Sample records for direct mineral carbonation

  1. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation...

  2. Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

  3. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Synthesis of supported carbon nanotubes in mineralized silica-wood composites. Abstract: Multiwall carbon...

  4. Mineralization of Carbon Dioxide: Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanov, V; Soong, Y; Carney, C; Rush, G; Nielsen, B; O'Connor, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CCS research has been focused on CO2 storage in geologic formations, with many potential risks. An alternative to conventional geologic storage is carbon mineralization, where CO2 is reacted with metal cations to form carbonate minerals. Mineralization methods can be broadly divided into two categories: in situ and ex situ. In situ mineralization, or mineral trapping, is a component of underground geologic sequestration, in which a portion of the injected CO2 reacts with alkaline rock present in the target formation to form solid carbonate species. In ex situ mineralization, the carbonation reaction occurs above ground, within a separate reactor or industrial process. This literature review is meant to provide an update on the current status of research on CO2 mineralization. 2

  5. Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

  6. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christenson, Norm; Walters, Jerel

    2014-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 2b of the SkyMine® Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO2 from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO2 to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO2 capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to the point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and deployment. The overall process is carbon negative, resulting in mineralization of CO2 that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at the commercial scale. The project is being conducted in two phases. The primary objectives of Phase 1 were to evaluate proven SkyMine® process chemistry for commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2, complete a NEPA evaluation, and develop a comprehensive carbon life cycle analysis. The objective of Phase 2b was to build the pilot plant to be operated and tested in Phase 2c.

  7. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  8. Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development National Renewable Energy Laboratory logo The...

  9. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. Synergistic control of these parameters offers the potential for further improvements in carbonation reactivity. A new sonication exfoliation system incorporating a novel sealing system was developed to carry out the sonication studies. Our initial studies that incorporate controlled sonication have not yet lead to a significant improvement in the extent of carbonation observed. Year 2 studies will emphasize those approaches that offer the greatest potential to cost effectively enhance carbonation, as well as combined approaches that may further enhance carbonation. Mechanistic investigations indicate incongruent dissolution results in the observed silica-rich passivating layer formation. Observations of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating layers that form indicate the layers can exhibit significant permeability to the key reactants present (e.g., Mg{sup 2+}, H{sup +}, H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, and HCO{sub 3} -). Atomistic modeling supports the observation of robust passivating layers that retain significant permeability to the key reaction species involved. Studies in Year 2 will emphasize the impact that controlled aqueous speciation and activity and slurry-flow dynamics have on the mechanisms that control carbonation reactivity and the potential they offer to substantially reduce olivine mineral sequestration process cost.

  10. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus far, we have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation apparatus with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated investigations to explore the potential that sonication may offer to enhance carbonation reactivity. During the second project year, we extended our investigations of the effects of sonication on the extent of carbonation as a function of the following parameters: particle size distribution, the mass of solid reactant, volume fraction of aqueous solution present, sonication power, time, temperature, and CO{sub 2} pressure. To date, none of the conditions investigated have significantly enhanced carbonation. Mechanistic investigations of the stirred ({approx}1,500 rpm) aqueous olivine carbonation process indicate the carbonation process involves both incongruent magnesium dissolution and silica precipitation, which results in robust silica-rich passivating layer formation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry observation of H within the passivating layer that forms during static carbonation suggests 2H{sup +}/Mg{sup 2+} ion exchange is associated with incongruent dissolution. Apparently, H{sub 2}O forms at or near the olivine/passivating-layer interface during the process and diffuses out through the passivating layers during the carbonation reaction. This is

  11. MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palomino, Angelica M.

    MIXTURES OF FINE-GRAINED MINERALS À KAOLINITE AND CARBONATE GRAINS ANGELICA M. PALOMINO 1, *, SUSAN, Georgia 30332-0355, USA Abstract--The behavior of mineral mixtures can be significantly different from properties of the individual minerals, and their ensuing effects on interparticle interactions and fabric

  12. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (i) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (ii) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li{sup +}, Na{sup +}, K{sup +}, Rb{sup +}, Cl{sup -}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (iii) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. We have succeeded in nearly doubling the extent of carbonation observed compared with the optimum procedure previously developed by the Albany Research Center. Aqueous carbonation reactivity was found to be a strong function of the ionic species present and their aqueous activities, as well as the slurry fluid flow conditions incorporated. High concentration sodium, potassium, and sodium/potassium bicarbonate aqueous solutions have been found to be the most effective solutions for enhancing aqueous olivine carbonation to date. Slurry-flow modeling using Fluent indicates that the slurry-flow dynamics are a strong function of particle size and mass, suggesting that controlling these parameters may offer substantial potential to enhance carbonation. Synergistic control of the slurry-flow and aqueous chemistry parameters offers further potential to improve carbonation reactivity, which is being investigated during the no-cost extension period. During the first project year we developed a new sonication exfoliation system with a novel sealing system to carry out the sonication studies. We also initiated(Abstract truncated).

  13. SkyMine Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe Jones; Clive Barton; Mark Clayton; Al Yablonsky; David Legere

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Topical Report addresses accomplishments achieved during Phase 1 of the SkyMine{reg_sign} Carbon Mineralization Pilot Project. The primary objectives of this project are to design, construct, and operate a system to capture CO{sub 2} from a slipstream of flue gas from a commercial coal-fired cement kiln, convert that CO{sub 2} to products having commercial value (i.e., beneficial use), show the economic viability of the CO{sub 2} capture and conversion process, and thereby advance the technology to a point of readiness for commercial scale demonstration and proliferation. The project will also substantiate market opportunities for the technology by sales of chemicals into existing markets, and identify opportunities to improve technology performance and reduce costs at commercial scale. The primary objectives of Phase 1 of the project were to elaborate proven SkyMine{reg_sign} process chemistry to commercial pilot-scale operation and complete the preliminary design ('Reference Plant Design') for the pilot plant to be built and operated in Phase 2. Additionally, during Phase 1, information necessary to inform a DOE determination regarding NEPA requirements for the project was developed, and a comprehensive carbon lifecycle analysis was completed. These items were included in the formal application for funding under Phase 2. All Phase 1 objectives were successfully met on schedule and within budget.

  14. Chemically Accelerated Carbon Mineralization: Chemical and Biological Catalytic Enhancement of Weathering of Silicate Minerals as Novel Carbon Capture and Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACCT Project: Columbia University is developing a process to pull CO2 out of the exhaust gas of coal-fired power plants and turn it into a solid that can be easily and safely transported, stored above ground, or integrated into value-added products (e.g. paper filler, plastic filler, construction materials, etc.). In nature, the reaction of CO2 with various minerals over long periods of time will yield a solid carbonate—this process is known as carbon mineralization. The use of carbon mineralization as a CO2 capture and storage method is limited by the speeds at which these minerals can be dissolved and CO2 can be hydrated. To facilitate this, Columbia University is using a unique process and a combination of chemical catalysts which increase the mineral dissolution rate, and the enzymatic catalyst carbonic anhydrase which speeds up the hydration of CO2.

  15. aqueous mineral carbonation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological...

  16. Running Head: Correlation of Microbial Communities with Caclium Carbonate1 (Travertine) Mineral Precipitation2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldenfeld, Nigel

    Precipitation2 3 4 Correlation of Microbial Communities with Calcium Carbonate (Travertine)5 Mineral of changing environmental conditions and associated calcium carbonate mineral18 precipitation along the spring and morphology of calcium carbonate mineral precipitation.3 Carbonate minerals are ideal for this type of study

  17. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  18. Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

  19. Effects of Additives and Templates on Calcium Carbonate Mineralization in vitro

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Accepted M anuscript Effects of Additives and Templates on Calcium Carbonate Mineralization controlling the calcium carbonate crystals formation and the complexity of the crystal morphologies in vitro organic matrices mediate calcium carbonate mineralization. Keywords: additive; template; in vitro

  20. Applications of mineral carbonation to geological sequestration of CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connor, William K.; Rush, G.E.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geological sequestration of CO2 is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. However, migration of the CO2 beyond the natural reservoir seals could become problematic, thus the identification of means to enhance the natural seals could prove beneficial. Injection of a mineral reactant slurry could provide a means to enhance the natural reservoir seals by supplying the necessary cations for precipitation of mineral carbonates. The subject study evaluates the merit of several mineral slurry injection strategies by conduct of a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin.

  1. Isotopic fractionations associated with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals: Insights from first-principles theoretical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Isotopic fractionations associated with phosphoric acid digestion of carbonate minerals: Insights for oxygen- and carbon-isotope analysis of carbonate minerals since 1950, and was recently established of oxygen isotope acid digestion fractionations among different carbonate minerals. We suggest these results

  2. Review of Distribution Coefficients for Radionuclides in Carbonate Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, M

    2009-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of the transport of radionuclides in carbonate minerals is necessary to be able to predict the fate of (and potentially remediate) radionuclides in the environment. In some environments, carbonate minerals such as calciate, aragonite, dolomite and limestone are present and an understanding of the sorption of radionuclides in these carbonate minerals is therefore advantageous. A list of the radionuclides of interest is given in Table 1. The distribution coefficient, K{sub d} is defined as the ratio of the contaminant concentration bound on the solid phase to the contaminant concentration remaining in the liquid phase at equilibrium. Some authors report distribution coefficients and other report partition coefficients, the data presented in this work assumes equality between these two terms, and data are presented and summarized in this work as logarithmic distribution coefficient (log K{sub D}). Published literature was searched using two methods. Firstly, the JNC Sorption Database, namely Shubutani et al (1999), and Suyama and Sasamoto (2004) was used to select elements of interest and a number of carbonate minerals. Secondly, on-line literature search tools were used to locate relevant published articles from 1900 to 2009. Over 300 data points covering 16 elements (hydrogen, carbon, calcium, nickel, strontium, technetium, palladium, iodine, cesium, samarium, europium, holmium, uranium, neptunium, plutonium and americium) were used to calculate an average and range of log K{sub d} values for each element. Unfortunately, no data could be found for chlorine, argon, krypton, zirconium, niobium, tin, thorium and curium. A description of the data is given below, together with the average, standard deviation, minimum, maximum and number of inputs for radionuclide K{sub d} values for calcite, aragonate, limestone, dolomite and unidentified carbonate rocks in Table 2. Finally, the data are condensed into one group (carbonate minerals) of data for each element of interest in Table 3.

  3. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous Solution. Incorporation of Np(V) and U(VI) in Carbonate and Sulfate Minerals Crystallized from Aqueous...

  4. Report TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ://www.entek.chalmers.se/~anly/symp/symp2001.html) "CO2 sequestration by magnesium silicate mineral carbonation in Finland" Ron Zevenhoven of magnesium oxide-based mineral carbonation for CO2 sequestration" Ron Zevenhoven, Jens Kohlmann. underReport TKK-ENY-9 Mineral carbonation for long-term storage of CO2 from flue gases Jens Kohlmann 1

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; George Alexander

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral carbonation is a promising concept for permanent CO{sub 2} sequestration due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the permanent storage of CO{sub 2} in solid form as carbonates, and the overall reaction being exothermic. However, the primary drawback to mineral carbonation is the reaction kinetics. To accelerate the reaction, aqueous carbonation processes are preferred, where the minerals are firstly dissolved in solution. In aqueous carbonation, the key step is the dissolution rate of the mineral, where the mineral dissolution reaction is likely to be surface controlled. In order to accelerate the dissolution process, the serpentine can be ground to very fine particle size (<37 {micro}m), but this is a very energy intensive process. Alternatively, magnesium could be chemically extracted in aqueous solution. Phase I showed that chemical surface activation helps to dissolve the magnesium from the serpentine minerals (particle size {approx}100 {micro}m), and furthermore, the carbonation reaction can be conducted under mild conditions (20 C and 650 psig) compared to previous studies that required >185 C, >1850 psig and <37 {micro}m particle size. Phase I also showed that over 70% of the magnesium can be extracted at ambient temperature leaving amorphous SiO{sub 2} with surface areas {approx} 330m{sup 2}/g. The overall objective of Phase 2 of this research program is to optimize the active carbonation process developed in Phase I in order to design an integrated CO{sub 2} sequestration module. During the current reporting period, Task 1 ''Mineral activation'' was initiated and focused on a parametric study to optimize the operation conditions for the mineral activation, where serpentine and sulfuric acid were reacted, as following the results from Phase 1. Several experimental factors were outlined as having a potential influence on the mineral activation. This study has focused to date on the effects of varying the acid concentration, particle size, and the reaction time. The reaction yields and the characterization of the reaction products by ICP/AES, TGA, and BET analyses were used to describe the influence of each of the experimental variables. The reaction yield was as high as 48% with a 5M acid concentration, with lower values directly corresponding to lower acid concentrations. ICP/AES results are indicative of the selective dissolution of magnesium with reaction yields. Significant improvements in the removal of moisture, as observed from TGA studies, as well as in the dissolution can be realized with the comminution of particles to a D{sub 50} less than 125 {micro}m. A minimum threshold value of 3M concentration of sulfuric acid was determined to exist in terms of the removal of moisture from serpentine. Contrary to expected, the reaction time, within this design of experiments, has been shown to be insignificant. Potentially coupled with this unexpected result are low BET surface areas of the treated serpentine. These results are issues of further consideration to be addressed under the carbonation studies. The remaining results are as expected, including the dissolution of magnesium, which is to be utilized within the carbonation unit. Phase 1 studies have shown that carbonation reactions could be carried out under a milder regime through the implementation of NaOH titration with the magnesium solution. The optimization of acid concentration, particle size, and reaction temperature will ultimately be determined according to the carbonation efficiencies. Therefore and according to the planned project schedule, research efforts are moving into Task 2 ''Aqueous carbonation'' as the redesign of the reactor unit is nearly completed.

  6. Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic matter: Further

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Interactions between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic October 2008. [1] Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into sediment traps in the deep sea have previously suggested that interactions between organic matter and minerals play a key

  7. Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological storage) or the ex-situ mineral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors

  8. Dissolution Kinetics of Calcium Carbonate Minerals A.V. Subhas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    Dissolution Kinetics of Calcium Carbonate Minerals A.V. Subhas1 *, N.E. Rollins2 , W. Berelson2 , J@gps.caltech.edu We present a novel measurement of the dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate minerals in seawater. These experiments significantly impact our understanding of calcium carbonate response to ocean acidification, water

  9. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation before and/or during carbonation may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for cost optimization of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process.

  10. Mineralization pathways in lake sediments with different oxygen and organic carbon supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Mineralization pathways in lake sediments with different oxygen and organic carbon supply Martin Abstract The intensity and pathways of mineralization of sedimentary organic matter were investigated equipped with both oxygen and ion-selective electrodes. Anaerobic sedimentary mineralization ranged from 13

  11. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter; K. Streib

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg(OH){sub 2} carbonation is a leading process candidate, which generates the stable naturally occurring mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) and water. Key to process cost and viability are the carbonation reaction rate and its degree of completion. This process, which involves simultaneous dehydroxylation and carbonation is very promising, but far from optimized. In order to optimize the dehydroxylation/carbonation process, an atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved is needed. Since Mg(OH){sub 2} dehydroxylation is intimately associated with the carbonation process, its mechanisms are also of direct interest in understanding and optimizing the process. In the first project year, our investigations have focused on developing an atomic-level understanding of the dehydroxylation/carbonation reaction mechanisms that govern the overall carbonation reaction process in well crystallized material. In years two and three, we will also explore the roles of crystalline defects and impurities. Environmental-cell, dynamic high-resolution transmission electron microscopy has been used to directly observe the dehydroxylation process at the atomic-level for the first time. These observations were combined with advanced computational modeling studies to better elucidate the atomic-level process. These studies were combined with direct carbonation studies to better elucidate dehydroxylation/carbonation reaction mechanisms. Dehydroxylation follows a lamellar nucleation and growth process involving oxide layer formation. These layers form lamellar oxyhydroxide regions, which can grow both parallel and perpendicular to the Mg(OH){sub 2} lamella. The number of oxide layers within the regions increases as they grow during dehydroxylation. Selected area diffraction suggests a novel two-dimensional variant of Vegard's law can describe the oxyhydroxide regions, with intralamellar Mg-Mg packing distances observed between those known for Mg(OH){sub 2} and MgO. Intralamellar and interlamellar elastic stress induced during dehydroxylation can contribute to crystallite cracking and MgO surface reconstruction, which may serve to enhance carbonation reactivity. The observed dehydroxylation process indicates a range of candidate materials for carbonation may be present during the carbonation process (i) the hydroxide, (ii) a range of intermediate oxyhydroxides, and (iii) the oxide, potentially in more-reactive, very small particle size form. Partial carbonation of single-crystal Mg(OH){sub 2} fragments over a wide range of reaction conditions (varying CO{sub 2} pressure and temperature) shows a linear or near-linear correlation between carbonation and dehydroxylation, with the extent of dehydroxylation substantially greater than the extent of carbonation. This suggests carbonation primarily occurs via intermediate oxyhydroxide or oxide formation. The range and type of intermediate oxyhydroxides/oxides that can form in advance of carbonation should provide a degree of control over both their formation and the overall reactivity observed for the carbonation process.

  12. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects on Mineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitman, Thea L.; Zhu, Zihua; Lehmann, Johannes C.

    2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is a critical and active pool in the global C cycle, and the addition of pyrogenic organic matter (PyOM) has been shown to change SOC cycling, increasing or decreasing mineralization rates (often referred to as priming). We adjusted the amount of easily mineralizable C in the soil, through 1-day and 6-month pre-incubations, and in PyOM made from maple wood at 350°C, through extraction. We investigated the impact of these adjustments on C mineralization interactions, excluding pH and nutrient effects and minimizing physical effects. We found short-term increases (+20-30%) in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions in the soil pre-incubated for 6 months. Over the longer term, both the 6-month and 1-day pre-incubated soils experienced net ~10% decreases in SOC mineralization with PyOM additions. This was possibly due to stabilization of SOC on PyOM surfaces, suggested by nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry. Additionally, the duration of pre-incubation affected priming interactions, indicating that there may be no optimal pre-incubation time for SOC mineralization studies. We show conclusively that relative mineralizability of SOC in relation to PyOM-24 C is an important determinant of the effect of PyOM additions on SOC mineralization.

  13. Carbonation of Clay Minerals Exposed to scCO2/Water at 200 degrees and 250 degrees C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugama, T.; Ecker, L.; Gill, S.; Butcher, T. (BNL); Bour, D. (AltaRock Energy, Inc.)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To clarify the mechanisms of carbonation of clay minerals, such as bentonite, kaolinite, and soft clay, we exposed them to supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2)/water at temperatures of 200 and 250 C and pressures of 1500 and 2000 psi for 72- and 107-hours. Bentonite, comprising three crystalline phases, montmorillonite (MMT), anorthoclase-type albite, and quartz was susceptible to reactions with ionic carbonic acid yielded by the interactions between scCO2 and water, particularly MMT and anorthoclase-type albite phases. For MMT, the cation-exchangeable ions, such as Na+ and Ca2+, present in its basal interplanar space, were replaced by proton, H+, from ionic carbonic acid; thereafter, the cations leaching from MMT directly reacted with CO32- as a counter ion of H+ to form carbonate compounds. Such in-situ carbonation process in basal space caused the shrinkage and breakage of the spacing structure within MMT. In contrast, the wet carbonation of anorthoclase-type albite, categorized as rock minerals, entailed the formation of three amorphous by-products, such as carbonates, kaolinite-like compounds, and silicon dioxide. Together, these two different carbonations caused the disintegration and corruption of bentonite. Kaolinite clay containing the amorphous carbonates and silicon dioxide was inert to wet carbonation. We noted only a gain in weight due to its water uptake, suggesting that kaolinite-like by-products generated by the wet carbonation of rock minerals might remain unchanged even during extended exposure. Soft clay consisting of two crystalline phases, dolomite and silicon dioxide, also was unaltered by wet carbonation, despite the uptake of water.

  14. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome.

  15. Carbon aerogel electrodes for direct energy conversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Kaschmitter, J.L.; Pekala, R.W.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct energy conversion device, such as a fuel cell, using carbon aerogel electrodes is described, wherein the carbon aerogel is loaded with a noble catalyst, such as platinum or rhodium and soaked with phosphoric acid, for example. A separator is located between the electrodes, which are placed in a cylinder having plate current collectors positioned adjacent the electrodes and connected to a power supply, and a pair of gas manifolds, containing hydrogen and oxygen positioned adjacent the current collectors. Due to the high surface area and excellent electrical conductivity of carbon aerogels, the problems relative to high polarization resistance of carbon composite electrodes conventionally used in fuel cells are overcome. 1 fig.

  16. R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    not considered in accounting for global C fluxes because mineral soil C is commonly thought to be relativelyR E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessments of Environment and Natural Resources, 209 Hills Building, University of Vermont, 81 Carrigan Drive, Burlington

  17. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA as well as flue gas from coal combustion. This topical report covers Phase 2b, which is the construction phase of pilot demonstration subsystems that make up the integrated plant. The subsystems included are the mineralization subsystem, the Alkalinity Based on Low Energy (ABLE) subsystem, the waste calcium oxide processing subsystem, and the fiber cement board production subsystem. The fully integrated plant is now capable of capturing CO2 from various sources (gas and coal) and mineralizing into a reactive calcium carbonate binder and subsequently producing commercial size (4ftx8ft) fiber cement boards. The topical report provides a description of the “as built” design of these subsystems and the results of the commissioning activities that have taken place to confirm operability. At the end of Phase 2b, the CCMP pilot demonstration is fully ready for testing.

  18. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (1) its structural and chemical simplicity, (2) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (3) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This final report covers the overall progress of this grant.

  19. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact.

  20. ATOMIC-LEVEL MODELING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: A SYNERGETIC APPROACH TO OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; J.B. Adams

    2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide mineral carbonation is a leading process candidate, which generates the stable naturally occurring mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}) and water. Key to process cost and viability are the carbonation reaction rate and its degree of completion. This process, which involves simultaneous dehydroxylation and carbonation is very promising, but far from optimized. In order to optimize the dehydroxylation/carbonation process, an atomic-level understanding of the mechanisms involved is needed. In this investigation Mg(OH){sub 2} was selected as a model Mg-rich lamellar hydrocide carbonation feedstock material due to its chemical and structural simplicity. Since Mg(OH){sub 2} dehydroxylation is intimately associated with the carbonation process, its mechanisms are also of direct interest in understanding and optimizing the process. The aim of the current innovative concepts project is to develop a specialized advanced computational methodology to complement the ongoing experimental inquiry of the atomic level processes involved in CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration. The ultimate goal is to integrate the insights provided by detailed predictive simulations with the data obtained from optical microscopy, FESEM, ion beam analysis, SIMS, TGA, Raman, XRD, and C and H elemental analysis. The modeling studies are specifically designed to enhance the synergism with, and complement the analysis of, existing mineral-CO{sub 2} reaction process studies being carried out under DOE UCR Grant DE-FG2698-FT40112. Direct contact between the simulations and the experimental measurements is provided by computing, from first principles, the equilibrium structures, elastic, optical, and vibrational properties of Mg(OH){sub 2} (brucite), MgO (periclase), MgCO{sub 3} (magnesite), as well as the energetics of the dehydroxylation reaction (Mg(OH){sub 2} {yields} MgO + H{sub 2}O), and the reactivity of CO{sub 2} with MgO and Mg(OH){sub 2}. From these calculations, thermodynamic characteristics of the reaction conditions can be inferred. This kind of information, when integrated with the atomic level data obtained from experimental gas-solid dehydroxylation/carbonation studies, will be used to design optimized reaction processes leading to the practical and cost-effective sequestration of CO{sub 2} in mineral form.

  1. Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Observation of Polymer Sheathing in Carbon Nanotube-Polycarbonate Composites W. Ding, A (MWCNT)-polycarbonate composites are presented. This sheathing was observed in images of the composite properties, increases in electrical conductivity3 and improved thermal properties4 are obtained with small

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Alexander; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Parvana Aksoy; Harold Schobert

    2006-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral carbonation provides a potential option for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Serpentine has been chosen as the feedstock mineral, due to its abundance and availability. However, the relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has recently been investigated. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion.

  3. activated mineral carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Blackhawk Road, APG, MD USA 21010 ABSTRACT The impregnated active carbon in active carbon filters by combining the electromechanical impedance spectroscopy (EMIS Giurgiutiu, Victor...

  4. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devenney, Martin; Gilliam, Ryan; Seeker, Randy

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate an innovative process to mineralize CO2 from flue gas directly to reactive carbonates and maximize the value and versatility of its beneficial use products. The program scope includes the design, construction, and testing of a CO2 Conversion to Material Products (CCMP) Pilot Demonstration Plant utilizing CO2 from the flue gas of a power production facility in Moss Landing, CA. This topical report covers Subphase 2a which is the design phase of pilot demonstration subsystems. Materials of construction have been selected and proven in both lab scale and prototype testing to be acceptable for the reagent conditions of interest. The target application for the reactive carbonate material has been selected based upon small-scale feasibility studies and the design of a continuous fiber board production line has been completed. The electrochemical cell architecture and components have been selected based upon both lab scale and prototype testing. The appropriate quality control and diagnostic techniques have been developed and tested along with the required instrumentation and controls. Finally the demonstrate site infrastructure, NEPA categorical exclusion, and permitting is all ready for the construction and installation of the new units and upgrades.

  5. Shedding light on carbon-mineral complexation in the soil environment: impacts on C sequestration and cycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    42 Shedding light on carbon-mineral complexation in the soil environment: impacts on C sequestration and cycling Sparks, D.L. & C. Chen Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Delaware@udel.edu) Abstract Organic matter (OM)-mineral complexation plays a critical role in soil carbon (C) stabilization

  6. Predicting carbonate mineral precipitation/dissolution events during progressive diagenesis of clastic rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Surdam, R.C.; MacGowan, D.B.; Dunn, T.L. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie (United States)); Moraes, M. (Petrobras (Brazil))

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is an observable, regular progression of early and late carbonate cements that is separated by carbonate mineral dissolution in many sandstones during progressive burial and diagenesis. The distribution of early cements is a function of incipient hydration of framework grains, sulfate reduction, and bacterial methanogenesis. These early cements typically precipitate from the sediment water interace to burial depths corresponding to about 80C. The distribution of late carbonate cements is a function of the relationship of organic acid anions, aluminosilicate reactions and CO{sub 2} in formation waters. Elevated PCO{sub 2} in a fluid where the pH is buffered by organic acid anions or aluminosilicates results in precipitation of a late carbonate cement (typically ferroan); these late carbonate cements generally form over the temperature interval of 100-130C. The late and early carbonate cement events are separated in time by a period of carbonate mineral dissolution or nonprecipitation. This dissolution is related to the increase in concentration of carboxylic acid anions resulting from the thermocatalytic cracking of oxygen-bearing functional groups from kerogen and/or redox reactions involving kerogen. Examples of the importance of early carbonate cementation/decementation to hydrocarbon reservoirs include the Campos basin of Brazil and the U.S. Gulf Coast. An example of late carbonate cementation/decementation includes the Norphlet Formation. This observed sequence of cementation and decementation can be modeled, and the modeling results can be used to predict enhanced porosity in the subsurface.

  7. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conceptual model of CO2 injection in bedded sandstone-shale sequences has been developed using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments. Numerical simulations were performed with the reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT to analyze mass transfer between sandstone and shale layers and CO2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Results indicate that most CO2 sequestration occurs in the sandstone. The major CO2 trapping minerals are dawsonite and ankerite. The CO2 mineral-trapping capacity after 100,000 years reaches about 90 kg per cubic meter of the medium. The CO2 trapping capacity depends on primary mineral composition. Precipitation of siderite and ankerite requires Fe+2 supplied mainly by chlorite and some by hematite dissolution and reduction. Precipitation of dawsonite requires Na+ provided by oligoclase dissolution. The initial abundance of chlorite and oligoclase therefore affects the CO2 mineral trapping capacity. The sequestration time required depends on the kinetic rate of mineral dissolution and precipitation. Dawsonite reaction kinetics is not well understood, and sensitivity regarding the precipitation rate was examined. The addition of CO2 as secondary carbonates results in decreased porosity. The leaching of chemical constituents from the interior of the shale causes slightly increased porosity. The limited information currently available for the mineralogy of natural high-pressure CO2 gas reservoirs is also generally consistent with our simulation. The ''numerical experiments'' give a detailed understanding of the dynamic evolution of a sandstone-shale geochemical system.

  8. DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    DIVISION S-10--WETLAND SOILS Carbon Accumulation and Storage in Mineral Subsoil beneath Peat Tim R subsoil (Turunen and Moore, 2003). TheyWe showed that sandy subsoils beneath peat near Ramsey Lake conditions beneath the peat. soils beneath the forest, those beneath the peat contained similar In this paper

  9. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  10. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  11. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  12. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  13. ambient carbon monoxide: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CARBONATION of MINING RESIDUES Understanding the Mechanisms and Optimization of Direct Carbon Dioxide Mineral Sequestration Thse Gnouyaro Palla Assima Doctorat en gnie...

