to improve the efficacy of breast cancer radiation therapy by blocking endosomal pathways, which enhances radiation-induced cell death within the field and drives antitumor immunity to assist therapeutic cure. The study illuminates and merges seemingly disparate concepts regarding the importance of autophagy in cancer therapy.

  8. Quantification of the Aerosol Direct Radiative Effect from Smoke over Clouds using Passive Space-borne Spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    irradiance is defined as the difference between the downwelling and upwelling irradiances Enet = E E

  9. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  10. Light ion irradiation for unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Linstadt, D.; Castro, J.R.; Phillips, T.L.; Petti, P.L.; Collier, J.M.; Daftari, I.; Schoethaler, R.; Rayner, A.

    1990-09-01

    Between 1978 and 1989, 32 patients with unfavorable soft tissue sarcoma underwent light ion (helium, neon) irradiation with curative intent at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The tumors were located in the trunk in 22 patients and head and neck in 10. Macroscopic tumor was present in 22 at the time of irradiation. Two patients had tumors apparently induced by previous therapeutic irradiation. Follow-up times for surviving patients ranged from 4 to 121 months (median 27 months). The overall 3-year actuarial local control rate was 62%; the corresponding survival rate was 50%. The 3-year actuarial control rate for patients irradiated with macroscopic tumors was 48%, while none of the patients with microscopic disease developed local recurrence (100%). The corresponding 3-year actuarial survival rates were 40% (macroscopic) and 78% (microscopic). Patients with retroperitoneal sarcoma did notably well; the local control rate and survival rate were 64% and 62%, respectively. Complications were acceptable; there were no radiation related deaths, while two patients (6%) required operations to correct significant radiation-related injuries. These results appear promising compared to those achieved by low -LET irradiation, and suggest that this technique merits further investigation.

  11. Irradiation-induced composition patterns in binary solid solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubey, Santosh; El-Azab, Anter [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)] [School of Nuclear Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47906 (United States)

    2013-09-28

    A theoretical/computational model for the irradiation-driven compositional instabilities in binary solid solutions has been developed. The model is suitable for investigating the behavior of structural alloys and metallic nuclear fuels in a reactor environment as well as the response of alloy thin films to ion beam irradiation. The model is based on a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the dynamics of vacancies, interstitials, and lattice atoms under irradiation. The dynamics of these species includes the stochastic generation of defects by collision cascades as well as the defect reactions and diffusion. The atomic fluxes in this model are derived based on the transitions of lattice defects. The set of reaction-diffusion equations are stiff, hence a stiffly stable method, also known as the Gear method, has been used to numerically approximate the equations. For the Cu-Au alloy in the solid solution regime, the model results demonstrate the formation of compositional patterns under high-temperature particle irradiation, with Fourier space properties (Fourier spectrum, average wavelength, and wavevector) depending on the cascade damage characteristics, average composition, and irradiation temperature.

  12. Treatment of Irradiated Graphite from French Bugey Reactor - 13424

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Thomas [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Studsvik, Inc., 5605 Glenridge Drive NE, Suite 705, Atlanta, GA (United States); Poncet, Bernard [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)] [electricite de France, 154 Avenue Thiers, CS 60018, 69458 Lyon Cedex 06 (France)

