National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for direct kinetic measurements

  1. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Wednesday, 25 January 2012 00:00 In the earth's troposphere, which...

  2. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules,...

  3. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirect Kinetic

  4. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantities. Because Criegee intermediates have long been thought to play a key role in atmospheric chemistry, the announcement of a method to directly measure their reactivity...

  5. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirectDirect

  6. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect ImagingDirect

  7. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirectDirect

  8. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDiracDirectDirect

  9. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileep Singh GroupDiracDirectDirect

  10. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileep Singh GroupDiracDirect

  11. Direct measurement of the kinetics of volume and enthalpy relaxation of an Au-based bulk metallic glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bünz, J.; Wilde, G. [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)] [Institute of Materials Physics, University of Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2013-12-14

    Structural relaxation of glasses below their glass transition is a well-studied phenomenon that still poses several open issues. With the advent of bulk metallic glasses with exceptionally low glass transition temperatures, new options are available that are based on the experimental assessment of the time dependence of several different thermodynamic quantities by direct measurements with high accuracy. In this contribution the first direct measurement of the isothermal relaxation of the volume and the enthalpy of an Au-based bulk metallic glassformer are reported and discussed with respect of the characteristics describing the underlying processes.

  12. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there...

  13. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and...

  14. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there has been much indirect evidence...

  15. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    reactant, CH2I. The CH2I reacts with a large excess of O2 to produce CH2OO-formaldehyde oxide-the simplest form of Criegee intermediate. The intense tunable light from the...

  16. Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileep Singh

  17. Direct measure of quantum correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Chang-shui [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Zhao, Haiqing [School of Science, Dalian Jiaotong University, Dalian 116028 (China)

    2011-12-15

    The quantumness of the correlation known as quantum correlation is usually measured by quantum discord. So far various quantum discords can be roughly understood as indirect measure by some special discrepancy of two quantities. We present a direct measure of quantum correlation by revealing the difference between the structures of classically and quantum correlated states. Our measure explicitly includes the contributions of the inseparability and local nonorthogonality of the eigenvectors of a density matrix. Besides its relatively easy computability, our measure can provide a unified understanding of quantum correlation of all the present versions.

  18. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics Adrien Couet a to reduce hydrogen pickup during operation, and the associated cladding degradation. The present study focuses on precisely and accurately measuring hydrogen pickup fraction for a set of alloys to specifically

  19. Direct measurement of thermophoretic forces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurent Helden; Ralf Eichhorn; Clemens Bechinger

    2014-12-19

    We study the thermophoretic motion of a micron sized single colloidal particle in front of a flat wall by evanescent light scattering. To quantify thermophoretic effects we analyse the nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) of the particle in a constant temperature gradient perpendicular to the confining walls. We propose to determine thermophoretic forces from a 'generalized potential' associated with the probability distribution of the particle position in the NESS. Experimentally we demonstrate, how this spatial probability distribution is measured and how thermophoretic forces can be extracted with 10 fN resolution. By varying temperature gradient and ambient temperature, the temperature dependence of Soret coefficient $S_T(T)$ is determined for $r = 2.5 \\mu m$ polystyrene and $r = 1.35 \\mu m$ melamine particles. The functional form of $S_T(T)$ is in good agreement with findings for smaller colloids. In addition, we measure and discuss hydrodynamic effects in the confined geometry. The theoretical and experimental technique proposed here extends thermophoresis measurements to so far inaccessible particle sizes and particle solvent combinations.

  20. Metal dependent structure, dynamics, and function in RNA measured by site-directed spin labeling and EPR spectroscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nak-Kyoon

    2007-04-25

    -directed spin labeling (SDSL) and EPR spectroscopy, distances in RNA duplexes, TAR RNA, and the hammerhead ribozyme have been measured to investigate RNA structures. Kinetic measurements have been performed in the extended hammerhead ribozyme to correlate...

  1. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.059-0.87 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, H{sub 2}S concentration, reaction pressure, and catalyst loading on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 62-78 v% hydrogen, 3,000-7,000-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,500-3,500 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 10 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 50 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-170 psia. The molar ratio of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} in the bubble reactor is maintained at 2 for all the reaction experiment runs.

  2. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2004-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and the hot-gas desulfurization using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term process development efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a micro bubble reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 1-6 milliseconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperature, moisture concentration, reaction pressure on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into liquid elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 70 v% hydrogen, 2,500-7,500-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,250-3,750 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 0-15 vol% moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to a micro bubble reactor are 100 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 40-170 psia.

  3. Direct visualization reveals kinetics of meiotic chromosome synapsis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rog, Ofer; Dernburg, Abby  F.

    2015-03-17

    The synaptonemal complex (SC) is a conserved protein complex that stabilizes interactions along homologous chromosomes (homologs) during meiosis. The SC regulates genetic exchanges between homologs, thereby enabling reductional division and the production of haploid gametes. Here, we directly observe SC assembly (synapsis) by optimizing methods for long-term fluorescence recording in C. elegans. We report that synapsis initiates independently on each chromosome pair at or near pairing centers—specialized regions required for homolog associations. Once initiated, the SC extends rapidly and mostly irreversibly to chromosome ends. Quantitation of SC initiation frequencies and extension rates reveals that initiation is a rate-limiting step inmore »homolog interactions. Eliminating the dynein-driven chromosome movements that accompany synapsis severely retards SC extension, revealing a new role for these conserved motions. This work provides the first opportunity to directly observe and quantify key aspects of meiotic chromosome interactions and will enable future in vivo analysis of germline processes.« less

  4. Direct Measurement of Chemical Shielding Anisotropies. Fluoranil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffin, Robert G.

    7222 Direct Measurement of Chemical Shielding Anisotropies. Fluoranil Sir: Although the nuclear magnetic shielding coefficient d is a tensor quantity, nearly all measurements of it have been confined to the mean shielding u = Tr(d), since all spectral information about its anisotropy is erased by rapid

  5. Comparisons of dense-plasma-focus kinetic simulations with experimental measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Welch, D.; Ellsworth, J.; Falabella, S.; Tang, V.

    2014-06-01

    Dense-plasma-focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high-energy electrons and ions, x rays, and neutrons. The mechanisms through which these physically simple devices generate such high-energy beams in a relatively short distance are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously we reported on fully kinetic simulations of a DPF and compared them with hybrid and fluid simulations of the same device. Here we present detailed comparisons between fully kinetic simulations and experimental data on a 1.2 kJ DPF with two electrode geometries, including neutron yield and ion beam energy distributions. A more intensive third calculation is presented which examines the effects of a fully detailed pulsed power driver model. We also compare simulated electromagnetic fluctuations with direct measurement of radiofrequency electromagnetic fluctuations in a DPF plasma. These comparisons indicate that the fully kinetic model captures the essential physics of these plasmas with high fidelity, and provide further evidence that anomalous resistivity in the plasma arises due to a kinetic instability near the lower hybrid frequency.

  6. Kinetic Mechanism of Direct Transfer of Escherichia coli SSB Tetramers between Single-Stranded DNA Molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohman, Timothy M.

    Kinetic Mechanism of Direct Transfer of Escherichia coli SSB Tetramers between Single-Stranded DNA tetramer forms transiently prior to the release of the acceptor DNA. When an initial 1:1 SSB-ssDNA complex tetramer to form a singly ligated complex. However, when an initial SSB-ssDNA complex is formed with (dT)35

  7. Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements byrate enhancement is due to a photo-chemical process. Thenanocrystals can be rapidly photo-oxidized. This oxidation

  8. Kinetics of Direct Oxidation of H2S in Coal Gas to Elemental Sulfur

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2005-11-01

    Removal of hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal gasifier gas and sulfur recovery are key steps in the development of Department of Energy's (DOE's) advanced Vision 21 plants that produce electric power and clean transportation fuels with coal and natural gas. These Vision 21 plants will require highly clean coal gas with H{sub 2}S below 1 ppm and negligible amounts of trace contaminants such as hydrogen chloride, ammonia, alkali, heavy metals, and particulate. The conventional method of sulfur removal and recovery employing amine, Claus, and tail-gas treatment is very expensive. A second generation approach developed under DOE's sponsorship employs hot-gas desulfurization (HGD) using regenerable metal oxide sorbents followed by Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). However, this process sequence does not remove trace contaminants and is targeted primarily towards the development of advanced integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plants that produce electricity (not both electricity and transportation fuels). There is an immediate as well as long-term need for the development of cleanup processes that produce highly clean coal gas for next generation Vision 21 plants. To this end, a novel process is now under development at several research organizations in which the H{sub 2}S in coal gas is directly oxidized to elemental sulfur over a selective catalyst. Such a process is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 160-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and 400 square cells/inch{sup 2}, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-wash-coated monolithic catalyst, and various reactors such as a micro packed-bed reactor, a micro bubble reactor, and a monolithic catalyst reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. This heterogeneous catalytic reaction has gaseous reactants such as H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2}. However, this heterogeneous catalytic reaction has heterogeneous products such as liquid elemental sulfur and steam.

  9. KINETICS OF DIRECT OXIDATION OF H2S IN COAL GAS TO ELEMENTAL SULFUR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K.C. Kwon

    2003-01-01

    The direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of SO{sub 2} is ideally suited for coal gas from commercial gasifiers with a quench system to remove essentially all the trace contaminants except H{sub 2}S. This direct oxidation process has the potential to produce a super clean coal gas more economically than both conventional amine-based processes and HGD/DSRP. The objective of this research is to support the near- and long-term DOE efforts to commercialize this direct oxidation technology. The objectives of this research are to measure kinetics of direct oxidation of H{sub 2}S to elemental sulfur in the presence of a simulated coal gas mixture containing SO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and moisture, using 60-{micro}m C-500-04 alumina catalyst particles and a PFA differential fixed-bed micro reactor, and to develop kinetic rate equations and model the direct oxidation process to assist in the design of large-scale plants. To achieve the above-mentioned objectives, experiments on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur were carried out for the space time range of 0.01-0.047 seconds at 125-155 C to evaluate effects of reaction temperatures, moisture concentrations, reaction pressures on conversion of hydrogen sulfide into elemental sulfur. Simulated coal gas mixtures consist of 61-89 v% hydrogen, 2,300-9,200-ppmv hydrogen sulfide, 1,600-4,900 ppmv sulfur dioxide, and 2.6-13.7 vol % moisture, and nitrogen as remainder. Volumetric feed rates of a simulated coal gas mixture to the reactor are 100-110 cm{sup 3}/min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure (SCCM). The temperature of the reactor is controlled in an oven at 125-155 C. The pressure of the reactor is maintained at 28-127 psia. The following results were obtained based on experimental data generated from the differential reactor system, and their interpretations, (1) Concentration of moisture and concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with SO{sub 2} over the moisture range of 2.5-13.6 v% moisture at 140 C and 120-123 psia. (2) Concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with SO{sub 2} over the temperature range of 135-145 C at 5-v% moisture and 112-123 psia. However, reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with SO{sub 2} appear to decrease slightly with increased reaction temperatures over the temperature range of 135-145 C at 5-v% moisture and 112-123 psia. (3) Concentrations of both H{sub 2}S and SO{sub 2} appear to affect slightly reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with SO{sub 2} over the pressure range of 28-123 psia at 5-v% moisture and 140 C. However, reaction rates of H{sub 2}S with SO{sub 2} increase significantly with increased reaction pressures over the pressure range of 28-123 psia at 5-v% moisture and 140 C.

  10. Measurement of directional thermal infrared emissivity of vegetation and soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, J.M. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Soil Science; Balick, L.K. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A new method has been developed for measuring directional thermal emissivity as a function of view angle for plant canopies and soils using two infrared thermometers each sensitive to a different wavelength band. By calibrating the two infrared thermometers to 0.1C consistency, canopy directional emissivity can be estimated with typical errors less than 0.005 in the 8--14 um wavelength band, depending on clarity of the sky and corrections for CO{sub 2} absorption by the atmosphere. A theoretical justification for the method is developed along with an error analysis. Laboratory measurements were used to develop corrections for CO{sub 2}, absorption and a field calibration method is used to obtain the necessary 0.1C consistency for relatively low cost infrared thermometers. The emissivity of alfalfa (LAI=2.5) and corn (LAI=3.2) was near 0.995 and independent of view angle. Individual corn leaves had an emissivity of 0.97. A wheat (LAI=3.0) canopy had an emissivity of 0.985 at nadir and 0.975 at 75 degree view angle. The canopy emissivity values tend to be higher than values in the literature, and are useful for converting infrared thermometer measurements to kinetic temperature and interpreting satellite thermal observations.

  11. A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as Measured by Chemical Shrinkage and Isothermal Calorimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bentz, Dale P.

    1 A Comparison Study of Portland Cement Hydration Kinetics as Measured by Chemical Shrinkage methods of evaluating cement hydration kinetics, namely chemical shrinkage and isothermal calorimetry tests, are used to investigate the early stage hydration of different classes of oilwell cement

  12. The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Effect of the Accuracy of Toroidal Field Measurements on Spatial Consistency of Kinetic Profiles at JET

  13. Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements by In Situ Raman Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    Photo-oxidation of Ge Nanocrystals: Kinetic Measurements byBerkeley, CA, 94720 ABSTRACT Ge nanocrystals are formed inthe Raman spectra of the Ge nanocrystals in-situ. The

  14. Sandia Energy - Direct Measurement of Key Molecule Will Increase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    an instrument, the Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometer in the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, that took direct measurements. (Photo by...

  15. Shell trajectory measurements from direct-drive implosion experiments...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A technique to measure the shell trajectory in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions is presented. The x-ray self emission of the target is measured with an...

  16. Measuring Cepheid Angular Sizes Directly using the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measuring Cepheid Angular Sizes Directly using the Palomar Testbed Interferometer M. Kuchner, B Cepheids with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) to measure their angular diameters at H and K bands

  17. Direct measurement of shear properties of microfibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behlow, H.; Saini, D.; Durham, L.; Simpson, J.; Skove, M. J.; Rao, A. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Oliveira, L. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Serkiz, S. M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Clemson Nanomaterials Center, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    As novel fibers with enhanced mechanical properties continue to be synthesized and developed, the ability to easily and accurately characterize these materials becomes increasingly important. Here we present a design for an inexpensive tabletop instrument to measure shear modulus (G) and other longitudinal shear properties of a micrometer-sized monofilament fiber sample, such as nonlinearities and hysteresis. This automated system applies twist to the sample and measures the resulting torque using a sensitive optical detector that tracks a torsion reference. The accuracy of the instrument was verified by measuring G for high purity copper and tungsten fibers, for which G is well known. Two industrially important fibers, IM7 carbon fiber and Kevlar{sup ®} 119, were also characterized with this system and were found to have G = 16.5 ± 2.1 and 2.42 ± 0.32 GPa, respectively.

  18. A Direct Measure of Entrainment DAVID M. ROMPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romps, David M.

    A Direct Measure of Entrainment DAVID M. ROMPS Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts for directly measuring convective entrainment and detrainment in a cloud- resolving simulation. This technique is used to quantify the errors in the entrainment and detrainment esti- mates obtained using the standard

  19. Measuring Photochemical Kinetics in Submonolayer Films by Transient ATR Spectroscopy on a Multimode Planar Waveguide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, Anne M.; Marucci, Nicole E.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2011-07-15

    Understanding the kinetics of reactions in molecular thin films can aid in the molecular engineering of organic photovoltaics and biosensors. Using two analytical methods, transient absorbance spectroscopy (TAS) and attenuated total reflectance (ATR), in a relatively simple arrangement when compared with previous TAS/ATR instruments to interrogate molecular structure and photochemistry at interfaces. The multimode planar waveguide geometry provides a significant path length enhancement relative to a conventional transmission geometry, making it feasible to perform measurements on low-surface-coverage films. This work demonstrates that TAS/ATR can be used to probe structure and photochemical kinetics in molecular films at extremely low surface coverages.

  20. Direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations: what it takes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Busch; Neil Stevens

    2015-01-17

    The uncertainty principle being a cornerstone of quantum mechanics, it is surprising that in nearly 90 years there have been no direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations. This lacuna was due to the absence of two essential ingredients: appropriate measures of measurement error (and disturbance), and precise formulations of such relations that are {\\em universally valid}and {\\em directly testable}. We formulate two distinct forms of direct tests, based on different measures of error. We present a prototype protocol for a direct test of measurement uncertainty relations in terms of {\\em value deviation errors} (hitherto considered nonfeasible), highlighting the lack of universality of these relations. This shows that the formulation of universal, directly testable measurement uncertainty relations for {\\em state-dependent} error measures remains an important open problem. Recent experiments that were claimed to constitute invalidations of Heisenberg's error-disturbance relation are shown to conform with the spirit of Heisenberg's principle if interpreted as direct tests of measurement uncertainty relations for error measures that quantify {\\em distances between observables}.

  1. Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal-Organic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct Measurement of Adsorbed Gas Redistribution in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Ying-Pin Chen, Yangyang Liu, Dahuan Liu, Mathieu Bosch, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J. Am....