  14. Calibrating the ChemCam LIBS for carbonate minerals on Mars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wiens, Roger C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clegg, Samuel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ollila, Ann M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Barefield, James E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lanza, Nina [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Newsom, Horton E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ChemCam instrument suite on board the NASA Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes the first LIBS instrument for extraterrestrial applications. Here we examine carbonate minerals in a simulated martian environment using the LIDS technique in order to better understand the in situ signature of these materials on Mars. Both chemical composition and rock type are determined using multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques. Composition is confirmed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. Our initial results suggest that ChemCam can recognize and differentiate between carbonate materials on Mars.

  15. Microbial and Chemical Enhancement of In-Situ Carbon Mineralization in Geological Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matter, J.; Chandran, K.

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictions of global energy usage suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} in the atmosphere unless major changes are made to the way energy is produced and used. Various carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies are currently being developed, but unfortunately little is known regarding the fundamental characteristics of CO{sub 2}-mineral reactions to allow a viable in-situ carbon mineralization that would provide the most permanent and safe storage of geologically-injected CO{sub 2}. The ultimate goal of this research project was to develop a microbial and chemical enhancement scheme for in-situ carbon mineralization in geologic formations in order to achieve long-term stability of injected CO{sub 2}. Thermodynamic and kinetic studies of CO{sub 2}-mineral-brine systems were systematically performed to develop the in-situ mineral carbonation process that utilizes organic acids produced by a microbial reactor. The major participants in the project are three faculty members and their graduate and undergraduate students at the School of Engineering and Applied Science and at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia University: Alissa Park in Earth and Environmental Engineering & Chemical Engineering (PI), Juerg Matter in Earth and Environmental Science (Co-PI), and Kartik Chandran in Earth and Environmental Engineering (Co-PI). Two graduate students, Huangjing Zhao and Edris Taher, were trained as a part of this project as well as a number of graduate students and undergraduate students who participated part-time. Edris Taher received his MS degree in 2012 and Huangjing Zhao will defend his PhD on Jan. 15th, 2014. The interdisciplinary training provided by this project was valuable to those students who are entering into the workforce in the United States. Furthermore, the findings from this study were and will be published in referred journals to disseminate the results. The list of the papers is given at the end of the report for reference.

  16. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Huifang; Zhou, Mo; Zhang, Fangfu; Konishi, Hiromi; Shen, Zhizhang; Teng, H.

    2013-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mica, biotite, muscovite, diopside, tremolite, ultramafic rock, hematite, Ca-Mg-carbonate, calcite, aragonite, dolomite, crystal nucleation, crystallization, interface, catalysis, EBSD, XRD, TEM

  17. Carbon Nanotubes Potentialities in Directional Dark Matter Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. M. Capparelli; G. Cavoto; D. Mazzilli; A. D. Polosa

    2014-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new solution to the problem of dark matter directional detection based on large parallel arrays of carbon nanotubes. The phenomenon of ion channeling in single wall nanotubes is simulated to calculate the expected number of recoiling carbon ions, due to the hypothetical scattering with dark matter particles, subsequently being driven along their longitudinal extension. As shown by explicit calculation, the relative orientation of the carbon nanotube array with respect to the direction of motion of the Sun has an appreciable effect on the channeling probability of the struck ion and this provides the required detector anisotropic response.

  18. Plant oils and mineral oils: effects as insecticide additives and direct toxicity to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Musca domestica L. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochou, Germain Ochou

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis by GERMAIN OCHOU OCHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject: Entomology PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis...

  19. Direct Observation of Completely Processed Calcium Carbonate Dust Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laskin, Alexander; Iedema, Martin J.; Ichkovich, Aviad; Graber, Ellen R.; Taraniuk, Ilya; Rudich, Yinon

    2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents, for the first time, field evidence of complete, irreversible processing of solid calcium carbonate (calcite)-containing particles and quantitative formation of liquid calcium nitrate particles apparently as a result of heterogeneous reaction of calcium carbonate-containing mineral dust particles with gaseous nitric acid. Formation of nitrates from individual calcite and sea salt particles was followed as a function of time in aerosol samples collected at Shoresh, Israel. Morphology and compositional changes of individual particles were observed using conventional scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (SEM/EDX) and computer controlled SEM/EDX. Environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM) was utilized to determine and demonstrate the hygroscopic behavior of calcium nitrate particles found in some of the samples. Calcium nitrate particles are exceptionally hygroscopic and deliquesce even at very low relative humidity (RH) of 9 -11% which is lower than typical atmospheric environments. Transformation of non-hygroscopic dry mineral dust particles into hygroscopic wet aerosol may have substantial impacts on light scattering properties, the ability to modify clouds and heterogeneous chemistry.

  20. SIMULTANEOUS MECHANICAL AND HEAT ACTIVATION: A NEW ROUTE TO ENHANCE SERPENTINE CARBONATION REACTIVITY AND LOWER CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; J. Diefenbacher; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter; A.V.G. Chizmeshya

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal can support a large fraction of global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other candidate technologies, which propose long-term storage (e.g., ocean and geological sequestration), mineral sequestration permanently disposes of CO{sub 2} as geologically stable mineral carbonates. Only benign, naturally occurring materials are formed, eliminating long-term storage and liability issues. Serpentine carbonation is a leading mineral sequestration process candidate, which offers large scale, permanent sequestration. Deposits exceed those needed to carbonate all the CO{sub 2} that could be generated from global coal reserves, and mining and milling costs are reasonable ({approx}$4 to $5/ton). Carbonation is exothermic, providing exciting low-cost process potential. The remaining goal is to develop an economically viable process. An essential step in this development is increasing the carbonation reaction rate and degree of completion, without substantially impacting other process costs. Recently, the Albany Research Center (ARC) has accelerated serpentine carbonation, which occurs naturally over geological time, to near completion in less than an hour. While reaction rates for natural serpentine have been found to be too slow for practical application, both heat and mechanical (attrition grinding) pretreatment were found to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity. Unfortunately, these processes are too energy intensive to be cost-effective in their present form. In this project we explored the potential that utilizing power plant waste heat (e.g., available up to {approx}200-250 C) during mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) offers to enhance serpentine mineral carbonation, while reducing pretreatment energy consumption and process cost. This project was carried out in collaboration with the Albany Research Center (ARC) to maximize the insight into the potential thermomechanical activation offers. Lizardite was selected as the model serpentine material for investigation, due to the relative structural simplicity of its lamellar structure when compared with the corrugated and spiral structures of antigorite and chrysotile, respectively. Hot-ground materials were prepared as a function of grinding temperature, time, and intensity. Carbonation reactivity was explored using the standard ARC serpentine carbonation test (155 C, 150 atm CO{sub 2}, and 1 hr). The product feedstock and carbonation materials were investigated via a battery of techniques, including X-ray powder diffraction, electron microscopy, thermogravimetric and differential thermal, BET, elemental, and infrared analysis. The incorporation of low-level heat with moderate mechanical activation (i.e., thermomechanical activation) was found to be able to substantially enhance serpentine carbonation reactivity in comparison with moderate mechanical activation alone. Increases in the extent of carbonation of over 70% have been observed in this feasibility study, indicating thermomechanical activation offers substantial potential to lower process cost. Investigations of the thermomechanically activated materials that formed indicate adding low-level heat during moderately intense lizardite mechanical activation promotes (1) energy absorption during activation, (2) structural disorder, and (3) dehydroxylation, as well as carbonation reactivity, with the level of energy absorption, structural disorder and dehydroxylation generally increasing with increasing activation temperature. Increasing activation temperatures were also associated with decreasing surface areas and water absorptive capacities for the activated product materials. The above decreases in surface area and water absorption capacity can be directly correlated with enhanced particle sintering during thermomechanical activation, as evidenced by electron microscopy observation. The level of induced structural disorder appears to be a key parameter in enhancing carbonation reactivity. However, p

  1. Carbon Mineralization by Aqueous Precipitation for Beneficial Use of CO2 from Flue Gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Constantz; Randy Seeker; Martin Devenney

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Calera's innovative Mineralization via Aqueous Precipitation (MAP) technology for the capture and conversion of CO{sub 2} to useful materials for use in the built environment was further developed and proven in the Phase 1 Department of Energy Grant. The process was scaled to 300 gallon batch reactors and subsequently to Pilot Plant scale for the continuous production of product with the production of reactive calcium carbonate material that was evaluated as a supplementary cementitious material (SCM). The Calera SCM{trademark} was evaluated as a 20% replacement for ordinary portland cement and demonstrated to meet the industry specification ASTM 1157 which is a standard performance specification for hydraulic cement. The performance of the 20% replacement material was comparable to the 100% ordinary portland cement control in terms of compressive strength and workability as measured by a variety of ASTM standard tests. In addition to the performance metrics, detailed characterization of the Calera SCM was performed using advanced analytical techniques to better understand the material interaction with the phases of ordinary portland cement. X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies at the Advanced Photon Source in Argonne National Lab confirmed the presence of an amorphous phase(s) in addition to the crystalline calcium carbonate phases in the reactive carbonate material. The presence of carboaluminate phases as a result of the interaction of the reactive carbonate materials with ordinary portland cement was also confirmed. A Life Cycle Assessment was completed for several cases based on different Calera process configurations and compared against the life cycle of ordinary portland cement. In addition to the materials development efforts, the Calera technology for the production of product using an innovative building materials demonstration plant was developed beyond conceptual engineering to a detailed design with a construction schedule and cost estimate.

  2. Carbon-Carbon Composites as Recuperator Material for Direct Gas Brayton Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RA Wolf

    2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Of the numerous energy conversion options available for a space nuclear power plant (SNPP), one that shows promise in attaining reliable operation and high efficiency is the direct gas Brayton (GB) system. In order to increase efficiency, the GB system incorporates a recuperator that accounts for nearly half the weight of the energy conversion system (ECS). Therefore, development of a recuperator that is lighter and provides better performance than current heat exchangers could prove to be advantageous. The feasibility of a carbon-carbon (C/C) composite recuperator core has been assessed and a mass savings of 60% and volume penalty of 20% were projected. The excellent thermal properties, high-temperature capabilities, and low density of carbon-carbon materials make them attractive in the GB system, but development issues such as material compatibility with other structural materials in the system, such as refractory metals and superalloys, permeability, corrosion, joining, and fabrication must be addressed.

  3. Iron-Doped Carbon Aerogels: Novel Porous Substrates for Direct Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, S A; Baumann, T F; Kong, J; Satcher, J H; Dresselhaus, M S

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the synthesis and characterization of Fe-doped carbon aerogels (CAs) and demonstrate the ability to grow carbon nanotubes directly on monoliths of these materials to afford novel carbon aerogel-carbon nanotube composites. Preparation of the Fe-doped CAs begins with the sol-gel polymerization of the potassium salt of 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid with formaldehyde, affording K{sup +}-doped gels that can then be converted to Fe{sup 2+}- or Fe{sup 3+}-doped gels through an ion exchange process, dried with supercritical CO{sub 2} and subsequently carbonized under an inert atmosphere. Analysis of the Fe-doped CAs by TEM, XRD and XPS revealed that the doped iron species are reduced during carbonization to form metallic iron and iron carbide nanoparticles. The sizes and chemical composition of the reduced Fe species were related to pyrolysis temperature as well as the type of iron salt used in the ion exchange process. Raman spectroscopy and XRD analysis further reveal that, despite the presence of the Fe species, the CA framework is not significantly graphitized during pyrolysis. The Fe-doped CAs were subsequently placed in a thermal CVD reactor and exposed to a mixture of CH{sub 4} (1000 sccm), H{sub 2} (500 sccm), and C{sub 2}H{sub 4} (20 sccm) at temperatures ranging from 600 to 800 C for 10 minutes, resulting in direct growth of carbon nanotubes on the aerogel monoliths. Carbon nanotubes grown by this method appear to be multiwalled ({approx}25 nm in diameter and up to 4 mm long) and grow through a tip-growth mechanism that pushes catalytic iron particles out of the aerogel framework. The highest yield of CNTs were grown on Fe-doped CAs pyrolyzed at 800 C treated at CVD temperatures of 700 C.

  4. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the GHG emissions (“carbon footprint”) of crop production inMaterials and methods – “carbon footprint” calculation basedLCA) principles A carbon footprint is “the total set of

  5. Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Click Here for Full Article Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust aerosols in China, particularly black carbon (BC), is the primary reason for precipitation and temperature, W. Chen, and H. Liao (2010), Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust

  6. Plant oils and mineral oils: effects as insecticide additives and direct toxicity to Heliothis virescens (F.) and Musca domestica L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ochou, Germain Ochou

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Ware et al. 1975, 1978, 1980, Bigley et al. 1981). In his analysis of the effects of toxaphene, camphene and cottonseed oil, Bigley et al. (1981) indicated that a number of nontoxic vegetable oils were as effective as toxaphene in increasing...PLANT OILS AND MINERAL OILS: EFFECTS AS INSECTICIDE ADDITIVES AND DIRECT TOXICITY TO HELIOTHIS VIRESCENS (F. ) AND MUSCA DOMESTICA L. A Thesis by GERMAIN OCHOU OCHOU Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial...

  7. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

  8. Mineral Sequestration of Carbon Dixoide in a Sandstone-Shale System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clays and Clay Minerals, 39(4), 355-361. Hower, J. ,Eslinger, E.V. , Hower, M.E. , Perry, E.A. , 1976. Mechanismanalyses such as those by Hower et al. (1976), for the

  9. CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams and sequestration. Carbon sequestration is often associated with the planting of trees. As they mature, the trees INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has

  10. Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garmestani, Hamid

    of the carbon nanotubes on their ability to enhance the mechanical properties of the composites that they form of carbon nanotube dispersion on composite properties, their degree of alignment in the respective matrixUniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow Erin

  11. Change in atmospheric mineral aerosols in response to climate: Last glacial period, preindustrial, modern, and doubled carbon dioxide climates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    parameters on mineral aerosol mobilization, transport, andand L. Kiehl (2003), Mineral aerosol and cloud interactions,for paleoclimate, in Dust Aerosols, Loess Soils and Global

  12. Standard test method for carbon (total) in uranium oxide powders and pellets by direct combustion-infrared detection method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standard test method for carbon (total) in uranium oxide powders and pellets by direct combustion-infrared detection method

  13. Role of clay minerals on the carbonate chemistry in a marine clay formation Lerouge C., Grangeon S., Mazurek M., Wille G.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Role of clay minerals on the carbonate chemistry in a marine clay formation Lerouge C., Grangeon S., Mazurek M., Wille G. Samples from different levels of the Opalinus clay formation at Benken were studied. At the scale of the formation, the trace element content in calcite is anticorrelated with clay content

  14. artery calcium mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    between diatom aggregates, minerals, particulate organic carbon, and dissolved organic October 2008. 1 Correlations of particulate organic carbon (POC) and mineral fluxes into...

  15. Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Carbon supported PtRh catalysts for ethanol oxidation in alkaline direct ethanol fuel cell S and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon, Hong Kong SAR, China a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 26 carbon supported PtRh catalysts and compare their catalytic activities with that of Pt/C in alkaline

  16. DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800135 Directed Self-Assembly of Gradient Concentric Carbon Nanotube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    DOI: 10.1002/adfm.200800135 Directed Self-Assembly of Gradient Concentric Carbon Nanotube Rings the need for lithography or an external field over large surface areas using a facile routine. Carbon stripes of iron catalyst,[31] and blown bubble film process[32] to fabricate nanotube-based devices, e

  17. Conductivity measurements of molten metal oxides and their evaluation in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Since Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC) technology is in a beginning stage, emphasis should be laid on addressing the fundamental aspects. A molten electrolyte is required to facilitate ionic contact between solid ...

  18. Evaluation of the environmental viability of direct injection schemes for ocean carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Israelsson, Peter H. (Peter Hampus), 1973-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the expected impact of several promising schemes for ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection of CO2, and serves as an update to the assessment by Auerbach et al. (1997) and Caulfield et al. ...

  19. Direct template synthesis of mesoporous carbon and its application to supercapacitor electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Songhun, E-mail: yoonshun@krict.re.kr [Advanced Chemical Technology Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Sinseongno 19, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Seung M. [Research Center for Energy Conversion and Storage (RCECS), School of Chemical and Biological Engineering and Institute of Chemical Process, College of Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Chulwee [Advanced Chemical Technology Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology (KRICT), Sinseongno 19, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct templating method which is facile, inexpensive and suitable for the large scale production of mesoporous carbon is reported herein. A meso-structure surfactant/silicate template was made in a solution phase and resorcinol-formaldehyde as a carbon precursor was incorporated into the template solution. After aging, carbonization and hydrofluoric acid (HF) etching, mesoporous carbon was obtained. Using X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and nitrogen sorption, the synthesis mechanism of the mesoporous carbon was elucidated. According to the small angle X-ray scattering measurements, the surface became smoother after the removal of the silica, indicating that the silica was mostly located at the pore surface of the carbon. Also, the calculation of the pore volume demonstrated that the silica was transferred into the pores of the carbon without structural collapse during HF etching. When the prepared mesoporous carbon was applied to a supercapacitor electrode, the rectangular shape of the cyclic voltammogram was less collapsed, even at a high scan rate, which is indicative of its high rate capability. This was due to the low resistance of the electrolyte in the pores (3.8 {Omega} cm{sup 2}), which was smaller than that of conventional activated carbon electrodes and even comparable to that of ordered mesoporous carbon electrodes. This improved performance was probably due to the well developed mesoporosity and high pore connectivity of the prepared mesoporous carbon.

  20. Direct effects of increasing carbon dioxide on vegetation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strain, B R; Cure, J D [eds.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO/sub 2/ is an essential environmental resource. It is required as a raw material of the orderly development of all green plants. As the availability of CO/sub 2/ increases, perhaps reaching two or three times the concentration prevailing in preindustrial times, plants and all other organisms dependent on them for food will be affected. Humans are releasing a gaseous fertilizer into the global atmosphere in quantities sufficient to affect all life. This volume considers the direct effects of global CO/sub 2/ fertilization on plants and thus on all other life. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual papers. (ACR)

  1. Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-Based Nanostructures by Plasmon Resonant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Steve

    Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-Based Nanostructures by Plasmon Resonant Chemical Vapor Deposition the strong plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles in the catalytic decomposition of CO to grow various forms of carbonaceous materials. Irradiating gold nanoparticles in a CO environment at their plasmon resonant frequency

  2. Fluid dynamics of sinking carbon dioxide hydrate particle releases for direct ocean carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chow, Aaron C. (Aaron Chunghin), 1978-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One strategy to remove anthropogenic CO? from the atmosphere to mitigate climate change is by direct ocean injection. Liquid CO? can react with seawater to form solid partially reacted CO? hydrate composite particles (pure ...

  3. Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macris, Catherine Amy

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. Schauble (2010) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionationand E. Tonui (2008) Inter-mineral Iron Isotope Fractionation+ (aq) with carbonate minerals. Geochimica et Cosmochimica

  4. Exploiting simultaneous observational constraints on mass and absorption to estimate the global direct radiative forcing of black carbon and brown carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwarz, J. P.

    Atmospheric black carbon (BC) is a leading climate warming agent, yet uncertainties on the global direct radiative forcing (DRF) remain large. Here we expand a global model simulation (GEOS-Chem) of BC to include the ...

  5. The sensitivity of tropical convective precipitation to the direct radiative forcings of black carbon aerosols emitted from major regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chien

    Previous works have suggested that the direct radiative forcing (DRF) of black carbon (BC) aerosols are able to force a significant change in tropical convective precipitation ranging from the Pacific and Indian Ocean to ...

  6. Combined Power Generation and Carbon Sequestration Using Direct FuelCell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cell offers an innovative approach for separation of carbon dioxide from greenhouse gases (GHG). The carbonate fuel cell system also produces electric power at high efficiency. The simultaneous generation of power and sequestration of greenhouse gases offer an attractive scenario for re-powering the existing coal-fueled power plants, in which the carbonate fuel cell would separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas and would generate additional pollutant-free electric power. Development of this system is concurrent with emergence of Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) technology for generation of electric power from fossil fuels. DFC is based on carbonate fuel cell featuring internal reforming. This technology has been deployed in MW-scale power plants and is readily available as a manufactured product. This final report describes the results of the conceptualization study conducted to assess the DFC-based system concept for separation of CO2 from GHG. Design and development studies were focused on integration of the DFC systems with coal-based power plants, which emit large amounts of GHG. In parallel to the system design and simulation activities, operation of laboratory scale DFC verified the technical concept and provided input to the design activity. The system was studied to determine its effectiveness in capturing more than ninety percent of CO2 from the flue gases. Cost analysis was performed to estimate the change in cost of electricity for a 200 MW pulverized coal boiler steam cycle plant retrofitted with the DFC-based CO2 separation system producing an additional 127 MW of electric power. The cost increments as percentage of levelized cost of electricity were estimated for a range of separation plant installations per year and a range of natural gas cost. The parametric envelope meeting the goal (<20% increase in COE) was identified. Results of this feasibility study indicated that DFC-based separation systems have the potential for capturing at least 90% of the emissions from the greenhouse gases generated by power plants and other industrial exhaust streams, and yet entail in less than 20% increase in the cost of energy services for long-term deployment (beyond 2012). The anticipated cost of energy increase is in line with DOE's goal for post-combustion systems as outlined in the ''Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines'', published by NETL, April 2005. During the course of this study certain enabling technologies were identified and the needs for further research and development were discussed.

  7. Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast to conven-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biomimetic Mineralization: Mesoporous Structures Biological mineral synthesis, in contrast of mineral crystals. Mesophases are materials which have domain length scales of the order of a few as a molecular blueprint for the site- directed formation of the inorganic phase, by providing an interface

  8. Sensitivity Study of the Effects of Mineral Dust Particle Nonsphericity and Thin Cirrus Clouds on MODIS Dust Optical Depth Retrievals and Direct Radiative Forcing Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Qian

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A special challenge posed by mineral dust aerosols is associated with their predominantly nonspherical particle shapes. In the present study, the scattering and radiative properties for nonspherical mineral dust aerosols at violet-to-blue (0.412, 0...

  9. Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

  10. Optimization and Comparison of Direct and Indirect Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Plant Cycles for Nuclear Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwin A. Harvego; Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There have been a number of studies involving the use of gases operating in the supercritical mode for power production and process heat applications. Supercritical carbon dioxide (CO2) is particularly attractive because it is capable of achieving relatively high power conversion cycle efficiencies in the temperature range between 550 C and 750 C. Therefore, it has the potential for use with any type of high-temperature nuclear reactor concept, assuming reactor core outlet temperatures of at least 550 C. The particular power cycle investigated in this paper is a supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle. The CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle can be used as either a direct or indirect power conversion cycle, depending on the reactor type and reactor outlet temperature. The advantage of this cycle when compared to the helium Brayton cycle is the lower required operating temperature; 550 C versus 850 C. However, the supercritical CO2 Recompression Brayton Cycle requires an operating pressure in the range of 20 MPa, which is considerably higher than the required helium Brayton cycle operating pressure of 8 MPa. This paper presents results of analyses performed using the UniSim process analyses software to evaluate the performance of both a direct and indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle for different reactor outlet temperatures. The direct supercritical CO2 cycle transferred heat directly from a 600 MWt reactor to the supercritical CO2 working fluid supplied to the turbine generator at approximately 20 MPa. The indirect supercritical CO2 cycle assumed a helium-cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), operating at a primary system pressure of approximately 7.0 MPa, delivered heat through an intermediate heat exchanger to the secondary indirect supercritical CO2 Brayton Recompression cycle, again operating at a pressure of about 20 MPa. For both the direct and indirect cycles, sensitivity calculations were performed for reactor outlet temperature between 550 C and 850 C. The UniSim models used realistic component parameters and operating conditions to model the complete reactor and power conversion systems. CO2 properties were evaluated, and the operating ranges of the cycles were adjusted to take advantage of the rapidly changing properties of CO2 near the critical point. The results of the analyses showed that, for the direct supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies in the range of 40 to 50% can be achieved. For the indirect supercritical CO2 power cycle, thermal efficiencies were approximately 10% lower than those obtained for the direct cycle over the same reactor outlet temperature range.

  11. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Diffusion and Adsorption of Uranyl Carbonate Species in Nanosized Mineral Fractures. Abstract: Atomistic...

  12. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralizatio...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic Organic Matter and Soil Organic Carbon. Carbon Mineralizability Determines Interactive Effects onMineralization of Pyrogenic...

  13. Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is compatible with much of the existing fuel infrastructure.

  14. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and...

  15. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions Where We Are Directions The Bradbury Science Museum is located at 1350 Central Avenue Los Alamos, NM 87544 Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the...

  16. Metal Carbonation of Forsterite in Supercritical CO2 and H2O...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    study fundamental mineral carbonation processes and reaction extent relevant to geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) using a model silicate mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4)+supercritic...

  17. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with speci?c sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  18. JOM: Journal of the Minerals, Metals, and Materials Society, 2012, Vol. 62, Issue 10, pp. 1148-1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nikhil

    -1157 Thermal expansion of carbon nanofiber reinforced multiscale polymer composites Ronald Poveda, Sriniket. Keywords: Polymer matrix composite; nanocomposite; carbon nanofibers; thermal properties; coefficient materials. Therefore, understanding the trends observed in the CTE of composites with respect

  19. Directing and Sensing Changes in Molecular Conformation on Individual Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hone, James

    and drain electrodes on a silicon oxide surface. The doped silicon wafer serves as a global back of the carbon nanotubes with functional molecules that can be toggled back-and-forth between different molecular of thermally grown SiO2 on their surface.10 Source and drain electrodes (5 nm of Cr followed by 50 nm of Au

  20. Final report : LDRD project 79824 carbon nanotube sorting via DNA-directed self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinson, David B; Leung, Kevin; Rempe, Susan B.; Dossa, Paul D.; Frischknecht, Amalie Lucile; Martin, Marcus Gary

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have shown great promise in novel applications in molecular electronics, biohazard detection, and composite materials. Commercially synthesized nanotubes exhibit a wide dispersion of geometries and conductivities, and tend to aggregate. Hence the key to using these materials is the ability to solubilize and sort carbon nanotubes according to their geometric/electronic properties. One of the most effective dispersants is single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but there are many outstanding questions regarding the interaction between nucleic acids and SWNTs. In this work we focus on the interactions of SWNTs with single monomers of nucleic acids, as a first step to answering these outstanding questions. We use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to calculate the binding energy of six different nucleotide monophosphates (NMPs) to a (6,0) single-wall carbon nanotube in aqueous solution. We find that the binding energies are generally favorable, of the order of a few kcal/mol. The binding energies of the different NMPs were very similar in salt solution, whereas we found a range of binding energies for NMPs in pure water. The binding energies are sensitive to the details of the association of the sodium ions with the phosphate groups and also to the average conformations of the nucleotides. We use electronic structure (Density Functional Theory (DFT) and Moller-Plesset second order perturbation to uncorrelated Hartree Fock theory (MP2)) methods to complement the classical force field study. With judicious choices of DFT exchange correlation functionals, we find that DFT, MP2, and classical force field predictions are in qualitative and even quantitative agreement; all three methods should give reliable and valid predictions. However, in one important case, the interactions between ions and metallic carbon nanotubes--the SWNT polarization-induced affinity for ions, neglected in most classical force field studies, is found to be extremely large (on the order of electron volts) and may have important consequences for various SWNT applications. Finally, the adsorption of NMPs onto single-walled carbon nanotubes were studied experimentally. The nanotubes were sonicated in the presence of the nucleotides at various weight fractions and centrifuged before examining the ultraviolet absorbance of the resulting supernatant. A distinct Langmuir adsorption isotherm was obtained for each nucleotide. All of the nucleotides differ in their saturation value as well as their initial slope, which we attribute to differences both in nucleotide structure and in the binding ability of different types or clusters of tubes. Results from this simple system provide insights toward development of dispersion and separation methods for nanotubes: strongly binding nucleotides are likely to help disperse, whereas weaker ones may provide selectivity that may be beneficial to a separation process.

  1. Direct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu,EnergyDimitriDirac ChargeDiracDirect

  2. A Thermodynamic Model for Predicting Mineral Reactivity in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide: I. Phase Behavior of Carbon Dioxide - Water - Chloride Salt Systems Across the H2O-Rich to the CO2-Rich Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, Ronald D.; Wang, Zheming; Anderko, Andre; Wang, Peiming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase equilibria in mixtures containing carbon dioxide, water, and chloride salts have been investigated using a combination of solubility measurements and thermodynamic modeling. The solubility of water in the CO2-rich phase of ternary mixtures of CO2, H2O and NaCl or CaCl2 was determined, using near infrared spectroscopy, at 90 atm and 40 to 100 °C. These measurements fill a gap in the experimental database for CO2 water salt systems, for which phase composition data have been available only for the H2O-rich phases. A thermodynamic model for CO2 water salt systems has been constructed on the basis of the previously developed Mixed-Solvent Electrolyte (MSE) framework, which is capable of modeling aqueous solutions over broad ranges of temperature and pressure, is valid to high electrolyte concentrations, treats mixed-phase systems (with both scCO2 and water present) and can predict the thermodynamic properties of dry and partially water-saturated supercritical CO2 over broad ranges of temperature and pressure. Within the MSE framework the standard-state properties are calculated from the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers equation of state whereas the excess Gibbs energy includes a long-range electrostatic interaction term expressed by a Pitzer-Debye-Hückel equation, a virial coefficient-type term for interactions between ions and a short-range term for interactions involving neutral molecules. The parameters of the MSE model have been evaluated using literature data for both the H2O-rich and CO2-rich phases in the CO2 - H2O binary and for the H2O-rich phase in the CO2 - H2O - NaCl / KCl / CaCl2 / MgCl2 ternary and multicompontent systems. The model accurately represents the properties of these systems at temperatures from 0°C to 300 °C and pressures up to ~4000 atm. Further, the solubilities of H2O in CO2-rich phases that are predicted by the model are in agreement with the new measurements for the CO2 - H2O - NaCl and CO2 - H2O - CaCl2 systems. Thus, the model can be used to predict the effect of various salts on the water content and water activity in CO2-rich phases on the basis of parameters determined from the properties of aqueous systems. Given the importance of water activity in CO2-rich phases for mineral reactivity, the model can be used as a foundation for predicting mineral transformations across the entire CO2/H2O composition range from aqueous solution to anhydrous scCO2. An example application using the model is presented which involves the transformation of forsterite to nesquehonite as a function of temperature and water content in the CO2-rich phase.