    2013-07-01

    Beginning in 2009, in order to determine an alternative to direct disposal for decommissioned irradiated graphite from EDF's Bugey NPP, Studsvik and EDF began a test program to determine if graphite decontamination and destruction were practicable using Studsvik's thermal organic reduction (THOR) technology. The testing program focused primarily on the release of C-14, H-3, and Cl-36 and also monitored graphite mass loss. For said testing, a bench-scale steam reformer (BSSR) was constructed with the capability of flowing various compositions of gases at temperatures up to 1300 deg. C over uniformly sized particles of graphite for fixed amounts of time. The BSSR was followed by a condenser, thermal oxidizer, and NaOH bubbler system designed to capture H-3 and C-14. Also, in a separate series of testing, high concentration acid and peroxide solutions were used to soak the graphite and leach out and measure Cl-36. A series of gasification tests were performed to scope gas compositions and temperatures for graphite gasification using steam and oxygen. Results suggested higher temperature steam (1100 deg. C vs. 900 deg. C) yielded a practicable gasification rate but that lower temperature (900 deg. C) gasification was also a practicable treatment alternative if oxygen is fed into the process. A series of decontamination tests were performed to determine the release behavior of and extent to which C-14 and H-3 were released from graphite in a high temperature (900-1300 deg. C), low flow roasting gas environment. In general, testing determined that higher temperatures and longer roasting times were efficacious for releasing H-3 completely and the majority (80%) of C-14. Manipulating oxidizing and reducing gas environments was also found to limit graphite mass loss. A series of soaking tests was performed to measure the amount of Cl-36 in the samples of graphite before and after roasting in the BSSR. Similar to C-14 release, these soaking tests revealed that 70-80% Cl-36 is released during roasting tests. (authors)

  13. Bright tunable femtosecond x-ray emission from laser irradiated micro-droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Tong-Pu Hu, Li-Xiang; Yin, Yan; Shao, Fu-Qiu; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Ma, Yan-Yun; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Luo, Wen; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-09-15

    It is demonstrated that bright femtosecond X-rays can be obtained by irradiating a moderate laser onto a helium micro-droplet. The laser ponderomotive force continuously sweeps electrons from the droplets and accelerates them forward. The electrons exposed in the outrunning laser field oscillate transversely and emit photons in the forward direction. The total flux of photons with energies above 1?keV is as high as 10{sup 9}/shot which is about 10-fold enhancement compared with betatron oscillation under similar laser conditions. The maximum achieved peak brightness is up to 10{sup 21} photons/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW. By adjusting laser and droplet parameters, we can get tunable X-rays with required brightness and energy.

  14. Systems and methods for retaining and removing irradiation targets in a nuclear reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Runkle, Gary A.; Matsumoto, Jack T.; Dayal, Yogeshwar; Heinold, Mark R.

    2015-12-08

    A retainer is placed on a conduit to control movement of objects within the conduit in access-restricted areas. Retainers can prevent or allow movement in the conduit in a discriminatory fashion. A fork with variable-spacing between prongs can be a retainer and be extended or collapsed with respect to the conduit to change the size of the conduit. Different objects of different sizes may thus react to the fork differently, some passing and some being blocked. Retainers can be installed in inaccessible areas and allow selective movement in remote portions of conduit where users cannot directly interface, including below nuclear reactors. Position detectors can monitor the movement of objects through the conduit remotely as well, permitting engagement of a desired level of restriction and object movement. Retainers are useable in a variety of nuclear power plants and with irradiation target delivery, harvesting, driving, and other remote handling or robotic systems.

  15. Measurements of the divergence of fast electrons in laser-irradiated spherical targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaakobi, B.; Solodov, A. A.; Myatt, J. F.; Delettrez, J. A.; Stoeckl, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2013-09-15

    In recent experiments using directly driven spherical targets on the OMEGA laser system, the energy in fast electrons was found to reach ?1% of the laser energy at an irradiance of ?1.1 × 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}. The fraction of these fast electrons absorbed in the compressed fuel shell depends on their angular divergence. This paper describes measurements of this divergence deduced from a series of shots where Mo-coated shells of increasing diameter (D) were suspended within an outer CH shell. The intensity of the Mo–K? line and the hard x-ray radiation were found to increase approximately as ?D{sup 2}, indicating wide divergence of the fast electrons. Alternative interpretations of these results (electron scattering, radiation excitation of K?, and an electric field due to return current) are shown to be unimportant.

