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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

Ren; Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

2

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol

3

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer

4

Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

6

Direct Methanol Fuel Cells - Energy Innovation Portal  

Our partners gain access to one of the most advanced and experienced direct methanol fuel cell ... The cured film is then transferred to the SPE ...

7

Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

8

A methanol sensor for portable direct methanol fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An aqueous methanol sensor for portable direct methanol fuel cell applications is demonstrated. The design is based on current output limited by methanol diffusion through a Nafion 117 perfluorosulfonic acid membrane. Steady-state polarization measurements demonstrate sensitivity to concentrations of 0 to 4 M over a temperature range of 40 to 80C. Furthermore, a correlation that is first order in concentration and temperature is demonstrated for concentrations of 0 to 3 M, with an accuracy of {+-}0.1 M. Measurements of transient response to step concentration change indicate a response time of about 10 to 50 s, depending primarily on temperature.

Barton, S.A.C.; West, A.C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry; Murach, B.L.; Fuller, T.F. [International Fuel Cells, South Windsor, CT (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold

11

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Portable Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methanol fuel cell stack has at cl f is being incorporated a portable ions. 1 performance and flow rate for cell Water data, transport mechanisms fuel are discussed. Stack response has Implications slack performance and conditions addressed. Introduction 1 development a methanol fuel is presently pursued at 1 sponsorship from Research (1 A five methanol oxidizing stack has at stack incorporates liquiddirect methanol proton exchange membrane [1, 2], methanol (1 by oxidation an solution methanol at reduction at cathode. `1 focus results out stacks. form a n part of 1 cells have as storage but complicated systems to Upon of the methanol fuel many system simpler than before. In the can oxidized at thus is for fuel With the f mixture, electrolytes always at a of operation free-aqueous acid and thus corrosion issues addressed electrode assemblies consist main catalyzed cathode, and a polymer catalyst is the cathode catalyst is as a polymer `1 current state at the for is V at current d...

Narayanan Frank And; T. Valdez; S. R. Narayanan; H Frank; W. Chun

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's...

13

Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methanol-Tolerant Cathode Catalyst Composite For Direct Methanol Fuel Cells A direct methanol fuel cell...

14

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation (DMFCC) Place Altadena, California Zip 91001 Product DMFCC is focused on providing intellectual property protection and disposable fuel cartridge for the direct methanol fuel cell industry. Coordinates 34.185405°, -118.131529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.185405,"lon":-118.131529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

15

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Direct methanol/air fuel cells: Systems considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Successful operation of a direct methanol/air fuel cell system depends upon appropriate integration of the fuel cell components and accommodation of the need for heat and mass transfer within the system. The features of the system that must be considered separately and in an interactive fashion are: (1) the physical state of the fuel feed stream, (2) electrode characteristics, (3) characteristics of the electrolyte, (4) product water removal, (5) heat transfer into our out of the stack, and (6) methanol loss modes. The operating temperature and pressure will be determined, to a large extent, by these features. An understanding of the component features and their interactions is necessary for initial system considerations for direct methanol/air fuel cells.

Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Direct methanol fuel cells at reduced catalyst loadings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup -2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

Zelenay, P. (Piotr); Guyon, F. (Francois); Gottesfeld, Shimshon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS AT REDUCED CATALYST LOADINGS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup {minus}2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

P. ZELENAY; F. GUYON; SM. GOTTESFELD

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Assessment of methanol electro-oxidation for direct methanol-air fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of Energy Storage and Distribution of the US Department of Energy (DOE) supports the development of a methanol-air fuel cell for transportation application. The approach used at Los Alamos National Laboratory converts the methanol fuel to a hydrogen-rich gas in a reformer, then operates the fuel cell on hydrogen and air. The reformer tends to be bulky (raising vehicle packaging problems), has a long startup period, and is not well suited for the transient operation required in a vehicle. Methanol, however, can be oxidized electrochemically in the fuel cell. If this process can be conducted efficiently, a direct methanol-air fuel cell can be used, which does not require a reformer. The objective of this study is to assess the potential of developing a suitable catalyst for the direct electrochemical oxidation of methanol. The primary conclusion of this study is that no acceptable catalysts exist can efficiently oxidize methanol electrochemically and have the desired cost and lifetime for vehicle applications. However, recent progress in understanding the mechanism of methanol oxidation indicates that a predictive base can be developed to search for methanol oxidation catalysts and can be used to methodically develop improved catalysts. Such an approach is strongly recommended. The study also recommends that until further progress in developing high-performance catalysts is achieved, research in cell design and testing is not warranted. 43 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Fritts, S.D.; Sen, R.K.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell ...  

Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels; ... The Regents of the University of California (Los Alamos, NM) Application Number: 09/ 472,387:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of methanol crossover in a liquid-feed polymer-electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell employing a proton-exchange membrane electrolyte with Pt-Ru/C as anode and Pt/C as cathode is reported. The fuel cell can deliver a power density of ca. 0.2 W/cm{sup 2} at 95 C, sufficient to suggest that the stack construction is well worthwhile. Methanol crossover across the polymer electrolyte at concentrations beyond 2 M methanol affects the performance of the cell which appreciates with increasing operating temperature.

Ravikumar, M.K.; Shukla, A.K. [Indiana Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

23

Real-time mass spectrometric study of the methanol crossover in a direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The products of methanol crossover through the acid-doped polybenzimidazole polymer electrolyte membrane (PBI PEM) to the cathode of a prototype direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) were analyzed using multipurpose electrochemical mass spectrometry (MPEMS) coupled to the cathode exhaust gas outlet. It was found that the methanol crossing over reacts almost quantitatively to CO{sub 2} at the cathode with the platinum of the cathode acting as a heterogeneous catalyst. The cathode open-circuit potential is inversely proportional to the amount of CO{sub 2} formed. A poisoning effect on the oxygen reduction also was found. Methods for the estimation of the methanol crossover rate at operating fuel cells are suggested.

Wang, J.T.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinh (PI) Dinh (PI) Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives Develop cost-effective, reliable, durable fuel cells for portable power applications (e.g., cell phones, computers, etc.) that meet all DOE targets. Note that the energy density (Wh/L), volumetric (W/L), and specific power (W/kg) all depend on knowing the weight and volume of the entire DMFC system as well as the volume and concentration of fuel, which are system specific (power application and manufacturer dependent). In our model study the surface power density levels on HOPG will allow for indirect evaluation of our system to DOE's energy density

25

Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing  

SciTech Connect

ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOEs R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNFs novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel containment. PROJECT OVERVIEW The University of North Florida (UNF), with project partner the University of Florida, recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a 20-watt, direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), portable power supply based on the UNF innovative passive water recovery MEA. Extensive component, sub-system, and system development and testing was undertaken to meet the rigorous demands of the consumer electronic application. Numerous brassboard (nonpackaged) systems were developed to optimize the integration process and facilitating control algorithm development. The culmination of the development effort was a fully-integrated, DMFC, power supply (referred to as DP4). The project goals were 40 W/kg for specific power, 55 W/l for power density, and 575 Whr/l for energy density. It should be noted that the specific power and power density were for the power section only, and did not include the hybrid battery. The energy density is based on three, 200 ml, fuel cartridges, and also did not include the hybrid battery. The results show that the DP4 system configured without the methanol concentration sensor exceeded all performance goals, achieving 41.5 W/kg for specific power, 55.3 W/l for power density, and 623 Whr/l for energy density. During the project, the DOE revised its technical targets, and the definition of many of these targets, for the portable power application. With this revision, specific power, power density, specific energy (Whr/kg), and energy density are based on the total system, including fuel tank, fuel, and hybridization battery. Fuel capacity is not defined, but the same value is required for all calculations. Test data showed that the DP4 exceeded all 2011 Technical Status values; for example, the DP4 energy density was 373 Whr/l versus the DOE 2011 status of 200 Whr/l. For the

Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L [University of North Florida

2013-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

26

Planar micro-direct methanol fuel cell prototyped by rapid powder blasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a planar micro-direct methanol fuel cell (@m-DMFC) fabricated by rapid prototyping-powder blasting technology. Using an elastomeric mask, we pattern two parallel microfluidic channels in glass. The anode and cathode of the fuel cell are formed ... Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell, Microchannel, Nafion, Powder blasting

M. Shen; S. Walter; L. Dovat; M. A. M. Gijs

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

Murph, S.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

28

Fabrication of silicon nanopillar arrays and application on direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a simple method that combines self-assembled nanosphere lithography (SANL) and photo-assisted electrochemical etching (PAECE) to fabricate near-perfect and orderly arranged nanopillar arrays for the direct methanol fuel cells electrode (DMFCs) ... Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell, Nanopillar, Photo-assisted electrochemical etching, Self-assembled nanosphere lithography

Yu-Hsiang Tang; Mao-Jung Huang; Ming-Hua Shiao; Chii-Rong Yang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A carbon riveted Pt/Graphene catalyst with high stability for direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pt/Graphene catalyst was prepared by microwave-assisted polyol process, and carbonization was riveted onto the catalyst surface to enhance the catalyst stability. The physical properties of the obtained catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction ... Keywords: Direct methanol fuel cell, Methanol electrooxidation, Pt/Graphene, Stability

Xiaowei Liu, Jialin Duan, Hailong Chen, Yufeng Zhang, Xuelin Zhang

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, April--June 1997  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in Phase 2 of the program. Progress in these areas is described.

Fuller, T.F. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States); Kunz, H.R. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Moore, R. [Univ. of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, MS (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* >50 mWmg precious group metal (PGM) in an MEA with 50% Pt reduction. Develop a second generation membrane with an areal * resistance <0.0375 cm 2 and a methanol permeation...

34

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) blend membrane technology Overview of membrane properties and performance Summary 3 Membrane Technology Polymer Blend * Kynar ® PVDF * Chemical and electrochemical stability * Mechanical strength * Excellent barrier against methanol * Polyelectrolyte * H + conduction and water uptake Flexible Blending Process  PVDF can be compatibilized with a number of polyelectrolytes  Process has been scaled to a pilot line Property Control * Morphology: 10-100s nm domains * Composition can be tailored to minimize methanol permeation, while optimizing

35

X-ray absorption and electrochemical studies of direct methanol fuel cell catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In order for polymer electrolyte fuel cells to operate directly on methanol instead of hydrogen, methanol oxidation must be catalyzed in the acidic cell environment. Pt-Ru and Pt-Ru oxide are considered to be the most active catalysts for this purpose; Ru enhances the Pt activity for reasons not yet fully understood. XAS and electrochemical techniques were used to study this enhancement. Preliminary results indicate that Ru does effect the d-band occupancy of Pt, which in turn may effect the kinetics of the methanol oxidation reaction on this metal by altering the strength of the Pt-CO bond. Further research is needed.

Zurawski, D.J.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.; Baxter, S.F.; Krumpelt, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Modeling of the anode side of a direct methanol fuel cell with analytical solutions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, analytical solutions were derived (for any methanol oxidation reaction order) for the profiles of methanol concentration and proton current density by assuming diffusion mass transport mechanism, Tafel kinetics, and fast proton transport in the anodic catalyst layer of a direct methanol fuel cell. An expression for the Thiele modulus that allows to express the anodic overpotential as a function of the cell current, and kinetic and mass transfer parameters was obtained. For high cell current densities, it was found that the Thiele modulus ($\\phi^2$) varies quadratically with cell current density; yielding a simple correlation between anodic overpotential and cell current density. Analytical solutions were derived for the profiles of both local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer and local anodic current density in the catalyst layer. Under the assumptions of the model presented here, in general, the local methanol concentration in the catalyst layer cannot be expressed as an explicit fun...

Mosquera, Martn A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cells: an option for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

PEFCs most frequently considered for electric vehicles have been based on either hydrogen carried aboard, or steam-reforming of methanol on board to produce H2 + CO2. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), which use a liquid methanol fuel feed, completely avoid the complexity and weight penalties of the reformer, but have not been considered a serious option until recently, because of much lower power densities. Recent advances in DMFCs have been dramatic, however, with the DMFC reaching power densities which are significant fractions of those provided by reformate/air fuel cells. Use of established Pt-Ru anode electrocatalysts and Pt cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in enhanced DMFC performance, particularly when operated above 100 C and when catalyst layer composition and structure are optimized. The higher DMFC power densities recently achieved provide a new basis for considering DMFCs for transportation applications.

Gottesfeld, S.; Cleghorn, S.J.C.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, T.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; Startup America; Vehicles and Fuels; ... The Regents of the University of California (Los Alamos, NM) Application Number: 09/ 713,149:

39

Direct methanol fuel cell cathodes with sulfur and nitrogen-based carbon functionality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of carbon functionality on the electrocatalytic performance of carbon black-supported, Pt-based, direct methanol fuel cell cathodes was investigated. Polarization data show that cathodes with nitrogen and sulfur functionality have enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction. Transmission electron microscopy results indicate that this behavior may be ascribed to a platinum particle size effect.

Roy, S.C.; Christensen, P.A.; Hamnett, A.; Thomas, K.M.; Trapp, V. [Univ. of Newcastle, Newcastle-upon-Tyne (United Kingdom)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the course of the work on the P3 technology set, a platform approach was taken to the system design. By working in this direction, a number of product iterations with substantial market potential were identified. Although the main effort has been the development of a prototype charger for consumer electronic devices, multiple other product concepts were developed during the program showing the wide variety of potential applications.

Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Direct methanol fuel cells: Developments for portable power and for potential transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors describe here results of recent efforts at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), devoted to potential application of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs) as (1) portable power sources at the 50 W level, and (2) primary power sources for electric vehicles. In general, DMFC R and D efforts focus on further improvements in anode catalytic activity, fuel utilization (as related to methanol crossover) and air cathode performance in the presence of the presence of the significant flux of aqueous methanol from anode to cathode. There are significant differences between technical parameters and targets for the two different DMFC applications, which the authors have addressed. They include the lower cell temperature (about 60 C) preferred in portable power vs. operation around 100 C as target temperature for transportation applications, and the much stronger concern for cost of catalyst and any other stack materials in DMFCs developed for potential transportation applications. Most, if not all, recent DMFC work for either portable power or potential transportation applications has strongly focused on cells with polymeric (primarily PFSA) membrane electrolytes. In work at LANL, thin film catalysts bonded to the membrane, e.g., by the decal method, provided best results in terms of catalyst utilization and overall cell performance. In most tests, the single DMFC hardware consisted of uncatalyzed carbon-cloth gas-diffusion backings and graphite blocks with machined serpentine flow channels--quite similar to hardware employed in work with hydrogen/air PEFCs. However, the machined graphite hardware has recently been replaced by alternative, non-machined flow-field/bipolar plates, which enables effective air and aqueous methanol solution distribution along an active area of 50 cm{sup 2}, at a pitch per cell of 2 mm.

Ren, X.; Thomas, S.C.; Zelenay, P.; Gottesfeld, S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

42

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Methanol to someone by Methanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Methanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Methanol Methanol (CH3OH), also known as wood alcohol, is an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act of 1992. As an engine fuel, methanol has chemical and physical fuel properties similar to ethanol. Methanol use in vehicles has declined dramatically since the early 1990s, and automakers no longer

43

TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

Murph, S.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

The development and fabrication of miniaturized direct methanol fuel cells and thin-film lithium ion battery hybrid system for portable applications .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this work, a hybrid power module comprising of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and a Li-ion battery has been proposed for low power (more)

Prakash, Shruti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

46

Methanol fuel cell model: Anode  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An isothermal, steady-state model of an anode in a direct methanol feed, polymer electrolyte fuel cell is presented. The anode is considered to be a porous electrode consisting of an electronically conducting catalyst structure that is thinly coated with an ion-selective polymer electrolyte. The pores are filled with a feed solution of 2 M methanol in water. Four species are transported in the anode: water, methanol, hydrogen ions, and carbon dioxide. All four species are allowed to transport in the x-direction through the depth of the electrode. Species movement in the pseudo y-direction is taken into account for water, methanol, and carbon dioxide by use of an effective mass-transfer coefficient. Butler-Volmer kinetics are observed for the methanol oxidation reaction. Predictions of the model have been fitted with kinetic parameters from experimental data, and a sensitivity analysis was performed to identify critical parameters affecting the anode`s performance. Kinetic limitations are a dominant factor in the performance of the system. At higher currents, the polymer electrolyte`s conductivity and the anode`s thickness were also found to be important parameters to the prediction of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell anode`s behavior in the methanol oxidation region 0.5--0.6 V vs. a reversible hydrogen electrode.

Baxter, S.F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Battaglia, V.S.; White, R.E. [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

West, B.; Green, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Electro-osmotic drag of water in ionomeric membranes. New measurements employing a direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) employing a proton conducting membrane was used to determine the electro-osmotic drag coefficient of water in the ionomeric membrane. Water flux across the membrane in such a cell (operated with 1.0 M aqueous methanol at the anode and dry O{sub 2} at the cathode) is driven by protonic drag exclusively at sufficiently high current densities. This is evidenced experimentally by a linear relationship between cell current and flux of water measured crossing the membrane. Application of the DMFC for such water-drag measurements is significantly simpler experimentally than the approach described by the authors before, particularly so for measurements above room temperature. In measurements the authors performed in the DMFC configuration on Nafion 117 membranes, the water drag coefficient was found to increase with temperature, from 2.0 H{sub 2}O/H{sup +} at 15 C to 5.1 H{sub 2}O/H{sup +} at 130 C. Implications of these new results on water management in DMFCs are briefly discussed.

Ren, X.; Henderson, W.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Development of Methanol Industry and Methanol Fuel in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, China firmly established itself as the driver of the global methanol industry. The country became the world's largest methanol producer and consumer. The development of the methanol industry and methanol fuel in China is reviewed in this article. China is rich in coal but is short on oil and natural gas; unfortunately, transportation development will need more and more oil to provide the fuel. Methanol is becoming a dominant alternative fuel. China is showing the rest of the world how cleaner transportation fuels can be made from coal.

Li, W.Y.; Li, Z.; Xie, K.C. [Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan (China)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PolyFuel has developed state-of-the-art portable fuel cell technology for the portable computing market. A novel approach to passive water recycling within the MEA has led to significant system simplification and size reduction. Miniature stack technology with very high area utilization and minimalist seals has been developed. A highly integrated balance of plant with very low parasitic losses has been constructed around the new stack design. Demonstration prototype systems integrated with laptop computers have been shown in recent months to leading OEM computer manufacturers. PolyFuel intends to provide this technology to its customers as a reference design as a means of accelerating the commercialization of portable fuel cell technology. The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

Brian Wells

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Power Supply For All-Day True Wireless Mobile Computing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The primary goal of the project was to match the energy density of a commercial lithium ion battery for laptop computers. PolyFuel made large strides against this goal and has now demonstrated 270 Wh/liter compared with lithium ion energy densities of 300 Wh/liter. Further, more incremental, improvements in energy density are envisioned with an additional 20-30% gains possible in each of the next two years given further research and development.

Brian Wells

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Role of hydrous ruthenium oxide in Pt-Ru direct methanol fuel cell anode electrocatalysts: The importance of mixed electron/proton conductivity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pt-Ru is the favored anode catalyst for the oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). The nanoscale Pt-Ru blacks are accepted to be bimetallic alloys as based on their X-ray diffraction patterns. These bulk and surface analyses show that although practical Pt-Ru blacks have diffraction patterns consistent with an alloy assignment, they are primarily a mix of Pt metal and Ru oxides plus some Pt oxides and only small amounts of Ru metal. Thermogravimetric analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of as-received Pt-Ru electrocatalysts indicate that DMFC materials contain substantial amounts of hydrous ruthenium oxide (RuO{sub x}H{sub y}). A potential misidentification of nanoscale Pt-Ru blacks arises because RuO{sub x}H{sub y} is amorphous and cannot be discerned by X-ray diffraction. Hydrous ruthenium oxide is a mixed proton and electron conductor and innately expresses Ru-OH speciation. These properties are of key importance in the mechanism of methanol oxidation, in particular, Ru-OH is a critical component of the bifunctional mechanism proposed for direct methanol oxidation in that it is the oxygen-transfer species that oxidatively dissociates {single_bond}C{triple_bond}O fragments from the Pt surface. The catalysts and membrane-electrode assemblies of DMFCs should not be processed at or exposed to temperatures >150 C, as such conditions deleteriously lower the proton conductivity of hydrous ruthenium oxide and thus affect the ability of the Ru component of the electrocatalyst to dissociate water. With this analytical understanding of the true nature of practical nanoscale Pt-Ru electrocatalysts, the authors can now recommend that hydrous ruthenium oxide, rather than Ru metal or anhydrous RuO{sub 2}, is the preferred Ru speciation in these catalysts.

Rolison, D.R.; Hagans, P.L.; Swider, K.E.; Long, J.W. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Surface Chemistry Branch

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Development and demonstration of advanced technologies for direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons (methanol, methane, propane)  

SciTech Connect

Direct methanol fuel cells use methanol directly as a fuel, rather than the reformate typically required by fuel cells, thus eliminating the reformer and fuel processing train. In this program, Giner, Inc. advanced development of two types of direct methanol fuel cells for military applications. Advancements in direct methanol proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (DMPEMFC) technology included developement of a Pt-Ru anode catalyst and an associated electrode structure which provided some of the highest DMPEMFC performance reported to date. Scale-up from a laboratory-scale single cell to a 5-cell stack of practical area, providing over 100 W of power, was also demonstrated. Stable stack performance was achieved in over 300 hours of daily on/off cycling. Direct methanol aqueous carbonate fuel cells were also advanced with development of an anode catalyst and successful operation at decreased pressure. Improved materials for the cell separator/matrix and the hardware were also identified.

Kosek, J.A.; LaConti, A.B.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

and Methanol and Methanol Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Ethanol and Methanol Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Ethanol and Methanol Tax Ethyl alcohol and methyl alcohol motor fuels are taxed at a rate of $0.08 per gallon when used as a motor fuel. Ethyl alcohol is defined as a motor

55

In Proc of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Symposium, 199th Electrochem.l Soc. Mtg, Washington DC, 3/01.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, J. Kosek, and C. Cropley, in Proton Conducting Membrane Fuel Cells I, S. Gottesfeld, G. Halpert, A. Kindler, S. Surampudi, J. Kosek, C. Cropley, and A. LaConti, in Proceedings of the 32nd Intersociety

Wang, Chao-Yang

56

Methanol reformers for fuel cell powered vehicles: Some design considerations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are being developed for use in automotive propulsion systems as alternatives for the internal combustion engine in buses, vans, passenger cars. The two most important operational requirements for a stand-alone fuel cell power system for a vehicle are the ability to start up quickly and the ability to supply the necessary power on demand for the dynamically fluctuating load. Methanol is a likely fuel for use in fuel cells for transportation applications. It is a commodity chemical that is manufactured from coal, natural gas, and other feedstocks. For use in a fuel cell, however, the methanol must first be converted (reformed) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The desired features for a methanol reformer include rapid start-up, good dynamic response, high fuel conversion, small size and weight, simple construction and operation, and low cost. In this paper the present the design considerations that are important for developing such a reformer, namely: (1) a small catalyst bed for quick starting, small size, and low weight; (2) multiple catalysts for optimum operation of the dissociation and reforming reactions; (3) reforming by direct heat transfer partial oxidation for rapid response to fluctuating loads; and (4) thermal independence from the rest of the fuel cell system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

New MEA Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Performance, Durability, and Cost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Fletcher (Primary Contact), Philip Cox University of North Florida (UNF) 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32224 Phone: (904) 620-1844 Email: jfletche@UNF.edu DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000475 Subcontractors: * University of Florida, Gainesville, FL * Northeastern University, Boston, MA * Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells, Swindon, UK

58

Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

Masel, Richard I. (Champaign, IL); Zhu, Yimin (Urbana, IL); Kahn, Zakia (Palatine, IL); Man, Malcolm (Vancouver, CA)

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Methanol production from biomass and natural gas as transportation fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two processes are examined for production of methanol. They are assessed against the essential requirements of a future alternative fuel for road transport: that it (1) is producible in amounts comparable to the 19 EJ of motor fuel annually consumed in the US, (2) minimizes emissions of criteria pollutants, (3) reduces greenhouse gas emissions from production and use, (4) is cost-competitive with petroleum fuel, and (5) is compatible with the emerging vehicle technologies, especially those powdered by fuel cells. The methanol yield, production cost, and potential for reduction of overall fuel-cycle CO{sub 2} emissions were evaluated and compared to those of reformulated gasoline. The results show that a process utilizing natural gas and biomass as cofeedstocks can meet the five requirements more effectively than individual processes utilizing those feedstocks separately. When end-use efficiencies are accounted for, the cost per vehicle mile traveled would be less than that of gasoline used in current vehicles. CO{sub 2} emissions from the vehicle fleet would be reduced 66% by methanol used in fuel cell vehicles and 8--36% in flexible-fuel or dedicated-methanol vehicles during the transition period. Methanol produced from natural gas and biomass, together in one process, and used in fuel cell vehicles would leverage petroleum displacement by a factor of about 5 and achieve twice the overall CO{sub 2} emission reduction obtainable from the use of biomass alone.

Borgwardt, R.H. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). National Risk Management Research Lab.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

The Target Market for Methanol Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be to place a surcharge on dirtier fuels (e g gasoline) as asurcharge specifically targeted to supporting cleaner fuels and

Sperling, Daniel

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

Hyde, J.D. [New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (US). Automotive Emissions Lab.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The Target Market for Methanol Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be to place a surcharge on dirtier fuels (e.g. gasoline) assurcharge was specifically targeted to supporting cleaner fuels and

Sperling, Daniel; Setiawan, Winardi; Hungerford, David

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Demonstration of dissociated methanol as an automotive fuel: system performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of system performance testing of an automotive system devised to provide hydrogen-rich gases to an internal combustion engine by dissociating methanol on board the vehicle. The dissociation of methanol absorbs heat from the engine exhaust and increases the lower heating value of the fuel by 22%. The engine thermal efficiency is increased by raising the compression ratio and burning with excess air.

Finegold, J. G.; Karpuk, M. E.; McKinnon, J. T.; Passamaneck, R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

An Investigation of Different Methods of Fabricating Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methanol fuel cells are electrochemical conversion devices that produce electricity from methanol fuel. The current process of fabricating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is tedious and if it is not sufficiently ...

Hall, Kwame (Kwame J.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Controlling combustion characteristics using a slit nozzle in a direct-injection methanol engine  

SciTech Connect

A new type of fuel injection nozzle, called a `slit nozzle,` has been developed to improve poor ignitability and to stabilize combustion under low load conditions in direct-injection methanol diesel engines manufactured for medium-duty trucks. This nozzle has a single oblong vent like a slit. Engine test results indicate that the slit nozzle can improve combustion and thermal efficiency, especially at low loads and no load. This can be explained by the fact that the slit nozzle forms a more highly concentrated methanol spray around the glow-plug than do multi-hole nozzles. As a result, this nozzle improves flame propagation. 3 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Kusaka, Jin; Daisho, Yasuhiro; Saito, Takeshi; Kihara, Ryoji

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ATOM-ECONOMICAL PATHWAYS TO METHANOL FUEL CELL FROM BIOMASS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economical production of alcohol fuels from biomass, a feedstock low in carbon and high in water content, is of interest. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a Liquid Phase Low Temperature (LPLT) concept is under development to improve the economics by maximizing the conversion of energy carrier atoms (C,H) into energy liquids (fuel). So far, the LPLT concept has been successfully applied to obtain highly efficient methanol synthesis. This synthesis was achieved with specifically designed soluble catalysts, at temperatures < 150 C. A subsequent study at BNL yielded a water-gas-shift (WGS) catalyst for the production of hydrogen from a feedstock of carbon monoxide and H{sub 2}O at temperatures < 120 C. With these LPLT technologies as a background, this paper extends the discussion of the LPLT concept to include methanol decomposition into 3 moles of H{sub 2} per mole of methanol. The implication of these technologies for the atom-economical pathways to methanol fuel cell from biomass is discussed.