  2. Growth Kinetics and Modeling of Direct Oxynitride Growth with NO-O2 Gas Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everist, Sarah; Nelson, Jerry; Sharangpani, Rahul; Smith, Paul Martin; Tay, Sing-Pin; Thakur, Randhir

    1999-05-03

    We have modeled growth kinetics of oxynitrides grown in NO-O2 gas mixtures from first principles using modified Deal-Grove equations. Retardation of oxygen diffusion through the nitrided dielectric was assumed to be the dominant growth-limiting step. The model was validated against experimentally obtained curves with good agreement. Excellent uniformity, which exceeded expected walues, was observed.

  3. Kinetics of visible light photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals:Theory and in situ measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, I.D.; Xu, Q.; Yuan, C.W.; Beeman, J.W.; Ager III, J.W.; Chrzan, D.C.; Haller, E.E.

    2006-11-14

    Photo-oxidation of Ge nanocrystals illuminated with visible laser light under ambient conditions was investigated. The photo-oxidation kinetics were monitored by in situ measurement of the crystalline Ge volume fraction by Raman spectroscopy. The effects of laser power and energy on the extent of oxidation were measured using both in situ and ex situ Raman scattering techniques. A mechanistic model in which the tunneling of photo-excited carriers to the oxide surface for electron activated molecular oxygen dissociation is proposed. This quantitative model successfully describes all experimental photo-oxidation observations using physical parameters.

  4. Measuring kinetic energy changes in the mesoscale with low acquisition rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roldán, É.; Martínez, I. A.; Rica, R. A.; Dinis, L.

    2014-06-09

    We report on the measurement of the average kinetic energy changes in isothermal and non-isothermal quasistatic processes in the mesoscale, realized with a Brownian particle trapped with optical tweezers. Our estimation of the kinetic energy change allows to access to the full energetic description of the Brownian particle. Kinetic energy estimates are obtained from measurements of the mean square velocity of the trapped bead sampled at frequencies several orders of magnitude smaller than the momentum relaxation frequency. The velocity is tuned applying a noisy electric field that modulates the amplitude of the fluctuations of the position and velocity of the Brownian particle, whose motion is equivalent to that of a particle in a higher temperature reservoir. Additionally, we show that the dependence of the variance of the time-averaged velocity on the sampling frequency can be used to quantify properties of the electrophoretic mobility of a charged colloid. Our method could be applied to detect temperature gradients in inhomogeneous media and to characterize the complete thermodynamics of biological motors and of artificial micro and nanoscopic heat engines.

  5. Direct photons measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefan Bathe; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2006-09-19

    Results from the PHENIX experiment at RHIC on direct photon production in p+p, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV are presented. In p+p collisions, direct photon production at high p_T behaves as expected from perturbative QCD calculations. The p+p measurement serves as a baseline for direct photon production in Au+Au collisions. In d+Au collisions, no effects of cold nuclear matter are found within the large uncertainty of the measurement. In Au+Au collisions, the production of high p_T direct photons scales as expected for particle production in hard scatterings. This supports jet quenching models, which attribute the suppression of high p_T hadrons to the energy loss of fast partons in the medium produced in the collision. Low p_T direct photons, measured via e+e- pairs with small invariant mass, are possibly related to the production of thermal direct photons.

  6. Direct photons at low $p_{T}$ measured in PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Peressounko

    2007-02-12

    Direct photon spectra measured at small $p_T$ in p+p, d+Au and Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}=200$ GeV are presented. Several measurement techniques including statistical subtraction, tagging, and internal and external conversion were applied and found to produce consistent results. The p+p and d+Au results are found to be in very good agreement with pQCD predictions over the entire $p_T$ range. No excess of direct photons in Au+Au collisions with respect to binary scaled d+Au data is observed within systematic errors.

  7. Direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. H. Ebrahimnazhad Rahbari; J. Vollmer; S. Herminghaus; M. Brinkmann

    2012-06-09

    We present a novel computational method for direct measurement of yield stress of discrete materials. The method is well-suited for the measurement of jamming phase diagram of a wide range of discrete particle systems such as granular materials, foams, and colloids. We further successfully apply the method to evaluate the jamming phase diagram of wet granular material in order to demonstrates the applicability of the model.

  8. New Directions in Measurement for Software Quality Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suryn, Witold

    1 New Directions in Measurement for Software Quality Control Paul Krause, Bernd Freimut and Witold Suryn Abstract--Assessing and controlling software quality is still an immature discipline. One is needed to software quality control as compared with manufacturing quality control. In particular

  9. Shell trajectory measurements from direct-drive implosion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D. T.; Sorce, C.; Epstein, R.; Whiting, N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A technique to measure the shell trajectory in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions is presented. The x-ray self emission of the target is measured with an x-ray framing camera. Optimized filtering limits the x-ray emission from the corona plasma, isolating a sharp intensity gradient very near the ablation surface. This enables one to measure the radius of the imploding shell with an accuracy better than 1 {mu}m and to determine a 200-ps average velocity to better than 2%.

  10. Low frequency, electrodynamic simulation of kinetic plasmas with the DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-In-Cell (DADIPIC) method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbons, M.R.

    1995-06-01

    This dissertation describes a new algorithm for simulating low frequency, kinetic phenomena in plasmas. DArwin Direct Implicit Particle-in-Cell (DADIPIC), as its name implies, is a combination of the Darwin and direct implicit methods. One of the difficulties in simulating plasmas lies in the enormous disparity between the fundamental scale lengths of a plasma and the scale lengths of the phenomena of interest. The objective is to create models which can ignore the fundamental constraints without eliminating relevant plasma properties. Over the past twenty years several PIC methods have been investigated for overcoming the constraints on explicit electrodynamic PIC. These models eliminate selected high frequency plasma phenomena while retaining kinetic phenomena at low frequency. This dissertation shows that the combination of Darwin and Direct Implicit allows them to operate better than they have been shown to operate in the past. Through the Darwin method the hyperbolic Maxwell`s equations are reformulated into a set of elliptic equations. Propagating light waves do not exist in the formulation so the Courant constraint on the time step is eliminated. The Direct Implicit method is applied only to the electrostatic field with the result that electrostatic plasma oscillations do not have to be resolved for stability. With the elimination of these constraints spatial and temporal discretization can be much larger than that possible with explicit, electrodynamic PIC. The code functions in a two dimensional Cartesian region and has been implemented with all components of the particle velocities, the E-field, and the B-field. Internal structures, conductors or dielectrics, may be placed in the simulation region, can be set at desired potentials, and driven with specified currents.

  11. n-Butane: Ignition delay measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Ignition delay time measurements were recorded at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2 for n-butane at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, 30 and 45 atm at temperatures from 690 to 1430 K in both a rapid compression machine and in a shock tube. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1328 reactions involving 230 species was constructed and used to validate the delay times. Moreover, this mechanism has been used to simulate previously published ignition delay times at atmospheric and higher pressure. Arrhenius-type ignition delay correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K which relate ignition delay time to temperature and concentration of the mixture. Furthermore, a detailed sensitivity analysis and a reaction pathway analysis were performed to give further insight to the chemistry at various conditions. When compared to existing data from the literature, the model performs quite well, and in several instances the conditions of earlier experiments were duplicated in the laboratory with overall good agreement. To the authors' knowledge, the present paper presents the most comprehensive set of ignition delay time experiments and kinetic model validation for n-butane oxidation in air. (author)

  12. Determination of the kinetic parameters of the CALIBAN metallic core reactor from stochastic neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casoli, P.; Authier, N.; Chapelle, A. [Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique et Aux Energies Alternatives, CEA, DAM, F-21120 Is sur Tille (France)

    2012-07-01

    Several experimental devices are operated by the Criticality and Neutron Science Research Dept. of the CEA Valduc Laboratory. One of these is the Caliban metallic core reactor. The purpose of this study is to develop and perform experiments allowing to determinate some of fundamental kinetic parameters of the reactor. The prompt neutron decay constant and particularly its value at criticality can be measured with reactor noise techniques such as Rossi-{alpha} and Feynman variance-to-mean methods. Subcritical, critical, and even supercritical experiments were performed. Fission chambers detectors were put nearby the core and measurements were analyzed with the Rossi-{alpha} technique. A new value of the prompt neutron decay constant at criticality was determined, which allows, using the Nelson number method, new evaluations of the effective delayed neutron fraction and the in core neutron lifetime. As an introduction of this paper, some motivations of this work are given in part 1. In part 2, principles of the noise measurements experiments performed at the CEA Valduc Laboratory are reminded. The Caliban reactor is described in part 3. Stochastic neutron measurements analysis techniques used in this study are then presented in part 4. Results of fission chamber experiments are summarized in part 5. Part 6 is devoted to the current work, improvement of the experimental device using He 3 neutron detectors and first results obtained with it. Finally, conclusions and perspectives are given in part 7. (authors)

  13. Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

    2006-08-30

    We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

  14. Centrality measures highlight proton traps and access points to proton highways in kinetic Monte Carlo trajectories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krueger, Rachel A.; Haibach, Frederick G.; Fry, Dana L.; Gomez, Maria A.

    2015-04-21

    A centrality measure based on the time of first returns rather than the number of steps is developed and applied to finding proton traps and access points to proton highways in the doped perovskite oxides: AZr{sub 0.875}D{sub 0.125}O{sub 3}, where A is Ba or Sr and the dopant D is Y or Al. The high centrality region near the dopant is wider in the SrZrO{sub 3} systems than the BaZrO{sub 3} systems. In the aluminum-doped systems, a region of intermediate centrality (secondary region) is found in a plane away from the dopant. Kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) trajectories show that this secondary region is an entry to fast conduction planes in the aluminum-doped systems in contrast to the highest centrality area near the dopant trap. The yttrium-doped systems do not show this secondary region because the fast conduction routes are in the same plane as the dopant and hence already in the high centrality trapped area. This centrality measure complements kMC by highlighting key areas in trajectories. The limiting activation barriers found via kMC are in very good agreement with experiments and related to the barriers to escape dopant traps.

  15. Kinetic Monte Carlo Simulations and Molecular Conductance Measurements of the Bacterial Decaheme Cytochrome MtrF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Byun, H. S.; Pirbadian, S.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Shi, Liang; El-Naggar, Mohamed Y.

    2014-09-05

    Microorganisms overcome the considerable hurdle of respiring extracellular solid substrates by deploying large multiheme cytochrome complexes that form 20 nanometer conduits to traffic electrons through the periplasm and across the cellular outer membrane. Here we report the first kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and single-molecule scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) measurements of the Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 outer membrane decaheme cytochrome MtrF, which can perform the final electron transfer step from cells to minerals and microbial fuel cell anodes. We find that the calculated electron transport rate through MtrF is consistent with previously reported in vitro measurements of the Shewanella Mtr complex, as well as in vivo respiration rates on electrode surfaces assuming a reasonable (experimentally verified) coverage of cytochromes on the cell surface. The simulations also reveal a rich phase diagram in the overall electron occupation density of the hemes as a function of electron injection and ejection rates. Single molecule tunneling spectroscopy confirms MtrF's ability to mediate electron transport between an STM tip and an underlying Au(111) surface, but at rates higher than expected from previously calculated heme-heme electron transfer rates for solvated molecules.

  16. Direct Measurements of Pore Fluid Density by Vibrating Tube Densimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruszkiewicz, Miroslaw {Mirek} S; Rother, Gernot; Wesolowski, David J; Cole, David R; Wallacher, Dirk

    2012-01-01

    The densities of pore-confined fluids were measured for the first time by means of a vibrating tube method. Isotherms of total adsorption capacity were measured directly making the method complementary to the conventional gravimetric or volumetric/piezometric adsorption techniques, which yield the excess adsorption (the Gibbsian surface excess). A custom-made high-pressure, high-temperature vibrating tube densimeter (VTD) was used to measure the densities of subcritical and supercritical propane (between 35 C and 97 C) and supercritical carbon dioxide (between 32 C and 50 C) saturating hydrophobic silica aerogel (0.2 g/cm3, 90% porosity) synthesized inside Hastelloy U-tubes. Additionally, excess adsorption isotherms for supercritical CO2 and the same porous solid were measured gravimetrically using a precise magnetically-coupled microbalance. Pore fluid densities and total adsorption isotherms increased monotonically with increasing density of the bulk fluid, in contrast to excess adsorption isotherms, which reached a maximum at a subcritical density of the bulk fluid, and then decreased towards zero or negative values at supercritical densities. Compression of the confined fluid significantly beyond the density of the bulk liquid at the same temperature was observed at subcritical temperatures. The features of the isotherms of confined fluid density are interpreted to elucidate the observed behavior of excess adsorption. The maxima of excess adsorption were found to occur below the critical density of the bulk fluid at the conditions corresponding to the beginning of the plateau of total adsorption, marking the end of the transition of pore fluid to a denser, liquid-like pore phase. The results for propane and carbon dioxide showed similarity in the sense of the principle of corresponding states. No measurable effect of pore confinement on the liquid-vapor critical point was found. Quantitative agreement was obtained between excess adsorption isotherms determined from VTD total adsorption results and those measured gravimetrically at the same temperature, confirming the validity of the vibrating tube measurements. Vibrating tube densimetry was demonstrated as a novel experimental approach capable of providing the average density of pore-confined fluids.

  17. Direct Measurement of the Surface Tension of Nanobubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attard, Phil

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that when the nanobubble contact line is pinned to a penetrating tip the interface behaves like a Hookean spring with spring constant proportional to the nanobubble surface tension. Atomic force microscope (AFM) data for several nanobubbles and solutions are analysed and yield surface tensions in the range 0.04--0.05 N/m (compared to 0.072 N/m for saturated water), and supersaturation ratios in the range 2--5. These are the first direct measurements of the surface tension of a supersaturated air-water interface. The results are consistent with recent theories of nanobubble size and stability, and with computer simulations of the surface tension of a supersaturated solution.

  18. Direct Measurement of the Surface Tension of Nanobubbles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phil Attard

    2015-05-09

    It is shown that when the nanobubble contact line is pinned to a penetrating tip the interface behaves like a Hookean spring with spring constant proportional to the nanobubble surface tension. Atomic force microscope (AFM) data for several nanobubbles and solutions are analysed and yield surface tensions in the range 0.04--0.05 N/m (compared to 0.072 N/m for saturated water), and supersaturation ratios in the range 2--5. These are the first direct measurements of the surface tension of a supersaturated air-water interface. The results are consistent with recent theories of nanobubble size and stability, and with computer simulations of the surface tension of a supersaturated solution.

  19. Autoignition measurements and a validated kinetic model for the biodiesel surrogate, methyl butanoate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, S.; Curran, H.J.; Simmie, J.M.

    2008-04-15

    The autoignition of methyl butanoate has been studied at 1 and 4 atm in a shock tube over the temperature range 1250-1760 K at equivalence ratios of 1.5, 1.0, 0.5, and 0.25 at fuel concentrations of 1.0 and 1.5%. These measurements are complemented by autoignition data from a rapid compression machine over the temperature range 640-949 K at compressed gas pressures of 10, 20, and 40 atm and at varying equivalence ratios of 1.0, 0.5, and 0.33 using fuel concentrations of 1.59 and 3.13%. The autoignition of methyl butanoate is observed to follow Arrhenius-like temperature dependence over all conditions studied. These data, together with speciation data reported in the literature in a flow reactor, a jet-stirred reactor, and an opposed-flow diffusion flame, were used to produce a detailed chemical kinetic model. It was found that the model correctly simulated the effect of change in equivalence ratio, fuel fraction, and pressure for shock tube ignition delays. The agreement with rapid compression machine ignition delays is less accurate, although the qualitative agreement is reasonable. The model reproduces most speciation data with good accuracy. In addition, the important reaction pathways over each regime have been elucidated by both sensitivity and flux analyses. (author)

  20. Direct Measurement of Mercury Reactions In Coal Power Plant Plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2005-12-31

    Recent field and pilot-scale results indicate that divalent mercury emitted from power plants may rapidly transform to elemental mercury within the power plant plumes. Simulations of mercury chemistry in plumes based on measured rates to date have improved regional model fits to Mercury Deposition Network wet deposition data for particular years, while not degrading model verification fits for remaining years of the ensemble. The years with improved fit are those with simulated deposition in grid cells in the State of Pennsylvania that have matching MDN station data significantly less than the model values. This project seeks to establish a full-scale data basis for whether or not significant reduction or oxidation reactions occur to mercury emitted from coal-fired power plants, and what numerical redox rate should apply for extension to other sources and for modeling of power plant mercury plumes locally, regionally, and nationally. Although in-stack mercury (Hg) speciation measurements are essential to the development of control technologies and to provide data for input into atmospheric fate and transport models, the determination of speciation in a cooling coal combustion plume is more relevant for use in estimating Hg fate and effects through the atmosphere. It is mercury transformations that may occur in the plume that determine the eventual rate and patterns of mercury deposited to the earth's surface. A necessary first step in developing a supportable approach to modeling any such transformations is to directly measure the forms and concentrations of mercury from the stack exit downwind to full dispersion in the atmosphere. As a result, a study was sponsored by EPRI and jointly funded by EPRI, the U.S Department of Energy (DOE), and the Wisconsin Department of Administration. The study was designed to further our understanding of plume chemistry. The study was carried out at the We Energies Pleasant Prairie Power Plant, Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. Aircraft and ground measurements support the occurrence of a reduction in the fraction of reactive gaseous mercury (RGM) (with a corresponding increase in elemental mercury) as part of the Total Gaseous Mercury (TGM) emitted from the Pleasant Prairie stack. This occurrence is based on comparison of the RGM concentrations in the plume (at standard conditions) compared to the RGM in the stack. There was found to be a 44% drop in the fraction of RGM between the stack exit and the first sampling arc and a 66% reduction from the stack to the 5-mile sampling arc, with no additional drop between the 5- and 10-mile arcs. Smaller-scale experiments in both test chambers and pilot-scale coal combustor exhaust streams have indicated the presence of rapid and relatively complete reduction reactions converting divalent into elemental mercury within power plant plumes prior to full dispersion in the atmosphere. These measurements, however, have been unable to identify whether the reactions occur during plume rise from physical to virtual stack height (during positive thermal buoyancy). The presence, rate, completeness, ubiquity, and dependence on source characteristics of these reactions, however, must be demonstrated in plume environments associated with fully operational power plants. That requirement, to capture either the reactions or the reaction products of chemistry that may be occurring very close to stack exits in highly turbulent environments, constrains the precision and reproducibility with which such full-scale experiments can be carried out. The work described here is one of several initial steps required to test whether, and in what direction, such rapid mercury redox reactions might be occurring in such plumes.

