Sample records for direct kinetic measurements

  1. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect Kinetic Measurements of a

  2. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal Financial InterventionsDirectDirect Kinetic

  3. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel pricesDiesel28, 2007,DiracDirect Kinetic

  4. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal Financial InterventionsDirectDirectDirect

  5. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel pricesDiesel28, 2007,DiracDirectDirect

  6. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal Financial InterventionsDirectDirect

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel pricesDiesel28, 2007,DiracDirect

  8. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  9. Direct measurement of the kinetics of volume and enthalpy relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bünz, J.; Wilde, G. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural relaxation of glasses below their glass transition is a well-studied phenomenon that still poses several open issues. With the advent of bulk metallic glasses with exceptionally low glass transition temperatures, new options are available that are based on the experimental assessment of the time dependence of several different thermodynamic quantities by direct measurements with high accuracy. In this contribution the first direct measurement of the isothermal relaxation of the volume and the enthalpy of an Au-based bulk metallic glassformer are reported and discussed with respect of the characteristics describing the underlying processes.

  10. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

  11. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Direct kinetic correlation of carriers and ferromagnetism in Co2+ : ZnO. Abstract: We report the use of controlled...

  12. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there has been much indirect evidence...

  13. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDiesel pricesDiesel28,

  14. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal Financial

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: direct measurement of combustion...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    direct measurement of combustion intermediate Direct Measurement of Key Molecule Will Increase Accuracy of Combustion Models On March 3, 2015, in Computational Modeling &...

  16. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics Adrien Couet a to reduce hydrogen pickup during operation, and the associated cladding degradation. The present study focuses on precisely and accurately measuring hydrogen pickup fraction for a set of alloys to specifically

  17. On bias of kinetic temperature measurements in complex plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantor, M. [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany) [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Association Euratom-FOM Institute DIFFER, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Ioffe Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg 194021 (Russian Federation); Moseev, D., E-mail: dmitry.moseev@ipp.mpg.de [Association Euratom-Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Association Euratom-FOM Institute DIFFER, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Salewski, M. [Association Euratom-DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Ris o Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)] [Association Euratom-DTU, Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark, DTU Ris o Campus, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetic temperature in complex plasmas is often measured using particle tracking velocimetry. Here, we introduce a criterion which minimizes the probability of faulty tracking of particles with normally distributed random displacements in consecutive frames. Faulty particle tracking results in a measurement bias of the deduced velocity distribution function and hence the deduced kinetic temperature. For particles with a normal velocity distribution function, mistracking biases the obtained velocity distribution function towards small velocities at the expense of large velocities, i.e., the inferred velocity distribution is more peaked and its tail is less pronounced. The kinetic temperature is therefore systematically underestimated in measurements. We give a prescription to mitigate this type of error.

  18. Direct measurement of thermophoretic forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Helden; Ralf Eichhorn; Clemens Bechinger

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the thermophoretic motion of a micron sized single colloidal particle in front of a flat wall by evanescent light scattering. To quantify thermophoretic effects we analyse the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) of the particle in a constant temperature gradient perpendicular to the confining walls. We propose to determine thermophoretic forces from a 'generalized potential' associated with the probability distribution of the particle position in the NESS. Experimentally we demonstrate, how this spatial probability distribution is measured and how thermophoretic forces can be extracted with 10 fN resolution. By varying temperature gradient and ambient temperature, the temperature dependence of Soret coefficient $S_T(T)$ is determined for $r = 2.5 \\mu m$ polystyrene and $r = 1.35 \\mu m$ melamine particles. The functional form of $S_T(T)$ is in good agreement with findings for smaller colloids. In addition, we measure and discuss hydrodynamic effects in the confined geometry. The theoretical and experimental technique proposed here extends thermophoresis measurements to so far inaccessible particle sizes and particle solvent combinations.

  19. Direct measurement of the quantum wavefunction by strong measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giuseppe Vallone; Daniele Dequal

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Weak measurements are supposed to be essential for the so called direct measurement of the quantum wavefunction [Nature (London) 474, 188 (2011)]. Here we show that direct measurement of the wavefunction can be obtained by using measurements of arbitrary strength. In particular, in the case of strong (i.e. projective) measurements, we compared the precision and the accuracy of the two methods, by showing that strong measurements outperform weak measurements in both. We also give the exact expression of the reconstructed wavefunction obtained by the weak measurement approach, allowing to define the range of applicability of such method.

  20. Kinetic Mechanism of Direct Transfer of Escherichia coli SSB Tetramers between Single-Stranded DNA Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    Kinetic Mechanism of Direct Transfer of Escherichia coli SSB Tetramers between Single-Stranded DNA tetramer forms transiently prior to the release of the acceptor DNA. When an initial 1:1 SSB-ssDNA complex tetramer to form a singly ligated complex. However, when an initial SSB-ssDNA complex is formed with (dT)35

  1. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Link, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ellsworth, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Falabella, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  2. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and 400 square cells/inch{sup 2}, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-wash-coated monolithic catalyst, and various reactors such as a micro packed-bed reactor, a micro bubble reactor, and a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam.

  3. Direct amplitude detuning measurement with ac dipole

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    White, S.; Maclean, E.; Tomás, R.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In circular machines, nonlinear dynamics can impact parameters such as beam lifetime and could result in limitations on the performance reach of the accelerator. Assessing and understanding these effects in experiments is essential to confirm the accuracy of the magnetic model and improve the machine performance. A direct measurement of the machine nonlinearities can be obtained by characterizing the dependency of the tune as a function of the amplitude of oscillations (usually defined as amplitude detuning). The conventional technique is to excite the beam to large amplitudes with a single kick and derive the tune from turn-by-turn data acquired with beam position monitors. Although this provides a very precise tune measurement it has the significant disadvantage of being destructive. An alternative, nondestructive way of exciting large amplitude oscillations is to use an ac dipole. The perturbation Hamiltonian in the presence of an ac dipole excitation shows a distinct behavior compared to the free oscillations which should be correctly taken into account in the interpretation of experimental data. The use of an ac dipole for direct amplitude detuning measurement requires careful data processing allowing one to observe the natural tune of the machine; the feasibility of such a measurement is demonstrated using experimental data from the Large Hadron Collider. An experimental proof of the theoretical derivations based on measurements performed at injection energy is provided as well as an application of this technique at top energy using a large number of excitations on the same beam.

  4. Directional measurements for sources of fission neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byrd, R.C.; Auchampaugh, G.F.; Feldman, W.C.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although penetrating neutron and gamma-ray emissions arguably provide the most effective signals for locating sources of nuclear radiation, their relatively low fluxes make searching for radioactive materials a tedious process. Even assuming lightly shielded sources and detectors with large areas and high efficiencies, estimated counting times can exceed several minutes for source separations greater than ten meters. Because determining the source position requires measurements at several locations, each with its own background, the search procedure can be lengthy and difficult to automate. Although directional measurements can be helpful, conventional collimation reduces count rates and increases the detector size and weight prohibitively, especially for neutron instruments. We describe an alternative approach for locating radiation sources that is based on the concept of a polarized radiation field. In this model, the presence of a source adds a directional component to the randomly oriented background radiation. The net direction of the local field indicates the source angle, and the magnitude provides an estimate of the distance to the source. The search detector is therefore seen as a device that responds to this polarized radiation field. Our proposed instrument simply substitutes segmented detectors for conventional single-element ones, so it requires little or no collimating material or additional weight. Attenuation across the detector creates differences in the count rates for opposite segments, whose ratios can be used to calculate the orthogonal components of the polarization vector. Although this approach is applicable to different types of radiation and detectors, in this report we demonstrate its use for sources of fission neutrons by using a prototype fast-neutron detector, which also provides background-corrected energy spectra for the incident neutrons.

  5. Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements byBerkeley, CA, 94720 ABSTRACT Ge nanocrystals are formed inthe Raman spectra of the Ge nanocrystals in-situ. The

  6. Direct Measurement of Oxygen Incorporation into Thin Film Oxides...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement of Oxygen Incorporation into Thin Film Oxides at Room Temperature Upon Ultraviolet Phton Irradiation. Direct Measurement of Oxygen Incorporation into Thin Film Oxides...

  7. Kinetic Simulations of Retarding-Field Analyzer Measurements in Tokamak Edge Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinetic Simulations of Retarding-Field Analyzer Measurements in Tokamak Edge Plasmas Fabrice of probe measurements in tokamaks, particularly those obtained from Retarding-Field-Analyzers (RFAs) [1]. This type of probe provides an integral of the ion velocity distribution in tokamak edge plasmas, which

  8. Sandia Energy - Direct Measurement of Key Molecule Will Increase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Measurement of Key Molecule Will Increase Accuracy of Combustion Models Home Energy Transportation Energy CRF Facilities News News & Events Computational Modeling &...

  9. New imaging tool directly measures liquid surfaces | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    directly measures liquid surfaces Released: May 30, 2013 Basic scientific insights of interest for energy storage, environmental cleanup The schematic of a vacuum compatible...

  10. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Oliveira, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Serkiz, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  11. Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Jip [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 Korea and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Sahn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

  12. Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boxer, Steven G.

    Quantitative, directional measurement of electric field heterogeneity in the active site SUMMARY Extensive structural studies of enzymes have revealed that biological catalysis occurs within substantial electrostatic field heterogeneity, widely differing sensitivities of discrete probes to a set

  13. Study of relaxation kinetics in argon afterglow by the breakdown time delay measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markovic, V.Lj.; Gocic, S.R.; Stamenkovic, S.N.; Petrovic, Z.Lj. [Department of Physics, University of Nis, P.O. BOX 224, 18001 Nis (Serbia and Montenegro); Institute of Physics, P.O. BOX 68, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the afterglow kinetics in argon is studied by the breakdown time delay measurements as a function of relaxation time t{sub d}({tau}) ('memory curve'). Measurements were carried out at the pressure of 1.33 mbar in a gas tube with gold-plated copper cathode and approximate and exact numerical models are developed to follow metastable and charged particle decay. It was found that the early afterglow kinetics is governed by the charged particle decay up to hundreds of milliseconds, extending from ambipolar to the free diffusion limit. Quenching processes reduce the effective lifetime of metastable states several orders of magnitude below that relevant for the time scale of the observations if realistic abundances and processes are included in the model. Nitrogen atoms originating from impurities and recombining on the cathode surface can determine the breakdown time delay down to that defined by the level of cosmic rays and natural radioactivity.

  14. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behnke, E; Brice, S J; Broemmelsiek, D; Collar, J I; Cooper, P S; Crisler, M; Dahl, C E; Fustin, D; Hall, J; Harnish, C; Levine, I; Lippincott, W H; Moan, T; Nania, T; Neilson, R; Ramberg, E; Robinson, A E; Sonnenschein, A; Vázquez-Jáuregui, E; Rivera, R A; Uplegger, L

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have directly measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6+-0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble nucleation theory. This measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  15. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldán, É. [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A., E-mail: rul@ugr.es [ICFO–Institut de Ciències Fotòniques, Mediterranean Technology Park, Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 3, 08860 Castelldefels (Barcelona) (Spain); Dinis, L. [GISC–Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos, Madrid (Spain); Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  16. Direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; J. Vollmer; S. Herminghaus; M. Brinkmann

    2012-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a novel computational method for direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials. The method is well-suited for the measurement of jamming phase diagram of a wide range of discrete particle systems such as granular materials, foams, and colloids. We further successfully apply the method to evaluate the jamming phase diagram of wet granular material in order to demonstrates the applicability of the model.

  17. New Directions in Measurement for Software Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    of statistical data. In total this provides a framework for quality control in software engineering that is freed1 New Directions in Measurement for Software Quality Control Paul Krause, Bernd Freimut and Witold Suryn Abstract--Assessing and controlling software quality is still an immature discipline. One

  18. Material loss angles from direct measurements of broadband thermal noise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Principe, Maria; Pierro, Vincenzo; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Taurasi, Ilaria; Villar, Akira E; Black, Eric D; Libbrecht, Kenneth G; Michel, Christophe; Morgado, Nazario; Pinard, Laurent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We estimate the loss angles of the materials currently used in the highly reflective test-mass coatings of interferometric detectors of gravitational waves, namely Silica, Tantala, and Ti-dop ed Tantala, from direct measurement of coating thermal noise in an optical interferometer testbench, the Caltech TNI. We also present a simple predictive theory for the material properties of amorphous glassy oxide mixtures, which gives results in good agreement with our measurements on Ti-doped Tantala. Alternative measure ment methods and results are reviewed, and some critical issues are discussed.

  19. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, M.R.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  20. Direct measurements of transport properties are essential for site characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Conca, J.L. [Washington State Univ. Tri-Cities, Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Sciences

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurements of transport parameters on subsurface sediments using, the UFA method provided detailed hydrostratigraphic mapping, and subsurface flux distributions at a mixed-waste disposal site at Hanford. Seven hundred unsaturated conductivity measurements on fifty samples were obtained in only six months total of UFA run time. These data are used to provide realistic information to conceptual models, predictive models and restoration strategies. The UFA instrument consists of an ultracentrifuge with a constant, ultralow flow pump that provides fluid to the sample surface through a rotating seal assembly and microdispersal system. Effluent from the sample is collected in a transparent, volumetrically-calibrated chamber at the bottom of the sample assembly. Using a strobe light, an observer can check the chamber while the sample is being centrifuged. Materials can be run in the UFA as recomposited samples or in situ samples can be subcored directly into the sample UFA chamber.

  1. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  2. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  3. A Direct Measurement of the $W$ Decay Width

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vine, Troy; /University Coll. London

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct measurement of the W boson total decay width is presented in proton-antiproton collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV using data collected by the CDF II detector. The measurement is made by fitting a simulated signal to the tail of the transverse mass distribution in the electron and muon decay channels. An integrated luminosity of 350 pb{sup -1} is used, collected between February 2002 and August 2004. Combining the results from the separate decay channels gives the decay width as 2.038 {+-} 0.072 GeV in agreement with the theoretical prediction of 2.093 {+-} 0.002 GeV. A system is presented for the management of detector calibrations using a relational database schema. A description of the implementation and monitoring of a procedure to provide general users with a simple interface to the complete set of calibrations is also given.

  4. Directional correlation measurements for gamma transitions in /sup 127/Te

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Souza, M.O.M.D.; Saxena, R.N.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The directional correlation of coincident ..gamma.. transitions in /sup 127/Te has been measured following the ..beta../sup -/ decay of /sup 127/Sb (T/sub 1/2/ = 3.9 d) using Ge(Li)-Ge(Li) and Ge(Li)-NaI(T1) gamma spectrometers. Measurements have been carried out for 14 gamma cascades resulting in the determination of multipole mixing ratios delta(E2/M1) for 15 ..gamma.. transitions. The present results permitted a definite spin assignment of (7/2) for the 785 keV level and confirmation of several previous assignments to other levels in /sup 127/Te. The g factor of the 340 keV ((9/2)/sup -/) level has also been measured using the integral perturbed angular correlation method in the hyperfine magnetic field of a Te in Ni matrix. The results of the g factor as well as the mixing ratio for the 252 keV ((9/2)/sup -/..-->..(11/2)/sup -/) transition support the earlier interpretation of this state as an anomalous coupling state.

  5. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Cole, David R [ORNL; Wallacher, Dirk [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  6. Direct Measurement of \\DeltaG/G at Compass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yann Bedfer; for the COMPASS Collaboration

    2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The gluon polarization $\\Delta{G}/G$ is the key to a further clarification of the spin structure of the nucleon. The COMPASS collaboration at CERN has set out to undertake the direct determination of this quantity. It accesses the gluon distribution via the photon-gluon fusion process (PGF) in scattering polarized muons off a polarized deuteron target. And it explores three different channels to tag the PGF: open charm production and high transverse momentum (high p_T), in either electroproduction (Q^2 > 1 GeV^2) or quasi-real photoproduction (Q^2 < 1 GeV^2). The high p_T quasi-real photoproduction channel yields the most precise measurement. The result indicates that the gluon polarization is small. I describe its experimental aspects and its theoretical framework, based on PYTHIA. And I report on the preliminary results obtained in the other two channels, and on the prospects for future analysis and data taking.

  7. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations and Molecular Conductance Measurements of the Bacterial Decaheme Cytochrome MtrF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byun, H. S.; Pirbadian, S.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shi, Liang; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms overcome the considerable hurdle of respiring extracellular solid substrates by deploying large multiheme cytochrome complexes that form 20 nanometer conduits to traffic electrons through the periplasm and across the cellular outer membrane. Here we report the first kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and single-molecule scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrF, which can perform the final electron transfer step from cells to minerals and microbial fuel cell anodes. We find that the calculated electron transport rate through MtrF is consistent with previously reported in vitro measurements of the Shewanella Mtr complex, as well as in vivo respiration rates on electrode surfaces assuming a reasonable (experimentally verified) coverage of cytochromes on the cell surface. The simulations also reveal a rich phase diagram in the overall electron occupation density of the hemes as a function of electron injection and ejection rates. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy confirms MtrF's ability to mediate electron transport between an STM tip and an underlying Au(111) surface, but at rates higher than expected from previously calculated heme-heme electron transfer rates for solvated molecules.

  8. Direct measurements of the ionization profile in krypton helicon plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D. W.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Gulbrandsen, N. [Department of Physics and Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Tromso, N-9037 Tromso (Norway)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Helicons are efficient plasma sources, capable of producing plasma densities of 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} with only 100 s W of input rf power. There are often steep density gradients in both the neutral density and plasma density, resulting in a fully ionized core a few cm wide surrounded by a weakly ionized plasma. The ionization profile is usually not well known because the neutral density is typically inferred from indirect spectroscopic measurements or from edge pressure gauge measurements. We have developed a two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) diagnostic capable of directly measuring the neutral density profile. We use TALIF in conjunction with a Langmuir probe to measure the ionization fraction profile as a function of driving frequency, magnetic field, and input power. It is found that when the frequency of the driving wave is greater than a critical frequency, f{sub c} Almost-Equal-To 3f{sub lh}, where f{sub lh} is the lower hybrid frequency at the antenna, the ionization fraction is small (0.1%) and the plasma density low (10{sup 17} m{sup -3}). As the axial magnetic field is increased, or, equivalently, the driving frequency decreased, a transition is observed. The plasma density increases by a factor of 10 or more, the plasma density profile becomes strongly peaked, the neutral density profile becomes strongly hollow, and the ionization fraction in the core approaches 100%. Neutral depletion in the core can be caused by a number of mechanisms. We find that in these experiments the depletion is due primarily to plasma pressure and neutral pumping.

  9. Kinetics of rapid oxidant consumption: measurements with a rotating ring disc electrode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworske, D.A.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal and marine waters receive strong oxidants, such as ozone and chlorine, from several natural and anthropogenic sources. These oxidants react rapidly with Br/sup -/ and I/sup -/ in seawater to produce Br/sub 2/, I/sub 2/ and various hydrolysis products. The fate of these halogen products is of geochemical and biological interest. The rotating ring disc electrode (RRDE) was used to study the rapid decay of these oxidants in natural waters. Copper-plated disc experiments address the hypothesis that Cu catalyzes the decomposition of oxidant. Pseudo first-order and second-order reaction kinetics of model compounds and field samples were also studied, via in situ generation of Br/sub 3/. Pseudo first-order behavior is observed for ammonia and glycine, and the rate constants obtained from the RRDE method compare favorably with the literature (8.1 x 10/sup 7/ and 8.5 x 10/sup 7/ L/mol-sec, respectively). Second-order behavior is observed in natural water samples collected from the Patuxent River. Calculations suggest that the observed fast demand has a rate constant in excess of 10/sup 7/ L/mol-sec, and that the substrate responsible for the demand approaches concentrations of 1 x 10/sup -5/ M. The ubiquitous distribution of rapid demand, as measured in the Patuxent estuary, suggests that proteinaceous organosulfur may contribute to the observed rapid demand.

  10. Autoignition measurements and a validated kinetic model for the biodiesel surrogate, methyl butanoate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, S.; Curran, H.J.; Simmie, J.M. [Combustion Chemistry Centre, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The autoignition of methyl butanoate has been studied at 1 and 4 atm in a shock tube over the temperature range 1250-1760 K at equivalence ratios of 1.5, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.25 at fuel concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. These measurements are complemented by autoignition data from a rapid compression machine over the temperature range 640-949 K at compressed gas pressures of 10, 20, and 40 atm and at varying equivalence ratios of 1.0, 0.5, and 0.33 using fuel concentrations of 1.59 and 3.13%. The autoignition of methyl butanoate is observed to follow Arrhenius-like temperature dependence over all conditions studied. These data, together with speciation data reported in the literature in a flow reactor, a jet-stirred reactor, and an opposed-flow diffusion flame, were used to produce a detailed chemical kinetic model. It was found that the model correctly simulated the effect of change in equivalence ratio, fuel fraction, and pressure for shock tube ignition delays. The agreement with rapid compression machine ignition delays is less accurate, although the qualitative agreement is reasonable. The model reproduces most speciation data with good accuracy. In addition, the important reaction pathways over each regime have been elucidated by both sensitivity and flux analyses. (author)

  11. substituted G8 with 8-azaguanine and used its fluorescence properties to directly measure the pKa of this residue. The observed pKa of ~9.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    substituted G8 with 8-azaguanine and used its fluorescence properties to directly measure the p kinetic measurements, which indicates that G8 is largely protonated in the active site. Because the reaction's pH-rate profile cannot be explained as being dependent on G8 deprotonation, the role

  12. Oxidation kinetics of methylphosphonic acid in supercritical water : experimental measurements and model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Patricia A. (Patricia Ann), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (cont.) at well-defined operating conditions and to develop. both microscopic and macroscopic models, ranging from regressed global models to an elementary reaction mechanism, to quantify MPA oxidation kinetics in supercritical ...

  13. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Bailey, Joe M. [London Centre for Nanotechnology, University College London, London (United Kingdom); Centre for Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology, University College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  14. Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt? events produced in pp? collisions at Fermilab’s Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding ...

  15. Direct Measurements of 22 Mg Resonances and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Alejandro

    that depend on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Naðp; �23Mg reaction. We have measured the strengths of low A classical nova is a thermonuclear outburst on the surface of a white-dwarf star that is accreting hydrogen nucleosynthesis because most of the relevant thermonuclear reaction rates are based on experimental information [1

  16. Direct mass measurements beyond the proton drip-line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Rauth; D. Ackermann; K. Blaum; M. Block; A. Chaudhuri; S. Eliseev; R. Ferrer; D. Habs; F. Herfurth; F. P. Hessberger; S. Hofmann; H. -J. Kluge; G. Maero; A. Martin; G. Marx; M. Mukherjee; J. B. Neumayr; W. R. Plass; W. Quint; S. Rahaman; D. Rodriguez; C. Scheidenberger; L. Schweikhard; P. G. Thirolf; G. Vorobjev; C. Weber; Z. Di

    2007-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    First on-line mass measurements were performed at the SHIPTRAP Penning trap mass spectrometer. The masses of 18 neutron-deficient isotopes in the terbium-to-thulium region produced in fusion-evaporation reactions were determined with relative uncertainties of about $7\\cdot 10^{-8}$, nine of them for the first time. Four nuclides ($^{144, 145}$Ho and $^{147, 148}$Tm) were found to be proton-unbound. The implication of the results on the location of the proton drip-line is discussed by analyzing the one-proton separation energies.

  17. Direct measurement of the plasma response to electrostatic ion waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarfaty, M.; DeSouza-Machado, S.; Skiff, F. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States). Inst. for Plasma Research

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasma wave-wave and wave-particle interactions are studied in a linear magnetized plasma. The relatively quiet plasma is produced by an argon gas-discharge. The plasma density is n{sub e} {approx_equal} 10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}3} and the electron/ion temperatures are T{sub e} {approx_equal} 5eV and T{sub i} = 0.05eV. A grid and a four ring antenna, both mounted on a scanning carriage, are used to launch electrostatic ion waves in the plasma. Laser Induced Fluorescence measurements of both the linear and the nonlinear plasma response to the wave fields are presented. The Vlasov-Poisson equations are used to explain the measured zero, first and second order terms of the ion distribution function in the presence of wave fields. In addition to the broadening (heating) of the ion distribution as the authors increase the wave amplitudes, induced plasma flows are observed both along and across the magnetic field.

  18. Measuring bi-directional current through a field-effect transistor by virtue of drain-to-source voltage measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Steven Richard

    2006-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring current, and particularly bi-directional current, in a field-effect transistor (FET) using drain-to-source voltage measurements. The drain-to-source voltage of the FET is measured and amplified. This signal is then compensated for variations in the temperature of the FET, which affects the impedance of the FET when it is switched on. The output is a signal representative of the direction of the flow of current through the field-effect transistor and the level of the current through the field-effect transistor. Preferably, the measurement only occurs when the FET is switched on.

  19. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  20. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  1. Direct measurements of ion dynamics in collisional magnetic presheaths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, M. Umair [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Jackson, Cory D.; Kim, Justin F.; Hershkowitz, Noah [Department of Engineering Physics, The University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion velocities and temperatures are measured in the presheath of a grounded plate downstream from an argon helicon plasma source using laser-induced fluorescence (P{sub rf}?450?750?W, T{sub e}=2.5?5?eV, T{sub i}=0.1?0.6?eV, n{sub 0}?1×10{sup 12}cm{sup ?3},?p{sub n}=1?6.5?mTorr, ?=0.3?2?cm, ?{sub i}??0.5?cm). The plate is held 16°?60° relative to the 1?kG background axial magnetic field. The velocity profiles are compared to a 1D fluid model similar to those presented by Riemann [Phys. Plasmas 1, 552 (1994)] and Ahedo [Phys. Plasmas 4, 4419 (1997)] for the 1 mTorr dataset and are shown to agree well. The model is sensitive to parameters such as collision and ionization frequencies and simplified models, such one presented by Chodura [Phys. Fluids 25, 1628 (1982)], are shown to be inaccurate. E{sup ?}×B{sup ?} flows as large as 40% of c{sub s} at the sheath edge are inferred. Definitions for the term “magnetic presheath” and implications for ion flow to tokamak divertors and Hall thruster walls are discussed.

  2. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

    2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

  3. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions Where We Are Directions The Bradbury Science Museum is located at 1350 Central Avenue Los Alamos, NM 87544 Los Alamos (elevation 7,355 feet) is perched high atop the...

  4. Direct measurement of DNA-mediated adhesion between lipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Shimobayashi; B. M. Mognetti; L. Parolini; D. Orsi; P. Cicuta; L. Di Michele

    2015-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Multivalent interactions between deformable mesoscopic units are ubiquitous in biology, where membrane macromolecules mediate the interactions between neighbouring living cells and between cells and solid substrates. Lately, analogous artificial materials have been synthesised by functionalising the outer surface of compliant Brownian units, for example emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles, with selective linkers, in particular short DNA sequences. This development extended the range of applicability of DNA as a selective glue, originally applied to solid nano and colloidal particles. On very deformable lipid vesicles, the coupling between statistical effects of multivalent interactions and mechanical deformation of the membranes gives rise to complex emergent behaviours, as we recently contributed to demonstrate [Parolini et al., Nature Communications, 2015, 6, 5948]. Several aspects of the complex phenomenology observed in these systems still lack a quantitative experimental characterisation and fundamental understanding. Here we focus on the DNA-mediated multivalent interactions of a single liposome adhering to a flat supported bilayer. This simplified geometry enables the estimate of the membrane tension induced by the DNA-mediated adhesive forces acting on the liposome. Our experimental investigation is completed by morphological measurements and the characterisation of the DNA-melting transition, probed by in-situ F\\"{o}rster Resonant Energy Transfer spectroscopy. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of an analytical theory that couples the deformation of the vesicle to a full description of the statistical mechanics of mobile linkers. With at most one fitting parameter, our theory is capable of semi-quantitatively matching experimental data, confirming the quality of the underlying assumptions.