MAHAJAN,D.; WEGRZYN,J.E.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tax Refund for Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Tax Refund for Methanol Used in Biodiesel Production on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search

68

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the U.S.  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Methanol as an alternative transportation fuel in the US: Options for sustainable and/or energy-secure transportation L. Bromberg and W.K. Cheng Prepared by the Sloan Automotive Laboratory Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge MA 02139 September 27, 2010 Finalized November 2, 2010 Revised November 28, 2010 Final report UT-Battelle Subcontract Number:4000096701 1 Abstract Methanol has been promoted as an alternative transportation fuel from time to time over the past forty years. In spite of significant efforts to realize the vision of methanol as a practical transportation fuel in the US, such as the California methanol fueling corridor of the 1990s, it did not succeed on a large scale. This white paper covers all important aspects of methanol as a transportation fuel.

69

Technical and Economic Assessment of Hydrogen and Methanol Poweredd Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this thesis is to assess and compare the technical and economic status and prospects of hydrogen and methanol powered fuel cell electric vehicles.

Patrick Jung; Chalmers Tekniska Hgskola; Kristian Lindgren; Ingrid Rde

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Evaluation of dissociated and steam-reformed methanol as automotive engine fuels  

SciTech Connect

Dissociated and steam reformed methanol were evaluated as automotive engine fuels. Advantages and disadvantages in using methanol in the reformed rather than liquid state are discussed. Engine dynamometer tests were conducted with a four cylinder, 2.3 liter, spark ignition automotive engine to determine performance and emission characteristics operating on simulated dissociated and steam reformed methanol (2H/sub 2/ + CO and 3H/sub 2/ + CO/sub 2/ respectively), and liquid methanol. Results are presented for engine performance and emissions as functions of equivalence ratio, at various throttle settings and engine speeds. Operation on dissociated and steam reformed methanol was characterized by flashback (violent propagation of a flame into the intake manifold) which limited operation to lower power output than was obtainable using liquid methanol. It was concluded that: an automobile could not be operated solely on dissociated or steam reformed methanol over the entire required power range - a supplementary fuel system or power source would be necessary to attain higher powers; the use of reformed methanol, compared to liquid methanol, may result in a small improvement in thermal efficiency in the low power range; dissociated methanol is a better fuel than steam reformed methanol for use in a spark ignition engine; and use of dissociated or steam reformed methanol may result in lower exhaust emissions compared to liquid methanol. 36 references, 27 figures, 3 tables.

Lalk, T.R.; McCall, D.M.; McCanlies, J.M.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Richards, and L. Aruoux, "CNG Market DevelopmentStudy," Pub.with compressed natural gas (CNG). Weconclude that methanolrelative to methanol and CNG. ) )ASCENDANCE OF METHANOL

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber for use as a sulfur removal subsystem in transportation fuel cell systems. Results suggest that an on-board GAC adsorber may not be attractive due to size and weight constraints. However, it may be feasible to install this GAC adsorber at methanol distribution stations, where space and weight are not a critical concern. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the GAC adsorber concept will be attractive if the spent AC can be regenerated for reuse. These preliminary analyses were made on basis of very limited breakthrough data obtained from the bench-scale testing. Optimization on dynamic testing parameters and study on regeneration of spent AC are needed.

Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sederquist, R. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Dieselzymes: development of a stable and methanol tolerant lipase for biodiesel production by directed evolution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAR, Metzger JO, Schfer HJ: Oils and fats as renewable rawJ, Liu DH: Conversion of soybean oil to biodiesel fuel usingdielectric environment of the oil and methanol mixture used

Korman, Tyler P; Sahachartsiri, Bobby; Charbonneau, David M; Huang, Grace L; Beauregard, Marc; Bowie, James U

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the first such report that will be submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1--December 31, 2003. This quarter saw progress in three areas. These areas are: (1) Evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor, as well as (3) Set up and data collection of baseline performance using the steam reformer. All of the projects are proceeding on schedule. During this quarter one conference paper was written that will be presented at the ASME Power 2004 conference in March 2004, which outlines the research direction and basis for looking at the coal to hydrogen pathway.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Characterization and research investigation of methanol and methyl fuels. Final progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work on several aspects of using pure methanol as an alternate fuel are reported. A stock (OEM) Pinto engine mounted on a dynamometer was used to compare methanol with Indolene in terms of power, efficiency, and emissions for a variety of speeds and loads. Although the engine was designed for use with gasoline, it was found that methanol was generally superior in power, thermal efficiency and reduced emissions with the exception of aldehydes. Three different fuel metering systems were tested for a variety of speeds and loads using the dynamometer mounted engine. They were all found to provide superior steady state performance on methanol when compared with the OEM carburetor system with enlarged fuel jets for methanol. Mileage and emissions from a Pinto vehicle equipped with the various fuel metering systems were computer predicted for the Federal emissions test procedure using laboratory engine measurements. A computer was used to simulate the test engine's thermokinetic combustion events. The computer model predicts power, fuel economy and emissions with air-fuel ratio, compression ratio, spark advance and speed as parameters. A small (60 hp) gas turbine was converted to run on methanol. The conversion was easily accomplished, but atomization of the fuel was found to be important in obtaining a reduction in CO and NO/sub x/ for methanol in comparison with jet engine fuel. Environmental factors of marine and aquatic methanol spills and photochemical smog are under study. Preliminary experimentation relative to marine spills indicates that methanol is naturally present in that environment. It appears at this early stage of investigation that damage to the ecosystem from a major coastal spill may be localized and of short duration.

Pefley, R.K.; Browning, L.H.; Hornberger, M.L.; Likos, W.E.; McCormack, M.C.; Pullman, B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

A Methanol Steam Reforming Micro Reactor for Proton Exchange Membrane Micro Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat, mass and momentum transfer from a fuel reforming packed bed to a surrounding silicon wafer has been simulated. Modeling showed quantitatively reasonable agreement with experimental data for fuel conversion efficiency, hydrogen production rate, outlet methanol mole fraction and outlet steam mole fraction. The variation in fuel conversion efficiency with the micro reformer thermal isolation can be used to optimize fuel-processing conditions for micro PEM fuel cells.

Park, H G; Piggott, W T; Chung, J; Morse, J D; Havstad, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Benett, W; Sopchak, D; Upadhye, R

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop July 30, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Carbon Anode Electrochemistry Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells Coal Preprocessing Prior to Introduction Into the Fuel Cell Potential Market Applications for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells Discussion of Key R&D Needs Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

78

Dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analytical models were developed for the dynamic response of steam-reformed, methanol-fueled, polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications. Focus is on heat transfer effects likely to limit rapid response of PEFC systems. Depending on the thermal mass, the heat exchangers and steam reformer can have time constants on the order of several seconds to many minutes. On the other hand, the characteristic time constants associated with pressure/density disturbances arising from flow rate fluctuations are on the order of milliseconds. In vehicular applications, the response time of the turbomachinery, which is determined by rotational inertia, can be on the order of seconds or less. Dynamic reformer model was used to examine methanol conversion efficiency and thermal performance during a cold start. Response times are determined to achieve 50-100% of the steady-state methanol conversion for two catalyst tube diameters. Thermal performance is considered in terms of the approach to steady-state temperature, possibility of catalyst overheating, and penalty in system efficiency incurred during startup time. For the complete reference PEFC system, various turn-down scenarios were simulated by varying the relative rates of change of fuel cell loading and system flows. Depending on relative rates of cell loading changes to flow rate changes, overheating of the catalyst can occur due to excess heat transfer in the reformer preheater; this can be controlled by an additional water quench between catalyst bed and preheater, but only if the flow rate change is sufficiently fast relative to load changes.

Geyer, H.K.; Ahluwalia, R.K.; Kumar, R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. were coal, oil shale, and biomass. Natural gas (produced from coal and oil shale, methanol produced frommethanol was rated below oil shale and other coal-liquid

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Direct methane conversion to methanol. Final report, July 19, 1990--May 18, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One objective of this project was to demonstrate the effectiveness of a catalytic membrane reactor (a ceramic membrane combined with a catalyst) to selectively produce methanol by partial oxidation of methane. Methanol is used as a chemical feed stock, gasoline additive, and turbine fuel. Methane partial oxidation using a catalytic membrane reactor has been determined as one of the promising approaches for methanol synthesis from methane. Methanol synthesis and separation in one step would also make methane valuable for producing chemicals and fuels. Another valuable fuel product is H{sub 2}. Its separation from other gasification products would make it very valuable as a chemical feedstock and clean fuel for fuel cells. Gasification of coal or other organic fuels as a source of H{sub 2} produces compounds (CO, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}O) that require high temperature (1000-1500{degrees}F) and high pressure (600-1000 psia) separations. A zeolite membrane layer on a mechanically stable ceramic or stainless steel support would have ideal applications for this type of separation. Separations using zeolite membrane was also evaluated for use in the production in the above fuels. 20 refs., 20 figs., 1 tab.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Reformers for the production of hydrogen from methanol and alternative fuels for fuel cell powered vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was (i) to assess the present state of technology of reformers that convert methanol (or other alternative fuels) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture for use in a fuel cell, and (ii) to identify the R&D needs for developing reformers for transportation applications. Steam reforming and partial oxidation are the two basic types of fuel reforming processes. The former is endothermic while the latter is exothermic. Reformers are therefore typically designed as heat exchange systems, and the variety of designs used includes shell-and-tube, packed bed, annular, plate, and cyclic bed types. Catalysts used include noble metals and oxides of Cu, Zn, Cr, Al, Ni, and La. For transportation applications a reformer must be compact, lightweight, and rugged. It must also be capable of rapid start-up and good dynamic performance responsive to fluctuating loads. A partial oxidation reformer is likely to be better than a steam reformer based on these considerations, although its fuel conversion efficiency is expected to be lower than that of a steam reformer. A steam reformer better lends itself to thermal integration with the fuel cell system; however, the thermal independence of the reformer from the fuel cell stack is likely to yield much better dynamic performance of the reformer and the fuel cell propulsion power system. For both steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming, research is needed to develop compact, fast start-up, and dynamically responsive reformers. For transportation applications, steam reformers are likely to prove best for fuel cell/battery hybrid power systems, and partial oxidation reformers are likely to be the choice for stand-alone fuel cell power systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

NMR studies of methanol transport in membranes for fuel cell applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Characterization of the methanol diffusion process in Nafion 117 was achieved with the use of a modified pulsed field gradient NMR technique. To ensure that the concentration of methanol was constant throughout the entire experiment, the membrane was continually immersed in the methanol solution. When using the standard pulsed field gradient NMR method, the diffusion of the methanol in the membrane is strongly influenced by the diffusion of methanol in solution. Application of a filter gradient suppresses the signal from the methanol in solution, enabling the methanol diffusion in the membrane to be observed unambiguously. Complete suppression of the solution signal was achieved when a 60% filter gradient was employed. Under such circumstances, the coefficient for diffusion of methanol within the membrane was calculated to be 4x10-6cm2s-1, which is similar to the values reported in the literature. Consequently, the use of NMR filter gradient measurements is a valid method for studying the diffusion coefficient of methanol within fuel cell membranes.

Every, H. A. (Hayley A.); Zawodzinski, T. A. (Thomas A.), Jr.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fuel processor for fuel cell power system. [Conversion of methanol into hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; Springer, T.E.; Huff, J.R.

1986-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

85

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent Developmentof Alcohol Fuels in of the United States,"and L. S. Sullivan, Proc. Int. Alcohol Fuel Syrup.on Alcohol Fuel Technol. , Ottawa, Canada, pp. 2-373 to 2-

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparative Analysis of Future Transportation Fuels," UCB-Press plc THE TRANSPORTATION FUTURE? FUEL OF THE DANIELPurdue University, "Transportation Energy Futures; Paths of

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the second report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1--March 31, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) Internal and external evaluations of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel; (2) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation; (3) Design and set up of the autothermal reactor; (4) Steam reformation of Coal Based Methanol; and (5) Initial catalyst degradation studies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Advanced system analysis for indirect methanol fuel cell power plants for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

The indirect methanol cell fuel concept actively pursued by the USDOE and General Motors Corporation proposes the development of an electrochemical engine'' (e.c.e.), an electrical generator capable for usually efficient and clean power production from methanol fuel for the transportation sector. This on-board generator works in consort with batteries to provide electrical power to drive propulsion motors for a range of electric vehicles. Success in this technology could do much to improve impacted environmental areas and to convert part of the transportation fleet to natural gas- and coal-derived methanol as the fuel source. These developments parallel work in Europe and Japan where various fuel cell powered vehicles, often fueled with tanked or hydride hydrogen, are under active development. Transportation applications present design challenges that are distinctly different from utility requirements, the thrust of most of previous fuel cell programs. In both cases, high conversion efficiency (fuel to electricity) is essential. However, transportation requirements dictate as well designs for high power densities, rapid transients including short times for system start up, and consumer safety. The e.c.e. system is formed from four interacting components: (1) the fuel processor; (2) the fuel cell stack; (3) the air compression and decompression device; and (4) the condensing cross flow heat exchange device. 2 figs.

Vanderborgh, N.E.; McFarland, R.D.; Huff, J.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

NETL: News Release - Full Scale Direct FuelCell? Completes One Year of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 31, 2000 March 31, 2000 Full Scale Direct FuelCellTM Completes One Year of Operation Confirms Performance and Durability of New Energy Generating Technology A commercial design of an advanced fuel cell - the building block of a family of environmentally super-clean, fuel-flexible power plants - has passed several milestones in a joint public-private development effort. FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell The Direct FuelCell is a versatile, combustion-less power source being developed in the Department of Energy's fuel cell research program. It can use natural gas, methanol, ethanol, bio-gas or other hydrogen-rich fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has completed one year of commercial design validation and endurance testing of a 250 kilowatt-class Direct FuelCellTM

91

Assessment of Direct Carbon Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel cells have been under development for stationary power applications because of their high fuel efficiency and low emission characteristics. Research and development of direct carbon fuel cells (DCFC) that can use carbon as a fuel have been identified as an emerging option that needs further assessment and test validation. This project is one of several EPRI fuel cell projects that is investigating the technical and performance characteristics of fuel cells and their potential to impact electric util...

2005-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the ninth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2005-December 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) reformate purification, (2) heat transfer enhancement, (3) autothermal reforming coal-derived methanol degradation test; and (4) model development for fuel cell system integration. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuels," SR88-11-02, Sacramento, CA(1988). 35. J. A. Alson,Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA(1982). 14. K. D. Smith, D.DevelopmentReport Sacramento, CA(1986). 19. California

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the sixth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in four areas. These areas are: (1) Autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (2) Catalyst deactivation, (3) Steam reformer transient response, and (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Comparative study of heavy-duty engine operation with diesel fuel and ignition-improved methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be made suitable for compression ignition engines by ignition-improving additives. The ignition improver demand can be minimized by increasing the compression ratio. The technical suitability of this fuel can be regarded as proven, since most of the problems connected with its use have been solved. Its economic viability, however, has still to be doubted. From an environmental point of view, ignition-improved methanol deserves great interest due to the total absence of soot in the exhaust and the considerably reduced NO/sub x/ emission.

Hardenberg, H.O.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the fourth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of July 1-Sept 30, 2004 along with a recap of progress from the start of the project on Oct 1, 2003 to Sept 30, 2004. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule. This year saw progress in several areas. These areas are: (1) External and internal evaluation of coal based methanol and a fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design set up and initial testing of three laboratory scale steam reformers, (3) Design, set up and initial testing of a laboratory scale autothermal reactor, (4) Hydrogen generation from coal-derived methanol using steam reformation, (5) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (6) Initial catalyst degradation studies with steam reformation and coal based methanol, and (7) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen can be produced from many feed stocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the third report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 30, 2004. This quarter saw progress in five areas. These areas are: (1) External evaluation of coal based methanol and the fuel cell grade baseline fuel, (2) Design, set up and initial testing of the autothermal reactor, (3) Experiments to determine the axial and radial thermal profiles of the steam reformers, (4) Catalyst degradation studies, and (5) Experimental investigations of heat and mass transfer enhancement methods by flow field manipulation. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels  

Direct Conversion of Biomass into Transportation Fuels . Return to Marketing Summary. Skip footer navigation to end of page. Contacts | Web Site Policies | U.S ...

99

HYDROGEN PRODUCTION FOR FUEL CELLS VIA REFORMING COAL-DERIVED METHANOL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the tenth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of January 1-March 31, 2006. This quarter saw progress in six areas. These areas are: (1) The effect of catalyst dimension on steam reforming, (2) Transient characteristics of autothermal reforming, (3) Rich and lean autothermal reformation startup, (4) Autothermal reformation degradation with coal derived methanol, (5) Reformate purification system, and (6) Fuel cell system integration. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Micro fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

An ambient temperature, liquid feed, direct methanol fuel cell device is under development. A metal barrier layer was used to block methanol crossover from the anode to the cathode side while still allowing for the transport of protons from the anode to the cathode. A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical engine that converts chemical energy into clean electrical power by the direct oxidation of methanol at the fuel cell anode. This direct use of a liquid fuel eliminates the need for a reformer to convert the fuel to hydrogen before it is fed into the fuel cell.

Zook, L.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hockaday, R. [Energy Related Devices Inc., Los Alamos, NM (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells - Energy ...  

Solar Photovoltaic; Solar Thermal; ... Contract Number W-7405-ENG-36 awarded by the United States Department of Energy to The Regents of the University of California.

102

Clean air program: Design guidelines for bus transit systems using alcohol fuel (methanol and ethanol) as an alternative fuel. Final report, July 1995-April 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides design guidelines for the safe use of alcohol fuel (Methanol or Ethanol). It is part of a series of individual monographs being published by the FTA providing guidelines for the safe use of Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG), Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and alcohol fuels (Methanol and Ethanol). Each report in this series describes, for the subject fuel, the important fuel properties, guidelines for the design and operation of bus fueling, storage and maintenance facilities, issues on personnel training and emergency preparedness.

Raj, P.K.; DeMarco, V.R.; Hathaway, W.T.; Kangas, R.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Direct methanol oxidation on platinum electrodes with ruthenium adatoms in hot phosphoric acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancement of the electrocatalytic activity of platinum for direct methanol oxidation by Ru adatoms and by the elevation of operating temperatures was investigated in hot phosphoric acid (60 to 190 C). It is clear that a higher temperature operation (>100 C) is advantageous for the enhancement of methanol oxidation and a maximum enhancement by Ru adatoms at each operating temperature is obtained at Pt/Ru = 1/1. These results are quite similar to those obtained at low temperatures in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The mechanism of the electrocatalysis on platinum electrodes with Ru adatoms in hot H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} is discussed based on the experimental data in comparison with those in 0.5 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The rate of methanol oxidation is proportional to Ru coverage ({theta}{sub Ru}{sup Pt}) by the introduction of Ru sites contributing to the adsorption of oxygen species required for the oxidation of the organic species absorbed on Pt sites in a Ru coverage region of {theta} {le} 0.5, but it is reduced inversely proportional to {theta} due to the reduction of a dissociative adsorption rate of methanol on the platinum sites in the region of {theta} > 0.5, where the coverage of organic species becomes zero.

Watanabe, Masahiro; Genjima, Yasuhiro [Yamanashi Univ., Kofu (Japan); Turumi, Kazunori [Tanaka Kikinzoku Kogyo Technical Center, Hiratsuka (Japan)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the seventh report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of April 1-June 31, 2005. This quarter saw progress in these areas. These areas are: (1) Steam reformer transient response, (2) Heat transfer enhancement, (3) Catalyst degradation, (4) Catalyst degradation with bluff bodies, and (5) Autothermal reforming of coal-derived methanol. All of the projects are proceeding on or slightly ahead of schedule.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

105

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel FTP Emissions Test Results from Flexible-Fuel Methanol Dodge Spirits and Ford Econoline Vans Kenneth J. Kelly, Brent K. Bailey, and Timothy C. Coburn National Renewable Energy Laboratory Wendy Clark Automotive Testing Laboratories, Inc. Leslie Eudy ManTech Environmental Technology, Inc. Peter Lissiuk Environmental Research and Development Corp. Presented at Society for Automotive Engineers International Spring Fuels and Lubricants Meeting Dearborn, MI May 6-8, 1996 The work described here was wholly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, a U.S. government agency. As such, this information is in the public domain, may be copied and otherwise accessed freely, and is not subject to copyright laws. These papers were previously published in hard copy form by the Society of Automotive Engineers, Inc.

106

Hydrogen Production for Fuel Cells Via Reforming Coal-Derived Methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen can be produced from many feedstocks including coal. The objectives of this project are to establish and prove a hydrogen production pathway from coal-derived methanol for fuel cell applications. This progress report is the eighth report submitted to the DOE reporting on the status and progress made during the course of the project. This report covers the time period of October 1, 2004-September 30, 2005 and includes an entire review of the progress for year 2 of the project. This year saw progress in eight areas. These areas are: (1) steam reformer transient response, (2) steam reformer catalyst degradation, (3) steam reformer degradation tests using bluff bodies, (4) optimization of bluff bodies for steam reformation, (5) heat transfer enhancement, (6) autothermal reforming of coal derived methanol, (7) autothermal catalyst degradation, and (8) autothermal reformation with bluff bodies. The project is on schedule and is now shifting towards the design of an integrated PEM fuel cell system capable of using the coal-derived product. This system includes a membrane clean up unit and a commercially available PEM fuel cell.

Paul A. Erickson

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

107

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

PolyFuel Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zip 94043 Product Polyfuel specialises in membrane technology for direct methanol fuel cells. References PolyFuel Inc1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

110

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells for transportation. 1999 Annual Progress Report.J. , Gottesfeld, S. , 1999. Direct methanol fuel cells.Auxiliary power units; Fuel cells 1. Introduction A large

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

SciTech Connect

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

115

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2004-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

116

Methanol-tolerant cathode catalyst composite for direct methanol fuel cells  

oxidation catalyst adjacent the anode electrode and the membrane, an oxidant reduction catalyst adjacent the cathode electrode and the membrane, comprises an oxidant reduction catalyst layer of a platinum-chromium alloy so that oxidation at the ...

117

1995 world methanol conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 20 papers contained in this volume deal with the global markets for methanol, the production of MTBE, integrating methanol production into a coal-to-SNG complex, production of methanol from natural gas, catalysts for methanol production from various synthesis gases, combined cycle power plants using methanol as fuel, and economics of the methanol industry. All papers have been processed for inclusion on the data base.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

Upatnieks, Ansis (Livermore, CA)

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

119

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the system, was demonstrated. System analyses of 40 MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, were carried out using CHEMCAD simulation software. The analyses included systems for near-term and long-term deployment. A new concept was developed that was based on clusters of one-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant, including the key equipment layout and the site plan, was completed. The process information and operational data from the proof-of-concept tests were used in the design of 40 MW high efficiency DFC/T power plants. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant was also prepared. Pilot-scale tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were conducted. The tests demonstrated that the concept has the potential to offer higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output and fuel utilization capabilities were also evaluated. Detailed design of the packaged sub-MW DFC/T Alpha Unit was completed, including equipment and piping layouts, instrumentation, electrical, and structural drawings. The lessons learned from the proof-of-concept tests were incorporated in the design of the Alpha Unit. The sub-MW packaged unit was fabricated, including integration of the Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) stack module with the mechanical balance-of-plant and electrical balance-of-plant. Factory acceptance tests of the Alpha DFC/T power plant were conducted at Danbury, CT. The Alpha Unit achieved an unsurpassed electrical efficiency of 58% (LHV natural gas) during the factory tests. The resulting high efficiency in conversion of chemical energy to electricity far exceeded any sub-MW class power generation equipment presently in the market. After successful completion of the factory tests, the unit was shipped to the Billings Clinic in Billings, MT, for field demonstration tests. The DFC/T unit accomplished a major achievement by successfully completing 8000 hours of operation at the Billings site. The Alpha sub-MW DF

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Methane to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop a novel process by which natural gas or methane from coal gasification products can be converted to a transportable liquid fuel. It is proposed that methanol can be produced by the direct, partial oxidation of methane utilizing air or oxygen. It is anticipated that, compared to present technologies, the new process might offer significant economic advantages with respect to capital investment and methane feedstock purity requirements. Results to date are discussed. 6 refs.

Finch, F.T.; Danen, W.C.; Lyman, J.L.; Oldenborg, R.C.; Rofer, C.K.; Ferris, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral Intensity With 5% Coal (x ::: 86.9 cm) CalculatedPredictions B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel TemperatureMethanol as the Fuel B. Methanol/Coal Slurry as the Fuel C.

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Rapid starting methanol reactor system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a methanol-to-hydrogen cracking reactor for use with a fuel cell vehicular power plant. The system is particularly designed for rapid start-up of the catalytic methanol cracking reactor after an extended shut-down period, i.e., after the vehicular fuel cell power plant has been inoperative overnight. Rapid system start-up is accomplished by a combination of direct and indirect heating of the cracking catalyst. Initially, liquid methanol is burned with a stoichiometric or slightly lean air mixture in the combustion chamber of the reactor assembly. The hot combustion gas travels down a flue gas chamber in heat exchange relationship with the catalytic cracking chamber transferring heat across the catalyst chamber wall to heat the catalyst indirectly. The combustion gas is then diverted back through the catalyst bed to heat the catalyst pellets directly. When the cracking reactor temperature reaches operating temperature, methanol combustion is stopped and a hot gas valve is switched to route the flue gas overboard, with methanol being fed directly to the catalytic cracking reactor. Thereafter, the burner operates on excess hydrogen from the fuel cells.

Chludzinski, Paul J. (38 Berkshire St., Swampscott, MA 01907); Dantowitz, Philip (39 Nancy Ave., Peabody, MA 01960); McElroy, James F. (12 Old Cart Rd., Hamilton, MA 01936)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

Bharat L. Bhatt

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

126

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Injector spray characterization of methanol in reciprocating engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers a study that addressed cold-starting problems in alcohol-fueled, spark-ignition engines by using fine-spray port-fuel injectors to inject fuel directly into the cylinder. This task included development and characterization of some very fine-spray, port-fuel injectors for a methanol-fueled spark-ignition engine. After determining the spray characteristics, a computational study was performed to estimate the evaporation rate of the methanol fuel spray under cold-starting and steady-state conditions.

Dodge, L.; Naegeli, D. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

129

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

130

Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA); Cherepy, Nerine (Oakland, CA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

131

Results from the first year of operation of the Federal Methanol Fleet at Argonne National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory, under the auspices of the Department of Energy's Alternative Fuels Utilization Program, has managed the Federal Methanol Fleet Project since its inception in fiscal year 1985. This congressionally-mandated project directed the Department of Energy to introduce methanol-fueled vehicles into civilian government fleet operations. This interim report describes the first year of operation of a methanol fleet at Argonne National Laboratory in Argonne, Illinois. The fleet consists of five methanol-fueled 1986 Chevrolet S-10 pickup trucks along with five Chevrolet S-10s for comparison, as well as five methanol-fueled 1986 Ford Crown Victorias paired with four gasoline Fords. Data have been collected and tabulated on fuel consumption, maintenance records, oil sample analyses, and driver perceptions of vehicle operability. Energy efficiency for the methanol vehicles was slightly greater than that for the counterpart gasoline vehicles. Maintenance records reveal that the methanol vehicles required substantially more service than the gasoline vehicles, but a large proportion of the difference was due to methanol component replacements where improvements or upgrades were scheduled to be implemented after the vehicles were in service. Oil sample analyses revealed that engine wear rates were higher in the methanol vehicles. Drivers indicated that the methanol vehicles are quite acceptable, but they rated the gasoline vehicles higher. The Argonne fleet serves as the cold-weather site of the Federal Methanol Fleet and, as such, the methanol vehicles have been outfitted with special systems to aid in cold-starting and driveability.