  3. Direct Access to Mesoporous Crystalline TiO2/Carbon Composites with Large and Uniform Pores for Use as Anode Materials in Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jinwoo; Jung, Yoon S.; Warren, Scott C.; Kamperman, Marleen; Oh, Seung M.; DiSalvo, Francis J.; Wiesner, Ulrich

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mesoporous and highly crystalline TiO{sub 2} (anatase)/carbon composites with large (>5?nm) and uniform pores were synthesized using PI-b-PEO block copolymers as structure directing agents. Pore sizes could be tuned by utilizing block copolymers with different molecular weights. The resulting mesoporous TiO{sub 2}/carbon was successfully used as an anode material for Li ion batteries. Without addition of conducting aid (Super P), the electrode showed high capacity during the first insertion/desertion cycle due to carbon wiring inside the walls of mesoporous TiO{sub 2}/carbon. The electrode further showed stable cycle performance up to 50 cycles and the specific charge capacity at 30?C was 38?mA h (g of TiO{sub 2}){sup ?1}, which indicates CCM-TiO{sub 2}/carbon can be used as a material for high rate use.

  4. Preliminary conceptual model for mineral evolution in Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, C.J.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model is presented for mineral alteration in Yucca Mountain, Nevada, that suggests that the mineral transformations observed there are primarily controlled by the activity of aqueous silica. The rate of these reactions is related to the rate of evolution of the metastable silica polymorphs opal-CT and cristobalite assuming that a{sub SiO{sub 2(aq)}} is fixed at the equilibrium solubility of the most soluble silica polymorph present. The rate equations accurately predict the present depths of disappearance of opal-CT and cristobalite. The rate equations have also been used to predict the extent of future mineral alteration that may result from emplacement of a high-level nuclear waste repository in Yucca Mountain. Relatively small changes in mineralogy are predicted, but these predictions are based on the assumption that emplacement of a repository would not increase the pH of water in Yucca Mountain nor increase its carbonate content. Such changes may significantly increase mineral alteration. Some of the reactions currently occurring in Yucca Mountain consume H{sup +} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}. Combining reaction rate models for these reactions with water chemistry data may make it possible to estimate water flux through the basal vitrophyre of the Topopah Spring Member and to help confirm the direction and rate of flow of groundwater in Yucca Mountain.

  5. Mechanism of direct current electrical charge conduction in p-toluenesulfonate doped polypyrrole/carbon composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Amit [National Physical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Chemistry, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India); Singh, Rajiv K.; Singh, Hari K.; Singh, Ramadhar, E-mail: ramadhar@mail.nplindia.org [National Physical Laboratory, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research, Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India); Srivastava, Pankaj [Department of Chemistry, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi 221005 (India)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Polypyrrole/carbon (PPy/C) composites have been synthesized using varying concentration of p-toluenesulfonate (pTS) dopant by surface initiated in-situ chemical oxidative polymerization. The synthesis and influence of pTS on the structure of the PPy/C composites are confirmed by Fourier transform infrared studies and the morphological features have been examined by scanning electron microscopy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, employed to examine the surface composition and doping level of these composites, confirms the anionic doping into the polymer backbone. Electron spin resonance measurement has been carried out on these samples to identify the nature of the charge carriers and their concentration at different doping levels. The dc electrical conductivity of these composites has been measured in the temperature range ?10–305?K. The observed results have been analyzed in the framework of existing theoretical models. Different Mott's parameters, such as characteristic temperature (T{sub 0}), density of states at the Fermi level (N(E{sub F})), average hopping distance (R), and average hopping energy (W), evaluated from dc conductivity data supports the applicability of Mott's three dimensional variable range hopping mechanism in this system.

  6. Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Task 3: Mechanical behaviors of carbonated minerals. - Task 4: Modeling of CO2- reservoir rock interactions. - Task 5: Preparation of report covering the four tasks previous task,...

  7. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2002 U.S. Department of the Interior U for Mineral Products . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 The Role of Nonfuel Minerals in the U.S. Economy . . . 4 2001 U.S. Net Import Reliance for Selected Nonfuel Mineral Materials

  8. Calcifying Cyanobacteria - The potential of biomineralization for Carbon Capture and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, Christer G

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    induced  mineralization of calcium carbonate: The role of cluster involved in calcium carbonate biomineralization.  45.  Aloisi G: The calcium carbonate saturation state in 

  9. Soil Interfaces in a Changing World International Symposium of Interactions of Soil Minerals with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Minerals with Organic Components and Microorganisms 3rd InterCongress of Commission 2.5 IUSS Soil chemical at Carbon/Mineral and Metal(loid)/Mineral Interfaces Donald L. Sparks, Chunmei Chen, Peter Leinweber, Matt to investigate biogeochemical processes at mineral/microbe interfaces that involve nutrients such as C, N, and P

  10. Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Markovich

    2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

  11. Received 28 Apr 2013 | Accepted 9 Sep 2013 | Published 15 Oct 2013 Earthworms facilitate carbon sequestration through

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    carbon sequestration through unequal amplification of carbon stabilization compared with mineralization carbon would entirely reflect the earthworms' contribution to net carbon sequestration. We show how two widespread earthworm invaders affect net carbon sequestration through impacts on the balance of carbon

  12. Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

  13. Biologically Enhanced Carbon Sequestration: Research Needs and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Curtis M.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon dioxide removal as calcium carbonate mineral. Energyin the form of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3 , as calcite), andto the formation of calcium carbonate; on the other hand,

  14. RIETVELD REFINEMENT OF REAL STRUCTURE PARAMETERS OF DISORDERED CLAY MINERALS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    -conventional hydrocarbons in Germany) Germany's potential for shale oil and shale gas NIKO seal gas-rich shale shale: sedimentary rock which contains quartz, carbonates and clay minerals #12;clay minerals in shales quartz

  15. MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    MINERAL FACILITIES MAPPING PROJECT Yadira Soto-Viruet Supervisor: David Menzie, Yolanda Fong-Sam Minerals Information Team (MIT) USGS Summer Internship 2009 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Minerals Information Team (MIT): Annually reports on the minerals facilities of more than 180 countries

  16. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2014 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2014, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  17. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2012 #12;U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey MINERAL contained within this report. Suggested citation: U.S. Geological Survey, 2012, Mineral commodity summaries and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products......................................................... 4 The Role

  18. MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 20 U.S. Department of the Interior U MINERAL COMMODITY SUMMARIES 2003 #12;U.S. DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR GALE A. NORTON, Secretary For sale;CONTENTS Page General: Growth Rates of Leading and Coincident Indexes for Mineral Products

  19. Earth's Mineral Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    Earth's Mineral Evolution :: Astrobiology Magazine - earth science - evol...rth science evolution Extreme Life Mars Life Outer Planets Earth's Mineral Evolution Summary (Nov 14, 2008): New research. Display Options: Earth's Mineral Evolution Based on a CIW news release Mineral Kingdom Has Co

  20. Selective flotation of phosphate minerals with hydroxamate collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Wang, Xuming (Salt Lake City, UT); Li, Minhua (Salt Lake City, UT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for separating phosphate minerals from a mineral mixture, particularly from high-dolomite containing phosphate ores. The method involves conditioning the mineral mixture by contacting in an aqueous in environment with a collector in an amount sufficient for promoting flotation of phosphate minerals. The collector is a hydroxamate compound of the formula; ##STR1## wherein R is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms. M is a cation, typically hydrogen, an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal. Preferably, the collector also comprises an alcohol of the formula, R'--OH wherein R' is generally hydrophobic and chosen such that the collector has solubility or dispersion properties so that it can be distributed in the mineral mixture, typically an alkyl, aryl, or alkylaryl group having 6 to 18 carbon atoms.

  1. Lab 2: Mineral Lab notes. Minerals are inorganic, solid, naturally occurring substances that have a characteristic chemical compositions,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    a characteristic chemical compositions, distinctive physical properties, and crystalline structures. Chemical is silicon dioxide SiO2; the mineral galena is an ore of lead, and its chemical formula is PbS, a lead sulfide; and the mineral calcite, which is used as an antacid and in fertilizers, is calcium carbonate Ca

  2. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the invention comprises an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane therebetween, the anode and the cathode each comprising a patterned sheet of longitudinally aligned transition metal-containing carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon nanotubes are in contact with and are aligned generally perpendicular to the membrane, wherein a catalytically active transition metal is incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  3. High-Temperature Co-electrolysis of Steam and Carbon Dioxide for Direct Production of Syngas; Equilibrium Model and Single-Cell Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, J. E.; Stoots, C. M.; Herring, J. S.; Hartvigsen, J. J.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study has been completed to assess the performance of single solid-oxide electrolysis cells operating over a temperature range of 800 to 850ºC in the coelectrolysis mode, simultaneously electrolyzing steam and carbon dioxide for the direct production of syngas. The experiments were performed over a range of inlet flow rates of steam, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and nitrogen and over a range of current densities (-0.1 to 0.25 A/cm2) using single electrolyte-supported button electrolysis cells. Steam and carbon dioxide consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation and a gas chromatograph, respectively. Cell operating potentials and cell current were varied using a programmable power supply. Measured values of open-cell potential and outlet gas composition are compared to predictions obtained from a chemical equilibrium coelectrolysis model. Model predictions of outlet gas composition based on an effective equilibrium temperature are shown to agree well with measurements. Cell area-specific resistance values were similar for steam electrolysis and coelectrolysis.

  4. BIOMEDICAL VIGNETTE Mineral Surface Directed Membrane Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Eric

    components and the input of energy and material from the environment to execute very basic cellular processes can play a critical role in organizing proto-biological materials in a way that could have led membrane vesicles from fatty acids. This ability of clay to influence the formation of supramolecular

  5. Carbon Smackdown: Carbon Capture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Jeffrey Long

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this July 9, 2010 Berkeley Lab summer lecture, Lab scientists Jeff Long of the Materials Sciences and Nancy Brown of the Environmental Energy Technologies Division discuss their efforts to fight climate change by capturing carbon from the flue gas of power plants, as well as directly from the air

  6. MINERAL FINE STRUCTURE OF THE AMERICAN LOBSTER CUTICLE JOSEPH G. KUNKEL,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkel, Joseph G.

    . Calcite and amorphous calcium carbonate are the most abundant and most acid vulnerable of the cuticle than calcium carbonate has been diminished. But this detail in crustaceans is now yielding. Milne-Edwards, 1837, that the 3 minerals calcite, amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), and carbonate

  7. Continuous air agglomeration method for high carbon fly ash beneficiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, McMahon L. (Pittsburgh, PA); Champagne, Kenneth J. (Monongahela, PA); Finseth, Dennis H. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The carbon and mineral components of fly ash are effectively separated by a continuous air agglomeration method, resulting in a substantially carboree mineral stream and a highly concentrated carbon product. The method involves mixing the fly ash comprised of carbon and inorganic mineral matter with a liquid hydrocarbon to form a slurry, contacting the slurry with an aqueous solution, dispersing the hydrocarbon slurry into small droplets within the aqueous solution by mechanical mixing and/or aeration, concentrating the inorganic mineral matter in the aqueous solution, agglomerating the carbon and hydrocarbon in the form of droplets, collecting the droplets, separating the hydrocarbon from the concentrated carbon product, and recycling the hydrocarbon.

  8. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilAElectronicCurves | SciTech Connect Journal Article:

  9. Universal ripper miner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Roger J. (Bloomington, MN); Larson, David A. (Minneapolis, MN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A universal ripper miner used to cut, collect and transfer material from an underground mine working face includes a cutter head that is vertically movable in an arcuate cutting cycle by means of drive members, such as hydraulically actuated pistons. The cutter head may support a circular cutter bit having a circular cutting edge that may be indexed to incrementally expose a fresh cutting edge. An automatic indexing system is disclosed wherein indexing occurs by means of a worm gear and indexing lever mechanism. The invention also contemplates a bi-directional bit holder enabling cutting to occur in both the upstroke and the downstroke cutting cycle. Another feature of the invention discloses multiple bits arranged in an in-line, radially staggered pattern, or a side-by-side pattern to increase the mining capacity in each cutting cycle. An on-board resharpening system is also disclosed for resharpening the cutting edge at the end of cutting stroke position. The aforementioned improvement features may be used either singly, or in any proposed combination with each other.

  10. Pd modified Au on carbon as an effective and durable catalyst for the direct oxidation of HMF to FDCA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villa, Alberto [Universita di Milano, Italy; Schiavoni, Marco [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Campisi, Sebastiano [University of Milan and INFN, Milano, Italy; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Prati, Laura [Universita di Milano, Italy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the modification of a gold/carbon catalyst with Pt or Pd produces stable and recyclable catalysts for the selective oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA). This finding is a significant advance over current conversion technology because of the technological importance of FDCA. Indeed, FDCA has been identified as one of twelve potential building blocks for the production of value added chemicals derived from biosources.1 FDCA is a potential replacement source of terephthalic acid, the monomer presently used for the production of polyethylene terephthalate (PET) and derived from hydrocarbon sources.2

  11. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Willow brook, IL)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane there between. A bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated in the nanotubes forms at least one portion of the MEA and is in contact with the membrane. A combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into a first reaction zone maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is transmitted to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes. The nanotubes are in contact with a portion of the MEA at production or being positioned in contact thereafter. Methods of forming a PEMFC are also disclosed.

  12. PAPER www.rsc.org/greenchem | Green Chemistry Carbonates: eco-friendly solvents for palladium-catalysed direct arylation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , pyrrole, imidazole or isoxazole derivatives was found to require a more elevated reaction temperature. The direct arylation of heteroaromatics is an important field for research in organic synthesis due powerful method for the synthesis of a wide variety of arylated heterocycles.3­10 This reaction provides

  13. Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Biodiesel: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-10-408

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maness, P. C.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OPX Biotechnologies, Inc. (OPX), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and Johnson Matthey will develop and optimize a novel, engineered microorganism that directly produces biodiesel from renewable hydrogen (H2) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The proposed process will fix CO2 utilizing H2 to generate an infrastructure-compatible, energy-dense fuel at costs of less than $2.50 per gallon, with water being produced as the primary byproduct. NREL will perform metabolic engineering on the bacterium Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) and a techno-economic analysis to guide future scale-up work. H2 and CO2 uptakes rates will be genetically increased, production of free fatty acids will be enhanced and their degradation pathway blocked in order to meet the ultimate program goals.

  14. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Lithium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ober, J.A.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States led the world in lithium mineral and compound production and consumption. Estimated consumption increased slightly, and world production also grew. Sales increased for domestic producers, who announced price increases for the third consecutive year. Because lithium is electrochemically reactive and has other unique properties, there are many commercial lithium products. Producers sold lithium as mineral concentrate, brine, compound, or metal, depending upon the end use. Most lithium compounds were consumed in the production of ceramics, glass, and primary aluminum.

  15. Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster Location P-19 Gregory K. Lilik, Andr L. Boehman Department of Energy & Mineral Engineering EMS Energy...

  16. Laser Assisted Direct Local Synthesis of Semiconducting Nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RYU, SANG GIL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    electrically driven lasers," Nature 421 (6920), 241-245 (Hsu, A. Bushmaker et al. , "Laser Directed Growth of Carbon-al. , "Scanning focused laser activation of carbon nanotube

  17. ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ANALYSIS OF ENHANCED COALBED METHANE RECOVERY THROUGH CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN THE CENTRAL recovered. Carbon sequestration, therefore, allows the utilization of unexploited mineral resources while potential of coalbed methane production using carbon dioxide sequestration in the Central Appalachian Basin

  18. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach Re-direct Destination: The reactivity of sandstones was studied under...

  19. EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Bhringer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EMBODIED CARBON TARIFFS Christoph Böhringer Jared C. Carbone Thomas F. Rutherford Revised: August 2013 Abstract Embodied carbon tariffs tax the direct and indirect carbon emissions embodied in trade -- an idea popularized by countries seeking to extend the reach of domestic carbon regu- lations. We

  20. Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 2D—Building Market Confidence and Understanding II: Carbon Accounting and Woody Biofuels Forest Carbon and Biomass Energy – LCA Issues and Challenges Reid Miner, Vice President, NCASI

  1. Micromodel Investigations of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks. Abstract: In this study, carbon dioxide exsolution from carbonated water is directly observed under reservoir...

  2. Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

  3. Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    News ????????????????? ® College of Engineering and Mineral Resources Winter 2008 table of contents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 wvCROSSROADS DepartmentofCivilandEnvironmentalEngineering Civil engineering exchange program and environmental engineering with a focus in transportation will have the opportunity to study abroad as part

  4. Mineral mesopore effects on nitrogenous organic matter Andrew R. Zimmermana,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chorover, Jon

    as sequestration of pollutants in soils and sediments (Luthy et al., 1997), turnover of natural soil organic carbon that organic matter (OM) may be protected from enzymatic degradation by sequestration within mineral mesopores observations. These results provide a potential mechanism for the selective sequestration and preservation

  5. Mineral Rights and Proceeds (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section contains provisions which determine when mineral rights are presumed to be abandoned by property owners.

  6. Carbon Footprint Towson University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fath, Brian D.

    Carbon Footprint Towson University GHG Inventory for Educational Institutes Getting Starting.TM The Carbon Footprint 8 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 1. Scope I-Direct Emissions works.TM The Carbon Footprint 10 The Constellation Experience A Broad Inventory 3. Scope III

  7. Mineral Requirements of Sheep.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1918-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constituents in feed, residues, and excrements were estimated. In connection with other digestion experiments, estimates were made of certain ash constituents in feeds, excrements and urine. The results of this work throw light upon the mineral requirements...,11 grams phosphoric acid. The ratio of lime to phosphoric acid in tri- calcium phosphate is 1 :0.80. Table 7.-Average magnesia eaten and digested. BALANCE EXPEBIMENTS In twenty tests with ten rations, the urine was analyzed in addition to the feeds...

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Carbonate cements in Miller field of the UK North Sea: a natural

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    a minority of the reservoired CO2 in Miller (6­24%) has been sequestrated in carbonates, even after 70 Ma sequestration Á Carbonate cements Á Stable isotopes Á Mineral dissolution Á Miller field Introduction, anorthite, chlorite), however, to provide cations for carbonate formation. Mineral sequestration efficiency

  9. Natural materials for carbon capture.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myshakin, Evgeniy M. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (National Energy Technology Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Naturally occurring clay minerals provide a distinctive material for carbon capture and carbon dioxide sequestration. Swelling clay minerals, such as the smectite variety, possess an aluminosilicate structure that is controlled by low-charge layers that readily expand to accommodate water molecules and, potentially, carbon dioxide. Recent experimental studies have demonstrated the efficacy of intercalating carbon dioxide in the interlayer of layered clays but little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the process and the extent of carbon capture as a function of clay charge and structure. A series of molecular dynamics simulations and vibrational analyses have been completed to assess the molecular interactions associated with incorporation of CO2 in the interlayer of montmorillonite clay and to help validate the models with experimental observation.

  10. Optimization of Mineral Activation for CO2 sequestration Hui X. Ou, McNair Scholar, Pennsylvania State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    mineral carbonates, has proved to be a promising concept for permanent CO2 sequestration. However provide incremental improvements, and therefore, carbon sequestration technologies must be developed to achieve zero emissions (DOE, 1999). Carbon sequestration refers to the removal and long-term storage

  11. CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rollins, Andrew M.

    materials. MATERIALS AND DESIRED DATA Carbon-Carbon Composites(T300 & SWB): Crush Resistance, Bend StrengthCARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE ALLCOMP Carbon-Carbon Composite · C-C supplied in two forms · T300: C strength 4340 steel, carbon-carbon composite, and Carbon-Silicon Carbide composite were tested to examine

  12. Degradation of dome cutting minerals in Hanford waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Huber, Heinz J.; Cooke, Gary A.

    2013-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however.

  13. Degradation of Dome Cutting Minerals in Hanford Waste - 13100

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, Jacob G.; Cooke, Gary A.; Huber, Heinz J. [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC, P.O. Box 850, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the Hanford Tank Farms, recent changes in retrieval technology require cutting new risers in several single-shell tanks. The Hanford Tank Farm Operator is using water jet technology with abrasive silicate minerals such as garnet or olivine to cut through the concrete and rebar dome. The abrasiveness of these minerals, which become part of the high-level waste stream, may enhance the erosion of waste processing equipment. However, garnet and olivine are not thermodynamically stable in Hanford waste, slowly degrading over time. How likely these materials are to dissolve completely in the waste before the waste is processed in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant can be evaluated using theoretical analysis for olivine and collected direct experimental evidence for garnet. Based on an extensive literature study, a large number of primary silicates decompose into sodalite and cancrinite when exposed to Hanford waste. Given sufficient time, the sodalite also degrades into cancrinite. Even though cancrinite has not been directly added to any Hanford tanks during process times, it is the most common silicate observed in current Hanford waste. By analogy, olivine and garnet are expected to ultimately also decompose into cancrinite. Garnet used in a concrete cutting demonstration was immersed in a simulated supernate representing the estimated composition of the liquid retrieving waste from Hanford tank 241-C-107 at both ambient and elevated temperatures. This simulant was amended with extra NaOH to determine if adding caustic would help enhance the degradation rate of garnet. The results showed that the garnet degradation rate was highest at the highest NaOH concentration and temperature. At the end of 12 weeks, however, the garnet grains were mostly intact, even when immersed in 2 molar NaOH at 80 deg. C. Cancrinite was identified as the degradation product on the surface of the garnet grains. In the case of olivine, the rate of degradation in the high-pH regimes of a waste tank is expected to depend on two main parameters: carbonate is expected to slow olivine degradation rates, whereas hydroxide is expected to enhance olivine dissolution rates. Which of these two competing dissolution drivers will have a larger impact on the dissolution rate in the specific environment of a waste tank is currently not identifiable. In general, cancrinite is much smaller and less hard than either olivine or garnet, so would be expected to be less erosive to processing equipment. Complete degradation of either garnet or olivine prior to being processed at the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant cannot be confirmed, however. (authors)

  14. Minerals 2013, 3, 304-317; doi:10.3390/min3030304 ISSN 2075-163X

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    of mineral resources as: "a state of dynamic interplay between environment and society (in a broad sense particularly in the low-carbon energy industry, and global demand outstripping availability. Despite this focus

  15. Mineralization of Basalts in the CO2-H2O-SO2-O2 System. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SO2-O2 System. Mineralization of Basalts in the CO2-H2O-SO2-O2 System. Abstract: Sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) containing minor amounts of co-contaminants in geologic...

  16. Carbon fuel cells with carbon corrosion suppression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical cell apparatus that can operate as either a fuel cell or a battery includes a cathode compartment, an anode compartment operatively connected to the cathode compartment, and a carbon fuel cell section connected to the anode compartment and the cathode compartment. An effusion plate is operatively positioned adjacent the anode compartment or the cathode compartment. The effusion plate allows passage of carbon dioxide. Carbon dioxide exhaust channels are operatively positioned in the electrochemical cell to direct the carbon dioxide from the electrochemical cell.

  17. High performance of a carbon supported ternary PdIrNi catalyst for ethanol electro-oxidation in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    -oxidation in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells Shuiyun Shen, T. S. Zhao,* Jianbo Xu and Yinshi Li-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM DEFCs). We demonstrate that the use of the ternary PdIrNi catalyst for the ethanol oxidation reaction (EOR) in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells (AEM DEFCs) offers

  18. Institute for Mineral and Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for energy. Mining and processing are vulnerable to energy price increases. Power is the largest contributingInstitute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges #12;Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 2 Vision The vision of the Institute for Mineral and Energy

  19. ENHANCING THE ATOMIC-LEVEL UNDERSTANDING OF CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS VIA ADVANCED COMPUTATIONAL MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.V.G. Chizmeshya; M.J. McKelvy; G.H. Wolf; R.W. Carpenter; D.A. Gormley; J.R. Diefenbacher; R. Marzke

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fossil fuels currently provide 85% of the world's energy needs, with the majority coming from coal, due to its low cost, wide availability, and high energy content. The extensive use of coal-fired power assumes that the resulting CO2 emissions can be vented to the atmosphere. However, exponentially increasing atmospheric CO2 levels have brought this assumption under critical review. Over the last decade, this discussion has evolved from whether exponentially increasing anthropogenic CO2 emissions will adversely affect the global environment, to the timing and magnitude of their impact. A variety of sequestration technologies are being explored to mitigate CO2 emissions. These technologies must be both environmentally benign and economically viable. Mineral carbonation is an attractive candidate technology as it disposes of CO2 as geologically stable, environmentally benign mineral carbonates, clearly satisfying the first criteria. The primary challenge for mineral carbonation is cost-competitive process development. CO2 mineral sequestration--the conversion of stationary-source CO2 emissions into mineral carbonates (e.g., magnesium and calcium carbonate, MgCO3 and CaCO3)--has recently emerged as one of the most promising sequestration options, providing permanent CO2 disposal, rather than storage. In this approach a magnesium-bearing feedstock mineral (typically serpentine or olivine; available in vast quantities globally) is specially processed and allowed to react with CO2 under controlled conditions. This produces a mineral carbonate which (1) is environmentally benign, (2) already exists in nature in quantities far exceeding those that could result from carbonating the world's known fossil fuel reserves, and (3) is stable on a geological time scale. Minimizing the process cost via optimization of the reaction rate and degree of completion is the remaining challenge. As members of the DOE/NETL managed National Mineral Sequestration Working Group we have already significantly improved our understanding of mineral carbonation. Group members at the Albany Research Center have recently shown that carbonation of olivine and serpentine, which naturally occurs over geological time (i.e., 100,000s of years), can be accelerated to near completion in hours. Further process refinement will require a synergetic science/engineering approach that emphasizes simultaneous investigation of both thermodynamic processes and the detailed microscopic, atomic-level mechanisms that govern carbonation kinetics. Our previously funded Phase I Innovative Concepts project demonstrated the value of advanced quantum-mechanical modeling as a complementary tool in bridging important gaps in our understanding of the atomic/molecular structure and reaction mechanisms that govern CO2 mineral sequestration reaction processes for the model Mg-rich lamellar hydroxide feedstock material Mg(OH)2. In the present simulation project, improved techniques and more efficient computational schemes have allowed us to expand and augment these capabilities and explore more complex Mg-rich, lamellar hydroxide-based feedstock materials, including the serpentine-based minerals. These feedstock materials are being actively investigated due to their wide availability, and low-cost CO2 mineral sequestration potential. Cutting-edge first principles quantum chemical, computational solid-state and materials simulation methodology studies proposed herein, have been strategically integrated with our new DOE supported (ASU-Argonne National Laboratory) project to investigate the mechanisms that govern mineral feedstock heat-treatment and aqueous/fluid-phase serpentine mineral carbonation in situ. This unified, synergetic theoretical and experimental approach has provided a deeper understanding of the key reaction mechanisms than either individual approach can alone. We used ab initio techniques to significantly advance our understanding of atomic-level processes at the solid/solution interface by elucidating the origin of vibrational, electronic, x-ray and electron energy loss sp

  20. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Weathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31 (ed. A. F.as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approachWeathering Rates of Silicate Minerals , Vol. 31, pp. 565-

  1. Insights into Silicate Carbonation Processes in Water-Bearing Supercritical CO2 Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Quin RS; Thompson, Christopher J.; Loring, John S.; Windisch, Charles F.; Bowden, Mark E.; Hoyt, David W.; Hu, Jian Z.; Arey, Bruce W.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Schaef, Herbert T.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) is considered an integral part to moderating CO2 concentrations in the atmosphere and subsequently minimizing effects of global climate change. Although subsurface injection of CO2 is common place in certain industries, deployment at the scale required for emission reduction is unprecedented and therefore requires a high degree of predictability. Accurately modeling geochemical processes in the subsurface requires experimental derived data for mineral reactions occurring between the CO2, water, and rocks. Most work in this area has focused on aqueous-dominated systems in which dissolved CO2 reacts to form crystalline carbonate minerals. Comparatively little laboratory research has been conducted on reactions occurring between minerals in the host rock and the wet supercritical fluid phase. In this work, we studied the carbonation of wollastonite [CaSiO3] exposed to variably hydrated supercritical CO2 (scCO2) at a range of temperatures (50, 55 and 70 °C) and pressures (90,120 and 160 bar) that simulate conditions in geologic repositories. Mineral transformation reactions were followed by three novel in situ high pressure techniques, including x-ray diffraction that tracked the rate and extents of wollastonite conversion to calcite. Increased dissolved water concentrations in the supercritical CO2 resulted in increased silicate carbonation approaching ~50 wt. %. Development of thin water films on the mineral surface were directly observed with infrared spectroscopy and determined to be critical for facilitating carbonation processes. Even in extreme low water conditions, magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance detected formation of Q3 [Si(OSi)3OH] and Q4 [Si(OSi)4] amorphous silica species. Unlike the thick (<10 ?m) passivating silica layers observed in the fully water saturated scCO2 experiments, images obtained from a focused ion beam sectioned sample indicted these coatings were chemically wollastonite but structurally amorphous. In addition, evidence of an intermediate hydrated amorphous calcium carbonate forming under these conditions further emphasize the importance of understanding geochemical processes occurring in water bearing scCO2 fluids.