  1. Oxidation kinetics of methylphosphonic acid in supercritical water : experimental measurements and model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Patricia A. (Patricia Ann), 1978-

    2004-01-01

    (cont.) at well-defined operating conditions and to develop. both microscopic and macroscopic models, ranging from regressed global models to an elementary reaction mechanism, to quantify MPA oxidation kinetics in supercritical ...

  2. substituted G8 with 8-azaguanine and used its fluorescence properties to directly measure the pKa of this residue. The observed pKa of ~9.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Long

    substituted G8 with 8-azaguanine and used its fluorescence properties to directly measure the p kinetic measurements, which indicates that G8 is largely protonated in the active site. Because the reaction's pH-rate profile cannot be explained as being dependent on G8 deprotonation, the role

  3. The Measure of Human Error: Direct and Indirect Performance Shaping Factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald L. Boring; Candice D. Griffith; Jeffrey C. Joe

    2007-08-01

    The goal of performance shaping factors (PSFs) is to provide measures to account for human performance. PSFs fall into two categories—direct and indirect measures of human performance. While some PSFs such as “time to complete a task” are directly measurable, other PSFs, such as “fitness for duty,” can only be measured indirectly through other measures and PSFs, such as through fatigue measures. This paper explores the role of direct and indirect measures in human reliability analysis (HRA) and the implications that measurement theory has on analyses and applications using PSFs. The paper concludes with suggestions for maximizing the reliability and validity of PSFs.

  4. Direct measurements improve estimates of dairy greenhouse-gas emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitloehner, Frank M; Sun, Huawei; Karlik, John F

    2009-01-01

    that a small quantity of Greenhouse gases measured entericSC, Pain BF. 1994. Greenhouse gas emissions from intensiveT, Hartung E, Brose G. 2001. Greenhouse gas emissions from

  5. Direct and alignment-insensitive measurement of cantilever curvature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Aeppli, Gabriel; Bailey, Joe M.

    2013-07-15

    We analytically derive and experimentally demonstrate a method for the simultaneous measurement of deflection for large arrays of cantilevers. The Fresnel diffraction patterns of a cantilever independently reveal tilt, curvature, cubic, and higher order bending of the cantilever. It provides a calibrated absolute measurement of the polynomial coefficients describing the cantilever shape, without careful alignment and could be applied to several cantilevers simultaneously with no added complexity. We show that the method is easily implemented, works in both liquid media and in air, for a broad range of displacements and is especially suited to the requirements for multi-marker biosensors.

  6. Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement at CDF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Gerry P.

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width in the lepton+jets decay channel of tt? events produced in pp? collisions at Fermilab’s Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. From a data sample corresponding ...

  7. Direct Measurements of 22 Mg Resonances and Consequences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garcia, Alejandro

    that depend on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Naðp; Þ23Mg reaction. We have measured the strengths of low A classical nova is a thermonuclear outburst on the surface of a white-dwarf star that is accreting hydrogen nucleosynthesis because most of the relevant thermonuclear reaction rates are based on experimental information [1

  8. Isobutane ignition delay time measurements at high pressure and detailed chemical kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Healy, D.; Curran, H.J.; Donato, N.S.; Aul, C.J.; Petersen, E.L.; Zinner, C.M.; Bourque, G.

    2010-08-15

    Rapid compression machine and shock-tube ignition experiments were performed for real fuel/air isobutane mixtures at equivalence ratios of 0.3, 0.5, 1, and 2. The wide range of experimental conditions included temperatures from 590 to 1567 K at pressures of approximately 1, 10, 20, and 30 atm. These data represent the most comprehensive set of experiments currently available for isobutane oxidation and further accentuate the complementary attributes of the two techniques toward high-pressure oxidation experiments over a wide range of temperatures. The experimental results were used to validate a detailed chemical kinetic model composed of 1328 reactions involving 230 species. This mechanism has been successfully used to simulate previously published ignition delay times as well. A thorough sensitivity analysis was performed to gain further insight to the chemical processes occurring at various conditions. Additionally, useful ignition delay time correlations were developed for temperatures greater than 1025 K. Comparisons are also made with available isobutane data from the literature, as well as with 100% n-butane and 50-50% n-butane-isobutane mixtures in air that were presented by the authors in recent studies. In general, the kinetic model shows excellent agreement with the data over the wide range of conditions of the present study. (author)

  9. On the measurement of kinetic temperature in high redshift galactic halos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Levshakov; Wilhelm W. Kegel

    1999-05-11

    We consider the deconvolution of the thermal and the turbulent profiles for a pair of ions with different atomic weights under the condition that the lines are formed in an absorbing medium with fluctuating density and velocity fields. Our method is based on the entropy-regularized minimization (ERM) procedure. From synthetic spectra we found that the CII and SiII lines can be used to estimate the mean (density weighted) kinetic temperature with a sufficiently high accuracy (of about 10%) in a rather wide range of the ionization parameter, -6 < log U < -2. This is a generalization of a previous result (Levshakov, Takahara and Agafonova 1999) where we did not account for density fluctuations.

  10. Bi-Directional Energy Cascades and the Origin of Kinetic Alfv\\'enic and Whistler Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Che, H; Viñas, A F

    2013-01-01

    The observed sub-proton scale turbulence spectrum in the solar wind raises the question of how that turbulence originates. Observations of keV energetic electrons during solar quite-time suggest them as possible source of free energy to drive the turbulence. Using particle-in-cell simulations, we explore how free energy in energetic electrons, released by an electron two-stream instability drives Weibel-like electromagnetic waves that excite wave-wave interactions. Consequently, both kinetic Alfv\\'enic and whistler waves are excited that evolve through inverse and forward magnetic energy cascades.

  11. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF MERCURY REACTIONS IN COAL POWER PLANT PLUMES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leonard Levin

    2006-06-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-02NT41422 and specifically addresses Program Area of Interest: No.5--Environmental and Water Resources. The project team includes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) as the contractor and the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) and Frontier Geosciences as subcontractors. Wisconsin Energies and its Pleasant Prairie Power Plant acted as host for the field-testing portion of the research. The project is aimed at clarifying the role, rates, and end results of chemical transformations that may occur to mercury that has been emitted from elevated stacks of coal-fired electric power plants. Mercury emitted from power plants emerges in either its elemental, divalent, or particulate-bound form. Deposition of the divalent form is more likely to occur closer to the source than that of the other two forms, due to its solubility in water. Thus, if chemical transformations occur in the stack emissions plume, measurements in the stack may mischaracterize the fate of the material. Initial field and pilot plant measurements have shown significant and rapid chemical reduction of divalent to elemental mercury may occur in these plumes. Mercury models currently assume that the chemical form of mercury occurring in stacks is the same as that which enters the free atmosphere, with no alteration occurring in the emissions plume. Recent data indicate otherwise, but need to be evaluated at full operating scale under field conditions. Prestbo and others have demonstrated the likelihood of significant mercury chemical reactions occurring in power plant plumes (Prestbo et al., 1999; MDNR-PPRP, 2000; EERC, 2001). This experiment will thus increase our understanding of mercury atmospheric chemistry, allowing informed decisions regarding source attribution. The experiment was carried out during the period August 22-September 5, 2003. The experimental site was the Pleasant Prairie Power Plant in Pleasant Prairie, Wisconsin, just west of Kenosha. The experiment involved using an aircraft to capture emissions and document chemistry changes in the plume. While using the airplane for sampling, supplemental fast-response sensors for NOx, connected to data loggers, were used to gauge entry and exit times and transect intervals through plume emissions material. The Frontier Geosciences Static Plume Dilution Chamber (SPDC) was employed simultaneously adjacent to the stack to correlate its findings with the aircraft sampling, as well as providing evaluation of the SPDC as a rapid, less costly sampler for mercury chemistry. A complementary stack plume method, the Dynamic Plume Dilution (DPD) was used in the latter portion of the experiment to measure mercury speciation to observe any mercury reduction reaction with respect to both the reaction time (5 to 30 seconds) and dilution ratio. In addition, stack sampling using the ''Ontario Hydro'' wet chemistry method and continuous mercury monitors (CMM) were used to establish the baseline chemistry in the stack. Comparisons among stack, SPDC, DPD and aircraft measurements allow establishment of whether significant chemical changes to mercury occur in the plume, and of the verisimilitude of the SPDC and DPD methods. This progress report summarizes activities during a period of results review from the stack/aircraft subcontractor, data analysis and synthesis, and preparation and presentation of preliminary results to technical and oversight meetings.

  12. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-. gamma. and direct-. gamma. + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  13. Direct reaction measurements with a 132Sn radioactive ion beam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. L. Jones; A. S. Adekola; D. W. Bardayan; J. C. Blackmon; K. Y. Chae; K. A. Chipps; J. A. Cizewski; L. Erikson; C. Harlin; R. Hatarik; R. Kapler; R. L. Kozub; J. F. Liang; R. Livesay; Z. Ma; B. H. Moazen; C. D. Nesaraja; F. M. Nunes; S. D. Pain; N. P. Patterson; D. Shapira; J. F. Shriner Jr; M. S. Smith; T. P. Swan; J. S. Thomas

    2011-05-24

    The (d,p) neutron transfer and (d,d) elastic scattering reactions were measured in inverse kinematics using a radioactive ion beam of 132Sn at 630 MeV. The elastic scattering data were taken in a region where Rutherford scattering dominated the reaction, and nuclear effects account for less than 8% of the cross section. The magnitude of the nuclear effects was found to be independent of the optical potential used, allowing the transfer data to be normalized in a reliable manner. The neutron-transfer reaction populated a previously unmeasured state at 1363 keV, which is most likely the single-particle 3p1/2 state expected above the N=82 shell closure. The data were analyzed using finite range adiabatic wave calculations and the results compared with the previous analysis using the distorted wave Born approximation. Angular distributions for the ground and first excited states are consistent with the previous tentative spin and parity assignments. Spectroscopic factors extracted from the differential cross sections are similar to those found for the one neutron states beyond the benchmark doubly-magic nucleus 208Pb.

  14. Direct measurement of DNA-mediated adhesion between lipid bilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. F. Shimobayashi; B. M. Mognetti; L. Parolini; D. Orsi; P. Cicuta; L. Di Michele

    2015-04-16

    Multivalent interactions between deformable mesoscopic units are ubiquitous in biology, where membrane macromolecules mediate the interactions between neighbouring living cells and between cells and solid substrates. Lately, analogous artificial materials have been synthesised by functionalising the outer surface of compliant Brownian units, for example emulsion droplets and lipid vesicles, with selective linkers, in particular short DNA sequences. This development extended the range of applicability of DNA as a selective glue, originally applied to solid nano and colloidal particles. On very deformable lipid vesicles, the coupling between statistical effects of multivalent interactions and mechanical deformation of the membranes gives rise to complex emergent behaviours, as we recently contributed to demonstrate [Parolini et al., Nature Communications, 2015, 6, 5948]. Several aspects of the complex phenomenology observed in these systems still lack a quantitative experimental characterisation and fundamental understanding. Here we focus on the DNA-mediated multivalent interactions of a single liposome adhering to a flat supported bilayer. This simplified geometry enables the estimate of the membrane tension induced by the DNA-mediated adhesive forces acting on the liposome. Our experimental investigation is completed by morphological measurements and the characterisation of the DNA-melting transition, probed by in-situ F\\"{o}rster Resonant Energy Transfer spectroscopy. Experimental results are compared with the predictions of an analytical theory that couples the deformation of the vesicle to a full description of the statistical mechanics of mobile linkers. With at most one fitting parameter, our theory is capable of semi-quantitatively matching experimental data, confirming the quality of the underlying assumptions.

  15. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinrich, M P; Zhang, Y; Kiowski, O; Powalla, M; Lemmer, U; Slobodskyy, A

    2010-01-01

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  16. Direct measurements of band gap grading in polycrystalline CIGS solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. P. Heinrich; Z-H. Zhang; Y. Zhang; O. Kiowski; M. Powalla; U. Lemmer; A. Slobodskyy

    2010-09-20

    We present direct measurements of depth-resolved band gap variations of CuIn(1-x)Ga(x)Se2 thin-film solar cell absorbers. A new measurement technique combining parallel measurements of local thin-film interference and spectral photoluminescence was developed for this purpose. We find sample-dependent correlation parameters between measured band gap depth and composition profiles, and emphasize the importance of direct measurements. These results bring a quantitative insight into the electronic properties of the solar cells and open a new way to analyze parameters that determine the efficiency of solar cells.

  17. An improved multipyranometer array for the measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, Bryce Kirtley

    1997-01-01

    This thesis describes the development of an improved multipyranometer array (NDA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diff-use solar radiation. The NWA described in this thesis is an improvement over ...

  18. An Improved Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an improved multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous remote measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over previously published MPA ...

  19. Measurements of Direct CP-Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Bottom Baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaltonen, T.

    We report final measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using the complete ?s ...

  20. Direct measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mauzerall, Denise

    in unconventional production. Estimates of methane emissions from activities on producing oil and gas sites in unconventional oil and gas production is beinDirect measurements of methane emissions from abandoned oil and gas wells in Pennsylvania Mary

  1. THE EFFECT OF CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION ON THE ACCURACY OF PYRHELIOMETER MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grether, D.

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse, and Total Solar Radiation," Solar Energy, vol. 4,r Presented at the Solar Radiation workshop of Solar Rising,MEASUREMENTS OF THE DIRECT SOLAR RADIATION D. Grether, D.

  2. Fundamental Kinetics Database Utilizing Shock Tube Measurements (Volumes 1, 2, 3, 4, and Volume 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davidson, D. F.; Hanson, R. K

    The data from shock tube experiments generally takes three forms: ignition delay times, species concentration time-histories and reaction rate measurements. Volume 1 focuses on ignition delay time data measured and published by the Shock Tube Group in the Mechanical Engineering Department of Stanford University. The cut-off date for inclusion into this volume was January 2005. Volume 2 focuses on species concentration time-histories and was cut off December 2005. The two volumes are in PDF format and are accompanied by a zipped file of supporting data. Volume 3 was issued in 2009. Volume 4, Ignition delay times measurements came out in May, 2014, along with Reaction Rates Measurements, Vol 6. Volume 5 is not available at this time.

  3. Collisional kinetics of non-uniform electric field, low-pressure, direct-current discharges in H$_{2}$

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phelps, A V

    2010-01-01

    A model of the collisional kinetics of energetic hydrogen atoms, molecules, and ions in pure H$_2$ discharges is used to predict H$_\\alpha$ emission profiles and spatial distributions of emission from the cathode regions of low-pressure, weakly-ionized discharges for comparison with a wide variety of experiments. Positive and negative ion energy distributions are also predicted. The model developed for spatially uniform electric fields and current densities less than $10^{-3}$ A/m$^2$ is extended to non-uniform electric fields, current densities of $10^{3}$ A/m$^2$, and electric field to gas density ratios $E/N = 1.3$ MTd at 0.002 to 5 Torr pressure. (1 Td = $10^{-21}$ V m$^2$ and 1 Torr = 133 Pa) The observed far-wing Doppler broadening and spatial distribution of the H$_\\alpha$ emission is consistent with reactions among H$^+$, H$_2^+$, H$_3^+$, and H$^-H$ ions, fast H atoms, and fast H$_2$ molecules, and with reflection, excitation, and attachment to fast H atoms at surfaces. The H$_\\alpha$ excitation and ...