  5. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, M P; Zhang, Y; Kiowski, O; Powalla, M; Lemmer, U; Slobodskyy, A

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  6. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Heinrich; Z-H. Zhang; Y. Zhang; O. Kiowski; M. Powalla; U. Lemmer; A. Slobodskyy

    2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  7. Direct measurement of the carrier leakage in an InGaAsP/InP laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, T.R.; Margalit, S.; Koren, U.; Yu, K.L.; Chiu, L.C.; Hasson, A.; Yariv, A.

    1983-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Carrier leakage over the heterobarrier in an InGaAsP/InP laser is measured directly in a laser-bipolar-transistor structure. Experimental results indicate a significant amount of carrier leakage under normal laser operating conditions.

  8. Direct Measurement of the Electron Density of Extended Femtosecond Laser Pulse-Induced Filaments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Y.-H.; Varma, S.; Antonsen, T. M.; Milchberg, H. M. [Institute for Research in Electronics and Applied Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct time- and space-resolved measurements of the electron density of femtosecond laser pulse-induced plasma filaments. The dominant nonlinearity responsible for extended atmospheric filaments is shown to be field-induced rotation of air molecules.

  9. THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,

  10. An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due...

  11. An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA studies due...

  12. Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Challenges and Progress Toward a Commercial Kinetic Hydropower System for its kinetic hydropower devices, and has made precise measurements

  13. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  14. Effect of the terrestrial magnetic field on direct-current measurements in underground pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dzhala, R.M.; Dikmarova, L.P.; Kornienko, V.Yu.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of the secondary field of an underground pipeline, magnetized by the terrestrial magnetic field, on noncontacting measurements of direct current flowing in it is discussed. The systematic errors of three known measurement methods are compared. A method based on the measurement of the difference between the field components parallel to the terrestrial field component orthogonal to the pipline is identified as the most accurate. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Direct Measurements of Damping Rates and Stability Limits for Low Frequency MHD Modes and Alfvén Eigenmodes in the JET Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct Measurements of Damping Rates and Stability Limits for Low Frequency MHD Modes and Alfvén Eigenmodes in the JET Tokamak

  16. Direct measurement of the $^{18}F(p,\\alpha)^{15}O$ reaction for application to nova gamma-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Séréville, N; Leleux, P; Coc, A; Kiener, J; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A; Tatischeff, V; Descouvemont, P; Figuera, P; Hammache, F; Achouri, L; Orr, N; Stefan, I; Casarejos, E; Davinson, T; Robertson, D; Laird, A M; Fox, S P; Mumby-Croft, P; Vaughan, K

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Direct measurement of the $^{18}F(p,\\alpha)^{15}O$ reaction for application to nova gamma-ray emission

  17. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Deposition of Li is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. Here we perform the first in situ high spatial resolution measurement coupled with real-time quantitative electrochemistry to characterize SEI formation on gold using a standard battery electrolyte. We demonstrate that a dendritic SEI forms prior to Li deposition and that it remains on the surface after Li electrodissolution.

  18. A system for the real time, direct measurement of natural gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowell, T. [PMI, Badger Meter, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    PMI/Badger Meter, Inc. with partial sponsorship from the Gas Research Institute, has designed and developed direct measurement total energy flow metering instrumentation. As industry demands for improved accuracy and speed of measurement have increased so has the complexity of the overall hardware and software systems. Considering traditional system approaches, few companies have the in house capability of maintaining a complete system. This paper addresses efforts to implement a direct, total gas energy flow metering system which is simple to use and cost effective.

  19. Direct conversion of rheological compliance measurements into storage and loss moduli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R M L Evans; Manlio Tassieri; Dietmar Auhl; Thomas A Waigh

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We remove the need for Laplace/inverse-Laplace transformations of experimental data, by presenting a direct and straightforward mathematical procedure for obtaining frequency-dependent storage and loss moduli ($G'(\\omega)$ and $G"(\\omega)$ respectively), from time-dependent experimental measurements. The procedure is applicable to ordinary rheological creep (stress-step) measurements, as well as all microrheological techniques, whether they access a Brownian mean-square displacement, or a forced compliance. Data can be substituted directly into our simple formula, thus eliminating traditional fitting and smoothing procedures that disguise relevant experimental noise.

  20. Direct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: Potential ApplicationYu,EnergyDimitriDirac ChargeDiracDirect

  1. A Direct Inspection of the Displacement Current Using the Phase Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Hua Weng; Jin-Pan Zhu; Jing-Yan He; Zhi-Min Chen; Huang-Ping Yan; Ying Weng

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    After J. C. Maxwell brought forward the concept of displacement currents, H. R. Hertz and other scholars verified the existence of electromagnetic waves in experimental, and then confirmed indirectly the conceptive correctness of displacement currents. During the recent years, along with the evolution of electronic measurement technologies, the researchers are attempting to validate directly the amplitude and orientation of displacement currents in experimental. The paper proposes and achieves one phase measurement experiment to scrutinize the orientation of displacement currents. The study indicates that the existing measurement technology is capable of inspecting directly the amplitude and orientation of displacement currents. The test results do not locate on the predicted range of classical electromagnetic theory presently. The displacement current may not be treatable similar to the conductive current to a certain extent. This conclusion enriches the understanding to the property of displacement currents.

  2. Measurements of direct photons in Au+Au collisions with PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Bannier

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The PHENIX experiment has published direct photon yields and elliptic flow coefficients $v_2$ from Au+Au collisions at RHIC energies. These results have sparked much theoretical discussion. The measured yields and flow parameters are difficult to reconcile in current model calculations of thermal radiation based on hydrodynamic time evolution of the collision volume. Our latest analyses which use high statistics data from the 2007 and 2010 runs allow the determination of direct photon yields with finer granularity in centrality and photon momentum and down to $p_T$ as low as 0.4 GeV/$c$. We will summarize the current status and present new results from PHENIX.

  3. Partial discharge measurements on a high voltage direct current mass impregnated paper cable

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeroense, M.J.P. [NKF KABEL B.V., Delft (Netherlands); Kreuger, F.H. [Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Partial discharge measurement has been a good tool for the quality assurance of cables under alternating voltage. With the growing interest in High Voltage Direct Current cables it seems therefore logical to extend this technique for use at direct voltage. The paper describes this technique as used on a HVDC cable with mass impregnated paper. The different phases of operation (no load, full load, cooling phase, etc.) are characterized by a different discharge behavior. Special attention is given to the dangerous cooling phase. Models have been developed which can explain the discharge patterns that were measured. This paper gives an insight in the electrical behavior of a HVDC cable with mass impregnated paper insulation.

  4. An improved multipyranometer array for the measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, Bryce Kirtley

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN IMPROVED MULTIPYRANOMETER ARRAY FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF DIRECT AND DIFFUSE SOLAR RADIATION A Thesis by BRYCE KIRTLEY MUNGER Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulffllment of the requirements... Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Haberl (Co-Chair of ommittee) W. D. Turner (C -Chair of Committee) J. Trost (Member) Suhada...

  5. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sinev

    2009-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  6. Direct vs. projective: measures of children's perceptions of the parent-child relationship as predictors of future relationship quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collie, Claire Futamase

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predictive validity of a projective measure of childrens perceptions of the parent-child relationship was compared with the predictive validity of more direct measures. The criterion variable was the quality of a newly formed relationship...

  7. Evidence for production of single top quarks and first direct measurement of |Vtb|

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The D0 Collaboration presents first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Using a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset, we apply a multivariate analysis to separate signal from background and measure {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.9 {+-} 1.4 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.035%, corresponding to a 3.4 standard deviation significance. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the CKM matrix element that describes the W tb coupling and find 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L.

  8. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Takahashi, K. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  9. Measurement of the direct energy gap of coherently strained SnxGe1x Ge,,001... heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Measurement of the direct energy gap of coherently strained SnxGe1Àx ÕGe,,001... heterostructures The direct energy gap has been measured for coherently strained SnxGe1 x alloys on Ge 001 substrates with 0 for coherently strained SnxGe1 x alloys indicates a large alloy contribution and a small strain contribution

  10. A direct measurement of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals and its effect on optoelectronic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mustafeez, Waqas; Salleo, Alberto, E-mail: asalleo@stanford.edu [Geballe Laboratory for Advanced Materials, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Majumdar, Arka; Vu?kovi?, Jelena [Ginzton Laboratory, Stanford University, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since reports that silicon nanocrystals (Si-NCs) can exhibit direct transition emission, the silicon laser field is at a juncture where the importance of this discovery needs to be evaluated. Most theoretical models predicted a monotonic increase in the bandgap and experimental information currently available on the electronic structure at the ? valley of these promising materials is circumstantial as it is obtained from emission measurements where competing non-radiative relaxation and recombination processes only provide an incomplete picture of the electronic structure of Si-NCs. Optical absorption, the most immediate probe of the electronic structure beyond the band-edges, showing the evolution of the ? valley states with nanocrystal size has not been measured. Here, we show such measurements, performed with high dynamic range, allowing us to observe directly the effect of crystal size on the ? valley splitting far above the band-edges. We show that the splitting is 100?s of meV more pronounced than predicted by pseudo potential calculations and Luttinger-Kohn model. We also show that ultrafast red-shifting emission can be observed in plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition prepared Si-NCs.

  11. Direct measurement of the extraordinary optical momentum using a nano-cantilever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antognozzi; S. Simpson; R. Harniman; J. Senior; R. Hayward; H. Hoerber; M. R. Dennis; A. Y. Bekshaev; K. Y. Bliokh; F. Nori

    2015-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation pressure has been known since Kepler's observation that a comet's tail is always oriented away from the sun, and in the past centuries this phenomenon stimulated remarkable discoveries in electromagnetism, quantum physics and relativity [1-3]. In modern terms, the pressure of light is associated with the momentum of photons, which plays a crucial role in a variety of systems, from atomic [4-7] to astronomical [8,9] scales. Experience from these cases leads us to assume that the direction of the optical momentum and the radiation-pressure force are naturally aligned with the propagation of light, i.e., its wavevector. Here we report the direct observation of an extraordinary optical momentum and force directed perpendicular to the wavevector, and proportional to the optical spin (i.e., degree of circular polarization). This transverse spin-dependent optical force, a few orders of magnitude weaker than the usual radiation pressure, was recently predicted for evanescent waves [10] and other structured fields [11]. Fundamentally, it can be associated with the enigmatic "spin momentum," introduced by Belinfante in field theory 75 years ago [12-14]. We measure this unusual transverse momentum using a nano-cantilever with extremely low compliance (capable of femto-Newton resolution), which is immersed in an evanescent optical field directly above the total-internal-reflecting glass surface. Such sensors, perpendicular to a substrate, have already shown an extreme force resolution in various systems [15-19]. Our findings revisit fundamental momentum properties of light, while the experimental technique opens the way for precision measurements of fine optical forces in structured fields at subwavelength scales.

  12. Direct measurement of activation time and nucleation rate in capillary-condensed water nanomeniscus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sung, Baekman; Kim, Jongwoo; Stambaugh, Corey; Chang, Sung-Jin; Jhe, Wonho, E-mail: whjhe@snu.ac.kr [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)] [Center for Nano-Liquid, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate real-time observation of nucleation of the single water nanomeniscus formed via capillary condensation. We directly measure (i) activation time by time-resolved atomic force microscopy and (ii) nucleation rate by statistical analysis of its exponential distribution, which is the experimental evidence that the activation process is stochastic and follows the Poisson statistics. It implies that formation of the water nanomeniscus is triggered by nucleation, which requires activation for producing a nucleus. We also find the dependence of the nucleation rate on the tip-sample distance and temperature.

  13. Direct measurement of the cosmic acceleration by 21cm absorption systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hao-Ran; Pen, Ue-Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    So far there is only indirect evidence that the universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The evidence for cosmic acceleration is based on the observation of different objects at different distances, and requires invoking the Copernican cosmological principle, and Einstein's equations of motion. We examine the direct observability using recession velocity drifts (Sandage-Loeb effect) of 21cm hydrogen absorption systems in upcoming radio surveys. This measures the change in velocity of the {\\it same} objects separate by a time interval and is a model-independent measure of acceleration. We forecast that for a CHIME-like survey with a decade time span, we can detect the acceleration of a $\\Lambda$CDM universe with $\\sim 6\\sigma$ confidence. This acceleration test requires modest data analysis and storage changes from the normal processing, and cannot be recovered retroactively.

  14. Direct Measurement of the Spatial-Spectral Structure of Waveguided Parametric Down-Conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter J. Mosley; Andreas Christ; Andreas Eckstein; Christine Silberhorn

    2009-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the propagation of higher-order spatial modes in a waveguided parametric down-conversion photon pair source. Observing the multimode photon pair spectrum from a periodically poled KTiOPO$_4$ waveguide allowed us to isolate individual spatial modes through their distinctive spectral properties. We have measured directly the spatial distribution of each mode of the photon pairs, confirming the findings of our waveguide model, and demonstrated by coincidence measurements that the total parity of the modes is conserved in the nonlinear interaction. Furthermore, we show that we can combine the advantages of a waveguide source with the potential to generate spatially entangled photon pairs as in bulk crystal down-converters.

  15. A direct approach to fault-tolerance in measurement-based quantum computation via teleportation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus Silva; Vincent Danos; Elham Kashefi; Harold Ollivier

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a simple variant of the one-way quantum computing model [R. Raussendorf and H.-J. Briegel, PRL 86, 5188, 2001], called the Pauli measurement model, where measurements are restricted to be along the eigenbases of the Pauli X and Y operators, while auxiliary qubits can be prepared both in the $\\ket{+_{\\pi\\over 4}}:={1/\\sqrt{2}}(\\ket{0}+e^{i{\\pi\\over 4}}\\ket{1})$ state, and the usual $\\ket{+}:={1/ \\sqrt{2}}(\\ket{0}+\\ket{1})$ state. We prove the universality of this quantum computation model, and establish a standardization procedure which permits all entanglement and state preparation to be performed at the beginning of computation. This leads us to develop a direct approach to fault-tolerance by simple transformations of the entanglement graph and preparation operations, while error correction is performed naturally via syndrome-extracting teleportations.

  16. A direct approach to fault-tolerance in measurement-based quantum computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danos, V; Ollivier, H; Silva, M; Danos, Vincent; Kashefi, Elham; Ollivier, Harold; Silva, Marcus

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss a simple variant of the one-way quantum computing model [R. Raussendorf and H.-J. Briegel, PRL 86, 5188, 2001], called the Pauli measurement model, where measurements are restricted to be along the eigenbases of the Pauli X and Y operators, while auxiliary qubits can be prepared both in the $\\ket{+_{\\pi\\over 4}}:={1/\\sqrt{2}}(\\ket{0}+e^{i{\\pi\\over 4}}\\ket{1})$ state, and the usual $\\ket{+}:={1/ \\sqrt{2}}(\\ket{0}+\\ket{1})$ one. We prove the universality of this quantum computation model, and establish a standardization procedure which permits all entanglement and preparation to be performed at the beginning of computation. This leads us to develop a direct approach to fault-tolerance by simple transformations of the entanglement graph and preparation operations, while error correction is performed naturally via syndrome-extracting teleportations.

  17. Direct measurement of the size of 2003 UB313 from the Hubble Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller; H. G. Roe; D. L. Rabinowitz; C. A. Trujillo

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to directly measure the angular size of the large Kuiper belt object 2003 UB313. By carefully calibrating the point spread function of a nearby field star, we measure the size of 2003 UB313 to be 34.3$\\pm$1.4 milliarcseconds, corresponding to a diameter of 2400$\\pm$100 km or a size $\\sim5$% larger than Pluto. The V band geometric albedo of 2003 UB313 is $86\\pm7$%. The extremely high albedo is consistent with the frosty methane spectrum, the lack of red coloring, and the lack of observed photometric variation on the surface of 2003 UB313. Methane photolysis should quickly darken the surface of 2003 UB313, but continuous evaporation and redeposition of surface ices appears capable of maintaining the extreme alebdo of this body.

  18. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies for radiochemistry (macro to micro levels), biochemistry and biology to imaging principles, tracer kinetics, pharmacokinetics and biochemical assays. New generations of radiochemists will be immersed in the biochemistry and biology for which their labeled probes are being developed for assays of these processes. In this program engineers and radio-chemists integrate the principles of microfluidics and radiolabeling along with proper system design and chemistry rule sets to yield Synthesizers enabling biological and pharmaceutical scientists to develop diverse arrays of probes to pursue their interests. This progression would allow also radiochemists to focus on the further evolution of rapid, high yield synthetic reactions with new enabling technologies, rather than everyday production of radiotracers that should be done by technologists. The invention of integrated circuits in electronics established a platform technology that allowed an evolution of ideas and applications far beyond what could have been imagined at the beginning. Rather than provide a technology for the solution to a single problem, it is hoped that microfluidic radiochemistry will be an enabling platform technology for others to solve many problems. As part of this objective, another program goal is to commercialize the technologies that come from this work so that they can be provided to others who wish to use it.

  19. Direct nuclear heating measurements and analyses for structural materials induced by deuterium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Kosako, K.; Oyama, Y.; Maekawa, F.; Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan); Kumar, A.; Youssef, M.Z.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear heat deposition rates in the structural components of a fusion reactor have been measured directly with a microcalorimeter incorporated with an intense deuterium-tritium (D- T) neutron source, the Fusion Neutronics Source (FNS) at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), under the framework of the JAERI/U.S. Department of Energy (U.S. DOE) collaborative program on fusion neutronics. Heat deposition rates at positions up to 200 mm of depth in a Type 304 stainless steel assembly bombarded with D-T neutrons were measured along with single probe experiments. The measured heating rates were compared with comprehensive calculations in order to verify the adequacy of the currently available database relevant to the nuclear heating. In general, calculations with data of JENDL-3 and ENDL-85 libraries gave good agreement with experiments for all single probe materials, whereas RMCCS, based on ENDF/B-V, suffered from unreasonable overestimation in the heating number. It was demonstrated that the nuclear/thermal coupled calculation is a powerful tool to analyze the time-dependent temperature change due to the heat transfer in the probe materials. The analysis for the Type 304 stainless steel assembly, based on JENDL-3, demonstrated that the calculation, in general, was in good agreement with the measurement up to 200 mm of depth along the central axis of the assembly. 31 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  20. Field comparisons of direct and component measurements of net radiation under clear skies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duchon, C.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wilk, G.E. [National Weather Service, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurements of net radiation are basic to all studies of the surface energy budget. In preparation for an energy budget experiment significant differences were found between direct and component measurement of net radiation, which prompted this investigation of their cause. The instruments involved were an all-black single-dome Fritschen-type net pyrradiometer, two Eppley model 8-48 pyranometers, and an Eppley model PIR pyrgeometer. Each had recently been calibrated. The accuracy of the component instruments was considered first. Comparisons of about one hour on each of three nights between the pyrgeometer and five empirical formulas showed that the average departure over all formulas from the pyrgeometer average was {minus}1%. Other comparisons between the pyrgeometer and an infrared thermometer viewing the surface yielded similar results. Alternate shading and unshading of the pyrgeometer looking upward during daytime resulted in a formula that was used to correct the downward longwave radiation under clear skies. The correction is dependent on wind speed, in contrast to a recent paper showing negligible dependence, but is in accord with earlier findings. Based on manufacturer`s specifications, the pyranometer calibrations were considered to be within 2% of the World Radiation Reference. Thus a series of experiments was carried out using what were believed to be reasonably accurate component measurements of net radiation and measurements from the net pyrradiometer.

  1. Qweak: First Direct Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuruzzaman, NFN [Hampton University, JLAB

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Qweak experiment at Hall C of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, QWp, through a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at low momentum transfer Q2= 0.025 (GeV/c)2 with incident electron beam energy of 1.155 GeV. The Qweak experiment, along with earlier results of parity violating elastic scattering experiments, is expected to determine the most precise value of QWp which is suppressed in the Standard Model. If this result is further combined with the 133Cs atomic parity violation (APV) measurement, significant constraints on the weak charge of the up quark, down quark, and neutron can be extracted. This data will also be used to determine the weak-mixing angle, sin2 ?W, with a relative uncertainty of < 0.5% that will provide a competitive measurement of the running of sin2 ?W to low Q2. An overview of the experiment and its results using the commissioning dataset, constituting approximately 4% of the data collected in the experiment, are reported here.

  2. Direct measurement of the biphoton Wigner function through two-photon interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Douce; Andreas Eckstein; Stephen P. Walborn; Antonio Z. Khoury; Sara Ducci; Arne Keller; Thomas Coudreau; Pérola Milman

    2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) experiment was a benchmark in quantum optics, evidencing the quantum nature of the photon. In order to go deeper, and obtain the complete information about the quantum state of a system, for instance, composed by photons, the direct measurement or reconstruction of the Wigner function or other quasi--probability distribution in phase space is necessary. In the present paper, we show that a simple modification in the well-known HOM experiment provides the direct measurement of the Wigner function. We apply our results to a widely used quantum optics system, consisting of the biphoton generated in the parametric down conversion process. In this approach, a negative value of the Wigner function is a sufficient condition for non-gaussian entanglement between two photons. In the general case, the Wigner function provides all the required information to infer entanglement using well known necessary and sufficient criteria. We analyze our results using two examples of parametric down conversion processes taken from recent experiments. The present work offers a new vision of the HOM experiment that further develops its possibilities to realize fundamental tests of quantum mechanics involving decoherence and entanglement using simple optical set-ups.

  3. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  4. Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of simplified procedures for a multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA...

  5. Measuring surface ocean wave height and directional spectra using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler from an autonomous underwater vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haven, Scott

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) is a proven technology which is capable of measuring surface wave height and directional information, however it is generally limited to rigid, bottom mounted applications which ...

  6. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis zones inside biofuel producing and wastewater remediating microalgal biofilms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, Hans C.; Kesaano, Maureen; Moll, Karen; Smith, Terence; Gerlach, Robin; Carlson, Ross; Miller, Charles D.; Peyton, Brent; Cooksey, Keith; Gardner, Robert D.; Sims, Ronald C.

    2014-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: Microalgal biofilm based technologies are of keen interest due to their high biomass concentrations and ability to utilize renewable resources, such as light and CO2. While photoautotrophic biofilms have long been used for wastewater remediation applications, biofuel production represents a relatively new and under-represented focus area. However, the direct measurement and characterization of fundamental parameters required for physiological analyses are challenging due to biofilm heterogeneity. This study evaluated oxygenic photosynthesis and biofuel precursor molecule production using a novel rotating algal biofilm reactor (RABR) operated at field- and laboratory-scales for wastewater remediation and biofuel production, respectively. Clear differences in oxygenic-photosynthesis, respiration and biofuel-precursor capacities were observed between the two systems and different conditions based on light and nitrogen availability. Nitrogen depletion was not found to have the same effect on lipid accumulation compared to prior planktonic studies. Physiological characterizations of these microalgal biofilms identify potential areas for future process optimization.

  7. Direct measurement of the Wigner function by photon-number-resolving detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niranjan Sridhar; Reihaneh Shahrokhshahi; Aaron J. Miller; Brice Calkins; Thomas Gerrits; Adriana Lita; Sae Woo Nam; Olivier Pfister

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Photon-number-revolving (PNR) detection allows the direct measurement of the Wigner quasiprobability distribution of an optical mode without the need for numerically processing an inverse Radon transform [K. Banaszek and K. W\\'odkiewicz, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 4344 (1996)]. In this work, we reproduced the seminal experiment of Banaszek et al. [Phys. Rev. A 60, 674 (1999)] of quantum tomography of a pure coherent state, and of a statistical mixture thereof, and extended it to the more general case of photon fluxes with much more than one photon per detection time. This was made possible by the use of a superconducting transition-edge sensor to perform PNR detection from 0 to 5 photons at 1064 nm, at about 70% system efficiency and with no dead time. We detail signal acquisition and detection efficiency and discuss prospects for applying such quantum tomography to non-Gaussian states.

  8. Torsion pendulum facility for direct force measurements of LISA GRS related disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Carbone; A. Cavalleri; G. Ciani; R. Dolesi; M. Hueller; D. Tombolato; S. Vitale; W. J. Weber

    2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A four mass torsion pendulum facility for testing of the LISA GRS is under development in Trento. With a LISA-like test mass suspended off-axis with respect to the pendulum fiber, the facility allows for a direct measurement of surface force disturbances arising in the GRS. We present here results with a prototype pendulum integrated with very large-gap sensors, which allows an estimate of the intrinsic pendulum noise floor in the absence of sensor related force noise. The apparatus has shown a torque noise near to its mechanical thermal noise limit, and would allow to place upper limits on GRS related disturbances with a best sensitivity of 300 fN/Hz^(1/2) at 1mHz, a factor 50 from the LISA goal. Also, we discuss the characterization of the gravity gradient noise, one environmental noise source that could limit the apparatus performances, and report on the status of development of the facility.

  9. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  10. Implications of the B-mode Polarization Measurement for Direct Detection of Inflationary Gravitational Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachiko Kuroyanagi; Shinji Tsujikawa; Takeshi Chiba; Naoshi Sugiyama

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The prospects for direct measurements of inflationary gravitational waves by next generation interferometric detectors inferred from the possible detection of B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background are studied. We compute the spectra of the gravitational wave background and the signal-to-noise ratios by two interferometric detectors (DECIGO and BBO) for large-field inflationary models in which the tensor-to-scalar ratio is greater than the order of 0.01. If the reheating temperature $T_{\\rm RH}$ of chaotic inflation with the quadratic potential is high ($T_{\\rm RH}>7.9\\times10^6$ GeV for upgraded DECIGO and $T_{\\rm RH}> 1.8\\times 10^{6}$ GeV for BBO), it will be possible to reach the sensitivity of the gravitational background in future experiments at $3\\sigma$ confidence level. The direct detection is also possible for natural inflation with the potential $V(\\phi)=\\Lambda^4 [1-\\cos(\\phi/f)]$, provided that $f>4.2 M_{\\rm pl}$ (upgraded DECIGO) and $f>3.6 M_{\\rm pl}$ (BBO) with $T_{\\rm RH}$ higher than $10^8$ GeV. The quartic potential $V(\\phi)=\\lambda \\phi^4/4$ with a non-minimal coupling $\\xi$ between the inflaton field $\\phi$ and the Ricci scalar $R$ gives rise to a detectable level of gravitational waves for $|\\xi|$ smaller than the order of 0.01, irrespective of the reheating temperature.

  11. The first direct measurement of 12C(12C,n)23Mg at stellar energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucher, B; Fang, X; Heger, A; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Alongi, A; Ayangeakaa, A D; Beard, M; Best, A; Browne, J; Cahillane, C; Couder, M; deBoer, R J; Kontos, A; Lamm, L; Li, Y J; Long, A; Lu, W; Lyons, S; Notani, M; Patel, D; Paul, N; Pignatari, M; Roberts, A; Robertson, D; Smith, K; Stech, E; Talwar, R; Tan, W P; Wiescher, M; Woosley, S E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrons produced by the carbon fusion reaction 12C(12C,n)23Mg play an important role in stellar nucleosynthesis. However, past studies have shown large discrepancies between experimental data and theory, leading to an uncertain cross section extrapolation at astrophysical energies. We present the first direct measurement that extends deep into the astrophysical energy range along with a new and improved extrapolation technique based on experimental data from the mirror reaction 12C(12C,p)23Na. The new reaction rate has been determined with a well-defined uncertainty that exceeds the precision required by astrophysics models. Using our constrained rate, we find that 12C(12C,n)23Mg is crucial to the production of Na and Al in Pop-III Pair Instability Supernovae. It also plays a non-negligible role in the production of weak s-process elements as well as in the production of the important galactic gamma-ray emitter 60Fe.

  12. Kinetic measurements on the silicates of the Yucca Mountain potential repository. [Final report], January--September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, H.L.; Wilkin, R.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal effort has been concentrated on the preparation of clean clinoptilolite, quartz, and boehmite and then reaction of the natural clinoptilolite solid solution to the Naendmember, plus measurements of the endmember solubility to derive an accurate equilibrium constant for the clinoptilolite dissolution reaction, correctly speciated. We are very pleased with the consistency between the best calorimetrically measured and modeled equilibrium constants and those we have determined from 125{degrees}C to 265{degrees}C. These results now provide a basis for relating measurements of reaction rates to departures from equilibrium.