  2. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Wang, Xiqing

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  3. Mesoporous carbon materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng (Knoxville, TN); Wang, Xiqing (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for fabricating a mesoporous carbon material, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic compound or material, (iii) a crosslinkable aldehyde component, and (iv) at least 0.5 M concentration of a strong acid having a pKa of or less than -2, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a mesoporous carbon material. The invention is also directed to a mesoporous carbon material having an improved thermal stability, preferably produced according to the above method.

  4. MALDI Analysis of Oligonucleotides Directly from Montmorillonite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferris, James P.

    naturally on the Earth. Montmoril- lonite is a clay mineral containing several chemical elements (Si, O, Na their extraction from the montmorillonite followed by chro- matographic separation and characterization. The latter of the direct MALDI analysis of the oligonucleotides on the minerals that catalyzed their formation

  5. Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Migrating Contaminant Sticks To Minerals Aluminum oxide in common soil minerals captures uranium Using computational chemistry models, scientists at Pacific Northwest National...

  6. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy. Abstract: The...

  7. First Direct Observation of CO2's Greenhouse Effect at the Earth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Direct Observation of Carbon Dioxide's Increasing Greenhouse Effect at Earth's Surface First Direct Observation of Carbon Dioxide's Increasing Greenhouse Effect at Earth's...

  8. UNDERSTANDING OLIVINE CO2 MINERAL SEQUESTRATION MECHANISMS AT THE ATOMIC LEVEL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.J. McKelvy; H. Bearat; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; R. Nunez; R.W. Carpenter

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbonation of Mg-rich minerals offers an intriguing candidate carbon sequestration process technology, which can provide large-scale CO{sub 2} disposal. Such disposal bypasses many long-term storage problems by (i) providing containment in the form of mineral carbonates that have proven stable over geological time, (ii) generating only environmentally benign materials, and (iii) essentially eliminating the need for continuous site monitoring. The primary challenge for viable process development is reducing process cost. This is the primary focus of the CO{sub 2} Mineral Sequestration Working Group managed by Fossil Energy at DOE, which includes members from the Albany Research Center, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, Penn State University, Science Applications International Corporation, and the University of Utah, as well as from our research group at Arizona State University. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a leading process candidate, which converts CO{sub 2} into the mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). As olivine carbonation is exothermic, it offers intriguing low-cost potential. Recent studies at the Albany Research Center have found aqueous-solution carbonation is a promising approach. Cost effectively enhancing carbonation reactivity is central to reducing process cost. Many of the mechanisms that impact reactivity occur at the solid/solution interface. Understanding these mechanisms is central to the ability to engineer new and modified processes to enhance carbonation reactivity and lower cost. Herein, we report the results of our UCR I project, which focused on exploring the reaction mechanisms that govern aqueous-solution olivine carbonation using model olivine feedstock materials. Carbonation was found to be a complex process associated with passivating silica layer formation, which includes the trapping of magnesite nanocrystals within the passivating silica layers, cracking and exfoliation of the layers, silica surface migration, olivine etch pit formation, transfer of the Mg and Fe in the olivine into the product carbonate, and the nucleation and growth of magnesite crystals on/in the silica/olivine reaction matrix. These phenomena occur in concert with the large solid volume changes that accompany the carbonation process, which can substantially impact carbonation reactivity. Passivating silica layer formation appears to play a major role in inhibiting carbonation reactivity. New approaches that can mitigate the effectiveness of passivating layer formation may offer intriguing potential to enhance carbonation reactivity and lower process cost.

  9. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

  10. RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    RON MINER MEMORIAL BIOENGINEERING SCHOLARSHIP The Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship honors the memory of J. Ronald Miner, an Agricultural Engineering professor at OSU for over thirty years. Ron came to OSU from the Ron Miner Memorial Scholarship which resides with the OSU Foundation. The name

  11. Atmosphere-crust coupling and carbon sequestration on the young Mars Professor Martin R. Lee1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Zaoyang

    Atmosphere-crust coupling and carbon sequestration on the young Mars Professor Martin R. Lee1 *, Dr the idea that CO2 was `scrubbed' by precipitation of carbonate minerals within the planet's crust - a reaction termed `carbonation'. This project will seek evidence for carbonation by analysis of martian

  12. Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Advanced Diesel Combustion with Low Hydrocarbon and Carbon Monoxide Emissions Poster presented at the 16th Directions...

  13. atmospheric carbon exchange: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon, little research has examined the direct effects of forest management practices on carbon sequestration. At the Howland Forest in Maine, USA, we are using eddy 19 Analytical...

  14. J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    J Bone Miner Metab . Author manuscript Page /1 13 Mineral maturity and crystallinity index are distinct characteristics of bone mineral Delphine Farlay 1 * , G rard Panczeré 2 , Christian Rey 3 , Pierre the hypothesis that mineral maturity and crystallinity index are two different characteristics of bone mineral

  15. Optical Mineralogy Lab #7A & #7B Biaxial Minerals In this lab, you will view various optical characteristics of orthorhombic, monoclinic and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dundas, Robert G.

    Optical Mineralogy Lab #7A & #7B ­ Biaxial Minerals In this lab, you will view various optical characteristics of orthorhombic, monoclinic and triclinic crystals. All minerals that are within these three and (d) insert the Bertrand lens. Directions: PART I 1. For the following minerals: diopside Bxa, biotite

  16. Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report describes the activities of the Iowa State Mining and Mineral Resources Research Institute (ISMMRRI) at Iowa State University for the period July 1, 1989, to June 30, 1990. Activities include research in mining- and mineral-related areas, education and training of scientists and engineers in these fields, administration of the Institute, and cooperative interactions with industry, government agencies, and other research centers. During this period, ISMMRRI has supported research efforts to: (1) Investigate methods of leaching zinc from sphalerite-containing ores. (2) Study the geochemistry and geology of an Archean gold deposit and of a gold-telluride deposit. (3) Enchance how-quality aggregates for use in construction. (4) Pre-clean coal by triboelectric charging in a fluidized-bed. (5) Characterize the crystal/grain alignment during processing of yttrium-barium-copper-perovskite (1-2-3) superconductors. (5) Study the fluid inclusion properties of a fluorite district. (6) Study the impacts of surface mining on community planning. (7) Assess the hydrophobicity of coal and pyrite for beneficiation. (8) Investigate the use of photoacoustic absorption spectroscopy for monitoring unburnt carbon in the exhaust gas from coal-fired boilers. The education and training program continued within the interdepartmental graduate minor in mineral resources includes courses in such areas as mining methods, mineral processing, industrial minerals, extractive metallurgy, coal science and technology, and reclamation of mined land. In addition, ISMMRRI hosted the 3rd International Conference on Processing and Utilization of High-Sulfur Coals in Ames, Iowa. The Institute continues to interact with industry in order to foster increased cooperation between academia and the mining and mineral community.

  17. Process for producing organic products containing silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon by the direct reaction between elemental silicon and organic amines and products formed thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pugar, E.A.; Morgan, P.E.D.

    1988-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A process is disclosed for producing, at a low temperature, a high purity organic reaction product consisting essentially of silicon, hydrogen, nitrogen, and carbon. The process comprises reacting together a particulate elemental high purity silicon with a high purity reactive amine reactant in a liquid state at a temperature of from about O/degree/C up to about 300/degree/C. A high purity silicon carbide/silicon nitride ceramic product can be formed from this intermediate product, if desired, by heating the intermediate product at a temperature of from about 1200-1700/degree/C for a period from about 15 minutes up to about 2 hours or the organic reaction product may be employed in other chemical uses.

  18. Directives Tools

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Useful links and resources for Directives Writers, Directives Point of Contact (DPCs), Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and Draft Directive Reviewers.

  19. Minerals handbook 1984/1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crowson, P.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This handbook consists of statistical tables giving a profile of almost 50 strategic minerals. A compendium of statistics on reserves, production, and trade, the book provides a view of international supply and demand. Information is complied here which is otherwise available only through scattered sources. The 1984/1985 edition has been updated and expanded. Reserves have been recalculated on the new basis instituted by the United States. Seven new minerals have been added: arsenic, berrylium, bismuth, boron, gallium, rare earths, and tellurium. Growth rates of consumption have been extended and the section on end use of patterns for each mineral now shows the percentage for Europe and Japan as well as the U.S.

  20. Sequestration Offsets versus Direct Emission Reductions: Consideration of Environmental Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    support for allocating resources to alter the market mix of carbon sequestration and direct emission carbon sequestration practices also influence the environment by for example reducing erosion1 Sequestration Offsets versus Direct Emission Reductions: Consideration of Environmental

  1. Identification of Fragile Microscopic Structures during Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Qafoku, Odeta; Wang, Zheming; Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study we examine the nature of highly fragile reaction products that form in low water content super critical carbon dioxide (scCO2) using a combination of scanning electron microscopy/focus ion beam (SEM/FIB), confocal Raman spectroscopy, helium ion microscopy (HeIM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). HeIM images show these precipitates to be fragile rosettes that can readily decompose even under slight heating from an electron beam. Using the TEM revealed details on the interfacial structure between the newly formed surface precipitates and the underlying initial solid phases. The detailed microscopic analysis revealed that the growth of the precipitates either followed a tip growth mechanism with precipitates forming directly on the forsterite surface if the initial solid was non-porous (natural forsterite) or growth from the surface of the precipitates where fluid was conducted through the porous (nanoforsterite) agglomerates to the growth center. The mechanism of formation of the hydrated/hydroxylated magnesium carbonate compound (HHMC) phases offers insight into the possible mechanisms of carbonate mineral formation from scCO2 solutions which has recently received a great deal of attention as the result of the potential for CO2 to act as an atmospheric greenhouse gas and impact overall global warming. The techniques used here to examine these fragile structures an also be used to examine a wide range of fragile material surfaces. SEM and FIB technologies have now been brought together in a single instrument, which represents a powerful combination for the studies in biological, geological and materials science.

  2. UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Authigenic mineral corrosion and the origins of secondary porosity in lacustrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henderson, Gideon

    UK Oil and Gas Collaborative Doctoral Training Centre (2015 start) Project Title: Authigenic mineral corrosion and the origins of secondary porosity in lacustrine carbonate reservoirs). Additionally, the project will assess late diagenetic corrosion by examining the pathways triggered by shallow

  3. Diagenetic clays as pore-lining minerals in coalbed methane reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.S.; Nick, K.E. (STIM-LAB, Inc., Duncan, OK (United States))

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleat surfaces from Mary Lee and Black Creek coal seams in the Black Warrior Basin and Fruitland coal from the San Juan Basin show significant amounts of diagenetic quartz, illite, kaolinite, carbonate minerals, barite, gypsum and iron sulfides and sulfates. SEM, XRD, thin section and reflected light microscopy analyses were used to identify and describe diagenetic minerals and surface textures observed along permeable cleat surfaces. SEM-EDS analysis reveals a variety of pore-lining diagenetic minerals with complex crystal morphologies in permeable cleats of preserved core and mine samples. Surface textures were varied from smooth and vitreous, dull and pitted, to rough and irregular with imbedded diagenetic minerals, often clays or sulfides. Illite is the most abundant clay and occurs as surface coatings, aggregates, authigenic crystals embedded in the coal surface, or oriented subparallel to the fracture face. Kaolinite is also abundant and occurs as abraded platelets and loosely attached aggregates packed against steps, as meniscus shapes on smooth fracture faces, and as a thick crust of anhedral crystals. Chlorite, the least abundant clay, appears as sheets of small crystals. Locally abundant sulfate, sulfide and carbonate minerals are present in masses of euhedral crystals or concentrated as thick crusts. Surface irregularities sometimes control the distribution of diagenetic minerals. Coal fines of unambiguous internal origin and masses of clays are often concentrated at surface irregularities such as steps, laminations of interbedded clays, or sulfides and coal and rough areas of fractures. Their distribution suggests mobility within fractures.

  4. Diagenetic clays as pore-lining minerals in coalbed methane reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, K.S.; Nick, K.E. [STIM-LAB, Inc., Duncan, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cleat surfaces from Mary Lee and Black Creek coal seams in the Black Warrior Basin and Fruitland coal from the San Juan Basin show significant amounts of diagenetic quartz, illite, kaolinite, carbonate minerals, barite, gypsum and iron sulfides and sulfates. SEM, XRD, thin section and reflected light microscopy analyses were used to identify and describe diagenetic minerals and surface textures observed along permeable cleat surfaces. SEM-EDS analysis reveals a variety of pore-lining diagenetic minerals with complex crystal morphologies in permeable cleats of preserved core and mine samples. Surface textures were varied from smooth and vitreous, dull and pitted, to rough and irregular with imbedded diagenetic minerals, often clays or sulfides. Illite is the most abundant clay and occurs as surface coatings, aggregates, authigenic crystals embedded in the coal surface, or oriented subparallel to the fracture face. Kaolinite is also abundant and occurs as abraded platelets and loosely attached aggregates packed against steps, as meniscus shapes on smooth fracture faces, and as a thick crust of anhedral crystals. Chlorite, the least abundant clay, appears as sheets of small crystals. Locally abundant sulfate, sulfide and carbonate minerals are present in masses of euhedral crystals or concentrated as thick crusts. Surface irregularities sometimes control the distribution of diagenetic minerals. Coal fines of unambiguous internal origin and masses of clays are often concentrated at surface irregularities such as steps, laminations of interbedded clays, or sulfides and coal and rough areas of fractures. Their distribution suggests mobility within fractures.

  5. Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Carbide-derived carbons - From porous networks to nanotubes and graphene Re-direct Destination: Carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are a large family of carbon materials derived from...

  6. Mineral replacement rate of olivine by chrysotile and brucite under high1 alkaline conditions2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    that could possibly contribute to reduce51 carbon dioxide emissions. Geological sequestration and ex including chrysotile [15­18]. Serpentine minerals are49 also crucial for sequestration of CO2 due to its availability and sequestration capacity [19­21].50 Indeed a lot of studies are looking for technologies

  7. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Summer Training Report 2010 Abdul-Aziz Al ...........................................................................................13 #12;2 1. Introduction King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals (KFUPM) give an opportunity

  8. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Nutrient balance is the key to any effective nutrition program, especially where trace minerals are concerned. Many factors cannot be optimized when mineral intake is not properly balanced. Recommendations are given for the producer....

  9. Mineral Selection for Multicomponent Equilibrium Geothermometry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Plamer, C. D.; Ohly, S. R.; Smith, R. W.; Neupane, G.; McLing, T.; Mattson, E.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Muliticomponent geothermometry requires knowledge of the mineral phases in the reservoir with which the geothermal fluids may be equilibrated.

  10. Mineral Supplementation of Beef Cows in Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herd, Dennis B.

    1997-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in these problem herds returned to acceptable levels with mineral supplementation practices described in this publication. Need for Minerals Maintenance, growth, lactation, reproduction and animal health cannot be optimized where mineral intake is not properly... than during lactation. Since milk is low in copper, the cow must build the fetal liver concentration of copper 4 Table 1. Diet Formulation Guidelines 1996 Beef NRC Common Requirements Formulation Lactating Lactating Maximum Mineral Dry Cow Cow Dry Cow...

  11. Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zok, Frank

    REVIEW Mineral minimization in nature's alternative teeth Christopher C. Broomell1, , Rashda K, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106, USA Contrary to conventional wisdom, mineralization, with little to no help from mineralization. Based on biochemical analyses, three of these mouthparts, the jaws

  12. PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    r PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING NI\\SI\\National Aeronautit &II LPI #12;PROGRAM AND ABSTRACTS FOR CLAY MINERALS SOCIETY 28th ANNUAL MEETING Houston, Texas October contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the Clay Minerals Society 28th Annual

  13. 2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals -Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2.20 Properties of Rocks and Minerals - Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals R. J. Harrison, R 621 622 623 623 579 #12;580 Magnetic Properties of Rocks and Minerals 2.20.5.3 2.20.5.4 2, and are present in all types of rocks, sediments, and soils. These minerals retain a memory of the geomagnetic

  14. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer PlantMunhall,Missouri:EnergyOssian, New York: EnergyOuachitaOwasso,OwlsMichigan:Ohio:Drill

  15. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  16. High performance ultracapacitors with carbon nanomaterials and ionic liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lu, Wen; Henry, Kent Douglas

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to the use of carbon nanotubes and/or electrolyte structures in various electrochemical devices, such as ultracapacitors having an ionic liquid electrolyte. The carbon nanotubes are preferably aligned carbon nanotubes. Compared to randomly entangled carbon nanotubes, aligned carbon nanotubes can have better defined pore structures and higher specific surface areas.

  17. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  18. A List of Kansas Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grover, Charles H.

    1895-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Master Th e s i s Geology Grov e r , C h a r l e s H. 1895 L i s t of Kansas m i n e r a l s * A l i s t of Kansas Minerals with "brief notes on the^cr^stjalogr&phio (form, chemical composition, and the p r i n c i p a l l o c a l i t i e s f...£om which £hey have been reported* ^S/V-y The f o l l o w i n g l i s t , i t i s believed, embraces a l l the minerals of the state that have been so f a r discovered and reported. Two s i m i l a r i i s t s have been heretofore published i n...

  19. Mineral bridges in nacre revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonio G. Checa; Julyan H. E. Cartwright; Marc-Georg Willinger

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We confirm with high-resolution techniques the existence of mineral bridges between superposed nacre tablets. In the towered nacre of both gastropods and the cephalopod Nautilus there are large bridges aligned along the tower axes, corresponding to gaps (150-200 nm) in the interlamellar membranes. Gaps are produced by the interaction of the nascent tablets with a surface membrane that covers the nacre compartment. In the terraced nacre of bivalves bridges associated with elongated gaps in the interlamellar membrane (> 100 nm) have mainly been found at or close to the edges of superposed parental tablets. To explain this placement, we hypothesize that the interlamellar membrane breaks due to differences in osmotic pressure across it when the interlamellar space below becomes reduced at an advanced stage of calcification. In no cases are the minor connections between superimposed tablets (mineral bridges, found to be such.

  20. GEOC R Lee Penn Sunday, March 25, 2012 12 -Biogeochemical transformation of Fe-and Mn-along a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration within the Christina River Basin Critical Zone States Organic carbon (C)-mineral complexation mechanism is crucial in C sequestration. It is a function

  1. Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brewer, Carol

    Mineral Scavenger Hunt 1. CONTRIBUTOR'S NAME: Johnny MacLean 2. NAME OF INQUIRY: Mineral Scavenger from minerals? What are some objects in the classroom that come from minerals? What minerals did these objects come from? b. Ecological Theme(s): Minerals are the building blocks of rocks. Rocks

  2. Ion mass spectrometry investigations of the discharge during reactive high power pulsed and direct current magnetron sputtering of carbon in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, S.; Greczynski, G.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L. [Thin Film Physics Div., Department of Physics (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 (Sweden); Czigany, Zs. [Institute of Technical Physics and Materials Science, Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly Thege Miklos ut 29-33. H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mass spectrometry was used to investigate discharges formed during high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a graphite target in Ar and Ar/N{sub 2} ambient. Ion energy distribution functions (IEDFs) were recorded in time-averaged and time-resolved mode for Ar{sup +}, C{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, N{sup +}, and C{sub x}N{sub y}{sup +} ions. An increase of N{sub 2} in the sputter gas (keeping the deposition pressure, pulse width, pulse frequency, and pulse energy constant) results for the HiPIMS discharge in a significant increase in C{sup +}, N{sup +}, and CN{sup +} ion energies. Ar{sup +}, N{sub 2}{sup +}, and C{sub 2}N{sup +} ion energies, in turn, did not considerably vary with the changes in working gas composition. The HiPIMS process showed higher ion energies and fluxes, particularly for C{sup +} ions, compared to DCMS. The time evolution of the plasma species was analyzed for HiPIMS and revealed the sequential arrival of working gas ions, ions ejected from the target, and later during the pulse-on time molecular ions, in particular CN{sup +} and C{sub 2}N{sup +}. The formation of fullerene-like structured CN{sub x} thin films for both modes of magnetron sputtering is explained by ion mass-spectrometry results and demonstrated by transmission electron microscopy as well as diffraction.

  3. Carbon Vol. 28, Nos. 213. pp. 261-279, 1990 Printed in Great Britain.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : carbon formation from catalyzed CO decomposition over iron and from liquid phase coking of hydrocarbons. preparation of carbons via catalytic cracking of CO and coking processes, 2. carbon active sites of concern. In par- ticular. we envisioned gasifying plentiful anthracite coal, with its attendant mineral matter

  4. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range formation of calcium carbonate minerals (e.g. calcite) occurs in a wide range of natural envi- ronments (e

  5. Mineral Resource Information System for Field Lab in the Osage Mineral Reservation Estate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, H.B.; Johnson, William I.

    1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Osage Mineral Reservation Estate is located in Osage County, Oklahoma. Minerals on the Estate are owned by members of the Osage Tribe who are shareholders in the Estate. The Estate is administered by the Osage Agency, Branch of Minerals, operated by the U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Oil, natural gas, casinghead gas, and other minerals (sand, gravel, limestone, and dolomite) are exploited by lessors. Operators may obtain from the Branch of Minerals and the Osage Mineral Estate Tribal Council leases to explore and exploit oil, gas, oil and gas, and other minerals on the Estate. Operators pay a royalty on all minerals exploited and sold from the Estate. A mineral Resource Information system was developed for this project to evaluate the remaining hydrocarbon resources located on the Estate. Databases on Microsoft Excel spreadsheets of operators, leases, and production were designed for use in conjunction with an evaluation spreadsheet for estimating the remaining hydrocarbons on the Estate.

  6. Electronic Surface Structures of Coal and Mineral Particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.K. Mazumder; D.A. Lindquist; K.B. Tennal; Steve Trigwell; Steve Farmer; Albert Nutsukpul; Alex Biris

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surface science studies related to tribocharging and charge separation studies were performed on electrostatic beneficiation of coal. In contrast to other cleaning methods, electrostatic beneficiation is a dry cleaning process requiring no water or subsequent drying. Despite these advantages, there is still uncertainty in implementing large scale commercial electrostatic beneficiation of coal. The electronic surface states of coal macerals and minerals are difficult to describe due to their chemical complexity and variability [1]. The efficiency in separation of mineral particles from organic macerals depends upon these surface states. Therefore, to further understand and determine a reason for the bipolar charging observed in coal separation, surface analysis studies using Ultra-violet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on coal samples and several materials that are used or considered for use in tribocharging. Electrostatic charging is a surface phenomenon, so the electronic surface states of the particles, which are influenced by the environmental conditions, determine both polarity and magnitude of tribocharging. UPS was used to measure the work function of the materials as typically used in ambient air. XPS was used to determine the surface chemistry in the form of contamination and degree of oxidation under the same environmental conditions. Mineral bearing coals are those amenable to electrostatic beneficiation. Three types of coal, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Kentucky No. 9 were investigated in this study. Pulverized coal powder was tribocharged against copper. Pyritic and other ashes forming minerals in coal powders should charge with a negative polarity from triboelectrification, and organic macerals should acquire positive charge, according to the relative differences in the surface work functions between the material being charged and the charging medium. Different types of minerals exhibit different magnitudes of negative charge and some may also charge positively against copper [2]. Only the mineral sulfur fraction of the total sulfur content is accessible by the electrostatic method since organic sulfur is covalently bound with carbon in macerals. The sizes of mineral constituents in coal range from about 0.1 to 100 {micro}m, but pyrites in many coals are on the lower end of this scale necessitating fine grinding for their liberation and separation. A ready explanation for coal powder macerals to charge positively by triboelectrification is found in the large numbers of surface carbon free radicals available to release electrons to form aromatic carbocations. There is evidence that these cationic charges are delocalized over several atoms [3]. Only perhaps one in one hundred thousand of the surface atoms is charged during triboelectrification [4], making it difficult to predict charging levels since the data depends upon the surface chemical species involved in charging. Based on the high electron affinity of oxygen atoms, oxidation is expected to decrease the extent of a coal particle to charge positively. Also, ion transfer may contribute to the increasingly negative charging character of oxidized coal carbons. A variety of oxidized surface functional groups may influence charge properties. For example, carboxylic acid functions can lose protons to form carboxylate anions. The samples of coal investigated in this study showed differing degrees of beneficiation, consistent with a more extensively oxidized Illinois No. 6 coal sample relative to that of Pittsburgh No. 8. Even though oxygen in air is deleterious to coal stored prior to beneficiation, other gases might favorably influence charge properties. To this end, coal exposed to vapors of acetone, ammonia, and sulfur dioxide also were beneficiated and analyzed in this study.

  7. Precambrian Research 179 (2010) 135149 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Woodward

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for a strong isotopic depth gradient, but carbonate minerals in iron formations can be markedly depleted in 13, strengthening the hypothesis that such fossils capture communities driven by iron metabolism. Indeed, X

  8. Use of carbonates for biological and chemical synthesis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rau, Gregory Hudson

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A system of using carbonates, especially water-insoluble or sparing soluble mineral carbonates, for maintaining or increasing dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations in aqueous media. In particular, the system generates concentrated dissolve inorganic carbon substrates for photosynthetic, chemosynthetic, or abiotic chemical production of carbonaceous or other compounds in solution. In some embodiments, the invention can also enhance the dissolution and retention of carbon dioxide in aqueous media, and can produce pH buffering capacity, metal ions, and heat, which can be beneficial to the preceding syntheses.

  9. Scanning probe microscopy: Sulfate minerals in scales and cements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, C. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The principles of scanning probe microscopy (SPM) are illustrated with examples from oilfield mineralogy, particularly emphasizing sulfate minerals involved in scale formation and cement hydration chemistry. The topography of the (010) cleavage surface of gypsum observed by atomic force microscopy shows atomically flat terraces separated by shallow steps often only one unit cell high. SPM allows direct observation of processes on mineral surfaces while they are in contact with solutions. The dissolution etching and crystal growth of gypsum and barite are discussed and rates of step migration estimated. The orientation of steps is related to the crystallographic axes. The action of phosphonate crystal growth inhibitor on gypsum and of a chelating scale solvent on barite are also shown. The multiphase microstructure of an oilwell cement clinker is described in relation to its hydration chemistry in contact with water and its reaction with sulfate ions.

  10. Minerals and Mining Program (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Minerals and Mining Program has the authority to oversee mining activities in the state and issue regulations pertaining to the permitting and environmental impact mitigation of, and...

  11. Understanding microbe-mineral electron exchange | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    insight into how bacteria, such as S. oneidensis (above), exchange electrons with minerals in their surroundings as part of cellular respiration-a series of electron exchanges...

  12. Mineral Test Hole Regulatory Act (Tennessee)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Mineral Hole Regulatory Act is applicable to any person (individual, corporation, company, association, joint venture, partnership, receiver, trustee, guardian, executor, administrator,...

  13. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  14. Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral Faces. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    interactions, and in testing surface complexation theories. Citation: Zarzycki PP, SME Chatman, T Preocanin, and KM Rosso.2011."Electrostatic Potential of Specific Mineral...

  15. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  16. The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torgersen, Christian

    The mission of the USGS National Minerals Information Center (formerly the Minerals Information of and demand for minerals and mineral materials essential to the U.S. economy and national security. Examples with the information required to ensure that the Nation has an adequate and dependable supply of minerals and materials

  17. Transition metal-catalyzed process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hartwig, John F. (Durham, CT); Kawatsura, Motoi (Chatham, NJ); Loeber, Oliver (New Haven, CT)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a process for addition of amines to carbon-carbon double bonds in a substrate, comprising: reacting an amine with a compound containing at least one carbon-carbon double bond in the presence a transition metal catalyst under reaction conditions effective to form a product having a covalent bond between the amine and a carbon atom of the former carbon-carbon double bond. The transition metal catalyst comprises a Group 8 metal and a ligand containing one or more 2-electron donor atoms. The present invention is also directed to enantioselective reactions of amine compounds with compounds containing carbon-carbon double bonds, and a calorimetric assay to evaluate potential catalysts in these reactions.