  4. Combined valence bond-molecular mechanics potential-energy surface and direct dynamics study of rate constants and kinetic isotope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Combined valence bond-molecular mechanics potential-energy surface and direct dynamics study of the MPW54 potential-energy surface are then used to parametrize a new kind of analytical potential-energy of molecular mechanics to treat a reactive potential-energy surface or a new kind of combined quantum

  5. Direct measurements of heat output by marine microbial and phage communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    for monitoring microbial activities via their energy usage. Calorimeters have been used to measure the heat and energy. Phage are also important mediators of microbial diversity. Most phage are strain1 Direct measurements of heat output by marine microbial and phage communities E. Djamali1, 2 , P

  6. Direct photons in Au+Au collisions measured with the PHENIX detector at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Petti

    2011-07-27

    A major goal of experiments in heavy-ion physics is the characterization of the quark gluon plasma (QGP) produced in the collision of heavy ions at high energy. Direct photons are a particularly good probe of the produced medium because they do not interact strongly and so can escape the medium unmodified, carrying information about when the photon was produced. It is expected that direct photon contributions from different sources (QGP radiation, hard scattering, hadron gas radiation) dominate at different transverse momentum ranges. Low momentum direct photons are dominated by thermal radiation (both from the QGP and hadron gas), while high momentum direct photons dominantly come from hard parton scatterings in the initial collision. We present a summary of techniques to measure direct photons with the PHENIX detector, with a focus on low momentum direct photons through their external conversion to dilepton pairs.

  7. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacci, Robert L.; Dudney, Nancy J.; More, Karren L.; Parent, Lucas R.; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.; Unocic, Raymond R.

    2013-12-20

    Deposition of Li is a major safety concern existing in Li-ion secondary batteries. Here we perform the first in situ high spatial resolution measurement coupled with real-time quantitative electrochemistry to characterize SEI formation on gold using a standard battery electrolyte. We demonstrate that a dendritic SEI forms prior to Li deposition and that it remains on the surface after Li electrodissolution.

  8. Electron kinetic effects on interferometry, polarimetry and Thomson scattering measurements in burning plasmas (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mirnov, V. V.; Hartog, D. J. Den; Duff, J.; Parke, E.; Brower, D. L.; Ding, W. X.

    2014-11-15

    At anticipated high electron temperatures in ITER, the effects of electron thermal motion on Thomson scattering (TS), toroidal interferometer/polarimeter (TIP), and poloidal polarimeter (PoPola) diagnostics will be significant and must be accurately treated. The precision of the previous lowest order linear in ? = T{sub e}/m{sub e}c{sup 2} model may be insufficient; we present a more precise model with ?{sup 2}-order corrections to satisfy the high accuracy required for ITER TIP and PoPola diagnostics. The linear model is extended from Maxwellian to a more general class of anisotropic electron distributions that allows us to take into account distortions caused by equilibrium current, ECRH, and RF current drive effects. The classical problem of the degree of polarization of incoherent Thomson scattered radiation is solved analytically exactly without any approximations for the full range of incident polarizations, scattering angles, and electron thermal motion from non-relativistic to ultra-relativistic. The results are discussed in the context of the possible use of the polarization properties of Thomson scattered light as a method of T{sub e} measurement relevant to ITER operational scenarios.

  9. Compilation of directly measured nuclear spins of ground states and long-lived isomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Allison; Karamy, Babak; Setoodehnia, Kiana; Singh, Balraj

    2013-02-15

    A compilation of the nuclear spins of ground and isomeric states measured by direct methods is presented. The first compilation of direct measurements of nuclear spins and moments was published in 1976 (G. H. Fuller, J. Phys. Chem. Ref. Data 5, 835, (1976)) with literature covered up to 1974. To our knowledge, the present work is the first such compilation since then. It is anticipated that the area of direct spin measurement will continue to expand using the state-of-the-art radioactive ion-beam and laser techniques. Literature cutoff date for the present compilation is February 2013. It is intended that the present compilation will be kept updated in a timely manner.

  10. Supplement to First direct measurements of formaldehyde flux via eddy covariance: implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    Supplement to First direct measurements of formaldehyde flux via eddy covariance: implications for missing in-canopy formaldehyde sources J. P. DiGangi1 , E. S. Boyle1 , T. Karl2 , P. Harley2 , A. The concentration of formaldehyde (HCHO) in the cal- ibration mixture was quantified using HITRAN absorption line

  11. Ion energy measurements in a Direct Wave-Drive Matthew S. Feldman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ion energy measurements in a Direct Wave-Drive Thruster Matthew S. Feldman and Edgar Y. Choueiri difference is a DWDT operates continuously to inject wave momentum, whereas PIT discharges its energy Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, 91109, USA An experiment

  12. Measurement of direct neutron capture by neutron-rich sulfur isotopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Beer; C. Coceva; R. Hofinger; P. Mohr; H. Oberhummer; P. V. Sedyshev; Yu. P. Popov

    1996-09-18

    Thermal neutron capture cross sections for $^{34}$S(n,$\\gamma$)$^{35}$S and $^{36}$S(n,$\\gamma$)$^{37}$S have been measured and spectroscopic factors of the final states have been extracted. The calculated direct-capture cross sections reproduce the experimental data.

  13. Direct

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDirac Charge Dynamcs inDirect

  14. Directions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferencesPlatinum FuelEnergy InnovationDirections

  15. Exploration of jet energy loss via direct $?$-charged particle azimuthal correlation measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Hamed

    2009-09-25

    The multiplicities of charged particles azimuthally associated with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ have been measured for Au+Au, p+p, and d+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV in the STAR experiment. Charged particles with transverse momentum 0.5 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for p+p and d+Au, and 3 $<$ $p_T^{h^{\\pm}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c for Au+Au and pseudorapidity $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 1.5 in coincidence with direct photons and $\\pi^{0}$ of high transverse momentum 8 $<$ $p_T^{\\gamma,\\pi^{0}}$ $<$ 16 GeV/c at $\\mid\\eta\\mid$ $\\leq$ 0.9 have been used for this analysis. Within the considered range of kinematics, the observed suppressions of the associated yields per direct $\\gamma$ in central Au+Au relative to p+p and d+Au are similar and constant with direct photon fractional energy $z_{T}$ ($z_{T}=p_{T}^{h^{\\pm}}/p_{T}^{\\gamma}$). The measured suppressions of the associated yields with direct $\\gamma$ are comparable to those with $\\pi^{0}$. The data are compared to theoretical predictions.

  16. Ion-Kinetic-Energy Measurements and Energy Balance in a Z-Pinch Plasma at Stagnation E. Kroupp, D. Osin, A. Starobinets, V. Fisher, V. Bernshtam, and Y. Maron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kroupp, Eyal

    Ion-Kinetic-Energy Measurements and Energy Balance in a Z-Pinch Plasma at Stagnation E. Kroupp, D of Physics, Technion-Israeli Institute of Technology, Haifa, Israel C. Deeney Sandia National Laboratories with simultaneous imaging along the pinch, was employed. Over the emission period, a drop of the ion-kinetic energy

  17. Direct extraction of coherent mode properties from imaging measurements in a linear plasma column

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Light, A. D.; Sechrest, Y.; Munsat, T.; Center for Integrated Plasma Studies, Department of Physics, University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, Colorado 80309 ; Thakur, S. C.; Brandt, C.; Tynan, G. R.; Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093

    2013-08-15

    Spectral properties of coherent waves in an argon plasma column are examined using fluctuation data from fast imaging. Visible light from ArII line emission is collected at high frame rates using a high-speed digital camera. A cross-spectral phase technique allows direct visualization of dominant phase structures as a function of frequency, as well as identification of azimuthal asymmetries present in the system. Experimental dispersion estimates are constructed from imaging data alone. Drift-like waves are identified by comparison with theoretical dispersion curves, and a tentative match of a low-frequency spectral feature to Kelvin-Helmholtz-driven waves is presented. Imaging measurements are consistent with previous results, and provide non-invasive, single-shot measurements across the entire plasma cross-section. Implications of the measured spectral properties for imaging measurements of mode dynamics are explored.

  18. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  19. Measuring of fissile isotopes partial antineutrino spectra in direct experiment at nuclear reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. V. Sinev

    2009-02-22

    The direct measuring method is considered to get nuclear reactor antineutrino spectrum. We suppose to isolate partial spectra of the fissile isotopes by using the method of antineutrino spectrum extraction from the inverse beta decay positron spectrum applied at Rovno experiment. This admits to increase the accuracy of partial antineutrino spectra forming the total nuclear reactor spectrum. It is important for the analysis of the reactor core fuel composition and could be applied for non-proliferation purposes.

  20. Direct vs. projective: measures of children's perceptions of the parent-child relationship as predictors of future relationship quality 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collie, Claire Futamase

    1997-01-01

    The predictive validity of a projective measure of childrens perceptions of the parent-child relationship was compared with the predictive validity of more direct measures. The criterion variable was the quality of a newly ...

  1. Measurements of Direct CP Violating Asymmetries in Charmless Decays of Strange Bottom Mesons and Bottom Baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2011-03-01

    We report measurements of direct CP-violating asymmetries in charmless decays of neutral bottom hadrons to pairs of charged hadrons with the upgraded Collider Detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. Using a data sample corresponding to 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we obtain the first measurements of direct CP violation in bottom strange mesons, A{sub CP}(B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = +0.39 {+-} 0.15 (stat) {+-} 0.08 (syst), and botton baryons, A{sub CP}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}) = + 0.03 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.05 (syst) and A{sub CP} ({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} pK{sup -}) = +0.37 {+-} 0.17 (stat) {+-} 0.03 (syst). In addition, they measure CP violation in B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays with 3.5{sigma} significance, A{sub CP} (B{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}{pi}{sup -}) = -0.086 {+-} 0.023 (stat) {+-} 0.009 (syst), in agreement with the current world average. Measurements of branching fractions of B{sub s}{sup 0} {yields} K{sup +}K{sup -} and B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decays are also updated.

  2. Direct thrust measurements and modelling of a radio-frequency expanding plasma thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lafleur, T.; Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Takahashi, K. [Space Plasma, Power and Propulsion Group, Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Iwate University, Morioka 020-8551 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    It is shown analytically that the thrust from a simple plasma thruster (in the absence of a magnetic field) is given by the maximum upstream electron pressure, even if the plasma diverges downstream. Direct thrust measurements of a thruster are then performed using a pendulum thrust balance and a laser displacement sensor. A maximum thrust of about 2 mN is obtained at 700 W for a thruster length of 17.5 cm and a flow rate of 0.9 mg s{sup -1}, while a larger thrust of 4 mN is obtained at a similar power for a length of 9.5 cm and a flow rate of 1.65 mg s{sup -1}. The measured thrusts are in good agreement with the maximum upstream electron pressure found from measurements of the plasma parameters and in fair agreement with a simple global approach used to model the thruster.

  3. Measurement of the direct energy gap of coherently strained SnxGe1x Ge,,001... heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atwater, Harry

    Measurement of the direct energy gap of coherently strained SnxGe1Àx ÕGe,,001... heterostructures The direct energy gap has been measured for coherently strained SnxGe1 x alloys on Ge 001 substrates with 0 for coherently strained SnxGe1 x alloys indicates a large alloy contribution and a small strain contribution

  4. Direct measurement of the extraordinary optical momentum using a nano-cantilever

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Antognozzi; S. Simpson; R. Harniman; J. Senior; R. Hayward; H. Hoerber; M. R. Dennis; A. Y. Bekshaev; K. Y. Bliokh; F. Nori

    2015-06-13

    Radiation pressure has been known since Kepler's observation that a comet's tail is always oriented away from the sun, and in the past centuries this phenomenon stimulated remarkable discoveries in electromagnetism, quantum physics and relativity [1-3]. In modern terms, the pressure of light is associated with the momentum of photons, which plays a crucial role in a variety of systems, from atomic [4-7] to astronomical [8,9] scales. Experience from these cases leads us to assume that the direction of the optical momentum and the radiation-pressure force are naturally aligned with the propagation of light, i.e., its wavevector. Here we report the direct observation of an extraordinary optical momentum and force directed perpendicular to the wavevector, and proportional to the optical spin (i.e., degree of circular polarization). This transverse spin-dependent optical force, a few orders of magnitude weaker than the usual radiation pressure, was recently predicted for evanescent waves [10] and other structured fields [11]. Fundamentally, it can be associated with the enigmatic "spin momentum," introduced by Belinfante in field theory 75 years ago [12-14]. We measure this unusual transverse momentum using a nano-cantilever with extremely low compliance (capable of femto-Newton resolution), which is immersed in an evanescent optical field directly above the total-internal-reflecting glass surface. Such sensors, perpendicular to a substrate, have already shown an extreme force resolution in various systems [15-19]. Our findings revisit fundamental momentum properties of light, while the experimental technique opens the way for precision measurements of fine optical forces in structured fields at subwavelength scales.

  5. Microfluidic Technology Platforms for Synthesizing, Labeling and Measuring the Kinetics of Transport and Biochemical Reactions for Developing Molecular Imaging Probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, Michael E.

    2009-09-01

    Radiotracer techniques are used in environmental sciences, geology, biology and medicine. Radiotracers with Positron Emission Tomography (PET) provided biological examinations of ~3 million patients 2008. Despite the success of positron labeled tracers in many sciences, there is limited access in an affordable and convenient manner to develop and use new tracers. Integrated microfluidic chips are a new technology well matched to the concentrations of tracers. Our goal is to develop microfluidic chips and new synthesis approaches to enable wide dissemination of diverse types of tracers at low cost, and to produce new generations of radiochemists for which there are many unfilled jobs. The program objectives are to: 1. Develop an integrated microfluidic platform technology for synthesizing and 18F-labeling diverse arrays of different classes of molecules. 2. Incorporate microfluidic chips into small PC controlled devices (“Synthesizer”) with a platform interfaced to PC for electronic and fluid input/out control. 3. Establish a de-centralized model with Synthesizers for discovering and producing molecular imaging probes, only requiring delivery of inexpensive [18F]fluoride ion from commercial PET radiopharmacies vs the centralized approach of cyclotron facilities synthesizing and shipping a few different types of 18F-probes. 4. Develop a position sensitive avalanche photo diode (PSAPD) camera for beta particles embedded in a microfluidic chip for imaging and measuring transport and biochemical reaction rates to valid new 18F-labeled probes in an array of cell cultures. These objectives are met within a research and educational program integrating radio-chemistry, synthetic chemistry, biochemistry, engineering and biology in the Crump Institute for Molecular Imaging. The Radiochemistry Training Program exposes PhD and post doctoral students to molecular imaging in vitro in cells and microorganisms in microfluidic chips and in vivo with PET, from new technologies for radiochemistry (macro to micro levels), biochemistry and biology to imaging principles, tracer kinetics, pharmacokinetics and biochemical assays. New generations of radiochemists will be immersed in the biochemistry and biology for which their labeled probes are being developed for assays of these processes. In this program engineers and radio-chemists integrate the principles of microfluidics and radiolabeling along with proper system design and chemistry rule sets to yield Synthesizers enabling biological and pharmaceutical scientists to develop diverse arrays of probes to pursue their interests. This progression would allow also radiochemists to focus on the further evolution of rapid, high yield synthetic reactions with new enabling technologies, rather than everyday production of radiotracers that should be done by technologists. The invention of integrated circuits in electronics established a platform technology that allowed an evolution of ideas and applications far beyond what could have been imagined at the beginning. Rather than provide a technology for the solution to a single problem, it is hoped that microfluidic radiochemistry will be an enabling platform technology for others to solve many problems. As part of this objective, another program goal is to commercialize the technologies that come from this work so that they can be provided to others who wish to use it.

  6. Proposal for direct measurement of concurrence via visibility in a cavity QED system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sang Min; Ji, Se-Wan; Lee, Hai-Woong; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2008-01-01

    Proposal for direct measurement of concurrence via visibility in a cavity QED system Sang Min Lee,1 Se-Wan Ji,1 Hai-Woong Lee,1 and M. Suhail Zubairy2,3 1Department of Physics, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon 305...-701, Korea 2Department of Physics and Institute for Quantum Studies, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843-4242, USA 3Texas A&M University at Qatar, Education City, P.O. Box 23874, Doha, Qatar #1;Received 24 January 2008; published 22 April...

  7. Direct measurement of the size of 2003 UB313 from the Hubble Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller; H. G. Roe; D. L. Rabinowitz; C. A. Trujillo

    2006-04-11

    We have used the Hubble Space Telescope to directly measure the angular size of the large Kuiper belt object 2003 UB313. By carefully calibrating the point spread function of a nearby field star, we measure the size of 2003 UB313 to be 34.3$\\pm$1.4 milliarcseconds, corresponding to a diameter of 2400$\\pm$100 km or a size $\\sim5$% larger than Pluto. The V band geometric albedo of 2003 UB313 is $86\\pm7$%. The extremely high albedo is consistent with the frosty methane spectrum, the lack of red coloring, and the lack of observed photometric variation on the surface of 2003 UB313. Methane photolysis should quickly darken the surface of 2003 UB313, but continuous evaporation and redeposition of surface ices appears capable of maintaining the extreme alebdo of this body.