  13. Kinetics of Silica Polymerization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weres, Oleh

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    see S . ) It is the kinetic expression of the increase Therate is in part the kinetic expression of. the reducedrates calculated using kinetic expressions given in Chapter

  14. Kinetic measurements on the silicates of the Yucca Mountain potential repository. Final report for October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, H.L.; Wilkin, R.T. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Ore Deposits Research Section

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report includes a summary and discussion of results obtained under this project on the solubilities in subcritical aqueous solutions of Mont St. Hilaire analcime, Wikieup analcime, and Castle Creek Na-clinoptilolite. Also included here are the methods and results of hydrothermal flow-through experiments designed to measure the rates of Na-clinoptilolite dissolution and precipitation at 125{degree}C. In this report, high-temperature solubility measurements made in our lab are integrated and discussed along with the low-temperature measurements made at Yale University. The final report prepared by the group at Yale University (Lasaga et al.) includes a synthesis of dissolution rate measurements made between 25{degree} and 125{degree}C on the Na-clinoptilolite.

  15. Measuring photometric and spectral radiometric bi-directional transmission and reflection in a video-goniospectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Eleanor (Eleanor Catherine)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective use of complex fenestration systems (CFS) in buildings requires a detailed knowledge of their optical spectral and directional properties. Bidirectional scattering functions (BSDFs), either in transmission ...

  16. Fuels Performance Technologies: Milestone FY06 9.1 -- Using IQT measurements, develop simplified kinetic expressions for ignition of fuels that could be used in HCCI engine models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, J. D.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discusses the development of a new fuel characterization, based on simplified kinetic expression, to quantify ignition quality for low-temperature combustion vehicle applications.

  17. Direct measurement of the chemical reactivity of silicon electrodes with LiPF6-based battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL; Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Sacci, Robert L [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E [ORNL] [ORNL; Browning, Jim [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first direct measurement of the chemistry and extent of reactivity between a lithium ion battery electrode surface (Si) and a liquid electrolyte (1.2M LiPF6-3:7 wt% ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate). This layer is estimated to be 3.6 nm thick and partially originates from the consumption of the silicon surface.

  18. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

  19. Direct Measurement of the Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of NiTi Shape Memory Gordon A. Shaw1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crone, Wendy C.

    Direct Measurement of the Nanoscale Mechanical Properties of NiTi Shape Memory Alloy Gordon A. Shaw.S.A. ABSTRACT The mechanical properties of sputter-deposited NiTi shape memory alloy thin films ranging the findings, which suggest that the substrate tends block the shape memory effect as film thickness decreases

  20. Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

  1. Conductivity measurements of molten metal oxides and their evaluation in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Since Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC) technology is in a beginning stage, emphasis should be laid on addressing the fundamental aspects. A molten electrolyte is required to facilitate ionic contact between solid ...

  2. Classical kinetic energy, quantum fluctuation terms and kinetic-energy functionals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. P. Hamilton; Ricardo A. Mosna; L. Delle Site

    2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We employ a recently formulated dequantization procedure to obtain an exact expression for the kinetic energy which is applicable to all kinetic-energy functionals. We express the kinetic energy of an N-electron system as the sum of an N-electron classical kinetic energy and an N-electron purely quantum kinetic energy arising from the quantum fluctuations that turn the classical momentum into the quantum momentum. This leads to an interesting analogy with Nelson's stochastic approach to quantum mechanics, which we use to conceptually clarify the physical nature of part of the kinetic-energy functional in terms of statistical fluctuations and in direct correspondence with Fisher Information Theory. We show that the N-electron purely quantum kinetic energy can be written as the sum of the (one-electron) Weizsacker term and an (N-1)-electron kinetic correlation term. We further show that the Weizsacker term results from local fluctuations while the kinetic correlation term results from the nonlocal fluctuations. For one-electron orbitals (where kinetic correlation is neglected) we obtain an exact (albeit impractical) expression for the noninteracting kinetic energy as the sum of the classical kinetic energy and the Weizsacker term. The classical kinetic energy is seen to be explicitly dependent on the electron phase and this has implications for the development of accurate orbital-free kinetic-energy functionals. Also, there is a direct connection between the classical kinetic energy and the angular momentum and, across a row of the periodic table, the classical kinetic energy component of the noninteracting kinetic energy generally increases as Z increases.

  3. Status on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Bonebrake, Eric; Imel, G. R.; Harris, Jason; Beller, Dennis; Hatchett, D.; Droessler, J.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy. This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  4. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    in colloidal ensembles levitated above macroscopic surfaces. TIRM and VM are well established optical microscopy techniques for measuring normal and lateral colloidal excursions near macroscopic planar surfaces. The interactions between particle-particle...

  5. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase...

  6. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the ...

  7. Evanescent wave and video microscopy methods for directly measuring interactions between surface-immobilized biomolecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everett, William Neil

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatial and temporal tracking of passively diffusing functionalized colloids continues to be an improving and auspicious approach to measuring weak specific and non-specific biomolecular interactions. Evidence of this is given by the recent increase...

  8. Direct measurement of the extraordinary optical momentum using a nano-cantilever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antognozzi, M; Harniman, R; Senior, J; Hayward, R; Hoerber, H; Dennis, M R; Bekshaev, A Y; Bliokh, K Y; Nori, F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation pressure has been known since Kepler's observation that a comet's tail is always oriented away from the sun, and in the past centuries this phenomenon stimulated remarkable discoveries in electromagnetism, quantum physics and relativity [1-3]. In modern terms, the pressure of light is associated with the momentum of photons, which plays a crucial role in a variety of systems, from atomic [4-7] to astronomical [8,9] scales. Experience from these cases leads us to assume that the direction of the optical momentum and the radiation-pressure force are naturally aligned with the propagation of light, i.e., its wavevector. Here we report the direct observation of an extraordinary optical momentum and force directed perpendicular to the wavevector, and proportional to the optical spin (i.e., degree of circular polarization). This transverse spin-dependent optical force, a few orders of magnitude weaker than the usual radiation pressure, was recently predicted for evanescent waves [10] and other structured ...

  9. A comparison of spanwise aerodynamic loads estimated from measured bending moments versus direct pressure measurements on horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simms, D A; Butterfield, C P

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two methods can be used to determine aerodynamic loads on a rotating wind turbine blade. The first is to make direct pressure measurements on the blade surface. This is a difficult process requiring costly pressure instrumentation. The second method uses measured flap bending moments in conjunction with analytical techniques to estimate airloads. This method, called ALEST, was originally developed for use on helicopter rotors and was modified for use on horizontal axis wind turbine blades. Estimating airloads using flap bending moments in much simpler and less costly because measurements can be made with conventional strain gages and equipment. This paper presents results of airload estimates obtained using both methods under a variety of operating conditions. Insights on the limitations and usefulness of the ALEST bending moment technique are also included. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  10. Direct Measurement of Supernova Neutrino Emission Parameters with a Gadolinium-Enhanced Super-Kamiokande Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan Yuksel; Shin'ichiro Ando; John Beacom

    2006-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The time-integrated luminosity and average energy of the neutrino emission spectrum are essential diagnostics of core-collapse supernovae. The SN 1987A electron antineutrino observations by the Kamiokande-II and IMB detectors are only roughly consistent with each other and theory. Using new measurements of the star formation rate history, we reinterpret the Super-Kamiokande upper bound on the electron antineutrino flux from all past supernovae as an excluded region in neutrino emission parameter space. A gadolinium-enhanced Super-Kamiokande should be able to jointly measure these parameters, and a future megaton-scale detector would enable precision studies.

  11. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  12. Direct nuclear heating measurements and analyses for plasma-facing materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Youssef, M.Z. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Kosako, K.; Oyama, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental measurement of nuclear heating rates was carried out in a simulated D-T fusion neutron environment from 1989 through 1992 under the U.S. DOE/JAERI collaborative program at the Fusion Neutronics Source Facility. Small probes of materials were irradiated in close vicinity of a rotating target. A sophisticated microcalorimetric technique was developed for on-line measurements of local nuclear heating in a mixed neutron plus photon field. Measurements with probes of graphite, titanium, copper, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, tin, tungsten, and lead are presented. These measurements have been analyzed using the three-dimensional Monte Carlo code MCNP and various heating number/kerma factor libraries. The ratio of calculated to experimental (C/E) heating rates shows a large deviation from 1 for all the materials except tungsten. For example, C/E`s for graphite range from 1.14 ({delta} = 10%) to 1.36 (10%) for various kerma factor libraries. Uncertainty estimates on total nuclear heating using a sensitivity approach are presented. Interestingly, C/E data for all libraries and materials can be consolidated to obtain a probability density distribution of C/E`s that very much resembles a Gaussian distribution centered at 1.04. The concept of `quality factor` is defined and elaborated so as to take cognizance of observed uncertainties on prediction of nuclear heating for all the nine materials. 45 refs., 69 figs., 9 tabs.

  13. Lightning strikes to tall objects: Currents inferred from far electromagnetic fields versus directly measured currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    -field-to-current conversion factor for lightning strikes to flat ground based on the transmission line model and (b currents on tall towers are used for testing the validity of field-to-current conversion equations [e on current measurement location (e.g., near the top or bottom of the tower) and on whether initial or largest

  14. MEASUREMENT OF THE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS WITH ICECUBE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K., E-mail: rasha.abbasi@icecube.wisc.ed, E-mail: paolo.desiati@icecube.wisc.ed [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observation of an anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays with energies in the multi-TeV region in the Southern sky using data from the IceCube detector. Between 2007 June and 2008 March, the partially deployed IceCube detector was operated in a configuration with 1320 digital optical sensors distributed over 22 strings at depths between 1450 and 2450 m inside the Antarctic ice. IceCube is a neutrino detector, but the data are dominated by a large background of cosmic-ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the southern sky. The data include 4.3 billion muons produced by downward-going cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere; these events were reconstructed with a median angular resolution of 3{sup 0} and a median energy of {approx}20 TeV. Their arrival direction distribution exhibits an anisotropy in right ascension with a first-harmonic amplitude of (6.4 {+-} 0.2 stat. {+-} 0.8 syst.) x 10{sup -4}.

  15. Direct measurements of the effects of salt and surfactant on interaction forces between colloidal particles at water-oil interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Park; J. P. Pantina; E. Furst; M. Oettel; S. Reynaert; J. Vermant

    2007-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The forces between colloidal particles at a decane-water interface, in the presence of low concentrations of a monovalent salt (NaCl) and of the surfactant sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) in the aqueous subphase, have been studied using laser tweezers. In the absence of electrolyte and surfactant, particle interactions exhibit a long-range repulsion, yet the variation of the interaction for different particle pairs is found to be considerable. Averaging over several particle pairs was hence found to be necessary to obtain reliable assessment of the effects of salt and surfactant. It has previously been suggested that the repulsion is consistent with electrostatic interactions between a small number of dissociated charges in the oil phase, leading to a decay with distance to the power -4 and an absence of any effect of electrolyte concentration. However, the present work demonstrates that increasing the electrolyte concentration does yield, on average, a reduction of the magnitude of the interaction force with electrolyte concentration. This implies that charges on the water side also contribute significantly to the electrostatic interactions. An increase in the concentration of SDS leads to a similar decrease of the interaction force. Moreover the repulsion at fixed SDS concentrations decreases over longer times. Finally, measurements of three-body interactions provide insight into the anisotropic nature of the interactions. The unique time-dependent and anisotropic interactions between particles at the oil-water interface allow tailoring of the aggregation kinetics and structure of the suspension structure.

  16. Comparing Pulsed Doppler LIDAR with SODAR and Direct Measurements for Wind Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.; Scott, G. N.; Pichugina, Y. L.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a pressing need for good wind-speed measurements at greater and greater heights to assess the availability of the resource in terms of power production and to identify any frequently occurring atmospheric structural characteristics that may create turbulence that impacts the operational reliability and lifetime of wind turbines and their components. In this paper, we summarize the results of a short study that compares the relative accuracies of wind speeds derived from a high-resolution pulsed Doppler LIDAR operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and a midrange Doppler SODAR with wind speeds measured by four levels of tower-based sonic anemometry up to a height of 116 m.

  17. Measurement of the B+- --> rho+- pi0 Branching Fraction and Direct CP Asymmetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved measurement of the process B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0} is presented. The data sample of 211 fb{sup -1} comprises 232 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric B Factory at SLAC. The yield and CP asymmetry are calculated using an extended maximum likelihood fitting method. The branching fraction and asymmetry are found to be {Beta}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = [10.0 {+-} 1.4 (Stat.) {+-} 0.9 (Syst.)] x 10{sup -6} and {Alpha}{sub CP}(B{sup {+-}} {yields} {rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup 0}) = -0.01 {+-} 0.13 (Stat.) {+-} 0.02 (Syst.), superseding previous measurements. The statistical significance of the signal is calculated to be 8.7{sigma}.

  18. Direct Measurement of the Free Energy of Aging Hard-Sphere Colloidal Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojman Zargar; Bernard Nienhuis; Peter Schall; Daniel Bonn

    2013-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the most important unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. The difference between glasses and liquids is believed to be caused by very large free energy barriers for particle rearrangements; however so far it has not been possible to confirm this experimentally. We provide the first quantitative determination of the free energy for an aging hard-sphere colloidal glass. The determination of the free energy allows for a number of new insights in the glass transition, notably the quantification of the strong spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the free energy. A study of the local minima of the free energy reveals that the observed variations are directly related to the rearrangements of the particles. Our main finding is that the probability of particle rearrangements shows a power law dependence on the free energy changes associated with the rearrangements, similarly to the Gutenberg-Richter law in seismology.

  19. Triangular Ring Resonator: Direct measurement of the parity-odd parameters of the photon sector of SME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qasem Exirifard

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the the Triangular Ring (TR) resonator. We show that the difference between the clockwise and anti-clockwise resonant frequencies of a vacuum TR resonator is sensitive to the birefringence parity-odd parameters of the photon's sector of the minimal Standard Model Extension (mSME): the Standard Model plus all the perturbative parameters encoding the break the Lorentz symmetry. We report that utilizing the current technology allows for direct measurement of these parameters with a sensitivity of the parity even ones and improves the best current resonator bounds by couple of orders of magnitudes. We note that designing an optical table that rotates perpendicular to the gravitational equipotential surface (geoid) allows for direct measurement of the constancy of the light speed at the vicinity of the earth in all directions in particular perpendicular to the geoid. If this table could achieve the precision of the ordinary tables, then it would improve the GPS bounds on the constancy of the light speed perpendicular to geoid by about eight orders of magnitude.

  20. Direct Schmidt number measurement of high-gain parametric down conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. V. Dyakonov; P. R. Sharapova; T. Sh. Iskhakov; G. Leuchs

    2014-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the transverse Schmidt number for the bipartite bright squeezed vacuum state by means of second-order intensity correlation function measurement. Assuming that the number of modes is equal in both beams we determine the Schmidt number considering only one of the subsystems. The obtained results demonstrate that this approach is equally efficient over the whole propagation of the state from the near field to the far field regions of its emitter.

  1. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, L P; Jenkins, D G; Andreyev, A N; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Deacon, A N; De Witte, H; DiJulio, D; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Geibel, K; Grahn, T; Hadinia, B; Hass, M; Heenen, P -H; Hess, H; Huyse, M; Jakobsson, U; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kröll, Th; Kumar, V; Ivanov, O; Martin-Haugh, S; Mücher, D; Orlandi, R; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Reiter, P; Scheck, M; Seidlitz, M; Singh, K; Smith, J F; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Wadsworth, R; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Zieli?ska, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^...

  2. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  3. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Gaffney; A. P. Robinson; D. G. Jenkins; A. N. Andreyev; M. Bender; A. Blazhev; N. Bree; B. Bruyneel; P. A. Butler; T. E. Cocolios; T. Davinson; A. N. Deacon; H. De Witte; D. DiJulio; J. Diriken; A. Ekström; Ch. Fransen; S. J. Freeman; K. Geibel; T. Grahn; B. Hadinia; M. Hass; P. -H. Heenen; H. Hess; M. Huyse; U. Jakobsson; N. Kesteloot; J. Konki; Th. Kröll; V. Kumar; O. Ivanov; S. Martin-Haugh; D. Mücher; R. Orlandi; J. Pakarinen; A. Petts; P. Peura; P. Rahkila; P. Reiter; M. Scheck; M. Seidlitz; K. Singh; J. F. Smith; J. Van de Walle; P. Van Duppen; D. Voulot; R. Wadsworth; N. Warr; F. Wenander; K. Wimmer; K. Wrzosek-Lipska; M. Zieli?ska

    2015-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^{+}_{1})=29^{+8}_{-8}}$ W.u. and $43^{+17}_{-12}$ W.u., respectively. Additionally, $E2$ matrix elements connecting the $2^{+}_{1}$ state with the $4^{+}_{1}$ and $2^{+}_{2}$ states were determined in $^{202}$Rn. No excited $0^{+}$ states were observed in the current data set, possibly due to a limited population of second-order processes at the currently-available beam energies. Conclusions: The results are discussed in terms of collectivity and the deformation of both nuclei studied is deduced to be weak, as expected from the low-lying level-energy schemes. Comparisons are also made to state-of-the-art beyond-mean-field model calculations and the magnitude of the transitional quadrupole moments are well reproduced.

  4. Progress on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Smith, L. E.; Gavron, A.; Devlin, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Danon, Yaron; Becker, Bjorn; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) of next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT continues to support a multi-institutional collaboration to address the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) as an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. An LSDS is comprised of a stack of lead (typically 1-6 m3) in which materials to be measured are placed in the lead and a pulse of neutrons is injected. The neutrons in this pulse lose energy due to inelastic and (subsequently) elastic scattering and the average energy of the neutrons decreases as the time increases by a well-defined relationship. In the interrogation energy region (~0.1-1000 eV) the neutrons have little energy spread (~30%) about the average neutron energy. Due to this characteristic, the energy of the (assay) neutrons can then be determined by measuring the time elapsed since the neutron pulse. By measuring the induced fission neutrons emitted from the used fuel, it is possible to determine isotopic-mass content by unfolding the unique structure of isotopic resonances across the interrogation energy region. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  5. Direct measurement of the 15N(p,gamma)16O total cross section at novae energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Bemmerer; A Caciolli; R Bonetti; C Broggini; F Confortola; P Corvisiero; H Costantini; Z Elekes; A Formicola; Zs Fulop; G Gervino; A Guglielmetti; C Gustavino; Gy Gyurky; M Junker; B Limata; M Marta; R Menegazzo; P Prati; V Roca; C Rolfs; C Rossi Alvarez; E Somorjai; O Straniero

    2009-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The 15N(p,gamma)16O reaction controls the passage of nucleosynthetic material from the first to the second carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle. A direct measurement of the total 15N(p,gamma)16O cross section at energies corresponding to hydrogen burning in novae is presented here. Data have been taken at 90-230 keV center-of-mass energy using a windowless gas target filled with nitrogen of natural isotopic composition and a bismuth germanate summing detector. The cross section is found to be a factor two lower than previously believed.

  6. Proposed method for direct measurement of non-Markovian character of the qubits coupled to bosonic reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Xu; W. L. Yang; M. Feng

    2010-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The non-Markovianity is a recently proposed characterization of the non-Markovian behavior in an open quantum system, based on which we first present a practical idea for directly measuring the non-Markovian character of a single qubit coupled to a zero-temperature bosonic reservoir, and then extend to investigate the dynamics of two noninteracting qubits subject to two reservoirs respectively with a lower bound of non-Markovianity. Our scheme, with no need of optimization procedures and quantum state tomography, is helpful for experimental implementation.

  7. Measuring the black hole spin direction in 3D Cartesian numerical relativity simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilios Mewes; José A. Font; Pedro J. Montero

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the so-called flat-space rotational Killing vector method for measuring the Cartesian components of a black hole spin can be derived from the surface integral of Weinberg's pseudotensor over the apparent horizon surface when using Gaussian normal coordinates in the integration. Moreover, the integration of the pseudotensor in this gauge yields the Komar angular momentum integral in a foliation adapted to the axisymmetry of the spacetime. As a result, the method does not explicitly depend on the evolved lapse $\\alpha$ and shift $\\beta^i$ on the respective timeslice, as they are fixed to Gaussian normal coordinates, while leaving the coordinate labels of the spatial metric $\\gamma_{ij}$ and the extrinsic curvature $K_{ij}$ unchanged. Such gauge fixing endows the method with coordinate invariance, which is not present in integral expressions using Weinberg's pseudotensor, as they normally rely on the explicit use of Cartesian coordinates.

  8. Towards a direct transition energy measurement of the lowest nuclear excitation in 229Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. v. d. Wense; P. G. Thirolf; D. Kalb; M. Laatiaoui

    2012-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The isomeric first excited state of the isotope 229Th exhibits the lowest nuclear excitation energy in the whole landscape of known atomic nuclei. For a long time this energy was reported in the literature as 3.5(5) eV, however, a new experiment corrected this energy to 7.6(5) eV, corresponding to a UV transition wavelength of 163(11) nm. The expected isomeric lifetime is $\\tau=$ 3-5 hours, leading to an extremely sharp relative linewidth of Delta E/E ~ 10^-20, 5-6 orders of magnitude smaller than typical atomic relative linewidths. For an adequately chosen electronic state the frequency of the nuclear ground-state transition will be independent from influences of external fields in the framework of the linear Zeeman and quadratic Stark effect, rendering 229mTh a candidate for a reference of an optical clock with very high accuracy. Moreover, in the literature speculations about a potentially enhanced sensitivity of the ground-state transition of $^{229m}$Th for eventual time-dependent variations of fundamental constants (e.g. fine structure constant alpha) can be found. We report on our experimental activities that aim at a direct identification of the UV fluorescence of the ground-state transition energy of 229mTh. A further goal is to improve the accuracy of the ground-state transition energy as a prerequisite for a laser-based optical control of this nuclear excited state, allowing to build a bridge between atomic and nuclear physics and open new perspectives for metrological as well as fundamental studies.

  9. 1994 Triggered Lightning Test Program: Measured responses of a reinforced concrete building under direct lightning attachments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schnetzer, G.H.; Chael, J.; Davis, R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fisher, R.J.; Magnotti, P.J. [Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rocket-triggered lightning test was carried out during the summer of 1994 on a specially designed steel reinforced concrete test building located at Ft. McClellan, Alabama. Currents, voltages, and magnetic fields were measured at 24 instrumented locations during 42 return strokes triggered to designated points on the structure and its lightning protection systems. As was found during an earlier similar lightning test of an earth covered munitions storage building, the buried power service conduits carried a much larger fraction of incident stroke current away from the building than did the intended grounding elements of the lightning protection system. Electrical breakdown and subsequent arcing occurred repeatedly to create dominant current paths to earth that were not accounted for in pretest linear modeling. Potential hazard level transient voltages, surprisingly more resistive than inductive in nature, were recorded throughout the structure. Also surprisingly, strikes to a single grounded protection mast system resulted in internal environments that were generally comparable to those occurring during strikes to roof-mounted air terminals. A description of the test structure, experimental procedures, and a full set of the resultant data are presented in this two-volume report.

  10. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

    2004-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  11. Measurement of elemental speciation by liquid chromatography -- inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LC-ICP-MS) with the direct injection nebulizer (DIN)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shum, S.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is divided into 4 parts: elemental speciation, speciation of mercury and lead compounds by microbore column LC-ICP-MS with direct injection nebulization, spatially resolved measurements of size and velocity distributions of aerosol droplets from a direct injection nebulizer, and elemental speciation by anion exchange and size exclusion chromatography with detection by ICP-MS with direct injection nebulization. Tabs, figs, refs.

  12. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined include triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, together with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as ?0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium is shown to form homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials are used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. This method requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor an estimate for the SHE potential and thus allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media.

  13. Direct multi-wavelength limb-darkening measurements of three late-type giants with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wittkowski; C. A. Hummel; K. J. Johnston; D. Mozurkewich; A. R. Hajian; N. M. White

    2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present direct measurements of the limb-darkened intensity profiles of the late-type giant stars HR5299, HR7635, and HR8621 obtained with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) at the Lowell Observatory. A triangle of baselines with lengths of 18.9 m, 22.2 m, and 37.5 m was used. We utilized squared visibility amplitudes beyond the first minimum, as well as triple amplitudes and phases in up to 10 spectral channels covering a wavelength range of ~650 nm to ~850 nm. We find that our data can best be described by featureless symmetric limb-darkened disk models while uniform disk and fully darkened disk models can be rejected. We derive high-precision angular limb-darkened diameters for the three stars of 7.44 mas +/- 0.11 mas, 6.18 mas +/- 0.07 mas, and 6.94 mas +/- 0.12 mas, respectively. Using the HIPPARCOS parallaxes, we determine linear limb-darkened radii of 114 R$_\\odot \\pm $13 R$_\\odot$, 56 R$_\\odot \\pm $4 R$_\\odot$, and 98 R$_\\odot \\pm $9 R$_\\odot$, respectively. We compare our data to a grid of Kurucz stellar model atmospheres, with them derive the effective temperatures and surface gravities without additional information, and find agreement with independent estimates derived from empirical calibrations and bolometric fluxes. This confirms the consistency of model predictions and direct observations of the limb-darkening effect.

  14. Update on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Warren, Glen A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Stewart, T.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) of next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to address the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) as an active, nondestructive assay method. LSDS has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than today’s confirmatory assay methods, for which typical uncertainties are approximately 10%. LSDS techniques are sensitive to the fission resonances in the energy range of ~0.1-1000 eV, enabling their use to determine the mass content of the fissile isotopes in used fuel. This paper will present an update with regard to applying LSDS for used fuel assay and the development of algorithms to extract fissile isotopic masses from the used fuel.

  15. Prediction of liquid metal alloy radiant properties from measurements of the Hall coefficient and the direct current resistivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havstad, M.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Qiu, T. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal radiative properties of high temperature solid and liquid metal alloys are particularly useful to research and development efforts in laser cladding and machining, electron beam welding and laser isotope separation. However the cost, complexity, and difficulty of measuring these properties have forced the use of crude estimates from the Hagen-Rubens relation, the Drude relations, or extrapolation from low temperature or otherwise flawed data (e.g., oxidized). The authors have found in this work that published values for the Hall coefficient and the electrical resistivity of liquid metal alloys can provide useful estimates of the reflectance and emittance of some groups of binary liquid metal and high temperature solid alloys. The estimation method computes the Drude free electron parameters, and thence the optical constants and the radiant properties from the dependence of the Hall coefficient and direct current resistivity on alloy composition (the Hall coefficient gives the free electron density and the resistivity gives the average time between collisions). They find that predictions of the radiant properties of molten cerium-copper alloy, which use the measured variations in the Hall coefficient and resistivity (both highly nonlinear) as a function of alloy fraction (rather than linear combinations of the values of the pure elements) yield a good comparison to published measurements of the variation of the normal spectral emittance (a different but also nonlinear function) of cerium-copper alloy at the single wavelength available for comparison, 0.645 {mu}m. The success of the approach in the visible range is particularly notable because one expects a Drude based approach to improve with increasing wavelength from the visible into the infrared. Details of the estimation method, the comparison between the calculation and the measured emittance, and a discussion of what groups of elements may also provide agreement is given.

  16. Direct-Normal Solar Irradiance -A Closure Experiment, Halthore et al. 1 Comparison of Model Estimated and Measured Direct-Normal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ). This is the energy in the solar spectrum falling per unit time on a unit area of a surface oriented normal to the Sun Direct-normal solar irradiance (DNSI), the total energy in the solar spectrum incident in unit time extinction of solar energy without regard to the details of the extinction - whether absorption or scattering

  17. Measurements of prompt gamma-rays from fast-neutron induced fission with the LICORNE directional neutron source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, J N; Halipre, P; Oberstedt, S; Oberstedt, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the IPN Orsay we have developed a unique, directional, fast neutron source called LICORNE, intended initially to facilitate prompt fission gamma measurements. The ability of the IPN Orsay tandem accelerator to produce intense beams of $^7$Li is exploited to produce quasi-monoenergetic neutrons between 0.5 - 4 MeV using the p($^7$Li,$^7$Be)n inverse reaction. The available fluxes of up to 7 × 10$^7$ neutrons/second/steradian for the thickest hydrogen-rich targets are comparable to similar installations, but with two added advantages: (i) The kinematic focusing produces a natural neutron beam collimation which allows placement of gamma detectors adjacent to the irradiated sample unimpeded by source neutrons. (ii) The background of scattered neutrons in the experimental hall is drastically reduced. The dedicated neutron converter was commissioned in June 2013. Some preliminary results from the first experiment using the LICORNE neutron source at the IPN Orsay are presented. Prompt fission gamma rays from fas...