McGill, R.N.; Hillis, S.L.; Larsen, R.P.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Direct Methanol Fuel Cells for Portable Power: A Fuel Cell System...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ambient conditions * System simplicity, i.e., air breathing mode of operation * Complete power system including sensing and control * Competitive cost Twin cell DMFC, 10cm 2...

133

List of Methanol Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methanol Incentives Methanol Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 22 Methanol Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 22) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alcohol Fuel Credit (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Commercial Industrial Ethanol Methanol No Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program Pennsylvania Commercial Industrial Residential General Public/Consumer Nonprofit Schools Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations Ethanol Methanol Biodiesel No Biodiesel and Alcohol Fuel Blend Sales Tax Exemption (Washington) Sales Tax Incentive Washington Commercial Ethanol Methanol

134

Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

Mahadevan, Kathyayani

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

135

DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT  

SciTech Connect

The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

136

The Role of Transport Phenomena in the Direct Oxidation of Solid Fuels.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Direct carbon fuel cells have shown promise for stationary power generation by utilizing the direct oxidation of a solid carbon fuel source at the (more)

Banas, Charles J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

The densities and reaction heat of methanol synthesis System from cornstalk syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be used as possibole replacement for conventional gasoline and Diesel fuel. In order to produce methanol

Ling?feng Zhu; Qing?ling Zhao; Jing Chen; Le Zhang; Run?tao Zhang; Li?li Liu; Zhao?yue Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Room-temperature fuel cells and their integration into portable and embedded systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are a promising nextgeneration energy source for portable applications, due to their high energy density and the ease of handling of the liquid fuel. However, the limited range of output power obtainable from a fuel ...

Naehyuck Chang; Jueun Seo; Donghwa Shin; Younghyun Kim

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Tuning the transport properties of layer-by-layer thin films for fuel cell applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing global focus on alternative energy sources has led to a renewed interest in fuel cells. For low power, portable applications, direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are the most promising type of fuel cell. DMFCs ...

Ashcraft, James Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

methanol.qxd  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Methanol One in a series of fact sheets United States Environmental Protection Agency EPA420-F-00-040 March 2002 www.epa.gov Transportation and Air Quality Transportation and Regional Programs Division C L E A N A L T E R N A T I V E F U E L S C L E A N E R A I R Because of the environ- mental advantages and cost savings, Arizona Checker Leasing Company purchased its first methanol-fueled vehicles in 1993 and cur- rently counts 300 in its fleet of nearly 450 automobiles. The company leases its M85 fuel-flexible vehicles to two cab companies in the Phoenix area. The company purchases its methanol from the California Energy Com- mission, which sells it at a lower, subsidized price. According to the company, methanol has performed just as well as gasoline, providing a safe, reliable, and cost- effective fuel source for the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Optical Diagnostics and Direct Injection of Liquid Fuel Sprays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research described here addresses the problem of a paucity of high quality data on the full field structure of high pressure liquid fuel sprays for gasoline direct injection, GDI, engines. The paper describes the application of phase Doppler anemometry, ... Keywords: GDI, PDA, laser sheet, spray, visualisation

G. K. Hargrave; G. Wigley; J. Allen; A. Bacon

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

Systematic theoretical study of alloys of platinum for enhanced methanol fuel cell performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ability of substitutional atoms in the (111)Pt surface to attract a water molecule and activate the formation of OH{sub ads} on them is calculated using the ASED-MO theory. OH{sub ads} is believed to be the oxidant that removes the CO poison from Pt anode surfaces in organic fuel cells. A total of 42 alloying atoms is treated, Sc through Se from period 4, Y through Te from period 5, and La through Po from period 6. As surface substitutional atoms, no elements to the right of the Pt group are found to attract H{sub 2}O strongly enough to activate OH dissociation. Some of these elements, including Sn, are known to be active in the electrocatalytic oxidation of CO{sub ads} but are believed to be atoms or complexes on or near the Pt surface. Of the elements to the left of the Pt group, a number from the first and second transition series attract and activate H{sub 2}O with comparable or greater effectiveness than Ru, a known activator when present on Pt electrode surfaces. Whether these can be made stable alloy surfaces for organic fuel cell operation is an experimental issue. Past experimental work in the literature suggests promise for some of them.

Anderson, A.B.; Grantscharova, E.; Seong, S. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electronically conducting proton exchange polymers as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and methanol oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of supported catalysts were prepared by the chemical deposition of Pt and Pt-Ru particles on chemically prepared poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and PEDOT/polyvinylsulfate (PVS) composites. The polymer particles were designed to provide a porous, proton-conducting and electron-conducting catalyst support for use in fuel cells. These polymer-supported catalysts were characterized by electron microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and conductivity measurements. Their catalytic activities toward hydrogen and methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction were evaluated in proton exchange membrane fuel-cell-type gas diffusion electrodes. Activities for oxygen reduction comparable to that obtained with a commercial carbon-supported catalyst were observed, whereas those for hydrogen and methanol oxidation were significantly inferior, although still high for prototype catalysts.

Lefebvre, M.C.; Qi, Z.; Pickup, P.G. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John`s, Newfoundland (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

146

Methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

147

Anodic oxidation of methanol using a new base electrocatalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anodic oxidation of methanol, the reaction employed on the anode of the direct methanol fuel cell, is conventionally carried out using noble electrocatalysts. The best of these has been found to be a codeposited mixture of platinum and ruthenium. The use of base materials as anode catalysts requires, in addition to electrocatalytic activity, a low corrosion rate in the cell electrolyte. The authors present here some preliminary results of measurements of the anodic oxidation of methanol using a newly synthesized base electrocatalyst: this catalyst is passivated by the highly aggressive electrolyte.

Burstein, G.T.; Barnett, C.J.; Kucernak, A.R.J.; Williams, K.R. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Nafion titania nanotubes nanocomposite electrolytes for high-temperature direct methanol fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nafion-based nanocomposite membranes containing various amounts of titania nanotubes (TNTs) as an inorganic filler have been prepared using melt-mixing method and have been investigated for proton exchange membrane applications. The onedimensional TNTs ...

Nonhlanhla Precious Cele, Suprakas Sinha Ray, Lucky Sikhwivhilu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in batteries, ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicleBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle SymposiumBattery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an experimental fuel cell/supercapacitor-powered hybridof fuel cell/battery/supercapacitor hybrid power source for

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Delivery Workshop in Washington, DC, May 7-8, 2003. Attendees included researchers, government officials, and industry members. A key element of the overall hydrogen energy infrastructure is the delivery system that moves the hydrogen from its point of production to an end-use device. The DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office will initiate, in fiscal year 2004, a research program targeted specifically at addressing hydrogen transportation and delivery. This special workshop was held to outline the future technology and research needs for developing cost-effective, reliable, and safe hydrogen delivery systems. The proceedings of the Hydrogen Delivery Workshop, which include the presentations and the recommendations of the four breakout groups, are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.

155

Analytical performance of direct-hydrogen-fueled polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for transportation applications.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a stand-alone polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system directly fueled by hydrogen has been evaluated for transportation vehicles. The study was carried out using a systems analysis code and a vehicle analysis code. The systems code includes models for the various PEFC components and is applicable for steady-state and transient situations. At the design point the system efficiency is above 50% for a 50-kW system. The efficiency improves under partial load and approaches 60% at 40% load, as the fuel cell operating point moves to lower current densities on the V-I polarization curve. At much lower loads, the system efficiency drops because of the deterioration in the performance of the compressor, expander, and eventually the fuel cell. The system performance suffers at lower temperatures, as the V-I characteristic curve for the fuel cell shifts downward because of the increased ohmic losses. The results of the transient analysis indicate that the hydrogen-fueled PEFC system can start rather rapidly, within seconds from ambient conditions. However, the warm-up time constant to reach the design operating temperatures is about 180 s. It is important during this period for the coolant to bypass the system radiator until the coolant temperature approaches the design temperature for the fuel cell. The systems analysis code has been applied to two mid-size vehicles: the near-term Ford AIV Sable and the future P2000 vehicle. The results of this study show that the PEFC system in these vehicles can respond well to the demands of the FUDS and Highway driving cycles, with both warm and cold starting conditions. The results also show that the fuel-cell AIV Sable vehicle has impressive gains in fuel economy over that of the internal combustion engine vehicle. However, this vehicle will not be able to meet the PNGV goal of 80 mpg. On the other hand, the P2000 vehicle approaches this goal with variable efficiency of the compressor and expander. It is expected to exceed that goal by a big margin, if the efficiency of the compressor and expander can be maintained constant (at 0.8) over the power range of the fuel cell system.

Doss, E. D.

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

156

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

capacitors fuel-cell hybrid electric vehicle optimizationsize for fuel cell hybrid electric vehicle-Part I, Journalbeen developed for hybrid electric vehicles with an internal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Preliminary study on direct recycling of spent PWR fuel in PWR system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preliminary study on direct recycling of PWR spent fuel to support SUPEL (Straight Utilization of sPEnt LWR fuel in LWR system) scenario has been conducted. Several spent PWR fuel compositions in loaded PWR fuel has been evaluated to obtain the criticality of reactor. The reactor can achieve it criticality for U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel is at least 4.0 a% with the minimum fraction of the spent fuel in the core is 15.0 %. The neutron spectra become harder with the escalating of U-235 enrichment in the loaded fresh fuel as well as the amount of the spent fuel in the core.

Waris, Abdul; Nuha; Novitriana; Kurniadi, Rizal; Su'ud, Zaki [Nuclear Physics and Biophysics Research Division, Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Jalan Ganesa 10 Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

158

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

159

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

160

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Amoco Oil Company is investigating the direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuels via partial oxidation. This report describes work completed in the first quarter of the two-year project (first quarter FY 1990). Task 1 of the work, preparation of the Project Management Plan, has been completed. Work was started and progress made on three other tasks during this quarter: Task 2. Modification of an existing Amoco pilot plant to handle the conditions of this project. Minor modifications were made to increase the maximum operating pressure to 1500 psig. Other more extensive modifications are being designed, including addition of an oxygen compressor and recycle system. Task 3.1. Evaluation of a Los Alamos National Laboratory methane oxidation kinetic model for suitability in guiding the experimental portions of this project. Task 3.2. Process variable (e.g. temperature, pressure, residence time) studies to determine optimal partial oxidation conditions. 1 fig.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Proton and methanol transport in poly(perfluorosulfonate) membranes containing Cs{sup +} and H{sup +} cations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Poly(perfluorosulfonate acid) membranes were doped with cesium ions to several degrees. These, along with the H{sup +}-form membrane, were investigated in relation to methanol permeability as well as hydrogen ion conductivity. While retaining considerable conductivity, the cesium-doped membranes are highly impermeable to methanol. The author found that methanol permeability in the membrane reduced by over one order of magnitude, owing to the presence of cesium ions. These findings are discussed on the basis of alterations produced by cesium in the membrane microstructure. Also discussed is the potential implication of these results in the direct methanol fuel cell technology.

Tricoli, V. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

MODELING AND DESIGN FOR A DIRECT CARBON FUEL CELL WITH ENTRAINED FUEL AND OXIDIZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The novel molten carbonate fuel cell design described in this report uses porous bed electrodes. Molten carbonate, with carbon fuel particles and oxidizer entrained, is circulated through the electrodes. Carbon may be reacted directly, without gasification, in a molten carbonate fuel cell. The cathode reaction is 2CO{sub 2} + O{sub 2} 4e{sup -} {yields} 2CO{sub 3}{sup =}, while the anode reaction can be either C + 2CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO{sub 2} + 4e{sup -} or 2C + CO{sub 3}{sup =} {yields} 3CO + 2e{sup -}. The direct carbon fuel cell has an advantage over fuel cells using coal-derived synthesis gas in that it provides better overall efficiency and reduces equipment requirements. Also, the liquid electrolyte provides a means for transporting the solid carbon. The porous bed cell makes use of this carbon transport ability of the molten salt electrolyte. A one-dimensional model has been developed for predicting the performance of this cell. For the cathode, dependent variables are superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the gas phase, superficial O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} fluxes in the liquid phase, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The variables are related by correlations, from the literature, for gas-liquid mass transfer, liquid-solid mass transfer, cathode current density, electrode overpotential, and resistivity of a liquid with entrained gas. For the anode, dependent variables are superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the gas phase, superficial CO{sub 2} flux in the liquid phase, superficial C flux, superficial current density through the electrolyte, and electrolyte potential. The same types of correlations relate the variables as in the cathode, with the addition of a correlation for resistivity of a fluidized bed. CO production is not considered, and axial dispersion is neglected. The model shows behavior typical of porous bed electrodes used in electrochemical processes. Efficiency is comparable to that of membrane electrode fuel cells. Effective bed depths are on the order of 1-5 centimeter, giving power/volume lower than for membrane electrode cells. The porous bed design, however, uses less expensive materials and is more resistant to fouling by coal impurities. The model will be used in the second phase of the project to design a laboratory-scale prototype cell. The prototype cell will demonstrate the concept and provide experimental data for improving the model.

Alan A. Kornhauser; Ritesh Agarwal

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Use of Natural Gas: Economic Fuel Choices from the Regional Power System and Consumer's Perspective Council document 2012-01 Background Is it better to use natural gas directly in water heaters; total-energy efficiency, fuel switching, direct use of gas, and others. The natural gas companies

165

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Strategic Directions for Hydrogen...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Glossary Quick Links Hydrogen Production Hydrogen Delivery Hydrogen Storage Fuel Cells Technology Validation Manufacturing Codes & Standards Education Systems Analysis...

166

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski...

167

Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

168

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various option will be performed as experimental data become available. The project is of two year's duration and contains three major tasks: Project Management Plan, Pilot Plant Modification, and Comparison of Preliminary Data With Los Alamos Model: We will determine if the kinetic model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory can be used to guide our experimental effort. Other subtasks under Task 3 include: Pressure/Temperature/Reaction Time Effects; Study of Different Injection Systems: Different schemes for introducing and mixing reactants before or within the reactor will be evaluated theoretically and/or experimentally; Study of Different Quench Systems; Effect of Reactor Geometry; Effect of Reactor Recycle; and Enhanced-Yield Catalyst Study. 5 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Foral, M.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States Department of.Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of coal-fired turbine technology in the areas of Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion, Integrated Gasification Combined Cycles, and Direct Coal-Fired Turbines. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of coal-fired turbine systems is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept that has been configured to meet this technical challenge. This ceramic barrier filter, ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases, and is considering cleaning temperatures up to 2100{degrees}F. This document describes Phase II of the program, the design, construction, and shakedown of a bench-scale facility to test and confirm the feasibility of this ILEC technology.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

batteries and ultracapacitors for electric vehicles. EVS24Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposiumpublications on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ultracapacitors, fuel cells and hybrid vehicle design. Dr.on electric and hybrid vehicle technology and applicationsand performance. Hybrid vehicles utilizing a load leveling

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

REPORT: Inert-Matrix Fuel: Actinide ''Burning'' and Direct ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jun 27, 2007 ... Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241 Am...

173

Hybrid fuel cell for mobile devices : an integrated approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As mobile devices advance to 3G and beyond, there will be a pressing need for increased power to drive these devices, which the current batteries cannot provide. The direct methanol fuel cell has been identified as a ...

Sohn, Munhee, 1981-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

175

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

176

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

177

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

Parks, P.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction  

SciTech Connect

The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Richmond, C.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 4/3/2012 eere.energy.gov Fuel Cell Technologies Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/year for transportation Widespread market penetration of fuel cells could lead to: · 180,000 new jobs in the US by 2020 · 675,000 jobs by 2035 FuelCells2000, Pike Research, Fuel Cell Today, ANL http://www1.eere -- including biogas, methanol, H2 · Hydrogen -- can be produced cleanly using sunlight or biomass directly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions Total Energy USA Houston, Texas Dr. Sunita Satyapal 11/27/2012 Director, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung, Toyota, UTC Power, Nissan, Ballard, Plug Power, Panasonic, Delphi Technologies Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Source: Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011.

182

Realistic assessment of direct radiolysis for synthetic fuels production using fusion radiation sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

These studies indicate that synthetic fuel production by direct radiolysis cannot compete economically with other production methods. Low G-values and radiation contamination of products are given as reasons. (MOW)

Pendergrass, J.H.; Booth, L.A.; Finch, F.T.; Frank, T.G.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

``Clean`` fuels: Does the new direction make environmental sense?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the ramifications of this a three-pronged energy philosophy, with special reference to its expected environmental impact if it is fully implemented as policy. To recapitulate, the three prongs are to rely on a free energy market to determine winners and losers, which could certainly include Reformulated Gasoline (RFG) if it remains relatively cheap and clean; refocus the bulk of government-sponsored transportation energy research toward a ``great leap ahead`` to fully renewable and essentially pollution-free fuels such as hydrogen and fuel cells; and discontinue AFV pump priming. Of special interest is a premise that appears common to all prongs--that none of these measures represents a retreat from environmental goals or accomplishments on record since the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 was passed.

Saricks, C.L.; Wang, M.Q.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method of steam reforming methanol to hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen by the catalyzed steam reforming of methanol is accomplished using a reformer of greatly reduced size and cost wherein a mixture of water and methanol is superheated to the gaseous state at temperatures of about 800.degree. to about 1,100.degree. F. and then fed to a reformer in direct contact with the catalyst bed contained therein, whereby the heat for the endothermic steam reforming reaction is derived directly from the superheated steam/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

186

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Hydrogen and fuel cells can provide these benefits and address critical challenges in...

187

Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Design on Elevated-Temperature and Methanol-Blocking Proton Exchange Membrane for Fuel Cell Application. Author(s), Yan Xiang.

188

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Method for making methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Mednick, R. Lawrence (Roslyn Heights, NY); Blum, David B. (Wayne, NJ)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Method for making methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methanol is made in a liquid-phase methanol reactor by entraining a methanol-forming catalyst in an inert liquid and contacting said entrained catalyst with a synthesis gas comprising hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Mednick, R. Lawrence (Roslyn Heights, NY); Blum, David B. (Wayne, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Feasibility study of repowering the USCGC vindicator (WMEC-3) with modular diesel fueled direct fuel cells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, AEL was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I contract on Navy Topic N88-94 by the NAVSEA RD Officer, Code 03R. In 1990, this topic moved to Phase II with a contract involving the lab demonstration of the use of diesel type fuel in high temperature molten carbonate or Direct Fuel Cells (DFCs). The Phase II work was successfully completed in 1992. In 1995, Navy Code 03R agreed to transfer Topic N88-94 to the USCG RD Office, G-SIR. The Phase III Feasibility Study was awarded to AEL in 1996 to perform the work described in this report. The USCGC VINDICATOR (WMEC-3) has been evaluated as the candidate ship for fuel cell repowering at 2.58 MW. It is a former T-AGOS ship with diesel-electric propulsion and ship`s service. The four 600 kW diesel generators (2.4 MW) would be replaced with twelve 215 kW DFC one-sided-fit fuel cell modules embodying a `no-maintenance` rapid changeout approach. The repowered ship would be faster, consume half of the fuel for the equivalent range, be super-quiet, be air pollution-free, cut the crew complement and produce potable water onboard as a byproduct. The study evaluated technical aspects of fuel cells, naval architectural removals and additions, maintenance, risk and cost-effectiveness issues. The use of electric utility type DFCs, with the cost reduction and mass production advantages of this on-land marketplace will make possible early introduction of marine-derivative fuel cell power plants for ship applications. It is concluded that repowering ships with fuel cells is feasible and that the next step is a Preliminary Design.

Kumm, W.H.; Lisie, H.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ERC product improvement activities for direct fuel cell power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current power plant demonstration status to the commercial design in an approximately five-year period. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of the overall program goal are: (1) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (2) Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (3) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (4) Define the stack and BOP equipment packaging arrangement and define module designs, (5) Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry. A seven-task program, dedicated to attaining objective(s) in the areas noted above, was initiated in December 1994. Accomplishments of the first six months are discussed in this paper.

Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.; Bentley, C. [and others

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Methanol tolerant oxygen reduction catalysts based on transition metal sulfides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen reduction activity and methanol tolerance of a range of transition metal sulfide electrocatalysts have been evaluated in half-cell experiments and in a liquid-feed solid polymer electrolyte direct methanol fuel cell. These catalysts were prepared in high surface area form by direct synthesis onto various surface-functionalized carbon blacks. Of the materials tested, mixed-metal catalysts based on ReRuS and MoRuS were observed to give the best oxygen reduction activities. In addition, significant increases in performance were observed when employing sulfur-functionalized carbon black, which were attributed to the preferential deposition of active Ru sites in the catalyst-preparation process. Although the intrinsic activity of the best material tested, namely, Mo{sub 2}Ru{sub 5}S{sub 5} on sulfur-treated XC-72, was lower than Pt (by ca. 1545 mV throughout the entire polarization curve), its activity relative to Pt increased significantly in methanol-contaminated electrolytes. This was due to methanol oxidation side reactions reducing the net activity of the Pt, especially at low overpotentials.

Reeve, R.W.; Christensen, P.A.; Hamnett, A.; Haydock, S.A.; Roy, S.C. [Univ. of Newcastle, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mathematical Modeling of Liquid-Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Z. H. Wang* and C. Y. Wang*,z  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, T. I. Valdez, S. Surampudi, G. Halpert, J. Kosek, and C. Cropley, in Proceedings of the 11th Annual

196

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

197

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the full cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into reductions in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns, particularly under the High Market Share Scenario.

Mintz, M.M.; Wang, M.Q.; Vyas, A.D.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Furnace combustion and radiation characteristics of methanol and a methanol/coal slurry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental facility has been built to study the combustion of methanol and a slurry of methanol plus 5% coal in an environment similar to industrial and utility boilers. The furnace is a horizontal water cooled cylinder, 20 cm in diameter by one meter long, with a firing rate of 60 kW. The measurements taken throughout the furnace include temperature and concentration of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, oxides of nitrogen, methanol and particulates. Spectral radiation intensity measurements are taken along the axis of the furnace burning methanol and the methanol/coal slurry. The effect of the fuel on flame structure is reported. The temperatures in the pure methanol flame are, in general, higher than in the methanol/coal flame. The levels of the oxides of nitrogen are low in the pure methanol flame (less than 20 ppM NO). Addition of 5% coal to the methanol causes NO concentration to increase to 100 ppM. This represents a conversion of 40% of the coal bound nitrogen to NO. Particulate levels increase from less than .001 g/m/sup 3/ for the pure methanol to over .25 g/m/sup 3/ when pulverized coal is added. The low levels of soot and particulates in the methanol flame have an effect on the spectral intensity. No continuous radiation is measured in the methanol flame, but small amounts of particulate radiation can be seen from the spectra of the methanol/coal flame. The total emittance of the flame is increased from about .10 to .135 with the addition of 5% pulverized coal, but the radiation intensity is reduced because of the lower flame temperatures. A numerical program has been written to calculate the spectral intensity from an inhomogeneous mixture of combustion products. Comparisons are made between the calculated intensity and the measured intensity for both fuel systems. The numerical results are about 25% lower than the measured results. Reasons for this are discussed.

Grosshandler, W.L.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to ``fuel-related`` repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

West, B.H.; McGill, R.N. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Federal Methanol Fleet Project final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Federal Methanol Fleet Project concluded with the termination of data collection from the three fleet sites in February 1991. The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) completed five years of operation, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) completed its fourth year in the project, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) completed its third. Twenty of the thirty-nine vehicles in the fleet were powered by fuel methanol (typically M85, 85 % methanol, 15 % unleaded gasoline, although the LBL fleet used M88), and the remaining control vehicles were comparable gasoline vehicles. Over 2.2 million km (1.4 million miles) were accumulated on the fleet vehicles in routine government service. Data collected over the years have included vehicle mileage and fuel economy, engine oil analysis, emissions, vehicle maintenance, and driver acceptance. Fuel economies (on an energy basis) of the methanol and gasoline vehicles of the same type were comparable throughout the fleet testing. Engine oil analysis has revealed higher accumulation rates of iron and other metals in the oil of the methanol vehicles, although no significant engine damage has been attributed to the higher metal content. Vehicles of both fuel types have experienced degradation in their emission control systems, however, the methanol vehicles seem to have degraded their catalytic converters at a higher rate. The methanol vehicles have required more maintenance than their gasoline counterparts, in most cases, although the higher levels of maintenance cannot be attributed to fuel-related'' repairs. According to the daily driver logs and results from several surveys, drivers of the fleet vehicles at all three sites were generally satisfied with the methanol vehicles.

West, B.H.; McGill, R.N. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Hillis, S.L.; Hodgson, J.W. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

203

Direct Carbon Conversion: Application to the Efficient Conversion of Fossil Fuels to Electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We introduce a concept for efficient conversion of fossil fuels to electricity that entails the decomposition of fossil-derived hydrocarbons into carbon and hydrogen, and electrochemical conversion of these fuels in separate fuel cells. Carbon/air fuel cells have the advantages of near zero entropy change and associated heat production (allowing 100% theoretical conversion efficiency). The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product are invariant, allowing constant EMF and full utilization of fuel in single pass mode of operation. System efficiency estimates were conducted for several routes involving sequential extraction of a hydrocarbon from the fossil resource by (hydro) pyrolysis followed by thermal decomposition. The total energy conversion efficiencies of the processes were estimated to be (1) 80% for direct conversion of petroleum coke; (2) 67% HHV for CH{sub 4}; (3) 72% HHV for heavy oil (modeled using properties of decane); (4) 75.5% HHV (83% LHV) for natural gas conversion with a Rankine bottoming cycle for the H{sub 2} portion; and (5) 69% HHV for conversion of low rank coals and lignite through hydrogenation and pyrolysis of the CH{sub 4} intermediate. The cost of carbon fuel is roughly $7/GJ, based on the cost of the pyrolysis step in the industrial furnace black process. Cell hardware costs are estimated to be less than $500/kW.

Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Berry, G; Pasternak, A; Surles, T; Steinberg, M

2001-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Alcohol fuels program technical review  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last issue of the Alcohol Fuels Process R/D Newsletter contained a work breakdown structure (WBS) of the SERI Alcohol Fuels Program that stressed the subcontracted portion of the program and discussed the SERI biotechnology in-house program. This issue shows the WBS for the in-house programs and contains highlights for the remaining in-house tasks, that is, methanol production research, alcohol utilization research, and membrane research. The methanol production research activity consists of two elements: development of a pressurized oxygen gasifier and synthesis of catalytic materials to more efficiently convert synthesis gas to methanol and higher alcohols. A report is included (Finegold et al. 1981) that details the experimental apparatus and recent results obtained from the gasifier. The catalysis research is principally directed toward producing novel organometallic compounds for use as a homogeneous catalyst. The utilization research is directed toward the development of novel engine systems that use pure alcohol for fuel. Reforming methanol and ethanol catalytically to produce H/sub 2/ and CO gas for use as a fuel offers performance and efficiency advantages over burning alcohol directly as fuel in an engine. An application of this approach is also detailed at the end of this section. Another area of utilization is the use of fuel cells in transportation. In-house researchers investigating alternate electrolyte systems are exploring the direct and indirect use of alcohols in fuel cells. A workshop is being organized to explore potential applications of fuel cells in the transportation sector. The membrane research group is equipping to evaluate alcohol/water separation membranes and is also establishing cost estimation and energy utilization figures for use in alcohol plant design.