  8. Measurement of the complete nuclide production and kinetic energies of the system 136Xe + hydrogen at 1 GeV per nucleon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Napolitani; K. -H. Schmidt; L. Tassan-Got; P. Armbruster; T. Enqvist; A. Heinz; V. Henzl; D. Henzlova; A. Kelic; R. Pleskac; M. V. Ricciardi; C. Schmitt; O. Yordanov; L. Audouin; M. Bernas; A. Lafriaskh; F. Rejmund; C. Stephan; J. Benlliure; E. Casarejos; M. Fernandez Ordonez; J. Pereira; A. Boudard; B. Fernandez; S. Leray; C. Villagrasa; C. Volant

    2007-06-05

    We present an extensive overview of production cross sections and kinetic energies for the complete set of nuclides formed in the spallation of 136Xe by protons at the incident energy of 1 GeV per nucleon. The measurement was performed in inverse kinematics at the FRagment Separator (GSI, Darmstadt). Slightly below the Businaro-Gallone point, 136Xe is the stable nuclide with the largest neutron excess. The kinematic data and cross sections collected in this work for the full nuclide production are a general benchmark for modelling the spallation process in a neutron-rich nuclear system, where fission is characterised by predominantly mass-asymmetric splits.

  9. Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling System and Horizontal Directional Drilling Technology Demonstration, Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Myers, D.A.; Gardner, M.G.; Williamson, T.; Huffman, J.

    1999-06-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling (EMWD) system and Horizontal Directional Drilling (HDD) were successfully demonstrated at the Mock Tank Leak Simulation Site and the Drilling Technology Test Site, Hanford, Washington. The use of directional drilling offers an alternative to vertical drilling site characterization. Directional drilling can develop a borehole under a structure, such as a waste tank, from an angled entry and leveling off to horizontal at the desired depth. The EMWD system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The technology demonstration consisted of the development of one borehole under a mock waste tank at a depth of {approximately} {minus}8 m ({minus}27 ft.), following a predetermined drill path, tracking the drill path to within a radius of {approximately}1.5 m (5 ft.), and monitoring for zones of radiological activity using the EMWD system. The purpose of the second borehole was to demonstrate the capability of drilling to a depth of {approximately} {minus}21 m ({minus}70 ft.), the depth needed to obtain access under the Hanford waste tanks, and continue drilling horizontally. This report presents information on the HDD and EMWD technologies, demonstration design, results of the demonstrations, and lessons learned.

  10. Direct measurement of the biphoton Wigner function through two-photon interference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Douce; Andreas Eckstein; Stephen P. Walborn; Antonio Z. Khoury; Sara Ducci; Arne Keller; Thomas Coudreau; Pérola Milman

    2013-09-26

    The Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) experiment was a benchmark in quantum optics, evidencing the quantum nature of the photon. In order to go deeper, and obtain the complete information about the quantum state of a system, for instance, composed by photons, the direct measurement or reconstruction of the Wigner function or other quasi--probability distribution in phase space is necessary. In the present paper, we show that a simple modification in the well-known HOM experiment provides the direct measurement of the Wigner function. We apply our results to a widely used quantum optics system, consisting of the biphoton generated in the parametric down conversion process. In this approach, a negative value of the Wigner function is a sufficient condition for non-gaussian entanglement between two photons. In the general case, the Wigner function provides all the required information to infer entanglement using well known necessary and sufficient criteria. We analyze our results using two examples of parametric down conversion processes taken from recent experiments. The present work offers a new vision of the HOM experiment that further develops its possibilities to realize fundamental tests of quantum mechanics involving decoherence and entanglement using simple optical set-ups.

  11. Qweak: First Direct Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuruzzaman, NFN

    2014-04-01

    The Qweak experiment at Hall C of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, QWp, through a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at low momentum transfer Q2= 0.025 (GeV/c)2 with incident electron beam energy of 1.155 GeV. The Qweak experiment, along with earlier results of parity violating elastic scattering experiments, is expected to determine the most precise value of QWp which is suppressed in the Standard Model. If this result is further combined with the 133Cs atomic parity violation (APV) measurement, significant constraints on the weak charge of the up quark, down quark, and neutron can be extracted. This data will also be used to determine the weak-mixing angle, sin2 ?W, with a relative uncertainty of < 0.5% that will provide a competitive measurement of the running of sin2 ?W to low Q2. An overview of the experiment and its results using the commissioning dataset, constituting approximately 4% of the data collected in the experiment, are reported here.

  12. Development of Simplified Calculations for a Multipyranometer Array for the Measurement of Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munger, B. K.; Haberl, J. S.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the development of simplified procedures for a multipyranometer array (MPA) for the continuous measurement of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The MPA described in this paper is an improvement over ...

  13. Direct Measurement and Chemical Speciation of Top Ring Zone Liquid During Engine Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Splitter, Derek A; Burrows, Barry Clay; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The present manuscript consists of proof of concept experiments involving direct measurements and detailed chemical speciation from the top ring zone of a running engine. The work uses a naturally aspirated single cylinder utility engine that has been modified to allow direct liquid sample acquisition from behind the top ring. Samples were analyzed and spectated using gas chromatographic techniques. Results show that the liquid mixture in the top ring zone is neither neat lubricant nor fuel but a combination of the two with unique chemical properties. At the tested steady state no-load operating condition, the chemical species of the top ring zone liquid were found to be highly dependent on boiling point, where both low reactivity higher boiling point fuel species and lubricant are observed to be the dominant constituents. The results show that at least for the tested condition, approximately 25% of the top ring zone is comprised of gasoline fuel like molecules, which are dominated by high octane number aromatic species, while the remainder of the liquid is comprised of lubricant like species.

  14. An optical technique for measuring divergence, beam profile, and aiming direction, of relativistic negative hydrogen ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hershcovitch, A.

    1988-02-01

    A novel, nonobstructive diagnostic technique for high energy H/sup minus/D/sup minus/ ion beams is described. This scheme employs spectroscopic techniques designed to measure beam profile, perpendicular velocity spread (i.e., divergence), and orientation of multiMeV H/sup minus/ beams. The basic principle of this method is to photoneutralize a small portion of the H/sup minus/ beam in a way such that the photodetachment process results in the formation of excited hydrogen atoms in the n = 2 levels. Observation of fluorescence from spontaneous decay of H(sp) andor induced deacy of H(2s) can be readily used to determine beam profile. Doppler broadening measurements can be used to determine velocity spread from which beam emittance is calculated. With off-the-shelf instruments resolutions of 1 mm for beam profile and 2 x 10/sup minus/2) ..pi.. cm-mrad are possible. For photodetachment, the best commercially available laser is found to be ArF eximer laser. The analysis is performed for the 200 MEV BNL Linac. The laser, which has a pulse duration which has a pulse duration which is of 10/sup minus/5) of the linac can produce sufficient signal at a negligible beam loss. In addition, measurements of minute Doppler shifts of this Lyman-Alpha radiation by a spectrograph could in principle resolve beam direction to within 1.57 ..mu..rad. The process under consideration has a resonance known as the shape resonance. As the following literature review indicates, the total cross section is known and there is a reasonable agreement between theory and experiment. There are no experimental measurements of partical cross sections. nevertheless, there are theoretical estimates which agree within 15%. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Physical Reference Frames and Astrometric Measurements of Star Direction in General Relativity \\\\I. Stellar Aberration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariateresa Crosta; Alberto Vecchiato

    2009-02-17

    The high accuracy of modern space astrometry requires the use of General Relativity to model the propagation of stellar light through the gravitational field encountered from a source to a given observer inside the Solar System. In this sense relativistic astrometry is part of fundamental physics. The general relativistic definition of astrometric measurement needs an appropriate use of the concept of reference frame, which should then be linked to the conventions of the IAU Resolutions (2000), which fix the celestial coordinate system. A consistent definition of the astrometric observables in the context of General Relativity is also essential to find uniquely the stellar coordinates and proper motion, this being the main physical task of the inverse ray tracing problem. Aim of this work is to set the level of reciprocal consistency of two relativistic models, GREM and RAMOD (Gaia, ESA mission), in order to garantee a physically correct definition of light direction to a star, an essential item for deducing the star coordinates and proper motion within the same level of measurement accuracy.

  16. A Direct Top-Quark Width Measurement from Lepton + Jets Events at CDF II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top-quark width using t{bar t} events produced in p{bar p} collisions at Fermilab's Tevatron collider and collected by the CDF II detector. In the mode where the top quark decays to a W boson and a bottom quark, we select events in which one W decays leptonically and the other hadronically (lepton + jets channel) . From a data sample corresponding to 4.3 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, we identify 756 candidate events. The top-quark mass and the mass of W boson that decays hadronically are reconstructed for each event and compared with templates of different top-quark widths ({Lambda}{sub t}) and deviations from nominal jet energy scale ({Delta}{sub JES}) to perform a simultaneous fit for both parameters, where {Delta}{sub JES} is used for the in situ calibration of the jet energy scale. By applying a Feldman-Cousins approach, we establish an upper limit at 95% confidence level (CL) of {Lambda}{sub t} < 7.6 GeV and a two-sided 68% CL interval of 0.3 GeV < {Lambda}{sub t} < 4.4 GeV for a top-quark mass of 172.5 GeV/c{sup 2}, which are consistant with the standard model prediction. This is the first direct measurement of {Lambda}{sub t} to set a lower limit with 68% CL.

  17. Direct mass measurements of Cd isotopes show strong shell gap at N=82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Knöbel; M. Diwisch; F. Bosch; D. Boutin; L. Chen; C. Dimopoulou; A. Dolinskii; B. Franczak; B. Franzke; H. Geissel; M. Hausmann; C. Kozhuharov; J. Kurcewicz; S. A. Litvinova; G. Martínez-Pinedo; M. Matoš; M. Mazzocco; G. Münzenberg; S. Nakajima; C. Nociforo; F. Nolden; T. Ohtsubo; A. Ozawa; Z. Patyk; W. R. Plaß; C. Scheidenberger; J. Stadlmann; M. Steck; B. Sun; T. Suzuki; P. Walker; H. Weick; M. -R. Wu; M. Winkler; T. Yamaguchi

    2015-07-16

    A $^{238}$U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission at 410 MeV/u in a beryllium target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B$\\rho$-tagging at the dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with B$\\rho$-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined by an accuracy of $2\\times 10^{-4}$. A new method of data analysis, using a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided mass values for 25 different isotopes for the first time. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the experiment and analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the $^{129,130,131}$Cd isotopes mass values directly measured for the first time. The Cd results clearly show a very pronounced shell effect at $N=82$ which is in agreement with the conclusion from $\\gamma$-ray spectroscopy of $^{130}$Cd and confirms the assumptions of modern shell-model calculations.

  18. Estimates of rates and errors for measurements of direct-{gamma} and direct-{gamma} + jet production by polarized protons at RHIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beddo, M.E.; Spinka, H.; Underwood, D.G.

    1992-08-14

    Studies of inclusive direct-{gamma} production by pp interactions at RHIC energies were performed. Rates and the associated uncertainties on spin-spin observables for this process were computed for the planned PHENIX and STAR detectors at energies between {radical}s = 50 and 500 GeV. Also, rates were computed for direct-{gamma} + jet production for the STAR detector. The goal was to study the gluon spin distribution functions with such measurements. Recommendations concerning the electromagnetic calorimeter design and the need for an endcap calorimeter for STAR are made.

  19. The first direct measurement of 12C(12C,n)23Mg at stellar energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucher, B; Fang, X; Heger, A; Almaraz-Calderon, S; Alongi, A; Ayangeakaa, A D; Beard, M; Best, A; Browne, J; Cahillane, C; Couder, M; deBoer, R J; Kontos, A; Lamm, L; Li, Y J; Long, A; Lu, W; Lyons, S; Notani, M; Patel, D; Paul, N; Pignatari, M; Roberts, A; Robertson, D; Smith, K; Stech, E; Talwar, R; Tan, W P; Wiescher, M; Woosley, S E

    2015-01-01

    Neutrons produced by the carbon fusion reaction 12C(12C,n)23Mg play an important role in stellar nucleosynthesis. However, past studies have shown large discrepancies between experimental data and theory, leading to an uncertain cross section extrapolation at astrophysical energies. We present the first direct measurement that extends deep into the astrophysical energy range along with a new and improved extrapolation technique based on experimental data from the mirror reaction 12C(12C,p)23Na. The new reaction rate has been determined with a well-defined uncertainty that exceeds the precision required by astrophysics models. Using our constrained rate, we find that 12C(12C,n)23Mg is crucial to the production of Na and Al in Pop-III Pair Instability Supernovae. It also plays a non-negligible role in the production of weak s-process elements as well as in the production of the important galactic gamma-ray emitter 60Fe.

  20. Direct mass measurements of Cd isotopes show strong shell gap at N=82

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knöbel, R; Bosch, F; Boutin, D; Chen, L; Dimopoulou, C; Dolinskii, A; Franczak, B; Franzke, B; Geissel, H; Hausmann, M; Kozhuharov, C; Kurcewicz, J; Litvinova, S A; Martínez-Pinedo, G; Matoš, M; Mazzocco, M; Münzenberg, G; Nakajima, S; Nociforo, C; Nolden, F; Ohtsubo, T; Ozawa, A; Patyk, Z; Plaß, W R; Scheidenberger, C; Stadlmann, J; Steck, M; Sun, B; Suzuki, T; Walker, P; Weick, H; Wu, M -R; Winkler, M; Yamaguchi, T

    2015-01-01

    A $^{238}$U projectile beam was used to create cadmium isotopes via abrasion-fission at 410 MeV/u in a beryllium target at the entrance of the in-flight separator FRS at GSI. The fission fragments were separated with the FRS and injected into the isochronous storage ring ESR for mass measurements. The Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) was performed under two different experimental conditions, with and without B$\\rho$-tagging at the dispersive central focal plane of the FRS. In the experiment with B$\\rho$-tagging the magnetic rigidity of the injected fragments was determined by an accuracy of $2\\times 10^{-4}$. A new method of data analysis, using a correlation matrix for the combined data set from both experiments, has provided mass values for 25 different isotopes for the first time. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the experiment and analysis has given access even to rare isotopes detected with a few atoms per week. In this letter we present for the $^{129,130,131}$Cd isotopes mass values directly ...

  1. The combustion chemistry of a fuel tracer: Measured flame speeds and ignition delays and a detailed chemical kinetic model for the oxidation of acetone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pichon, S.; Black, G.; Simmie, J.M.; Curran, H.J.; Chaumeix, N.; Yahyaoui, M.; Donohue, R.

    2009-02-15

    Acetone ignition delay and stretch-free laminar flame speed measurements have been carried out and a kinetic model has been developed to simulate these and literature data for acetone and for ketene, which was found to be an important intermediate in its oxidation. The mechanism has been based on one originally devised for dimethyl ether and modified through validation of the hydrogen, carbon monoxide and methane sub-mechanisms. Acetone oxidation in argon was studied behind reflected shock waves in the temperature range 1340-1930 K, at 1 atm and at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2; it is also shown that the addition of up to 15% acetone to a stoichiometric n-heptane mixture has no effect on the measured ignition delay times. Flame speeds at 298 K and 1 atm of pure acetone in air were measured in a spherical bomb; a maximum flame speed of {proportional_to}35 cm s{sup -1} at {phi}=1.15 is indicated. (author)

  2. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

  3. Measuring photometric and spectral radiometric bi-directional transmission and reflection in a video-goniospectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stokes, Eleanor (Eleanor Catherine)

    2008-01-01

    The effective use of complex fenestration systems (CFS) in buildings requires a detailed knowledge of their optical spectral and directional properties. Bidirectional scattering functions (BSDFs), either in transmission ...

  4. Rubber Latex Gloves as a Direct Dosimeter for Measuring Dermal Harvester Pesticide Exposure Particularly With Malathion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Terry Enriquez

    2011-01-01

    GLOVES AS A DIRECT DOSIMETER………..10 1.5. RESEARCHDOSIMETER…………………………………………………………..with specific glove dosimeters may limit the value of off-

  5. Direct photon and neutral pion production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions measured with the ALICE experiment at LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dmitri Peressounko; for the ALICE collaboration

    2014-12-26

    Measurements of direct photon and neutral pion production in heavy-ion collisions provide a comprehensive set of observables characterizing properties of the hot QCD medium. Direct photons provide means to test the initial stage of an AA collision and carry information about the temperature and space-time evolution of the hot medium. Neutral pion suppression probes the parton energy loss in the hot medium. Measurements of neutral meson spectra in pp collisions at LHC energies $\\sqrt{s}=$0.9, 2.76, 7 TeV serve as a reference for heavy-ion collisions and also provide valuable input data for parameterization of the QCD parton Fragmentation Functions. In this talk, results from the ALICE experiment on direct photon and neutral pion production in pp and Pb-Pb collisions are summarized.