  18. Direct measurement of the correlated dynamics of the protein-backbone and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng Sun; Odingo Mitchell; Jiaxin Huang; Gregory S. Boutis

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the direct measurement of the correlation times of the protein backbone carbons and proximal waters of hydration in mechanically strained elastin by nuclear magnetic resonance methods. The experimental data indicate a decrease in the correlation times of the carbonyl carbons as the strain on the biopolymer is increased. These observations are in good agreement with short 4ns molecular dynamics simulations of (VPGVG)3, a well studied mimetic peptide of elastin. The experimental results also indicate a reduction in the correlation time of proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain applied to the elastomer. A simple model is suggested that correlates the increase in the motion of proximal waters of hydration to the increase in frequency of libration of the protein backbone that develops with increasing strain. Together, the reduction in the protein entropy accompanied with the increase in entropy of the proximal waters of hydration with increasing strain, support the notion that the source of elasticity is driven by an entropic mechanism arising from the change in entropy of the protein backbone.

  19. Direct measurements of marine aerosols to examine the influence of biological activity, anthropogenic emissions, and secondary processing on particle chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaston, Cassandra Jayne

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    radiation contributing to the aerosol direct effect [IPCC, 2007; Poschl, 2005] and also serve as nuclei for the formation of cloud

  20. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p(p)over-bar Collisions at root s = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity yW in p(p)over-bar collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV. We use a sample of W?e? events in data from 1??fb[superscript ...

  1. KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Albert J.

    of the temperature distribution on the cavity wall surface in diesel exhaust aftertreatment filters usingABSTRACT KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih) Non-contact remote-sensing radiation thermometry

  2. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A Potential MicrohydroDistrictInformationEau ClaireEcoEco Kinetics Jump

  3. Amber Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatechFuels JumpKinetics Jump to:

  4. Strain in the mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo model for sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørk, R; Tikare, V; Olevsky, E; Pryds, N

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shrinkage strains measured from microstructural simulations using the mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for solid state sintering are discussed. This model represents the microstructure using digitized discrete sites that are either grain or pore sites. The algorithm used to simulate densification by vacancy annihilation removes an isolated pore site at a grain boundary and collapses a column of sites extending from the vacancy to the surface of sintering compact, through the center of mass of the nearest grain. Using this algorithm, the existing published kMC models are shown to produce anisotropic strains for homogeneous powder compacts with aspect ratios different from unity. It is shown that the line direction biases shrinkage strains in proportion the compact dimension aspect ratios. A new algorithm that corrects this bias in strains is proposed; the direction for collapsing the column is determined by choosing a random sample face and subsequently a random point on that face as the end point for...

  5. ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search : final results and measurements in support of next generation instruments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichhart, Lea

    2013-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Astrophysical observations give convincing evidence for a vast non-baryonic component, the so-called dark matter, accounting for over 20% of the overall content of our Universe. Direct dark matter search experiments ...

  6. Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

  7. Direct Methanol Fuel Cells - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect Kinetic Measurements of

  8. Kinetic vs. energetic discrimination in biological copying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2013-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and can not be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the opposite, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Pol{\\gamma}, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway

  9. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez Castillo, J; Alvarez-Muniz, J; et al

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore »values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  10. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  11. Progress in an oxygen-carrier reaction kinetics experiment for rotary-bed chemical looping combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jester-Weinstein, Jack (Jack L.)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design process for an experimental platform measuring reaction kinetics in a chemical looping combustion (CLC) process is documented and justified. To enable an experiment designed to characterize the reaction kinetics ...

  12. Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B(±)?J/?K(±) and B(±)?J/??(±) decays with 10.4??fb(?1) of Tevatron data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Chen, G.; Clutter, Justace Randall; Sekaric, Jadranka; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B#1; ! J=cK#1; and B#1; ! J=c#1;#1; decays with 10:4 fb#2;1 of Tevatron data V.M. Abazov,31 B. Abbott,66 B. S. Acharya,25 M. Adams,45 T. Adams,43 J. P. Agnew,40 G.D. Alexeev,31 G. Alkhazov,35 A. Alton..., Seattle, Washington 98195, USA (Received 8 April 2013; published 12 June 2013) We present a measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in B#1; mesons decaying to J=cK#1; and J=c#1;#1; where J=c decays to #2;þ#2;#2;, using the full run II data...

  13. Direct measurements of the energy flux due to chemical reactions at the surface of a silicon sample interacting with a SF6 plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dussart, Remi; Pichon, Laurianne E; Bedra, Larbi; Semmar, Nadjib; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; 10.1063/1.2995988

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy exchanges due to chemical reactions between a silicon surface and a SF6 plasma were directly measured using a heat flux microsensor (HFM). The energy flux evolution was compared with those obtained when only few reactions occur at the surface to show the part of chemical reactions. At 800 W, the measured energy flux due to chemical reactions is estimated at about 7 W.cm\\^{-2} against 0.4 W.cm\\^{-2} for ion bombardment and other contributions. Time evolution of the HFM signal is also studied. The molar enthalpy of the reaction giving SiF4 molecules was evaluated and is consistent with values given in literature.

  14. Direct measurement of the W boson decay width in proton-antiproton collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Jun-jie

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation describes a direct measurement of the W boson total decay width, {Lambda}{sub W}, using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. The measurement uses an integrated luminosity of 177.3 pb{sup -1} data, collected during the 2002-2003 run. The width is determined from the shape of the transverse mass distribution, M{sub T}, by fitting the data in the tail region 100 < M{sub T} < 200 GeV. The result if {Lambda}{sub W} = 2.011 {+-} 0.093(stat) {+-} 0.107(syst) GeV.

  15. Direct measurement of strontium-90 and uranium-238 in soils on a real-time basis: 1994 summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schilk, A.J.; Hubbard, C.W.; Knopf, M.A.; Thompson, R.C.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditional methodologies for quantitative characterization of radionuclide-contaminated soils over extended areas are often tedious, costly, and non-representative. A rapid characterization methodology was designed that provides reliable output with spatial resolution on the order of a few meters or less. It incorporates an innovative sensor of square plastic scintillating fibers that has been designed to be placed directly on or above a contaminated soil to detect and quantify high-energy beta particles associated with the decay chains of uranium and/or strontium. Under the direction and auspices of the DOE`s Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Integrated Program, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) constructed a high-energy beta scintillation sensor that was optimized for the detection and quantification of uranium and strontium contamination in surface soils (in the presence of potentially interfering natural and anthropogenic radionuclides), demonstrated and evaluated this detector in various field and laboratory scenarios, and provides this document in completion of the aforementioned requirements.

  16. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  17. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  18. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  19. Direct measurements of growing amorphous order and non-monotonic dynamic correlations in a colloidal glass-former

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hima Nagamanasa; Shreyas Gokhale; A. K. Sood; Rajesh Ganapathy

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    While the transformation of flowing liquids into rigid glasses is omnipresent, a complete understanding of vitrification remains elusive. Of the numerous approaches aimed at solving the glass transition problem, the Random First-Order Theory (RFOT) is the most prominent. However, the existence of the underlying thermodynamic phase transition envisioned by RFOT remains debatable, since its key microscopic predictions concerning the growth of amorphous order and the nature of dynamic correlations lack experimental verification. Here, by using holographic optical tweezers, we freeze a wall of particles in an equilibrium configuration of a 2D colloidal glass-forming liquid and provide direct evidence for growing amorphous order in the form of a static point-to-set length. Most remarkably, we uncover the non-monotonic dependence of dynamic correlations on area fraction and show that this non-monotonicity follows directly from the change in morphology of cooperatively rearranging regions, as predicted by RFOT. Our findings suggest that the glass transition has a thermodynamic origin.

  20. Measurement of direct CP violation parameters in B±?J/?K± and B±?J/??± decays with 10.4??fb-1 of Tevatron data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Beattie, M.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hart, B.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Holzbauer, J.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kur?a, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lamont, I.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; Mason, N.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the direct CP-violating charge asymmetry in B± mesons decaying to J/?K± and J/??± where J/? decays to ?+??, using the full run II data set of 10.4??fb?1 of proton-antiproton collisions collected using the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. A difference in the yield of B? and B+ mesons in these decays is found by fitting to the difference between their reconstructed invariant mass distributions resulting in asymmetries of AJ/?K=[0.59±0.37]%, which is the most precise measurement to date, and AJ/??=[?4.2±4.5]%. Both measurements are consistent with standard model predictions.

  1. Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University (Japan)

    2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

  2. Measurement of Feynman-x Spectra of Photons and Neutrons in the Very Forward Direction in Deep-Inelastic Scattering at HERA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H1 Collaboration

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of normalised cross sections for the production of photons and neutrons at very small angles with respect to the proton beam direction in deep-inelastic $ep$ scattering at HERA are presented as a function of the Feynman variable $x_F$ and of the centre-of-mass energy of the virtual photon-proton system $W$. The data are taken with the H1 detector in the years 2006 and 2007 and correspond to an integrated luminosity of $131 \\mathrm{pb}^{-1}$. The measurement is restricted to photons and neutrons in the pseudorapidity range $\\eta>7.9$ and covers the range of negative four momentum transfer squared at the positron vertex $6scattering models and of models for hadronic interactions of high energy cosmic rays are compared to the measured cross sections.

  3. Slow Sorption Kinetics of Pentachlorophenol on Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    -term sorption kinetic data and a void in the understanding of the factors that control the slow sorption stage virtually unexplored. A complete understanding of the mechanisms that control the slow sorption of organic.1; cation exchange capacity (CEC), 5.02 cmol/kg; 1.7% organic matter (measured by incineration); 29.6% sand

  4. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  5. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA); Knerr, Christopher (Lawrenceville, GA)

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  6. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  7. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  8. Directives Tools

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Useful links and resources for Directives Writers, Directives Point of Contact (DPCs), Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and Draft Directive Reviewers.

  9. Measurement of the Penetration Depth and Coherence Length of MgB2 in All Directions Using Transmission Electron Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loudon, J.C.; Yazdi, S.; Kasama, T.; Zhigadlo, N.D.; Karpinski, J.

    2015-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    the value 6.523× 106 m?1V?1 at 300 kV. V0, the mean inner po- tential, was calculated as V0 = 17.71 V from theoretical scattering factors given in ref. 20, giving ?i = 244±5 nm and the thickness, l, varied from 200–290 nm across the field of view of Fig. 5... . These show that the con- ditions used (4.8 mT and 10.8 K) were in the low field limit (neutron diffraction) but not quite in the low temperature limit (< 5 K from radio-frequency measurements). In 2005, Fletcher et al.23 performed...

  10. Extinction of the N=20 neutron-shell closure for 32Mg examined by direct mass measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Chaudhuri; C. Andreoiu; T. Brunner; U. Chowdhury; S. Ettenauer; A. T. Gallant; G. Gwinner; A. A. Kwiatkowski; A. Lennarz; D. Lunney; T. D. Macdonald; B. E. Schultz; M. C. Simon; V. V. Simon; J. Dilling

    2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The 'island of inversion' around $^{32}$Mg is one of the most important paradigm for studying the disappearance of the stabilizing 'magic' of a shell closure. We present the first Penning-trap mass measurements of the exotic nuclides $^{29-31}$Na and $^{30-34}$Mg, which allow a precise determination of the empirical shell gap for $^{32}$Mg. The new value of 1.10(3) MeV is the lowest observed shell gap for any nuclide with a canonical magic number.

  11. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

  12. Atomistic Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations of Polycrystalline Copper Electrodeposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treeratanaphitak, Tanyakarn; Abukhdeir, Nasser Mohieddin

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-fidelity kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) simulation method (T. Treeratanaphitak, M. Pritzker, N. M. Abukhdeir, Electrochim. Acta 121 (2014) 407--414) using the semi-empirical multi-body embedded-atom method (EAM) potential has been extended to model polycrystalline metal electrodeposition. The presented KMC-EAM method enables true three-dimensional atomistic simulations of electrodeposition over experimentally relevant timescales. Simulations using KMC-EAM are performed over a range of overpotentials to predict the effect on deposit texture evolution. Results show strong agreement with past experimental results both with respect to deposition rates on various copper surfaces and roughness-time power law behaviour. It is found that roughness scales with time $\\propto t^\\beta$ where $\\beta=0.62 \\pm 0.12$, which is in good agreement with past experimental results. Furthermore, the simulations provide insights into sub-surface deposit morphologies which are not directly accessible from experimental measurements.

  13. Mesoscale Equipartition of kinetic energy in Quantum Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salort, Julien; Lévêque, Emmanuel; 10.1209/0295-5075/94/24001

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The turbulence of superfluid helium is investigated numerically at finite temperature. Direct numerical simulations are performed with a "truncated HVBK" model, which combines the continuous description of the Hall-Vinen-Bekeravich-Khalatnikov equations with the additional constraint that this continuous description cannot extend beyond a quantum length scale associated with the mean spacing between individual superfluid vortices. A good agreement is found with experimental measurements of the vortex density. Besides, by varying the turbulence intensity only, it is observed that the inter-vortex spacing varies with the Reynolds number as $Re^{-3/4}$, like the viscous length scale in classical turbulence. In the high temperature limit, Kolmogorov's inertial cascade is recovered, as expected from previous numerical and experimental studies. As the temperature decreases, the inertial cascade remains present at large scales while, at small scales, the system evolves towards a statistical equipartition of kinetic ...

  14. Investigation of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence and mixing using direct numerical simulation with experimentally-measured initial conditions. I. Comparison to experimental data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mueschke, N; Schilling, O

    2008-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A 1152 x 760 x 1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) using initial conditions, geometry, and physical parameters chosen to approximate those of a transitional, small Atwood number Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment [Mueschke, Andrews and Schilling, J. Fluid Mech. 567, 27 (2006)] is presented. The density and velocity fluctuations measured just off of the splitter plate in this buoyantly unstable water channel experiment were parameterized to provide physically-realistic, anisotropic initial conditions for the DNS. The methodology for parameterizing the measured data and numerically implementing the resulting perturbation spectra in the simulation is discussed in detail. The DNS model of the experiment is then validated by comparing quantities from the simulation to experimental measurements. In particular, large-scale quantities (such as the bubble front penetration hb and the mixing layer growth parameter {alpha}{sub b}), higher-order statistics (such as velocity variances and the molecular mixing parameter {theta}), and vertical velocity and density variance spectra from the DNS are shown to be in favorable agreement with the experimental data. Differences between the quantities obtained from the DNS and from experimental measurements are related to limitations in the dynamic range of scales resolved in the simulation and other idealizations of the simulation model. This work demonstrates that a parameterization of experimentally-measured initial conditions can yield simulation data that quantitatively agrees well with experimentally-measured low- and higher-order statistics in a Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer. This study also provides resolution and initial conditions implementation requirements needed to simulate a physical Rayleigh-Taylor mixing experiment. In Part II [Mueschke and Schilling, Phys. Fluids (2008)], other quantities not measured in the experiment are obtained from the DNS and discussed, such as the integral- and Taylor-scale Reynolds numbers, Reynolds stress anisotropy and two-dimensional density and velocity variance spectra, hypothetical chemical product formation measures, other local and global mixing parameters, and the statistical composition of mixed fluid.

  15. Kinetic theory viscosity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2004-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the viscous evolution of Keplerian accretion discs can be understood in terms of simple kinetic theory. Although standard physics texts give a simple derivation of momentum transfer in a linear shear flow using kinetic theory, many authors, as detailed by Hayashi & Matsuda 2001, have had difficulties applying the same considerations to a circular shear flow. We show here how this may be done, and note that the essential ingredients are to take proper account of, first, isotropy locally in the frame of the fluid and, second, the geometry of the mean flow.

  16. Measurement of direct CP violation in b -> scc and b -> dcc quark transitions using B+ -> J/psiK+ and B+ -> J/psi pi+ decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holubyev, K.; /Lancaster U.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the measurement of the direct CP violation in the b {yields} sc{bar c} transition using the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, and in the b {yields} dc{bar c} transition using the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}. The decays of B{sup +} mesons are reconstructed in approximately 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by D0 detector in 2002-2007 during Run II of Fermilab Tevatron collider. Using the unbinned likelihood fit, a signal of 40,222 {+-} 242 of B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} and 1,578 {+-} 119 of B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +} events is obtained. The corresponding direct CP violation asymmetries are measured to be A{sub CP}(B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S)K{sup +}) = +0.0077 {+-} 0.0061(stat.) {+-} 0.0027(syst.), and A{sub CP}(B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S){pi}{sup +}) = - 0.089 {+-} 0.081(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.). The result on A{sub CP} (B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S)K{sup +}) is consistent with the 2007 world average and is the most precise measurement of this asymmetry, with uncertainty approaching the level of the Standard Model prediction. The result on A{sub CP} (B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S){pi}{sup +}) constitutes the first measurement of this asymmetry at the hadron collider, with uncertainty at the level of the 2007 world average. The measurement presented in this thesis has become possible due to the sophisticated online and offline tracking/vertexing implemented at D0, and the regular reversal of the polarities of the D0 detector magnets.

  17. Function library programming to support B89 evaluation of Sheffield Apollo RS50 DCC (Direct Computer Control) CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank, R.N.

    1990-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Inspection Shop at Lawrence Livermore Lab recently purchased a Sheffield Apollo RS50 Direct Computer Control Coordinate Measuring Machine. The performance of the machine was specified to conform to B89 standard which relies heavily upon using the measuring machine in its intended manner to verify its accuracy (rather than parametric tests). Although it would be possible to use the interactive measurement system to perform these tasks, a more thorough and efficient job can be done by creating Function Library programs for certain tasks which integrate Hewlett-Packard Basic 5.0 language and calls to proprietary analysis and machine control routines. This combination provides efficient use of the measuring machine with a minimum of keyboard input plus an analysis of the data with respect to the B89 Standard rather than a CMM analysis which would require subsequent interpretation. This paper discusses some characteristics of the Sheffield machine control and analysis software and my use of H-P Basic language to create automated measurement programs to support the B89 performance evaluation of the CMM. 1 ref.

  18. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  19. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  20. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling &...

  1. Ducted kinetic Alfven waves in plasma with steep density gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houshmandyar, Saeid [Solar Observatory Department, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, Texas 77446 (United States); Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Given their high plasma density (n {approx} 10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}), it is theoretically possible to excite Alfven waves in a conventional, moderate length (L {approx} 2 m) helicon plasma source. However, helicon plasmas are decidedly inhomogeneous, having a steep radial density gradient, and typically have a significant background neutral pressure. The inhomogeneity introduces regions of kinetic and inertial Alfven wave propagation. Ion-neutral and electron-neutral collisions alter the Alfven wave dispersion characteristics. Here, we present the measurements of propagating kinetic Alfven waves in helium helicon plasma. The measured wave dispersion is well fit with a kinetic model that includes the effects of ion-neutral damping and that assumes the high density plasma core defines the radial extent of the wave propagation region. The measured wave amplitude versus plasma radius is consistent with the pile up of wave magnetic energy at the boundary between the kinetic and inertial regime regions.

  2. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  3. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore California 94550 (United States); Welch, D. [Voss Scientific, LLC, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States); Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C. [National Security Technologies, LLC, Las Vegas, Nevada 89030 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  4. Measurements of the volt-ampere characteristics and the breakdown voltages of direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges in microgaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klas, M.; Matej?ik, Š. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, Mlynskadolina F2, 84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Radjenovi?, B.; Radmilovi?-Radjenovi?, M. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, P.O. Box 57, 11080 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The discharge phenomena for micro meter gap sizes include many interesting problems from engineering and physical perspectives. In this paper, the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical results of the breakdown voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges. The measurements were performed at a constant pressure of around one atmosphere, while varying the gap size between two parallel plane tungsten electrodes between 1??m and 100??m. From the measured breakdown voltage curves, the effective yields and the ionization coefficients were derived for both gases. Present data for the ionization coefficients correlate with the data obtained for the breakdown voltage curves measured for fixed 100??m interelectrode separation. The current-voltage characteristics were plotted for the various gap sizes illustrating the role of the field emission effects in the microgaps. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the enhancement factors were determined. The gap spacing dependence of the field emission current can be explained by the introduction of two ideas, the first being a space charge effect by emitted electrons, and the second a change in the breakdown mechanism. Experimental results, presented here, demonstrate that Townsend phenomenology breaks down when field emission becomes the key mechanism affecting the breakdown and deforming the left hand side of the breakdown voltage curves.

  5. Isothermal crystallization kinetics in simulated high-level nuclear waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vienna, J.D.; Hrma, P.; Smith, D.E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Crystallization kinetics of a simulated high-level waste (HLW) glass were measured and modelled. Kinetics of acmite growth in the standard HW39-4 glass were measured using the isothermal method. A time-temperature-transformation (TTT) diagram was generated from these data. Classical glass-crystal transformation kinetic models were empirically applied to the crystallization data. These models adequately describe the kinetics of crystallization in complex HLW glasses (i.e., RSquared = 0.908). An approach to measurement, fitting, and use of TTT diagrams for prediction of crystallinity in a HLW glass canister is proposed.

  6. Kinetics of Oscillating Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Strack

    2005-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of core-collapse supernovae, Strack and Burrows (Phys. Rev. D 71, 093004 (2005)) have recently developed an extension of the classical Boltzmann kinetic formalism that retains all the standard neutrino oscillation phenomenology, including resonant flavor conversion (the MSW effect), neutrino self-interactions, and the interplay between neutrino-matter coupling and flavor oscillations. In this thesis, I extend the Strack & Burrows formalism to incorporate general relativity, spin degrees of freedom, and a possible neutrino magnetic-moment/magnetic-field interaction.

  7. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  8. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  9. DSRP, direct sulfur production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McMichael, W.J.; Agarwal, S.K.; Jang, B.L.; Howe, G.B. [Research Triangle Institute, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Chen, D.H.; Hopper, J.R. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate on a bench-scale the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for up to 99 percent or higher recovery of sulfur (as elemental sulfur) from regeneration off-gases and coal-gas produced in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generating systems. Fundamental kinetic and thermodynamic studies will also be conducted to enable development of a model to predict DSRP performance in large-scale reactors and to shed light on the mechanism of DSRP reactions. The ultimate goal of the project is to advance the DSRP technology to the point where industry is willing to support its further development.

  10. Kinetic theory for dilute cohesive granular gases with a square well potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satoshi Takada; Kuniyasu Saitoh; Hisao Hayakawa

    2015-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop the kinetic theory of dilute cohesive granular gases in which the attractive part is described by a square well potential. We derive the hydrodynamic equations from the kinetic theory with the microscopic expressions for the dissipation rate and the transport coefficients. We check the validity of our theory by performing the direct simulation Monte Carlo.

  11. Direct measurement of isothermal flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and high strain rates with application to Ta and Ta-W alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Isaacs, J.B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed for measuring the flow stress of metals over a broad range of strains, strain rates, and temperatures, in uniaxial compression. It utilizes a recent, enhanced version of the classical (Kolsky) compression split Hopkinson bar, in which a sample is subjected to a single stress pulse of a predefined profile, and then recovered without being subjected to any other additional loading. For the present application, the UCSD`s split Hopkinson bar is further enhanced by the addition of a new mechanism by means of which the incident and transmission bars of the split Hopkinson construction are moved into a constant-temperature furnace containing the sample, and gently brought into contact with the sample, as the elastic stress pulse reaches and loads the sample. Using several samples of the same material and testing them at the same strain rate and temperature, but different incremental strains, an accurate estimate of the material`s isothermal flow stress can be obtained. Additionally, the modified Hopkinson technique allows the direct measurement of the change in the (high strain-rate) flow stress with a change of the strain rate, while the strain and temperature are kept constant, i.e., the strain rate can be increased or decreased during the high strain-rate test. The technique is applied to obtain both quasi-isothermal and adiabatic flow stresses of tantalum (Ta) and a tantalum-tungsten (Ta-W) alloy at elevated temperatures. These experimental results show the flow stress of these materials to be controlled by a simple long-range plastic-strain-dependent barrier, and a short-range thermally activated Peierls mechanism. For tantalum, a model which fits the experimental data over strains from a few to over 100%, strain rates from quasi-static to 40,000/s, and temperatures from {minus}200 to 1,000 C, is presented and discussed.

  12. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. P. Schleich; J. P. Dahl

    2002-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number, N, of particles. We present a quantum state of N non-interacting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space.

  13. Niobium Silicon alloys for Kinetic Inductance Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calvo, M; Monfardini, A; Benoit, A; Boudou, N; Bourrion, O; Catalano, A; Dumoulin, L; Goupy, J; Sueur, H Le; Marnieros, S

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are studying the properties of Niobium Silicon amorphous alloys as a candidate material for the fabrication of highly sensitive Kinetic Inductance Detectors (KID), optimized for very low optical loads. As in the case of other composite materials, the NbSi properties can be changed by varying the relative amounts of its components. Using a NbSi film with T_c around 1 K we have been able to obtain the first NbSi resonators, observe an optical response and acquire a spectrum in the band 50 to 300 GHz. The data taken show that this material has very high kinetic inductance and normal state surface resistivity. These properties are ideal for the development of KID. More measurements are planned to further characterize the NbSi alloy and fully investigate its potential.

  14. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo­Yong Shin 1 , Eun Jeong the complexity of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  15. DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DNA Computing Complexity Analysis Using DNA/DNA Hybridization Kinetics Soo-Yong Shin1 , Eun Jeong of DNA computing. The complexity of any computational algorithm is typically measured in terms of time and space. In DNA computing, the time complexity can be measured by the total reaction time

  16. Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding David E. Hertzog,, Xavier a microfluidic mixer for studying protein folding and other reactions with a mixing time of 8 µs and sample) measurements of single-stranded DNA. We also demon- strate the feasibility of measuring fast protein folding

  17. Solution of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Donald Ross

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A general class of two-step alternating-direction semi-implicit methods is proposed for the approximate solution of the semi-discrete form of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations. An exponential transformation ...

  18. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Developing chemical kinetic mechanisms and applying them to simulating engine combustion processes. deer09aceves.pdf More Documents & Publications Chemical Kinetic Research on...

  19. Temperature Independent Physisorption Kinetics and Adsorbate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature Independent Physisorption Kinetics and Adsorbate Layer Compression for Ar Adsorbed on Pt (111). Temperature Independent Physisorption Kinetics and Adsorbate Layer...

  20. thermodynamics kinetics | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    its kinetic behavior is more complex. Very little reliable kinetic information on coal gasification reactions exists, partly because it is highly depended on the process...

  1. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  2. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460?°C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51?±?3 and 87?±?5?kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475?°C and E{sub d} of 110?±?5?kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585?°C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62?±?3 and 270?±?10?kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited an additional high temperature peak at 910?°C with E{sub d}?=?370?±?10?kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d}?=?535?±?40?kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  3. Kinetics and morphology of erbium silicide formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Picraux, S.T.; Wu, C.S.; Lau, S.S.