Not Available

206

Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

motor fuels and fuel systems are compressed and liquefied natural gas, ethanol (E85), methanol (M85), hydrogen, hythane, electricity, fuels from biological materials or...

207

Technical and economic assessment of particle control technology for direct coal fueled turbines: Final report  

SciTech Connect

Gilbert/Commomwealth (1984) analyzed ten different concepts for high-temperature, high-pressure control of gas stream particulate matter in coal-fueled pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) systems. This paper analyzes the five higher ranking concepts of the Gilbert study at direct coal fueled turbine conditions which are even more severe than PFBC conditions. The five concepts are ceramic crossflow filter, ceramic bag filter, granular bed filter, and advanced cyclones. Five ranking factors were used: economic, design, operations complexity, materials/mechanical, and development status. (DLC)

DiBella, C.A.W.; Thomas, R.L.; Rubow, L.N.; Zaharchuk, R.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii's Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. (ed.)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Engineering Bacteria for Efficient Fuel Production: Novel Biological Conversion of Hydrogen and Carbon Dioxide Directly into Free Fatty Acids  

SciTech Connect

Electrofuels Project: OPX Biotechnologies is engineering a microorganism currently used in industrial biotechnology to directly produce a liquid fuel from hydrogen and carbon dioxide (CO2). The microorganism has the natural ability to use hydrogen and CO2 for growth. OPX Biotechnologies is modifying the microorganism to divert energy and carbon away from growth and towards the production of liquid fuels in larger, commercially viable quantities. The microbial system will produce a fuel precursor that can be chemically upgraded to various hydrocarbon fuels.

2010-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

210

Direct Conversion of Carbon Fuels in a Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anodes of elemental carbon may be discharged in a galvanic cell using a molten carbonate electrolyte, a nickel-foam anode-current collector, and a porous nickel air cathode to achieve power densities of 40-100 mW/cm{sup 2}. We report cell and anode polarization, surface area, primary particle size and a crystallization index for nine particulate carbon samples derived from fuel oil, methane, coal, charred biological material and petroleum coke. At 800 C, current densities of 50-125 mA/cm{sup 2} were measured at a representative cell voltage of 0.8 V. Power densities for cells with two carbon-anode materials were found to be nearly the same on scales of 2.8- and 60 cm{sup 2} active area. Constant current operation of a small cell was accompanied by constant voltage during multiple tests of 10-30 hour duration. Cell voltage fell off after the carbon inventory was consumed. Three different cathode structures are compared, indicating that an LLNL fabricated porous nickel electrode with <10 {micro}m pores provides improved rates compared with nickel foam with 100-300 {micro}m pores. Petroleum coke containing substantial sulfur and ash discharges at a slightly lower rate than purified petroleum coke. The sulfur leads to degradation of the anode current collector over time. A conceptual model for electrochemical reactivity of carbon is presented which indicates the importance of (1) bulk lattice disorder, which continually provides surface reactive sites during anodic dissolution and (2) electrical conductivity, which lowers the ohmic component of anode polarization.

Cherepy, N J; Fiet, K J; Krueger, R; Jankowski, A F; Cooper, J F

2004-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

211

Optimization of Fuel Cell System Operating Conditions for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Indirect Methanol Pem Fuel Cell System, SAE 2001, (paperof automotive PEM fuel cell stacks, SAE 2000 (paper numberParasitic Loads in Fuel Cell Vehicles, International Journal

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Direct electrochemical conversion of carbon anode fuels in molton salt media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We are conducting research into the direct electrochemical conversion of reactive carbons into electricity--with experimental evidence of total efficiencies exceeding 80% of the heat of combustion of carbon. Together with technologies for extraction of reactive carbons from broad based fossil fuels, direct carbon conversion addresses the objectives of DOE's ''21st Century Fuel Cell'' with exceptionally high efficiency (>70% based on standard heat of reaction, {Delta}H{sub std}), as well as broader objectives of managing CO{sub 2} emissions. We are exploring the reactivity of a wide range of carbons derived from diverse sources, including pyrolyzed hydrocarbons, petroleum cokes, purified coals and biochars, and relating their electrochemical reactivity to nano/microstructural characteristics.

Cherepy, N; Krueger, R; Cooper, J F

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

213

Implementation of the Article 7a of the Fuel Quality Directive Dear Commissioner Hedegaard,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As environmental and civil society organisations committed to green technology development and halting dangerous climate change, we are concerned about the approach being taken by the European Commission in implementing Article 7a of the Fuel Quality Directive. Our concerns have escalated after media reports that the latest draft implementing measures still do not include any specific default values for all unconventional feedstocks, most specifically tar sands and oil shale. The recent dramatic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico has demonstrated the risks associated with the extraction of oil. It has also shown the need for proper, fair and independent regulation from the side of public authorities. The EUs commitment to a clean and resource-efficient energy future is now being put to the test with the implementing measures for the Fuel Quality Directive. We call on you to send a clear signal to the world that the EU is truly set on a clean and resource-efficient pathway by ensuring that the carbon footprint of oil extraction and production is properly taken into account in the implementing measures for the FuelQuality Directive. Both the urgency with which we need to reduce greenhouse gas

To Commissioner Connie Hedegaard; Jos Dings; Peter H. Lehner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Partial oxidation reforming of methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol is an attractive fuel for fuel cell-powered vehicles because it has a fairly high energy density, can be pumped into the tank of a vehicle mush like gasoline, and is relatively easy to reform. For on-board reforming, the reformer must be compact and lightweight, and have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Steam reforming reactors with the tube-and-shell geometry that was used on the prototype fuel cell-powered buses are heat transfer limited. To reach their normal operating temperature, these types of reactors need 45 minutes from ambient temperature start-up. The dynamic response is poor due to temperature control problems. To overcome the limitations of steam reforming, ANL explored the partial oxidation concept used in the petroleum industry to process crude oils. In contrast to the endothermic steam reforming reaction, partial oxidations is exothermic. Fuel and air are passed together over a catalyst or reacted thermally, yielding a hydrogen-rich gas. Since the operating temperature of such a reactor can be controlled by the oxygen-to- methanol ratio, the rates of reaction are not heat transfer limited. Start-up and transient response should be rapid, and the mass and volume are expected to be small by comparison.

Krumpelt, M.; Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

216

Progress on High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The direct, nondestructive measurement of fissile and fissionable isotopes in spent fuel is not yet possible. Current methods which infer plutonium content through proxy measurements and confirmatory burnup calculations have relatively large uncertainty and do not satisfy the desire for a measurement that is independent of operator declarations. We are currently exploring the High Energy Delayed Gamma Spectroscopy (HEDGS) technique for direct, independent Pu measurement in light-water reactor fuels. HEDGS exploits the unique distribution of fission-product nuclei from each of the fissile isotopes. Fission is stimulated in the sample with a source of interrogating neutrons, and delayed gamma rays from the decay of the short-lived fission-product nuclei are measured. The measured gamma spectrum from the unknown sample is then fit with a linear combination of gamma spectra from pure U-235, Pu-239, and Pu-241, as deduced from the known fission-product yield curves and decay properties of the fission-product nuclei, to determine the original proportions of these fissile isotopes. In previous work, we performed preliminary modeling studies of HEDGS on idealized single fuel pins of various burnups. Here, we report progress on extending our GEANT-based modeling tools to efficiently model full pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel assemblies using variance reduction techniques specific to the background emissions and induced signal, as appropriate. Predicted performance for a nominal HEDGS instrument design, is reported for the assay of U-235, Pu-239 and Pu-241 in spent fuel assemblies ranging from fresh to 60 GWd/MTU in burnup.

Campbell, Luke W.; Smith, Leon E.

2010-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

217

Quick-start catalyzed methanol partial oxidation reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalytic methanol partial oxidation reformer described in this paper offers all the necessary attributes for use in transportation fuel cell systems. The bench-scale prototype methanol reformer developed at Argonne is a cylindrical reactor loaded with copper zinc oxide catalyst. Liquid methanol, along with a small amount of water, is injected as a fine spray into a flowing air stream, past an igniter onto the catalyst bed where the partial oxidation reaction takes place.

Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Technical-economic assessment of the production of methanol from biomass. Executive summary. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of a comprehensive systems study which assessed the engineering and economic feasibilities of the production of methanol from biomass utilizing existing technology. The three major components of the biomass to methanol system assessed are the availability of biomass feedstocks, the thermochemical conversion of biomass to methanol fuels, and the distribution and markets for methanol fuels. The results of this study show that methanol fuel can be produced from biomass using commercially available technology in the near term, and could be produced economically in significant quantities in the mid-to-late 1980's when advanced technology is available.

Wan, E.I.; Simmons, J.A.; Price, J.D.; Nguyen, T.D.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

219

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Stories of Discovery & Innovation From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Enlarge Photo Image by Eric Steen, JBEI Once E. coli have secreted oil, they sequester themselves from the droplets as shown by this optical image, thereby facilitating oil recovery. Currently, biochemical processing of cellulosic biomass requires costly enzymes for sugar liberation. By giving the E. coli the capacity to ferment both cellulose and hemicellulose without the 03.28.11 From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass A microbe that can produce an advanced biofuel directly from biomass was developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy

220

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Model, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,Solid-Polymer- Electrolyte Fuel Cell, J. Electrochem. Soc. ,

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is compatible with much of the existing fuel infrastructure.

Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 1: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project ID: 78 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; costs; methanol; hydrogen fueling Purpose As the DOE considers both direct hydrogen and reformer-based fuel cell vehicles, it is vital to have a clear perspective of the relative infrastructure costs to supply each prospective fuel (gasoline, methanol, or hydrogen). Consequently, this analysis compares these infrastructure costs as well as the cost to remove sulfur from gasoline (as will most likely be required for use in fuel cell systems) and the cost implications for several hydrogen tank filling options. This analysis supports Analysis

223

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressed Natural Gas (CNG), synthetic diesel, methanol,FCX Fuels Gasoline, Diesel, CNG, FT diesel, methanol, H2,H2, electricity Gasoline, diesel, CNG, biogas, LPG, ethanol,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 US DoE-NETL Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO 2 Peter G. Brewer (brpe@mbari.org; 831-626-6618) Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road Moss Landing CA 95039 Introduction. My laboratory has now been engaged in carrying out small scale controlled field experiments on the ocean sequestration of fossil fuel CO 2 for about five years, and the field has changed enormously in that time. We have gone from theoretical assessments to experimental results, and from cartoon sketches of imagined outcomes to high-resolution video images of experiments on the ocean floor shared around the world. It seems appropriate therefore to give a brief review, albeit one very much from a

225

Direct contact low emission steam generating system and method utilizing a compact, multi-fuel burner  

SciTech Connect

A high output, high pressure direct contact steam generator for producing high quality steam particularly suited for use with low grade, low cost fuel. When used in a system incorporating heat recovery and conversion of carryover water enthalpy into shaft horsepower, the unit disclosed provides high quality, high pressure steam for ''steam drive'' or thermal stimulation of petroleum wells through injection of high pressure steam and combustion gas mixtures. A particular feature of the burner/system disclosed provides compression of a burner oxidant such as atmospheric air, and shaft horesepower for pumping high pressure feedwater, from a lowest cost energy source such as leased crude, or other locally available fuel.

Eisenhawer, S.; Donaldson, A. B.; Fox, R. L.; Mulac, A. J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

226

Study on Catalytic Experiments of Methanol Synthesis from Cornstalk Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass energy is a renewable and potential resource. In order to research the conversion of cornstalk biomass (the agricultural residues) into the fuel methanol and the effective utilization of biomass energy, the low-heat-value cornstalk gas was produced ... Keywords: Cornstalk, Syngas, Catalyst, Methanol, Synthesis

Zhu Lingfeng; Gao Ruqin; Liu Lili; Wang Yan; Wang Yangyang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electrolytic synthesis of methanol from CO.sub.2  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and system for synthesizing methanol from the CO.sub.2 in air using electric power. The CO.sub.2 is absorbed by a solution of KOH to form K.sub.2 CO.sub.3 which is electrolyzed to produce methanol, a liquid hydrocarbon fuel.

Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

The Equilibrium Compositions of Methanol Synthesis System by Cornstalk Syngas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol can be used as a promising alternative for conventional gasoline and Diesel fuel. It is necessary to decompose biomass such as cornstalks in order to produce methanol which is a raw material from agricultural residues. A promising route for processing cornstalks is firstly to gasify cornstalks with thermo?chemical method to prepare the syngas

Ling?feng Zhu; Qing?ling Zhao; Yang?yang Wang; Jing Chen; Le Zhang; Run?tao Zhang; Li?li Liu; Zhao?yue Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Definition: Fuel cell | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel cell Fuel cell Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fuel cell An electrochemical device that converts chemical energy directly into electricity. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A fuel cell is a device that converts the chemical energy from a fuel into electricity through a chemical reaction with oxygen or another oxidizing agent. Hydrogen is the most common fuel, but hydrocarbons such as natural gas and alcohols like methanol are sometimes used. Fuel cells are different from batteries in that they require a constant source of fuel and oxygen/air to sustain the chemical reaction; however, fuel cells can produce electricity continually for as long as these inputs are supplied. In 1838, German physicist Christian Friedrich Schönbein invented the first

230

Mass Production Cost Estimation For Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systesm for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing costs of complete 80 kWnet direct?hydrogen proton ex

231

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2009 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis. It contains estimates for material and manufacturing cost of complete 80 kWnet direct hydrogen proton exch

232

General Circulation Model Calculations of the Direct Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate and Fossil-Fuel Soot Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new radiation code within a general circulation model is used to assess the direct solar and thermal radiative forcing by sulfate aerosol of anthropogenic origin and soot aerosol from fossil-fuel burning. The radiative effects of different ...

J. M. Haywood; D. L. Roberts; A. Slingo; J. M. Edwards; K. P. Shine

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Combined Power Generation and Carbon Sequestration Using Direct FuelCell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The unique chemistry of carbonate fuel cell offers an innovative approach for separation of carbon dioxide from greenhouse gases (GHG). The carbonate fuel cell system also produces electric power at high efficiency. The simultaneous generation of power and sequestration of greenhouse gases offer an attractive scenario for re-powering the existing coal-fueled power plants, in which the carbonate fuel cell would separate the carbon dioxide from the flue gas and would generate additional pollutant-free electric power. Development of this system is concurrent with emergence of Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) technology for generation of electric power from fossil fuels. DFC is based on carbonate fuel cell featuring internal reforming. This technology has been deployed in MW-scale power plants and is readily available as a manufactured product. This final report describes the results of the conceptualization study conducted to assess the DFC-based system concept for separation of CO2 from GHG. Design and development studies were focused on integration of the DFC systems with coal-based power plants, which emit large amounts of GHG. In parallel to the system design and simulation activities, operation of laboratory scale DFC verified the technical concept and provided input to the design activity. The system was studied to determine its effectiveness in capturing more than ninety percent of CO2 from the flue gases. Cost analysis was performed to estimate the change in cost of electricity for a 200 MW pulverized coal boiler steam cycle plant retrofitted with the DFC-based CO2 separation system producing an additional 127 MW of electric power. The cost increments as percentage of levelized cost of electricity were estimated for a range of separation plant installations per year and a range of natural gas cost. The parametric envelope meeting the goal (<20% increase in COE) was identified. Results of this feasibility study indicated that DFC-based separation systems have the potential for capturing at least 90% of the emissions from the greenhouse gases generated by power plants and other industrial exhaust streams, and yet entail in less than 20% increase in the cost of energy services for long-term deployment (beyond 2012). The anticipated cost of energy increase is in line with DOE's goal for post-combustion systems as outlined in the ''Carbon Capture and Sequestration Systems Analysis Guidelines'', published by NETL, April 2005. During the course of this study certain enabling technologies were identified and the needs for further research and development were discussed.

Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Methanol and hydrogen from biomass for transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methanol and hydrogen from biomass for transportation [1] Robert H. Williams, Eric D. Larson, Ryan from biomass via indirectly heated gasifiers and their use in fuel cell vehicles would make it possible for biomass to be used for road transportation, with zero or near-zero local air pollution and very low levels

235

Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct-Injection Flex-Fuel Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the compression stroke. The residues calculated from the proposed model were validated with those generated from to detect the fuel ethanol concentration by placing them in the tank or in the fuel line. However by means of the closed-loop air/fuel ratio correction signal based on the Exhaust Gas Oxygen (EGO) sensor

Stefanopoulou, Anna

236

Fuel Cell Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

variety of other fuels, including natural gas and renewable fuels such as methanol or biogas. Fuel cells provide these benefits and address critical challenges in all energy...

237

Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

Steven Markovich

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

238

Technology development goals for automotive fuel cell power systems. Final report, Appendix B-2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Directed Technologies, Inc. has previously submitted a detailed technical assessment and concept design for a mid-size, five-passenger fuel cell electric vehicle (FCEV), under contract to the Argonne National Laboratory. As a supplement to that contract, DTI has reviewed the literature and conducted a preliminary evaluation of two energy carriers for the FCEV: hydrogen and methanol. This report compares the estimated fuel efficiency, cost of producing and delivering the fuel, and the resultant life cycle costs of the FCEV when fueled directly by hydrogen and when fueled by methanol with on-board reforming to produce the required hydrogen-rich gas for the fuel cell. This work will be supplemented and expanded under the Ford contract with the Department of Energy to develop the FCEV and its fuel infrastructure.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. Phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hawaii has abundant natural energy resources, especially biomass, that could be used to produce alternative fuels for ground transportation and electricity. This report summarizes activities performed during 1988 to June 1991 in the first phase of the Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program. The Alcohol Transportation Fuels Demonstration Program was funded initially by the Energy Division of the State of Hawaii`s Department of Business, Economic Development and Tourism, and then by the US Department of Energy. This program was intended to support the transition to an altemative transportation fuel, methanol, by demonstrating the use of methanol fuel and methanol-fueled vehicles, and solving the problems associated with that fuel. Specific objectives include surveying renewable energy resources and ground transportation in Hawaii; installing a model methanol fueling station; demonstrating a methanol-fueled fleet of (spark-ignition engine) vehicles; evaluating modification strategies for methanol-fueled diesel engines and fuel additives; and investigating the transition to methanol fueling. All major objectives of Phase I were met (survey of local renewable resources and ground transportation, installation of methanol refueling station, fleet demonstration, diesel engine modification and additive evaluation, and dissemination of information on alternative fueling), and some specific problems (e.g., relating to methanol fuel contamination during handling and refueling) were identified and solved. Several key issues emerging from Phase I (e.g., methanol corrosion, flame luminosity, and methanol-transition technoeconomics) were recommended as topics for follow-on research in subsequent phases of this program.

Kinoshita, C.M. [ed.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

240

Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips. Attachment V. The Florida eucalyptus energy farm: environmental impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall environmental impact of the eucalyptus to methanol energy system in Florida is assessed. The environmental impacts associated with the following steps of the process are considered: (1) the greenhouse and laboratory; (2) the eucalyptus plantation; (3) transporting the mature logs; (4) the hammermill; and (5) the methanol synthesis plant. Next, the environmental effects of methanol as an undiluted motor fuel, methanol as a gasoline blend, and gasoline as motor fuels are compared. Finally, the environmental effects of the eucalypt gasification/methanol synthesis system are compared to the coal liquefaction and conversion system.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Direct electrochemical conversion of carbon: systems for efficient conversion of fossil fuels to electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The direct electrochemical conversion of carbon involves discharge of suspensions of reactive carbon particles in a molten salt electrolyte against an oxygen (air) cathode. (Figure 1). The free energy and the enthalpy of the oxidation reaction are nearly identical. This allows theoretical efficiencies ({Delta}G(T)/{Delta}H) to approach 100% at temperatures from 500 to 800 C. Entropy heat losses are therefore negligible. The activities of the elemental carbon and of the carbon dioxide product are uniform throughout the fuel cell and constant over discharge time. This stabilizes cell EMF and allows full utilization of the carbon fuel in a single pass. Finally, the energy cost for pyrolysis of hydrocarbons is generally very low compared with that of steam reforming or water gas reactions. Direct electrochemical conversion of carbon might be compared with molten carbonate fuel cell using carbon rather than hydrogen. However, there are important differences. There is no hydrogen involved (except from trace water contamination). The mixture of molten carbonate and carbon is not highly flammable. The carbon is introduced in as a particulate, rather than as a high volume flow of hydrogen. At the relatively low rates of discharge (about 1 kA/m{sup 2}), the stoichiometric requirements for carbon dioxide by the cathodic reaction may be met by diffusion across the thin electrolyte gap. We report recent experimental work at LLNL using melt slurries of reactive carbons produced by the thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons. We have found that anodic reactivity of carbon in mixed carbonate melts depends strongly on form, structure and nano-scale disorder of the materials, which are fixed by the hydrocarbon starting material and the conditions of pyrolysis. Thus otherwise chemically pure carbons made by hydrocarbon pyrolysis show rates at fixed potentials that span an order of magnitude, while this range lies 1-2 orders of magnitude higher than the current density of graphite plate electrodes. One carbon materials was identified which delivered anode current densities of 1 kA/m{sup 2} at 0.8 V (i.e., 80% efficiency, based on the standard enthalpy of carbon/oxygen reaction, and assuming full conversion), which we believe to be sufficiently great to allow practical application in fuel cell arrays. Since the hydrocarbon starting materials are ''ash free,'' entrainment of ash into the melt is not limiting. Finally, the use of fine carbon particulates in slurries avoids cost and logistics of carbon electrode manufacture and distribution.

Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N; Krueger, R

2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

242

A Two Dimensional Model of a Direct Propane Fuel Cell with an Interdigitated Flow Field .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing environmental concerns as well as diminishing fossil fuel reserves call for a new generation of energy conversion technologies. Fuel cells, which convert the chemical (more)

Khakdaman, Hamidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.-), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O' Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1991-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Homogeneous catalyst formulations for methanol production  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is disclosed synthesis of CH.sub.3 OH from carbon monoxide and hydrogen using an extremely active homogeneous catalyst for methanol synthesis directly from synthesis gas. The catalyst operates preferably between 100.degree.-150.degree. C. and preferably at 100-150 psia synthesis gas to produce methanol. Use can be made of syngas mixtures which contain considerable quantities of other gases, such as nitrogen, methane or excess hydrogen. The catalyst is composed of two components: (a) a transition metal carbonyl complex and (b) an alkoxide component. In the simplest formulation, component (a) is a complex of nickel tetracarbonyl and component (b) is methoxide (CH.sub.3 O.sup.13 ), both being dissolved in a methanol solvent system. The presence of a co-solvent such as p-dioxane, THF, polyalcohols, ethers, hydrocarbons, and crown ethers accelerates the methanol synthesis reaction.

Mahajan, Devinder (Port Jefferson, NY); Sapienza, Richard S. (Shoreham, NY); Slegeir, William A. (Hampton Bays, NY); O' Hare, Thomas E. (Huntington Station, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Assessment of PNGV fuels infrastructure. Phase 1 report: Additional capital needs and fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the methodologies and results of Argonne`s assessment of additional capital needs and the fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of using six different fuels in the vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) that the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles is currently investigating. The six fuels included in this study are reformulated gasoline, low-sulfur diesel, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol are assumed to be burned in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines. Diesel and dimethyl ether are assumed to be burned in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines. Hydrogen and methanol are assumed to be used in fuel-cell vehicles. The authors have analyzed fuels infrastructure impacts under a 3X vehicle low market share scenario and a high market share scenario. The assessment shows that if 3X vehicles are mass-introduced, a considerable amount of capital investment will be needed to build new fuel production plants and to establish distribution infrastructure for methanol, ethanol, dimethyl ether, and hydrogen. Capital needs for production facilities will far exceed those for distribution infrastructure. Among the four fuels, hydrogen will bear the largest capital needs. The fuel efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translates directly into reductions in total energy demand, fossil energy demand, and CO{sub 2} emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency results in substantial petroleum displacement and large reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds, sulfur oxide, and particulate matter of size smaller than 10 microns.

Wang, M.; Stork, K.; Vyas, A.; Mintz, M.; Singh, M.; Johnson, L.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas: Final topical report, demonstration of one-step slurry-phase process for the co-production of methanol and isobutanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Liquid phase co-production of methanol and isobutanol (LPIBOH) was de, demonstrated at DOE`s Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Methanol and isobutanol are key intermediates in a synthesis gas-based route to methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE). The technology was demonstrated in a new 18 in. slurry bubble-column reactor that was designed to demonstrate higher pressures and temperatures,higher gas superficial velocities, and lower gas hourly space velocities--all of which are conducive to obtaining optimal isobutanol yield. The integration of the new reactor into the AFDU included the addition of a high-pressure synthesis gas compressor, a high-pressure hydrogen feed source, and a closed-loop methanol- solvent absorption system to remove CO{sub 2} from the unconverted synthesis gas. These modifications were completed in January 1994. The LPIBOH run followed after a short turnaround. It employed a cesium- promoted Cu/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories and subsequently scaled up to a production- sized batch. Over a thirteen day campaign on simulated Shell gasifier gas, the catalyst and reactor system were tested at a matrix of pressures (750, 1300, 1735 psig) and space velocities (3000, 5000, 8200 sL/kg-hr), representing numerous first-of-a-kind run conditions for the AFDU. Inlet gas superficial velocities spanned an impressive 0.16 to 1.0 ft/sec. Stable reactor performance for a full twelve-hour data period at 1.0 ft/sec was another significant milestone for the liquid phase technology program. Apart from the catalyst deactivation, the run successfully demonstrated mixed alcohol synthesis in a slurry bubble-column reactor, as well as all of the new equipment installed for the trial. Although the full capabilities of the new oxygenates system will not be tested until future runs, the design objectives for the modifications were met with respect to the LPIBOH run.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Alternative fuels for heavy duty engines: Status of fleet trials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of Annex 3 are to collect, assess and disseminate data on the use of methanol and natural gas in heavy duty compression ignition engines. Originally, the objective was directed at methanol, but in 1990 the mandate of Annex 3 was broadened to include natural gas. This is the latest update on field trials using these two fuels. The report outlines progress being made and identifies major trends. The more important events since the last progress report include: the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Certification of Detroit Diesel Corporation's 6V-92 methanol engine; the introduction of transit buses in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, using DDC methanol engines; an introduction of two DDC engined ethanol fueled transit buses at Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada; the testing of catalytic converters, by Detroit Diesel Corporation, with alcohol powered engines; the discontinuance of methanol in MAN engines/buses at Seattle Metro; a tender for over 100 methanol powered transit buses for South Coast Rapid Transit District (SCRTD), Los Angeles, California; the potential purchase of an additional 150 methanol powered buses for SCRTD, in addition to 10 buses for Sacramento Regional Transit District; and, the expanded interest of transit properties in using natural gas in both compressed natural gas (CNG) and liquefied natural gas (LNG) engines. 21 figs.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel-economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the fill fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low-sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. Results were obtained for three scenarios: a Reference Scenario without PNGVs, a High Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2030, and a Low Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for half as many sales by 2030. Under the higher of these two, the fuel-efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into a nearly 50% reduction in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur oxide, (SO{sub x}), and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM{sub 10}) for most of the engine-fuel combinations examined. The key exceptions were diesel- and ethanol-fueled vehicles for which PM{sub 10} emissions increased.