  6. Direct measurement of the chemical reactivity of silicon electrodes with LiPF6-based battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veith, Gabriel M; Baggetto, Loic; Sacci, Robert L; Unocic, Raymond R; Tenhaeff, Wyatt E; Browning, Jim

    2014-01-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the chemistry and extent of reactivity between a lithium ion battery electrode surface (Si) and a liquid electrolyte (1.2M LiPF6-3:7 wt% ethylene carbonate:dimethyl carbonate). This layer is estimated to be 3.6 nm thick and partially originates from the consumption of the silicon surface.

  7. Measurements of Direct CP Asymmetries in B ? X[subscript s]? Decays Using Sum of Exclusive Decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lees, J.?P.

    We measure the direct CP violation asymmetry, A[subscript CP], in B ? X[subscript s]? and the isospin difference of the asymmetry, ?A[subscript CP], using 429??fb[superscript -1] of data collected at ?(4S) resonance with ...

  8. Automated spectro-goniometer: A spherical robot for the field measurement of the directional reflectance of snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    reflectance of snow Thomas H. Paintera) Institute for Computational Earth System Science, University the spectral hemispherical-directional reflectance factor HDRF of snow in the field across the wavelength range 0.4 2.5 m. Few measurements of snow's HDRF exist in the literature, in part caused by a lack

  9. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 14 OCTOBER 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1601 Direct measurement of hydroxyl in the lunar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Youxue

    LETTERS PUBLISHED ONLINE: 14 OCTOBER 2012 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1601 Direct measurement of hydroxyl R. Rossman2 , John M. Eiler2 and Lawrence A. Taylor1 Remote sensing discoveries of hydroxyl suggested that hydroxyl in the lunar regolith can result from the implantation of hydrogen ions by the solar

  10. Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct measurements of ballasting by opal and calcite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthews, Adrian

    Production, oxygen respiration rates, and sinking velocity of copepod fecal pellets: Direct of copepod fecal pellets egested by Temora longicornis were measured using a nanoflagellate (Rhodomonas sp pellet production varied between 0.8 pellets ind21 h21 and 3.8 pellets ind21 h21 and was significantly

  11. Solvent-Dependent Molecular Structure of Ionic Species Directly Measured by Ultrafast X-Ray Solution Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    Solvent-Dependent Molecular Structure of Ionic Species Directly Measured by Ultrafast X often play important roles in chemical reactions occurring in water and other solvents, but it has been elusive to determine the solvent-dependent molecular structure with atomic resolution. The triiodide ion

  12. Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct and absolute temperature mapping and heat transfer measurements in diode-end-pumped Yb and heat sink grease respectively). The dynamics of thermal effects is also presented. PACS 42.55.Xi (Diode-pumped in a diode-end-pumped Yb:YAG crystal, using a calibrated infrared camera, with a 60-µm spatial resolution

  13. Conductivity measurements of molten metal oxides and their evaluation in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    2011-09-08

    ABSTRACT Since Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC) technology is in a beginning stage, emphasis should be laid on addressing the fundamental aspects. A molten electrolyte is required to facilitate ionic contact between solid carbon fuel and electrolyte...

  14. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). Wemore »present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.« less

  15. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). We present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.

  16. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moy, Derek [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute.; Manivannan, A. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Narayanan, S. R. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Loker Hydrocarbon Research Institute.

    2014-11-01

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). We present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. We expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.

  17. Direct mass measurements of cadmium and palladium isotopes and their double-beta transition Q-values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Smorra; T. Beyer; K. Blaum; M. Block; Ch. E. Düllmann; K. Eberhardt; M. Eibach; S. Eliseev; Sz. Nagy; W. Nörtershäuser; D. Renisch

    2012-01-31

    The Q-value of the double-electron capture in Cd-108 has been determined to be (272.04 +/- 0.55) keV in a direct measurement with the double-Penning trap mass spectrometer TRIGA-TRAP. Based on this result a resonant enhancement of the decay rate of Cd-108 is excluded. We have confirmed the double-beta transition Q-values of Cd-106 and Pd-110 recently measured with the Penning-trap mass spectrometers SHIPTRAP and ISOLTRAP, respectively. Furthermore, the atomic masses of the involved nuclides Cd-106, Cd-108, Cd-110, Pd-106, Pd-108 and Pd-110 have been directly linked to the atomic mass standard.

  18. Direct measurement of the work of fracture for grain boundaries of twist misorientation about (100) in tungsten

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J.M.; Shen, B.W.

    1984-06-01

    The authors report results on the direct measurement of the work of fracture in twist boundaries in electron beam zone refined bicrystals of tungsten. The work of fracture is referred to as the energy required for crack extension. This approach may be used to advantage when the effects of impurities are present, for example, in problems related to grain boundary embrittlement in steels, copper and nickel.

  19. Direct measurements of ensemble particle and surface interactions on homogeneous and patterned substrates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Hung-Jen

    2006-08-16

    range particle-particle attraction and recovery of the expected DLVO particle-wall interactions for all concentrations examined. The possible influence of charge heterogeneity and particle size polydispersity on measured distribution functions...

  20. Direct Measurement of the Total Decay Width of the Top Quark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We present a measurement of the total decay width of the top quark using events with top-antitop quark pair candidates reconstructed in the final state with one charged lepton and four or more hadronic jets. We use the ...

  1. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kinetics Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Combustion Chemistry Combustion Kinetics Combustion KineticsAshley Otero2015-10-28T02:45:13+00:00 The...

  2. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen, Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan); Mori, Yoshitaka [Graduate School for the Creation of New Photonics Industries, Hamamatsu, Shizuoka 431-1202 (Japan); Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Suita, Osaka 565-087 (Japan)

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  3. Reaction kinetics for the high temperature oxidation of Pu--1wt%Ga in water vapor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stakebake, J L; Saba, M A

    1988-01-01

    Oxidation of plutonium metal is greatly accelerated by the presence of water vapor. The magnitude of the effect of water vapor on oxidation kinetics is determined by temperature, water concentration, and oxygen concentration. Most of the previous work has been directed toward evaluating the effect of moisture on the atmospheric oxidation of plutonium. Work on the isolation and characterization of the water reaction with plutonium has been very limited. The present work was undertaken to determine the kinetics of the plutonium--water reaction over a wide range of temperature and pressure. Reaction kinetics were measured using a vacuum microbalance system. The temperature range investigated was 100--500/degree/C. The effect of water vapor pressure on reaction kinetics was determined at 300/degree/C by varying the water pressure from 0.1 to 15 Torr. 2 figs.

  4. Nonlinear and linear timescales near kinetic scales in solar wind turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthaeus, W. H.; Wan, M.; Shay, M. A.; Oughton, S.; Osman, K. T.; Chapman, S. C.; Servidio, S.; Valentini, F.; Gary, S. P.; Roytershteyn, V.; Karimabadi, H.

    2014-08-01

    The application of linear kinetic treatments to plasma waves, damping, and instability requires favorable inequalities between the associated linear timescales and timescales for nonlinear (e.g., turbulence) evolution. In the solar wind these two types of timescales may be directly compared using standard Kolmogorov-style analysis and observational data. The estimated local (in scale) nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic cascade times, evaluated as relevant kinetic scales are approached, remain slower than the cyclotron period, but comparable to or faster than the typical timescales of instabilities, anisotropic waves, and wave damping. The variation with length scale of the turbulence timescales is supported by observations and simulations. On this basis the use of linear theory—which assumes constant parameters to calculate the associated kinetic rates—may be questioned. It is suggested that the product of proton gyrofrequency and nonlinear time at the ion gyroscales provides a simple measure of turbulence influence on proton kinetic behavior.

  5. A direct measurement of the electronic structure of Si nanocrystals and its effect on optoelectronic properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vuckovic, Jelena

    materials is circumstantial as it is obtained from emission measurements where competing non and the coupling with a nanophotonic cavity improves when temper- atures are lowered. The higher photon energy for solid state laser sources as their incorporation into nanophotonic structures is much more challenging

  6. Direct Measurement of the Free Energy of Aging Hard-Sphere Colloidal Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rojman Zargar; Bernard Nienhuis; Peter Schall; Daniel Bonn

    2013-03-17

    The nature of the glass transition is one of the most important unsolved problems in condensed matter physics. The difference between glasses and liquids is believed to be caused by very large free energy barriers for particle rearrangements; however so far it has not been possible to confirm this experimentally. We provide the first quantitative determination of the free energy for an aging hard-sphere colloidal glass. The determination of the free energy allows for a number of new insights in the glass transition, notably the quantification of the strong spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the free energy. A study of the local minima of the free energy reveals that the observed variations are directly related to the rearrangements of the particles. Our main finding is that the probability of particle rearrangements shows a power law dependence on the free energy changes associated with the rearrangements, similarly to the Gutenberg-Richter law in seismology.

  7. Nuclear-data evaluation based on direct and indirect measurements with general correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muir, D.W.

    1988-01-01

    Optimum procedures for the statistical improvement, or updating, of an existing nuclear-data evaluation are reviewed and redeveloped from first principles, consistently employing a minimum-variance viewpoint. A set of equations is derived which provides improved values of the data and their covariances, taking into account information from supplementary measurements and allowing for general correlations among all measurements. The minimum-variance solutions thus obtained, which we call the method of ''partitioned least squares,'' are found to be equivalent to a method suggested by Yu. V. Linnik and applied by a number of authors to the analysis of fission-reactor integral experiments; however, up to now, the partitioned-least-squares formulae have not found widespread use in the field of basic data evaluation. This approach is shown to give the same results as the more commonly applied Normal equations, but with reduced matrix inversion requirements. Examples are provided to indicate potential areas of application. 10 refs.

  8. Measurement of positive direct current corona pulse in coaxial wire-cylinder gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yin, Han Zhang, Bo He, Jinliang Wang, Wenzhuo

    2014-03-15

    In this paper, a system is designed and developed to measure the positive corona current in coaxial wire-cylinder gaps. The characteristic parameters of corona current pulses, such as the amplitude, rise time, half-wave time, and repetition frequency, are statistically analyzed and a new set of empirical formulas are derived by numerical fitting. The influence of space charges on corona currents is tested by using three corona cages with different radii. A numerical method is used to solve a simplified ion-flow model to explain the influence of space charges. Based on the statistical results, a stochastic model is developed to simulate the corona pulse trains. And this model is verified by comparing the simulated frequency-domain responses with the measured ones.

  9. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaffney, L P; Jenkins, D G; Andreyev, A N; Bender, M; Blazhev, A; Bree, N; Bruyneel, B; Butler, P A; Cocolios, T E; Davinson, T; Deacon, A N; De Witte, H; DiJulio, D; Diriken, J; Ekström, A; Fransen, Ch; Freeman, S J; Geibel, K; Grahn, T; Hadinia, B; Hass, M; Heenen, P -H; Hess, H; Huyse, M; Jakobsson, U; Kesteloot, N; Konki, J; Kröll, Th; Kumar, V; Ivanov, O; Martin-Haugh, S; Mücher, D; Orlandi, R; Pakarinen, J; Petts, A; Peura, P; Rahkila, P; Reiter, P; Scheck, M; Seidlitz, M; Singh, K; Smith, J F; Van de Walle, J; Van Duppen, P; Voulot, D; Wadsworth, R; Warr, N; Wenander, F; Wimmer, K; Wrzosek-Lipska, K; Zieli?ska, M

    2015-01-01

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^...

  10. Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Transport Phenomena and Interfacial Kinetics in Planar Microfluidic Membraneless Fuel Cells Abruna, Hector Daniel Cornell University 30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION Our work is...

  11. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E.J.; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  12. Collectivity in the light radon nuclei measured directly via Coulomb excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. P. Gaffney; A. P. Robinson; D. G. Jenkins; A. N. Andreyev; M. Bender; A. Blazhev; N. Bree; B. Bruyneel; P. A. Butler; T. E. Cocolios; T. Davinson; A. N. Deacon; H. De Witte; D. DiJulio; J. Diriken; A. Ekström; Ch. Fransen; S. J. Freeman; K. Geibel; T. Grahn; B. Hadinia; M. Hass; P. -H. Heenen; H. Hess; M. Huyse; U. Jakobsson; N. Kesteloot; J. Konki; Th. Kröll; V. Kumar; O. Ivanov; S. Martin-Haugh; D. Mücher; R. Orlandi; J. Pakarinen; A. Petts; P. Peura; P. Rahkila; P. Reiter; M. Scheck; M. Seidlitz; K. Singh; J. F. Smith; J. Van de Walle; P. Van Duppen; D. Voulot; R. Wadsworth; N. Warr; F. Wenander; K. Wimmer; K. Wrzosek-Lipska; M. Zieli?ska

    2015-03-11

    Background: Shape coexistence in heavy nuclei poses a strong challenge to state-of-the-art nuclear models, where several competing shape minima are found close to the ground state. A classic region for investigating this phenomenon is in the region around $Z=82$ and the neutron mid-shell at $N=104$. Purpose: Evidence for shape coexistence has been inferred from $\\alpha$-decay measurements, laser spectroscopy and in-beam measurements. While the latter allow the pattern of excited states and rotational band structures to be mapped out, a detailed understanding of shape coexistence can only come from measurements of electromagnetic matrix elements. Method: Secondary, radioactive ion beams of $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn were studied by means of low-energy Coulomb excitation at the REX-ISOLDE facility in CERN. Results: The electric-quadrupole ($E2$) matrix element connecting the ground state and first-excited $2^{+}_{1}$ state was extracted for both $^{202}$Rn and $^{204}$Rn, corresponding to ${B(E2;2^{+}_{1} \\to 2^{+}_{1})=29^{+8}_{-8}}$ W.u. and $43^{+17}_{-12}$ W.u., respectively. Additionally, $E2$ matrix elements connecting the $2^{+}_{1}$ state with the $4^{+}_{1}$ and $2^{+}_{2}$ states were determined in $^{202}$Rn. No excited $0^{+}$ states were observed in the current data set, possibly due to a limited population of second-order processes at the currently-available beam energies. Conclusions: The results are discussed in terms of collectivity and the deformation of both nuclei studied is deduced to be weak, as expected from the low-lying level-energy schemes. Comparisons are also made to state-of-the-art beyond-mean-field model calculations and the magnitude of the transitional quadrupole moments are well reproduced.

  13. Proposed method for direct measurement of non-Markovian character of the qubits coupled to bosonic reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Z. Y. Xu; W. L. Yang; M. Feng

    2010-03-24

    The non-Markovianity is a recently proposed characterization of the non-Markovian behavior in an open quantum system, based on which we first present a practical idea for directly measuring the non-Markovian character of a single qubit coupled to a zero-temperature bosonic reservoir, and then extend to investigate the dynamics of two noninteracting qubits subject to two reservoirs respectively with a lower bound of non-Markovianity. Our scheme, with no need of optimization procedures and quantum state tomography, is helpful for experimental implementation.

  14. Direct measurement of the 15N(p,gamma)16O total cross section at novae energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D Bemmerer; A Caciolli; R Bonetti; C Broggini; F Confortola; P Corvisiero; H Costantini; Z Elekes; A Formicola; Zs Fulop; G Gervino; A Guglielmetti; C Gustavino; Gy Gyurky; M Junker; B Limata; M Marta; R Menegazzo; P Prati; V Roca; C Rolfs; C Rossi Alvarez; E Somorjai; O Straniero

    2009-02-04

    The 15N(p,gamma)16O reaction controls the passage of nucleosynthetic material from the first to the second carbon-nitrogen-oxygen (CNO) cycle. A direct measurement of the total 15N(p,gamma)16O cross section at energies corresponding to hydrogen burning in novae is presented here. Data have been taken at 90-230 keV center-of-mass energy using a windowless gas target filled with nitrogen of natural isotopic composition and a bismuth germanate summing detector. The cross section is found to be a factor two lower than previously believed.

  15. Potential structure of discharge plasma inside liquid directly measured by an electrostatic probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Qiang; Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Kaneko, Toshiro; CREST Matsuda, Naoki

    2013-06-17

    Potential structures of a discharge plasma inside a liquid are investigated by an electrostatic probe measurement. The time evolution of radial profiles of the floating potential for the plasma inside liquid reveals that the dominant negative charges in the plasma are the negative ion species such as OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} rather than electrons. In addition, a positive potential gradient exists at the plasma-liquid interface due to the presence of an electrical double layer which is caused by the separation of low-mass positive ion of H{sup +} and high-mass negative ions of OH{sup -} and O{sub 2}{sup -} near the plasma-liquid interface.