    1985-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth kinetics and surface morphology of erbium silicide formation from Er layers on Si(100) substrates are examined using both fast e-beam annealing and furnace annealing. Very smooth erbium silicide layers have been grown using a line-source e beam to heat and react the Er overlayers with the substrate. This contrasts to the severe pitting observed when Er layers are reacted with Si in conventional furnace annealing. The pitting phenomenon can be explained by a thin contaminant layer at the interface between Er and Si. Our results suggest the contamination barrier is not due to oxygen, as usually assumed, but may be related to the presence of carbon. Rapid e-beam heating to reaction temperatures of approx.1200 K permits dispersion of the barrier layer before substantial silicide growth can occur, allowing smooth silicide growth. Heating to shorter times to just disperse the interface barrier allows uniform layer growth by subsequent furnace annealing and has permitted measurement of the kinetics of erbium silicide formation on crystalline Si. The reaction obeys (time)/sup 1//sup ///sup 2/ kinetics but is shown to be not totally diffusion limited by the ability to sustain multiple interface growth from a single Si source. The growth rates are nearly an order of magnitude slower for the Er/Si(100) interface than for the Er/amorphous-Si, but with a similar activation energy near 1.75 eV in both cases.

  4. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  5. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KTRIC AMPLIFICATION IN THE JACOBSEN HYDROLYTIC KINET RESOLUTION OF RACEMIC EPOXIDES 20 Applicability of Homocompetitive Reaction Kinetics to the Jacobsen HKR Effect of Catalyst EE and Choice of Epoxide on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Effect of Temperature on Amplification and Reaction Rate in the Jacobsen HKR . Effect of Low EE Catalyst Generation on Amplification in the Jacobsen HKR. . . . 21 21 25 26 27 30 31 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page V AS...

  6. Kinetic models of opinion formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Toscani

    2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and discuss certain kinetic models of (continuous) opinion formation involving both exchange of opinion between individual agents and diffusion of information. We show conditions which ensure that the kinetic model reaches non trivial stationary states in case of lack of diffusion in correspondence of some opinion point. Analytical results are then obtained by considering a suitable asymptotic limit of the model yielding a Fokker-Planck equation for the distribution of opinion among individuals.

  7. The aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds is quantified using measured reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol polluted cloud scenes and modeled reflectance spectra of unpolluted cloud scenes. The cloud reflectance spectra are read from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    distribution of clouds and aerosols along the white CALIPSO track in Fig.1b is shown in Fig. 2. The distanceThe aerosol direct radiative effect (DRE) over clouds is quantified using measured reflectance spectra of UV-absorbing aerosol polluted cloud scenes and modeled reflectance spectra of unpolluted cloud

  8. Measurement of the Cross Section for Direct-Photon Production in Association with a Heavy Quark in p[¯ over p] Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We report on a measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark using the full data set of ?s=1.96??TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to 9.1??fb[superscript -1] ...

  9. Spatial mapping of ices in the Oph-F core: A direct measurement of CO depletion and the formation of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Pontoppidan

    2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: Ices in dense star-forming cores contain the bulk of volatile molecules apart from H2 and thus represent a large fraction of dark cloud chemistry budget.To directly constrain the freeze-out profile of CO, the formation route of CO2 and the carrier of the 6.8 micron band, the spatial distribution of the CO/CO2 ice system and the 6.8 micron band carrier are measured in a nearby dense core. Methods: VLT-ISAAC, ISOCAM-CVF and Spitzer-IRS archival mid-infrared (3-20 micron) spectroscopy of young stellar objects is used to construct a map of the abundances of CO and CO2 ices in the Oph-F star-forming core, probing core radii from 2 10^3 to 14 10^3 AU or densities from 5 10^4 to 5 10^5 cm^-3 with a resolution of ~ 3000 AU. Results: The line-of-sight averaged abundances relative to water ice of both CO and CO2 ices increase monotonously with decreasing distance to the core center. The map traces the shape of the CO abundance profile between freeze-out ratios of 5-60% and shows that the CO2 ice abundance increases by a factor of 2 as the CO freezes out. It is suggested that this indicates a formation route of CO2 on a CO ice surface to produce a CO2 component dilute in CO ice, in addition to a fraction of the CO2 formed at lower densities along with the water ice mantle. It is predicted that the CO2 bending mode band profile should reflect a high CO:CO2 number ratio in the densest parts of dark clouds. In contrast to CO and CO2, the abundance of the carrier of the 6.8 micron band remains relatively constant throughout the core. A simple freeze-out model of the CO abundance profile is used to estimate the binding energy of CO on a CO ice surface to 814+/-30 K.

  10. Dissolution Kinetics of Calcium Carbonate Minerals A.V. Subhas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Emmanuel

    Dissolution Kinetics of Calcium Carbonate Minerals A.V. Subhas1 *, N.E. Rollins2 , W. Berelson2 , J@gps.caltech.edu We present a novel measurement of the dissolution kinetics of calcium carbonate minerals in seawater. These experiments significantly impact our understanding of calcium carbonate response to ocean acidification, water

  11. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  12. Kinetic Controls on Cu and Pb Sorption by Ferrihydrite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    time. To determine key factors controlling the kinetics, we measured Cu and Pb uptake as a function that the surfaces of primary particles with diameters of only a few nanometers are accessible even after aggregation ferrihydrite aggregates or the branched structure of primary ferrihydrite particles. Consequently, they fitted

  13. Analysis of a direct energy conversion system using medium energy helium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Jesse James

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A scaled direct energy conversion device was built to convert kinetic energy of singly ionized helium ions into an electric potential by the process of direct conversion. The experiments in this paper aimed to achieve higher potentials and higher...

  14. Analysis of a direct energy conversion system using medium energy helium ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Jesse James

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A scaled direct energy conversion device was built to convert kinetic energy of singly ionized helium ions into an electric potential by the process of direct conversion. The experiments in this paper aimed to achieve ...

  15. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  16. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J. [Research/Professor

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  17. Direct measurement of product of the electron mobility and mean free drift time of CdZnTe semiconductors using position sensitive single

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    Institute of Physics. Related Articles A new detector for mass spectrometry: Direct detection of low energy of material trends in nonproportionality of scintillators J. Appl. Phys. 109, 123716 (2011) A digital method Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E503 (2010) Development of a thermal neutron detector based on scintillating

  18. Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankat; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Camou, Alejandro; Aul, Christopher

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This final report documents the technical results of the 3-year project entitled, “Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels,” funded under the NETL of DOE. The research was conducted under six main tasks: 1) program management and planning; 2) turbulent flame speed measurements of syngas mixtures; 3) laminar flame speed measurements with diluents; 4) NOx mechanism validation experiments; 5) fundamental NOx kinetics; and 6) the effect of impurities on NOx kinetics. Experiments were performed using primary constant-volume vessels for laminar and turbulent flame speeds and shock tubes for ignition delay times and species concentrations. In addition to the existing shock- tube and flame speed facilities, a new capability in measuring turbulent flame speeds was developed under this grant. Other highlights include an improved NOx kinetics mechanism; a database on syngas blends for real fuel mixtures with and without impurities; an improved hydrogen sulfide mechanism; an improved ammonia kintics mechanism; laminar flame speed data at high pressures with water addition; and the development of an inexpensive absorption spectroscopy diagnostic for shock-tube measurements of OH time histories. The Project Results for this work can be divided into 13 major sections, which form the basis of this report. These 13 topics are divided into the five areas: 1) laminar flame speeds; 2) Nitrogen Oxide and Ammonia chemical kinetics; 3) syngas impurities chemical kinetics; 4) turbulent flame speeds; and 5) OH absorption measurements for chemical kinetics.

  19. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  20. A new water anomaly: the temperature dependence of the proton mean kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Flammini; Fabio Bruni; Maria Antonietta Ricci

    2009-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The mean kinetic energy of protons in water is determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments, performed above and below the temperature of maximum density and in the supercooled phase. The temperature dependence of this energy shows an anomalous behavior, as it occurs for many water properties. In particular two regions of maximum kinetic energy are identified: the first one, in the supercooled phase in the range 269 K - 272 K, and a second one above 273 K. In both these regions the measured proton kinetic energy exceedes the theoretical prediction based on a semi-classical model. Noteworthy, the proton mean kinetic energy has a maximum at 277 K, the temperature of the maximum density of water. In the supercooled metastable phase the measured mean kinetic energy and the proton momentum distribution clearly indicate proton delocalization between two H-bonded oxygens.

  1. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Desorption Kinetics of Methanol, Ethanol, and Water from Graphene. Abstract: The desorption kinetics of methanol,...

  3. Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the Birnessite-Water Interface L A U R), directly oxidized As(III). However, these studies did not explore the role that cation adsorption has on As at the birnessite-water interface were investigated using batch adsorption experiments (0.1 g L-1; pH 4.5 and 6.0; I

  4. Direct fabrication of nanopores in a metal foil using focused ion beam with in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagoshi, Kotaro; Honda, Junki; Sakaue, Hiroyuki; Takahagi, Takayuki; Suzuki, Hitoshi [Graduate School of Advanced Sciences of Matter, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan)

    2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A through hole with a diameter less than 100 nm was fabricated in an Ag foil using only a focused ion beam (FIB) system and in situ measurements of the penetrating ion beam. During the drilling of the foil by a FIB of Ga{sup +} ions, the transmitted part of the beam was measured with an electrode mounted on the back face of the foil. When the beam current penetrating through the nanopore reached a certain value, irradiation was stopped and the area of the created aperture was measured with a scanning electron microscope. The resulting area was correlated with the current of the penetrating ion beam. This suggests that we can fabricate a nanopore of the desired size by controlling the ion beam via penetrating ion beam measurements. The smallest aperture thus created was circular with diameter of 30 nm.

  5. Direct electrical observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-based two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, W.; Zhu, M.; Yue, Y.; Song, B.; Encomendero, J.; Xing, H.; Fay, P., E-mail: pfay@nd.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Sensale-Rodriguez, B. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112 (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, signatures of plasma waves in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors were observed by direct electrical measurement at room temperature. Periodic grating-gate device structures were fabricated and characterized by on-wafer G-band (140–220?GHz) s-parameter measurements as a function of gate bias voltage and device geometry. A physics-based equivalent circuit model was used to assist in interpreting the measured s-parameters. The kinetic inductance extracted from the measurement data matches well with theoretical predictions, consistent with direct observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-channel devices at room temperature. This observation of electrically significant room-temperature plasma-wave effects in GaN-channel devices may have implications for future millimeter-wave and THz device concepts and designs.

  6. Directives Help

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

  7. Direct Numerical Simulation of Autoignition in a Jet in a Cross-Flow |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect Kinetic Measurements

  8. Direct Observation of the Oxygenated Species during Oxygen Reduction on a

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect Kinetic MeasurementsPlatinum

  9. Spectroscopic and Kinetic Investigation of the Catalytic Mechanism of Tyrosine Hydroxylase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eser, Bekir Engin

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    into the catalytic mechanism of this physiologically important enzyme. Analysis of the TyrH reaction by rapid freeze-quench M?ssbauer spectroscopy allowed the first direct characterization of an Fe(IV) intermediate in a mononuclear non- heme enzyme catalyzing... aromatic hydroxylation. Further rapid kinetic studies established the kinetic competency of this intermediate to be the long-postulated hydroxylating species, Fe(IV)O. Spectroscopic investigations of wild-type (WT) and mutant TyrH complexes using...

  10. Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improving alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Salvador Aceves, Daniel Flowers, Bill Pitz, Charlie Westbrook, Emma Silke,...

  11. Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure Approximation of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 5, 2007 ... Kinetic Modeling and Thermodynamic Closure. Approximation of Liquid Crystal Polymers. Haijun Yu. Program in Applied and Computational ...

  12. Aerial Measuring System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish policy for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Program. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  13. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Estimating The Thermodynamics And Kinetics Of Chlorinated Hydrocarbon Degradation. Abstract: Many...

  14. First Direct Double- Decay Q-Value Measurement of 82Se in Support of Understanding the Nature of the Neutrino

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lincoln, David L. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Holt, Jason D. [Technische Univ. Darmstadt/GSI/UTK/ORNL; Bollen, Georg [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Brodeur, Maxime [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Bustabad, Scott [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Engel, Jonathan [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Novario, Samuel J. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Redshaw, Matthew [NSCL, Michigan State Univ.,/Central Michigan Univ.-Mt. Pleasant; Ringle, Ryan [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing; Schwarz, Stefan [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In anticipation of results from current and future double- decay studies, we report a measurement resulting in a 82Se double- decay Q value of 2997.9(3) keV, an order of magnitude more precise than the currently accepted value. We also present preliminary results of a calculation of the 82Se neutrinoless double- decay nuclear matrix element that corrects in part for the small size of the shell model single-particle space. The results of this work are important for designing next generation double- decay experiments and for the theoretical interpretations of their observations.

  15. Kinetics of small single particle combustion of zirconium alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei Haoyan; Yoo, Choong-Shik [Department of Chemistry and Institute for Shock Physics, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington 99164-2816 (United States)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present quantitative kinetic information regarding small, 1-10 {mu}m in diameter, single particle combustion of Zr-rich metal alloy foils subjected to either mechanical impacts or laser-ablation. The lights from combustion of metal fragments were recorded on a high-speed camera. The particle size was determined by the motion analysis of individual particle trajectory based on an aerodynamic drag law and further verified by the microstructure and chemical composition analysis of recovered post-burn particles. The measured particle sizes show a log-normal distribution centered at around 3.1 {mu}m in diameter, and the composition of recovered particles is that of fully oxidized ZrO{sub 2}. The temperature evolution of each particle along the space/time-trajectory is determined based on the thermal emission from combustion using a single-color photographic spectro-pyrometry. The result indicates that the particle has reached the maximum combustion temperature of 4000 K, well beyond the melting temperature of ZrO{sub 2}, and undergone the solidification of molten ZrO{sub 2} during the cooling stage. It also shows that the maximum combustion temperature decreases linearly with increasing the particle diameter, following the correlation t aD{sup 1.5-1.8} between the burn time (t) and the particle diameter (D). Combining the particle size, the burn time, and the particle temperature, both temperature and mass burn rates are obtained as a function of particle size. As the particle size increases, the temperature burn rate decreases, whereas the mass burn rate goes in the opposite direction.

  16. Visualizing kinetic pathways of homogeneous nucleation in colloidal crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Tan; Ning Xu; Lei Xu

    2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    When a system undergoes a transition from a liquid to a solid phase, it passes through multiple intermediate structures before reaching the final state. However, our knowledge on the exact pathways of this process is limited, mainly due to the difficulty of realizing direct observations. Here, we experimentally study the evolution of symmetry and density for various colloidal systems during liquid-to-solid phase transitions, and visualize kinetic pathways with single-particle resolution. We observe the formation of relatively-ordered precursor structures with different symmetries, which then convert into metastable solids. During this conversion, two major cross-symmetry pathways always occur, regardless of the final state and the interaction potential. In addition, we find a broad decoupling of density variation and symmetry development, and discover that nucleation rarely starts from the densest regions. These findings hold for all our samples, suggesting the possibility of finding a unified picture for the complex crystallization kinetics in colloidal systems.

  17. Understanding S-shaped current-voltage characteristics of organic solar cells: Direct measurement of potential distributions by scanning Kelvin probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saive, Rebecca, E-mail: rebecca.saive@innovationlab.de; Kowalsky, Wolfgang [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany) [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mueller, Christian [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany) [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Schinke, Janusz; Lovrincic, Robert [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany) [InnovationLab GmbH, 69115 Heidelberg (Germany); Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comparison of the potential distribution along the cross section of bilayer poly(3-hexylthiophene)/1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C61 (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells, which show normal and anomalous, S-shaped current-voltage (IV) characteristics. We expose the cross sections of the devices with a focussed ion beam and measure them with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. We find that in the case of S-shaped IV-characteristics, there is a huge potential drop at the PCBM/Al top contact, which does not occur in solar cells with normal IV-characteristics. This behavior confirms the assumption that S-shaped curves are caused by hindered charge transport at interfaces.

  18. Direct submillimeter absorptivity measurements on epitaxial Ba{sub 1-x}K{sub x}BiO{sub 3}films at 2K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, D.; Richards, P.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Nicol, E.J. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Hellman, E.S.; Hartford, E.H. Jr. [AT and T Bell Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States); Platt, C.E.; Schweinfurth, R.A.; VanHarlingen, D.J. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Amano, J. [Hewlett-Packard Lab., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have used a bolometric technique to obtain accurate low temperature loss data for epitaxial thin films of Ba{sub 0.6}K{sub 0.4}BiO{sub 3} from 30 to 700 cm{sup {minus}1}. These films were grown on MgO and SrTiO{sub 3} substrates by MBE, off-axis sputtering and laser deposition techniques. All films show a strong absorption onset near the BCS tunneling gap of 3.5k{sub B}T{sub c}. We have analyzed these data using a Kramers-Kronig transformation and have corrected for finite film thickness effects. Results indicate that the absorption onset is consistent with a superconducting energy gap. Comparison is made with predictions based on strong coupling Eliashberg theory using {alpha}{sup 2}F({omega}) spectra obtained from the literature. While we are able to fit the overall measured absorptivity, we are unable to fit the structure observed in our data.

  19. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  20. The kinetics of spinel crystallization from a high-level waste glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.G. [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States). Div. of Soils; Hrma, P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of spinel crystallization from a molten high-iron simulated high-level nuclear waste glass was studied using isothermal heat treatments. Optical microscopy with image analysis was used to measure volume fraction of spinel as a function of heat treatment time and temperature. The Johnson-Mehl-Avrami equation was fitted to data to determine kinetic coefficients for spinel crystallization. The liquidus temperature and Avrami number are T{sub L} = 1,337K and n = 1.5.

  1. Extraction of kinetic freeze-out properties and effect of resonance decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levente Molnar

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present STAR results from identified particle spectra measured in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 62.4 GeV Au-Au collisions. Particle production and system dynamics are compared to results at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV. We extract kinetic and chemical freeze-out parameters using blast wave model parameterization and statistical model. We discuss the effect of resonance decays on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters.

  2. Kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for deformable objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Tu Clausthal

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. We used our kinetic bounding volume hierarchies for collision detection and performed a comparison with the classical bottomup update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  3. Kinetics of the decomposition of tungsten hexacarbonyl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podoprigora, V.I.; Baev, A.K.

    1987-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A differential-flow apparatus is devised for the study of the kinetics of the thermal decomposition of volatile metal carbonyls under quasi-stationary conditions. The applicability of the general kinetic approach to the investigation of the thermodecomposition of carbonyl compounds and of the analysis of the experimental data on the basis of specific thermodecomposition rates was proved. Well-founded kinetic characteristics were obtained for the first time for the thermodecomposition of tungsten carbonyl in the kinetic region and under quasi-stationary pyrolysis conditions.

  4. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation (8744, 8746) Jae-Soon Choi Oak Ridge National Laboratory CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data...

  5. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  6. CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CLEERS Coordination & Development of Catalyst Process Kinetic Data - Pres. 1: Coordination of CLEERS Project; Pres. 2: ORNL Research on LNT Sulfation & Desulfation CLEERS...

  7. Transpulmonary Lactate and Pyruvate Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Matthew Lawrence

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of background isotope enrichments of lactate andbecause equivalent isotope enrichments were measured, theL]/[P]) and isotope enrichment values, because it receives

  8. Kinetics of actinide complexation reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, K.L.; Sullivan, J.C.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Though the literature records extensive compilations of the thermodynamics of actinide complexation reactions, the kinetics of complex formation and dissociation reactions of actinide ions in aqueous solutions have not been extensively investigated. In light of the central role played by such reactions in actinide process and environmental chemistry, this situation is somewhat surprising. The authors report herein a summary of what is known about actinide complexation kinetics. The systems include actinide ions in the four principal oxidation states (III, IV, V, and VI) and complex formation and dissociation rates with both simple and complex ligands. Most of the work reported was conducted in acidic media, but a few address reactions in neutral and alkaline solutions. Complex formation reactions tend in general to be rapid, accessible only to rapid-scan and equilibrium perturbation techniques. Complex dissociation reactions exhibit a wider range of rates and are generally more accessible using standard analytical methods. Literature results are described and correlated with the known properties of the individual ions.

  9. Second-order radio frequency kinetic theory revisited: Resolving inconsistency with conventional fluid theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiale [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China) [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Gao, Zhe [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The second-order velocity distribution function was calculated from the second-order rf kinetic theory [Jaeger et al., Phys. Plasmas 7, 641 (2000)]. However, the nonresonant ponderomotive force in the radial direction derived from the theory is inconsistent with that from the fluid theory. The inconsistency arises from that the multiple-timescale-separation assumption fails when the second-order Vlasov equation is directly integrated along unperturbed particle orbits. A slowly ramped wave field including an adiabatic turn-on process is applied in the modified kinetic theory in this paper. Since this modification leads only to additional reactive/nonresonant response relevant with the secular resonant response from the previous kinetic theory, the correct nonresonant ponderomotive force can be obtained while all the resonant moments remain unchanged.

  10. Evaluation of kinetic phosphorescence analysis for the determination of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Croatto, P.V.; Frank, I.W.; Johnson, K.D.; Mason, P.B.; Smith, M.M.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, New Brunswick Laboratory (NBL) has used a fluorometric method for the determination of sub-microgram quantities of uranium. In its continuing effort to upgrade and improve measurement technology, NBL has evaluated the commercially-available KPA-11 kinetic phosphorescence analyzer (Chemchek, Richland, WA). The Chemchek KPA-11 is a bench-top instrument which performs single-measurement, quench-corrected analyses for trace uranium. It incorporates patented kinetic phosphorimetry techniques to measure and analyze sample phosphorescence as a function of time. With laser excitation and time-corrected photon counting, the KPA-11 has a lower detection limit than conventional fluorometric methods. Operated with a personal computer, the state-of-the-art KPA-11 offers extensive time resolution and phosphorescence lifetime capabilities for additional specificity. Interferences are thereby avoided while obtaining precise measurements. Routine analyses can be easily and effectively accomplished, with the accuracy and precision equivalent to the pulsed-laser fluorometric method presently performed at NBL, without the need for internal standards. Applications of kinetic phosphorimetry at NBL include the measurement of trace level uranium in retention tank, waste samples, and low-level samples. It has also been used to support other experimental activities at NBL by the measuring of nanogram amounts of uranium contamination (in blanks) in isotopic sample preparations, and the determining of elution curves of different ion exchange resins used for uranium purification. In many cases, no pretreatment of samples was necessary except to fume them with nitric acid, and then to redissolve and dilute them to an appropriate concentration with 1 M HNO{sub 3} before measurement. Concentrations were determined on a mass basis ({micro}g U/g of solution), but no density corrections were needed since all the samples (including the samples used for calibration) were in the same density matrix (1 M HNO{sub 3}). A statistical evaluation of the determination of uranium using kinetic phosphorimetry is described in this report, along with a discussion of the method, and an evaluation of the use of plastic versus quartz cuvettes. Measurement with a precision of {+-} 3--4% relative standard deviation (RSD) and an accuracy of better than {+-} 2% relative difference (RD) are obtained in the 0.0006 to 5 {micro}g U/g-solution range. The instrument detection limit is 0.04 ppb (4 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using quartz cells, and 0.11 ppb (11 x 10{sup {minus}5} {micro}g U/g solution) using disposable methacrylate cuvettes.

  11. Amber Kinetics, Inc. Smart Grid Demonstration Project | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2,AUDITCaliforniaWeifangwikiAgouraAlbatechFuels JumpKinetics Jump

  12. Kinetics of adsorption of uranium from seawater by humic acids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heitkamp, D. (Institut fuer Chemie Der Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany)); Wagener, K. (Lehrstuhl fuer Biophysik der Technischen Hochschule, Aachen (West Germany))

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The kinetics of the adsorption of uranium from seawater by humic acids fixed onto a polymer matrix was measured in a fluidized bed as a function of the grain size of the adsorbent and the flow velocity of the seawater. The adsorption rate was found to be governed by the diffusion of the uranium ions through the hydrodynamic surface layer of the adsorbent which is always formed in laminar flows of liquids. The measured rate constants are interpreted in terms of effective diffusion coefficients of 3.6 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s for uranyl ions and 1.8 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} cm{sup 2}/s for tricarbonatouranate ions in the surface layer. As a consequence of this kinetic behavior, the geometry of the adsorbent as well as the velocity of the water flow are relevant parameters for the amount of adsorbent needed for a projected extraction rate. This conclusion applies to all adsorption processes where diffusion through the hydrodynamic layer is the rate-determining kinetic step.

  13. ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    1262 ADVANCES IN ENVIRONMENTAL REACTION KINETICS AND THERMODYNAMICS: LONG-TERM FATE thermodynamic and kinetic data is available with regard to the formation of these mixed metal precipitate phases to six months from the initial addition of aqueous nickel. Additionally, we have determined thermodynamic

  14. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  15. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek™ Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  16. Nonequilibrium sensing and its analogy to kinetic proofreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For a paradigmatic model of chemotaxis, we analyze the effect how a nonzero affinity driving receptors out of equilibrium affects sensitivity. This affinity arises whenever changes in receptor activity involve ATP hydrolysis. The sensitivity integrated over a ligand concentration range is shown to be enhanced by the affinity, providing a measure of how much energy consumption improves sensing. With this integrated sensitivity we can establish an intriguing analogy between sensing with nonequilibrium receptors and kinetic proofreading: the increase in integrated sensitivity is equivalent to the decrease of the error in kinetic proofreading. The influence of the occupancy of the receptor on the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reaction rates is shown to be crucial for the relation between integrated sensitivity and affinity. This influence can even lead to a regime where a nonzero affinity decreases the integrated sensitivity, which corresponds to anti-proofreading.

  17. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

    2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  18. Supporting information Figure S1: Pump-rePump-Probe kinetics of peridinin in methanol. Peridinin was excited at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Stokkum, Ivo

    Supporting information Figure S1: Pump-rePump-Probe kinetics of peridinin in methanol. Peridinin spectra (black lines) measured after excitation of peridinin in methanol at 400 nm and dumping at 3 ps

  19. Thermally Activated, Inverted Interfacial Electron Transfer Kinetics: High Driving Force Reactions between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    between Tin Oxide Nanoparticles and Electrostatically-Bound Molecular Reactants Dennis A. Gaal and Joseph: The kinetics and mechanism of fast electron transfer (ET) between tin oxide nanoparticles and electrostatically-order studies establish that, at least in the short time regime, electrons are transferred directly from the tin

  20. Direct Measurement of the W Boson Width

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Clutter, Justace Randall; McGivern, Carrie Lynne; Moulik, Tania; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.

    2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    , Dublin, Ireland 32Korea Detector Laboratory, Korea University, Seoul, Korea 33SungKyunKwan University, Suwon, Korea 34CINVESTAV, Mexico City, Mexico 35FOM-Institute NIKHEF and University of Amsterdam/NIKHEF, Amsterdam, The Netherlands 36Radboud University... ¼ ffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffiffi 2peTp#1;T½1#1; cosð#3;#5;Þ#3; p , where #3;#5; is the opening angle between the electron and neutrino in the plane perpendicu- lar to the beam axis, and peT and p#1;T are the transverse momenta of the electron and neutrino, respectively...

  1. Direct measurement and analysis of cyclohexadienyl oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James Wagner

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The oxidation of cyclohexadienyl radical (c-C?H?) and similar resonantly stabilized radicals are important in an astonishing array of processes in nature. Cyclohexadienyl radical has been postulated to be significant in a ...

  2. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwelling irradiance ARM

  3. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarization ARMdownwelling irradiance

  4. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling irradiance ARM

  5. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwelling irradiance ARMnormal

  6. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowband upwellingpolarizationupwellingdiffuse downwellingdirect

  7. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons...

  8. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  9. Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and precipitation in the sediments under alkaline and saline conditions . Transport-controlled kinetics of dissolution and...

  10. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments. Abstract: A...

  11. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Structure, Kinetics, and Thermodynamics of the Aqueous Uranyl(VI) Cation. Abstract: Molecular simulation techniques...

  12. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced...

  13. Design and operating characteristics of a transient kinetic analysis...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    operating characteristics of a transient kinetic analysis catalysis reactor system employing in situ transmission Design and operating characteristics of a transient kinetic...

  14. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data...