Mintz, M. M.; Vyas, A. D.; Wang, M. Q.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emerging Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Emerging Alternative Fuels Several emerging alternative fuels are under development or already developed and may be available in the United States. These fuels may

250

Direct Experimental Evaluation of the Grain Boundaries Gas Content in PWR fuels: New Insight and Perspective of the ADAGIO Technique  

SciTech Connect

Over the last decades, many analytical experiments (in-pile and out-of-pile) have underlined the active role of the inter-granular gases on the global fuel transient behavior under accidental conditions such as RIA and/or LOCA. In parallel, the improvement of fission gas release modeling in nuclear fuel performance codes needs direct experimental determination/validation regarding the local gas distribution inside the fuel sample. In this context, an experimental program, called 'ADAGIO' (French acronym for Discriminating Analysis of Accumulation of Inter-granular and Occluded Gas), has been initiated through a joint action of CEA, EDF and AREVA NP in order to develop a new device/technique for quantitative and direct measurement of local fission gas distribution within an irradiated fuel pellet. ADAGIO technique is based on the fact that fission gas inventory (intra and inter-granular parts) can be distinguished by controlled fuel oxidation, since grain boundaries oxidize faster than the bulk. The purpose of the current paper is to present both the methodology and the associated results of the ADAGIO program performed at CEA. It has been divided into two main parts: (i) feasibility (UO{sub 2} and MOX fuels), (ii) application on high burn up UO{sub 2} fuel. (authors)

Pontillon, Y.; Noirot, J.; Caillot, L. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SA3C, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France); Muller, E. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, DEN/DEC/SESC, Centre d'Etudes de Cadarache, BP1, 13108 Saint Paul Les Durance (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Membrane Hydration by Direct Liquid Water Contact  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An effective means of providing direct liquid hydration of the membrane tends to improve performance particularly of cells with thicker membranes or at elevated temperatures. Supplying the water to the membrane from the anode flow-field through the anode backing via wicks would appear to have advantages over delivering the water through the thickness of the membrane with regards to the uniformity and stability of the supply and the use of off-the-shelf membranes or MEAs. In addition to improving cell performance, an important contribution of direct liquid hydration approaches may be that the overall fuel cell system becomes simpler and more effective. The next steps in the evolution of this approach are a demonstration of the effectiveness of this technique with larger active area cells as well as the implementation of an internal flow-field water reservoir (to eliminate the injection method). Scale-up to larger cell sizes and the use of separate water channels within the anode flow-field is described.

Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Gottesfeld, S.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fuel Cells for Portable Power: 1. Introduction to DMFCs; 2. Advanced Materials and Concepts for Portable Power Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thanks to generally less stringent cost constraints, portable power fuel cells, the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) in particular, promise earlier market penetration than higher power polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) for the automotive and stationary applications. However, a large-scale commercialization of DMFC-based power systems beyond niche applications already targeted by developers will depend on improvements to fuel cell performance and performance durability as well as on the reduction in cost, especially of the portable systems on the higher end of the power spectrum (100-250 W). In this part of the webinar, we will focus on the development of advanced materials (catalysts, membranes, electrode structures, and membrane electrode assemblies) and fuel cell operating concepts capable of fulfilling two key targets for portable power systems: the system cost of $5/W and overall fuel conversion efficiency of 2.0-2.5 kWh/L. Presented research will concentrate on the development of new methanol oxidation catalysts, hydrocarbon membranes with reduced methanol crossover, and improvements to component durability. Time permitted, we will also present a few highlights from the development of electrocatalysts for the oxidation of two alternative fuels for the direct-feed fuel cells: ethanol and dimethyl ether.

Zelenay, Piotr [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

256

SPOUTED BED ELECTRODES (SBE) FOR DIRECT UTILIZATION OF CARBON IN FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Phase I project was focused on an investigation of spouted bed particulate electrodes for the direct utilization of solid carbon in fuel cells. This approach involves the use of a circulating carbon particle/molten carbonate slurry in the cell that provides a few critical functions: it (1) fuels the cell continuously with entrained carbon particles; (2) brings particles to the anode surfaces hydrodynamically; (3) removes ash from the anode surfaces and the cell hydrodynamically; (4) provides a facile means of cell temperature control due to its large thermal capacitance; (5) provides for electrolyte maintenance and control in the electrode separator(s); and (6) can (potentially) improve carbon conversion rates by ''pre-activating'' carbon particle surfaces via formation of intermediate oxygen surface complexes in the bulk molten carbonate. The approach of this scoping project was twofold: (1) adaptation and application of a CFD code, originally developed to simulate particle circulation in spouted bed electrolytic reactors, to carbon particle circulation in DCFC systems; and (2) experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of carbon slurry circulation in DCFC systems using simulated slurry mixtures. The CFD model results demonstrated that slurry recirculation can be used to hydrodynamically feed carbon particles to anode surfaces. Variations of internal configurations were investigated in order to explore effects on contacting. It was shown that good contacting with inclined surfaces could be achieved even when the particles are of the same density as the molten carbonate. The use of CO{sub 2} product gas from the fuel cell as a ''lift-gas'' to circulate the slurry was also investigated with the model. The results showed that this is an effective method of slurry circulation; it entrains carbon particles more effectively in the draft duct and produces a somewhat slower recirculation rate, and thus higher residence times on anode surfaces, and can be controlled completely via pressure balance. Experimental investigations in a rectangular spouted vessel hydrodynamics apparatus (SVHA) showed that hydrodynamics can be used to control the circulation, residence time, and distribution of carbon within the spouted bed, as well as provide good particle contact with anode surfaces. This was shown to be a function of viscosity, carbon loading, and particle size, as well as relative densities. Higher viscosities and smaller particle sizes favor more efficient particle entrainment in the draft duct, and particle recirculation. Both the computational and experimental results are consistent with each another and exhibit the same general qualitative behavior. Based upon this work, a design of a prototype SBE/DCFC cell was developed and is presented.

J.M. Calo

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Design and Test of a Carbon-Tolerant Alkaline Fuel Cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents new results which may constitute a breakthrough in the effort to develop fuel cells truly suitable for use in cars and trucks. For decades, researchers have known that the alkaline fuel cell (AFC) is much cheaper to make, more efficient and more durable than the more popular PEM fuel cell; however, "carbon poisoning" (either from CO2 in air or from contaminants in reformed methanol) causes big problems in the kind of oxygen-hydrogen AFC commonly used in space. This paper reports successful tests of a technique for coating the electrodes with polystyrene which, in conjunction with older common-sense techniques, appears to solve the problem. This kind of design is applicable to cars run on hydrogen fuel, on reformed methanol or even direct methanol. Developing a test methodology was a major part of the work. A foreword by one of the sponsors at NSF discusses the larger importance of this work for energy security and the environment.

Urquidi-Macdonald, M; Grimes, P; Tewari, A; Sambhy, V; Urquidi-Macdonald, Mirna; Sen, Ayusman; Grimes, Patrick; Tewari, Ashutosh; Sambhy, Varun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Production of Methanol by the Brookhaven National Laboratory Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important issue for electric utility planners is the need for economically attractive and environmentally acceptable fuel energy sources. The delivery of fuel values to distant markets by means of methanol produced by a more efficient and lower capital cost process merits careful consideration.

1990-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

259

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications. Hydrogen vehicle safety report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews the safety characteristics of hydrogen as an energy carrier for a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), with emphasis on high pressure gaseous hydrogen onboard storage. The authors consider normal operation of the vehicle in addition to refueling, collisions, operation in tunnels, and storage in garages. They identify the most likely risks and failure modes leading to hazardous conditions, and provide potential countermeasures in the vehicle design to prevent or substantially reduce the consequences of each plausible failure mode. They then compare the risks of hydrogen with those of more common motor vehicle fuels including gasoline, propane, and natural gas.

Thomas, C.E. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

1 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program Source: US DOE 8/5/2011 eere.energy.gov 5th International Conference on Polymer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- including biogas, methanol, H2 · Hydrogen -- can be produced cleanly using sunlight or biomass directly Today, ANL Widespread market penetration of fuel cells could lead to: · 180,000 new jobs in the US by 2020 · 675,000 jobs by 2035 Various analyses project that the global fuel cell/hydrogen market could

263

Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. Promoted metal oxide catalysts were tested. Several of these exhibited similar high ethylene to ethane ratios and low carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios observed for the NaCl/{alpha}-alumina catalyst system reported earlier. Research on catalysts containing potentially activated metals began with testing of metal molecular sieves. Silver catalysts were shown to be promising as low temperature catalysts. Perovskites were tested as potential methane coupling catalysts. A layered perovskite (K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10}) gave the highest C{sub 2} yield. Work continued on the economic evaluation of a hypothetical process converting methane to ethylene. An engineering model of the methane coupling system has been prepared. 47 refs., 17 figs., 57 tabs.

Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.

1989-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

264

TransForum v6n1 - Hydrogen + Advances in Fuel Cell Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available, fuel cells could operate on conventional fuels, such as natural gas, propane, gasoline, and diesel, or alternative fuels, such as methanol, ethanol, and...

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Alternative Fuel Definition to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Definition on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Definition The following fuels are defined as alternative fuels by the Energy Policy Act (EPAct) of 1992: pure methanol, ethanol, and other alcohols; blends of

266

Material and Energy Balances for Methanol from Biomass Using Biomass Gasifiers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Biomass to Methanol Systems Analysis Project is the determination of the most economically optimum combination of unit operations which will make the production of methanol from biomass competitive with or more economic than traditional processes with conventional fossil fuel feedstocks. This report summarizes the development of simulation models for methanol production based upon the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) ''Renugas'' gasifier and the Battelle Columbus Laboratory (BCL) gasifier. This report discusses methanol production technology, the IGT and BCL gasifiers, analysis of gasifier data for gasification of wood, methanol production material and energy balance simulations, and one case study based upon each of the gasifiers.

Bain, R. L.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Comparative analysis of selected fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicles powered by fuel cells operate more efficiently, more quietly, and more cleanly than internal combustion engines (ICEs). Furthermore, methanol-fueled fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) can utilize major elements of the existing fueling infrastructure of present-day liquid-fueled ICE vehicles (ICEVs). DOE has maintained an active program to stimulate the development and demonstration o fuel cell technologies in conjunction with rechargeable batteries in road vehicles. The purpose of this study is to identify and assess the availability of data on FCVs, and to develop a vehicle subsystem structure that can be used to compare both FCVs and ICEV, from a number of perspectives--environmental impacts, energy utilization, materials usage, and life cycle costs. This report focuses on methanol-fueled FCVs fueled by gasoline, methanol, and diesel fuel that are likely to be demonstratable by the year 2000. The comparative analysis presented covers four vehicles--two passenger vehicles and two urban transit buses. The passenger vehicles include an ICEV using either gasoline or methanol and an FCV using methanol. The FCV uses a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, an on-board methanol reformer, mid-term batteries, and an AC motor. The transit bus ICEV was evaluated for both diesel and methanol fuels. The transit bus FCV runs on methanol and uses a Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) fuel cell, near-term batteries, a DC motor, and an on-board methanol reformer. 75 refs.

NONE

1993-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

268

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Markets  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document provides information about near-term markets (such as for forklifts and telecommunications) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

269

Noble Metal Based Nanomaterials in the Application of Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Fuel cells are envisaged to be a new generation of power sources which convert chemical energy into electrical energy with, theoretically, both economical and (more)

Su, Liang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Exploratory fuel-cell research: I. Direct-hydrocarbon polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. II. Mathematical modeling of fuel-cell cathodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A strong need exists today for more efficient energy-conversion systems. Our reliance on limited fuel resources, such as petroleum for the majority of our energy needs makes it imperative that we utilize these resources as efficiently as possible. Higher-efficiency energy conversion also means less pollution, since less fuel is consumed and less exhaust created for the same energy output. Additionally, for many industrialized nations, such as the United States which must rely on petroleum imports, it is also imperative from a national-security standpoint to reduce the consumption of these precious resources. A substantial reduction of U.S. oil imports would result in a significant reduction of our trade deficit, as well as costly military spending to protect overseas petroleum resources. Therefore, energy-conversion devices which may utilize alternative fuels are also in strong demand. This paper describes research on fuel cells for transportation.

Perry, M.L.; McLarnon, F.R.; Newman, J.S.; Cairns, E.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Catalysis Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalysis Working Group Catalysis Working Group The Catalysis Working Group (CWG) meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, and collaboratively develop both an understanding of and tools for studying electrocatalysis for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and other low- and intermediate-temperature fuel cell systems, including direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), alkaline fuel cells (AFCs), alkaline membrane fuel cells (AMFCs), and phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFCs). The CWG members include principal and co-principal investigators in electrocatalysis projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as supporting DOE personnel. More information on DOE electrocatalysis activities can be found in the Multi-Year Research, Development, and Demonstration Plan.

272

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988 the Department of Energy (DOE) undertook a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States. During the next two decades, alternative fuels such as alcohol (methanol or ethanol), compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity could become practical alternatives to oil-based fuels in the US transportation sector. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability. To keep interested parties informed about the progress of the DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment, the Department periodically publishes reports dealing with particular aspects of this complex study. This report provides an analysis of the expected costs to produce methanol from biomass feedstock.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. The behavior of alkaline earth/metal oxide/halide catalysts containing strontium was found to be different from the behavior of catalysts containing barium. Two approaches were pursued to avoid the heterogeneous/homogeneous mechanism in order to achieve higher C{sub 2} selectivity/methane conversion combinations. One approach was to eliminate or minimize the typical gas phase combustion chemistry and make more of the reaction occur on the surface of the catalyst by using silver. Another approach was to change the gas phase chemistry to depart from the typical combustion reaction network by using vapor-phase catalysts. The layered perovskite K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10} was further studied. Modifications of process and catalyst variables for LaCaMnCoO{sub 6} catalysts resulted in catalysts with superior performance. Results obtained with a literature catalyst Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Pr{sub 6}O{sub 11} were better than those obtained with NaCO{sub 3}/Pr-Ce oxide or Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/Ag-Pr-Ce oxide. 52 refs., 15 figs., 9 tabs.

Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.; Matherne, J.L.; Kinkade, N.E.

1990-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

274

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, I. Mechanistic ModelI V Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, II. Empirical Modelexchange membrane fuel cells," Journal of Power Sources,

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, I. Mechanistic ModelIV Solid Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell, II. Empirical Modelexchange membrane fuel cells," Journal of Power Sources,

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

277

2007 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

The fuel cell industry, which has experienced continued increases in sales, is an emerging clean energy industry with the potential for significant growth in the stationary, portable, and transportation sectors. Fuel cells produce electricity in a highly efficient electrochemical process from a variety of fuels with low to zero emissions. This report describes data compiled in 2008 on trends in the fuel cell industry for 2007 with some comparison to two previous years. The report begins with a discussion of worldwide trends in units shipped and financing for the fuel cell industry for 2007. It continues by focusing on the North American and U.S. markets. After providing this industry-wide overview, the report identifies trends for each of the major fuel cell applications -- stationary power, portable power, and transportation -- including data on the range of fuel cell technologies -- polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), alkaline fuel cell (AFC), molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC), and direct-methanol fuel cell (DMFC) -- used for these applications.

McMurphy, K.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Economic impact of an improved methanol catalyst. [Forecasting to 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic future of methanol is reviewed in light of its potential uses as a substitute for traditional hydrocarbon fuels and feedstocks as well as some evolving new uses. Methanol's future market position will depend strongly on its production cost in comparison with competitive products. One promising way to reduce the production cost is by use of an improved catalyst in the process by which methanol is obtained from the feedstock - which can be either natural gas or a similar product such as synthesis gas from coal gasification. To estimate the potential cost savings with an improved catalyst, we have based our analysis on a recent study which assumed use of synthesis gas from underground coal gasification as a feedstock for making methanol. The improved catalyst we studied was an actinide oxide whose features include high tolerance to sulfur and heat, and a yield of about 4 mol% methanol per pass with a 2/1 mixture of H/sub 2//CO. We calculated the effect of this catalyst on methanol production costs in a 12,000-bbl/day plant. The result was a saving of from 1 cent to 2.5 cent per gallon on the total methanol synthesis cost of 23 cents per gallon (i.e., a saving in the conversion process of 4.4% to 10.9%), excluding the cost of the raw feed gas. We conclude from this study that the improved catalyst could bring important savings in methanol production. The estimated savings range from 4.4% to 10.9% in the cost of methanol synthesis from the feedstock material. Another possibility for lowering methanol production costs in the future may lie in switching from a natural-gas-based feedstock to a coal-based feedstock - for example, using synthesis gas from underground coal gasification as the raw material. Our projections suggest that coal will eventually become a less expensive feedstock than natural gas.

Grens, J.; Borg, I.; Stephens, D.; Colmenares, C.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

279

Program on Technology Innovation: Systems Assessment of Direct Carbon Fuel Cells Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficiently using abundant coal resources in a way that limits CO2 emissions is among the toughest challenges facing the power industry. Coal options available include combustion systems such as pulverized coal (PC) and supercritical systems that use the steam Rankin cycle; integrated-gasification-combined-cycle (IGCC) systems that use a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle; and advanced gasification fuel cell cycles, which use a combination of high-temperature fuel cells with gas or steam turbine sy...

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Quality Standards Fuel Quality Standards to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Fuel Quality Standards on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Fuel Quality Standards The South Dakota Department of Public Safety may promulgate rules establishing: Standards for the maximum volume percentages of ethanol and methanol

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

282

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process. Peroxide formation of dimethyl ether in methanol mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Organic peroxides could form when dimethyl ether in methanol is stored for three to six months at a time. The objective of this work was to determine the level of peroxide formation from dimethyl ether in reagent grade methanol and raw methanol at room temperature under 3 atmospheres (45 psig) of air. Raw methanol is methanol made from syngas by the LPMEOH Process without distillation. Aliphatic ethers tend to react slowly with oxygen from the air to form unstable peroxides. However, there are no reports on peroxide formation from dimethyl ether. After 172 days of testing, dimethyl ether in either reagent methanol or raw methanol at room temperature and under 60--70 psig pressure of air does not form detectable peroxides. Lack of detectable peroxides suggests that dimethyl ether or dimethyl ether and methanol may be stored at ambient conditions. Since the compositions of {approximately} 1.3 mol% or {approximately} 4.5 mol% dimethyl ether in methanol do not form peroxides, these compositions can be considered for diesel fuel or an atmospheric turbine fuel, respectively.

Waller, F.J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Determination of the Operating Envelope for a Direct Fired Fuel Cell Turbine Hybrid Using Hardware Based Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The operating range of a direct fired solid oxide fuel cell gas turbine (SOFC/GT) hybrid with bypass control of cathode airflow was determined using a hardware-based simulation facility designed and built by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Three methods of cathode airflow management using bypass valves in a hybrid power system were evaluated over the maximum range of operation. The cathode air flow was varied independently over the full range of operation of each bypass valve. Each operating point was taken at a steady state condition and was matched to the thermal, pressure and flow output of a corresponding fuel cell operation condition. Turbine electric load was also varied so that the maximum range of fuel cell operation could be studied, and a preliminary operating map could be made. Results are presented to show operating envelopes in terms of cathode air flow, fuel cell and turbine load, and compressor surge margin to be substantial.

David Tucker; Eric Liese; Randall Gemmen

2009-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

284

Minimally refined biomass fuels: an economic shortcut  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An economic shortcut can be realized if the sugars from which ethanol is made are utilized directly as concentrated aqueous solutions for fuels rather than by further refining them through fermentation and distillation steps. Simple evaporation of carbohydrate solutions from sugar cane or sweet sorghum, or from hydrolysis of starch or cellulose content of many plants yield potential liquid fuels of energy contents (on a volume basis) comparable to highly refined liquid fuels like methanol and ethanol. The potential utilization of such minimally refined biomass derived fuels is discussed and the burning of sucrose-ethanol-water solutions in a small modified domestic burner is demonstrated. Other potential uses of sugar solutions or emulsion and microemulsions in fuel oils for use in diesel or turbine engines are proposed and discussed.

Pearson, R.K.; Hirschfeld, T.B.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Fuel cell integrated with steam reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A H.sub.2 -air fuel cell integrated with a steam reformer is disclosed wherein a superheated water/methanol mixture is fed to a catalytic reformer to provide a continuous supply of hydrogen to the fuel cell, the gases exhausted from the anode of the fuel cell providing the thermal energy, via combustion, for superheating the water/methanol mixture.

Beshty, Bahjat S. (Lower Makefield, PA); Whelan, James A. (Bricktown, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Plenary lecture 6: influence of gasoline-methanol mixtures in a two-stroke engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the alternative fuels that are used is methanol. Methanol (CH3OH) is an alcohol that is produced from natural gas, biomass, coal and also municipal solid wastes and sewage. It is quite corrosive and poisonous and has lower volatility compared ...

Charalampos Arapatsakos

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Radiation Shielding Analysis for Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors (DUPIC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a part of the compatibility analysis of DUPIC fuel in Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors, the radiation physics calculations have been performed for the CANDU primary shielding system, which was originally designed for natural uranium core. At first, the conventional CANDU primary shield analysis method was validated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B in order to assess the current analysis code system and the cross-section data. The computational benchmark calculation was performed for the CANDU end shield system, which has shown that the conventional method produces results consistent with the reference calculations as far as the total dose rate and total heat deposition rate are concerned. Second, the primary shield system analysis was performed for the DUPIC fuel core based on the power distribution obtained from the time-average core model, and the results have shown that the dose rates and heat deposition rates through the primary shield of the DUPIC fuel core are not much different from those of the natural uranium core because the power levels on the core periphery are similar for both cores. This study has shown that the current primary shield system is adaptable for the DUPIC fuel CANDU core without design modification.

Roh, Gyuhong; Choi, Hangbok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2004-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

289

A comparative experimental and computational study of methanol, ethanol, and n-butanol flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laminar flame speeds and extinction strain rates of premixed methanol, ethanol, and n-butanol flames were determined experimentally in the counterflow configuration at atmospheric pressure and elevated unburned mixture temperatures. Additional measurements were conducted also to determine the laminar flame speeds of their n-alkane/air counterparts, namely methane, ethane, and n-butane in order to compare the effect of alkane and alcohol molecular structures on high-temperature flame kinetics. For both propagation and extinction experiments the flow velocities were determined using the digital particle image velocimetry method. Laminar flame speeds were derived through a non-linear extrapolation approach based on direct numerical simulations of the experiments. Two recently developed detailed kinetics models of n-butanol oxidation were used to simulate the experiments. The experimental results revealed that laminar flame speeds of ethanol/air and n-butanol/air flames are similar to those of their n-alkane/air counterparts, and that methane/air flames have consistently lower laminar flame speeds than methanol/air flames. The laminar flame speeds of methanol/air flames are considerably higher compared to both ethanol/air and n-butanol/air flames under fuel-rich conditions. Numerical simulations of n-butanol/air freely propagating flames, revealed discrepancies between the two kinetic models regarding the consumption pathways of n-butanol and its intermediates. (author)

Veloo, Peter S.; Wang, Yang L.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Westbrook, Charles K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

290

Results from the second year of operation of the Federal Methanol Fleet at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory has completed its second year of operation of ten vehicles for the Federal Methanol Fleet Project; five of the vehicles are fueled with methanol. Over 56,000 miles were accumulated on the vehicles in the second year bringing the total to over 152,000 miles. Energy consumption for the methanol cars was slightly higher than that of the gasoline cars again this year, most likely as a result of shorter average trip lengths for the methanol gas. Iron and lead have accumulated at greater rates in the lubricating oil of the methanol cars. Driver's ratings of vehicles reflected some dissatisfaction with the cold-weather performance of the methanol cars, but the cars have no special provisions for cold weather starting, and the fuel vapor pressure has not been tailored to the season as at other test sites. Otherwise, drivers' opinions of the methanol cars have been favorable. 13 refs., 4 figs., 10 tabs.

West, B.H.; McGill (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Hillis, S.L. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

COMMERCIAL-SCALE DEMONSTRATION OF THE LIQUID PHASE METHANOL (LPMEOH) PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project, which was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under the Clean Coal Technology Program to demonstrate the production of methanol from coal-derived synthesis gas (syngas), has completed the 69-month operating phase of the program. The purpose of this Final Report for the ''Commercial-Scale Demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process'' is to provide the public with details on the performance and economics of the technology. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project was a $213.7 million cooperative agreement between the DOE and Air Products Liquid Phase Conversion Company, L.P. (the Partnership). The DOE's cost share was $92,708,370 with the remaining funds coming from the Partnership. The LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit is located at the Eastman Chemical Company (Eastman) chemicals-from-coal complex in Kingsport, Tennessee. The technology was the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products) and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} Process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern coal gasifiers. Originally tested at the Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU), a small, DOE-owned process development facility in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst, and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. The LPMEOH{trademark} Demonstration Project accomplished the objectives set out in the Cooperative Agreement with DOE for this Clean Coal Technology project. Overall plant availability (defined as the percentage of time that the LPMEOH{trademark} demonstration unit was able to operate, with the exclusion of scheduled outages) was 97.5%, and the longest operating run without interruption of any kind was 94 days. Over 103.9 million gallons of methanol was produced; Eastman accepted all of the available methanol for use in the production of methyl acetate, and ultimately cellulose acetate and acetic acid.

E.C. Heydorn; B.W. Diamond; R.D. Lilly

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Federal Tax Credits for Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the following alternative fuels: Compressed natural gas (CNG) Liquefied natural gas (LNG) Liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) Hydrogen Any liquid at least 85% methanol by volume...

293

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 11 for thrid quarter FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

294

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 15 fourth quarter FY 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

295

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 23 for second quarter FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Direct conversion of light hydrocarbon gases to liquid fuel. Quarterly technical status report No. 19 for first quarter FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to investigate the direct conversion of light gaseous hydrocarbons, such as those produced during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis or as a product of gasification, to liquid transportation fuels via a partial oxidation process. The process will be tested in an existing pilot plant to obtain credible mass balances. Specific objectives to be met include determination of optimal process conditions, investigation of various processing options (e.g. feed injection, product quench, and recycle systems), and evaluation of an enhanced yield thermal/catalytic system. Economic evaluation of the various options will be performed as experimental data become available.

Foral, M.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons (Biomimetic catalysis of the conversion of methane to methanol). Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In addition to inorganic catalysts that react with methane, it is well-known that a select group of aerobic soil/water bacteria called methanotrophs can efficiently and selectively utilize methane as the sole source of their energy and carbon for cellular growth. The first reaction in this metabolic pathway is catalyzed by the enzyme methane monooxygenase (MMO) forming methanol. Methanol is a technology important product from this partial oxidation of methane since it can be easily converted to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels (gasoline), used directly as a liquid fuel or fuel additive itself, or serve as a feedstock for chemicals production. This naturally occurring biocatalyst (MMO) is accomplishing a technologically important transformation (methane directly to methanol) for which there is currently no analogous chemical (non-biological) process. The authors approach has been to use the biocatalyst, MMO, as the initial focus in the development of discrete chemical catalysts (biomimetic complexes) for methane conversion. The advantage of this approach is that it exploits a biocatalytic system already performing a desired transformation of methane. In addition, this approach generated needed new experimental information on catalyst structure and function in order to develop new catalysts rationally and systematically. The first task is a comparative mechanistic, biochemical, and spectroscopic investigation of MMO enzyme systems. This work was directed at developing a description of the structure and function of the catalytically active sites in sufficient detail to generate a biomimetic material. The second task involves the synthesis, characterization, and chemical reactions of discrete complexes that mimic the enzymatic active site. These complexes were synthesized based on their best current understanding of the MMO active site structure.