  16. Measuring the black hole spin direction in 3D Cartesian numerical relativity simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilios Mewes; José A. Font; Pedro J. Montero

    2015-05-27

    We show that the so-called flat-space rotational Killing vector method for measuring the Cartesian components of a black hole spin can be derived from the surface integral of Weinberg's pseudotensor over the apparent horizon surface when using Gaussian normal coordinates in the integration. Moreover, the integration of the pseudotensor in this gauge yields the Komar angular momentum integral in a foliation adapted to the axisymmetry of the spacetime. As a result, the method does not explicitly depend on the evolved lapse $\\alpha$ and shift $\\beta^i$ on the respective timeslice, as they are fixed to Gaussian normal coordinates, while leaving the coordinate labels of the spatial metric $\\gamma_{ij}$ and the extrinsic curvature $K_{ij}$ unchanged. Such gauge fixing endows the method with coordinate invariance, which is not present in integral expressions using Weinberg's pseudotensor, as they normally rely on the explicit use of Cartesian coordinates.

  17. Towards a direct transition energy measurement of the lowest nuclear excitation in 229Th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. v. d. Wense; P. G. Thirolf; D. Kalb; M. Laatiaoui

    2012-11-04

    The isomeric first excited state of the isotope 229Th exhibits the lowest nuclear excitation energy in the whole landscape of known atomic nuclei. For a long time this energy was reported in the literature as 3.5(5) eV, however, a new experiment corrected this energy to 7.6(5) eV, corresponding to a UV transition wavelength of 163(11) nm. The expected isomeric lifetime is $\\tau=$ 3-5 hours, leading to an extremely sharp relative linewidth of Delta E/E ~ 10^-20, 5-6 orders of magnitude smaller than typical atomic relative linewidths. For an adequately chosen electronic state the frequency of the nuclear ground-state transition will be independent from influences of external fields in the framework of the linear Zeeman and quadratic Stark effect, rendering 229mTh a candidate for a reference of an optical clock with very high accuracy. Moreover, in the literature speculations about a potentially enhanced sensitivity of the ground-state transition of $^{229m}$Th for eventual time-dependent variations of fundamental constants (e.g. fine structure constant alpha) can be found. We report on our experimental activities that aim at a direct identification of the UV fluorescence of the ground-state transition energy of 229mTh. A further goal is to improve the accuracy of the ground-state transition energy as a prerequisite for a laser-based optical control of this nuclear excited state, allowing to build a bridge between atomic and nuclear physics and open new perspectives for metrological as well as fundamental studies.

  18. Universal deformation of soft substrates near a contact line and the direct measurement of solid surface stresses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Yonglu Che; John. S. Wettlaufer; Larry A. Wilen; Eric R. Dufresne

    2012-10-25

    Droplets deform soft substrates near their contact lines. Using confocal microscopy, we measure the deformation of silicone gel substrates due to glycerol and fluorinated-oil droplets for a range of droplet radii and substrate thicknesses. For all droplets, the substrate deformation takes a universal shape close to the contact line that depends on liquid composition, but is independent of droplet size and substrate thickness. This shape is determined by a balance of interfacial tensions at the contact line and provides a novel method for direct determination of the surface stresses of soft substrates. Moreover, we measure the change in contact angle with droplet radius and show that Young's law fails for small droplets when their radii approach an elastocapillary length scale. For larger droplets the macroscopic contact angle is constant, consistent with Young's law.

  19. Direct measurements of 22Na(p,g)23Mg resonances and consequences for 22Na production in classical novae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. L. Sallaska; C. Wrede; A. Garcia; D. W. Storm; T. A. D. Brown; C. Ruiz; K. A. Snover; D. F. Ottewell; L. Buchmann; C. Vockenhuber; D. A. Hutcheon; J. A. Caggiano

    2010-09-24

    The radionuclide 22Na is a potential astronomical observable that is expected to be produced in classical novae in quantities that depend on the thermonuclear rate of the 22Na(p,g)23Mg reaction. We have measured the strengths of low-energy 22Na(p,g)23Mg resonances directly and absolutely using a radioactive 22Na target. We find the strengths of resonances at E_p = 213, 288, 454, and 610 keV to be higher than previous measurements by factors of 2.4 to 3.2, and we exclude important contributions to the rate from proposed resonances at E_p = 198, 209, and 232 keV. The 22Na abundances expected in the ejecta of classical novae are reduced by a factor of ~ 2.

  20. Direct, spectroscopic measurement of electric fields in a plasma-RF antenna interaction region in Tore Supra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klepper, C Christopher; Hillis, Donald Lee; Isler, Ralph C; Hillairet, J.; Martin, E. H.; Colas, L.; Ekedahl, A.; Goniche, M.; Lotte, Ph.; Colledani, G.; Martin, V.; Panayotis, Stephanie; Pegourie, B.; Harris, Jeffrey H

    2013-01-01

    Balmer-series spectral line profiles of deuterium emission near a lower-hybrid (3.7 GHz) wave, high power (1-4 MW) launcher were measured with high-spectral resolution in the Tore Supra tokamak and fitted to an atomic physics model which includes both Zeeman and dynamic Stark effects. The magnetic field is static and the electric field is assumed to be monochromatic at 3.7 GHz. The determined strength and direction of the high-frequency electric field is found to be in good agreement with the results of a simulation that computes the propagation of these lower hybrid waves into the plasma in the region around the launch antenna and specifically in the region of estimated peak emission contributing to the measurement. This agreement indicates feasibility for the use of dynamic Stark effect spectroscopy to study interaction at the plasma antenna interactions in a fusion plasma environment. (C) 2013 Elsevier B. V. All rights reserved.

  1. Measurement of the direct $CP$ asymmetry in $\\bar{B}\\rightarrow X_{s+d}?$ decays with a lepton tag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Pesántez; P. Urquijo; J. Dingfelder; A. Abdesselam; I. Adachi; K. Adamczyk; H. Aihara; S. Al Said; K. Arinstein; D. M. Asner; V. Aulchenko; T. Aushev; R. Ayad; S. Bahinipati; A. M. Bakich; V. Bansal; E. Barberio; V. Bhardwaj; B. Bhuyan; A. Bobrov; A. Bondar; G. Bonvicini; A. Bozek; M. Bra?ko; T. E. Browder; D. ?ervenkov; V. Chekelian; A. Chen; B. G. Cheon; K. Chilikin; R. Chistov; K. Cho; V. Chobanova; Y. Choi; D. Cinabro; J. Dalseno; Z. Doležal; Z. Drásal; A. Drutskoy; D. Dutta; S. Eidelman; H. Farhat; J. E. Fast; T. Ferber; O. Frost; V. Gaur; N. Gabyshev; S. Ganguly; A. Garmash; D. Getzkow; R. Gillard; Y. M. Goh; B. Golob; J. Haba; J. Hasenbusch; X. H. He; A. Heller; T. Horiguchi; W. -S. Hou; M. Huschle; T. Iijima; K. Inami; A. Ishikawa; R. Itoh; Y. Iwasaki; I. Jaegle; D. Joffe; T. Julius; K. H. Kang; E. Kato; T. Kawasaki; C. Kiesling; D. Y. Kim; J. B. Kim; J. H. Kim; K. T. Kim; M. J. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. J. Kim; B. R. Ko; P. Kodyš; S. Korpar; P. Križan; P. Krokovny; B. Kronenbitter; T. Kuhr; T. Kumita; A. Kuzmin; Y. -J. Kwon; J. S. Lange; I. S. Lee; Y. Li; L. Li Gioi; J. Libby; D. Liventsev; P. Lukin; D. Matvienko; K. Miyabayashi; H. Miyata; R. Mizuk; G. B. Mohanty; A. Moll; H. K. Moon; E. Nakano; M. Nakao; T. Nanut; Z. Natkaniec; M. Nayak; C. Ng; N. K. Nisar; S. Nishida; S. Ogawa; S. Okuno; S. L. Olsen; C. Oswald; P. Pakhlov; G. Pakhlova; C. W. Park; H. Park; T. K. Pedlar; R. Pestotnik; M. Petri?; L. E. Piilonen; E. Ribežl; M. Ritter; A. Rostomyan; M. Rozanska; Y. Sakai; S. Sandilya; L. Santelj; T. Sanuki; Y. Sato; V. Savinov; O. Schneider; G. Schnell; C. Schwanda; A. J. Schwartz; K. Senyo; O. Seon; M. E. Sevior; V. Shebalin; C. P. Shen; T. -A. Shibata; J. -G. Shiu; B. Shwartz; A. Sibidanov; F. Simon; Y. -S. Sohn; A. Sokolov; E. Solovieva; M. Stari?; M. Steder; T. Sumiyoshi; U. Tamponi; N. Taniguchi; G. Tatishvili; Y. Teramoto; K. Trabelsi; M. Uchida; T. Uglov; Y. Unno; S. Uno; Y. Usov; C. Van Hulse; P. Vanhoefer; G. Varner; A. Vinokurova; V. Vorobyev; M. N. Wagner; B. Wang; C. H. Wang; M. -Z. Wang; P. Wang; Y. Watanabe; K. M. Williams; E. Won; J. Yamaoka; S. Yashchenko; Y. Yook; Z. P. Zhang; V. Zhilich; V. Zhulanov; A. Zupanc for the Belle Collaboration

    2015-06-21

    We report the measurement of the direct $CP$ asymmetry in the radiative $\\bar{B}\\rightarrow X_{s+d}\\gamma$ decay using a data sample of $(772 \\pm 11)\\times 10^6$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected at the $\\Upsilon(4S)$ resonance with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy $e^+e^-$ collider. The $CP$ asymmetry is measured as a function of the photon energy threshold. For $E^{\\rm{*}}_{\\gamma} \\geq 2.1~{\\rm{GeV}}$, where $E^{\\rm{*}}_{\\gamma}$ is the photon energy in the center-of-mass frame, we obtain $\\mathcal{A}_{CP}(\\bar{B}\\rightarrow X_{s+d}\\gamma)= (2.2 \\pm 3.9 \\pm 0.9) \\%$, consistent with the Standard Model prediction.

  2. Characterization of room temperature recrystallization kinetics in electroplated copper thin films with concurrent x-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treger, Mikhail; Noyan, I. C.; Witt, Christian; Cabral, Cyril; Murray, Conal; Jordan-Sweet, Jean; Rosenberg, Robert; Eisenbraun, Eric

    2013-06-07

    Concurrent in-situ four-point probe resistivity and high resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements were used to characterize room temperature recrystallization in electroplated Cu thin films. The x-ray data were used to obtain the variation with time of the integrated intensities and the peak-breadth from the Cu 111 and 200 reflections of the transforming grains. The variation of the integrated intensity and resistivity data with time was analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model. For both 111-textured and non-textured electroplated Cu films, four-point probe resistivity measurements yielded shorter transformation times than the values obtained from the integrated intensities of the corresponding Cu 111 reflections. In addition, the JMAK exponents fitted to the resistivity data were significantly smaller. These discrepancies could be explained by considering the different material volumes from which resistivity and diffraction signals originated, and the physical processes which linked these signals to the changes in the evolving microstructure. Based on these issues, calibration of the resistivity analysis with direct structural characterization techniques is recommended.

  3. Mass-ablation-rate measurements in direct-drive cryogenic implosions using x-ray self-emission images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, A. K., E-mail: adavi@lle.rochester.edu; Michel, D. T.; Hu, S. X.; Craxton, R. S.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Sangster, T. C.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    A technique to measure the mass ablation rate in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions using a pinhole x-ray framing camera is presented. In target designs consisting of two layers of different materials, two x-ray self-emission peaks from the coronal plasma were measured once the laser burned through the higher-Z outer layer. The location of the inner peak is related to the position of the ablation front and the location of the outer peak corresponds to the position of the interface of the two layers in the plasma. The emergence of the second peak was used to measure the burnthrough time of the outer layer, giving the average mass ablation rate of the material and instantaneous mass remaining. By varying the thickness of the outer layer, the mass ablation rate can be obtained as a function of time. Simulations were used to validate the methods and verify that the measurement techniques are not sensitive to perturbation growth at the ablation surface.

  4. Direct Kinetics Study of the Temperature Dependence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elrod, Matthew J.

    CH3O2 reac- tion and the potential atmospheric ramifications of significant CH2O production from for the detection of reactants and products. The temperature dependence of the CH2O-producing channel rate constant of methane in the atmosphere [1]. CH OH !: CH H O (1)4 3 2 1CH O( D) !: CH OH (2)4 3 CH O M !: CH O M (3)3 2

  5. Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Science Plan Current Status and Future Directions of the ARM Science Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TP Ackerman; AD Del Genio; RG Ellingson; RA Ferrare; SA Klein; GM McFarquhar; PJ Lamb; CN Long; J Verlinde

    2004-10-30

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program has matured into one of the key programs in the U.S. Climate Change Science Program. The ARM Program has achieved considerable scientific success in a broad range of activities, including site and instrument development, atmospheric radiative transfer, aerosol science, determination of cloud properties, cloud modeling, and cloud parameterization testing and development. The focus of ARM science has naturally shifted during the last few years to an increasing emphasis on modeling and parameterization studies to take advantage of the long time series of data now available. During the next 5 years, the principal focus of the ARM science program will be to: • Maintain the data record at the fixed ARM sites for at least the next five years. • Improve significantly our understanding of and ability to parameterize the 3-D cloud-radiation problem at scales from the local atmospheric column to the global climate model (GCM) grid square. • Continue developing techniques to retrieve the properties of all clouds, with a special focus on ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds. • Develop a focused research effort on the indirect aerosol problem that spans observations, physical models, and climate model parameterizations. • Implement and evaluate an operational methodology to calculate broad-band heating rates in the atmospheric columns at the ARM sites. • Develop and implement methodologies to use ARM data more effectively to test atmospheric models, both at the cloud-resolving model scale and the GCM scale. • Use these methodologies to diagnose cloud parameterization performance and then refine these parameterizations to improve the accuracy of climate model simulations. In addition, the ARM Program is actively developing a new ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) that will be available for short deployments (several months to a year or more) in climatically important regions. The AMF will have much of the same instrumentation as the remote facilities at ARM’s Tropical Western Pacific and the North Slope of Alaska sites. Over time, this new facility will extend ARM science to a much broader range of conditions for model testing.

  6. Direct in situ measurement of specific capacitance, monolayer tension, and bilayer tension in a droplet interface bilayer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Taylor, Graham J.; Venkatesan, Guru A.; Collier, C. Patrick; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-08-05

    In this study, thickness and tension are important physical parameters of model cell membranes. However, traditional methods to measure these quantities require multiple experiments using separate equipment. This work introduces a new multi-step procedure for directly accessing in situ multiple physical properties of droplet interface bilayers (DIB), including specific capacitance (related to thickness), lipid monolayer tension in the Plateau-Gibbs border, and bilayer tension. The procedure employs a combination of mechanical manipulation of bilayer area followed by electrowetting of the capacitive interface to examine the sensitivities of bilayer capacitance to area and contact angle to voltage, respectively. These data allow formore »determining the specific capacitance of the membrane and surface tension of the lipid monolayer, which are then used to compute bilayer thickness and tension, respectively. The use of DIBs affords accurate optical imaging of the connected droplets in addition to electrical measurements of bilayer capacitance, and it allows for reversibly varying bilayer area. After validating the accuracy of the technique with diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPhPC) DIBs in hexadecane, the method is applied herein to quantify separately the effects on membrane thickness and tension caused by varying the solvent in which the DIB is formed and introducing cholesterol into the bilayer. Because the technique relies only on capacitance measurements and optical images to determine both thickness and tension, this approach is specifically well-suited for studying the effects of peptides, biomolecules, natural and synthetic nanoparticles, and other species that accumulate within membranes without altering bilayer conductance.« less

  7. Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment and The Potential Employment, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of Direct Use Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: To measure the costs and economic; social; and environmental benefits of nationwide geothermal heat pump (GHP) deployment; and To survey selected states as to their potential employment; energy use and savings; and environmental impact for direct use applications.

  8. Direct Determination of Equilibrium Potentials for Hydrogen Oxidation/Production by Open Circuit Potential Measurements in Acetonitrile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, John A.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2013-03-14

    Open circuit potentials were measured for acetonitrile solutions of a variety of acids and their conjugate bases under 1 atm H2. Acids examined include triethylammonium, dimethylformamidium, 2,6-dichloroanilinium, 4-cyanoanilinium, 4-bromoanilinium, and 4-anisidinium salts. These potentials, together with the pKa values of the acids, establish the value of the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) potential in acetonitrile as ?0.028(4) V vs the ferrocenium/ferrocene couple. Dimethylformamidium is shown to form homoconjugates and other aggregates with dimethylformamide; open circuit potentials are used to quantify the extent of these reactions. Overpotentials for electrocatalytic hydrogen production and oxidation were determined from open circuit potentials and voltammograms of acidic or basic catalyst solutions under H2. This method requires neither pKa values, homoconjugation constants, nor an estimate for the SHE potential and thus allows direct comparison of catalytic systems in different media.