  15. Nonlinear evolution of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability: From fluid to kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur, BP 4229 06304, Nice Cedex 4 (France); Cerri, S. S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Califano, F.; Pegoraro, F. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Rossi, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy) [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); LPP-CNRS, Ecole Polytechnique, UPMC, Université Paris VI, Université Paris XI, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Faganello, M. [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, 13397 Marseille (France)] [International Institute for Fusion Science/PIIM, UMR 7345 CNRS, Aix-Marseille University, 13397 Marseille (France); Šebek, O. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague, Czech Republic and Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, B?ehová 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague, Czech Republic and Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University in Prague, B?ehová 7, 11519 Prague (Czech Republic); Trávní?ek, P. M. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic)] [Astronomical Institute and Institute of Atmospheric Physics, AS CR Bocni II/1401, CZ-14131 Prague (Czech Republic); and others

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas is typically a multi-scale process, where the energy is injected at large, fluid scales and dissipated at small, kinetic scales. Accurately modelling the global evolution requires to take into account the main micro-scale physical processes of interest. This is why comparison of different plasma models is today an imperative task aiming at understanding cross-scale processes in plasmas. We report here the first comparative study of the evolution of a magnetized shear flow, through a variety of different plasma models by using magnetohydrodynamic (MHD), Hall-MHD, two-fluid, hybrid kinetic, and full kinetic codes. Kinetic relaxation effects are discussed to emphasize the need for kinetic equilibriums to study the dynamics of collisionless plasmas in non trivial configurations. Discrepancies between models are studied both in the linear and in the nonlinear regime of the magnetized Kelvin-Helmholtz instability, to highlight the effects of small scale processes on the nonlinear evolution of collisionless plasmas. We illustrate how the evolution of a magnetized shear flow depends on the relative orientation of the fluid vorticity with respect to the magnetic field direction during the linear evolution when kinetic effects are taken into account. Even if we found that small scale processes differ between the different models, we show that the feedback from small, kinetic scales to large, fluid scales is negligible in the nonlinear regime. This study shows that the kinetic modeling validates the use of a fluid approach at large scales, which encourages the development and use of fluid codes to study the nonlinear evolution of magnetized fluid flows, even in the collisionless regime.

  16. HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefano Orsino

    2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

  17. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  18. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  19. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  20. Isothermal nitridation kinetics of TiSi{sub 2} powders

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roger, J., E-mail: roger@lcts.u-bordeaux1.fr; Maillé, L.; Dourges, M.A.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of the present work is to determine the kinetics of reaction between TiSi{sub 2} powder and gaseous nitrogen. Isothermal nitridation of TiSi{sub 2} powders with fine (1.4 µm) and medium (4.5 µm) particle size has been studied in pure nitrogen atmosphere from 1000 to 1200 °C for duration up to 50 h. The isothermal nitridation kinetics of TiSi{sub 2} powders were investigated by thermogravimetry. The nitridation rate strongly depends on the particle size and temperature. Smaller size particle exhibits higher nitridation rate due to its larger surface area. The conversion process is complex with nucleation and growth of TiN at the surface of the grain and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} inside the grain promoted by the Kirkendall effect with an influence of the volume increase. - Graphical abstract: Backscattered electrons image of a transverse TiSi{sub 2} grain nitrurated at 1100 °C for 50 h. - Highlights: • Influence of grain size on TiSi{sub 2} powder nitridation. • Influence of temperature on TiSi{sub 2} powder nitridation. • Experimental measurements of the nitridation kinetics. • An explanation of the nitridation mechanism.

  1. The Harrison Diffusion Kinetics Regimes in Solute Grain Boundary Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belova, Irina [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Fiedler, T [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia; Kulkarni, Nagraj S [ORNL; Murch, Prof. Graeme [University of Newcastle, NSW, Australia

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the limits of the principal Harrison kinetics regimes (Type-A, B and C) for grain boundary diffusion is very important for the correct analysis of the depth profiles in a tracer diffusion experiment. These regimes for self-diffusion have been extensively studied in the past by making use of the phenomenological Lattice Monte Carlo (LMC) method with the result that the limits are now well established. The relationship of those self-diffusion limits to the corresponding ones for solute diffusion in the presence of solute segregation to the grain boundaries remains unclear. In the present study, the influence of solute segregation on the limits is investigated with the LMC method for the well-known parallel grain boundary slab model by showing the equivalence of two diffusion models. It is shown which diffusion parameters are useful for identifying the limits of the Harrison kinetics regimes for solute grain boundary diffusion. It is also shown how the measured segregation factor from the diffusion experiment in the Harrison Type-B kinetics regime may differ from the global segregation factor.

  2. Kinetic limits of dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Marklof

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the pioneering work of Maxwell and Boltzmann in the 1860s and 1870s, a major challenge in mathematical physics has been the derivation of macroscopic evolution equations from the fundamental microscopic laws of classical or quantum mechanics. Macroscopic transport equations lie at the heart of many important physical theories, including fluid dynamics, condensed matter theory and nuclear physics. The rigorous derivation of macroscopic transport equations is thus not only a conceptual exercise that establishes their consistency with the fundamental laws of physics: the possibility of finding deviations and corrections to classical evolution equations makes this subject both intellectually exciting and relevant in practical applications. The plan of these lectures is to develop a renormalisation technique that will allow us to derive transport equations for the kinetic limits of two classes of simple dynamical systems, the Lorentz gas and kicked Hamiltonians (or linked twist maps). The technique uses the ergodic theory of flows on homogeneous spaces (homogeneous flows for short), and is based on joint work with Andreas Str\\"ombergsson.

  3. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian, E-mail: liuwjbdf@gmail.com [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Institute of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, and Center for Computational Science and Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same “direct relativistic mapping” between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  4. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  5. Mechanistic studies using kinetic isotope effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulmeier, Brian E.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding reaction mechanisms is an important aspect of chemistry. A now convenient way to study reaction mechanisms is kinetic isotope effects at natural abundance. This technique circumvents the cumbersome methods of traditional isotope effect...

  6. Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, Julianna G.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon TC-42 (trademark...

  7. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  8. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  9. A microfluidic device for investigating crystal nucleation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Laval; Jean-Baptiste Salmon; Mathieu Joanicot

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an original setup using microfluidic tools allowing one to produce continuously monodisperse microreactors ($\\approx 100$ nL), and to control their temperatures as they flow in the microdevice. With a specific microchannels geometry, we are able to apply large temperature quenches to droplets containing a KNO$_3$ solution (up to 50$^{\\circ}$C in 10 s), and then to follow nucleation kinetics at high supersaturations. By measuring the probability of crystal presence in the droplets as a function of time, we estimate the nucleation rate for different supersaturations, and confront our results to the classical nucleation theory.

  10. Computing realizations of reaction kinetic networks with given properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    chemical reactions, reaction kinetic systems are the main building blocks of highly interconnected´avid Csercsik, Katalin M. Hangos Process Control Research Group, Computer and Automation Research Institute}@scl.sztaki.hu Keywords: Applications: (bio)chemical kinetics, reaction kinetic systems, mass action kinet- ics

  11. Kinetics of the [beta]-[delta]phase transition in PBX9501.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L. B. (Laura B.); Henson, B. F. (Bryan F.); Asay, B. W. (Blaine W.); Dickson, P. M. (Peter M.); Robinson, J. M. (Jeanne M.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial step in the thermal decomposition of HMX is the solid state phase transition from the centrosymmetric beta form to the noncentrosymmetric delta form. The symmetry change makes the phase transition amenable to the application of second harmonic generation (SHG) as a probe of transition kinetics. We have used SHG to study the temperature dependence of the kinetics for unconfined PBX9501 and HMX. Spatially resolved SHG measurements have shown a nucleation and growth mechanism for the solid state phase transition. We have measured the transition rate as a function of temperature in order to obtain the activation energy and entropy of transition, which determine the phase transition kinetics. Additionally, we have observed temperature dependent reversion of the delta phase to beta phase and have fimd that we can control the reversion rate by controlling the cooling.

  12. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  13. Mineral dissolution kinetics at the pore scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, L.; Steefel, C.I.; Yang, L.

    2007-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Mineral dissolution rates in the field have been reported to be orders of magnitude slower than those measured in the laboratory, an unresolved discrepancy that severely limits our ability to develop scientifically defensible predictive or even interpretive models for many geochemical processes in the earth and environmental sciences. One suggestion links this discrepancy to the role of physical and chemical heterogeneities typically found in subsurface soils and aquifers in producing scale-dependent rates where concentration gradients develop. In this paper, we examine the possibility that scale-dependent mineral dissolution rates can develop even at the single pore and fracture scale, the smallest and most fundamental building block of porous media. To do so, we develop two models to analyze mineral dissolution kinetics at the single pore scale: (1) a Poiseuille Flow model that applies laboratory-measured dissolution kinetics at the pore or fracture wall and couples this to a rigorous treatment of both advective and diffusive transport, and (2) a Well-Mixed Reactor model that assumes complete mixing within the pore, while maintaining the same reactive surface area, average flow rate, and geometry as the Poiseuille Flow model. For a fracture, a 1D Plug Flow Reactor model is considered in addition to quantify the effects of longitudinal versus transverse mixing. The comparison of averaged dissolution rates under various conditions of flow, pore size, and fracture length from the three models is used as a means to quantify the extent to which concentration gradients at the single pore and fracture scale can develop and render rates scale-dependent. Three important minerals that dissolve at widely different rates, calcite, plagioclase, and iron hydroxide, are considered. The modeling indicates that rate discrepancies arise primarily where concentration gradients develop due to comparable rates of reaction and advective transport, and incomplete mixing via molecular diffusion. The magnitude of the reaction rate is important, since it is found that scaling effects (and thus rate discrepancies) are negligible at the single pore and fracture scale for plagioclase and iron hydroxide because of the slow rate at which they dissolve. In the case of calcite, where dissolution rates are rapid, scaling effects can develop at high flow rates from 0.1 cm/s to 1000 cm/s and for fracture lengths less than 1 cm. At more normal flow rates, however, mixing via molecular diffusion is effective in homogenizing the concentration field, thus eliminating any discrepancies between the Poiseuille Flow and the Well-Mixed Reactor model. This suggests that a scale dependence to mineral dissolution rates is unlikely at the single pore or fracture scale under normal geological/hydrologic conditions, implying that the discrepancy between laboratory and field rates must be attributed to other factors.

  14. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmschneider, Martin [University of Oxford; Killian, J Antoinette [University of Utrecht; Doux, Jacques P. F. [University of Utrecht; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Ulmschneider, Jakob [University of Heidelberg

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required to capture partitioning. Elevating temperatures to accelerate the dynamics has been avoided, as this was thought to lead to rapid denaturing. However, we show here that model TM peptides (WALP) are exceptionally thermostable. Circular dichroism experiments reveal that the peptides remain inserted into the lipid bilayer and are fully helical, even at 90 C. At these temperatures, sampling is 50 500 times faster, sufficient to directly simulate spontaneous partitioning at atomic resolution. A folded insertion pathway is observed, consistent with three-stage partitioning theory. Elevated temperature simulation ensembles further allow the direct calculation of the insertion kinetics, which is found to be first-order for all systems. Insertion barriers are Hin = 15 kcal/mol for a general hydrophobic peptide and 23 kcal/mol for the tryptophan-flanked WALP peptides. The corresponding insertion times at room temperature range from 8.5 s to 163 ms. High-temperature simulations of experimentally validated thermostable systems suggest a new avenue for systematic exploration of peptide partitioning properties.

  15. Heat Transfer Analysis and Assessment of Kinetics Systems for PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffrey W. Jorenby

    2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of thermal decomposition in high explosive (HE) charges has been an ongoing process since the early 1900s. This work is specifically directed towards the analysis of PBX 9501. In the early 1970s, Dwight Jaeger of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) developed a single-step, two-species kinetics system that was used in the development of one of the first finite element codes for thermal analyses known as EXPLO. Jaeger's research focused on unconfined spherical samples of HE charges to determine if varied heating ramps would cause detonation or deflagration. Tarver and McGuire of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) followed soon after with a three-step, four-species kinetics system that was developed for confined spheres under relatively fast heating conditions. Peter Dickson et al. of LANL then introduced a kinetics system with four steps and five species that included bimolecular products to capture the effects of the endothermic phase change that the HE undergoes. The results of four experiments are examined to study the effectiveness of these kinetics systems. The experiments are: (1) The LLNL scaled thermal explosion (STEX) experiments on confined cylindrical charges with long heating ramps in the range of 90 hours. (2) The LLNL one-dimensional time to explosion (ODTX) experiments on spherical charges that include confined, partially confined, and aged HE experiments. (3) The LANL unconfined one-dimensional experiments for small spheres. (4) The Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division at China Lake experiments on small confined cylinders. The three kinetics systems are applied to each of the four experiments with the use of the finite element analysis (FEA) heat conduction solver COYOTE. The numerical results using the kinetics systems are compared to each other and to the experimental data to determine which kinetics systems are best suited for analyzing conditions such as time to ignition, containment, heating time, and location of ignition.

  16. Alfvenic Turbulence in the Extended Solar Corona: Kinetic Effects and Proton Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Cranmer; A. A. van Ballegooijen

    2003-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the extended solar corona that contains the effects of collisionless dissipation and anisotropic particle heating. Measurements made by UVCS/SOHO have revived interest in the idea that ions are energized by the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant waves, but such high-frequency (i.e., small wavelength) fluctuations have not been observed. A turbulent cascade is one possible way of generating small-scale fluctuations from a pre-existing population of low-frequency MHD waves. We model this cascade as a combination of advection and diffusion in wavenumber space. The dominant spectral transfer occurs in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. As expected from earlier models, this leads to a highly anisotropic fluctuation spectrum with a rapidly decaying tail in parallel wavenumber. The wave power that decays to high enough frequencies to become ion cyclotron resonant depends on the relative strengths of advection and diffusion in the cascade. For the most realistic values of these parameters, though, there is insufficient power to heat protons and heavy ions. The dominant oblique fluctuations (with dispersion properties of kinetic Alfven waves) undergo Landau damping, which implies strong parallel electron heating. We discuss the probable nonlinear evolution of the electron velocity distributions into parallel beams and discrete phase-space holes (similar to those seen in the terrestrial magnetosphere) which can possibly heat protons via stochastic interactions.

  17. A reduced chemical kinetic model for IC engine combustion simulations with primary reference fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, ERB 1016B, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of primary reference fuel (PRF) has been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced reaction mechanism for n-heptane oxidation, a new reduced n-heptane mechanism was generated by including an additional five species and their relevant reactions, by updating the reaction rate constants of several reactions pertaining to oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach, a reduced mechanism for iso-octane oxidation was built and combined with the n-heptane mechanism to form a PRF mechanism. The final version of the PRF mechanism consists of 41 species and 130 reactions. Validation of the present PRF mechanism was performed with measurements from shock tube tests, and HCCI and direct injection engine experiments available in the literature. The results show that the present PRF mechanism gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements for multidimensional CFD simulations. (author)

  18. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  19. Studies of Reaction Kinetics of Methane Hydrate Dissocation in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Seol, Yongkoo; Kneafsey, Timothy J.

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is the description of the kinetic dissociation of CH4-hydrates in porous media, and the determination of the corresponding kinetic parameters. Knowledge of the kinetic dissociation behavior of hydrates can play a critical role in the evaluation of gas production potential of gas hydrate accumulations in geologic media. We analyzed data from a sequence of tests of CH4-hydrate dissociation by means of thermal stimulation. These tests had been conducted on sand cores partially saturated with water, hydrate and CH4 gas, and contained in an x-ray-transparent aluminum pressure vessel. The pressure, volume of released gas, and temperature (at several locations within the cores) were measured. To avoid misinterpreting local changes as global processes, x-ray computed tomography scans provided accurate images of the location and movement of the reaction interface during the course of the experiments. Analysis of the data by means of inverse modeling (history matching ) provided estimates of the thermal properties and of the kinetic parameters of the hydration reaction in porous media. Comparison of the results from the hydrate-bearing porous media cores to those from pure CH4-hydrate samples provided a measure of the effect of the porous medium on the kinetic reaction. A tentative model of composite thermal conductivity of hydrate-bearing media was also developed.

  20. Elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein patterning in the immunological synapse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreas Carlson; L. Mahadevan

    2015-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse (IS). Understanding the biophysical basis for protein patterning by deciphering the quantitative rules for their formation and motion is an important aspect of characterizing immune cell recognition and thence the rules for immune system activation. We propose a minimal mathematical model for the physical basis of membrane protein patterning in the IS, which encompass membrane mechanics, protein binding kinetics and motion, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Our theory leads to simple predictions for the spatial and temporal scales of protein cluster formation, growth and arrest as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity and kinetics of the adhesive proteins, and the fluid in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement these scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment shows that passive elastohydrodynamics and kinetics of protein binding in the synaptic cleft can describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, without evoking any active processes in the cytoskeleton. Despite the apparent complexity of the process, our analysis highlights the role of just two dimensionless parameters that characterize the spatial and temporal evolution of the protein pattern: a ratio of membrane elasticity to protein elasticity, and the ratio of a hydrodynamic time scale for fluid flow relative to the protein binding rate, and we present a simple phase diagram that encompasses the variety of patterns that can arise.

  1. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  2. Saffman-Taylor fingers with kinetic undercooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardiner, Bennett P J; Dallaston, Michael C; Moroney, Timothy J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mathematical model of a steadily propagating Saffman-Taylor finger in a Hele-Shaw channel has applications to two-dimensional interacting streamer discharges which are aligned in a periodic array. In the streamer context, the relevant regularisation on the interface is not provided by surface tension, but instead has been postulated to involve a mechanism equivalent to kinetic undercooling, which acts to penalise high velocities and prevent blow-up of the unregularised solution. Previous asymptotic results for the Hele-Shaw finger problem with kinetic undercooling suggest that for a given value of the kinetic undercooling parameter, there is a discrete set of possible finger shapes, each analytic at the nose and occupying a different fraction of the channel width. In the limit in which the kinetic undercooling parameter vanishes, the fraction for each family approaches 1/2, suggesting that this 'selection' of 1/2 by kinetic undercooling is qualitatively similar to the well-known analogue with surface tens...

  3. CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal degrees of freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal, S-412 96, G"oteborg, Sweden Abstract CO2 adsorbed measurements of non-dissociative sticking coefficient, S0, of CO2 on the Pt(111) surfac* *e

  4. Kinetics of Loop Formation and Breakage in the Denatured State of Iso-1-cytochrome c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roder, Heinrich

    Kinetics of Loop Formation and Breakage in the Denatured State of Iso-1-cytochrome c Eydiejo to measure the rates of histidine­heme loop formation and breakage in the denatured state of iso-1-cytochrome single surface histidine variants of iso-1-cytochrome c. A scaling factor (the dependence of kf on log

  5. Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

  6. Melting point measurements for quasicrystalline phases. [Al-Mn; icosahedral and decagonal phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, J.A.; Follstaedt, D.M.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Melting transitions of metastable quasicrystalline phases of Al-Mn have been observed using rapid electron-beam heating of fine-grained icosahedral surface layers. The congruent melting point for icosahedral Al/sub 80/Mn/sub 20/ was directly measured to be 910 +- 20/sup 0/C. Heating to higher temperatures shows another transition which is inferred to correspond to the liquidus of the decagonal phase at 965 +- 20/sup 0/C for 20 at. % Mn. The microstructure and formation kinetics of the decagonal phase are discussed, and its electron diffraction is described.

  7. An experimental and kinetic modeling study of combustion of isomers of butanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grana, Roberto; Frassoldati, Alessio; Faravelli, Tiziano; Ranzi, Eliseo [Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica, Politecnico di Milano, Milano (Italy); Niemann, Ulrich; Seiser, Reinhard; Cattolica, Robert; Seshadri, Kalyanasundaram [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A kinetic model is developed to describe combustion of isomers of butanol - n-butanol (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), sec-butanol (sec-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), iso-butanol (iso-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH), and tert-butanol (tert-C{sub 4}H{sub 9}OH). A hierarchical approach is employed here. This approach was previously found to be useful for developing detailed and semi-detailed mechanism of oxidation of various hydrocarbon fuels. This method starts from lower molecular weight compounds of a family of species and proceeds to higher molecular weight compounds. The pyrolysis and oxidation mechanisms of butanol isomers are similar to those for hydrocarbon fuels. Here, the development of the complete set of the primary propagation reactions for butanol isomers proceeds from the extension of the kinetic parameters for similar reactions already studied and recently revised for ethanol, n-propanol and iso-propanol. A detailed description leading to evaluation of rate constants for initiation reactions, metathesis reactions, decomposition reactions of alkoxy radicals, isomerization reactions, and four-center molecular dehydration reactions are given. Decomposition and oxidation of primary intermediate products are described using a previously developed semi-detailed kinetic model for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic mechanism is made up of more than 7000 reactions among 300 species. The model is validated by comparing predictions made using this kinetic model with previous and new experimental data on counterflow non-premixed flames of n-butanol and iso-butanol. The structures of these flames were measured by removing gas samples from the flame and analyzing them using a gas chromatograph. Temperature profiles were measured using coated thermocouples. The flame structures were measured under similar conditions for both fuels to elucidate the similarities and differences in combustion characteristics of the two isomers. The profiles measured include those of butanol, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapor, carbon monoxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and a number of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbon compounds. The predictions of the kinetic model of flame structures of the two isomers were satisfactory. Validation of the kinetic model was also performed by comparing predictions with experimental data reported in the literature. These data were obtained in batch reactors, flow reactors, jet-stirred reactors, and shock tubes. In these configurations, combustion is not influenced by molecular transport. The agreement between the kinetic model and experimental data was satisfactory. (author)

  8. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  9. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  10. Kinetic determination of selenium in biological material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efremenko, O.A.; Krasnyuk, I.I.; Kudrin, A.N.; Rudenko, B.A.

    1986-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A very promising method for selenium determination is a kinetic analytical procedure that combines the simplicity and availability of physical instrumentation with a low analyte detection limit. This paper reports a modification of the method to enable the determination of selenium in rat blood and involves decomposing the sample with a mixture of nitric and perchloric acids, separation of the selenium (IV) from other decomposition products, and quantitatively determining selenium by the described kinetic method using the indicator reaction of iron (II) edetate oxidation by sodium nitrate.

  11. Model Independent Bounds on Kinetic Mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hook, Anson; Izaguirre, Eder; Wacker, Jay G.; /SLAC

    2011-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New Abelian vector bosons can kinetically mix with the hypercharge gauge boson of the Standard Model. This letter computes the model independent limits on vector bosons with masses from 1 GeV to 1 TeV. The limits arise from the numerous e{sup +}e{sup -} experiments that have been performed in this energy range and bound the kinetic mixing by {epsilon} {approx}< 0.03 for most of the mass range studied, regardless of any additional interactions that the new vector boson may have.

  12. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  13. Directions and Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Directions & Maps Plan Your Visit Visit About the Museum Museum Hours Directions & Maps When to Visit Arrange for a Visit Around Los Alamos Contact Us invisible utility element...

  14. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Wenpeng Liu*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Wenpeng Liu*,a and Chao that performance and design of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is controlled not only by electrochemical kinetics and methanol crossover but also by water transport and by their complex interactions

  15. The aging of tungsten filaments and its effect on wire surface kinetics in hot-wire chemical vapor deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    desorption kinetics. In particular, the Si signal exhibits a high temperature activation energy consistent vapor deposition growth have been measured by quadrupole mass spectrometry. New wires produce Si with previous measurements; the activation energy for the SiH3 signal suggests its formation is catalyzed. Aged

  16. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  17. Interpreting the Aggregation Kinetics of Amyloid Peptides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caflisch, Amedeo

    Amyloid fibrils are insoluble mainly -sheet aggregates of proteins or peptides. The multi-step process) and amyloid-protected states, is used to investigate the kinetics of aggregation and the pathways of fibril state. The minimal-size aggregate able to form a fibril is generated by collisions of oligomers

  18. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  19. Thermodynamic and kinetic modeling of transcriptional pausing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Kuang-Yu

    in the cotranscriptional RNA secondary structure upstream of the RNA exit channel. The calculations involve no adjustable of recovery of backtracked paused complexes. A crucial ingredient of our model is the incorporation of kinetic secondary structure, an aspect not included explicitly in previous attempts at modeling the transcrip- tion

  20. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    and physicochemical criteria. The kinetic model yielded an excellent fit of the experimental data. The intrinsic kinetic parameters were used with the heterogeneous fixed bed reactor model which is explicitly accounting for the diffusional limitations inside...

  1. On the Geometrical Gyro-Kinetic Theory Emmanuel Frnod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    On the Geometrical Gyro-Kinetic Theory Emmanuel Frénod Mathieu Lutz Abstract - Considering introduced : Partial Lie Sums. Keywords - Tokamak; Stellarator; Gyro-Kinetic Approximation; Hamiltonian.6 The Darboux Coordinates System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 3.7 Expression

  2. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    detailed kinetic model for coke formation and gasification, which was coupled to the kinetic model for the main reactions. The calculation of the dynamic equilibrium coke content provided a crucial guideline for the selection of the steam to ethylbenzene...

  3. Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics Eastern State Fall Technical Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knyazev, Vadim D.

    Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics 1 Eastern State Fall Technical Meeting Chemical & Physical ­ 1017 s-1 #12;Paper # XXX Topic: Reaction Kinetics 2 and activation energy values close to the C-C bond

  4. Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Adsorption, Desorption, and Displacement Kinetics of H2O and CO2 on TiO2(110). Abstract: The adsorption, desorption, and...

  5. Products and Kinetics of the Reactions of an Alkane Monolayer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Products and Kinetics of the Reactions of an Alkane Monolayer and a Terminal Alkene Monolayer with NO Radicals. Products and Kinetics of the Reactions of an Alkane Monolayer and a...

  6. “Batch” Kinetics in Flow: Online IR Analysis and Continuous Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason S.

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic ...

  7. Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory Jan 28 2014 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM ORNL CONTACT : Email: Billy Fields Phone: Add to Calendar SHARE Kinetic theory describes...

  8. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Hydrogen Combustion Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed chemical kinetic model is used to explore the flammability and detonability of hydrogen mixtures. In the case of flammability, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for hydrogen is coupled to the CHEMKIN Premix code to compute premixed, laminar flame speeds. The detailed chemical kinetic model reproduces flame speeds in the literature over a range of equivalence ratios, pressures and reactant temperatures. A series of calculation were performed to assess the key parameters determining the flammability of hydrogen mixtures. Increased reactant temperature was found to greatly increase the flame speed and the flammability of the mixture. The effect of added diluents was assessed. Addition of water and carbon dioxide were found to reduce the flame speed and thus the flammability of a hydrogen mixture approximately equally well and much more than the addition of nitrogen. The detailed chemical kinetic model was used to explore the detonability of hydrogen mixtures. A Zeldovich-von Neumann-Doring (ZND) detonation model coupled with detailed chemical kinetics was used to model the detonation. The effectiveness on different diluents was assessed in reducing the detonability of a hydrogen mixture. Carbon dioxide was found to be most effective in reducing the detonability followed by water and nitrogen. The chemical action of chemical inhibitors on reducing the flammability of hydrogen mixtures is discussed. Bromine and organophosphorus inhibitors act through catalytic cycles that recombine H and OH radicals in the flame. The reduction in H and OH radicals reduces chain branching in the flame through the H + O{sub 2} = OH + O chain branching reaction. The reduction in chain branching and radical production reduces the flame speed and thus the flammability of the hydrogen mixture.

  9. Cyclization and Catenation Directed by Molecular Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Li Q.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Li, Alexander D.

    2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here that molecular self-assembly can effectively direct and enhance specific reaction pathways. Using perylene??-??stacking weak attractive forces, we succeeded in synthesizing perylene bisimide macrocyclic dimer and a concatenated dimer-dimer ring from dynamic self-assembly of monomeric bis-N, N’-(2-(2-(2-(2-thioacetyl ethoxy) ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl) perylene tetracarboxylic diimide. The monocyclic ring closure and the dimer-dimer ring concatenation were accomplished through formation of disulfide bonds, which was readily triggered by air oxidization under basic deacetylation conditions. The perylene cyclic dimer and its concatenated tetramer were characterized using both structural methods (NMR, mass spectroscopy) and photophysical measurements (UV-vis spectroscopy). Kinetic analyses offer informative insights about reaction pathways and possible mechanisms, which lead to the formation of fascinating concatenated rings. Molecular dynamic behaviors of both the monocyclic dimer and the concatenated dimer-dimer ring were modeled with the NWChem molecular dynamics software module, which shows distinct stacking activities for the monocyclic dimer and the concatenated tetramer.