  16. Solar Irradiances Measured using SPN1 Radiometers: Uncertainties and Clues for Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Badosa, Jordi; Wood, John; Blanc, Philippe; Long, Charles N.; Vuilleumier, Laurent; Demengel, Dominique; Haeffelin, Martial

    2014-12-08

    The fast development of solar radiation and energy applications, such as photovoltaic and solar thermodynamic systems, has increased the need for solar radiation measurement and monitoring, not only for the global component but also the diffuse and direct. End users look for the best compromise between getting close to state-of-the-art measurements and keeping capital, maintenance and operating costs to a minimum. Among the existing commercial options, SPN1 is a relatively low cost solar radiometer that estimates global and diffuse solar irradiances from seven thermopile sensors under a shading mask and without moving parts. This work presents a comprehensive study of SPN1 accuracy and sources of uncertainty, which results from laboratory experiments, numerical modeling and comparison studies between measurements from this sensor and state-of-the art instruments for six diverse sites. Several clues are provided for improving the SPN1 accuracy and agreement with state-of-the-art measurements.

  17. Aspects of General Relativity: Pseudo-Finsler extensions, Quasi-normal frequencies and Multiplication of tensorial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jozef Skakala

    2011-07-15

    This thesis is based on three different projects, all of them are directly linked to the classical general theory of relativity, but they might have consequences for quantum gravity as well. The first chapter deals with pseudo-Finsler geometric extensions of the classical theory, these being ways of naturally representing high-energy Lorentz symmetry violations. The second chapter deals with the problem of highly damped quasi-normal modes related to different types of black hole spacetimes. Besides the astrophysical meaning of the quasi-normal modes, there are conjectures about the link between the highly damped modes and black hole thermodynamics. The third chapter is related to the topic of multiplication of tensorial distributions.

  18. Aspects of General Relativity: Pseudo-Finsler extensions, Quasi-normal frequencies and Multiplication of tensorial distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skakala, Jozef

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is based on three different projects, all of them are directly linked to the classical general theory of relativity, but they might have consequences for quantum gravity as well. The first chapter deals with pseudo-Finsler geometric extensions of the classical theory, these being ways of naturally representing high-energy Lorentz symmetry violations. The second chapter deals with the problem of highly damped quasi-normal modes related to different types of black hole spacetimes. Besides the astrophysical meaning of the quasi-normal modes, there are conjectures about the link between the highly damped modes and black hole thermodynamics. The third chapter is related to the topic of multiplication of tensorial distributions.

  19. Physiologic and Radiographic Evidence of the Distal Edge of the Proton Beam in Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krejcarek, Stephanie C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Grant, P. Ellen [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Henson, John W. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Pappas Center for Neuro-oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)]. E-mail: tyock@partners.org

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Fatty replacement of bone marrow resulting from radiation therapy can be seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. We evaluated the radiographic appearance of the vertebral bodies in children treated with proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to illustrate the distal edge effect of proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 13 adolescents aged 12-18 years who received CSI with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. Ten of these patients had reached maximal or near-maximal growth. Proton beam radiation for these 10 patients was delivered to the thecal sac and exiting nerve roots only, whereas the remaining 3 patients had a target volume that included the thecal sac, exiting nerve roots, and entire vertebral bodies. Median CSI dose was 27 [range, 23.4-36] cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) given in 1.8-CGE fractions. Magnetic resonance images of the spine were obtained after completion of radiotherapy. Results: Magnetic resonance images of patients who received proton radiotherapy to the thecal sac only demonstrate a sharp demarcation of hyperintense T1-weighted signal in the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies, consistent with radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement. Magnetic resonance images of the patients prescribed proton radiotherapy to the entire vertebral column had corresponding hyperintense T1-weighted signal involving the entire vertebral bodies. Conclusion: The sharp delineation of radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement in the vertebral bodies demonstrates the rapid decrease in energy at the edge of the proton beam. This provides evidence for a sharp fall-off in radiation dose and supports the premise that proton radiotherapy spares normal tissues unnecessary irradiation.

  20. Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Topic 19 Extensions on the Likelihood Ratio Two-Sided Tests 1 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Outline Overview Normal Observations Two-Sample Proportions Power Analysis 2 / 12 #12;Overview Normal Observations Two