Watkins, B.E.; Taylor, R.T.; Satcher, J.H. [and others

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Engineered Nanostructured MEA Technology for Low Temperature Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalyst support technology based on unique engineered nanostructures for low temperature fuel cells which: (1) Achieves high catalyst activity and performance; (2) Improves catalyst durability over current technologies; and (3) Reduces catalyst cost. This project is directed at the development of durable catalysts supported by novel support that improves the catalyst utilization and hence reduce the catalyst loading. This project will develop a solid fundamental knowledge base necessary for the synthetic effort while at the same time demonstrating the catalyst advantages in Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs).

Zhu, Yimin

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

300

Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

xTL Fuels to someone xTL Fuels to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: xTL Fuels on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels xTL Fuels Synthetic liquid transportation fuels, collectively known as xTL fuels, are produced through specialized conversion processes. These production methods, including the Fischer-Tropsch process, produce fuels from carbon-based feedstocks, such as biomass, coal, or natural gas, and can

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fuels processing for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells primarily use hydrogen as the fuel. This hydrogen must be produced from other fuels such as natural gas or methanol. The fuel processor requirements are affected by the fuel to be converted, the type of fuel cell to be supplied, and the fuel cell application. The conventional fuel processing technology has been reexamined to determine how it must be adapted for use in demanding applications such as transportation. The two major fuel conversion processes are steam reforming and partial oxidation reforming. The former is established practice for stationary applications; the latter offers certain advantages for mobile systems and is presently in various stages of development. This paper discusses these fuel processing technologies and the more recent developments for fuel cell systems used in transportation. The need for new materials in fuels processing, particularly in the area of reforming catalysis and hydrogen purification, is discussed.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heavy-water-moderated, light-water-moderated and liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors fueled with natural or low-enriched uranium and containing thorium mixed with the uranium or in separate target channels. U-232 decays with a 69-year half-life through 1.9-year half-life Th-228 to Tl-208, which emits a 2.6 MeV gamma ray upon decay. We find that pressurized light-water-reactors fueled with LEU-thorium fuel at high burnup (70 MWd/kg) produce U-233 with U-232 contamination levels of about 0.4 percent. At this contamination level, a 5 kg sphere of U-233 would produce a gammaray dose rate of 13 and 38 rem/hr at 1 meter one and ten years after chemical purification respectively. The associated plutonium contains 7.5 percent of the undesirable heat-generating 88-year half-life isotope Pu-238. However, just as it is possible to produce weapon-grade plutonium in low-burnup fuel, it is also practical to use heavy-water reactors to produce U-233 containing only a few ppm of U-232 if the thorium is segregated in target channels and discharged a few times more frequently than the natural-uranium driver fuel. The dose rate from a 5-kg solid sphere of U-233 containing 5 ppm U-232 could be reduced by a further factor of 30, to about 2 mrem/hr, with a close-fitting lead sphere weighing about 100 kg. Thus the proliferation resistance of thorium fuel cycles depends very much upon how they are implemented. The original version of this manuscript was received by Science & Global Security on

Jungmin Kang A

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Results from the second year of operation of the federal methanol fleet at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This interim report describes the second year's operation of the methanol fleet at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) in Berkeley, California. The fleet consists of five 1984 methanol-fueled Chevrolet Citation sedans paired with five comparable gasoline-fueled Citations for comparison. Data have been collected and tabulated on fuel consumption, maintenance records, oil sample analyses, and driver perceptions of vehicle operability. Fuel efficiency was slightly improved as compared to the first year for both the methanol and gasoline vehicles. The methanol vehicles continued to experience slightly less energy efficiency than the gasoline vehicles. Maintenance data reveal that the methanol vehicles required substantially more service than the gasoline vehicles, which may be due partially to a greater sensitivity on the part of users about methanol vehicle problems. Oil sample analyses revealed that engine wear rates are lower for the second year as compared to the first year and are probably not cause for great alarm. Drivers still rate all of the vehicles quite highly, but the methanol vehicles were rated not as highly during the second year of operation as in the first year. 5 refs., 1 figs., 16 tabs.

McGill, R.N.; Hillis, S.L.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Environmental information volume: Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the commercial viability of the Liquid Phase Methanol Process using coal-derived synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This report describes the proposed actions, alternative to the proposed action, the existing environment at the coal gasification plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, environmental impacts, regulatory requirements, offsite fuel testing, and DME addition to methanol production. Appendices include the air permit application, solid waste permits, water permit, existing air permits, agency correspondence, and Eastman and Air Products literature.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

A Multi-Country Analysis of Lifecycle Emissions From Transportation Fuels and Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [power plant fuel. Coal Fuel oil NG/ boiler NG/ turbine Nuclear* Biomass Hydro*

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A MULTI-COUNTRY ANALYSIS OF LIFECYCLE EMISSIONS FROM TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

methanol, nuclear, and hydro power plants, individually orvehicles]) H = Hydro power (% of electricity generation [power plant fuel. Coal Fuel oil NG/ boiler NG/ turbine Nuclear* Biomass Hydro*

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center (W-STC) is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to economical gas turbine life. The ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases at temperatures up to 1850[degrees]F for advanced power generation systems (PFBC, APFBC, IGCC, DCF7). The objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the conceptual, technical feasibility of the REC concept. The ELEC development program has a 3 phase structure: Phase 1 - laboratory-scale testing; phase 2 - bench-scale equipment; design and fabrication; and phase 3 - bench-scale testing. Phase 1 laboratory testing has been completed. In Phase 1, entrained sulfur and alkali sorbent kinetics were measured and evaluated, and commercial-scale performance was projected. Related cold flow model testing has shown that gas-particle contacting within the ceramic barrier filter vessel will provide a good reactor environment. The Phase 1 test results and the commercial evaluation conducted in the Phase 1 program support the bench-scale facility testing to be performed in Phase 3. Phase 2 is nearing completion with the design and assembly of a modified, bench-scale test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ILEC features. This feasibility testing will be conducted in Phase 3.

Lippert, T.E.; Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines  

SciTech Connect

The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center (W-STC) is developing an Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concept for high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards, as well as to economical gas turbine life. The ILEC concept simultaneously controls sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in high-pressure fuel gases or combustion gases at temperatures up to 1850{degrees}F for advanced power generation systems (PFBC, APFBC, IGCC, DCF7). The objective of this program is to demonstrate, at a bench scale, the conceptual, technical feasibility of the REC concept. The ELEC development program has a 3 phase structure: Phase 1 - laboratory-scale testing; phase 2 - bench-scale equipment; design and fabrication; and phase 3 - bench-scale testing. Phase 1 laboratory testing has been completed. In Phase 1, entrained sulfur and alkali sorbent kinetics were measured and evaluated, and commercial-scale performance was projected. Related cold flow model testing has shown that gas-particle contacting within the ceramic barrier filter vessel will provide a good reactor environment. The Phase 1 test results and the commercial evaluation conducted in the Phase 1 program support the bench-scale facility testing to be performed in Phase 3. Phase 2 is nearing completion with the design and assembly of a modified, bench-scale test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the ILEC features. This feasibility testing will be conducted in Phase 3.

Lippert, T.E.; Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Yang, W.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

309

New electrolytes for direct methane fuel cells. Annual report, January 10, 1977-January 9, 1978. [Perhalogenated sulfonic acids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is aimed at developing a fuel cell electrolyte for the direct oxidation of CH/sub 4/ and/or impure H/sub 2/ fuels. Work in the first year has focused on the di- and tribasic methane sulfonic acids CX/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ and CX(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ where X was H, F, or Cl. Synthesis of the halogenated acids proved to be more difficult than anticipated, and only three acids, viz. CH(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/; CH/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/; CCl/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ were prepared in sufficient quantity for electrochemical testing. However, promising synthetic routes have been identified for the other acids. Cyclic voltammetry was used to study the adsorption properties of the acids and half cell tests with gas diffusion electrodes were used to determine their suitability as fuel cell electrolytes. Results are presented and discussed. Also a program has been under way to develop low Pt loading (1 mg cm/sup -2/) fuel cell electrodes. The objective was to achieve control over the mass transfer parameters of an electrode so that optimum structures could be designed for use with the new electrolytes. In the interest of reproducibility, the experimental electrodes incorporated only well characterized materials; all forms of carbon were omitted. Optimum performance with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was achieved with electrodes made as follows. One mg cm/sup -2/ Pt black and 1 mg cm/sup -2/ TFE 30 were mixed and filtered onto porous TFE tape. The tape was pressed into Au plated Ta screen sintered for 10 minutes at 340/sup 0/C. Current vs potential curves for both anodic reactions (CH/sub 4/ and H/sub 2/ oxidation) and cathodic reactions (O/sub 2/ and air reduction) were superior to the curves obtained with an American Cyanamid electrode containing 25 mg Pt cm/sup -2/. (WHK)

Brummer, S.B.; McHardy, J.; Koch, V.; Turner, M.; Toland, D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Methanol tailgas combustor control method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for controlling the power and temperature and fuel source of a combustor in a fuel cell apparatus to supply heat to a fuel processor where the combustor has dual fuel inlet streams including a first fuel stream, and a second fuel stream of anode effluent from the fuel cell and reformate from the fuel processor. In all operating modes, an enthalpy balance is determined by regulating the amount of the first and/or second fuel streams and the quantity of the first air flow stream to support fuel processor power requirements.

Hart-Predmore, David J. (Rochester, NY); Pettit, William H. (Rochester, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels-including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability-are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Isolation and Identification of Nitrogen Species in Jet Fuel and Diesel Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many performance characteristics of liquid fuels--including lubricity, the ability to swell seal materials, storage stability, and thermal stability--are determined, to a large degree, by the trace polar species that the fuel contains. Because the polar fraction comprises such a small portion of the fuel matrix, it is difficult to detect these species without first isolating them from the bulk fuel. This manuscript describes the extension of previous work that established a protocol for the isolation and identification of oxygenates in jet fuels. The current work shows that a liquid-liquid extraction using methanol, followed by an isolation step using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with a silica column, can successfully separate polar nitrogen-containing species from the fuel, in addition to separating oxygenates. The analytical protocol further isolates the polar target species using a polar capillary gas chromatography (GC) column and a nontraditional oven heating program. The method is amenable to milliliter quantitites of fuel samples and produces a matrix that can be analyzed directly, using typical GC methods. The method was evaluated using spiked surrogate fuels, as well as actual petroleum-derived jet fuel samples. Furthermore, it is shown that the method also can be extended for use on diesel fuels.

Link, D.D.; Baltrus, J.P.; Zandhuis, P.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Direct numerical simulation of temporally evolving luminous jet flames with detailed fuel and soot chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of 2D temporally-evolving luminous turbulent ethylene-air jet diffusion flames are performed using a high-order compressible Navier-Stokes solver. The simulations use a reduced mechanism derived from a detailed ethylene-air chemical kinetic mechanism that includes the reaction pathways for the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The gas-phase chemistry is coupled with a detailed soot particle model based on the method of moments with interpolative closure that accounts for soot nucleation, coagulation, surface growth through HACA mechanism, and oxidation. Radiative heat transfer of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, and soot is treated by solving the radiative transfer equation using the discrete transfer method. This work presents preliminary results of radiation effects on soot dynamics at the tip of a jet diffusion flame with a particular focus on soot formation/oxidation.

Sankaran, Ramanan [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1988, the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) became Public Law 100-494. The AMFA encourages the production and use of motor vehicles designed to operate on alternative fuels. The alternative fuels specified in the law are methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. The Department of Energy (DOE), along with several other federal, state, and local agencies, has undertaken numerous activities aimed at fulfilling the AMFA directives. Among these activities is the establishment of the Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC), operated and managed by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) in Golden Colorado. The AMFA targets activities for three vehicle types using alternative fuels: (1) light-duty vehicles such as automobiles, mini-vans, and light-duty; (2) heavy-duty vehicles such as tractor trailers and garbage trucks; and (3) urban transit buses. The primary purpose of the AFDC is to gather and analyze information on the fuel consumption, emissions, operation, and durability of these vehicles types. The AFDC staff work with an Oracle Relational Database Management System and statistical software to provide information to users.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Integrated low emission cleanup system for direct coal-fueled turbines (electrostatic agglomeration)  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this contract is to investigate the removal of SO[sub x] and particulate matter from direct coal-fired combustion gas streams at high temperature and high pressure conditions. This investigation will be accomplished through a bench-scale testing and evaluation program employing sorbent mixed with a coal-water slurry for SO[sub x] removal, and an innovative particulate control concept. The particulate control device utilizes electrostatic agglomeration followed by a high efficiency mechanical collector (cyclone). The process goal is to achieve particulate collection efficiency better than that required by the 1979 new source performance standards. An additional goal is to demonstrate 70% SO[sub x] removal efficiency. This research project is now in the second of a 3 phase (phase II) project. Phase II is to fabricate the combustor and particulate control devices and install the system at a test facility located at Research-Cottrell's, KVB Western Laboratory, Santa Ana, CA. There are three functional categories, or tasks which are to be completed in sequence. These tasks are itemized as follows: design, procurement, and installation, shakedown and startup, and reporting.

Quimby, J.M.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol process. Technical progress report number 8, April 1--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallon per day (260 tons per day (TPD)) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. Originally tested at a small (10 TPD), DOE-owned experimental unit in LaPorte, Texas, the technology provides several improvements essential for the economic coproduction of methanol and electricity directly from gasified coal. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface, protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology is being integrated with existing coal-gasifiers. A carefully developed test plan will allow operations at Eastman to simulate electricity demand load-following in coal-based IGCC facilities. The operations will also demonstrate the enhanced stability and heat dissipation of the conversion process, its reliable on/off operation, and its ability to produce methanol as a clean liquid fuel without additional upgrading.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

Technical-economic assessment of the production of methanol from biomass. Conversion process analysis. Final research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive engineering system study was conducted to assess various thermochemical processes suitable for converting biomass to methanol. A summary of the conversion process study results is presented here, delineating the technical and economic feasibilities of producing methanol fuel from biomass utilizing the currently available technologies. (MHR)

Wan, E.I.; Simmons, J.A.; Price, J.D.; Nguyen, T.D.

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

318

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

319

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

320

Wear, durability, and lubricating oil performance of a straight vegetable oil (Karanja) blend fueled direct injection compression ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and resulting associated environmental degradation has motivated search for alternative transportation fuels. Blending small quantity of Karanja oil (straight vegetable oil) with mineral diesel is one of the simplest available alternatives

Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Atul Dhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Commercial-scale demonstration of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) process. Technical progress report number 6, October 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project involves the construction of an 80,000 gallons per day (260 TPD) methanol unit utilizing coal-derived synthesis gas from Eastman`s integrated coal gasification facility. The new equipment consists of synthesis gas feed preparation and compression facilities, the liquid phase reactor and auxiliaries, product distillation facilities, and utilities. The technology to be demonstrated is the product of a cooperative development effort by Air Products and DOE in a program that started in 1981. Developed to enhance electric power generation using integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) technology, the LPMEOH{trademark} process is ideally suited for directly processing gases produced by modern-day coal gasifiers. This liquid phase process suspends fine catalyst particles in an inert liquid, forming a slurry. The slurry dissipates the heat of the chemical reaction away from the catalyst surface protecting the catalyst and allowing the methanol synthesis reaction to proceed at higher rates. At the Eastman complex, the technology will be integrated with existing coal-gasifiers. A carefully developed test plan will allow operations at Eastman to simulate electricity demand load-following in coal-based IGCC facilities. The operations will also demonstrate the enhanced stability and heat dissipation of the conversion process, its reliable on/off operation, and its ability to produce methanol as a clean liquid fuel without additional upgrading. An off-site product testing program will be conducted to demonstrate the suitability of the methanol product as a transportation fuel and as a fuel for stationary applications for small modular electric power generators for distributed power.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

322

Integrated system for coal-methanol liquefaction and slurry pipeline transportation. Final report. [In slurry transport  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering economics of an integrated coal-to-methanol conversion system and coal-in-methanol transportation system are examined, under the circumstances of the western coalfields, i.e., long distances from major markets and scarcity of water in the vicinity of the mines. The transportation economics are attractive, indicating tariffs of approximately 40 cents per million Btu per thousand miles for the coal-methanol pipeline vs 60 cents via coal-water pipelines and upwards of a dollar via rail. Energy consumption is also less in the coal-methanol pipeline than in the coal-water pipeline, and about equal to rail. It is also concluded that, by a proper marriage of the synthetic fuel (methanolization) plant to the slurrification plant, most, and in some cases all, of the water required by the synthetic fuel process can be supplied by the natural moisture of the coal itself. Thus, the only technology which presently exists and by which synthetic fuel from western coal can displace petroleum in the automotive fuel market is the integrated methanol conversion and tranportation system. The key element is the ability of the methanol slurry pipeline to accept and to deliver dry (1 to 5% moisture) coal, allowing the natural coal moisture to be used as synthesis feedstock in satisfaction of the large water requirement of any synthetic fuel plant. By virtue of these unique properties, this integrated system is seen as the only means in the foreseeable future whereby western coal can be converted to synthetic fuel and moved to distant markets.

Banks, W.F.; Davidson, J.K.; Horton, J.H.; Summers, C.W.

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Processing of Soybean Oil into Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abundant and easily refined, petroleum has provided high energy density liquid fuels for a century. However, recent price fluctuations, shortages, and concerns over the long term supply and greenhouse gas emissions have encouraged the development of alternatives to petroleum for liquid transportation fuels (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004). Plant-based fuels include short chain alcohols, now blended with gasoline, and biodiesels, commonly derived from seed oils. Of plant-derived diesel feedstocks, soybeans yield the most of oil by weight, up to 20% (Mushrush, Willauer et al. 2009), and so have become the primary source of biomass-derived diesel in the United States and Brazil (Lin, Cunshan et al. 2011). Worldwide ester biodiesel production reached over 11,000,000 tons per year in 2008 (Emerging Markets 2008). However, soybean oil cannot be burned directly in modern compression ignition vehicle engines as a direct replacement for diesel fuel because of its physical properties that can lead to clogging of the engine fuel line and problems in the fuel injectors, such as: high viscosity, high flash point, high pour point, high cloud point (where the fuel begins to gel), and high density (Peterson, Cook et al. 2001). Industrial production of biodiesel from oil of low fatty-acid content often follows homogeneous base-catalyzed transesterification, a sequential reaction of the parent triglyceride with an alcohol, usually methanol, into methyl ester and glycerol products. The conversion of the triglyceride to esterified fatty acids improves the characteristics of the fuel, allowing its introduction into a standard compression engine without giving rise to serious issues with flow or combustion. Commercially available biodiesel, a product of the transesterification of fats and oils, can also be blended with standard diesel fuel up to a maximum of 20 vol.%. In the laboratory, the fuel characteristics of unreacted soybean oil have also been improved by dilution with petroleum based fuels, or by aerating and formation of microemulsions. However, it is the chemical conversion of the oil to fuel that has been the area of most interest. The topic has been reviewed extensively (Van Gerpen, Shanks et al. 2004), so this aspect will be the focus in this chapter. Important aspects of the chemistry of conversion of oil into diesel fuel remain the same no matter the composition of the triglyceride. Hence, although the focus in this book is on soybean oil, studies on other plant based oils and simulated oils have occasional mention in this chapter. Valuable data can be taken on systems that are simpler than soybean based oils, with fewer or shorter chain components. Sometimes the triglycerides will behave differently under reaction conditions, and when relevant, these have been noted in the text. Although the price of diesel fuel has increased, economical production of biodiesel is a challenge because of (1) the increasing price of soybean oil feedstocks and reagent methanol, (2) a distributed supply of feedstocks that reduces the potential for economies of scale, (3) processing conditions that include pressures and temperatures above ambient, and (4) multiple processing steps needed to reduce contaminant levels to ASTM specification D6751 limits (Vasudevan & Briggs 2008). Much of the cost of biodiesel production is related to the conversion of the oil to the methyl ester and so there has been an emphasis to research improved methods of converting soybean oil to biodiesel. However, most of these studies have taken place at the bench scale, and have not demonstrated a marked improvement in yield or reduced oil-to-methanol ratio in comparison with standard base-catalyzed transesterification. One aspect that has a short term chance of implementation is the improvement of the conversion process by the use of a continuous rather than batch process, with energy savings generated by combined reaction and separation, online analysis, and reagent methanol added by titration as needed to produce ASTM specification grade fuel. By adapting process intensif

McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis shows that hybrid and electric cars perform bettercar (4-5 passengers) Fuels Gasoline, CNG, diesel, FT50, methanol, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Demand Forecasting System for Clean-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at-home refueling (compressed natural gas), the availabilitygasoline, compressed natural gas, and electricity -- haveclean fuels. For compressed natural gas and methanol this is

Brownstone, David; Bunch, David S.; Golob, Thomas F.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Evaluation of Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

ConocoPhillips, in conjunction with Nexant Inc., Penn State University, and Cummins Engine Co., joined with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in a cooperative agreement to perform a comprehensive study of new ultra clean fuels (UCFs) produced from remote sources of natural gas. The project study consists of three primary tasks: an environmental Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), a Market Study, and a series of Engine Tests to evaluate the potential markets for Ultra Clean Fuels. The overall objective of DOE's Ultra Clean Transportation Fuels Initiative is to develop and deploy technologies that will produce ultra-clean burning transportation fuels for the 21st century from both petroleum and non-petroleum resources. These fuels will: (1) Enable vehicles to comply with future emission requirements; (2) Be compatible with the existing liquid fuels infrastructure; (3) Enable vehicle efficiencies to be significantly increased, with concomitantly reduced CO{sub 2} emissions; (4) Be obtainable from a fossil resource, alone or in combination with other hydrocarbon materials such as refinery wastes, municipal wastes, biomass, and coal; and (5) Be competitive with current petroleum fuels. The objectives of the ConocoPhillips Ultra Clean Fuels Project are to perform a comprehensive life cycle analysis and to conduct a market study on ultra clean fuels of commercial interest produced from natural gas, and, in addition, perform engine tests for Fisher-Tropsch diesel and methanol in neat, blended or special formulations to obtain data on emissions. This resulting data will be used to optimize fuel compositions and engine operation in order to minimize the release of atmospheric pollutants resulting from the fuel combustion. Development and testing of both direct and indirect methanol fuel cells was to be conducted and the optimum properties of a suitable fuel-grade methanol was to be defined. The results of the study are also applicable to coal-derived FT liquid fuels. After different gas clean up processes steps, the coal-derived syngas will produce FT liquid fuels that have similar properties to natural gas derived FT liquids.

Robert Abbott; Edward Casey; Etop Esen; Douglas Smith; Bruce Burke; Binh Nguyen; Samuel Tam; Paul Worhach; Mahabubul Alam; Juhun Song; James Szybist; Ragini Acharya; Vince Zello; David Morris; Patrick Flynn; Stephen Kirby; Krishan Bhatia; Jeff Gonder; Yun Wang; Wenpeng Liu; Hua Meng; Subramani Velu; Jian-Ping Shen, Weidong Gu; Elise Bickford; Chunshan Song; Chao-Yang Wang; Andre' Boehman

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Advanced-fueled fusion reactors suitable for direct energy conversion. Fourth quarterly progress report: October 1976--December 1976 and first quarterly progress report: January 1977--March 1977  

SciTech Connect

The direct energy conversion efficiencies calculated for Cat-D and D-/sup 3/He fueled Tokamak reactors are summarized over a range of reactor designs, collector configurations, assumed T/sub e//T/sub i/ ratios, and power densities. The performance of a system of superconducting coils that produce those fields required to guide escaping plasma along the path between the bundle divertor coils and the direct converter is also discussed.

Blum, A.S. (ed.)

1977-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

328

Structure Sensitivity of Methanol Electrooxidation on Transition Metals  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have investigated the structure sensitivity of methanol electrooxidation on eight transition metals (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, Pd, Ir, Rh, and Ni) using periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFTGGA). Using the adsorption energies of 16 intermediates on two different facets of these eight face-centeredcubic transition metals, combined with a simple electrochemical model, we address the differences in the reaction mechanism between the (111) and (100) facets of these metals. We investigate two separate mechanisms for methanol electrooxidation: one going through a CO* intermediate (the indirect pathway) and another that oxidizes methanol directly to CO2 without CO* as an intermediate (the direct pathway). A comparison of our results for the (111) and (100) surfaces explains the origin of methanol electrooxidations experimentally-established structure sensitivity on Pt surfaces. For most metals studied, on both the (111) and (100) facets, we predict that the indirect mechanism has a higher onset potential than the direct mechanism. Ni(111), Au(100), and Au(111) are the cases where the direct and indirect mechanisms have the same onset potential. For the direct mechanism, Rh, Ir, and Ni show a lower onset potential on the (111) facet, whereas Pt, Cu, Ag, and Au possess lower onset potential on the (100) facet. Pd(100) and Pd(111) have the same onset potential for the direct mechanism. These results can be rationalized by the stronger binding energy of adsorbates on the (100) facet versus the (111) facet. Using linear scaling relations, we establish reactivity descriptors for the (100) surface similar to those recently developed for the (111) surface; the free energies of adsorbed CO* and OH* can describe methanol electrooxidation trends on various metal surfaces reasonably well.

Ferrin, Peter A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

329

Conversion of biomass to methanol and its effect on CO sub 2 emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose for this report is to present a preliminary analysis of various processes for conversion of biomass to methanol fuel with the objective of determining the effect of these processes on net CO{sub 2} emissions. The analysis is made primarily on the basis of first principles of mass and energy balances. There are at least four systems that can produce methanol from biomass (defined as wood or lignocellulose). These are reviewed and assessed. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Steinberg, M.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

New electrolytes for direct methane fuel cells. Final report, January 10,1977-January 9, 1979. [Methanesulfonic acids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is aimed at developing a fuel cell electrolyte for the direct oxidation of CH/sub 4/ and/or impure H/sub 2/ fuels. Of interest are di- and tribasic methanesulfonic acids CX/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ and CX(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ where X is H, F, or C1. Synthetic routes to CH/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/, CH(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/, CCl/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/, and CCl(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ have been identified and optimized. The diphenyl ester of CF/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ has been prepared for the first time and various approaches to CF(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ have been investigated. In parallel with the synthetic program, apparatus was designed and fabricated for the testing of the electrolytes under fuel cell conditions. A new PTFE test cell was developed for testing small amounts of electrolyte. Electrodes with low Pt loading were developed for use in electrolyte evaluation. Optimum performance with H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/ was achieved using 1 mg Pt/cm/sup 2/ and 1 mg TFE 30/cm/sup 2/ deposited on TFE tape, supported on a Au plated Ta screen, and sintered. Preliminary half cell tests using CH/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ and CH(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ indicated that these acids are insufficiently stable for use as fuel cell electrolytes. However, tests using CCl/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H/sub 2/) and CCl(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 3/ were encouraging, yielding H/sub 2/ oxidation rates equal to or better than those using H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. Stability tests were conducted by heating a sample of each acid at 130/sup 0/ for 30 days under atmospheres of N/sub 2/, O/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/. At the end of the test, each sample was analyzed for decomposition. In no case did IR analysis indicate significant decomposition and, in the case of the chloroacids, only a trace amount of free Cl/sup -/ was observed. Conductivity measurements showed the aqueous acids to be of the same conductivty as aqueous H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/. The dihydrate of CH/sub 2/(SO/sub 3/H)/sub 2/ was found to be more conductive than CF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/H.H/sub 2/O but less conductive than 100% H/sub 3/PO/sub 4/.