  18. Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Lipid Peroxidation Induced by Expandable Clay Minerals D A R I A K I B A N O V A , A N T O N I O N and toxicity. Herein, potential hazards of clay particle uptake areaddressed.Thispaperreportsthatthecontentanddistribution of structural Fe influence the ability of expandable clay minerals to induce lipid peroxidation (LP), a major

  19. Clay Minerals and Italy the Nannobacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Clay Minerals and Italy ­ the Nannobacterial Connection R. L. FOLK THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN This work is dedicated to F. Leo Lynch, a brilliant clay mineralogist who died in 2009. During Leo of nannobacterial precipitation of clay minerals were identified. (Lynch, 1994; Folk, Lynch & Rasbury, 1994). Leo

  20. Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources #12;IMER VISION IMER's vision is to enable the efficient and sustainable use and development of the world's mineral and energy resources for the benefit of society resources. IMER OBJECTIVES · Advance the science and technology required to enhance the prospectivity

  1. Chapter 15 Mineral Resources and the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    Materials produced from natural gas or crude oil, such as plastics Fertilizers for agriculture, phosphate tons per year. Gold and silver have annual consumption rates of 10,000 tons or less. Worldwide consumption of minerals #12; The fundamental problem associated with the availability of mineral resources

  2. Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation is hosting the Special Institute on Energy and Mineral Development in Indian Country. This two-day conference will cover laws, policies, and practices regarding natural resources development in Indian Country and how they've evolved in the recent years.

  3. New Mexico Bureau Mines and Mineral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunbar, Nelia W.

    Number22 - 1999 New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources a division of Nei~, Mexico Tech forsandblasting five times! ThisIssue Earth Briefs-Better age estimates on some New Mexico volcanic rocks Have You) NewMexico's Most Wanted Minera Is (pageT) Magnification of microscopic miner- als and glass (page 8

  4. Carbons for lithium ion cells prepared using sepiolite as an inorganic template.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandi, G.

    1998-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon anodes for Li ion cells have been prepared by the in situ polymerization of olefins such as propylene and ethylene in the channels of sepiolite clay mineral. Upon dissolution of the inorganic framework, a disordered carbon was obtained. The carbon was tested as anode in coin cells, yielding a reversible capacity of 633 mAh/g, 1.70 times higher than the capacity delivered by graphitic carbon, assuming 100% efficiency. The coulombic efficiency was higher than 90%.

  5. Carbon based prosthetic devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Devlin, D.J.; Carroll, D.W.; Barbero, R.S.; Archuleta, T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (US); Klawitter, J.J.; Ogilvie, W.; Strzepa, P. [Ascension Orthopedics (US); Cook, S.D. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (US). School of Medicine

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The project objective was to evaluate the use of carbon/carbon-fiber-reinforced composites for use in endoprosthetic devices. The application of these materials for the metacarpophalangeal (MP) joints of the hand was investigated. Issues concerning mechanical properties, bone fixation, biocompatibility, and wear are discussed. A system consisting of fiber reinforced materials with a pyrolytic carbon matrix and diamond-like, carbon-coated wear surfaces was developed. Processes were developed for the chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) of pyrolytic carbon into porous fiber preforms with the ability to tailor the outer porosity of the device to provide a surface for bone in-growth. A method for coating diamond-like carbon (DLC) on the articulating surface by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) was developed. Preliminary results on mechanical properties of the composite system are discussed and initial biocompatibility studies were performed.

  6. Coke gasification: the influence and behavior of inherent catalytic mineral matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihaela Grigore; Richard Sakurovs; David French; Veena Sahajwalla [Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Bangor, NSW (Australia)

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Gasification of coke contributes to its degradation in the blast furnace. In this study, the effect of gasification on the inherent catalytic minerals in cokes and their reciprocal influence on gasification are investigated. The catalytic mineral phases identified in the cokes used in this study were metallic iron, iron sulfides, and iron oxides. Metallic iron and pyrrhotite were rapidly oxidized during gasification to iron oxide. The catalysts had a strong influence on the apparent rates at the initial stages of reaction. As gasification proceeds, their effect on the reaction rate diminishes as a result of reducing the surface contact between catalyst and carbon matrix because of carbon consumption around the catalyst particles; with extended burnout the reactivity of the coke becomes increasingly dependent on surface area. The reaction rate in the initial stages was also influenced by the particle size of the catalytic minerals; for a given catalytic iron level, the cokes whose catalytic minerals were more finely dispersed had a higher apparent reaction rate than cokes containing larger catalytic particles. Iron, sodium, and potassium in the amorphous phase did not appear to affect the reaction rate. 40 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and central Eurasia. Volume 3. 1992 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume III, Minerals Yearbook -- International Review contains the latest available mineral data on more than 175 foreign countries and discusses the importance of minerals to the economies of these nations. Since the 1989 International Review, the volume has been presented as six reports. The report presents the Mineral Industries of Europe and Central Eurasia. The report incorporates location maps, industry structure tables, and an outlook section previously incorporated in the authors' Minerals Perspectives Series quinquennial regional books, which are being discontinued. This section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 45 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (EC); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (EFTA); Malta; the 11 Eastern European economies in transition (Albania, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Macedonia, Poland, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, and Slovenia); and the countries of Central Eurasia (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Estonia, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgystan, Latvia, Lithuania, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan).

  8. A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michelson, David G.

    A collaborative research venture between the minerals industry and The University of British Columbia MDRUMINERAL DEPOSIT RESEARCH UNIT To increase the understanding of mineral deposits and highly trained geologists for employment in the minerals industry. Mission Vision MDRU

  9. FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    FORMATION OF SEPIOLITE-PALYGORSKITE AND RELATED MINERALS FROM SOLUTION REZAN BIRSOY* Dokuz Eylu's sepiolite-palygorskite precipitates in lacustrine and perimarine environments. Although these minerals can transform from precursor minerals, the most common formation mechanism involves crystallization from

  10. Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Netoff, Theoden

    Senior Research Associate Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair Job Requisition 170892 Coleraine Minerals Research Laboratory Natural Resources Research Institute University of Minnesota Duluth (www.nrri.umn.edu) Position Description The Taconite Industry Minerals Research Endowed Chair

  11. Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ollivier-Gooch, Carl

    1 Mineral Deposit Research Unit The University of British Columbia Earth Sciences Building metallogenic constraints on mineralization in poorly understood or exposed portions of Yukon and Alaska. The mineral deposit studies, models, and metallogenic frameworks developed in this project

  12. Geological and Geotechnical Site Investigation for the Design of a CO2 Rich Flue Gas Direct Injection and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metz, Paul; Bolz, Patricia

    2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    With international efforts to limit anthropogenic carbon in the atmosphere, various CO{sub 2} sequestration methods have been studied by various facilities worldwide. Basalt rock in general has been referred to as potential host material for mineral carbonation by various authors, without much regard for compositional variations due to depositional environment, subsequent metamorphism, or hydrothermal alteration. Since mineral carbonation relies on the presence of certain magnesium, calcium, or iron silicates, it is necessary to study the texture, mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry of specific basalts before implying potential for mineral carbonation. The development of a methodology for the characterization of basalts with respect to their susceptibility for mineral carbonation is proposed to be developed as part of this research. The methodology will be developed based on whole rock data, petrography and microprobe analyses for samples from the Caledonia Mine in Michigan, which is the site for a proposed small-scale demonstration project on mineral carbonation in basalt. Samples from the Keweenaw Peninsula will be used to determine general compositional trends using whole rock data and petrography. Basalts in the Keweenaw Peninsula have been subjected to zeolite and prehnite-pumpellyite facies metamorphism with concurrent native copper deposition. Alteration was likely due to the circulation of CO{sub 2}-rich fluids at slightly elevated temperatures and pressures, which is the process that is attempted to be duplicated by mineral carbonation.

  13. Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

    Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration Tarun R Naik1 and Rakesh sequestration. Most of the studies related to the carbonation are limited to its effects on corrosion. The possibility of using carbonation process as a direct means for carbon dioxide sequestration is yet

  14. National Mineral Development Corporation Ltd NMDC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpen Energy Information NationalNational GridMineral

  15. Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDowell, William J. (Knoxville, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

  16. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Williams, K.H.; Wilkins, M.J.; Hubbard, S.S.

    2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of organic carbon into the subsurface as an electron donor for bioremediation of redox-sensitive contaminants like uranium often leads to mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, both of which can alter the flow field and potentially bioremediation efficacy. This work combines reactive transport modeling with a column experiment and field measurements to understand the biogeochemical processes and to quantify the biomass and mineral transformation/accumulation during a bioremediation experiment at a uranium contaminated site near Rifle, Colorado. We use the reactive transport model CrunchFlow to explicitly simulate microbial community dynamics of iron and sulfate reducers, and their impacts on reaction rates. The column experiment shows clear evidence of mineral precipitation, primarily in the form of calcite and iron monosulfide. At the field scale, reactive transport simulations suggest that the biogeochemical reactions occur mostly close to the injection wells where acetate concentrations are highest, with mineral precipitate and biomass accumulation reaching as high as 1.5% of the pore space. This work shows that reactive transport modeling coupled with field data can be an effective tool for quantitative estimation of mineral transformation and biomass accumulation, thus improving the design of bioremediation strategies.

  17. Analysis of Potential Leakage Pathways and Mineralization within Caprocks for Geologic Storage of CO(sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, James

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a multifaceted approach to investigate the nature of caprocks above, and the interface between, reservoir-­?quality rocks that might serve as targets for carbon storage. Fieldwork in southeastern Utah examined the regional-­? to m-­?scale nature of faults and fractures across the sedimentiological interfaces. We also used microscopic analyses and mechanical modeling to examine the question as to how the contacts between units interact, and how fractures may allow fluids to move from reservoirs to caprock. Regional-­?scale analyses using ASTER data enabled us to identify location of alteration, which led to site-­?specific studies of deformation and fluid flow. In the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a seal for the Navajo Sandstone, we evaluated mesoscale variability in fracture density and morphology and variability in elastic moduli in the Jurassic Carmel Formation, a proposed seal to the underlying Navajo Sandstone for CO{sub 2} geosequestration. By combining mechano-­?stratigraphic outcrop observations with elastic moduli derived from wireline log data, we characterize the variability in fracture pattern and morphology with the observed variability in rock strength within this heterolithic top seal. Outcrop inventories of discontinuities show fracture densities decrease as bed thickness increases and fracture propagation morphology across lithologic interfaces vary with changing interface type. Dynamic elastic moduli, calculated from wireline log data, show that Young’s modulus varies by up to 40 GPa across depositional interfaces, and by an average of 3 GPa across the reservoir/seal interface. We expect that the mesoscale changes in rock strength will affect the distributions of localized stress and thereby influence fracture propagation and fluid flow behavior within the seal. These data provide a means to closely tie outcrop observations to those derived from subsurface data and estimates of subsurface rock strength. We also studied damage zones associated normal faults in the Permian Cedar Mesa Sandstone, southeastern Utah. These faults are characterized by a single slip surfaces and damage zones containing deformation bands, veins, and joints. Field observations include crosscutting relationships, permeability increase, rock strength decrease, and ultraviolet light induced mineral fluorescence within the damage zone. These field observations combined with the interpreted paragenetic sequence from petrographic analysis, suggests a deformation history of reactivation and several mineralization events in an otherwise low-­?permeability fault. All deformation bands and veins fluoresce under ultraviolet light, suggesting connectivity and a shared mineralization history. Pre-­?existing deformation features act as loci for younger deformation and mineralization events, this fault and its damage zone illustrate the importance of the fault damage zone to subsurface fluid flow. We model a simplified stress history in order to understand the importance of rock properties and magnitude of tectonic stress on the deformation features within the damage zone. The moderate confining pressures, possible variations in pore pressure, and the porous, fine-­?grained nature of the Cedar Mesa Sandstone results in a fault damage zone characterized by enhanced permeability, subsurface fluid flow, and mineralization. Structural setting greatly influences fracture spacing and orientation. Three structural settings were examined and include fault proximity, a fold limb of constant dip, and a setting proximal to the syncline hinge. Fracture spacing and dominant fracture orientation vary at each setting and distinctions between regional and local paleo-­?stress directions can be made. Joints on the fold limb strike normal to the fold axis/bedding and are interpreted to be sub-­?parallel to the maximum regional paleo-­?stress direction as there is no fold related strain. Joints proximal to faults and the syncline hinge may have formed under local stress conditions associated with folding and faulting, and

  18. ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap ITP Mining: Mining Industry of the Future Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap mptroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications ITP...

  19. Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI) Adsorption In A Contaminated Aquifer Sediment: A Fluorescence Spectroscopy Determining Individual Mineral Contributions To U(VI)...

  20. Linked Reactivity at Mineral-Water Interfaces Through Bulk Crystal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at mineral-water interfaces is of fundamental importance to geochemistry, but for minerals that are natural semiconductors the pursuit of mechanistic understanding is uniquely...

  1. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant - FL 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemical Corp - Pilot Plant (FL.02) Designated Name: Not...

  2. King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum & Minerals Collage of Electrical Engineering Summer Training King Fahd university of Petroleum and Minerals OMVG Gambia River Basin Development Organization PLCs

  3. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminat...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Biogeochemical Transformation of Fe Minerals in a Petroleum-Contaminated Aquifer. Abstract: Biogeochemical...

  4. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Abstract Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems...

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM 02/11/2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    mineral-webinar.pdf More Documents & Publications LOW TEMPERATURE GEOTHERMAL MINERAL RECOVERY PROGRAM Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis...

  6. Climate VISION: PrivateSector Initiatives: Minerals - Industry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Industry Associations Industrial Minerals Association - North America The International Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) was formed in early 2002 to tap the benefits...

  7. affecting bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  8. alters bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  9. absorptiometric bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  10. avoiding mineral pretreatment: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  11. affecting born mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  12. atrazine mineralization capacity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  13. african mineral dust: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laurent 19 Does the size distribution of mineral dust aerosols depend on the wind speed at emission? CERN Preprints Summary: The size distribution of mineral dust aerosols...

  14. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals and sediments: insights from oxygen isotopes in phosphate. Biotic and abiotic pathways of phosphorus cycling in minerals...

  15. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  16. Non-aqueous formation of the calcium carbonate polymorph vaterite: astrophysical implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Day, Sarah J; Parker, Julia E; Evans, Aneurin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the formation of calcium carbonate, through the solid-gas interaction of amorphous Ca-silicate with gaseous CO2, at elevated pressures, and link this to the possible presence of calcium carbonate in a number of circumstellar and planetary environments. We use in-situ synchrotron X-Ray powder diffraction to obtain detailed structural data pertaining to the formation of the crystalline calcium carbonate phase vaterite and its evolution with temperature. We found that the metastable calcium carbonate phase vaterite was formed alongside calcite, at elevated CO2 pressure, at room temperature and subsequently remained stable over a large range of temperature and pressure. We report the formation of the calcium carbonate mineral vaterite whilst attempting to simulate carbonate dust grain formation in astrophysical environments. This suggests that vaterite could be a mineral component of carbonate dust and also presents a possible method of formation for vaterite and its polymorphs on planetary surfaces.

  17. Carbon films produced from ionic liquid carbon precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Lee, Je Seung

    2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is directed to a method for producing a film of porous carbon, the method comprising carbonizing a film of an ionic liquid, wherein the ionic liquid has the general formula (X.sup.+a).sub.x(Y.sup.-b).sub.y, wherein the variables a and b are, independently, non-zero integers, and the subscript variables x and y are, independently, non-zero integers, such that ax=by, and at least one of X.sup.+ and Y.sup.- possesses at least one carbon-nitrogen unsaturated bond. The invention is also directed to a composition comprising a porous carbon film possessing a nitrogen content of at least 10 atom %.

  18. The global distribution of mineral dust and its impacts on the climate system: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    radiation budget and hydrological cycle through their radiative and cloud condensation nucleus effects, semi-directly by changing the atmo- spheric cloud cover through evaporation of cloud droplets (i formation (i.e. the second indirect effect). Radiative forcing by mineral dust is associated with changes

  19. Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

  20. Sustainable growth and valuation of mineral reserves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adelman, Morris Albert

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The annual change in the value of an in-ground mineral is equal to the increase or decrease of inventories ("reserves"), multiplied by the market value of a reserve unit. The limited shrinking resource base does not exist. ...

  1. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  2. Mineral Leases by Political Subdivisions (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation authorizes local political subdivisions to lease lands they own for the development of mineral interests, including coal and lignite. A public hearing process is required prior to...

  3. Oil, Gas, and Metallic Minerals (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Operators of oil, gas, and metallic mineral exploration and production operations are required to obtain a drilling permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and file specific forms with...

  4. Chemical composition of dust storms in Beijing and implications for the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with pollution aerosol on the pathway Yele Sun,1 Guoshun Zhuang,1,2,3 Ying Wang,1 Xiujuan Zhao,1,4 Jie Li,5 Zifa direction could be seen as the ``polluted'' pathway and the north-northwesterly direction as the relatively ``less-polluted'' one. Dust storms not only delivered large amounts of mineral elements but also carried

  5. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  6. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  7. Experimental studies of oxygen isotope fractionation in the carbonic acid system at 15, 25, and 40 (degrees)C 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, William Cory

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In light of recent studies that show oxygen isotope fractionation in carbonate minerals to be a function of HCO3 2-; and CO3 2- concentrations, the oxygen isotope fractionation and exchange between water and components ...

  8. Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balzs Arat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balázs Arató1 , Mihály Pósfai1 and Rafal E-controlled mineralization Abstract. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetic minerals that have distinct for studying the biological membrane around the mineral grains. Our goals were to deduce the possible growth

  9. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE production table was prepared by Lisa D. Miller, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2011 to an estimated 4

  10. 2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005 Minerals Yearbook ZirconiuM and HafniuM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey of the mining and processing of heavy-mineral sands containing the titanium minerals ilmenite and rutile.). duPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands operation near Starke, fL. iluka produced zircon

  11. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued to increase in 2010 but quantities are withheld's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron minerals increased in 2010

  12. Preventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belzile, Nelson

    processes of sulfide minerals still remains an important issue for both mineral extraction and environmentalPreventing oxidation of iron sulfide minerals by polyethylene polyamines Yu-Wei Chen a,*, Yuerong on the passivation of pyrite and pyrrhotite minerals. Polyethylene polyamines, such as triethylenetetramine (TETA

  13. West Virginia University College of Engineering and Mineral Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    , and extracted minerals. Mine Environment - Designing and operating ventilation systems and controlling methane

  14. Accelerated carbonation treatment of industrial wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunning, Peter J., E-mail: gunning_peter@hotmail.co [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom); Hills, Colin D.; Carey, Paula J. [Centre for Contaminated Land Remediation, University of Greenwich, Chatham Maritime (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The disposal of industrial waste presents major logistical, financial and environmental issues. Technologies that can reduce the hazardous properties of wastes are urgently required. In the present work, a number of industrial wastes arising from the cement, metallurgical, paper, waste disposal and energy industries were treated with accelerated carbonation. In this process carbonation was effected by exposing the waste to pure carbon dioxide gas. The paper and cement wastes chemically combined with up to 25% by weight of gas. The reactivity of the wastes to carbon dioxide was controlled by their constituent minerals, and not by their elemental composition, as previously postulated. Similarly, microstructural alteration upon carbonation was primarily influenced by mineralogy. Many of the thermal wastes tested were classified as hazardous, based upon regulated metal content and pH. Treatment by accelerated carbonation reduced the leaching of certain metals, aiding the disposal of many as stable non-reactive wastes. Significant volumes of carbon dioxide were sequestrated into the accelerated carbonated treated wastes.

  15. Timing of the Early Triassic carbon cycle perturbations inferred from new UPb ages and ammonoid biochronozones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    reserved. Keywords: carbon isotope; U­Pb age; time scale; ammonoid; Early Triassic; South China EarthTiming of the Early Triassic carbon cycle perturbations inferred from new U­Pb ages and ammonoid and Mineral Resources, Jiangzheng Road 1, 530023 Nanning, China Received 13 October 2006; received in revised

  16. A Novel Growth Process of Calcium Carbonate Crystals in Silk Fibroin Hydrogel System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 A Novel Growth Process of Calcium Carbonate Crystals in Silk Fibroin Hydrogel System Yufei Ma fibroin hydrogel; Biomineralization 1. Introduction Calcium carbonate is an important mineral due to its) 2413-2420" DOI : 10.1016/j.msec.2013.02.006 #12;2 ABSTRACT We report an interesting finding of calcium

  17. An atomic-scale analysis of catalytically-assisted chemical vapor deposition of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grujicic, Mica

    Growth of carbon nanotubes during transition-metal particles catalytically-assisted thermal decomposition of the transition-metal particles and onto the surface of carbon nanotubes, carbon atom attachment to the growing. Carbon nanotubes are generally processed by laser ablation of carbon rods e.g. [7], a direct current arc

  18. Mineral fillers in plastics and elastomers. (Latest citations from the Rubber and Plastics Research Association database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the uses of such mineral fillers as talc, calcium carbonate, clay, wollastonite, mica, silica and boron in plastics and elastomers. Mechanical, electrical and tribological properties relative to flexural strength, abrasion resistance, heat stability, impact resistance, electrical conductivity, chemical resistance, dimensional stability and flame retardancy are considered. Effects of molding on mineral filled plastics and elastomers, and applications in electrical, electronic and automotive industries are also included. (Contains a minimum of 96 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  19. Reactive geochemical transport simulation to study mineral trapping for CO2 disposal in deep saline arenaceous aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO{sub 2} injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not amenable to laboratory experiment under ambient deep-aquifer conditions. Under conditions considered in our simulations, CO{sub 2} trapping by secondary carbonate minerals such as calcite (CaCO{sub 3}), dolomite (CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}), siderite (FeCO{sub 3}), and dawsonite (NaAlCO{sub 3}(OH){sub 2}) could occur in the presence of high pressure CO{sub 2}. Variations in precipitation of secondary carbonate minerals strongly depend on rock mineral composition and their kinetic reaction rates. Using the data presented in this paper, CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability after 10,000 years is comparable to CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters (2-5 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation). Under favorable conditions such as increase of the Mg-bearing mineral clinochlore (Mg{sub 5}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 3}O{sub 10}(OH){sub 8}) abundance, the capacity can be larger (10 kg CO{sub 2} per cubic meter of formation) due to increase of dolomite precipitation. Carbon dioxide-induced rock mineral alteration and the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the solid matrix results in decreases in porosity. A maximum 3% porosity decrease is obtained in our simulations. A small decrease in porosity may result in a significant decrease in permeability. The numerical simulations described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling conditions and parameters.

  20. One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    One Weird Trick to Stop Selfish Miners: Fresh Bitcoins, A Solution for the Honest Miner. Ethan Heilman Boston University heilman@bu.edu Abstract--A recent result in Bitcoin is the selfish mining incentive-compatible and harmful to Bitcoin. In this paper we introduce a new defense against selfish mining

  1. Carbon Fiber

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  2. Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon Sequestration- the process of capturing the CO2 released by the burning of fossil fuels and storing it deep withing the Earth, trapped by a non-porous layer of rock.

  3. Carbon Fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGetrick, Lee

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lee McGetrick leads ORNL's effort to produce light, durable carbon fiber at lower cost -- a key to improvements in manufacturing that will produce more fuel-efficient vehicles and other advances.

  4. PtRu/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid: A Novel Electrocatalyst for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell. PtRuCarbon Nanotube Nanocomposite Synthesized in Supercritical Fluid: A Novel...

  5. Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    is located directly above potential geologic sequestration sites according to the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada. This includes almost 150...

  6. accommodation epeiric carbonate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by surface modification with vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes Materials Science Websites Summary: molecules, and directly transmitted molecules without...

  7. Directives Help

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

  8. Lung cancer in uranium miners: A tissue resource and pilot study. Final performance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samet, J.; Gilliland, F.D.

    1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This project incorporates two related research projects directed toward understanding respiratory carcinogenesis in radon-exposed former uranium miners. The first project involved a continuation of the tissue resource of lung cancer cases from former underground uranium miners and comparison cases from non-miners. The second project was a pilot study for a proposed longitudinal study of respiratory carcinogenesis in former uranium miners. The objectives including facilitating the investigation of molecular changes in radon exposed lung cancer cases, developing methods for prospectively studying clinical, cytologic, cytogenetic, and molecular changes in the multi-event process of respiratory carcinogenesis, and assessing the feasibility of recruiting former uranium miners into a longitudinal study that collected multiple biological specimens. A pilot study was conducted to determine whether blood collection, induced sputum, bronchial brushing, washings, and mucosal biopsies from participants at two of the hospitals could be included efficiently. A questionnaire was developed for the extended study and all protocols for specimen collection and tissue handling were completed. Resource utilization is in progress at ITRI and the methods have been developed to study molecular and cellular changes in exfoliated cells contained in sputum as well as susceptibility factors.

  9. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. Forenergy and could capture and sequester carbon emissions.

  10. Capturing carbon | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon Released: October 02, 2011 New technology enables molecular-level insight into carbon sequestration Carbon sequestration is a potential solution for reducing greenhouse...

  11. Role of minerals in thermal alteration of organic matter. II. A material balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tannenbaum, E.; Huizinga, B.J.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pyrolysis experiments were performed on Green River and Monterey Formation kerogens (Types I and II, respectively) with and without calcite, illite, or montmorillonite at 300/sup 0/C for 2 to 1000 hours under dry and hydrous conditions. Pyrolysis products were identified and quantified, and a material balance of product and reactants resulted. Applying the results to maturation of organic matter in natural environments, they suggest that a given type of organic matter associated with different minerals in source rocks will yield different products. Furthermore, the different adsorption capacities of minerals exert a significant influence on the migration of polar and high molecular weight compounds generated from the breakdown of kerogen. Therefore, the overall accumulated products from carbonate source rocks are mainly heavy oils with some gas, whereas light oils and gases are the main products from source rocks that contain expandable clays with catalytic and adsorptive properties. 8 figures, 2 tables.

  12. Identification of Fragile Microscopic Structures during Mineral...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the nature of highly fragile reaction products that form in low water content super critical carbon dioxide (scCO2) using a combination of scanning electron microscopyfocus...

  13. Carbon supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delnick, F.M.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon supercapacitors are represented as distributed RC networks with transmission line equivalent circuits. At low charge/discharge rates and low frequencies these networks approximate a simple series R{sub ESR}C circuit. The energy efficiency of the supercapacitor is limited by the voltage drop across the ESR. The pore structure of the carbon electrode defines the electrochemically active surface area which in turn establishes the volume specific capacitance of the carbon material. To date, the highest volume specific capacitance reported for a supercapacitor electrode is 220F/cm{sup 3} in aqueous H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (10) and {approximately}60 F/cm{sup 3} in nonaqueous electrolyte (8).

  14. Mineral transformation and biomass accumulation associated with uranium bioremediation at Rifle, Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    iron(III) oxyhydroxides: effects of mineral solubility andMineral Transformation and Biomass Accumulation Associatedthe accumulation of new mineral phases and biomass. Word

  15. Bone mineral density and fractures in older men with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dam, T.-T.; Harrison, S.; Fink, H. A.; Ramsdell, J.; Barrett-Connor, E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    x ORIGINAL ARTICLE Bone mineral density and fractures inwas associated with lower bone mineral density (BMD) at theKeywords Bone loss . Bone mineral density . Elderly .

  16. Mineral balances, including in drinking water, estimated for Merced County dairy herds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Alejandro R Dr.; Santos, Jose Eduardo P.; Tabone, Tom J.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    et al. (1994). TABLE 3. Estimates of daily mineral intake,drinking-water mineral contributionand net mineral excretion in lactating cows on Merced County

  17. Carbon microtubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peng, Huisheng (Shanghai, CN); Zhu, Yuntian Theodore (Cary, NC); Peterson, Dean E. (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM)

    2011-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A carbon microtube comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the microtube has a diameter of from about 10 .mu.m to about 150 .mu.m, and a density of less than 20 mg/cm.sup.3. Also described is a carbon microtube, having a diameter of at least 10 .mu.m and comprising a hollow, substantially tubular structure having a porous wall, wherein the porous wall comprises a plurality of voids, said voids substantially parallel to the length of the microtube, and defined by an inner surface, an outer surface, and a shared surface separating two adjacent voids.

  18. Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    1 Chapter 29 Earth Minerals Did you read chapter 29 before coming to class? A. Yes B. No Lets play that begins in Hawaii Other "Hot Spots" around the world The interior structure of Earth has been determined outer core #12;2 What is different on earth (as opposed to other planets)? Continents Why does

  19. Clay mineral reactions in clastic diagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hower, J.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of clastic sediments have documented the formation and transformation of clay mineral assemblages during burial diagensis. The transformation of smectite to illite in shale by its reaction with the decomposition products of detrital K-feldspar and mica results in the production of new pore water at depth. The overall reaction mobilizes all the major chemical components in the shale, most of which are consumed in the formation of the diagenetic assemblage illite/smectite + chlorite + quartz. However, part of all the components is undoubtedly transported from the shale to sandstone units and is involved in cementation, replacement, and diagenetic clay mineral formation in these reservoir rocks. In contrast to burial diagenetic reactions in shale, where the sequence is monotonic and reasonably predictable, diagenetic reactions in sandstone are frequently variable. This variability is probably attributable to the fact that sandstones are open systems in which the reactions that proceed are controlled in part by the influx of new pore water, the chemistry of which is determined by an outside source. The useful understanding role of clay minerals in hydrocarbon exploration will follow from a determination of the system shale/sandstone/organic material. We need to tie in the nature and timing of shale mineral reactions and their control on the fluid and mass transfer from shale to sandstone.