  10. Parallel versus off-pathway Michaelis-Menten mechanism for single-enzyme kinetics of a fluctuating enzyme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Dua, Arti

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent fluorescence spectroscopy measurements of the turnover time distribution of single-enzyme turnover kinetics of $\\beta$-galactosidase provide evidence of Michaelis-Menten kinetics at low substrate concentration. However, at high substrate concentrations, the dimensionless variance of the turnover time distribution shows systematic deviations from the Michaelis-Menten prediction. This difference is attributed to conformational fluctuations in both the enzyme and the enzyme-substrate complex and to the possibility of both parallel and off-pathway kinetics. Here, we use the chemical master equation to model the kinetics of a single fluctuating enzyme that can yield a product through either parallel or off-pathway mechanisms. An exact expression is obtained for the turnover time distribution from which the mean turnover time and randomness parameters are calculated. The parallel and off-pathway mechanisms yield strikingly different dependences of the mean turnover time and the randomness parameter on the su...

  11. Kinetics of coal conversion to soluble products. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, J.W.

    1994-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this work are (1) to measure the kinetics of the conversion of coals to soluble products under model liquefaction conditions using GPS techniques to count the number of bonds broken; (2) to analyze these data using kinetic schemes based on the behavior of crosslinked macromolecular networks. The product was Soxhlet extracted with pyridine until the pyridine solution was clear. A gel permeation chromatogram of the pyridine soluble is shown in Figure 2A. The improved mass sensitive detector system requires only about 500 ng to acquire a chromatogram having fairly good S/N ratio. Apparently, no disturbance is caused by the remaining tetralin and naphthalene formed by dehydrogenation of tetralin. These seriously affect the lower molecular weight region when IR or UV detectors are used. It is a notable advantage of the mass sensitive detector that suitable adjustment of the nebulizer and of the evaporator completely suppressed the contribution of solvent to the chromatogram. The molecular weight distribution of liquefaction product appears to be almost unimodal if the small shoulder at the lower elution volume side is neglected.

  12. AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    - equilibrium cases, up to second order. (b) Derive an expression for the non-conservative form of the kineticAER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #4 1. Consider a monatomic gas with one translational by the relaxation time approx- imation. Neglecting external forces, the conserved form of the kinetic equation

  13. Kinetic modelling of the thermal decomposition of ettringite into metaettringite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the validity of kinetic assumptions (rate-determining step, expression of the rate as d/dt = k f() ...), a good1 Kinetic modelling of the thermal decomposition of ettringite into metaettringite J. Pourchez on nucleation and growth mechanisms of metaettringite remained. Therefore, a better understanding of the kinetic

  14. MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin Submitted in partial and Sciences COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 2006 #12;MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE;ABSTRACT MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin A mathematical

  15. Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andelman, David

    Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces Haim Diamant and David Andelman School-Fluid Interfaces, Adsorption, Adsorption Kinetics, Interfacial Tension. 1 #12;Abstract We review a new theoretical approach to the kinetics of surfactant adsorption at fluid-fluid interfaces. It yields a more complete

  16. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Worldwide Oil Production Example. The modern history of petroleum began in the 19Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production

  17. The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Inverse Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas ABSTRACT Kinetics Method and PID Compensation of the Annular Core Research Reactor by Benjamin Garnas B.S. General

  18. Kinetic and Macroscopic Models for Semiconductors Ansgar Jungel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jüngel, Ansgar

    Kinetic and Macroscopic Models for Semiconductors Ansgar J¨ungel Vienna University of Technology, Austria www.jungel.at.vu Ansgar J¨ungel (TU Wien) Kinetic Semiconductor Models www.jungel.at.vu 1 / 165 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 2 Semiconductor modeling Basics of semiconductor physics Kinetic models 3

  19. Kinetics of solid-gas reactions characterized by scanning AC nano-calorimetry with application to Zr oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Kechao; Lee, Dongwoo; Vlassak, Joost J., E-mail: vlassak@esag.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Scanning AC nano-calorimetry is a recently developed experimental technique capable of measuring the heat capacity of thin-film samples of a material over a wide range of temperatures and heating rates. Here, we describe how this technique can be used to study solid-gas phase reactions by measuring the change in heat capacity of a sample during reaction. We apply this approach to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of thin-film samples of zirconium in air. The results confirm parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 0.59?±?0.03 eV. The nano-calorimetry measurements were performed using a device that contains an array of micromachined nano-calorimeter sensors in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. We demonstrate that the oxidation kinetics can be quantified using a single sample, thus enabling high-throughput mapping of the composition-dependence of the reaction rate.

  20. Direct estimation of decoherence rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimír Bužek; Peter Rapcan; Jochen Rau; Mario Ziman

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The decoherence rate is a nonlinear channel parameter that describes quantitatively the decay of the off-diagonal elements of a density operator in the decoherence basis. We address the question of how to experimentally access such a nonlinear parameter directly without the need of complete process tomography. In particular, we design a simple experiment working with two copies of the channel, in which the registered mean value of a two-valued measurement directly determines the value of the average decoherence rate. No prior knowledge of the decoherence basis is required.

  1. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  2. The Autoignition of iso-Cetane: Shock Tube Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehlschlaeger, M A; Steinberg, J; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J

    2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {Phi} = 0.5 and 1.0 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 953 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements and detailed kinetic mechanism for isocetane presented here are the first of their kind.

  3. Studies of NO-char reaction kinetics obtained from drop-tube furnace and thermogravimetric experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaozeng Sun; Juwei Zhang; Xidong Hu; Shaohua Wu; Jiancheng Yang; Yang Wang; Yukun Qin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). Combustion Engineering Research Institute

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four coal chars were prepared in a flat flame flow reactor (FFR), which can simulate the temperature and gas composition of a real pulverized coal combustion environment. The pore structure of chars was measured by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption, and the Hg and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas were obtained. The kinetics of NO-char was studied in a drop-tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the TGA experiments, the random pore model (RPM) was applied to describe the NO-char reactions and obtain the intrinsic kinetics. By presenting the data of DTF and TGA experiments on the same Arrhenius plot, it can be concluded that TGA is an available tool to study the kinetics of a high-temperature NO-char reaction. With respect to the DTF experiments, in comparison to the BET surface area, the Hg surface area is a better basis for normalizing the reactivity of different coal chars because of less scatter in the measured values, better agreement with TGA experimental data, and more stable values during the process of reaction. Moreover, by comparing the Hg surface area of chars before and after reactions, it is believed that the Hg surface area basis is more appropriate for high-rank coal chars. The determined kinetic rate constants are in good agreement with other data in the literature, and a new rate constant expression is proposed. 30 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Stepping and crowding of molecular motors: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Ciandrini; M. Carmen Romano; A. Parmeggiani

    2014-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerisation (e.g. RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend the current statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of co-moving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

  5. Edge Direction and the Structure of Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foster, Jacob G; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directed networks are ubiquitous, from food webs to the World Wide Web, but the directionality of their interactions has been disregarded in most studies of global network structure. One important global property is the tendency of nodes with similar numbers of edges to be connected. This tendency, called assortativity, affects crucial structural and dynamic properties of real-world networks. Here we demonstrate the importance of edge direction by studying assortativity in directed networks. We define a set of four directed assortativity measures. By comparison to randomized networks, we discover significant features of three network classes: online/social networks, food webs, and word-adjacency networks. The full set of measures is needed to reveal patterns common to the class or to separate networks that have been previously classified together. Our measures expose limitations of existing theoretical models, and show that many networks are not purely assortative or disassortative but a mixture of the two.

  6. Testing a dissipative kinetic k-essence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardenas, V H; Villanueva, J R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we present a study of a purely kinetic k-essence model, characterized basically by a parameter $\\alpha$ in presence of a bulk dissipative term, whose relationship between viscous pressure $\\Pi$ and energy density $\\rho$ of the background follows a polytropic type law $\\Pi \\propto \\rho^{\\lambda+1/2}$, where $\\lambda$, in principle, is a parameter without restrictions. Analytical solutions for the energy density of the k-essence field are found in two specific cases: $\\lambda=1/2$ and $\\lambda=(1-\\alpha)/2\\alpha$, and then we show that these solutions posses the same functional form than the non-viscous counterpart. Finally, both approach are contrasted with observational data from type Ia supernova, and the most recent Hubble parameter measurements, and therefore, the best values for the parameters of the theory are founds.

  7. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of el...

  8. A New Spin on Neutrino Quantum Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Cirigliano; George M. Fuller; Alexey Vlasenko

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and discuss the quantum kinetic equations (QKEs) which govern neutrino flavor and spin evolution in hot, dense, and anisotropic media. A novel feature of these QKEs is the presence of a coherent spin-flip term which can mediate neutrino-antineutrino transformation for Majorana neutrinos and active-sterile transformation for Dirac neutrinos. We provide an alternative derivation of this term based on a standard effective Hamiltonian.

  9. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

    2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

  10. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  11. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  12. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  13. Direct Loan Program (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Connecticut Development Authority’s Direct Loan Program provides direct senior and subordinated loans and mezzanine investments to companies creating or maintaining jobs. Up to $20,000 per job...

  14. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1A, Directives System, dated 1-30-98.

  15. Measurement-Measurement-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jaehoon "Paul"

    Internet Measurement- System A Measurement- System B Control System GPS Satellite GPS Satellite GPS Receiver GPS Receiver 2) measurement 3) data1) command Methodology for One-way IP Performance Measurement This paper proposes a methodology for measurement of one-way IP performance metrics such as one-way delay

  16. The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

  17. Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

  18. Dust kinetic Alfvén waves and streaming instability in a non-Maxwellian magnetoplasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubab, N.; Jaffer, G. [Department of Space Science, Institute of Space Technology (IST), Islamabad Expressway, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan); Ali, S. [National Centre for Physics (NCP) at Quaid-i-Azam University Campus, Shahdra Valley Road, Islamabad 44000 (Pakistan)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust kinetic Alfvén wave (DKAW) instability is studied in a uniform dusty magnetoplasma by incorporating the superthermality effects of the electrons and perpendicularly streaming ?-distributed ions. The dispersion relation of the DKAW instability is investigated in the low-?{sub d} Lorentzian plasma limit. The solutions are analyzed for various scenarios of dusty and dusty-free plasmas. It is shown that the presence of dust particles and the cross-field superthermal ions sensibly modify the dispersion characteristics of the low-frequency DKAW. The present results are only valid for a frequency regime well below the dust cyclotron frequency. Numerical calculations are carried out for the growth rates by taking different dust parameters into account. It is found that the nonthermality is more effective for the dust kinetic Alfvén waves in the perpendicular direction as compared to the parallel one. The relevance of the results to the low-?{sub d} regions of space and astrophysical plasmas is highlighted.

  19. Non-equilibrium statistical field theory for classical particles: Basic kinetic theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viermann, Celia; Kozlikin, Elena; Lilow, Robert; Bartelmann, Matthias

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently Mazenko and Das and Mazenko introduced a non-equilibrium field theoretical approach to describe the statistical properties of a classical particle ensemble starting from the microscopic equations of motion of each individual particle. We use this theory to investigate the transition from those microscopic degrees of freedom to the evolution equations of the macroscopic observables of the ensemble. For the free theory, we recover the continuity and Jeans equations of a collisionless gas. For a theory containing two-particle interactions in a canonical perturbation series, we find the macroscopic evolution equations to be described by the Born-Bogoliubov-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy (BBGKY hierarchy) with a truncation criterion depending on the order in perturbation theory. This establishes a direct link between the classical and the field-theoretical approaches to kinetic theory that might serve as a starting point to investigate kinetic theory beyond the classical limits.

  20. Directives Templates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirections Both theDirectives Review

  1. Direct gas chromatography for the study of substrate removal kinetics in multi-component aqueous systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langley, William Douglas

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Apparatus and Analytical Procedures. ~ 5 10 III ~ CHEMICAL NOMENCLATURE AND ANALYTICAL RESPONSE s ~ 16 IV, RESULTS e 22 Tests A and B 22 Test C Test D Test E Test EE . ~ Test S ~ 23 ~ 33 41 49 56 TABLE OF CONTENTS, Continued Section Page Va... Table Page l. Chemical Nomenclature. ~ ~ . . . . . . . 16 2. Accuracy~ Precision, and Linearity of Detector and Recorder System. 18 3. Response to Chemical Oxygen Demand Test. . . . 21 4. Test Cg Reaction Conditions. . . . . . , . 24 5. Test C...

  2. Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhaohong

    Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped n-type Ge is observed through photoluminescence measurements by determining the spectrum peak shift. A linear relationship between the direct band gap emission and carrier concentration ...

  3. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  4. Ginzburg-Landau theory of the bcc-liquid interface kinetic coefficient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuo-An Wu; Ching-Hao Wang; Jeffrey J. Hoyt; Alain Karma

    2014-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Ginzburg-Landau (GL) theory of atomically rough bcc-liquid interfaces [Wu {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. B \\textbf{73}, 094101 (2006)] outside of equilibrium. We use this extension to derive an analytical expression for the kinetic coefficient, which is the proportionality constant $\\mu(\\hat n)$ between the interface velocity along a direction $\\hat n$ normal to the interface and the interface undercooling. The kinetic coefficient is expressed as a spatial integral along the normal direction of a sum of gradient square terms corresponding to different nonlinear density wave profiles. Anisotropy arises naturally from the dependence of those profiles on the angles between the principal reciprocal lattice vectors $\\vec K_i$ and $\\hat n$. Values of the kinetic coefficient for the$(100)$, $(110)$ and $(111)$ interfaces are compared quantitatively to the prediction of linear Mikheev-Chernov (MC) theory [J. Cryst. Growth \\textbf{112}, 591 (1991)] and previous molecular dynamics (MD) simulation studies of crystallization kinetics for a classical model of Fe. Additional MD simulations are carried out here to compute the relaxation time of density waves in the liquid in order to make this comparison free of fit parameter. The GL theory predicts a similar expression for $\\mu$ as the MC theory but yields a better agreement with MD simulations for both its magnitude and anisotropy due to a fully nonlinear description of density wave profiles across the solid-liquid interface. GL theory is also used to derive an inverse relation between $\\mu$ and the solid-liquid interfacial free-energy. The general methodology used here to derive an expression for $\\mu(\\hat n)$ also applies to amplitude equations derived from the phase-field-crystal model, which only differ from GL theory by the choice of cubic and higher order nonlinearities in the free-energy density.

  5. Kinetics of Uranium(VI) Desorption from Contaminated Sediments: Effect of Geochemical Conditions and Model Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Shi, Zhenqing; Zachara, John M.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stirred-flow cell experiments were performed to investigate the kinetics of uranyl [U(VI)] desorption from a contaminated sediment collected from the Hanford 300 Area at the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, Washington. Three influent solutions of variable pH, Ca and carbonate concentrations that affected U(VI) aqueous and surface speciation were used under dynamic flow conditions to evaluate the effect of geochemical conditions on the rate of U(VI) desorption. The measured rate of U(VI) desorption varied with solution chemical composition that evolved as a result of thermodynamic and kinetic interactions between the influent solutions and sediment. The solution chemical composition that led to a lower equilibrium U(VI) sorption to the solid phase yielded a faster desorption rate. The experimental results were used to evaluate a multi-rate, surface complexation model (SCM) that has been proposed to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in the Hanford sediment that contained complex sorbed U(VI) species in mass transfer limited domains. The model was modified and supplemented by including multi-rate, ion exchange reactions to describe the geochemical interactions between the solutions and sediment. With the same set of model parameters, the modified model reasonably well described the evolution of major ions and the rates of U(VI) desorption under variable geochemical and flow conditions, implying that the multi-rate SCM is an effective way to describe U(VI) desorption kinetics in subsurface sediments.

  6. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  7. Ionization based multi-directional flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Casleton, Kent H. (Morgantown, WV)

    2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method, system, and apparatus for conducting real-time monitoring of flow (airflow for example) in a system (a hybrid power generation system for example) is disclosed. The method, system and apparatus measure at least flow direction and velocity with minimal pressure drop and fast response. The apparatus comprises an ion source and a multi-directional collection device proximate the ion source. The ion source is configured to generate charged species (electrons and ions for example). The multi-directional collection source is configured to determine the direction and velocity of the flow in real-time.

  8. Direct-Write of Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect KineticInnovationDirect-Write

  9. Kinetic Bounding Volume Hierarchies for Collision Detection of Deformable Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabriel Zachmann; Rene Weller

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present novel algorithms for updating bounding volume hierarchies of objects undergoing arbitrary deformations. Therefore, we introduce two new data structures, the kinetic AABB tree and the kinetic BoxTree. The event-based approach of the kinetic data structures framework enables us to show that our algorithms are optimal in the number of updates. Moreover, we show a lower bound for the total number of BV updates, which is independent of the number of frames. Furthermore, we present a kinetic data structures which uses the kinetic AABB tree for collision detection and show that this structure can be easily extended for continuous collision detection of deformable objects. We performed a comparison of our kinetic approaches with the classical bottom-up update method. The results show that our algorithms perform up to ten times faster in practically relevant scenarios.

  10. Modeling Data using Directional Distributions Acknowledgements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sra, Suvrit

    , rather than its magnitudes. For example, modeling wind current directions, modeling geomagnetism, measurements corresponding to the position of the clock hands and modeling text data, all seem to require a cosine similarity measure often far outperforms using a traditional Euclidean distance metric

  11. A New Spin on Neutrino Quantum Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzo Cirigliano; George M. Fuller; Alexey Vlasenko

    2015-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have demonstrated that in anisotropic environments a coherent spin-flip term arises in the Quantum Kinetic Equations (QKEs) which govern the evolution of neutrino flavor and spin in hot and dense media. This term can mediate neutrino-antineutrino transformation for Majorana neutrinos and active-sterile transformation for Dirac neutrinos. We discuss the physical origin of the coherent spin-flip term and provide explicit expressions for the QKEs in a two-flavor model with spherical geometry. In this context, we demonstrate that coherent neutrino spin transformation depends on the absolute neutrino mass and Majorana phases.

  12. Benchmarks for the point kinetics equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapol, B. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering (United States); Picca, P. [Department of Systems and Industrial Engineering, University of Arizona (United States); Previti, A.; Mostacci, D. [Laboratorio di Montecuccolino Alma Mater Studiorum, Universita di Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new numerical algorithm is presented for the solution to the point kinetics equations (PKEs), whose accurate solution has been sought for over 60 years. The method couples the simplest of finite difference methods, a backward Euler, with Richardsons extrapolation, also called an acceleration. From this coupling, a series of benchmarks have emerged. These include cases from the literature as well as several new ones. The novelty of this presentation lies in the breadth of reactivity insertions considered, covering both prescribed and feedback reactivities, and the extreme 8- to 9- digit accuracy achievable. The benchmarks presented are to provide guidance to those who wish to develop further numerical improvements. (authors)

  13. 5, 1036910408, 2005 Products and kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and Physics Discussions The heterogeneous chemical kinetics of N2O5 on CaCO3 and other atmospheric mineral. At [N2O5]0=(4.0±1.0)×10 11 cm -3 we have found ss values ranging from (3.5±1.1)×10 -2 for CaCO3 to (0 and CaCO3 are lower. On CaCO3 the disappearance10 of N2O5 was also accompanied by the formation of CO2

  14. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  15. On quantum subsystem measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fedor Herbut

    2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    It is assumed that an arbitrary composite bipartite pure state in which the two subsystems are entangled is given, and it is investigated how the entanglement transmits the influence of measurement on only one of the subsystems to the state of the opposite subsystem. It is shown that any exact subsystem measurement has the same influence as ideal measurement on the opposite subsystem. In particular, the distant effect of subsystem measurement of a twin observable, i. e., so-called 'distant measurement', is always ideal measurement on the distant subsystem no matter how intricate the direct exact measurement on the opposite subsystem is.

  16. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

    1982-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

  17. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

  18. Photoluminescence of quasi-direct transitions in disordered In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}P/graded GaP alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, L.P.; Chtchekine, D.G.; Gilliland, G.D. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics] [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States). Dept. of Physics; Lee, H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Kyung Hee Univ., Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Hjalmarson, H.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Yu, J.G.; Craford, M.G. [Hewlett Packard, San Jose, CA (United States). Optoelectronics Div.] [Hewlett Packard, San Jose, CA (United States). Optoelectronics Div.; Wolford, D.J. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Microelectronics Research Center] [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Microelectronics Research Center

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have examined the photoluminescence and photoluminescence kinetics of a series of In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}P alloys in an effort: (1) to elucidate the electronic structure of the conduction band versus alloy composition, especially near the direct-indirect crossover; (2) to determine precisely the composition of the direct-indirect crossover, and its temperature dependence; and (3) to understand the nonradiative decay mechanism and its temperature dependence. They find that the fundamental bandgap is only determined by the {Gamma}{sub 1c} and X{sub 1c} states in samples with Ga-compositions ranging from 0.58 to 0.75, and that the 2-K direct-indirect crossover from {Gamma}{sub 1c} to X{sub 1c} occurs at x = 0.69 and is not strongly temperature-dependent. Further, they find, in agreement with the spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements at room temperature, that the mixing near crossover is rather complicated and leads to the previous observation of quasi-direct transitions. The combined photoluminescence and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements have therefore clearly resolved the controversy regarding the bandgap crossover. This has strong implications for the realization of InGaP-based efficient light-emitting devices with emission at higher energies.

  19. Directional intraoperative probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Majewski, Stanislaw; Popov, Vladimir; Loutts, Georgii

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An introperative surgical probe incorporating both a fiber optic imaging system and multi-element beta/gamma radiation directional indicating system is described.

  20. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    To establish directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors.

  1. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1, which establishes requirements for the development, coordination, and sunset review of DOE directives.

  2. Cancellation of Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective immediately the following Department of Energy directive is canceled. DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes, dated 04-14-2009.

  3. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L. SPARKS, Univ. of Delaware. The rates of atrazine adsorption-desorption on a Llano-vermiculite were measured using a stirred-low technique. Both adsorption and desorption followed a two

  4. An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect of water addition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiao, Li

    An experimental and kinetic study of syngas/air combustion at elevated temperatures and the effect 20 December 2011 Keywords: Syngas combustion Elevated temperatures Water addition Laminar flame speed a b s t r a c t Laminar flame speeds of premixed syngas/air mixtures were measured at various fuel

  5. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    kinetic models for fuel components and their mixtures are a critical need to enable optimization of fuel formulations for high engine efficiency and very low emissions Targets:...

  6. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- The solubility and kinetics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ |...

  7. air plasma kinetics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    explains the kinetic mechanism of nonequilibrium plasma-chemical transformations in the gas-liquid system and the evolution of hydrogen during the reforming as a function of...

  8. Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Publications Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries Materials Characterization Capabilities at the High Temperature...

  9. agonist dissociation kinetics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: supposes that the transition states for dissociation coincide with the free energy maximum along rionKinetic Pathways of Ion Pair Dissociation in Water Phillip...

  10. average kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy by kinetic averaging Pierre-Emmanuel Jabin Ecole Normale Sup-Landau energy for two dimensional divergence free fields ap- pearing in the gradient theory of...

  11. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Non-Petroleum Based Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY11 Objectives: * Develop a chemical kinetic models for an actual components in biodiesel Methyl palmitate Methyl linoleate Methyl linolenate * Develop a chemical...

  12. Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the Kinetics, Mechanics and Microstructure Changes in Storage Media given at the DOE Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen Storage Materials on May 18, 2006. storagetheorysessionei...

  13. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sircar; A. J. Roberts

    2015-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of electrolytes as well as due to the defective properties of the mucin polymer network.

  14. Non-Markovian polymer reaction kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Guérin; Olivier Bénichou; Raphaël Voituriez

    2012-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Describing the kinetics of polymer reactions, such as the formation of loops and hairpins in nucleic acids or polypeptides, is complicated by the structural dynamics of their chains. Although both intramolecular reactions, such as cyclization, and intermolecular reactions have been studied extensively, both experimentally and theoretically, there is to date no exact explicit analytical treatment of transport-limited polymer reaction kinetics, even in the case of the simplest (Rouse) model of monomers connected by linear springs. We introduce a new analytical approach to calculate the mean reaction time of polymer reactions that encompasses the non-Markovian dynamics of monomer motion. This requires that the conformational statistics of the polymer at the very instant of reaction be determined, which provides, as a by-product, new information on the reaction path. We show that the typical reactive conformation of the polymer is more extended than the equilibrium conformation, which leads to reaction times significantly shorter than predicted by the existing classical Markovian theory.

  15. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsson, E; Peysson, Y; Granetz, R S; Saint-Laurent, F; Vlainic, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Runaway electrons (REs) can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force due to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate REs mainly through knock-on collisions, where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of REs. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3-D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. A bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of REs from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a s...

  16. Directional Dark Matter Detection Beyond the Neutrino Bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Grothaus; Malcolm Fairbairn; Jocelyn Monroe

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent scattering of solar, atmospheric and diffuse supernovae neutrinos creates an irreducible background for direct dark matter experiments with sensitivities to WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-sections of 10^(-46)-10^(-48) cm^2, depending on the WIMP mass. Even if one could eliminate all other backgrounds, this "neutrino floor" will limit future experiments with projected sensitivities to cross-sections as small as 10^(-48) cm^2. Direction-sensitive detectors have the potential to study dark matter beyond the neutrino bound by fitting event distributions in multiple dimensions: recoil kinetic energy, recoil track angle with respect to the sun, and event time. This work quantitatively explores the impact of direction-sensitivity on the neutrino bound in dark matter direct detection.

  17. Departmental Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1983-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes the directives system to be used for publishing permanent and temporary directives issued by DOE Headquarters and addressed to Headquarters and/or field elements. Chg 1 dated 3-14-85. Cancels DOE 1321.1A.

  18. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hoffman, N. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kagan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  19. Localization of linear kinetic Alfvén wave in an inhomogeneous plasma and generation of turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R. P.; Goyal, R., E-mail: ravig.iitd@gmail.com [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi-110016 (India); Scime, Earl E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506-6315 (United States); Dwivedi, N. K. [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute, Schmiedlstrasse 6, 8042 Graz (Austria)] [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Space Research Institute, Schmiedlstrasse 6, 8042 Graz (Austria)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a model for the propagation of Kinetic Alfvén waves (KAWs) in inhomogeneous plasma when the inhomogeneity is transverse to the background magnetic field. The semi-analytical technique and numerical simulations have been performed to study the KAW dynamics when plasma inhomogeneity is incorporated in the dynamics. The model equations are solved in order to study the localization of KAW and their magnetic power spectrum which indicates the direct transfer of energy from lower to higher wave numbers. The inhomogeneity scale length plays a very important role in the turbulence generation and its level. The relevance of these investigations to space and laboratory plasmas has also been pointed out.

  20. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  1. Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirections Both the Fermilab box

  2. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisitingContract Management FermiDavidDieselDirections Both the

  3. Directives Tools - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederalDirections Basic Energy SciencesDirections


  4. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  5. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  6. The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics forKinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitationwhere n denotes kinetic mineral index, positive values of r

  7. AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    AER1301: KINETIC THEORY OF GASES Assignment #4 1. Consider a monatomic gas with one translational by the relaxation time approx- imation. Neglecting external forces, the conserved form of the kinetic equation function, in both the equilibrium and non- equilibrium cases, up to second order. (b) Derive an expression

  8. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 is an important phenomenon in many biological systems. Assembly of virus coat proteins into capsids [1 diseases. This approach to studying the kinetics of nanoparticle self-assembly may also provide a valuable

  9. Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eppstein, David

    Parametric and Kinetic Minimum Spanning Trees Pankaj K. Agarwal 1 David Eppstein 2 Leonidas J. Guibas 3 Monika R. Henzinger 4 Abstract We consider the parametric minimum spanning tree problem- pute the sequence of minimum spanning trees generated as varies. We also consider the kinetic minimum

  10. Rotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zagar, Nedjeljka

    energy, divergent energy, ALADIN, limited-area modelling 1. Introduction Horizontal divergenceRotational and divergent kinetic energy in the mesoscale model ALADIN By V. BLAZ ICA1 *, N. Z AGAR1 received 7 June 2012; in final form 7 March 2013) ABSTRACT Kinetic energy spectra from the mesoscale

  11. Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Robert E.

    Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

  12. Desorption Kinetics for Field-Aged Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rockne, Karl J.

    Harbor Estuary. Desorption kinetics for PAHs with a log octanol- water partition coefficient greater than This study considers desorption kinetics for 12 field-aged polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) desorbing 6 were well- described by a one-domain diffusion model that assumes that PAHs are initially

  13. Kinetic study of hydrogen sulfide absorption in aqueous chlorine solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    rate. To design, optimize and scale-up scrubbers, knowledge of the reaction kinetics and mechanism-1 s-1 ). Keywords Hydrogen sulfide, chlorine, kinetics, mass transfer, absorption, scrubber located at the bottom of the scrubber and is recirculated. pH and chlorine concentration are regulated

  14. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  15. The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reactiondiffusion kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinow, Peter

    The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reaction­diffusion kinetics 26th Southeastern 37240 The DNA binding activity of p53 displays reaction­diffusion kinetics ­ p. 1/2 #12;Collaborators, Vanderbilt University · Emmanuele DiBenedetto, PhD, Department of Mathematics, Vanderbilt University The DNA

  16. Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel Olivier Herbineta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Detailed chemical kinetic oxidation mechanism for a biodiesel surrogate Olivier Herbineta , William of methyl decanoate, a surrogate for biodiesel fuels. This model has been built by following the rules and biodiesel fuels to predict overall reactivity, but some kinetic details, including early CO2 production from

  17. Thermodynamics of accuracy in kinetic proofreading: Dissipation and efficiency trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Rao; Luca Peliti

    2015-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The high accuracy exhibited by biological information transcription processes is due to kinetic proofreading, i.e., by a mechanism which reduces the error rate of the information-handling process by driving it out of equilibrium. We provide a consistent thermodynamic description of enzyme-assisted assembly processes involving competing substrates, in a Master Equation framework. We introduce and evaluate a measure of the efficiency based on rigorous non-equilibrium inequalities. The performance of several proofreading models are thus analyzed and the related time, dissipation and efficiency vs. error trade-offs exhibited for different discrimination regimes. We finally introduce and analyze in the same framework a simple model which takes into account correlations between consecutive enzyme-assisted assembly steps. This work highlights the relevance of the distinction between energetic and kinetic discrimination regimes in enzyme-substrate interactions.

  18. Thermodynamics of accuracy in kinetic proofreading: Dissipation and efficiency trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Riccardo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The high accuracy exhibited by biological information transcription processes is due to kinetic proofreading, i.e., by a mechanism which reduces the error rate of the information-handling process by driving it out of equilibrium. We provide a consistent thermodynamic description of enzyme-assisted assembly processes involving competing substrates, in a Master Equation framework. We introduce and evaluate a measure of the efficiency based on rigorous non-equilibrium inequalities. The performance of several proofreading models are thus analyzed and the related time, dissipation and efficiency vs. error trade-offs exhibited for different discrimination regimes. We finally introduce and analyze in the same framework a simple model which takes into account correlations between consecutive enzyme-assisted assembly steps. This work highlights the relevance of the distinction between energetic and kinetic discrimination regimes in enzyme-substrate interactions.

  19. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  20. Inertial-Range Kinetic Turbulence in Pressure-Anisotropic Astrophysical Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, M W; Chen, C H K; Abel, I G; Cowley, S C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical framework for low-frequency electromagnetic (drift-)kinetic turbulence in a collisionless, multi-species plasma is presented. The result generalises reduced magnetohydrodynamics (RMHD) and kinetic RMHD (Schekochihin et al. 2009) for pressure-anisotropic plasmas, allowing for species drifts---a situation routinely encountered in the solar wind and presumably ubiquitous in hot dilute astrophysical plasmas (e.g. intracluster medium). Two main objectives are achieved. First, in a non-Maxwellian plasma, the relationships between fluctuating fields (e.g., the Alfven ratio) are order-unity modified compared to the more commonly considered Maxwellian case, and so a quantitative theory is developed to support quantitative measurements now possible in the solar wind. The main physical feature of low-frequency plasma turbulence survives the generalisation to non-Maxwellian distributions: Alfvenic and compressive fluctuations are energetically decoupled, with the latter passively advected by the former; the...

  1. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  2. Kinetic Gravity Braiding and axion inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Debaprasad Maity

    2013-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We constructed a new class of inflationary model with the higher derivative axion field which obeys constant shift symmetry. In the usual axion (natural) inflation, the axion decay constant is predicted to be in the super-Planckian regime which is believed to be incompatible with an effective field theory framework. With a novel mechanism originating from a higher derivative kinetic gravity braiding (KGB) of an axion field we found that there exist a huge parameter regime in our model where axion decay constant could be naturally sub-Planckian. Thanks to the KGB which effectively reduces the Planck constant. This effectively reduced Planck scale provides us the mechanism of further lowering down the speed of an axion field rolling down its potential without introducing super-Planckian axion decay constant. We also find that with that wide range of parameter values, our model induces almost scale invariant power spectrum as observed in CMB experiments.

  3. Active Polymers Confer Fast Reorganization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Swanson; Ned S. Wingreen

    2011-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime and mean length, MFPT ~ , by analogy to 1-d Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT ~ ^{1/2}. Since to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long, yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify active polymers' greater energy cost. PACS numbers: 87.10.Ed, 87.16.ad, 87.16.Ln

  4. Improving Reactivity Against Target Organothiophosphates via Active-Site Directed Mutagenisis of a Bacterial Phosphotriesterase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Githens, Tyler 1986-

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    the initial screen and were targets for steady state kinetic characterization of active site mutants. Site directed mutagenesis of binding sites was conducted and the most reactive point mutants, F132G, F132V and S308G, were used as backgrounds for subsequent...

  5. A Kinetic Theory Approach to Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    2002-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a kinetic theory approach to quantum gravity -- by which we mean a theory of the microscopic structure of spacetime, not a theory obtained by quantizing general relativity. A figurative conception of this program is like building a ladder with two knotted poles: quantum matter field on the right and spacetime on the left. Each rung connecting the corresponding knots represent a distinct level of structure. The lowest rung is hydrodynamics and general relativity; the next rung is semiclassical gravity, with the expectation value of quantum fields acting as source in the semiclassical Einstein equation. We recall how ideas from the statistical mechanics of interacting quantum fields helped us identify the existence of noise in the matter field and its effect on metric fluctuations, leading to the establishment of the third rung: stochastic gravity, described by the Einstein-Langevin equation. Our pathway from stochastic to quantum gravity is via the correlation hierarchy of noise and induced metric fluctuations. Three essential tasks beckon: 1) Deduce the correlations of metric fluctuations from correlation noise in the matter field; 2) Reconstituting quantum coherence -- this is the reverse of decoherence -- from these correlation functions 3) Use the Boltzmann-Langevin equations to identify distinct collective variables depicting recognizable metastable structures in the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes of quantum matter fields and how they demand of their corresponding spacetime counterparts. This will give us a hierarchy of generalized stochastic equations -- call them the Boltzmann-Einstein hierarchy of quantum gravity -- for each level of spacetime structure, from the macroscopic (general relativity) through the mesoscopic (stochastic gravity) to the microscopic (quantum gravity).

  6. Gravitationally Induced Particle Production: Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. S. Lima; I. P. Baranov

    2014-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A relativistic kinetic description for the irreversible thermodynamic process of gravitationally induced particle production is proposed in the context of an expanding Friedmann-Robertson-Walker (FRW) geometry. We show that the covariant thermodynamic treatment referred to as "adiabatic" particle production provoked by the cosmic time-varying gravitational field has a consistent kinetic counterpart. The variation of the distribution function is associated to a non-collisional kinetic term of quantum-gravitational origin which is proportional to the ratio $\\Gamma/H$, where $\\Gamma$ is the gravitational particle production rate and H is the Hubble parameter. For $\\Gamma production process. The macroscopic temperature evolution law is also kinetically derived for massive and massless particles. The present approach points to the possibility of an exact (semi-classical) quantum-gravitational kinetic treatment by incorporating back-reaction effects in the cosmic background.

  7. Geometric dynamics of Vlasov kinetic theory and its moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Cesare

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vlasov equation of kinetic theory is introduced and the Hamiltonian structure of its moments is presented. Then we focus on the geodesic evolution of the Vlasov moments. As a first step, these moment equations generalize the Camassa-Holm equation to its multi-component version. Subsequently, adding electrostatic forces to the geodesic moment equations relates them to the Benney equations and to the equations for beam dynamics in particle accelerators. Next, we develop a kinetic theory for self assembly in nano-particles. Darcy's law is introduced as a general principle for aggregation dynamics in friction dominated systems (at different scales). Then, a kinetic equation is introduced for the dissipative motion of isotropic nano-particles. The zeroth-moment dynamics of this equation recovers the classical Darcy's law at the macroscopic level. A kinetic-theory description for oriented nano-particles is also presented. At the macroscopic level, the zeroth moments of this kinetic equation recover the magnetiz...

  8. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  9. Direct Discharge Permit (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A direct discharge permit is required if a project involves the discharge of pollutants to state waters. For generation purposes, this involves the withdrawal of surface water for cooling purposes...

  10. A new method for solving of vector problems for kinetic equations with Maxwell boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Latyshev

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work the classical problem of the kinetic theory of gases (the Smoluchowsky' problem about temperature jump in rarefied gas) is considered. The rarefied gas fills half-space over a flat firm surface. logarithmic gradient of temperature is set far from surface. The kinetic equation with modelling integral of collisions in the form of BGK-model (Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook) is used. The general mirror-diffuse boundary conditions of molecules reflexions of gas from a wall on border of half-space (Maxwell conditions) are considered. Expanding distribution function on two orthogonal directions in space of velocities, the Smoluchowsky' problem to the solution of the homogeneous vector one-dimensional and one-velocity kinetic equation with a matrix kernel is reduced. Then generalization of source-method is used and boundary conditions include in non-homogeneous vector kinetic equation. The solution in the form of Fourier integral is searched. The problem is reduced to the solution of vector Fredholm integral equation of the second sort with matrix kernel. The solution of Fredholm equation in the form of Neumann's polynoms with vector coefficients is searched. The system vector algebraic interengaged equations turns out. The solution of this system is under construction in the form of Neumann's polynoms. Comparison with well-known Barichello - Siewert' high-exact results is made. Zero and the first approach of jumps of temperature and numerical density are received. It is shown, that transition from the zero to the first approach raises 10 times accuracy in calculation coefficients of temperature and concentration jump.

  11. Kinetic, Thermodynamic, and Structural Insight into the Mechanism of Phosphopantetheine Adenylyltransferase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wubben, Thomas J.; Mesecar, Andrew D. (Purdue); (UIC)

    2012-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Phosphopantetheine adenylyltransferase (PPAT) catalyzes the penultimate step in the coenzyme A (CoA) biosynthetic pathway, reversibly transferring an adenylyl group from ATP to 4'-phosphopantetheine (PhP) to form dephosphocoenzyme A. This reaction sits at the branch point between the de novo pathway and the salvage pathway, and has been shown to be a rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of CoA. Importantly, bacterial and mammalian PPATs share little sequence homology, making the enzyme a potential target for antibiotic development. A series of steady-state kinetic, product inhibition, and direct binding studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis PPAT (MtPPAT) was conducted and suggests that the enzyme utilizes a nonrapid-equilibrium random bi-bi mechanism. The kinetic response of MtPPAT to the binding of ATP was observed to be sigmoidal under fixed PhP concentrations, but substrate inhibition was observed at high PhP concentrations under subsaturating ATP concentrations, suggesting a preferred pathway to ternary complex formation. Negative cooperativity in the kinetic response of MtPPAT to PhP binding was observed under certain conditions and confirmed thermodynamically by isothermal titration calorimetry, suggesting the formation of an asymmetric quaternary structure during sequential ligation of substrates. Asymmetry in binding was also observed in isothermal titration calorimetry experiments with dephosphocoenzyme A and CoA. X-ray structures of MtPPAT in complex with PhP and the nonhydrolyzable ATP analogue adenosine-5'-[({alpha},{beta})-methyleno]triphosphate were solved to 1.57 {angstrom} and 2.68 {angstrom}, respectively. These crystal structures reveal small conformational changes in enzyme structure upon ligand binding, which may play a role in the nonrapid-equilibrium mechanism. We suggest that the proposed kinetic mechanism and asymmetric character in MtPPAT ligand binding may provide a means of reaction and pathway regulation in addition to that of the previously determined CoA feedback.

  12. A KINETIC MODEL OF SOLAR WIND GENERATION BY OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfven waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0 deg. and 60 deg. with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfven wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

  13. The Kinetic Engineering of Autonomous DNA-Based Robots and Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    of gene expression · autonomous universal computers. #12;"Autonomous Kinetic Engineering" of IrreversibleThe Kinetic Engineering of Autonomous DNA-Based Robots and Computing Machines John H. Reif Kinetic Engineering" techniques in: · recombinant DNA, · nano-engineering, and · molecular computing

  14. A Kinetic-Fluid Model C. Z. Cheng and Jay R. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Kinetic-Fluid Model C. Z. Cheng and Jay R. Johnson Princeton University, Plasma Physics developed a kinetic-MHD model [Cheng, 1991] to study particle kinetic eects on MHD phenomena by taking

  15. A KineticFluid Model C. Z. Cheng and Jay R. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Kinetic­Fluid Model C. Z. Cheng and Jay R. Johnson Princeton University, Plasma Physics have previously developed a kinetic­MHD model [Cheng, 1991] to study particle kinetic effects on MHD

  16. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  17. Art Directable Tornadoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwivedi, Ravindra

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Twisters? [Bond 1996], ?Tornado? [Nosseck 1996] and ?Hancock? [Berg 2008]. 5 (a) (b) Figure 4: Simulated tornadoes in "The Day After Tomorrow". (a) Twin tornadoes [Emmerich 2004]. (b) Tornado with a huge funnel [Emmerich 2004...]. The film "The Day after Tomorrow" [Emmerich 2004], had a variety of tornadoes with different shapes and sizes and the shots required a lot of art direct-ability to make it visually appealing and believable (Figure 4). In 2009, an animated movie ?Cloudy...

  18. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  19. Morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by solvo-thermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Majeed Khan, M.A., E-mail: majeed_phys@yahoo.co.in [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kumar, Sushil [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Alsalhi, M.S. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamed, Maqusood [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alhoshan, Mansour [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chemical Engineering Department, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alrokayan, Salman A. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamad, Tansir [Department of Chemistry, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanocrystals of copper indium disulphide (CuInS{sub 2}) were synthesized by a solvo-thermal method. The structure, morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetic behavior of samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis techniques. Non-isothermal measurements at different heating rates were carried out and the crystallization kinetics of samples were analyzed using the most reliable non-isothermal kinetic methods. The kinetic parameters such as glass transition temperature, thermal stability, activation energy, Avrami exponent etc. were evaluated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals have scientific and technological importance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples have been prepared by solvo-thermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesized samples exhibit excellent morphology and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of solar cell devices.

  20. Evidence for B+ to K0barK+ and B0 to K0K0bar, and Measurement of the Branching Fraction and Search for Direct CP Violation in B+ to K0pi+

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona, IFAE; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; /Bari U. /INFN, Bari; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /Bergen U. /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors present evidence for the b {yields} d penguin-dominated decays B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} and B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0} with significances of 3.5 and 4.5 standard deviations, respectively. The results are based on a sample of 227 million {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. We measure the branching fractions {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +}) = (1.5 {+-} 0.5 {+-} 0.1) x 10{sup -6} (< 2.4 x 10{sup -6}) and {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup 0}{bar K}{sup 0}) = (1.19{sub -0.35}{sup +0.40} {+-} 0.13) x 10{sup -6}, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively, and the upper limit on the branching fraction for {bar K}{sup 0}K{sup +} is at the 90% confidence level. They also present improved measurements of the charge-averaged branching fraction {Beta}(B{sup +} {yields} K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = (26.0 {+-} 1.3 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup -6} and CP-violating charge asymmetry {Alpha}{sub CP} (K{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}) = -0.09 {+-} 0.05 {+-} 0.01, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively.

  1. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DePaolo, D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    form of the kinetic  r ate expression (e.g.  equations 2); in  these  expressions  are  the  two  kinetic  isotopic 

  2. E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerated search kinetics Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dependence of the elongation kinetics. Marked acceleration... to the slowing of protein folding kinetics by other denaturants (28) and the acceleration of folding by TFE (26......

  3. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity. Effect of Grain Size on Uranium(VI) Surface Complexation Kinetics and Adsorption Additivity....

  4. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest molecules, for up to three gas hydrate guest molecules: CH4, CO2, and N2. The independent tracking of mobile fluid and hydrate guest molecules allows for the kinetic exchange of guest molecules between the mobile fluids and hydrate. The particular interest of this numerical investigation is to determine whether kinetic exchange parameters, determined from laboratory-scale experiments, are directly applicable to interpreting the Ignik Sikumi #1 data.

  5. Current measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and methods are provided for a system for measurement of a current in a conductor such that the conductor current may be momentarily directed to a current measurement element in order to maintain proper current without significantly increasing an amount of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element or adding resistance to assist in current measurement. The apparatus and methods described herein are useful in superconducting circuits where it is necessary to monitor current carried by the superconducting elements while minimizing the effects of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element.

  6. ROLES OF THE KINETIC AND DYNAMIC MECHANISMS IN THE L{sub p} -E{sub p} RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Fu, E-mail: ypqin@gzhu.edu.cn [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)] [Center for Astrophysics, Guangzhou University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation is a well-known relation in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Its implication remains unclear. We propose to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relation by considering the corresponding kinetic and dynamic mechanisms separately. In this way, one can tell how much the kinetic or dynamic mechanism contributes to the index of the relationship. Our analysis gives rise to several conclusions. (1) The index of the kinetic effect in the L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation can simply be derived from the theory of special relativity, which is generally larger than 2, depending on the situation concerned. (2) The index of the dynamic effect in the relation can be deduced from observation once a model of jets is adopted. According to current GRB data, we find that the dynamic effect alone tends to give rise to an anti-correlation between L{sub p} and E{sub p} ; in terms of statistics, the dynamic effect is obviously smaller than the kinetic effect; in the situation of jets with moving discrete radio clouds that move directly toward the observer, the index of the dynamic effect is currently constrained within (- 1.6, -1), while in other situations of jets, the constraints are different; both internal and external shocks can account for the current data.

  7. Directional correlation of [gamma] transitions in [sup 72]Ge following the decay of [sup 72]Ga

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landulfo, E.; Saxena, R.N.; Zamboni, C.B.; Lapolli, A.L. (Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN-Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear de Brasil, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil))

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional correlations of coincident gamma transitions in [sup 72]Ge have been measured following the [beta][sup [minus

  8. Evidence of critical balance in kinetic Alfven wave turbulence simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TenBarge, J. M.; Howes, G. G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical simulation of kinetic plasma turbulence is performed to assess the applicability of critical balance to kinetic, dissipation scale turbulence. The analysis is performed in the frequency domain to obviate complications inherent in performing a local analysis of turbulence. A theoretical model of dissipation scale critical balance is constructed and compared to simulation results, and excellent agreement is found. This result constitutes the first evidence of critical balance in a kinetic turbulence simulation and provides evidence of an anisotropic turbulence cascade extending into the dissipation range. We also perform an Eulerian frequency analysis of the simulation data and compare it to the results of a previous study of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence simulations.

  9. Kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kossaya, A.M.; Belyakov, B.P.; Kuchma, Z.V.; Sandrozd, M.K.; Vasil'eva, V.G.

    1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies the kinetics of interaction of gaseous hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide at temperatures 300-700 degrees. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory adsorption apparatus modified and adapted for work with corrosive hydrogen fluoride. Calcium oxide samples in granulated form and deposited on gamma-alumina were used in the experiments. Kinetic curves representing variations of the degree of conversion of the solid samples with time are shown. The influence of retardation dure to diffusion was observed in the experiments. The influence of diffusion control on the reaction rate was also observed in a study of the reaction kinetics on supported layers of calcium oxide.

  10. Directional spherical multipole wavelets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayn, Michael; Holschneider, Matthias [Institute for Mathematics, University Potsdam, Am Neuen Palais 10, 144 69 Potsdam (Germany)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct a family of admissible analysis reconstruction pairs of wavelet families on the sphere. The construction is an extension of the isotropic Poisson wavelets. Similar to those, the directional wavelets allow a finite expansion in terms of off-center multipoles. Unlike the isotropic case, the directional wavelets are not a tight frame. However, at small scales, they almost behave like a tight frame. We give an explicit formula for the pseudodifferential operator given by the combination analysis-synthesis with respect to these wavelets. The Euclidean limit is shown to exist and an explicit formula is given. This allows us to quantify the asymptotic angular resolution of the wavelets.

  11. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  12. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Joop Schaye

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} Msol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces on wind particles within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that this popular recipe gives dramatically different results because (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc, giving the dwarf galaxy an irregular morphology and creating a galactic fountain in the massive galaxy. Hydrodynamic drag within the disc results in a strong increase of the effective mass loading of the wind for the dwarf galaxy, but quenches much of the outflow in the case of the high-mass galaxy.

  13. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis and devolatilization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research continued on coal devolatilization. Results are presented for rapid devolatilization experiments performed with the 20 -- 30 micron size cut of the reference coal - PSOC 1451D - a high volatile bituminous, Appalachian Province coal. In agreement with behavior observed in rapid, radiant transient heating experiments -flash lamp - and moderate heating rate - heated grid - experiments for the same coal, the devolatilization process is observed to occur in four distinct phases: intraparticle heavy hydrocarbon detachment and transport; heavy hydrocarbon desorption; low temperature reformation reactions producing light gases; high temperature secondary reactions of tars and char degassing. Mass fraction yields light fast yields and tar and char characteristics are presented for a range of reactor temperatures which support the phenomenological picture. A phenomenological model is presented which indicates the distinct phases of devolatilization and the importance of heat transfer conditions on both the overall rate of particle mass loss and the observable volatiles product distribution. The approach taken to model heat transfer conditions in each of the devolatilization reactors employed in the overall investigation is outlined. Predicted weight loss results are shown for three different sets of overall devolatilization kinetic parameters given heat transfer conditions in the UTRC Hot Wall - Hot Gas reactor. 47 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Directional gamma detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LeVert, Francis E. (Downers Grove, Knoxville, TN); Cox, Samson A. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved directional gamma radiation detector has a collector sandwiched etween two layers of insulation of varying thicknesses. The collector and insulation layers are contained within an evacuated casing, or emitter, which releases electrons upon exposure to gamma radiation. Delayed electrons and electrons entering the collector at oblique angles are attenuated as they pass through the insulation layers on route to the collector.

  15. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

  16. Directed Diffusion Fabio Silva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    nodes can cache, or transform data, and may direct interests based on previously cached data (Section 3 University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA, USA 90089 ¶ Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA 90095 {fabio,johnh,govindan,estrin}@isi.edu February 10, 2004 1

  17. Turnitin Moodle Direct Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Turnitin Moodle® Direct Integration Instructor User Manual Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 1. Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 2 Contents Instructor User Manual 1 Creating a Turnitin Assignment 3 Accessing GradeMark® 15 Glossary 16 #12;Instructor User Manual Turnitin Moodle Integration Manual: 3

  18. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Daniel M. Harper, M.P.H. A Diverse Environmental Public Health Workforce to Meet the Diverse Environmental Health Challenges on environmental health and to build part nerships in the profession. In pursuit of these goals, we will feature

  19. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT John Sarisky, R.S., M.P.H. Developing Environmental Public Health Leadership Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up to of these goals, we will feature a column from the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers

  20. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Daneen Farrow Collier, M.S.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to pro vide up-to-date and relevant informa tion on environmental health the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention (CDC) in every

  1. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Brian Hubbard, M.P.H. Editor the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention (CDC) in every environmental health programs and professionals to antici pate, identify, and respond to adverse envi ronmental

  2. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-04. DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11/1/99. DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99.

  3. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-05: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Security Systems, dated 11-1-99 and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99. No cancellations.

  4. Community detection in directed acyclic graphs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Speidel, Leo; Masuda, Naoki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some temporal networks, most notably citation networks, are naturally represented as directed acyclic graphs (DAGs). To detect communities in DAGs, we propose a modularity for DAGs by defining an appropriate null model (i.e., randomized network) respecting the order of nodes. We implement a spectral method to approximately maximize the proposed modularity measure and test the method on citation networks and other DAGs. We find that the attained values of the modularity for DAGs are similar for partitions that we obtain by maximizing the proposed modularity (designed for DAGs), the modularity for undirected networks and that for general directed networks. In other words, if we neglect the order imposed on nodes (and the direction of links) in a given DAG and maximize the conventional modularity measure, the obtained partition is close to the optimal one in the sense of the modularity for DAGs.

  5. THERMOSTATICS AND KINETICS OF TRANSFORMATIONS IN PU-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    CALPHAD assessment of the thermodynamic properties of a series of Pu-based alloys is briefly presented together with some results on the kinetics of phase formation and transformations in Pu-Ga alloys.

  6. ash kinetics mechanism: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    close. Such an event we call a collision, and in a collision there is exchange of energy proportional to the average kinetic energy of a molecule. It is very satisfactory that...

  7. The Icarus Machine : a kinetic sculpture that demonstrates gyroscopic precision

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nichols, Laura E

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inspired by the desire to unite aspects of art and engineering into a comprehensive whole, I have designed and manufactured a kinetic sculpture that demonstrates gyroscopic precession. The aim of this project is to explore ...

  8. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  9. Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Hans

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

  10. RIS-M-2216 CHEMICAL KINETICS IN THE GAS PHASE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    KINETICS, EXPERIMENTAL DATA, GASES, HYDROGEN SULFIDES, PULSED IRRADIATION, RADIATION CHEMISTRY, RADIOLYSIS is subjected to high energy radiation (e.g. a- particles, Y-radiation or fast electrons), the primary products

  11. Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

  12. Phase IV Simulant Testing of Monosodium Titanate Adsorption Kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salt Disposition Systems Engineering Team identified the adsorption kinetics of actinides and strontium onto monosodium titanate (MST) as a technical risk in several of the processing alternatives selected for additional evaluation in Phase III of their effort.

  13. Integrating Acclimated Kinetic Envelopes into Sustainable Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jialiang

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    affects the energy usage of a building. In an effort to simultaneously consider and satisfy all of the various indoor comfort requirements, changing climatic conditions can generate conflicting conditions. Acclimated Kinetic Envelope (AKE) is a notion...

  14. NIST Standard Reference Database 17 NIST Chemical Kinetics Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Standard Reference Database 17 __________________________________________________________ NIST Chemical Kinetics Database WindowsTM Version 2Q98 Users' Guide (NIST) uses its best efforts to deliver a high quality copy of the Database and to verify that the data

  15. atom kinetic energy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .self-consistent Thomas Fermi TF atom discussed w Kais, Sabre 3 Towards an exact orbital-free single-particle kinetic energy density for the inhomogeneous electron liquid in the...

  16. astrophysical systems kinetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Thermonuclear Kinetics in Astrophysics CERN Preprints Summary: Over the billions of years since...

  17. Kinetics and Solvent Effects in the Synthesis of Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schleicher, Jay C.

    2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are being recognized as environmentally friendly ("green") solvents. However, their synthesis is often conducted in the very solvents that they will reportedly replace. This research has investigated the kinetics and solvent...

  18. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx...

  19. Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason Stuart

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

  20. Direct-Write of Silicon and Germanium Nanostructures

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign: PotentialFederal FinancialDirect KineticInnovation