Brummer, S.B.; Foos, J.; McHardy, J.; McVeigh, J.; Toland, D.; Turner, M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methods for using water produced by the fuel cells,"the amount of reaction water produced during starvation isalso allows liquid water produced at the cathode to leave

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Thermal Model to Evaluate Sub-Freezing Startup for a Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicle Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell Stack and System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and methods for using water produced by the fuel cells,"by ice formed from water produced in the stack reactions.and allows liquid water produced at the cathode to leave the

Sundaresan, Meena

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Technoeconomic Comparison of Biofuels: Ethanol, Methanol, and Gasoline from Gasification of Woody Residues (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation provides a technoeconomic comparison of three biofuels - ethanol, methanol, and gasoline - produced by gasification of woody biomass residues. The presentation includes a brief discussion of the three fuels evaluated; discussion of equivalent feedstock and front end processes; discussion of back end processes for each fuel; process comparisons of efficiencies, yields, and water usage; and economic assumptions and results, including a plant gate price (PGP) for each fuel.

Tarud, J.; Phillips, S.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

uel cells convert chemical energy directly to electrical energy cleanly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to fuel molecules (such as hydro- gen and methanol), thereby wasting energy by of cars powered by fuel cells. New water- replacement systems, such as imidazole (C3H4N2

Haile, Sossina M.

335

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Final technical report. Bimetallic complexes as methanol oxidation catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our work on the electrocatalyzed oxidation of methanol was initially motivated by the interest in methanol as an anodic reactant in fuel cells. The literature on electrochemical oxidation of alcohols can be roughly grouped into two sets: fuel cell studies and inorganic chemistry studies. Work on fuel cells primarily focuses on surface-catalyzed oxidation at bulk metal anodes, usually Pt or Pt/Ru alloys. In the surface science/electrochemistry approach to these studies, single molecule catalysts are generally not considered. In contrast, the inorganic community investigates the electrooxidation of alcohols in homogeneous systems. Ruthenium complexes have been the most common catalysts in these studies. The alcohol substrates are typically either secondary alcohols (e.g., isopropanol) such that the reaction stops after 2 e{sup -} oxidation to the aldehyde and 4 e{sup -} oxidation to the carboxylic acid can be observed. Methanol, which can also undergo 6 e{sup -} oxidation to CO{sub 2}, rarely appears in the homogeneous catalysis studies. Surface studies have shown that two types of metal centers with different functions result in more effective catalysts than a single metal; however, application of this concept to homogeneous systems has not been demonstrated. The major thrust of the work is to apply this insight from the surface studies to homogeneous catalysis. Even though homogeneous systems would not be appropriate models for active sites on Pt/Ru anodes, it is possible that heterobimetallic catalysts could also utilize two metal centers for different roles. Starting from that perspective, this work involves the preparation and investigation of heterobinuclear catalysts for the electrochemical oxidation of methanol.

McElwee-White, Lisa

2002-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

337

European Fuel Cells R&D Review. Final report, Purchase Order No. 062014  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aim of the Review is to present a statement on the status of fuel cell development in Europe, addressing the research, development and demonstration (RD&D) and commercialization activities being undertaken, identifying key European organizations active in development and commercialization of fuel cells and detailing their future plans. This document describes the RD&D activities in Europe on alkaline, phosphoric acid, polymer electrolyte, direct methanol, solid oxide, and molten carbonate fuel cell types. It describes the European Commission`s activities, its role in the European development of fuel cells, and its interaction with the national programs. It then presents a country-by-country breakdown. For each country, an overview is given, presented by fuel cell type. Scandinavian countries are covered in less detail. American organizations active in Europe, either in supplying fuel cell components, or in collaboration, are identified. Applications include transportation and cogeneration.

Michael, P.D.; Maguire, J. [Energy Technology Support Unit, Harwell (United Kingdom)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Synthesis and characterization of 1D ceria nanomaterials for CO oxidation and steam reforming of methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel one-dimensional (1D) ceria nanostructure has been investigated as a promising and practical approach for the reforming of methanol reaction. Size and shape of the ceria nanomaterials are directly involved with the catalytic activities. Several ...

Sujan Chowdhury; Kuen-Song Lin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Automotive storage of hydrogen as a mixture of methanol and water. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The concept of steam-reforming methanol on-board an automobile was evaluated as a candidate method of storing fuel for the hydrogen engine. This method uses low-temperature, engine waste heat to evaporate a 1:1 molar water-methanol mixture at 373/sup 0/K (212/sup 0/F) and to provide endothermic reaction heat at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F) to convert this mixture to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. By using engine waste heat, a fuel combustion enrichment of 8% (LHV) or 18% (HHV) is obtained when the reactor effluents are compared with those from the tanked fuel. Defining system efficiency as the product of the generator chemical efficiency (108%) and the engine thermal efficiency (assumed to be 30%) yields a value of 32.4%. Conservative estimates indicate that an additional volume of 44 to 49 liters and an additional weight of 110 to 140 kg would be required, compared with a conventional 20 gal gasoline tank. A 500 hour endurance test of this system with a Girdler G-66B catalyst was conducted at 505/sup 0/K (450/sup 0/F), atmospheric pressure, and low space velocity--compared with automotive requirements--at wide-open-throttle conditions with laboratory-grade methanol; there was no loss of activity. However, when fuel-grade methanol containing small amounts of higher alcohols was substituted for the laboratory-grade methanol, significant catalyst deactivation occurred. (auth)

Kester, F.L.; Konopka, A.J.; Camara, E.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: LIF, air-to-fuel mixing, gasoline direct injection engine, image analysis, intensified image acquisition, laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: Air-to-fuel mixing, Gasoline direct injection engine, Image analysis, Intensified image acquisition, LIF, Laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

50,000 mile methanol/gasoline blend fleet study: a progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven current production automobiles are being used in a fleet study to obtain operational experience in using 10% methanol/90% gasoline blends as an automotive fuel. Data from chassis dynamometer tests (run according to the 1975--1978 Federal test procedure) have been obtained, showing fuel economy and exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, unburned fuel, methanol, and aldehydes. These data are shown for each of the vehicles when operated on the 10% methanol blend, and on unleaded low octane Indolene. Chassis dynamometer tests were run at 5,000-mile intervals during the 35,000 miles accumulated on each of the four 1977 model-year vehicles and at 5,000 and 10,000 mile accumulation levels for each of the three 1978 model-year vehicles. These data show an average decrease in volumetric fuel economy (approx. = 5%) and a reduction in carbon monoxide emissions associated with the use of the 10% methanol blend. Exhaust emission deterioration factors are projected from the Federal test procedure urban cycle data. The most severe driveability problems that have been encountered thus far into the program are related to operating on a phase separated fuel and materials compatibility problems with an elastomer in the air-fuel control hardware of one vehicle.

Stamper, K R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

Chan, A.K.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

344

MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name MTI MicroFuel Cells Inc Place Albany, New York Zip NY 12205 Product Has developed a patented, miniaturised proprietary direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology called Mobion. Coordinates 42.707237°, -89.436378° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.707237,"lon":-89.436378,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

345

Methanol production method and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol is selectively produced from the reaction of methanol with carbon monoxide and hydrogen in the presence of a transition metal carbonyl catalyst. Methanol serves as a solvent and may be accompanied by a less volatile co-solvent. The solution includes the transition metal carbonyl catalysts and a basic metal salt such as an alkali metal or alkaline earth metal formate, carbonate or bicarbonate. A gas containing a high carbon monoxide to hydrogen ratio, as is present in a typical gasifer product, is contacted with the solution for the preferential production of ethanol with minimal water as a byproduct. Fractionation of the reaction solution provides substantially pure ethanol product and allows return of the catalysts for reuse.

Chen, Michael J. (Darien, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Density Functional Theory of a Nickel-based Anode Catalyst for Application in a Direct Propane Fuel Cell .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The maximum theoretical energy efficiency of fuel cells is much larger than those of the steam-power-turbine cycles that are currently used for generating electrical power. (more)

Vafaeyan, Shadi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report Number 1, July 1--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls), this propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; (3) analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) identify any future R and D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

Oei, G.

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

348

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

Oei, D.

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

349

Development of a New Class of Low Cost, High Frequency Link Direct DC to AC Converters for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC)  

SciTech Connect

This project proposes to design and develop a new class of power converters (direct DC to AC) to drastically improve performance and optimize the cost, size, weight and volume of the DC to AC converter in SOFC systems. The proposed topologies employ a high frequency link; direct DC to AC conversion approach. The direct DC to AC conversion approach is more efficient and operates without an intermediate dc-link stage. The absence of the dc-link, results in the elimination of bulky, aluminum electrolytic capacitors, which in turn leads to a reduction in the cost, volume, size and weight of the power electronic converter. The feasibility of two direct DC to AC converter topologies and their suitability to meet SECA objectives will be investigated. Laboratory proto-type converters (3-5kW) will be designed and tested in Phase-1. A detailed design trade-off study along with the test results will be available in the form of a report for the evaluation of SECA Industrial partners. This project proposes to develop a new and innovative power converter technology suitable for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) power systems in accordance with SECA objectives. The proposed fuel cell inverter (FCI) employs state of the art power electronic devices configured in two unique topologies to achieve direct conversion of DC power (24-48V) available from a SOFC to AC power (120/240V, 60Hz) suitable for utility interface and powering stand alone loads. The primary objective is to realize cost effective fuel cell converter, which operates under a wide input voltage range, and output load swings with high efficiency and improved reliability.

Prasad Enjeti; J.W. Howze

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Study Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Study As directed by the Nevada Legislature, the Legislative Commission (Commission) conducted an interim study in 2011 concerning the production and use of energy in the state. The study included information on the use

351

Integrated fuel processor development.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy's Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies has been supporting the development of fuel-flexible fuel processors at Argonne National Laboratory. These fuel processors will enable fuel cell vehicles to operate on fuels available through the existing infrastructure. The constraints of on-board space and weight require that these fuel processors be designed to be compact and lightweight, while meeting the performance targets for efficiency and gas quality needed for the fuel cell. This paper discusses the performance of a prototype fuel processor that has been designed and fabricated to operate with liquid fuels, such as gasoline, ethanol, methanol, etc. Rated for a capacity of 10 kWe (one-fifth of that needed for a car), the prototype fuel processor integrates the unit operations (vaporization, heat exchange, etc.) and processes (reforming, water-gas shift, preferential oxidation reactions, etc.) necessary to produce the hydrogen-rich gas (reformate) that will fuel the polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks. The fuel processor work is being complemented by analytical and fundamental research. With the ultimate objective of meeting on-board fuel processor goals, these studies include: modeling fuel cell systems to identify design and operating features; evaluating alternative fuel processing options; and developing appropriate catalysts and materials. Issues and outstanding challenges that need to be overcome in order to develop practical, on-board devices are discussed.

Ahmed, S.; Pereira, C.; Lee, S. H. D.; Krumpelt, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Formic acid oxidation in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: A real-time mass-spectrometry study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electro-oxidation of formic acid was studied in a direct-oxidation polymer-electrolyte fuel cell at 170 C using real-time mass spectrometry. The results are compared with those obtained for methanol oxidation under the same conditions. Formic acid was electrochemically more active than methanol on both Pt-black and Pt-Ru catalysts. The polarization potential of formic acid oxidation was ca. 90 to 100 mV lower than that of methanol. The oxidation of formic acid was dependent on the water/formic acid mole ratio. The best anode performance was obtained using a water/formic acid mole ratio of {approximately}2. In addition, Pt/Ru catalyst was more active than Pt-black for formic acid oxidation. The mass spectrometric results showed that CO{sub 2} is the only reaction product of formic acid oxidation. The results are discussed in terms of possible formic acid oxidation mechanisms.

Weber, M.; Wang, J.T.; Wasmus, S.; Savinell, R.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

One-pot, high-yield synthesis of titanate nanotube bundles decorated by Pd (Au) clusters for stable electrooxidation of methanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Titanate nanotube bundles assembled by several simple nanotubes were synthesized through a simple reaction between TiO{sub 2} crystallites and highly concentrated NaOH in the presence of Au or Pd sols. Due to the unique scrolling growth mechanism of titanate nanotubes (TNTs), Au or Pd clusters were encapsulated in situ by TNTs, and titanate/Au and titanate/Pd nanotube bundles were formed. In comparison with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) or active carbon that was widely used as carriers to support metal clusters, TNTs bundles can immobilize the metal clusters tightly and overcome the shortcoming of exfoliation of metal clusters from the carriers. The as-prepared titanate/metal hybrids possess mesoporosity and high surface area. The electrochemical oxidation of methanol demonstrates that titanate/Pd hybrids exhibit high electrocatalytic activity and excellent stability, and hence they should be ideal catalyst candidates in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs). - Graphical abstract: Titanate/Au and titanate/Pd nanotube bundles have been fabricated by taking advantage of the unique scrolling growth mechanism of titanate tubes. The titanate/Pd hybrids show stable catalytic effects toward the electrooxidation of methanol.

Xue Xiudong [Key Lab of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province and Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Gu Li [College of Biology and Chemical Engineering, Jiaxing University, Jiaxing, Zhejiang 314001 (China); Cao Xuebo, E-mail: xbcao@suda.edu.c [Key Lab of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province and Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China); Song Yingying; Zhu Lianwen; Chen Peng [Key Lab of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province and Department of Chemistry, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215123 (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Durability testing of a Toyota LCS-M (lean combustion system-methanol) Carina. Technical report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the exhaust emissions, fuel economy, and oil-sample analysis from a Toyota LCS-M Carina motor vehicle fueled with M100 fuel. The vehicle accumulated 6,000 miles driven over the AMA durability driving schedule in order to determine if exhaust-emissions levels increase during the first 5,000-15,000 miles of driving with a light-duty methanol-fueled vehicle. The program description, test-vehicle description, test facilities, and the test-vehicle specifications are included.

Piotrowski, G.K.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Impacts of alternative fuels on air quality  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine the impact of alternative fuels on air quality, particularly ozone formation. The alternative fuels of interest are methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, and natural gas. During the first year of study, researchers obtained qualitative data on the thermal degradation products from the fuel-lean (oxidative), stoichiometric, and fuel-rich (pyrolytic) decomposition of methanol and ethanol. The thermal degradation of ethanol produced a substantially larger number of intermediate organic by-products than the similar thermal degradation of methanol, and the organic intermediate by-products lacked stability. Also, a qualitative comparison of the UDRI flow reactor data with previous engine test showed that, for methanol, formaldehyde and acetone were the organic by-products observed in both types of tests; for ethanol, only very limited data were located.

Taylor, P.H.; Dellinger, B. [Dayton Univ., OH (United States). Research Inst.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol was investigated. The procedure for the carbon dioxide conversion was carried out using a small scale (more)

Okpo, Emmanuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Methanol production from eucalyptus wood chips  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of producing methanol from wood is demonstrated and sufficient cost data is provided to allow an assessment of the economic viability.

Fishkind, H.H.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydrogen production from the steam reforming of Dinethyl Ether and Methanol  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates dimethyl ether (DME) steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for fuel cell applications. Methanol has long been considered as a fuel for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds due to its high energy density, low reforming temperature, and zero impurity content. However, it has not been accepted as the fuel of choice due its current limited availability, toxicity and corrosiveness. While methanol steam reforming for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds has been extensively studied, the steam reforming of DME, CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3} + 3H{sub 2}O = 2CO{sub 2} + 6H{sub 2}, has had limited research effort. DME is the simplest ether (CH{sub 3}OCH{sub 3}) and is a gas at ambient conditions. DME has physical properties similar to those of LPG fuels (i.e. propane and butane), resulting in similar storage and handling considerations. DME is currently used as an aerosol propellant and has been considercd as a diesel substitute due to the reduced NOx, SOx and particulate emissions. DME is also being considered as a substitute for LPG fuels, which is used extensively in Asia as a fuel for heating and cooking, and naptha, which is used for power generation. The potential advantages of both methanol and DME include low reforming temperature, decreased fuel proccssor startup energy, environmentally benign, visible flame, high heating value, and ease of storage and transportation. In addition, DME has the added advantages of low toxicity and being non-corrosive. Consequently, DME may be an ideal candidate for the generation of hydrogen rich fuel cell feeds for both automotive and portable power applications. The steam reforming of DME has been demonstrated to occur through a pair of reactions in series, where the first reaction is DME hydration followed by MeOH steam reforming to produce a hydrogen rich stream.

Semelsberger, T. A. (Troy A.); Borup, R. L. (Rodney L.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Techno-economic Analysis for the Conversion of Lignocellulosic Biomass to Gasoline via the Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biomass is a renewable energy resource that can be converted into liquid fuel suitable for transportation applications. As a widely available biomass form, lignocellulosic biomass can have a major impact on domestic transportation fuel supplies and thus help meet the Energy Independence and Security Act renewable energy goals (U.S. Congress 2007). With gasification technology, biomass can be converted to gasoline via methanol synthesis and methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) technologies. Producing a gasoline product that is infrastructure ready has much potential. Although the MTG technology has been commercially demonstrated with natural gas conversion, combining MTG with biomass gasification has not been shown. Therefore, a techno-economic evaluation for a biomass MTG process based on currently available technology was developed to provide information about benefits and risks of this technology. The economic assumptions used in this report are consistent with previous U.S. Department of Energy Office of Biomass Programs techno-economic assessments. The feedstock is assumed to be wood chips at 2000 metric ton/day (dry basis). Two kinds of gasification technologies were evaluated: an indirectly-heated gasifier and a directly-heated oxygen-blown gasifier. The gasoline selling prices (2008 USD) excluding taxes were estimated to be $3.20/gallon and $3.68/gallon for indirectly-heated gasified and directly-heated. This suggests that a process based on existing technology is economic only when crude prices are above $100/bbl. However, improvements in syngas cleanup combined with consolidated gasoline synthesis can potentially reduce the capital cost. In addition, improved synthesis catalysts and reactor design may allow increased yield.

Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines. Twenty-eighth quarterly report, July--September 1994  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of advanced, coal-fueled turbine power plants such as pressurized fluid bed combustion and coal gasification combined cycles. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the coal-fueled turbine is high-temperature gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science & Technology Center, is evaluating Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure process gases. This document reports the status of a program in the twenty-seventh quarter to develop this ILEC technology.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Direct conversion of surplus fissile materials, spent nuclear fuel, and other materials to high-level-waste glass  

SciTech Connect

With the end of the cold war the United States, Russia, and other countries have excess plutonium and other materials from the reductions in inventories of nuclear weapons. The United States Academy of Sciences (NAS) has recommended that these surplus fissile materials (SFMs) be processed so they are no more accessible than plutonium in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). This spent fuel standard, if adopted worldwide, would prevent rapid recovery of SFMs for the manufacture of nuclear weapons. The NAS recommended investigation of three sets of options for disposition of SFMs while meeting the spent fuel standard: (1) incorporate SFMs with highly radioactive materials and dispose of as waste, (2) partly burn the SFMs in reactors with conversion of the SFMs to SNF for disposal, and (3) dispose of the SFMs in deep boreholes. The US Government is investigating these options for SFM disposition. A new method for the disposition of SFMs is described herein: the simultaneous conversion of SFMs, SNF, and other highly radioactive materials into high-level-waste (HLW) glass. The SFMs include plutonium, neptinium, americium, and {sup 233}U. The primary SFM is plutonium. The preferred SNF is degraded SNF, which may require processing before it can be accepted by a geological repository for disposal.

Forsberg, C.W.; Elam, K.R.

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

List of Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fuel Vehicles Incentives Fuel Vehicles Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 8 Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 8) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Alternative Fuel Vehicle Loan Program (Missouri) State Loan Program Missouri Schools Local Government Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations No Alternative Fuels Incentive Grant Fund (AFIG) (Pennsylvania) State Grant Program Pennsylvania Commercial Industrial Residential General Public/Consumer Nonprofit Schools Local Government Renewable Transportation Fuels Renewable Fuel Vehicles Other Alternative Fuel Vehicles Refueling Stations Ethanol Methanol Biodiesel No Alternative Vehicle Conversion Credits - Corporate (Louisiana) Corporate Tax Credit Louisiana Commercial Renewable Fuel Vehicles

363

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume I: summary  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly diesel No. 2. The study takes two approaches: (1) to determine how the use of diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and (2) to use fuels other than diesel No. 2 both in diesel and other types of engines. The study consists of two volumes; volume 1 is a summary and volume 2 is the technical document. The study indicates that the possible reduction in fuel usage by increasing the efficiency of the present engine is limited; it is already highly energy efficient. The use of non-petroleum fuels, particularly the oil shale distillates, offers a greater potential. A coal-fired locomotive using any one of a number of engines appears to be the best alternative to the diesel-electric locomotive with regard to life-cycle cost, fuel availability, and development risk. The adiabatic diesel is the second-rated alternative with high thermal efficiency (up to 64%) as its greatest advantage. The risks associated with the development of the adiabatic diesel, however, are higher than those for the coal-fired locomotive. The advantage of the third alternative, the fuel cell, is that it produces electricity directly from the fuel. At present, the only feasible fuel for a fuel cell locomotive is methanol. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives are used beyond 1995. Because synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are particularly suited to medium-speed diesel engines, the first commercial application of these fuels may be by the railroad industry.

Liddle, S.G.; Bonzo, B.B.; Purohit, G.P.; Stallkamp, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Solar photocatalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methanol  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the three-year LDRD program directed at developing catalysts based on metalloporphyrins to reduce carbon dioxide. Ultimately it was envisioned that such catalysts could be made part of a solar-driven photoredox cycle by coupling metalloporphyrins with semiconductor systems. Such a system would provide the energy required for CO{sub 2} reduction to methanol, which is an uphill 6-electron reduction. Molecular modeling and design capabilities were used to engineer metalloporphyrin catalysts for converting CO{sub 2} to CO and higher carbon reduction products like formaldehyde, formate, and methanol. Gas-diffusion electrochemical cells were developed to carry out these reactions. A tin-porphyrin/alumina photocatalyst system was partially developed to couple solar energy to this reduction process.

Ryba, G.; Shelnutt, J.; Prairie, M.R.; Assink, R.A.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Direct catalytic conversion of methane and light hydrocarbon gases. Quarterly report No. 6, January 16, 1988--April 15, 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to develop catalysts that directly convert methane and light hydrocarbons to intermediates that later can be converted to either liquid fuels or value-added chemicals, as economics dictate. During this reporting period, we synthesized several phthalocyanine catalysts supported on magnesia (MgO) in Task 3. In Task 4 we have tested these catalysts for oxidation of methane and did a number of blank experiments to determine the cause of the low methanol yield we have observed. Magnesia supported catalysts were prepared by first synthesizing the various metal tetrasulfophthalocyanines (TSPCs), converting them to the acid form, and then supporting these complexes on a basic support (MgO) by a neutralization reaction. The metals used were Ru, Pd, Cu, Fe, Co, Mn, and Mo. CoTSPC was also synthesized in zeolite Y using our standard template techniques described in Quarterly Report No. 1. These complexes were examined for catalytic activity in the oxidation of methane. The PdTSPC/MgO had greater activity, and oxidized some of the methane (selectivity of 2.8% from the methane oxidized at 375{degrees}C) to ethane. This is a much lower temperature for this reaction than previously reported in the literature. We also examined the reactivity of various components of the system in the oxidation of the product methanol. The reactor showed some activity for the oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide. When zeolite or magnesia were added, this activity increased. The magnesia oxidized most of the methanol to carbon dioxide, while the zeolite reduced some of the methanol to hydrocarbons. With oxygen in the feed gas stream (i.e., the conditions of our methane oxidation), a very large fraction of the methanol was oxidized to carbon dioxide when passed over magnesia. From this, we can conclude that any methanol formed in the oxidation of methane would probably be destroyed very quickly on the catalyst bed.

Wilson, R.B. Jr.; Chan, Yee Wai; Posin, B.M.

1988-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

366

Alternative Fuels Data Center - Fuel Properties Comparison  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels Data Center - Fuel Properties Comparison Fuels Data Center - Fuel Properties Comparison www.afdc.energy.gov 1 2/27/2013 Gasoline Diesel (No. 2) Biodiesel Propane (LPG) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Ethanol Methanol Hydrogen Electricity Chemical Structure C 4 to C 12 C 8 to C 25 Methyl esters of C 12 to C 22 fatty acids C 3 H 8 (majority) and C 4 H 10 (minority) CH 4 (83-99%), C 2 H 6 (1-13%) CH 4 CH 3 CH 2 OH CH 3 OH H 2 N/A Fuel Material (feedstocks) Crude Oil Crude Oil Fats and oils from sources such as soy beans, waste cooking oil, animal fats, and rapeseed A by-product of petroleum refining or natural gas processing Underground reserves Underground reserves Corn, grains, or

367

Development of alternative fuels from coal derived syngas. Topical report: Task 2.2, Demonstration of a one-step slurry-phase process for the production of dimethyl ether/methanol mixtures at the LaPorte Alternative Fuels Development Unit  

SciTech Connect

This report documents engineering, modification, and operations efforts of demonstration of dimethyl-ether/methanol coproduction in a slurry-phase reactor, carried out in a 2-ft diameter bubble column reactor. Equipment modifications made it possible to remove the product DME and by-product CO{sub 2} from the reactor effluent. Coproduction of dimethyl-ether (DME) and methanol (MeOH) was accomplished in the slurry reactor by physically mixing two different catalysts. The catalyst used to produce MeOH from syngas was manufactured by BASF (type S3-86); the catalyst used to convert MeOH to DME was Catapal {gamma}-alumina. Ratio of MeOH to DME catalysts determined the selectivity towards DME. The demonstration sought to study effect of cocatalyst ratio on product selectivity. Three different proportions of DME catalyst were examined: 0, 6.6, and 19.3 wt % alumina. At each catalyst proportion, the plant was operated at two different gas space velocities. Some process variables were maintained at fixed conditions; most important variables included: reactor temperature (482F), reactor pressure (750 psig), and reactor feed gas composition (35% H{sub 2}, 51% CO,13% CO{sub 2} 1% other, nominal-molar basis).

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

MEMS-based fuel cells with integrated catalytic fuel processor and method thereof  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Described herein is a means to incorporate catalytic materials into the fuel flow field structures of MEMS-based fuel cells, which enable catalytic reforming of a hydrocarbon based fuel, such as methane, methanol, or butane. Methods of fabrication are also disclosed.

Jankowski, Alan F. (Livermore, CA); Morse, Jeffrey D. (Martinez, CA); Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Havstad, Mark A. (Davis, CA)

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

369

Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument  

SciTech Connect

A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Alcohol Fuels Program technical review, Spring 1984  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The alcohol fuels program consists of in-house and subcontracted research for the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass into fuel alcohols via thermoconversion and bioconversion technologies. In the thermoconversion area, the SERI gasifier has been operated on a one-ton per day scale and produces a clean, medium-Btu gas that can be used to manufacture methanol with a relatively small gas-water shift reaction requirement. Recent research has produced catalysts that make methanol and a mixture of higher alcohols from the biomass-derived synthetic gas. Three hydrolysis processes have emerged as candidates for more focused research. They are: a high-temperature, dilute-acid, plug-flow approach based on the Dartmouth reactor; steam explosion pretreatment followed by hydrolysis using the RUT-C30 fungal organism; and direct microbial conversion of the cellulose to ethanol using bacteria in a single or mixed culture. Modeling studies, including parametric and sensitivity analyses, have recently been completed. The results of these studies will lead to a better definition of the present state-of-the-art for these processes and provide a framework for establishing the research and process engineering issues that still need resolution. In addition to these modeling studies, economic feasibility studies are being carried out by commercial engineering firms. Their results will supplement and add commercial validity to the program results. The feasibility contractors will provide input at two levels: Technical and economic assessment of the current state-of-the-art in alcohol production from lignocellulosic biomass via thermoconversion to produce methanol and higher alcohol mixtures and bioconversion to produce ethanol; and identification of research areas having the potential to significantly reduce the cost of production of alcohols.