  20. USED MINERAL-BASED CRANKCASE OIL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Used Mineral-Based Crankcase

    based crankcase oil vary depending on the brand and type of oil, whether gasoline or diesel fuel was used, the mechanical condition of the engine that the oil came from, and the amount of use between oil changes. Used oil is not naturally found in the environment. What happens to used mineral-based crankcase oil when it enters the environment? q Used mineral-based crankcase oil enters the air through the exhaust system during engine use. q It may enter water or soil when disposed of improperly. q The hydrocarbon components of the oil generally stick to the soil surface. q Some hydrocarbons evaporate into the air very quickly, and others evaporate more slowly. q Hydrocarbon components of the oil that enter surface water bind to small particles in the water and eventually settle to the bottom. q Hydrocarbons from used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s

  1. Iron oxyhydroxide mineralization on microbial extracellular polysaccharides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Clara S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Edwards, David C.; Emerson, David; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron biominerals can form in neutral pH microaerophilic environments where microbes both catalyze iron oxidation and create polymers that localize mineral precipitation. In order to classify the microbial polymers that influence FeOOH mineralogy, we studied the organic and mineral components of biominerals using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM), micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}XRF) microscopy, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). We focused on iron microbial mat samples from a creek and abandoned mine; these samples are dominated by iron oxyhydroxide-coated structures with sheath, stalk, and filament morphologies. In addition, we characterized the mineralized products of an iron-oxidizing, stalk-forming bacterial culture isolated from the mine. In both natural and cultured samples, microbial polymers were found to be acidic polysaccharides with carboxyl functional groups, strongly spatially correlated with iron oxyhydroxide distribution patterns. Organic fibrils collect FeOOH and control its recrystallization, in some cases resulting in oriented crystals with high aspect ratios. The impact of polymers is particularly pronounced as the materials age. Synthesis experiments designed to mimic the biomineralization processes show that the polysaccharide carboxyl groups bind dissolved iron strongly but release it as mineralization proceeds. Our results suggest that carboxyl groups of acidic polysaccharides are produced by different microorganisms to create a wide range of iron oxyhydroxide biomineral structures. The intimate and potentially long-term association controls the crystal growth, phase, and reactivity of iron oxyhydroxide nanoparticles in natural systems.

  2. 2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S. Geological Survey from a voluntary survey of domestic operations. Of the 44 operations surveyed, 31 did concentrates are developed by a second voluntary survey of domestic mining operations. Of the two domestic2006 Minerals Yearbook ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey

  3. By Joyce A. Ober The United States has been the largest Minerals Co. and the world's largest lithium sulfate solution is treated with soda ash,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    producer, owned a spodumene mine and lithium forming insoluble lithium carbonate that U.S. companies have% at the progress through a series of evaporation ponds. lithium as mineral concentrate, brine, company's New lithium through solar production of ceramics, glass, and primary FMC Corp., Lithium Div., mined

  4. In Vitro Enzymatic Reduction Kinetics of Mineral Oxides by Membrane Fractions from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruebush,S.; Icopini, G.; Brantley, S.; Tien, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study documents the first example of in vitro solid-phase mineral oxide reduction by enzyme-containing membrane fractions. Previous in vitro studies have only reported the reduction of aqueous ions. Total membrane (TM) fractions from iron-grown cultures of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were isolated and shown to catalyze the reduction of goethite, hematite, birnessite, and ramsdellite/pyrolusite using formate. In contrast, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and succinate cannot function as electron donors. The significant implications of observations related to this cell-free system are: (i) both iron and manganese mineral oxides are reduced by the TM fraction, but aqueous U(VI) is not; (ii) TM fractions from anaerobically grown, but not aerobically grown, cells can reduce the mineral oxides; (iii) electron shuttles and iron chelators are not needed for this in vitro reduction, documenting conclusively that reduction can occur by direct contact with the mineral oxide; (iv) electron shuttles and EDTA stimulate the in vitro Fe(III) reduction, documenting that exogenous molecules can enhance rates of enzymatic mineral reduction; and (v) multiple membrane components are involved in solid-phase oxide reduction. The membrane fractions, consisting of liposomes of cytoplasmic and outer membrane segments, contain at least 100 proteins including the enzyme that oxidizes formate, formate dehydrogenase. Mineral oxide reduction was inhibited by the addition of detergent Triton X-100, which solubilizes membranes and their associated proteins, consistent with the involvement of multiple electron carriers that are disrupted by detergent addition. In contrast, formate dehydrogenase activity was not inhibited by Triton X-100. The addition of anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS) and menaquinone-4 was unable to restore activity; however, menadione (MD) restored 33% of the activity. The addition of AQDS and MD to reactions without added detergent increased the rate of goethite reduction. The Michaelis-Menten K{sub m} values of 71 {+-} 22 m{sup 2}/L for hematite and 50 {+-} 16 m{sup 2}/L for goethite were calculated as a function of surface area of the two insoluble minerals. V{sub max} was determined to be 123 {+-} 14 and 156 {+-} 13 nmol Fe(II)/min/mg of TM protein for hematite and goethite, respectively. These values are consistent with in vivo rates of reduction reported in the literature. These observations are consistent with our conclusion that the enzymatic reduction of mineral oxides is an effective probe that will allow elucidation of molecular chemistry of the membrane-mineral interface where electron transfer occurs.

  5. Carbon Storage Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Carbon Sequestration Partnership MSU . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Montana State University MVA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring,...

  6. Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Department of Mining & Minerals Engineering Graduate Program of Study Name: ID#: Advisor: Graduate Members, with not less than three from the Department of Mining and Minerals Engineering and not less than

  7. african gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the outline of the country's geology and its mineral deposits. Mali, its geology and mineral resources Country summary Mali, located in West Africa, has a land area of 24 000...

  8. V-215: NetworkMiner Directory Traversal and Insecure Library...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities have been reported in NetworkMiner, which can be exploited by malicious people to compromise a user's system. PLATFORM: NetworkMiner 1.x ABSTRACT: The...

  9. aluminosilicate clay minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    used mineral-based crankcase oil may build up in shellfish or other organisms. q Some metals in used mineral-based crankcase oil dissolve in water and move through the s Used...

  10. anaerobic toluene mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were...

  11. accompanying mineral crystal: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 312 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  12. apatite structured minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 166 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  13. azoto mineral durante: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 109 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  14. articular cartilage mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 304 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  15. advanced mineral calciner: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 174 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  16. anionic alkali mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 444 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  17. actinide pyrochlore minerals: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 192 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  18. alkali mineral complex: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 303 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  19. activity bone mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 325 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  20. amaro mineral sand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 452 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  1. aporte del mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 118 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  2. artisanal gold miners: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 370 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  3. agua por mineral: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 171 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  4. adhesionvia template-driven mineralization: Topics by E-print...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 90 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  5. austrian mineral water: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 223 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  6. antimony minerals part: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign investment: Coal 45 1 Oil 4.7 6 Industrial minerals: Cement 42 1 Fluorspar 55 1 Rare earths 85 1 Metals: Aluminum 151 Mineral-filled polypropylene: Improvement of scratch...

  7. Low Carbon Fuel Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas, or even coal with carbon capture and sequestration. Afuels that facilitate carbon capture and sequestration. For

  8. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cycle plants, possibly with carbon capture and storage (CCS)natural gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology

  9. Methanation of Carbon Dioxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Daniel Jacob

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    gas plant with carbon capture and storage technology werewith carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology, to replace

  10. Carbon Additionality: Discussion Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Additionality: A review Discussion Paper Gregory Valatin November 2009 Forest Research. Voluntary Carbon Standards American Carbon Registry Forest Carbon Project Standard (ACRFCPS) 27 CarbonFix Standard (CFS) 28 Climate, Community and Biodiversity Standard (CCBS) 28 Forest Carbon Standard (FCS) 28

  11. Continuous Crystalline Carbonate Apatite Thin Films. A Biomimetic Guofeng Xu,, Ilhan A. Aksay,, and John T. Groves*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aksay, Ilhan A.

    of hydroxyapatite thin films for the obvious reason that they are good candidates as bioactive coatings for bone is regarded as a better model for bone minerals1 and, therefore, carbonated apatite thin film coatings be attributed to the under-development of proper synthetic methods that are geared to carbonated apatite

  12. Suspended sediment and carbonate transport in the Yukon River Basin, Alaska: Fluxes and potential future responses to climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ], nutrients [Dornblaser and Striegl, 2007], metals and contaminants [Brabets et al., 2000], and carbonates and contaminants reach the open ocean, or are sequestered in floodplains and deltas, or man-made impoundments from continents to oceans originating from carbonate minerals [Ludwig et al., 1998; Cole et al., 2007

  13. Experimental studies of oxygen isotope fractionation in the carbonic acid system at 15, 25, and 40 (degrees)C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, William Cory

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In light of recent studies that show oxygen isotope fractionation in carbonate minerals to be a function of HCO3 2-; and CO3 2- concentrations, the oxygen isotope fractionation and exchange between water and components of the carbonic acid system...

  14. Simultaneous precipitation of magnesite and lizardite from1 hydrothermal alteration of olivine under high-carbonate alkalinity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    under high-carbonate alkalinity2 3 Romain Lafaya, b , German Montes-Hernandeza, *, Emilie Janotsb experiments in order to investigate the simultaneous25 serpentinization and carbonation of olivine-situ and in-situ mineral sequestration of27 CO2). For this case, specific experimental conditions were

  15. The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    The Link between Clay Mineral Weathering and the Stabilization of Ni Surface Precipitates R O B E R 19717 The formation of transition-metal surface precipitates may occur during sorption to clay minerals formation are poorly understood. We monitored changes in the reversibility of Ni sorbed to a clay mineral

  16. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey TITANIUM October 2010, international data coordinator. World production of titanium dioxide (TiO2 ) contained in titanium mineral to be heavily reliant on imports of titanium mineral concentrates from Australia, Canada, and South Africa

  17. Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Mineralization of Pentachlorophenol With Enhanced Degradation and Power Generation From Air to completely mineralize pentachlorophenol (PCP; 5 mg/L), in the pres- ence of acetate or glucose. Degradation; mineralization Introduction Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is one of many recalcitrant and toxic compounds found

  18. 2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON May 2010 #12, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide content (tables 1, 5). Turkey and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6

  19. Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Mineral formation during simulated leaks of Hanford waste tanks Youjun Deng a , James B. Harsh a at the US DOE Hanford Site, Washington, caus- ing mineral dissolution and re-precipitation upon contact with subsurface sediments. The main mineral precipitation and transformation pathways were studied in solutions

  20. King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Ghadhban, Samir

    King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399 Summer Tra Advisor Examiner King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals Electrical Engineering Department EE399-Shafie ID: 200669580 King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals #12;2 · TAPLE OF CONNTENT - Introduction

  1. 2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM mineral concentrates in 2011, excluding U.S. production, was about 1.62 million metric tons (Mt) compared with 1.25 Mt in 2010. The primary source of zirconium was the mineral zircon (ZrSiO4 ), principally found

  2. 2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON October 2010, international data coordinator. U.S. consumption of minerals and compounds reported in boron oxide continued and the United States were the world's leading producers of boron minerals (table 6). World production of boron

  3. LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR MINERALS James Papike, Lawrence Taylor, and Steven Simon The lunar rocks described--make it easy to distinguish them from terrestrial rocks. However, the minerals that make up lunar rocks are (with a few notable exceptions) minerals that are also found on Earth. Both lunar and terrestrial rocks

  4. Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oganov, Artem R.

    Ab initio theory of phase transitions and thermoelasticity of minerals ARTEM R. OGANOV* , JOHN P transitions, equations of state, elasticity and thermoelastic properties of the Earth-forming minerals minerals at the extreme conditions of the Earth's interior. One can accurately predict the structures

  5. 2006 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Minerals Yearbook BORON U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey October 2007 tetraborate decahydrate and found in nature as the mineral tincal. Boric acid, also known as orthoboric acid boric acid. The most common minerals of commercial importance in the United States were colemanite

  6. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion THE CALCIFICATION OF COLLAGEN WITH FETUINS Received is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recentlyDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization

  7. COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    COLLECTIONS POLICY MANUAL Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum College of Earth and Mineral Sciences Manual for the Earth and Mineral Sciences Museum has been developed to standardize procedures and provide guidelines for handling collections. The policies outlined here were established by the EMS Museum Director

  8. 2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey BORON [ADVANCE, and Blacksburg, SC, through Industrial Minerals Inc. (American Borate Co., 2005; Industrial Minerals Inc., 2007 extracted from three salt layers, up to 100 meters (m) deep, in Searles Lake, located near Trona in San

  9. Molecular Characterization of Bacterial Respiration on Minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, Robert C.

    2013-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to contribute to our fundamental understanding of proteins and biological processes under extreme environmental conditions. We sought to define the biochemical and physiological mechanisms that underlie biodegradative and other cellular processes in normal, extreme, and engineered environments. Toward that end, we sought to understand the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during respiration by bacteria on soluble iron and insoluble sulfide minerals. In accordance with these general aims, the specific aims were two-fold: To identify, separate, and characterize the extracellular biomolecules necessary for aerobic respiration on iron under strongly acidic conditions; and to elucidate the molecular principles whereby these bacteria recognize and adhere to their insoluble mineral substrates under harsh environmental conditions. The results of these studies were described in a total of nineteen manuscripts. Highlights include the following: 1. The complete genome of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 (type strain) was sequenced in collaboration with the DOE Joint Genome Institute; 2. Genomic and mass spectrometry-based proteomic methods were used to evaluate gene expression and in situ microbial activity in a low-complexity natural acid mine drainage microbial biofilm community. This was the first effort to successfully analyze a natural community using these techniques; 3. Detailed functional and structural studies were conducted on rusticyanin, an acid-stable electron transfer protein purified from cell-free extracts of At. ferrooxidans. The three-dimensional structure of reduced rusticyanin was determined from a combination of homonuclear proton and heteronuclear 15N- and 13C-edited NMR spectra. Concomitantly, the three-dimensional structure of oxidized rusticyanin was determined by X-ray crystallography to a resolution of 1.9 A by multiwavelength anomalous dispersion (MAD) phasing; 4. An acid-stable red cytochrome with a novel absorbance peak at 579 nm was purified from cell-free extracts of L. ferriphilum. Functional studies demonstrated that this cytochrome was an important component of the aerobic iron respiratory chain in this organism; 5. The specific adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to pyrite is mediated by an extracellular protein that was identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of At. ferrooxidans to minerals was characterized by high affinity binding that exhibited a high specificity for pyrite over other sulfide minerals. The principal biopolymer involved in this high-affinity adhesion to pyrite was isolated by mineral affinity chromatography and identified as aporusticyanin. The adhesion of purified aporusticyanin to minerals was observed to adhere to different mineral with a pattern of reactivity identical to that observed with the intact bacterium. Further, preincubation of pyrite with excess exogenous aporusticyanin served to inhibit the adherence of intact cells to the surface of the mineral, indicating that the protein and the cells adhered to the pyrite in a mutually exclusive manner. Taken together, these observations support a model where aporusticyanin located on the surface of the bacterial cell acts as a mineral-specific receptor for the initial adherence of At. ferrooxidans to solid pyrite; 6. The specific adhesion of L. ferriphilum to pyrite was mediated by a different acid-stable extracellular protein than aporusticyanin; and 7. A prototype integrating cavity absorption meter (ICAM) was assembled to determine whether this novel spectrophotometer could be used to study cellular respiration in situ.

  10. Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostinski, Alex

    Mineral content analysis of atmospheric dust using hyperspectral information from space A one of the world's largest sources of atmospheric mineral dust. Mineral composition optical properties, and mineral deposition to Amazon forests. In this study we examine hyperspectral

  11. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of South Africa: Department of Minerals and Energy; SouthSouth Africa, various departments, ranging from the Minerals and Energyof Minerals and Energy: Mining and minerals in South Africa:

  12. Clay minerals in the Meuse -Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Clay minerals in the Meuse - Haute Marne underground laboratory (France): Possible influence of organic matter on clay mineral evolution Francis Claret1,2,* , Boris A. Sakharov3 , Victor A. Drits3 words: Callovo-Oxfordian, Clay minerals, Clay diagenesis, Illite-smectite, Mixed- layering

  13. Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiblen, George D

    Carbon Trading, Carbon Taxes and Social Discounting Elisa Belfiori belf0018@umn.edu University of Minnesota Abstract This paper considers the optimal design of policies to carbon emissions in an economy, such as price or quantity controls on the net emissions of carbon, are insufficient to achieve the social

  14. Understanding the ocean carbon and sulfur cycles in the context of a variable ocean : a study of anthropogenic carbon storage and dimethylsulfide production in the Atlantic Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levine, Naomi Marcil

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anthropogenic activity is rapidly changing the global climate through the emission of carbon dioxide. Ocean carbon and sulfur cycles have the potential to impact global climate directly and through feedback loops. Numerical ...

  15. Minerals Management Service perspective of platform reassessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dyhrkopp, F.G. [Minerals Management Service, New Orleans, LA (United States). Office of Structural and Technical Support

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a result of the destruction caused by the Loma Prieta Earthquake, which occurred in the San Francisco Bay Area in 1989, and the passage of Hurricane Andrew through the Central Gulf of Mexico (GOM) oil and gas fields in August 1002, the Minerals Management Service (MMS) has been actively developing a policy over the past few years that will comprehensively address the reassessment of existing Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) oil and gas structures. Central to the development of such policy has been the need to develop a procedure by which reassessment can be carried out. This paper discusses the history of MMS involvement in the area of reassessment, their concerns, and how they view the reassessment procedures found in the Draft Section 17, Assessment of Existing Platforms, proposed for inclusion in future API RP 2A Editions. Minerals Management Service procedures for review and approval of proposals to remove and reuse existing structures in OCS waters are also discussed.

  16. Energy and mineral resource systems: An introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tapp, B.A.; Watkins, J.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book provides a welcome approach to understanding the fundamental role that energy and mineral resources play in the affairs of nations and individuals. Chapter 1 presents background material on energy in the human environment. Chapter 2 deals with historical changes in predominant energy sources, energy efficiencies based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics, potential utility of secondary energy sources, and the distribution of energy reserves among political and economic units. Chapter 3 discusses the methods and pitfalls of projecting future energy demand and technologies of alternative energy sources. Chapter 4 analyzes the projected growth-decline patterns in world oil and coal production, viability of alternative sources, and three possible future energy scenarios. Chapter 5 concludes with methods of energy flow analysis and further discussion on future energy scenarios. Chapter 6 begins by establishing several basic points about mineral resource systems then proceeds with a discussion of consumption-production patterns of metals. Chapter 7 presents estimates of global metal stocks, outlines factors determining metal demand, and examines metal import-export balances and resource potential for Australia and the Pacific Basin region. Chapter 8 highlights current issues that affect the mineral resource industry. Chapter 9 recounts the historical changes in exploration approaches, from prospecting to the utilization of genetic models, specialist teams, and regional geochemical and geophysical surveys. Chapter 10 assesses the implications of the previously noted trends in metal consumption and new technologies and concludes that future energy and mineral resource system evaluations will be according to new strategems and economic criteria.

  17. IEED Energy and Mineral Development Grants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Secretary of the Interior, through the Office of lndian Energy and Economic Development (IEED), is soliciting grant proposals from federally recognized Indian tribes and tribal energy resource development organizations for projects that assess, evaluate, or otherwise promote the processing, use, or development of energy and mineral resources on Indian lands. Grant awards are subject to the availability of funds as appropriated by Congress and allotted to IEED.

  18. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse, and Zhu, Zhiliang, 2010, Public review draft; A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration

  19. Carbon-Optimal and Carbon-Neutral Supply Chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caro, F.; Corbett, C. J.; Tan, T.; Zuidwijk, R.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Li, M. Daskin. 2009. Carbon Footprint and the Management ofThe Importance of Carbon Footprint Estimation Boundaries.Carbon accounting and carbon footprint - more than just

  20. An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    a c t This paper discusses the technology of direct capture of carbon dioxide from the atmo- sphereAn idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy- ture,'' which refers to the direct removal of carbon dioxide from the ambient air. Air capture has

  1. Interactions of Aqueous U(VI) with Soil Minerals in Slightly Alkaline Natural Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nik; Icenhower, Jonathan P.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium (U) is a common contaminant at numerous surface and subsurface sites around the world. This paper covers some important aspects of the aqueous hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] interactions with soil minerals that are present in contaminated soils and sediments. The retention of U via interactions with soil minerals has significant consequences for the prediction of its short – and long – term behavior in soils and geological systems. Studies of the nature and type of these interactions have provided the necessary evidence for assessing the geochemical behavior of U in natural systems under different physical, biogeochemical, hydrological, and reducing or oxidizing conditions. Over the last 20 years, aqueous U(VI):solid phase interactions have been studied by geochemists, soil chemists, soil mineralogists and soil microbiologists, and the progress in some areas is remarkable. Although a mechanistic description and understanding of the complex interactions involving U and soil minerals of natural systems is currently impossible, results from carefully designed and executed experiments with these materials have improved our understanding of the heterogeneous system’s behavior and U contaminant mobility and transport. There are, however, areas that need further exploration and study. Numerous research publications were reviewed in this paper to present important findings coming out of the research, to reveal the current level of the understanding of the U(VI) interactions with soil minerals, and to provide ideas for future needs and research directions.

  2. Stable isotopes of authigenic minerals in variably-saturated fractured tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, D.S.; Evans, D.D.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying stable isotope variation and mineralogical changes in fractured rock may help establish the history of climatic and geomorphological processes that might affect the isolation properties of a waste repository site. This study examines the use of the stable isotope ratios of oxygen ({sup 18}O/{sup 16}O) and carbon ({sup 13}C/{sup 12}C) in authigenic minerals as hydrogeochemical tools tracing low-temperature rock-water interaction in variably-saturated fractured stuff. Isotopic compositions of fracture-filling and rock matrix minerals in the Apache Leap tuff, near Superior, Arizona were concordant with geothermal temperatures and in equilibrium with water isotopically similar to present-day meteoric water and groundwater. Oxygen and carbon isotope ratios of fracture-filling, in unsaturated fractured tuff, displayed an isotopic gradient believed to result from near-surface isotopic enrichment due to evaporation rather than the effects of rock-water interaction. Oxygen isotope ratios of rock matrix opal samples exhibited an isotopic gradient believed to result from, leaching and reprecipitation of silica at depth. Methods and results can be used to further define primary flowpaths and the movement of water in variably-saturated fractured rock. 71 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loring, John S.; Thompson, Christopher J.; Zhang, Changyong; Wang, Zheming; Schaef, Herbert T.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2012-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host brine, some will remain as neat to water saturated super critical CO2 (scCO2) near the well bore and at the caprock, especially in the short-term life cycle of the sequestration site. Little is known about the reactivity of minerals with scCO2 containing variable concentrations of water. In this study, we used high-pressure infrared spectroscopy to examine the carbonation of brucite (Mg(OH)2) in situ over a 24 hr reaction period with scCO2 containing water concentrations between 0% and 100% saturation, at temperatures of 35, 50, and 70 °C, and at a pressure of 100 bar. Little or no detectable carbonation was observed when brucite was reacted with neat scCO2. Higher water concentrations and higher temperatures led to greater brucite carbonation rates and larger extents of conversion to magnesium carbonate products. The only observed carbonation product at 35 °C was nesquehonite (MgCO3 • 3H2O). Mixtures of nesquehonite and magnesite (MgCO3) were detected at 50 °C, but magnesite was more prevalent with increasing water concentration. Both an amorphous hydrated magnesium carbonate solid and magnesite were detected at 70 °C, but magnesite predominated with increasing water concentration. The identity of the magnesium carbonate products appears strongly linked to magnesium water exchange kinetics through temperature and water availability effects.

  4. Thermal diffusivity mapping of 4D carbon-carbon composites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution, 2-D thermal diffusivity maps of carbon-carbon composites were obtained by a state-of-the-art infrared thermal imaging system. Unlike the traditional single-point IR detector used for thermal diffusivity measurements, the IR camera is capable of capturing images in its 256 x 256 pixel Focal Plane Array detector in a snap-shot mode. The camera takes up to 200 images at a rate of 120 frames/second. The temperature resolution of the Ir camera is 0.015 C and the spatial resolution is 20 {micro}m. Thermal diffusivity was calculated for each pixel. Four-direction carbon-carbon composites were used for the thermal diffusivity mapping study. The fiber bundles along the heat flow direction were found to have 25% higher diffusivity values than the surrounding matrix. The diffusivity map also showed detailed local variations in diffusivity which were impossible to measure using a single-point detector. Accurate diffusivity maps are very important to the design of composite materials.

  5. Minerals yearbook: Mineral industries of Europe and the USSR. Volume 3. 1990 international review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The section of the Minerals Yearbook reviews the minerals industries of 29 countries: the 12 nations of the European Community (Belgium, France, the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), Italy, Greece, the Netherlands, Denmark/Greenland, Spain, Portugal, Luxembourg, The United Kingdom, and Ireland); 6 of the 7 nations of the European Free Trade Association (Sweden, Norway, Finland, Iceland, Austria, and Switzerland); Malta; the 8 Centrally Planned Economies of Eastern Europe (the German Democratic Republic (GDR), Poland, Yugoslavia, Albania, Hungary, Czechoslovakia, Romania, and Bulgaria); and the USSR.

  6. Geophysical monitoring and reactive transport modeling of ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Y.; Ajo-Franklin, J.B.; Spycher, N.; Hubbard, S.S.; Zhang, G.; Williams, K.H.; Taylor, J.; Fujita, Y.; Smith, R.

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation is the basis for a promising in-situ remediation method for sequestration of divalent radionuclide and trace metal ions. It has also been proposed for use in geotechnical engineering for soil strengthening applications. Monitoring the occurrence, spatial distribution, and temporal evolution of calcium carbonate precipitation in the subsurface is critical for evaluating the performance of this technology and for developing the predictive models needed for engineering application. In this study, we conducted laboratory column experiments using natural sediment and groundwater to evaluate the utility of geophysical (complex resistivity and seismic) sensing methods, dynamic synchrotron x-ray computed tomography (micro-CT), and reactive transport modeling for tracking ureolytically-driven calcium carbonate precipitation processes under site relevant conditions. Reactive transport modeling with TOUGHREACT successfully simulated the changes of the major chemical components during urea hydrolysis. Even at the relatively low level of urea hydrolysis observed in the experiments, the simulations predicted an enhanced calcium carbonate precipitation rate that was 3-4 times greater than the baseline level. Reactive transport modeling results, geophysical monitoring data and micro-CT imaging correlated well with reaction processes validated by geochemical data. In particular, increases in ionic strength of the pore fluid during urea hydrolysis predicted by geochemical modeling were successfully captured by electrical conductivity measurements and confirmed by geochemical data. The low level of urea hydrolysis and calcium carbonate precipitation suggested by the model and geochemical data was corroborated by minor changes in seismic P-wave velocity measurements and micro-CT imaging; the latter provided direct evidence of sparsely distributed calcium carbonate precipitation. Ion exchange processes promoted through NH{sub 4}{sup +} production during urea hydrolysis were incorporated in the model and captured critical changes in the major metal species. The electrical phase increases were potentially due to ion exchange processes that modified charge structure at mineral/water interfaces. Our study revealed the potential of geophysical monitoring for geochemical changes during urea hydrolysis and the advantages of combining multiple approaches to understand complex biogeochemical processes in the subsurface.

  7. CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

  8. Photophysics of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samsonidze, Georgii G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reviews the recent advances made in optical studies of single-wall carbon nanotubes. Studying the electronic and vibrational properties of carbon nanotubes, we find that carbon nanotubes less than 1 nm in ...

  9. Nevada Division of Minerals | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jump to:Neppel Wind Power ProjectNeutron LogWildlifeMinerals

  10. Mineral Springs of Alaska | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanao GEPP Jump to:WestReport: Mineral

  11. Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    #12;Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward Zero Carbon Energy Production Toward

  12. Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

  13. Precambrian Research 172 (2009) 301310 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E3, Canada c Mineral Resources Tasmania, P.O. Box 56 the accuracy of regional and global correlations of Neoproterozoic sedimentary successions using relative"-type diamictite­cap carbonate pairs cannot be used as chronostratigraphic marker horizons for global correlation

  14. Method of making carbon-carbon composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engle, Glen B. (16716 Martincoit Rd., Poway, CA 92064)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making 2D and 3D carbon-carbon composites having a combined high crystallinity, high strength, high modulus and high thermal and electrical conductivity. High-modulus/high-strength mesophase derived carbon fibers are woven into a suitable cloth. Layers of this easily graphitizible woven cloth are infiltrated with carbon material to form green composites. The carbonized composite is then impregnated several times with pitch by covering the composite with hot pitch under pressure. The composites are given a heat treatment between each impregnant step to crack up the infiltrated carbon and allow additional pitch to enter the microstructure during the next impregnation cycle. The impregnated composites are then given a final heat treatment in the range 2500.degree. to 3100.degree. C. to fully graphitize the fibers and the matrix carbon. The composites are then infiltrated with pyrolytic carbon by chemical vapor deposition in the range 1000.degree. C. to 1300.degree. C. at a reduced. pressure.

  15. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Carbon Fiber Technology Facility is relevant in proving the scale- up of low-cost carbon fiber precursor materials and advanced manufacturing technologies * Significant...

  16. Motivating carbon dioxide | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Motivating carbon dioxide Motivating carbon dioxide Released: April 17, 2013 Scientists show what it takes to get the potential fuel feedstock to a reactive spot on a model...

  17. Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT IN THE MINERALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGuinness, Mark

    Sustainable Water Management in the Minerals Industry 1 SUSTAINABLE WATER MANAGEMENT interest. It arises in the provision of water for Queensland coal mines, where additional water is available via a pipeline from a public supply, and also in cases where recycled or more expensive water

  18. Carbon Capture (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Smit, Berend

    2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Berend Smit speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  19. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  20. Australasian Code for Reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    (JORC) Published The Joint Ore Reserves Committee of The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy, Australian Institute of Geoscientists, and Minerals Council of...

  1. Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Epithermal Gold Mineralization and a Geothermal Resource at Blue Mountain, Humboldt County, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Inventory...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Inventory Protocols Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) Borates and Soda Ash Sections Greenhouse Gas Inventory Protocol (PDF 75 KB) Download...

  3. Understanding Mineral Transport in Switchgrass | U.S. DOE Office...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    minerals influence the platform (e.g., pyrolysis, thermochemistry) used to produce biofuels from plant feedstocks. For example, high levels of silicon in ash decrease conversion...

  4. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- International Minerals and...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Corp - Bonnie Mill Plant - FL 03 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: International Minerals and Chemicals Corp., Bonnie Mill Plant (FL.03) Eliminated from consideration under...

  5. archaeology mineral exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Archaeology Press emphasizes primary research data and its 172 Oil and Gas Exploration Geosciences Websites Summary: Metals Industrial Minerals Oil and Gas Geothermal...

  6. Earth's most abundant mineral finally has a name | Argonne National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clarified the definition of Bridgmanite, a high-density form of magnesium iron silicate and the Earth's most abundant mineral - using Argonne National Laboratory's Advanced...

  7. SpectraMiner, an Interactive Data Mining and Visualization Software...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    we call SpectraMiner that makes it possible to handle hundreds of clusters without loss of information and thus overcome the limits set by traditional statistical data...

  8. atomic minerals exploration: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    method for delineating covered mineralization. Plants are capable of accumulating rare earth elements (REEs) in their tissue, and (more) Bluemel, Britt 2014-01-01 35...

  9. arable mineral soils: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    year (tyr) of magnesium ferrosilicon, and 8,500 tyr of ferrosilicon (Globe Specialty Metals, inc 320 Placement of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate Using Two Different Techniques....

  10. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Mineral Association Changes the Secondary Structure and Dynamics of Murine Amelogenin. Abstract: Biomineralization proteins, present during the...

  11. A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to solid-aqueous phase reactions. Citation: Freedman VL, P Saripalli, DH Bacon, and PD Meyer.2004."A Film Depositional Model of Permeability for Mineral Reactions in Unsaturated...

  12. Influence of Carbon Sources and Electron Shuttles on Ferric Iron Reduction by Cellulomonas sp. Strain ES6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erin K. Field; Robin Gerlach; Sridhar Viamajala; Laura K. Jennings; Alfred B. Cunningham; Brent M. Peyton; William A. Apel

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The reduction of hexavalent chromium, Cr(VI), to trivalent chromium, Cr(III), can be an important aspect of remediation processes at Department of Energy (DOE) and other contaminated sites. Cellulomonas species are found at several Cr(VI) contaminated and uncontaminated locations at the DOE site in Hanford, Washington. Members of this genus have demonstrated the ability to effectively reduce Cr(VI) to Cr(III) fermentatively and therefore play a potential role in hexavalent chromium remediation at this site. Batch studies were conducted with Cellulomonas sp. strain ES6 to assess the influence of various carbon sources, iron minerals, and electron shuttling compounds on Cr(VI) reduction. These chemical species are likely to be present in these terrestrial environments during in situ bioremediation. Results indicated that there were a number of interactions between these compounds that influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. The type of carbon source as well as the type of electron shuttle present influenced Cr(VI) reduction rates. When an electron shuttle, such as anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), was present in the system, reduction rates increased significantly. Biologically reduced AQDS (AHDS) reduced Cr(VI) almost instantaneously. The presence of iron minerals and their concentrations did not significantly influence Cr(VI) reduction rates. However, strain ES6 or AQDS could directly reduce surface-associated Fe(III) to Fe(II) which was capable of reducing Cr(VI) at a near instantaneous rate. These results suggest the rate limiting step in these systems is the transfer of electrons from strain ES6 to the intermediate or terminal electron acceptor whether that is Cr(VI), Fe(III), or AQDS.

  13. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  14. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, S.T.; Pekala, R.W.; Kaschmitter, J.L.

    1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granulated materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivity and power to system energy. 1 fig.

  15. Composite carbon foam electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer, Steven T. (San Leandro, CA); Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Kaschmitter, James L. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels used as a binder for granularized materials, including other forms of carbon and metal additives, are cast onto carbon or metal fiber substrates to form composite carbon thin film sheets. The thin film sheets are utilized in electrochemical energy storage applications, such as electrochemical double layer capacitors (aerocapacitors), lithium based battery insertion electrodes, fuel cell electrodes, and electrocapacitive deionization electrodes. The composite carbon foam may be formed by prior known processes, but with the solid particles being added during the liquid phase of the process, i.e. prior to gelation. The other forms of carbon may include carbon microspheres, carbon powder, carbon aerogel powder or particles, graphite carbons. Metal and/or carbon fibers may be added for increased conductivity. The choice of materials and fibers will depend on the electrolyte used and the relative trade off of system resistivty and power to system energy.

  16. Ab Initio Thermodynamic Model for Magnesium Carbonates and Hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaka, Anne M.; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An ab initio thermodynamic framework for predicting properties of hydrated magnesium carbonate minerals has been developed using density-functional theory linked to macroscopic thermodynamics through the experimental chemical potentials for MgO, water, and CO2. Including semiempirical dispersion via the Grimme method and small corrections to the generalized gradient approximation of Perdew, Burke, and Ernzerhof for the heat of formation yields a model with quantitative agreement for the benchmark minerals brucite, magnesite, nesquehonite, and hydromagnesite. The model shows how small differences in experimental conditions determine whether nesquehonite, hydromagnesite, or magnesite is the result of laboratory synthesis from carbonation of brucite, and what transformations are expected to occur on geological time scales. Because of the reliance on parameter-free first principles methods, the model is reliably extensible to experimental conditions not readily accessible to experiment and to any mineral composition for which the structure is known or can be hypothesized, including structures containing defects, substitutions, or transitional structures during solid state transformations induced by temperature changes or processes such as water, CO2, or O2 diffusion. Demonstrated applications of the ab initio thermodynamic framework include an independent means to evaluate differences in thermodynamic data for lansfordite, predicting the properties of Mg analogs of Ca-based hydrated carbonates monohydrocalcite and ikaite which have not been observed in nature, and an estimation of the thermodynamics of barringtonite from the stoichiometry and a single experimental observation.

  17. An Index-Based Approach to Assessing Recalcitrance and Soil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Engineered Black Carbons (Biochars)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Zimmerman, Andrew R.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Amonette, James E.; Herbert, Bruce

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of engineered black carbons (or biochars) to resist abiotic and, or biotic degradation (herein referred to as recalcitrance) is crucial to their successful deployment as a soil carbon sequestration strategy. A new recalcitrance index, the R{sub 50}, for assessing biochar quality for carbon sequestration is proposed. The R{sub 50} is based on the relative thermal stability of a given biochar to that of graphite and was developed and evaluated with a variety of biochars (n = 59), and soot-like black carbons. Comparison of R{sub 50}, with biochar physicochemical properties and biochar-C mineralization revealed the existence of a quantifiable relationship between R{sub 50} and biochar recalcitrance. As presented here, the R{sub 50} is immediately applicable to pre-land application screening of biochars into Class A (R{sub 50} {>=} 0.70), Class B (0.50 {<=} R{sub 50} < 0.70) or Class C (R{sub 50} < 0.50) recalcitrance/carbon sequestration classes. Class A and Class C biochars would have carbon sequestration potential comparable to soot/graphite and uncharred plant biomass, respectively, while Class B biochars would have intermediate carbon sequestration potential. We believe that the coupling of the R{sub 50}, to an index-based degradation, and an economic model could provide a suitable framework in which to comprehensively assess soil carbon sequestration in biochars.

  18. Research Summary Carbon Additionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the quality assurance of emissions reduction and carbon sequestration activities, but remains a source of muchResearch Summary Carbon Additionality Additionality is widely considered to be a core aspect controversy in national carbon accounting, international regulatory frameworks and carbon markets. A review

  19. Acetylenic carbon allotrope

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lagow, R.J.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fourth allotrope of carbon, an acetylenic carbon allotrope, is described. The acetylenic carbon allotropes of the present invention are more soluble than the other known carbon allotropes in many common organic solvents and possesses other desirable characteristics, e.g. high electron density, ability to burn cleanly, and electrical conductive properties. Many uses for this fourth allotrope are described herein. 17 figs.

  20. Carbon Monoxide Environmental Public

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The National Workgroup on Carbon Monoxide Surveillance Formed in April 2005 Membership: EPHT grantees Academic

  1. The Woodland Carbon Code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Woodland Carbon Code While society must continue to make every effort to reduce greenhouse gas a role by removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. The potential of woodlands to soak up carbon to help compensate for their carbon emissions. But before investing in such projects, people want to know

  2. Electrical properties of dispersions of graphene in mineral oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monteiro, O. R., E-mail: othon.monteiro@bakerhughes.com [Baker Hughes, 14990 Yorktown Plaza Dr., Houston, Texas 77040 (United States)

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersions of graphene in mineral oil have been prepared and electrical conductivity and permittivity have been measured. The direct current (DC) conductivity of the dispersions depends on the surface characteristics of the graphene platelets and followed a percolation model with a percolation threshold ranging from 0.05 to 0.1?wt. %. The difference in DC conductivities can be attributed to different states of aggregation of the graphene platelets and to the inter-particle electron transfer, which is affected by the surface radicals. The frequency-dependent conductivity (?(?)) and permittivity (?(?)) were also measured. The conductivity of dispersions with particle contents much greater than the percolation threshold remains constant and equal to the DC conductivity at low frequencies ? with and followed a power-law ?(?)???{sup s} dependence at very high frequencies with s?0.9. For dispersions with graphene concentration near the percolation threshold, a third regime was displayed at intermediate frequencies indicative of interfacial polarization consistent with Maxwell-Wagner effect typically observed in mixtures of two (or more) phases with very distinct electrical and dielectric properties.

  3. Mesoporous carbon materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Sheng; Fulvio, Pasquale Fernando; Mayes, Richard T.; Wang, Xiqing; Sun, Xiao-Guang; Guo, Bingkun

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A conductive mesoporous carbon composite comprising conductive carbon nanoparticles contained within a mesoporous carbon matrix, wherein the conductive mesoporous carbon composite possesses at least a portion of mesopores having a pore size of at least 10 nm and up to 50 nm, and wherein the mesopores are either within the mesoporous carbon matrix, or are spacings delineated by surfaces of said conductive carbon nanoparticles when said conductive carbon nanoparticles are fused with each other, or both. Methods for producing the above-described composite, devices incorporating them (e.g., lithium batteries), and methods of using them, are also described.

  4. On carbon footprints and growing energy use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Could fractional reductions in the carbon footprint of a growing organization lead to a corresponding real reduction in atmospheric CO{sub 2} emissions in the next ten years? Curtis M. Oldenburg, head of the Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program of LBNL’s Earth Sciences Division, considers his own organization's carbon footprint and answers this critical question? In addressing the problem of energy-related greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and climate change, it is essential that we understand which activities are producing GHGs and the scale of emission for each activity, so that reduction efforts can be efficiently targeted. The GHG emissions to the atmosphere of an individual or group are referred to as the ‘carbon footprint’. This terminology is entirely appropriate, because 85% of the global marketed energy supply comes from carbon-rich fossil fuel sources whose combustion produces CO{sub 2}, the main GHG causing global climate change. Furthermore, the direct relation between CO2 emissions and fossil fuels as they are used today makes energy consumption a useful proxy for carbon footprint. It would seem to be a simple matter to reduce energy consumption across the board, both individually and collectively, to help reduce our carbon footprints and therefore solve the energyclimate crisis. But just how much can we reduce carbon footprints when broader forces, such as growth in energy use, cause the total footprint to simultaneously expand? In this feature, I present a calculation of the carbon footprint of the Earth Sciences Division (ESD), the division in which I work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), and discuss the potential for reducing this carbon footprint. It will be apparent that in terms of potential future carbon footprint reductions under projections of expected growth, ESD may be thought of as a microcosm of the situation of the world as a whole, in which alternatives to the business-as-usual use of fossil fuels are needed if absolute GHG emission reductions are to be achieved.

  5. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from industrial by-product slags (Slag2PCC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    , it seems that carbonation of silicate minerals could be one of the solutions with most potential. More impor- tantly, it seems to be the only CO2 capture and storage (CCS) option for Finland (Koljonen et al industry, where it is used as a filler and coating pigment in paper. The potential for producing

  6. Characterization of contaminant phases in foraminifera carbonates by electron microprobe mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Characterization of contaminant phases in foraminifera carbonates by electron microprobe mapping L characterized by the presence of manganese-rich minerals in the sediments. The combined application the foraminiferal shells. Results illustrate the presence of at least two different Mn-rich contaminant phases

  7. Warming accelerates decomposition of decades-old carbon in forest soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). Although there are no global estimates of decadal-aged C, it makes up the majority of C in mineral soils, CA 94720; and d Energy and Resources Group, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 Edited (received for review January 10, 2012) Global climate carbon-cycle models predict acceleration of soil

  8. Mineralogy and Geochemistry of Pb, Zn and Ag Mine Tailings Originating From Carbonate-Rich Deposits 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClure, Roberta 1981-

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    control in the Zimapan area. Objectives of the study of the mine tailings are (1) to determine mineralogy of the tailings in order to identify acid-producing minerals and heavy metals at risk for release in acidic conditions, and (2) to quantify carbonate...

  9. Controlling porosity in lignin-derived nanoporous carbon for supercapacitor applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jeon, Ju-Won [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhang, Libing [Washington State University, Richland, WA (United States); Lutkenhaus, Jodie L. [Texas A&M University, College Station, TX (United States); Laskar, Dhrubojyoti D. [Washington Statte University, Richland, WA (United States); Lemmon, John P. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Choi, Daiwon [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Nandasiri, Manjula I. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Hashmi, Ali [Washington State University, Vancouver, WA (United States); Xu, Jie [Washington State University, Vancouver, WA (United States); Motkuri, Radha K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Fernandez, Carlos A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Liu, Jian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Tucker, Melvin P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); McGrail, Peter B. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Yang, Bin [Washington State University, Richland, WA (United States); Nune, Satish K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-cost renewable lignin has been used as a precursor to produce porous carbons. However, to date, it has not been easy to obtain high surface area porous carbon without activation processes or templating agents. Here, we demonstrate that low molecular weight lignin yields highly porous carbon (1092 m² g?¹) with more graphitization through direct carbonization without additional activation processes or templating agents. We found that molecular weight and oxygen consumption during carbonization are critical factors to obtain high surface area, graphitized porous carbons. This highly porous carbon from low-cost renewable lignin sources is a good candidate for supercapacitor electrode materials.

  10. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's penumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  11. Respiratory disease in Utah coal miners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rom, W.N.; Kanner, R.E.; Renzetti, A.D. Jr.; Shigeoka, J.W.; Barkman, H.W.; Nichols, M.; Turner, W.A.; Coleman, M.; Wright, W.E.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two hundred forty-two Utah underground coal miners volunteered to participate in a respiratory disease study. They were an older group (mean, 56 years of age) and had spent a mean of 29 years in the coal-mining industry. The prevalence of chronic bronchitis was 57%, and that of coal worker's pneumoconiosis, 25%; only one worker had progressive massive fibrosis. Significant impairment of pulmonary function was found among those with a history of cigarette smoking. Chronic bronchitis or coal worker's pneumoconiosis among nonsmokers did not impair pulmonary function. There was a significant association among the nonsmokers between increasing exposure to coal dust and coal worker's pneumoconiosis, but not for changes in pulmonary function. Coal mine dust had a significant influence in causing the symptom complex of chronic cough and sputum production, and coal worker's pneumoconiosis.

  12. Trichloroethylene Mineralization in a Fixed-Film Bioreactor Using a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Thomas K.

    Trichloroethylene Mineralization in a Fixed-Film Bioreactor Using a Pure Culture Expressing: An aerobic, single-pass, fixed-film bioreactor become an important compound for hazardous waste was designed). Although M. trichosporium OB3b has the highestindicator of TCE mineralization, the bioreactor with acti

  13. ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE FGF and ERK signaling coordinately regulate mineralization- related genes and play for Bone and Mineral Research and Springer 2011 Abstract To examine the roles of FGF and ERK MAPK signaling in an ERK MAPK-dependent manner. Real-time PCR analysis indicated that FGF2 upregulates Ank, Enpp1, Mgp, Slc

  14. Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    #12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

  15. Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benning, Liane G.

    Nanoparticulate bioavailable iron minerals in icebergs and glaciers R. RAISWELL 1 , L. G. BENNING 1+ Raiswell et al. (2006, 2008) used high- resolution microscopy, combined with chemical extraction methods an important mineral signature for the chemistry of the subglacial environment, and that they are significant

  16. 2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    subsidiary of Australian company Iluka Resources Ltd.). DuPont produced zircon from its heavy-mineral sands2010 Minerals Yearbook U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM. In 2010, the global economy began to recover, and consumption of zirconium ores and concentrates increased

  17. ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of manure compost and mineral fertilizer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Comparison of manure compost and mineral fertilizer for hybrid poplar plantation and methods Composted sheep manure (10 and 20 kg/tree) at planting was compared to N and P mineral Contrary to what we expected, compost treatments neither increased root development nor tree water status

  18. The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics forKinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitationwhere n denotes kinetic mineral index, positive values of r

  19. The role of reaction affinity and secondary minerals in regulating chemical weathering rates at the Santa Cruz Soil Chronosequence, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, K.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on Reaction- Rates among Minerals and Aqueous-Solutions .1.as a result of secondary mineral precipitation and approachterm and Contemporary Mineral Weathering rates. Geochim.

  20. Characterization and mischaracterization of authigenic magnesium-bearing minerals: Examples from Norphlet Sandstone, Alabama, Florida, and Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kugler, R.L. (Geological Survey of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Jurassic Norphlet sandstones are significant gas, condensate, and carbon dioxide reservoirs in the eastern Gulf Coast region. Diagenetic factors affecting the quality of these reservoirs are variable at microscopic to megascopic scales. Major authigenic components of the reservoirs include quartz, albite, K-feldspar, a variety of carbonate minerals, anhydrite, pyrite, illite, and chlorite; minor components include zeolite, tourmaline, apatite, and anatase. Although the diagenetic character of Norphlet sandstone has been intensely investigated, diagenetic pathways and the origin of porosity remain controversial. Characterization of chemically variable authigenic minerals is crucial to understanding fluid migration pathways and rock-water interactions. Detailed polarized-light and electron microscopy, energy- and wavelength-dispersion X-ray microanalysis, and X-ray diffractometry reveal that common authigenic Mg-bearing minerals in Norphlet reservoirs have been overlooked or improperly chemically characterized. Breunnerite has not been identified by other investigators, although it is abundant in cores from some wells. Authigenic chlorite, which is widespread in offshore reservoirs, commonly has been described as being Fe-rich, whereas electron probe microanalyses indicate that this chlorite is Mg-rich. Qualitative chemical characterization of authigenic minerals commonly is determined by EDX analysis during routine observation of textural relationships with a SEM. This type of analysis typically is performed with little regard for beam-sample-detector geometric relationships and other operational parameters. Peak intensities on EDX spectra collected using a lower electron beam potential (10 kV) more closely reflect proportions of Mg and Fe in breunnerite and chlorite. Thus, SEM operating parameters should be carefully considered, even for qualitative chemical analysis.

  1. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology 182183 (2013) 7690 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the carbon and water fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems in China are not well understood due to the lack covariance flux sites across China, and examined the carbon fluxes, evapotranspiration (ET), and water useDirect Agricultural and Forest Meteorology journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agrformet Carbon fluxes

  2. Microbes Turn Electricity Directly To Methane Without Hydrogen Generation March 30, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    catalysts and at a lower energy level than converting carbon dioxide to methane using conventional, non Park, Pa. -- A tiny microbe can take electricity and directly convert carbon dioxide and water to methane, producing a portable energy source with a potentially neutral carbon footprint, according

  3. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan M. Capalbo

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO2 utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other DOE regional partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Deliverables for the 7th Quarter reporting period include (1) for the geological efforts: Reports on Technology Needs and Action Plan on the Evaluation of Geological Sinks and Pilot Project Deployment (Deliverables 2 and 3), and Report on the Feasibility of Mineralization Trapping in the Snake River Plain Basin (Deliverable 14); (2) for the terrestrial efforts: Report on the Evaluation of Terrestrial Sinks and a Report of the Best Production Practices for Soil C Sequestration (Deliverables 8 and 15). In addition, the 7th Quarter activities for the Partnership included further development of the proposed activities for the deployment and demonstration phase of the carbon sequestration pilots including geological and terrestrial pilots, expansion of the Partnership to encompass regions and institutions that are complimentary to the steps we have identified, building greater collaborations with industry and stakeholders in the region, contributed to outreach efforts that spanned all partnerships, co-authorship on the Carbon Capture and Separation report, and developed a regional basis to address future energy opportunities in the region. The deliverables and activities are discussed in the following sections and appended to this report. The education and outreach efforts have resulted in a comprehensive plan which serves as a guide for implementing the outreach activities under Phase I. The public website has been expanded and integrated with the GIS carbon atlas. We have made presentations to stakeholders and policy makers including two tribal sequestration workshops, and made connections to other federal and state agencies concerned with GHG emissions, climate change, and efficient and environmental

  4. Log of Changes to IMA Mineral List This log file was begun in June 2010 to keep track of changes to the IMA list of minerals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Downs, Robert T.

    1 Log of Changes to IMA Mineral List This log file was begun in June 2010 to keep track of changes to the IMA list of minerals at http://rruff.info/IMA. 2 August 2013: Eltyubyuite: New mineral descriptions of wadalite: a new mineral from the Northern Caucasus, Kabardino-Balkaria, Russia. European Journal

  5. Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    already depend on mineral extraction and fossil fuel baseddirectly dependent on the mineral extraction industry. For

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF CONTINUOUS SOLVENT EXTRACTION PROCESSES FOR COAL DERIVED CARBON PRODUCTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliot B. Kennel; Quentin C. Berg; Stephen P. Carpenter; Dady Dadyburjor; Jason C. Hissam; Manoj Katakdaunde; Liviu Magean; Abha Saddawi; Alfred H. Stiller; John W. Zondlo

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this DOE-funded effort is to develop continuous processes for solvent extraction of coal for the production of carbon products. The largest applications are those which support metals smelting, such as anodes for aluminum smelting and electrodes for arc furnaces. Other carbon products include materials used in creating fuels for the Direct Carbon Fuel Cell, metals smelting, especially in the aluminum and steel industries, as well as porous carbon structural material referred to as ''carbon foam'' and carbon fibers. During this reporting period, efforts have focused on the development of carbon electrodes for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells (DCFC), and on carbon foam composites used in ballistic armor, as well as the hydrotreatment of solvents used in the basic solvent extraction process. A major goal is the production of 1500 pounds of binder pitch, corresponding to about 3000 pounds of hydrotreated solvent.

  7. The effects of harvesting intensity on soil CO2 efflux and carbon content in an east Texas bottomland hardwood ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Londo, Andrew James

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -harvested control. I hypothesized that respiration rates would vary directly with harvest intensity. The sodalime absorption technique was used for determining in situ respiration and the wet alkali method was used for measuring mineral soil respiration in the lab...

  8. Bone Mineral Density, Bone Turnover, and Systemic Inflammation in Non-cirrhotics with Chronic Hepatitis C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, J; Shoback, DMA; Zipperstein, J; Lizaola, B; Tseng, S; Terrault, NA

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mun˜oz-Torres M, et al. Bone mineral density, serum insulin-et al. Osteoporosis and bone mineral metabolism disorders in1069-9. 11. George J. Bone mineral density and disorders of

  9. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  10. A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Junhong

    A Generic Approach to Coat Carbon Nanotubes With Nanoparticles for Potential Energy Applications coated with nanoparticles of multiple materials to realize the multicomponent coating. High resolution.1115/1.2787026 Keywords: carbon nanotubes, nanoparticles, electrostatic force directed assembly, coating, size selection

  11. II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed biofuels production. GHG policies18 that create a carbon price either through an emissions trading system or directly by taxing GHG emissions also generate increased demand for biofuels. They do so by raising

  12. Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Capalbo

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

  13. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for power application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Tao, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are nanometer-diameter cylinders formed from rolled-up graphene sheets which have found widespread interests due to their many excellent electrical properties. In particular, most of them are direct ...

  14. Crystallinity and compositional changes in carbonated apatites: Evidence from {sup 31}P solid-state NMR, Raman, and AFM analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElderry, John-David P.; Zhu, Peizhi [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Mroue, Kamal H. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Xu, Jiadi [Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Pavan, Barbara [Department of Chemistry and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Fang, Ming [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Zhao, Guisheng; McNerny, Erin; Kohn, David H.; Franceschi, Renny T. [School of Dentistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Holl, Mark M.Banaszak [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Tecklenburg, Mary M.J., E-mail: mary.tecklenburg@cmich.edu [Department of Chemistry and Science of Advanced Materials Program, Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI 48859 (United States); Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Department of Biophysics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States); Morris, Michael D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1055 (United States)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid-state (magic-angle spinning) NMR spectroscopy is a useful tool for obtaining structural information on bone organic and mineral components and synthetic model minerals at the atomic-level. Raman and {sup 31}P NMR spectral parameters were investigated in a series of synthetic B-type carbonated apatites (CAps). Inverse {sup 31}P NMR linewidth and inverse Raman PO{sub 4}{sup 3?}?{sub 1} bandwidth were both correlated with powder XRD c-axis crystallinity over the 0.3–10.3 wt% CO{sub 3}{sup 2?} range investigated. Comparison with bone powder crystallinities showed agreement with values predicted by NMR and Raman calibration curves. Carbonate content was divided into two domains by the {sup 31}P NMR chemical shift frequency and the Raman phosphate ?{sub 1} band position. These parameters remain stable except for an abrupt transition at 6.5 wt% carbonate, a composition which corresponds to an average of one carbonate per unit cell. This near-binary distribution of spectroscopic properties was also found in AFM-measured particle sizes and Ca/P molar ratios by elemental analysis. We propose that this transition differentiates between two charge-balancing ion-loss mechanisms as measured by Ca/P ratios. These results define a criterion for spectroscopic characterization of B-type carbonate substitution in apatitic minerals. - Graphical abstract: Carbonated apatite shows an abrupt change in spectral (NMR, Raman) and morphological (AFM) properties at a composition of about one carbonate substitution per unit cell. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Crystallinity (XRD), particle size (AFM) of carbonated apatites and bone mineral. • Linear relationships among crystallinity, {sup 31}P NMR and Raman inverse bandwidths. • Low and high carbonated apatites use different charge-balancing ion-loss mechanism.

  15. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon cycling to improve climate modeling and carbon...

  16. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Tapan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Functionalization.M. S. Characterizing carbon nanotube samples with resonancewith a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Capacitor. Science

  17. Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

  18. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Australian terrestrial carbon budget Open Access 3 , G. P.The Australian terrestrial carbon budget Luo, C. , Mahowald,terrestrial carbon budget Richards, G. P. , Borough, C. ,

  19. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scanza, Rachel; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Y.; Albani, Samuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral components in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05Wm?2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17Wm?2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, ?0.05 and ?0.17Wm?2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.