Not Available

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

SciTech Connect

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

Albert Tsang

2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

374

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation.

McElroy, James F. (Hamilton, MA); Chludzinski, Paul J. (Swampscott, MA); Dantowitz, Philip (Peabody, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fuel cell power supply with oxidant and fuel gas switching  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a fuel cell vehicular power plant. Fuel for the fuel stack is supplied by a hydrocarbon (methanol) catalytic cracking reactor and CO shift reactor. A water electrolysis subsystem is associated with the stack. During low power operation part of the fuel cell power is used to electrolyze water with hydrogen and oxygen electrolysis products being stored in pressure vessels. During peak power intervals, viz, during acceleration or start-up, pure oxygen and pure hydrogen from the pressure vessel are supplied as the reaction gases to the cathodes and anodes in place of air and methanol reformate. This allows the fuel cell stack to be sized for normal low power/air operation but with a peak power capacity several times greater than that for normal operation. 2 figs.

McElroy, J.F.; Chludzinski, P.J.; Dantowitz, P.

1987-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

376

Hynol -- An economic process for methanol production from biomass and natural gas with reduced CO{sub 2} emission  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Hynol process is proposed to meet the demand for an economical process for methanol production with reduced CO{sub 2} emission. This new process consists of three reaction steps: (a) hydrogasification of biomass, (b) steam reforming of the produced gas with additional natural gas feedstock, and (c) methanol synthesis of the hydrogen and carbon monoxide produced during the previous two steps. The H{sub 2}-rich gas remaining after methanol synthesis is recycled to gasify the biomass in an energy neutral reactor so that there is no need for an expensive oxygen plant as required by commercial steam gasifiers. Recycling gas allows the methanol synthesis reactor to perform at a relatively lower pressure than conventional while the plant still maintains high methanol yield. Energy recovery designed into the process minimizes heat loss and increases the process thermal efficiency. If the Hynol methanol is used as an alternative and more efficient automotive fuel, an overall 41% reduction in CO{sub 2} emission can be achieved compared to the use of conventional gasoline fuel. A preliminary economic estimate shows that the total capital investment for a Hynol plant is 40% lower than that for a conventional biomass gasification plant. The methanol production cost is $0.43/gal for a 1085 million gal/yr Hynol plant which is competitive with current U.S. methanol and equivalent gasoline prices. Process flowsheet and simulation data using biomass and natural gas as cofeedstocks are presented. The Hynol process can convert any condensed carbonaceous material, especially municipal solid waste (MSW), to produce methanol.

Steinberg, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Dong, Yuanji [Hynol Corp., New York, NY (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meat this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter ILEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300[degree]F. This document reports the status of a program in the nineteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

378

Novel Catalyst Support Materials for PEM Fuel Cells: Current Status and Future Prospects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The catalyst supports exhibit great influence on the cost, performance, and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. This review paper is to summarize several important kinds of novel support materials for PEM fuel cells (including direct methanol fuel cell, DMFC): nanostructured carbon materials (carbon nanotubes/carbon nanofibers, mesoporous carbon), conductive doped diamonds and nanodiamonds, conductive oxides (tin oxide/indium tin oxide, titanium oxide, tungsten oxide) and carbides (tungsten carbides). The advantages and disadvantages, the acting mechanism to promote electrocatalysis, and the strategies to improve present catalyst support materials and to search for new ones are discussed. This is expected to throw light on future development of catalyst support for PEM fuel cells.

Shao, Yuyan; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yong; Lin, Yuehe

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Testing and Evaluation of Batteries for a Fuel Cell Powered Hybrid Bus  

SciTech Connect

Argonne National Laboratory conducted performance characterization and life-cycle tests on various batteries to qualify them for use in a fuel cell/battery hybrid bus. On this bus, methanol-fueled, phosphoric acid fuel cells provide routine power needs, while batteries are used to store energy recovered during bus braking and to produce short-duration power during acceleration. Argonne carried out evaluation and endurance testing on several lead-acid and nickel/cadmium batteries selected by the bus developer as potential candidates for the bus application. Argonne conducted over 10,000 hours of testing, simulating more than 80,000 miles of fuel cell bus operation, for the nickel/cadmium battery, which was ultimately selected for use in the three hybrid buses built under the direction of H-Power Corp.

Miller, J.F.; Webster, C.E.; Tummillo, A.F.; DeLuca, W.H.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Commercializing light-duty plug-in/plug-out hydrogen-fuel-cell vehicles: Mobile Electricity technologies and opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D; Kurani, Kenneth S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

An Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice by Commercial Fleets: Lessons in Transportation Choices, and Public Agencies' Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error gov. Error model model CNG constant Methanol constantcompressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles with over 300 milestime or refueling cost of CNG vehicles? My fuel choice

Crane, Soheila Soltani

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

An Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice by Commercial Fleets: Lessons in Transportation Choices, and Public Agencies' Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the agriculture industry to electric vehicles. Organizationsindustry, however, strongly prefers gasoline vehicle to the electricelectric vehicles. Methanol appears to be the alternative fuel of choice by agriculture industry.

Crane, Soheila Soltani

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Integrated low emissions cleanup system for direct coal fueled turbines (moving bed, fluid bed contactor/ceramic filter)  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy, Morgantown Energy Research Center (DOE/METC), is sponsoring the development of direct coal-fired turbine power plants as part of their Heat Engines program. A major technical challenge remaining for the development of the direct coal-fired turbine is high-temperature combustion gas cleaning to meet environmental standards for sulfur oxides and particulate emissions, as well as to provide acceptable turbine life. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Science Technology Center, is evaluating two Integrated Low Emissions Cleanup (ILEC) concepts that have been configured to meet this technical challenge: a baseline ceramic barrier filter nEC concept, and a fluidized bed ILEC concept. These ILEC concepts simultaneously control sulfur, particulate, and alkali contaminants in the high-pressure combustion gases at turbine inlet temperatures up to 2300[degrees]F. This document reports the status of a program in the eighteenth quarter to develop this ILEC technology for direct coal-fired turbine power plants.

Newby, R.A.; Alvin, M.A.; Bachovchin, D.M.; Yang, W.C.; Smeltzer, E.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1992-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

384

The origin of organic pollutants from the combustion of alternative fuels: Phase IV report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the US-DOE`s on-going interest in the use of alternative automotive fuels, the University of Dayton Research Institute has been conducting research on pollutant emissions resulting from the combustion of candidate fuels. This research, under the direction and sponsorship of the NREL, has been concerned primarily with the combustion of compressed natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), methanol, and ethanol. In the first 24 months of this program, studies of the oxygen rich, stoichiometric, and fuel-rich thermal degradation of these fuels in the temperature range of 300 to 1100{degrees}C at atmospheric pressure and for reaction times of 1.0 and 2.0 s were completed. Trace organic products were identified and quantified for each fuel as a function of temperature. The results of these studies agreed well with the results of tail-pipe emission studies in that the types and quantity of emissions measured in both the laboratory and engine tests were shown to be very similar under certain operating conditions. However, some chemicals were observed in the laboratory studies that were not observed in the engine studies and vice versa. This result is important in that it has implications concerning the origin of these emissions. Experiments concerning the NO perturbed oxidation of methanol, M85, ethanol, and E85 indicated the presence of complex oxidation chemistry. At mild temperatures, NO addition resulted in enhanced fuel conversion. At elevated temperatures, an inhibitory effect was observed through increased yields of both partial oxidation and pyrolysis-type reaction products. Comparison of flow reactor product distributions with engine test results generally indicated improved comparisons when NO was added to the fuel. Analysis of secondary components of alcohol fuels resulted in some unexpected observations. Several previously unidentified species were observed in these experiments which may impact atmospheric reactivity assessments of these fuels.

Taylor, P.H.; Dellinger, B. [Univ. of Dayton, OH (United States). Research Institute; Sidhu, S.K. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Batteries and fuel cells working group report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical energy systems are dominated by interfacial phenomena. Catalysis, corrosion, electrical and ionic contact, and wetting behavior are critical to the performance of fuel cells and batteries. Accordingly, development of processing techniques to control these surface properties is important to successful commercialization of advanced batteries and fuel cells. Many of the surface processing issues are specific to a particular electrochemical system. Therefore, the working group focused on systems that are of specific interest to DOE/Conservation and Renewable Energy. These systems addressed were: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells, Direct Methanol Oxidation (DMO) Fuel Cells, and Lithium/Polymer Batteries. The approach used by the working group for each of these systems was to follow the current path through the system and to identify the principal interfaces. The function of each interface was specified together with its desired properties. The degree to which surface properties limit performance in present systems was rated. Finally, the surface processing needs associated with the performance limiting interfaces were identified. This report summarizes this information.

Eberhardt, J. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Advanced Transportation Materials; Landgrebe, A. [USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Systems; Lemons, R.; Wilson, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); MacAurther, D. [CHEMAC International Corp., (United States); Savenell, R. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States); Swathirajan, S. [General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (United States); Wilson, D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Batteries and fuel cells working group report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrochemical energy systems are dominated by interfacial phenomena. Catalysis, corrosion, electrical and ionic contact, and wetting behavior are critical to the performance of fuel cells and batteries. Accordingly, development of processing techniques to control these surface properties is important to successful commercialization of advanced batteries and fuel cells. Many of the surface processing issues are specific to a particular electrochemical system. Therefore, the working group focused on systems that are of specific interest to DOE/Conservation and Renewable Energy. These systems addressed were: Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cells, Direct Methanol Oxidation (DMO) Fuel Cells, and Lithium/Polymer Batteries. The approach used by the working group for each of these systems was to follow the current path through the system and to identify the principal interfaces. The function of each interface was specified together with its desired properties. The degree to which surface properties limit performance in present systems was rated. Finally, the surface processing needs associated with the performance limiting interfaces were identified. This report summarizes this information.

Eberhardt, J. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Office of Advanced Transportation Materials); Landgrebe, A. (USDOE Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States). Electric and Hybrid Propulsion Systems); Lemons, R.; Wilson, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); MacAurther, D. (CH

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Fuel cells for transportation program: FY1997 national laboratory annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cells for Transportation Program is structured to effectively implement the research and development (R and D) required for highly efficient, low or zero emission fuel cell power systems to be a viable replacement for the internal combustion engine in automobiles. The Program is part of the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry initiative aimed at development of an 80 mile-per-gallon vehicle. This Annual Report summarizes the technical accomplishments of the laboratories during 1997. Participants include: Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). During 1997, the laboratory R and D included one project on solid oxide fuel cells; this project has since been terminated to focus Department resources on PEM fuel cells. The technical component of this report is divided into five key areas: fuel cell stack research and development; fuel processing; fuel cell modeling, testing, and evaluation; direct methanol PEM fuel cells; and solid oxide fuel cells.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Multiple fuel supply system for an internal combustion engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multiple fuel supply or an internal combustion engine wherein phase separation of components is deliberately induced. The resulting separation permits the use of a single fuel tank to supply components of either or both phases to the engine. Specifically, phase separation of a gasoline/methanol blend is induced by the addition of a minor amount of water sufficient to guarantee separation into an upper gasoline phase and a lower methanol/water phase. A single fuel tank holds the two-phase liquid with separate fuel pickups and separate level indicators for each phase. Either gasoline or methanol, or both, can be supplied to the engine as required by predetermined parameters. A fuel supply system for a phase-separated multiple fuel supply contained in a single fuel tank is described.

Crothers, William T. (Sunol, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fuel processing requirements and techniques for fuel cell propulsion power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuels for fuel cells in transportation systems are likely to be methanol, natural gas, hydrogen, propane, or ethanol. Fuels other than hydrogen wig need to be reformed to hydrogen on-board the vehicle. The fuel reformer must meet stringent requirements for weight and volume, product quality, and transient operation. It must be compact and lightweight, must produce low levels of CO and other byproducts, and must have rapid start-up and good dynamic response. Catalytic steam reforming, catalytic or noncatalytic partial oxidation reforming, or some combination of these processes may be used. This paper discusses salient features of the different kinds of reformers and describes the catalysts and processes being examined for the oxidation reforming of methanol and the steam reforming of ethanol. Effective catalysts and reaction conditions for the former have been identified; promising catalysts and reaction conditions for the latter are being investigated.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Yu, M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biobutanol to someone Biobutanol to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biobutanol on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Biobutanol Biobutanol is a 4-carbon alcohol (butyl alcohol) produced from the same feedstocks as ethanol including corn, sugar beets, and other biomass feedstocks. Butanol is generally used as an industrial solvent in products such as lacquers and enamels, but it also can be blended with other fuels

391

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biogas to someone by Biogas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biogas on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels Renewable Natural Gas (Biogas) Biogas-also known as biomethane, swamp gas, landfill gas, or digester gas-is the gaseous product of anaerobic digestion (decomposition without oxygen) of organic matter. In addition to providing electricity and heat, biogas is useful as a vehicle fuel. When processed to purity standards,

392

Is Methanol the Transportation Fuel of the Future?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal, oil shale, and biomass. Natural gas (NG)was virtuallytight gas-bearing sands, coal seams, shales, geopressurtzed

Sperling, Daniel; DeLuchi, Mark A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Carnol System for methanol production and CO{sub 2} mitigation from coal fired power plants and the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carnol System consists of methanol production by C0{sub 2} recovered from coal fired power plants and natural gas and the use of the methanol as an alternative automotive fuel. The Carnol process produces hydrogen by the thermal decomposition of natural gas and reacting the hydrogen with C0{sub 2} recovered from the power plant. The carbon produced can be stored or used as a materials commodity. A design and economic evaluation of the process is presented and compared to gasoline as an automotive fuel. An evaluation of the C0{sub 2} emission reduction of the process and system is made and compared to other conventional methanol production processes is including the use of biomass feedstock and methanol fuel cell vehicles. The C0{sub 2} for the entire Carnol System using methanol in automotive IC engines can be reduced by 56% compared to conventional system of coal plants and gasoline engines and by as much as 77% C0{sub 2} emission reduction when methanol is used in fuel cells in automotive engines. The Carnol System is shown to be an environmentally attractive and economically viable system connecting the power generation sector with the transportation sector which should warrant further development.

Steinberg, M.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

The Carnol System for methanol production and CO{sub 2} mitigation from coal fired power plants and the transportation sector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Carnol System consists of methanol production by CO{sub 2} recovered from coal fired power plants and natural gas and the use of the methanol as an alternative automotive fuel. The Carnol Process produces hydrogen by the thermal decomposition of natural gas and reacting the hydrogen with CO{sub 2} recovered from the power plant. The carbon produced can be stored or used as a materials commodity. A design and economic evaluation of the Carnol System is presented and compared to gasoline as an automotive fuel. An evaluation of the CO{sub 2} emission reduction of the process and system is made and compared to other conventional methanol production processes is including the use of biomass feedstock and methanol fuel cell vehicles. The CO{sub 2} for the entire Carnol System using methanol in automotive IC engines can be reduced by 56% compared to conventional system of coal plants and gasoline engines and by as much as 77% CO{sub 2} emission reduction when methanol is used in fuel cells in automotive engines. The Carnol System is shown to be an environmentally attractive and economically viable system connecting the power generation sector with the transportation sector which should warrant further development.

Steinberg, M.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Signage  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Signage The Ohio Turnpike Commission allows businesses to place their logos on directional signs within...

396

Demonstration of the fuel economy potential associated with M85-fueled vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A gasoline-fueled 1988 Chevrolet Corsica was converted to operate on M85 to demonstrate that the characteristics of methanol fuels can be exploited to emphasize vehicle fuel economy rather than vehicle performance. The results of the tests performed indicated fuel economy improvements of up to 21% at steady highway speeds, and almost 20% on the US Environmental Protection Agency`s federal test procedure city and highway cycles.

Hodgson, J.W.; Huff, S.P. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The low-temperature partial oxidation reforming of fuels for transportation fuel cell systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne`s partial-oxidation reformer (APOR) is a compact, lightweight, rapid-start, and dynamically responsive device to convert liquid fuels to H{sub 2} for use in automotive fuel cells. An APOR catalyst for methanol has been developed and tested; catalysts for other fuels are being evaluated. Simple in design, operation, and control, the APOR can help develop efficient fuel cell propulsion systems.

Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

398

Membrane reactor advantages for methanol reforming and similar reactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane reactors achieve efficiencies by combining in one unit a reactor that generates a product with a semipermeable membrane that extracts it. One well-known benefit of this is greater conversion, as removal of a product drives reactions toward completion, but there are several potentially larger advantages that have been largely ignored. Because a membrane reactor tends to limit the partial pressure of the extracted product, it fundamentally changes the way that total pressure in the reactor affects equilibrium conversion. Thus, many gas-phase reactions that are preferentially performed at low pressures in a conventional reactor are found to have maximum conversion at high pressures in a membrane reactor. These higher pressures and reaction conversions allow greatly enhanced product extraction as well. Further, membrane reactors provide unique opportunities for temperature management which have not been discussed previously. These benefits are illustrated for methanol reforming to hydrogen for use with PEM (polymer electrolyte membrane) fuel cells.

Buxbaum, R.E. [REB Research and Consulting Co., Ferndale, MI (United States)

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Fuel cell market applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

Williams, M.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

400

Opportunities for coal to methanol conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accumulations of mining residues in the anthracite coal regions of Pennsylvania offer a unique opportunity to convert the coal content into methanol that could be utilized in that area as an alternative to gasoline or to extend the supplies through blending. Additional demand may develop through the requirements of public utility gas turbines located in that region. The cost to run this refuse through coal preparation plants may result in a clean coal at about $17.00 per ton. After gasification and synthesis in a 5000 ton per day facility, a cost of methanol of approximately $3.84 per million Btu is obtained using utility financing. If the coal is to be brought in by truck or rail from a distance of approximately 60 miles, the cost of methanol would range between $4.64 and $5.50 per million Btu depending upon the mode of transportation. The distribution costs to move the methanol from the synthesis plant to the pump could add, at a minimum, $2.36 per million Btu to the cost. In total, the delivered cost at the pump for methanol produced from coal mining wastes could range between $6.20 and $7.86 per million Btu.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct methanol fuel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Alternative Fuel Vehicles: Real-World Perspectives from the Federal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by the alternative fuel used: ethanol (E85), methanol (M85), and compressed natural gas (CNG). Because there are very few federal fleet vehicles that run on liquefied petroleum gas...

402

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hawaii Laws and Incentives for...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

for operating a motor vehicle on state public highways according to the following rates: Fuel Type Tax Ethanol 0.145 times the rate for diesel Methanol 0.11 times the rate...

403

Preventing CO poisoning in fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell performance with CO contamination of the H.sub.2 fuel stream is substantially improved by injecting O.sub.2 into the fuel stream ahead of the fuel cell. It is found that a surface reaction occurs even at PEM operating temperatures below about 100.degree. C. to oxidatively remove the CO and restore electrode surface area for the H.sub.2 reaction to generate current. Using an O.sub.2 injection, a suitable fuel stream for a PEM fuel cell can be formed from a methanol source using conventional reforming processes for producing H.sub.2.

Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

P-Series to someone by P-Series to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels P-Series P-Series fuels are blends of natural gas liquids (pentanes plus), ethanol, and methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF), a biomass co-solvent. P-Series fuels are clear, colorless, 89-93 octane, liquid blends used either alone or mixed with gasoline in any proportion in flexible fuel vehicles. These fuels are

405

Dual Tank Fuel System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

Wagner, Richard William (Albion, NY); Burkhard, James Frank (Churchville, NY); Dauer, Kenneth John (Avon, NY)

1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles: "Mobile Electricity" Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Commercializing Light-Duty Plug-In/Plug-Out Hydrogen-Fuel-Cell Vehicles:Mobile Electricity Technologies, Early California Household Markets, and Innovation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

combustion Prius, Eco Fuel CNG Hybrid Escape, and Solara methanol vehicle, and a CNG vehicle. The participants werewas predominately the CNG vehicle. The authors explain the

Williams, Brett D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

Lestz, S.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Methanol sensor operated in a passive mode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor outputs a signal related to a concentration of methanol in an aqueous solution adjacent the sensor. A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is included with an anode side and a cathode side. An anode current collector supports the anode side of the MEA and has a flow channel therethrough for flowing a stream of the aqueous solution and forms a physical barrier to control access of the methanol to the anode side of the MEA. A cathode current collector supports the cathode side of the MEA and is configured for air access to the cathode side of the MEA. A current sensor is connected to measure the current in a short circuit across the sensor electrodes to provide an output signal functionally related to the concentration of methanol in the aqueous solution.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Thermally integrated staged methanol reformer and method  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A thermally integrated two-stage methanol reformer including a heat exchanger and first and second reactors colocated in a common housing in which a gaseous heat transfer medium circulates to carry heat from the heat exchanger into the reactors. The heat transfer medium comprises principally hydrogen, carbon dioxide, methanol vapor and water vapor formed in a first stage reforming reaction. A small portion of the circulating heat transfer medium is drawn off and reacted in a second stage reforming reaction which substantially completes the reaction of the methanol and water remaining in the drawn-off portion. Preferably, a PrOx reactor will be included in the housing upstream of the heat exchanger to supplement the heat provided by the heat exchanger.

Skala, Glenn William (Churchville, NY); Hart-Predmore, David James (Rochester, NY); Pettit, William Henry (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

FUEL ELEMENT  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

Bean, R.W.

1963-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

412

Fuel from Tobacco and Arundo Donax: Synthetic Crop for Direct Drop-in Biofuel Production through Re-routing the Photorespiration Intermediates and Engineering Terpenoid Pathways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PETRO Project: Biofuels offer renewable alternatives to petroleum-based fuels that reduce net greenhouse gas emissions to nearly zero. However, traditional biofuels production is limited not only by the small amount of solar energy that plants convert through photosynthesis into biological materials, but also by inefficient processes for converting these biological materials into fuels. Farm-ready, non-food crops are needed that produce fuels or fuel-like precursors at significantly lower costs with significantly higher productivity. To make biofuels cost-competitive with petroleum-based fuels, biofuels production costs must be cut in half.

None

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Density Functional Theory Study of Methanol Decomposition on the CeO2(110) Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methanol decomposition on the stoichiometric CeO2(110) surface has been investigated using density functional theory slab calculations. Three possible initial steps to decompose methanol by breaking one of three bonds (O?H, C?O and C?H) of methanol were examined. The relative order of thermodynamic stability for the three possible bond scission steps is: C?H > O?H > C?O. We further isolated transition state and determined activation energy for each bond-breaking mode using the nudged elastic method. The activation barrier for the most favorable dissociation mode, the O?H bond scission, is 0.3 eV on the (110) surface. An even lower activation barrier ( C?O > C?H. Our results are consistent with the previous experimental observation that methoxy is the dominant surface species after a stoichiometric CeO2 surface was exposed to methanol. The experimentally observed methanol chemistry was determined by the kinetics of initial dissociation steps rather than the thermodynamic stability of product states. Surface coverage of methanol was found to affect the relative stability between molecular and dissociative adsorption modes. Dissociative adsorption modes are preferred thermodynamically for methanol coverage up to 0.5 ML but only molecular adsorption was stable at full monolayer coverage. This work was supported by a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The computations were performed using the Molecular Science Computing Facility in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), which is a U.S. Department of Energy national scientific user facility located at PNNL in Richland, Washington. Computing time was made under a Computational Grand Challenge Computational Catalysis. Part of the computing time was also granted by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC).

Mei, Donghai; Deskins, N. Aaron; Dupuis, Michel; Ge, Qingfeng

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Liquid phase methanol reactor staging process for the production of methanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a process for the production of methanol from a syngas feed containing carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Basically, the process is the combination of two liquid phase methanol reactors into a staging process, such that each reactor is operated to favor a particular reaction mechanism. In the first reactor, the operation is controlled to favor the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide, and in the second reactor, the operation is controlled so as to favor the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide. This staging process results in substantial increases in methanol yield.

Bonnell, Leo W. (Macungie, PA); Perka, Alan T. (Macungie, PA); Roberts, George W. (Emmaus, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Fuel Cell Power PlantsFuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Safety and Grid Interface Direct Fuel Cell Module: FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct Fuel generation of combined heat andcombined heat and power ­Clean Power with natural gas f lfuel ­Renewable Power with biofuels ·Grid connected power generationgeneration ­High Efficiency Grid support

416

Future fuels and engines for railroad locomotives. Volume II. Technical document  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study was made of the potential for reducing the dependence of railroads on petroleum fuel, particularly Diesel No. 2. The study takes two approaches: (1) to determine how the use of Diesel No. 2 can be reduced through increased efficiency and conservation, and (2) to use fuels other then Diesel No. 2 both in Diesel and other types of engines. The study indicates that the possible reduction in fuel usage by increasing the efficiency of the present engine is limited; it is already highly energy efficient. The use of non-petroleum fuels, particularly the oil shale distillates, offers a greater potential. A coal-fired locomotive using any one of a number of engines appears to be the best alternative to the diesel-electric locomotive with regard to life-cycle cost, fuel availability, and development risk. The adiabatic diesel is the second-rated alternative with high thermal efficiency (up to 64%) as its greatest advantage. The risks associated with the development of the adiabatic diesel, however, are higher than those for the coal-fired locomotive. The advantage of the third alternative, the fuel cell, is that it produces electricity directly from the fuel. At present, the only feasible fuel for a fuel cell locomotive is methanol. Synthetic hydrocarbon fuels, probably derived from oil shale, will be needed if present diesel-electric locomotives are used beyond 1995. Because synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are particularly suited to medium-speed diesel engines, the first commercial application of these fuels may be by the railroad industry.

Liddle, S.G.; Bonzo, B.B.; Purohit, G.P.; Stallkamp, J.A.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Methanol Steam Reformer on a Silicon Wafer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the reforming rates, heat transfer and flow through a methanol reforming catalytic microreactor fabricated on a silicon wafer are presented. Comparison of computed and measured conversion efficiencies are shown to be favorable. Concepts for insulating the reactor while maintaining small overall size and starting operation from ambient temperature are analyzed.

Park, H; Malen, J; Piggott, T; Morse, J; Sopchak, D; Greif, R; Grigoropoulos, C; Havstad, M; Upadhye, R

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

418

Counterflow Extinction of Premixed and Nonpremixed Methanol and Ethanol Flames  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of methanol. Combustion and Flame, 25:343, 1975. [6] A. Leeand nitrogen. Combustion and Flame, 33:197215, 1978. [4] T.Methanol and Formaldehyde Flames. Ph.d thesis, University of

Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Synthetic carbonaceous fuels and feedstocks  

SciTech Connect

This invention relates to the use of a three compartment electrolytic cell in the production of synthetic carbonaceous fuels and chemical feedstocks such as gasoline, methane and methanol by electrolyzing an aqueous sodium carbonate/bicarbonate solution, obtained from scrubbing atmospheric carbon dioxide with an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution, whereby the hydrogen generated at the cathode and the carbon dioxide liberated in the center compartment are combined thermocatalytically into methanol and gasoline blends. The oxygen generated at the anode is preferably vented into the atmosphere, and the regenerated sodium hydroxide produced at the cathode is reused for scrubbing the CO.sub.2 from the atmosphere.