  20. INTEGRATED CARBONATION: A NOVEL CONCEPT TO DEVELOP A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE FOR VISION 21 POWER PLANTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mercedes Maroto-Valer; John M. Andresen; Yinzhi Zhang; Matthew E. Kuchta

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The greatest challenge to achieve no environmental impact or zero emissions for the Vision 21 plants is probably greenhouse gases, especially CO{sub 2} emissions that are inevitably associated with fossil fuel combustion. Mineral carbonation, that involves the reaction of CO{sub 2} with non-carbonate minerals to form stable mineral carbonates, has been lately proposed as a promising CO{sub 2} sequestration technology due to the vast natural abundance of the raw minerals, the long term stability of the mineral carbonates formed, and the overall process being exothermic, and therefore, potentially economic viable. However, carbonation efficiency is being considered a major hurdle for the development of economically viable sequestration technologies, where present studies require extensive mineral particle communition, high pressures and prior capture of the CO{sub 2}. Consequently, mineral carbonation will only become a viable cost-effective sequestration technology through innovative development of fast reaction routes under milder regimes in a continuous process. The objective of the proposed novel active carbonation concept is to promote and accelerate reaction rates and efficiencies through surface activation to the extent that extensive mineral particle communition and high temperatures and pressures are not required. In this research program, serpentine was used as the carbonation feedstock material. Physical and chemical surface activation studies were conducted to promote its inherent carbonation reactivity. The activated materials were characterized by a battery of analytical techniques to determine their surface properties and assess their potential as carbonation minerals. Active carbonation studies were conducted and the carbonation activity was quantitatively determined by the increase of the weight of solid products and the percent of stoichiometric conversion. This work has shown that chemical activation was more effective than the physical activation in terms of increasing the surface area (330 vs. 17m{sup 2}/g). The steam activated serpentine had a 73% conversion to magnesite at 155 C and 1850 psig after 1 hour reaction, while under the same operating conditions, the parent sample only had 8% conversion. However, heat treatment is very energy intensive, and therefore, this steam activation route was not further considered. For the chemical activation, the most effective acid used was sulfuric acid, that resulted in surface areas of over 330 m{sup 2}/g, and more than 70% of the magnesium was dissolved from the serpentine (100{micro}m), and therefore, made available for carbonation. As a consequence, the subsequent carbonation reaction could be conducted at ambient temperatures (20 C) and low pressures (600psi) and it was possible to achieve 73% conversion after only 3 hours. This is indeed a significant improvement over previous studies that required temperatures over 185 C and very high pressures of around 1950 psig. Finally, this project has been awarded a Phase II, where the active carbonation process developed during this Phase I will be optimized in order to design a CO{sub 2} sequestration module.

  1. au ag-polymetallic mineralization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Mineral and Energy Physics Websites Summary: Institute for Mineral and Energy Resources Answering Global Resource and Energy Challenges 12;Answering Global Resource and...

  2. The production of consumption: addressing the impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southern Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Basu, Sanjay; Stuckler, David; Gonsalves, Gregg; Lurie, Mark

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Rights Alliance: The Mining Sector, Tuberculosis andthe impact of mineral mining on tuberculosis in southernbetween mineral mining activities and tuberculosis incidence

  3. Assessment of industrial minerals and rocks in the controlled area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castor, S.B. [Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, Reno, NV (United States); Lock, D.E. [Mackay School of Mines, Reno, NV (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yucca Mountain in Nye County, Nevada, is a potential site for a permanent repository for high-level nuclear waste in Miocene ash flow tuff. The Yucca Mountain controlled area occupies approximately 98 km{sup 2} that includes the potential repository site. The Yucca Mountain controlled area is located within the southwestern Nevada volcanic field, a large area of Miocene volcanism that includes at least four major calderas or cauldrons. It is sited on a remnant of a Neogene volcanic plateau that was centered around the Timber Mountain caldera complex. The Yucca Mountain region contains many occurrences of valuable or potentially valuable industrial minerals, including deposits with past or current production of construction aggregate, borate minerals, clay, building stone, fluorspar, silicate, and zeolites. The existence of these deposits in the region and the occurrence of certain mineral materials at Yucca Mountain, indicate that the controlled area may have potential for industrial mineral and rock deposits. Consideration of the industrial mineral potential within the Yucca Mountain controlled area is mainly based on petrographic and lithologic studies of samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain. Clay minerals, zeolites, fluorite, and barite, as minerals that are produced economically in Nevada, have been identified in samples from drill holes in Yucca Mountain.

  4. Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society (June 2007)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randall T. Cygan

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    “Enchanted Clays: 44th Annual Meeting of the Clay Minerals Society” was held in early June 2007 in beautiful and historic Santa Fe, New Mexico, USA. Santa Fe provided an idyllic location in the southwestern United States for the attendees to enjoy technical and social sessions while soaking up the diverse culture and wonderful climate of New Mexico—The Land of Enchantment. The meeting included a large and varied group of scientists, sharing knowledge and ideas, benefitting from technical interactions, and enjoying the wonderful historic and enchanted environs of Santa Fe. Including significant number of international scientists, the meeting was attended by approximately two hundred participants. The meeting included three days of technical sessions (oral and poster presentations), three days of field trips to clay and geological sites of northern New Mexico, and a full day workshop on the stabilization of carbon by clays. Details can be found at the meeting web site: www.sandia.gov/clay.

  5. Identification of concrete deteriorating minerals by polarizing and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregerova, Miroslava, E-mail: mirka@sci.muni.cz [Masaryk University in Brno, Faculty of Science, Institute of Geological Sciences, Kotlarska 2, 611 37 Brno (Czech Republic); Vsiansky, Dalibor, E-mail: daliborv@centrum.cz [Research Institute of Building Materials, JSC., Hnevkovskeho 65, 617 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deterioration of concrete represents one of the most serious problems of civil engineering worldwide. Besides other processes, deterioration of concrete consists of sulfate attack and carbonation. Sulfate attack results in the formation of gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite in hardened concrete. Products of sulfate attack may cause a loss of material strength and a risk of collapse of the concrete constructions. The authors focused especially on the microscopical research of sulfate attack. Concrete samples were taken from the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic. A succession of degrading mineral formation was suggested. Microscope methods represent a new approach to solving the deterioration problems. They enable evaluation of the state of concrete constructions and in cooperation with hydro-geochemistry, mathematics and statistics permit prediction of the durability of a structure. Considering the number of concrete constructions and their age, research of concrete deterioration has an increasing importance. The results obtained can also be useful for future construction, because they identify the risk factors associated with formation of minerals known to degrade structures.

  6. Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    clean CO 2 for storage and a hydrogen stream to be recycledand storage ? Flexibility to make CO 2 -free hydrogen forand storage computational fluid dynamics carbon monoxide carbon dioxide direct reduced iron electric arc furnace gram gigajoules hour diatomic hydrogen

  7. Carbon Dioxide Corrosion and Inhibition Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    · Corrosion inhibition very important in the oil industry · Film forming inhibitors containing nitrogenCarbon Dioxide Corrosion and Inhibition Studies Kristin Gilida #12;Outline · Background = Zreal + Zim Rp 1/Corr Rate #12;Tafel · Measures corrosion rate directly · Measures iCORR from A and C

  8. 4, 34853533, 2004 Black carbon from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    . Important climatic effects due to direct impacts on radiation can be expected (e.g. Schult et al., 1997 and Seinfeld, 2002; Jacobson, 2002). Additionally, indirect climatic effects due to impacts on cloud droplet Discussions Simulating the global atmospheric black carbon cycle: a revisit to the contribution of aircraft

  9. OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS M. A. de and institutional perceptions for future carbon sequestration projects. INTRODUCTION The United States Department scrutiny. DOE, NEDO and NRC agreed to an initial field experiment on ocean carbon sequestration via direct

  10. Carbon Monoxide Safety Tips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Bryan W.; Garcia, Monica L.

    1999-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Protect yourself and your family from the deadly effects of carbon monoxide--a colorless, odorless poisonous gas. This publication describes the warning signs of carbon monoxide exposure and includes a home safety checklist....

  11. SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Project Objectives ­ Build and demonstrate a pilot facility#12;SCALE-UP OF CARBON /CARBON BIPOLAR PLATES Quarterly Report to the Department of Energy, May 19 #12;DOE PROGRAM OBJECTIVES Scale-up of Carbon/Carbon Bipolar Plates · Phase I ­ Technology Development

  12. ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    1 ESM 271 Carbon Footprints and Carbon Accounting Instructor: Sangwon Suh Bren hall 3422, suh: Homework (1 for each week @10%): 40% Personal carbon account (report): 30% Final exam: 30% Course schedule Week 1: Introduction to carbon footprint and carbon account - Background: carbon awareness, major

  13. Big Sky Carbon Atlas

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    (Acknowledgment to the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP); see home page at http://www.bigskyco2.org/)

  14. Evidence for biological activity in mineralization of secondary sulphate deposits in a basaltic environment: implications for the search for life in the Martian subsurface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Doc Richardson; Nancy W. Hinman; Jill R. Scott

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evidence of microbial activity associated with mineralization of secondary Na-sulphate minerals (thenardite, mirabilite) in the basaltic subsurface of Craters of the Moon National Monument (COM), Idaho were examined by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, laser desorption Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (LD-FTICR-MS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Peaks suggestive of bio/organic compounds were observed in the secondary Na-sulphate deposits by LD-FTICR-MS. FTIR provided additional evidence for the presence of bio/organic compounds. Sulphur fractionation was explored to assist in determining if microbes may play a role in oxidizing sulphur. The presence of bio/organic compounds associated with Na-sulphate deposits, along with the necessity of oxidizing reduced sulphur to sulphate, suggests that biological activity may be involved in the formation of these secondary minerals. The secondary Na-sulphate minerals probably form from the overlying basalt through leached sodium ions and sulphate ions produced by bio-oxidation of Fe-sulphide minerals. Since the COM basalts are one of the most comparable terrestrial analogues for their Martian counterparts, the occurrence of biological activity in the formation of sulphate minerals at COM has direct implications for the search for life on Mars. In addition, the presence of caves on Mars suggests the importance of these environments as possible locations for growth and preservation of microbial activity. Therefore, understanding the physiochemical pathways of abiotic and biotic mineralization in the COM subsurface and similar basaltic settings has direct implications for the search for extinct or extant life on Mars.

  15. Examination of carbon partitioning into austenite during tempering of bainite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Amy J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Caballero, Francisca G [CENIM-CSIC, MADRIS, SPAIN; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Garcia - Mateo, C [CENIM-CSIC, MADRID, SPAIN

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The redistribution of carbon after tempering of a novel nanocrystalline bainitic steel consisting of a mixture of supersaturated ferrite and retained austenite, has been analyzed by atom probe tomography. Direct supporting evidence of additional austenite carbon enrichment beyond that initially achieved during the bainite heat treatment was not obtained during subsequent tempering of this high carbon, high silicon steel. Evidence of competing reactions during tempering, such as the formation of carbon clusters in bainitic ferrite that signify the onset of the transitional carbides precipitation, was observed.

  16. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  17. Intro to Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

  18. Select Minerals and Potable Use of Reclaimed Wastewaters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolf, H.

    The long-observed relationships of an influence of drinking water mineral content on heart-circulatory deaths are developed to indicate that sodium -- when present in sufficiently high concentrations -- may be detrimental to human health...

  19. Immersion freezing of clay minerals and bacterial ice nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiranuma, Naruki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of clay minerals and biological aerosols has been investigated using the AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber. Both monodisperse and polydisperse ...

  20. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vein Mineralization in Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. LipidMiner: A Software for Automated Identification and Quantification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LipidMiner also only processes file formats generated from mass spectrometers from Thermo, i.e. the .RAW format. In the future, we are planning to accommodate file formats...

  2. Climate VISION: Private Sector Initiatives: Minerals: GHG Information

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GHG Information Read the Industrial Minerals Association - North America (IMA-NA) 2011 Greenhouse Gas and Energy Survey Industry Summary for the period from 2000 to 2010 (PDF 16...

  3. and J. Selverstone, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 83, 348 (1982); (19)].

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bermingham, Eldredge

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and J. Selverstone, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 83, 348 (1982); (19)]. 16. C. R. Vyhnal and C. P. Petrol. 132, 371 (1998); J. L. M. van Haren, J. J. Ague, D. M. Rye, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 60, 3487

  4. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The...

  5. Net receipts sharing and transfer of federal mineral responsibilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCannon, S. (Colorado Dept. of Natural Resources, Denver, CO (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two interrelated issues - the policy of net receipt sharing and the [open quotes]Mineral Royalty Transfer Study[close quotes] that was submitted to Congress in June of this year by the Minerals Management Service of the Department of Interior are discussed. The 1993 Interior Appropriations Act, P.L. 102-381, which was signed by the president on October 5, 1992, includes a provision that, in addition to costing states $37.5 million has a few other problems: It may be illegal, it flies in the face of the Mineral Leasing Act, it sets a frightening precedent, it is bad public policy and it ignores the substantial contribution of states to federal mineral development. This provision is known as net receipt sharing. The advantages and disadvantages of this Act are discussed.

  6. Carbone Lorraine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallawayCapara Energia S ACarbonWar RoomCarbone

  7. Carbon International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformation 8thCalwind IICaneyNW1 8LH Sector: Carbon

  8. Manufacture of finely divided carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, D.G.

    1980-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Finely divided carbon is manufactured by a process producing a gaseous stream containing carbon monoxide by reacting coal and air in a slagging ash gasifier, separating carbon monoxide from the gaseous mixture, and disproportionating the carbon monoxide to produce finely divided carbon and carbon dioxide, the latter of which is recycled to the gasifier.

  9. SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SmallholderSmallholder CarbonCarbon AgroforestryAgroforestry && Carbon for Poverty ReductionCarbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Roundtable (CAPR) GEO Forest Monitoring SymposiumGEO Forest Monitoring)Amazon Initiative Consortium (IA) #12;Carbon for Poverty Reduction Roundtable (CAPR)Carbon for Poverty Reduction

  10. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  11. Adsorption of dissolved organic carbon to mineral soils: A comparison of four isotherm approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Tim

    .N. Kothawala a, , T.R. Moore a,1 , W.H. Hendershot b,2 a Department of Geography and Global Environmental

  12. Device and method for separating minerals, carbon and cement additives from fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Link, Thomas A.; Schoffstall, Micael R.; Soong, Yee

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for separating organic and inorganic particles from a dry mixture by sizing the particles into isolated fractions, contacting the sized particles to a charged substrate and subjecting the charged particles to an electric field to separate the particles.

  13. emissions: mineral carbonation and Finnish pulp and paper industry (CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of serpentinites in energy and metal industry (ECOSERP) Carl-Johan Fogelholm, Project leader, professor Sanni Eloneva, Researcher Helsinki University of Technology, Dept. of Energy Technology, Research group of Energy Technology and Environmental Protection (ENY) Sähkömiehentie 4 A, 02015 Espoo Tel. +358 9 4511

  14. Deposition of Thin Films of Biocompatible Calcium Carbonate via Template-Driven Mineralization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajikumar, Parayil Kumaran

    Natural bone is a composite of collagen based hydrogel and inorganic dahilite crystals. The unusual combination of a hard inorganic material and an underlying elastic hydrogel network endows native bone with unique mechanical ...

  15. The impact of mineral fertilizers on the carbon footprint of crop production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brentrup, Frank

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) Methodology. Part II:calculation based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) principlesis based on life-cycle assessment (LCA) principles. It

  16. Improved estimation of mineral and fluid volumetric concentrations in thinly bedded carbonate formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    solid composition, include thin beds, and are subject to mud-filtrate invasion. They combine nuclear solid composition, thin beds, and mud-filtrate invasion. Likewise, neutron-capture spectroscopy and GR by Heidari et al. (2012) were suc- cessfully tested on challenging synthetic data sets, and are suitable

  17. Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration,

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof Energy ForrestalPrincetonF2:Bioenergywith emphasis on

  18. Project Profile: Direct Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Receiver Development |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010 | DepartmentEnergy MIT logoConcrete for

  19. Directions and Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions & Maps Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element...

  20. Formation of Carbon Dwarfs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles L. Steinhardt; Dimitar D. Sasselov

    2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the formation of dwarf carbon stars via accretion from a carbon AGB companion in light of the new 107 object sample of Downes et al. (2004). This sample is now large enough to allow good mass determination via comparison of a composite spectrum to theoretical atmospheric models. Carbon dwarfs of spectral type M are indeed main sequence M dwarfs with enhanced metallicity and carbon abundance. We also calculate the predicted abundance of both M and of F/G carbon dwarfs, and show that the latter should be falsifiable in the near future.

  1. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, William M. [Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico, CA, 95929 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  2. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--MINERALS INFORMATION 1 ZIRCONIUM AND HAFNIUM By Joseph Gambogi Zirconium at crust; however, zircon is the primary naturally occurring mineral the Old Hickory deposit south of the mining and processing zircon (Mineral Sands Report, 1997b). of heavy-mineral sands for the titanium

  3. The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    The mineral nature of asbestos Malcolm Ross a,*, Arthur M. Langer a , Gordon L. Nord a , Robert P Received 13 September 2007 Available online 1 October 2007 Abstract Fibrous minerals are common in nature but asbestiform minerals are rare. The unique mineralogical characteristic common to all the asbestos minerals

  4. cAnt-Miner: An Ant Colony Classification Algorithm to Cope with Continuous Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinke, Dietmar

    cAnt-Miner: An Ant Colony Classification Algorithm to Cope with Continuous Attributes Fernando E. B {febo2,A.A.Freitas,C.G.Johnson}@kent.ac.uk Abstract. This paper presents an extension to Ant-Miner, named cAnt- Miner (Ant-Miner coping with continuous attributes), which incorpo- rates an entropy

  5. V-Miner: Using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates to Mine Product Design and Test Data 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Bing

    V-Miner: Using Enhanced Parallel Coordinates to Mine Product Design and Test Data 1 Kaidi Zhao patterns can be easily detected visually. The Visual Miner (V-Miner) software includes both automated or data mining. This paper begins with an introduction to the proposed techniques and the V-Miner system

  6. GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 1. Minerals Key 1. What's a cation? Anion?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Carl S.

    GEOL 103 Writing Assignment 1. Minerals Key 1. What's a cation? Anion? A cation is a charged atom material. 5. What kinds of evidence tell us about the internal structure of minerals? How does the cleavage. Cleavage planes in minerals are planes of relatively weaker bonds that allow minerals to preferentially

  7. PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Barbara Anne

    PTYS 109 LAB EXPLORATION AND DISCOVERY IN PLANETARY SCIENCE ROCKS AND MINERALS 133 Rocks and Minerals I. OBJECTIVES One of the many ways to study Earth is by examining the rocks that make up its types of rocks and minerals; · determine the formation and the history of each rock and mineral; · infer

  8. ORIGINAL RESEARCH Minerals Form a Continuum Phase in Mature Cancellous Bone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, Paul A.

    ORIGINAL RESEARCH Minerals Form a Continuum Phase in Mature Cancellous Bone Po-Yu Chen · Damon the hierarchical structure of mineral in mature bone. A method to completely deproteinize bone without altering of mineral and protein constituents. SEM revealed that bone minerals are fused together and form a sheet

  9. INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON NICKEL SORPTION ON CLAY MINERAL AND OXIDE SURFACES. K. G. Scheckel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    INFLUENCE OF TEMPERATURE ON NICKEL SORPTION ON CLAY MINERAL AND OXIDE SURFACES. K. G. Scheckel1- ues are within the range of mineral formation which sup- ports previous findings of nickel precipitation on these mineral and oxide surfaces. Conclusions: Sorption of nickel on the mineral phases results

  10. Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon fiber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Study of fire retardant behavior of carbon nanotube membranes and carbon nanofiber paper in carbon Accepted 14 January 2010 Available online 20 January 2010 A B S T R A C T Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) and multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) membranes (buckypaper) and carbon nanofiber (CNF) paper

  11. Carbon activation process for increased surface accessibility in electrochemical capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doughty, Daniel H. (Albuquerque, NM); Eisenmann, Erhard T. (Belpre, OH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for making carbon film or powder suitable for double capacitor electrodes having a capacitance of up to about 300 F/cm.sup.3 is disclosed. This is accomplished by treating in aqueous nitric acid for a period of about 5 to 15 minutes thin carbon films obtained by carbonizing carbon-containing polymeric material having a high degree of molecular directionality, such as polyimide film, then heating the treated carbon film in a non-oxidizing atmosphere at a non-graphitizing temperature of at least 350.degree. C. for about 20 minutes, and repeating alternately the nitric acid step and the heating step from 7 to 10 times. Capacitors made with this carbon may find uses ranging from electronic devices to electric vehicle applications.

  12. Ferrosilicon smelting in a direct current furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosaj, Vishu D. (Midland, MI); May, James B. (Midland, MI)

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process for smelting ferrosilicon alloy. The process comprises adding a carbon source and tailings comprising oxides of silicon and iron to a substantially closed furnace. Heat is supplied to the furnace by striking a direct current arc between a cathode electrode and an anode functional hearth. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the cathode electrode is hollow and feed to the substantially closed furnace is through the hollow electrode.

  13. Ferrosilicon smelting in a direct current furnace

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dosaj, V.D.; May, J.B.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a process for smelting ferrosilicon alloy. The process comprises adding a carbon source and tailings comprising oxides of silicon and iron to a substantially closed furnace. Heat is supplied to the furnace by striking a direct current arc between a cathode electrode and an anode functional hearth. In a preferred embodiment of the present invention, the cathode electrode is hollow and feed to the substantially closed furnace is through the hollow electrode. 1 figure.

  14. Behavior of carbonate-rich fuels in ACFBC and PFBC conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ots, A.; Arro, H.; Pihu, T.; Prikk, A.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estonian oil shale is known as one of richest in carbonate fuels. High mineral matter content (60--75% in dry mass), moderate moisture (9--12%) and carbonate carbon dioxide content (17--19%), and low heating value (LHV 8--10 MJ/kg as received) are characteristic for Estonian oil shale. Approximately half of the mineral matter is in the carbonate form, mainly as calcium carbonate. The sulfur content of dry mass is 1.5--1.7% and Ca/S molar ratio is 8--10. Due to limestone present in oil shale, the additional sorbent for sulfur retention during combustion is not needed. The behavior of carbonates as well as the formation of ash at fluidized bed combustion (FBC) was the main topics to study. At Thermal Engineering Department (TED) of Tallinn Technical University a laboratory pressurized combustion facility was used for investigation the decomposition of soil shale carbonates in atmospheric and pressurized burning conditions. The experiments with oil shale were performed at pressures 0.1 MPa and 1.2 MPa and at the temperature 850 C. Based on the carbonate decomposition rate (CDR) 0.3--0.4 established experimentally at pressurized combustion, it may be concluded that the heating value of oil shale increases approximately by 5.5--8% and the carbon dioxide concentration in flue gas decreases by 13--20% compared with the conditions of the complete decomposition of carbonate. Combustion of oil shale was tested in 0.15--1.0 MW{sub th} test facilities. The tests confirmed the suitability of both ACFBC and PFBC technologies to utilize oil shale. The tests showed a nearly complete binding of sulfur by oil shale ash and a limited formation of NO{sub x} at combustion. Oil shale FBC is characterized by the formation of large amounts (40--85% from total) of fine-grained fly ash.

  15. Reactivity of iron-bearing minerals and CO2 sequestration: A multi-disciplinary experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoonen, Martin A. [Stony Brook University] (ORCID:0000000271331160)

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactivity of sandstones was studied under conditions relevant to the injection of supercritical carbon dioxide in the context of carbon geosequestration. The emphasis of the study was on the reactivity of iron-bearing minerals when exposed to supercritical CO2 (scCO2) and scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2. Flow through and batch experiments were conducted. Results indicate that sandstones, irrespective of their mineralogy, are not reactive when exposed to pure scCO2 or scCO2 with commingled aqueous solutions containing H2S and/or SO2 under conditions simulating the environment near the injection point (flow through experiments). However, sandstones are reactive under conditions simulating the edge of the injected CO2 plume or ahead of the plume (batch experiments). Sandstones containing hematite (red sandstone) are particularly reactive. The composition of the reaction products is strongly dependent on the composition of the aqueous phase. The presence of dissolved sulfide leads to the conversion of hematite into pyrite and siderite. The relative amount of the pyrite and siderite is influenced by the ionic strength of the solution. Little reactivity is observed when sulfite is present in the aqueous phase. Sandstones without hematite (grey sandstones) show little reactivity regardless of the solution composition.

  16. Carbon Dioxide Sealing Capacity: Textural or Compositional Controls?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranganu, Constantin; Soleymani, Hamidreza; Sadiqua, Soleymani; Watson, Kieva

    2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This research project is aiming to assess the carbon dioxide sealing capacity of most common seal-rocks, such as shales and non-fractured limestones, by analyzing the role of textural and compositional parameters of those rocks. We hypothesize that sealing capacity is controlled by textural and/or compositional pa-rameters of caprocks. In this research, we seek to evaluate the importance of textural and compositional parameters affecting the sealing capacity of caprocks. The conceptu-al framework involves two testable end-member hypotheses concerning the sealing ca-pacity of carbon dioxide reservoir caprocks. Better understanding of the elements controlling sealing quality will advance our knowledge regarding the sealing capacity of shales and carbonates. Due to relatively low permeability, shale and non-fractured carbonate units are considered relatively imper-meable formations which can retard reservoir fluid flow by forming high capillary pres-sure. Similarly, these unites can constitute reliable seals for carbon dioxide capture and sequestration purposes. This project is a part of the comprehensive project with the final aim of studying the caprock sealing properties and the relationship between microscopic and macroscopic characteristics of seal rocks in depleted gas fields of Oklahoma Pan-handle. Through this study we examined various seal rock characteristics to infer about their respective effects on sealing capacity in special case of replacing reservoir fluid with super critical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}). To assess the effect of textural and compositional properties on scCO{sub 2} maximum reten-tion column height we collected 30 representative core samples in caprock formations in three counties (Cimarron, Texas, Beaver) in Oklahoma Panhandle. Core samples were collected from various seal formations (e.g., Cherokee, Keys, Morrowan) at different depths. We studied the compositional and textural properties of the core samples using several techniques. Mercury Injection Porosimetry (MIP), Scanning Electron Microsco-py SEM, and Sedigraph measurements are used to assess the pore-throat-size distribu-tion, sorting, texture, and grain size of the samples. Also, displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation (Pd) and graphically derived threshold pressure (Pc) were deter-mined by MIP technique. SEM images were used for qualitative study of the minerals and pores texture of the core samples. Moreover, EDS (Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spec-trometer), BET specific surface area, and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) measurements were performed to study various parameters and their possible effects on sealing capaci-ty of the samples. We found that shales have the relatively higher average sealing threshold pressure (Pc) than carbonate and sandstone samples. Based on these observations, shale formations could be considered as a promising caprock in terms of retarding scCO{sub 2} flow and leak-age into above formations. We hypothesized that certain characteristics of shales (e.g., 3 fine pore size, pore size distribution, high specific surface area, and strong physical chemical interaction between wetting phase and mineral surface) make them an effi-cient caprock for sealing super critical CO{sub 2}. We found that the displacement pressure at 10% mercury saturation could not be the ultimate representative of the sealing capacity of the rock sample. On the other hand, we believe that graphical method, introduced by Cranganu (2004) is a better indicator of the true sealing capacity. Based on statistical analysis of our samples from Oklahoma Panhandle we assessed the effects of each group of properties (textural and compositional) on maximum supercriti-cal CO{sub 2} height that can be hold by the caprock. We conclude that there is a relatively strong positive relationship (+.40 to +.69) between supercritical CO{sub 2} column height based on Pc and hard/ soft mineral content index (ratio of minerals with Mohs hardness more than 5 over minerals with Mohs hardness less than 5) in both shales and limestone samples. Average median pore rad

  17. Carbon Trade Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation inOpen EnergyCallawayCapara Energia S ACarbon ClearCarbonCarbon

  18. Laboratory Directed Research & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ......................................................................43 Measuring Dark Energy and Dark Matter Using Gravitational Lensing ............................................................11 Development of an Ultrafast Electron Diffraction Facility for Condensed Matter Physics Challenges Electrochemical Fuel Generation from Water and Carbon Dioxide..............................................19

  19. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  20. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Old Hydrofracture Facility Waste Remediation Using the Borehole-Miner Extendible-Nozzle Sluicer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, J.A.; Boris, G.F.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A borehole-miner extendible-nozzle sluicing system was designed, constructed, and deployed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to remediate five horizontal underground storage tanks containing sludge and supernate at the ORNL Old Hydrofracture Facility site. The tanks were remediated in fiscal year 1998 to remove {approx}98% of the waste, {approx}3% greater than the target removal of >95% of the waste. The tanks contained up to 18 in. of sludge covered by supernate. The 42,000 gal of low level liquid waste were estimated to contain 30,000 Ci, with 97% of this total located in the sludge. The retrieval was successful. At the completion of the remediation, the State of Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation agreed that the tanks were cleaned to the maximum extent practicable using pumping technology. This deployment was the first radioactive demonstration of the borehole-miner extendible-nozzle water-jetting system. The extendible nozzle is based on existing bore hole-miner technology used to fracture and dislodge ore deposits in mines. Typically borehole-miner technology includes both dislodging and retrieval capabilities. Both dislodging, using the extendible-nozzle water-jetting system, and retrieval, using a jet pump located at the base of the mast, are deployed as an integrated system through one borehole or riser. Note that the extendible-nozzle system for Oak Ridge remediation only incorporated the dislodging capability; the retrieval pump was deployed through a separate riser. The borehole-miner development and deployment is part of the Retrieval Process Development and Enhancements project under the direction of the US Department of Energy's EM-50 Tanks Focus Area. This development and deployment was conducted as a partnership between RPD and E and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's US DOE EM040 Old Hydrofracture Facility remediation project team.