  9. Direct multi-wavelength limb-darkening measurements of three late-type giants with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Wittkowski; C. A. Hummel; K. J. Johnston; D. Mozurkewich; A. R. Hajian; N. M. White

    2001-08-10

    We present direct measurements of the limb-darkened intensity profiles of the late-type giant stars HR5299, HR7635, and HR8621 obtained with the Navy Prototype Optical Interferometer (NPOI) at the Lowell Observatory. A triangle of baselines with lengths of 18.9 m, 22.2 m, and 37.5 m was used. We utilized squared visibility amplitudes beyond the first minimum, as well as triple amplitudes and phases in up to 10 spectral channels covering a wavelength range of ~650 nm to ~850 nm. We find that our data can best be described by featureless symmetric limb-darkened disk models while uniform disk and fully darkened disk models can be rejected. We derive high-precision angular limb-darkened diameters for the three stars of 7.44 mas +/- 0.11 mas, 6.18 mas +/- 0.07 mas, and 6.94 mas +/- 0.12 mas, respectively. Using the HIPPARCOS parallaxes, we determine linear limb-darkened radii of 114 R$_\\odot \\pm $13 R$_\\odot$, 56 R$_\\odot \\pm $4 R$_\\odot$, and 98 R$_\\odot \\pm $9 R$_\\odot$, respectively. We compare our data to a grid of Kurucz stellar model atmospheres, with them derive the effective temperatures and surface gravities without additional information, and find agreement with independent estimates derived from empirical calibrations and bolometric fluxes. This confirms the consistency of model predictions and direct observations of the limb-darkening effect.

  10. Stratospheric sulfur oxidation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jayne, J.T.; Worsnop, D.R.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    Oxidation of SO2 to H2SO4 in the atmosphere is believed to involve the reaction of SO3 with water. It is commonly assumed that this is an important step leading to homogeneous nucleation of H2SO4 aerosol particles. Heterogeneous chemistry on sulfuric acid aerosols regulate much of the ozone photochemistry in the lower stratosphere and are also believed to have significant effect on the climate. Understanding aerosol loading requires a detailed knowledge of the stratospheric sulfur budget, including its oxidation kinetics. Here we present results of a laboratory project studying a key step in the oxidation process, the homogeneous reaction between SO3 and H2O vapor. Kinetic measurements are performed in a high-pressure turbulent fast-flow reactor (fabricated at MIT) which minimizes heterogeneous loss of SO3 on reactorwalls. The rate of decay of SO3 and the appearance of H2SO4 is monitored in the presence of excess water vapor. Gas phase reactants and products are detected via an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometer which is coupled to the exit of the flow reactor. Sulfuric acid nucleation studies can also be performed using the turbulent flow reactor. Initial measurements using a particle detector (based on Mie scattering) showed that aerosol formation and particle size distribution are controlled by varying the SO3/H2O gas ratio and the reactor temperature. Results for the reaction SO3J+ H2O show a second order dependence in water vapor density and a strong negative temperature dependence. The results, measured in the range -30C to +95C, imply that an SO3.H2O adduct and/or a water dimer species is likely involved in the reaction mechanism. Results of recent theoretical calculations on the SO3 + H2O system also support the finding that two water molecules are involved. Implications for the gas phase production of sulfuric acid in the atmosphere will be discussed.

  11. Direct Measurement of the Positive Acceleration of the Universe and Testing Inhomogeneous Models under Gravitational Wave Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kent Yagi; Atsushi Nishizawa; Chul-Moon Yoo

    2011-12-28

    One possibility for explaining the apparent accelerating expansion of the universe is that we live in the center of a spherically inhomogeneous universe. Although current observations cannot fully distinguish $\\Lambda$CDM and these inhomogeneous models, direct measurement of the acceleration of the universe can be a powerful tool in probing them. We have shown that, if $\\Lambda$CDM is the correct model, DECIGO/BBO would be able to detect the positive redshift drift (which is the time evolution of the source redshift $z$) in 3--5 year gravitational wave (GW) observations from neutron-star binaries, which enables us to rule out any Lema\\^itre-Tolman-Bondi (LTB) void model with monotonically increasing density profile. We may even be able to rule out any LTB model unless we allow unrealistically steep density profile at $z\\sim 0$. This test can be performed with GW observations alone, without any reference to electromagnetic observations, and is more powerful than the redshift drift measurement using Lyman $\\alpha$ forest.

  12. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-01-01

    novel measurements of chemical dynamics for clusters, Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at theUniversity of California Chemical Sciences Division,

  13. Measurement of a complete set of nuclides, cross-sections and kinetic energies in spallation of 238U 1A GeV with protons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Armbruster; J. Benlliure; M. Bernas; A. Boudard; E. Casarejos; S. Czajkowski; T. Enqvist; S. Leray; P. Napolitani; J. Pereira; F. Rejmund; M. -V. Ricciardi; K. -H. Schmidt; C. Stephan; J. Taieb; L. Tassan-Got; C. Volant

    2004-06-28

    Spallation residues and fission fragments from 1A GeV 238U projectiles irradiating a liquid hydrogen target were investigated by using the FRagment Separator at GSI for magnetic selection of reaction products including ray-tracing, energy-loss and time-of-flight techniques. The longitudinal-momentum spectra of identified fragments were analysed, and evaporation residues and fission fragments could be separated. For 1385 nuclides, production cross-sections covering 3 orders of magnitude with a mean accuracy of 15%, velocities in the U-rest frame and kinetic energies were determined. In the reaction all elements from uranium to nitrogen were found, each with a large number of isotopes.

  14. A NEW METHOD TO DIRECTLY MEASURE THE JEANS SCALE OF THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM USING CLOSE QUASAR PAIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rorai, Alberto; Hennawi, Joseph F. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); White, Martin [Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Although the baryons in the intergalactic medium (IGM) trace dark matter fluctuations on megaparsec scales, on smaller scales ?100 kpc, fluctuations are suppressed because the finite temperature gas is pressure supported against gravity, analogous to the classical Jeans argument. This Jeans filtering scale, which quantifies the small-scale structure of the IGM, has fundamental cosmological implications. First, it provides a thermal record of heat injected by ultraviolet photons during cosmic reionization events, and thus constrains the thermal and reionization history of the universe. Second, the Jeans scale determines the clumpiness of the IGM, a critical ingredient in models of cosmic reionization. Third, it sets the minimum mass scale for gravitational collapse from the IGM, and hence plays a pivotal role in galaxy formation. Unfortunately, it is extremely challenging to measure the Jeans scale via the standard technique of analyzing purely longitudinal Ly? forest spectra, because the thermal Doppler broadening of absorption lines along the line-of-sight, is highly degenerate with Jeans smoothing. In this work, we show that the Jeans filtering scale can be directly measured by characterizing the coherence of correlated Ly? forest absorption in close quasar pairs, with separations small enough ?100 kpc to resolve it. We present a novel technique for this purpose, based on the probability density function (PDF) of phase angle differences of homologous longitudinal Fourier modes in close quasar pair spectra. A Bayesian formalism is introduced based on the phase angle PDF, and Markov Chain Monte Carlo techniques are used to characterize the precision of a hypothetical Jeans scale measurement, and explore degeneracies with other thermal parameters governing the IGM. A semi-analytical model of the Ly? forest is used to generate a large grid (500) of thermal models from a dark matter only simulation. Our full parameter study indicates that a realistic sample of only 20 close quasar pair spectra can pinpoint the Jeans scale to ? 5% precision, independent of the amplitude T{sub 0} and slope ? of the temperature-density relation of the IGM T=T{sub 0}(?/ ?-bar ){sup ?-1}. This exquisite sensitivity arises because even long-wavelength one-dimensional Fourier modes ?10 Mpc, i.e., two orders of magnitude larger than the Jeans scale, are nevertheless dominated by projected small-scale three-dimensional (3D) power. Hence phase angle differences between all modes of quasar pair spectra actually probe the shape of the 3D power spectrum on scales comparable to the pair separation. We show that this new method for measuring the Jeans scale is unbiased and is insensitive to a battery of systematics that typically plague Ly? forest measurements, such as continuum fitting errors, imprecise knowledge of the noise level and/or spectral resolution, and metal-line absorption.

  15. Photon noise from chaotic and coherent millimeter-wave sources measured with horn-coupled, aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flanigan, Daniel; Jones, Glenn; Johnson, Bradley R; Ade, Peter; Araujo, Derek; Bradford, Kristi; Cantor, Robin; Che, George; Day, Peter K; Doyle, Simon; Kjellstrand, Carl Bjorn; LeDuc, Henry G; Limon, Michele; Luu, Vy; Mauskopf, Philip; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Tucker, Carole; Zmuidzinas, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    We report photon-noise limited performance of horn-coupled, aluminum lumped-element kinetic inductance detectors at millimeter wavelengths. The detectors are illuminated by a millimeter-wave source that uses an active multiplier chain to produce radiation between 140 and 160 GHz. We feed the multiplier with either amplified broadband noise or a continuous-wave tone from a microwave signal generator. We demonstrate that the detector response over a 40 dB range of source power is well-described by a simple model that considers the number of quasiparticles. The detector noise-equivalent power (NEP) is dominated by photon noise when the absorbed power is greater than approximately 1 pW, which corresponds to $\\mathrm{NEP} \\approx 2 \\times 10^{-17} \\; \\mathrm{W} \\; \\mathrm{Hz}^{-1/2}$, referenced to absorbed power. At higher source power levels we observe the relationships between noise and power expected from the photon statistics of the source signal: $\\mathrm{NEP} \\propto P$ for broadband (chaotic) illumination ...

  16. Kinetic Modeling of Microbiological Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Fang, Yilin

    2012-09-17

    Kinetic description of microbiological processes is vital for the design and control of microbe-based biotechnologies such as waste water treatment, petroleum oil recovery, and contaminant attenuation and remediation. Various models have been proposed to describe microbiological processes. This editorial article discusses the advantages and limiation of these modeling approaches in cluding tranditional, Monod-type models and derivatives, and recently developed constraint-based approaches. The article also offers the future direction of modeling researches that best suit for petroleum and environmental biotechnologies.

  17. Strain in the mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo model for sintering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørk, R; Tikare, V; Olevsky, E; Pryds, N

    2014-01-01

    Shrinkage strains measured from microstructural simulations using the mesoscale kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for solid state sintering are discussed. This model represents the microstructure using digitized discrete sites that are either grain or pore sites. The algorithm used to simulate densification by vacancy annihilation removes an isolated pore site at a grain boundary and collapses a column of sites extending from the vacancy to the surface of sintering compact, through the center of mass of the nearest grain. Using this algorithm, the existing published kMC models are shown to produce anisotropic strains for homogeneous powder compacts with aspect ratios different from unity. It is shown that the line direction biases shrinkage strains in proportion the compact dimension aspect ratios. A new algorithm that corrects this bias in strains is proposed; the direction for collapsing the column is determined by choosing a random sample face and subsequently a random point on that face as the end point for...

  18. KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Albert J.

    of the temperature distribution on the cavity wall surface in diesel exhaust aftertreatment filters usingABSTRACT KONG, JIAN. Infrared-Based Temperature Measurement in Ceramics Grinding and Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Filters. (Under the direction of Albert J. Shih) Non-contact remote-sensing radiation thermometry

  19. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p(p)over-bar Collisions at root s = 1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paus, Christoph M. E.

    We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity yW in p(p)over-bar collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV. We use a sample of W?e? events in data from 1??fb[superscript ...

  20. YAZDANI BOROUJENI, BEHDAD. Road Grade Quantification Using GPS in On-Board Vehicle Emission Measurements. (Under the direction of H. Christopher Frey.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, H. Christopher

    that NOx emission rates are 4 times higher when driving on a road with +5 percent grade compared to a flat Emission Measurements. (Under the direction of H. Christopher Frey.) Real-world vehicle tailpipe emissions constitute an important portion of ambient air pollution. NOx , CO2, CO, and hydrocarbons are among the main

  1. ZEPLIN-III direct dark matter search : final results and measurements in support of next generation instruments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reichhart, Lea

    2013-11-28

    Astrophysical observations give convincing evidence for a vast non-baryonic component, the so-called dark matter, accounting for over 20% of the overall content of our Universe. Direct dark matter search experiments ...

  2. Nonlinear effects in kinetic resolutions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Derrell W.

    1999-01-01

    The impact of nonlinear effects in the asymmetric catalysis of kinetic resolutions is analyzed. It is found with minimal assumptions that the kinetics of homocompetitive reactions should apply generally to kinetic resolutions involving partially...

  3. Direct Measurement of the W Production Charge Asymmetry in p anti-p Collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-01-01

    We present the first direct measurement of the W production charge asymmetry as a function of the W boson rapidity y{sub W} in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. We use a sample of W {yields} e{nu} events in data from 1 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity collected using the CDF II detector. In the region |y{sub W}| < 3.0, this measurement is capable of constraining the ratio of up and down quark momentum distributions in the proton more directly than in previous measurements of the asymmetry that are a function of the charged-lepton pseudorapidity.

  4. Apparatus and method for direct measurement of coal ash sintering and fusion properties at elevated temperatures and pressures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Khan, M. Rashid (Morgantown, WV)

    1990-01-01

    A high-pressure microdilatometer is provided for measuring the sintering and fusion properties of various coal ashes under the influence of elevated pressures and temperatures in various atmospheres. Electrical resistivity measurements across a sample of coal ash provide a measurement of the onset of the sintering and fusion of the ash particulates while the contraction of the sample during sintering is measured with a linear variable displacement transducer for detecting the initiation of sintering. These measurements of sintering in coal ash at different pressures provide a mechanism by which deleterious problems due to the sintering and fusion of ash in various combustion systems can be minimized or obviated.

  5. Kinetic vs. energetic discrimination in biological copying

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pablo Sartori; Simone Pigolotti

    2013-04-12

    We study stochastic copying schemes in which discrimination between a right and a wrong match is achieved via different kinetic barriers or different binding energies of the two matches. We demonstrate that, in single-step reactions, the two discrimination mechanisms are strictly alternative and can not be mixed to further reduce the error fraction. Close to the lowest error limit, kinetic discrimination results in a diverging copying velocity and dissipation per copied bit. On the opposite, energetic discrimination reaches its lowest error limit in an adiabatic regime where dissipation and velocity vanish. By analyzing experimentally measured kinetic rates of two DNA polymerases, T7 and Pol{\\gamma}, we argue that one of them operates in the kinetic and the other in the energetic regime. Finally, we show how the two mechanisms can be combined in copying schemes implementing error correction through a proofreading pathway

  6. Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wikswo, John

    Nano Research Kinetics of Molecular Recognition Mediated Nanoparticle Self-Assembly Chinmay Soman1 using nanoparticle self-assembly mediated by molecular interactions, including polynucleotide Directed self-assembly of nanostructures into microstructures through intermolecular interactions

  7. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemore »values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.« less

  8. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  9. Progress in an oxygen-carrier reaction kinetics experiment for rotary-bed chemical looping combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jester-Weinstein, Jack (Jack L.)

    2013-01-01

    The design process for an experimental platform measuring reaction kinetics in a chemical looping combustion (CLC) process is documented and justified. To enable an experiment designed to characterize the reaction kinetics ...

  10. Magnetically applied pressure-shear : a new technique for direct strength measurement at high pressure (final report for LDRD project 117856).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamppa, Derek C.; Haill, Thomas A.; Alexander, C. Scott; Asay, James Russell

    2010-09-01

    A new experimental technique to measure material shear strength at high pressures has been developed for use on magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) drive pulsed power platforms. By applying an external static magnetic field to the sample region, the MHD drive directly induces a shear stress wave in addition to the usual longitudinal stress wave. Strength is probed by passing this shear wave through a sample material where the transmissible shear stress is limited to the sample strength. The magnitude of the transmitted shear wave is measured via a transverse VISAR system from which the sample strength is determined.

  11. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P

    2011-06-17

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  12. A simple theory of protein folding kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pande, Vijay S

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple model of protein folding dynamics that captures key qualitative elements recently seen in all-atom simulations. The goals of this theory are to serve as a simple formalism for gaining deeper insight into the physical properties seen in detailed simulations as well as to serve as a model to easily compare why these simulations suggest a different kinetic mechanism than previous simple models. Specifically, we find that non-native contacts play a key role in determining the mechanism, which can shift dramatically as the energetic strength of non-native interactions is changed. For protein-like non-native interactions, our model finds that the native state is a kinetic hub, connecting the strength of relevant interactions directly to the nature of folding kinetics.

  13. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi-Kang Shi; Gregory Eyink

    2015-07-29

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree of degeneracy $\\delta$ of the critical points. Following Van Hove, we show that non-degenerate singularities lead to finite phase measures for $D>2$ but produce divergences when $D\\leq 2$ and possible breakdown of wave kinetics if the collision integral itself becomes too large (or even infinite). Similar divergences and possible breakdown can occur for degenerate singularities, when $D-\\delta\\leq 2,$ as we find for several physical examples, including electron-hole kinetics in graphene. When the standard kinetic equation breaks down, then one must develop a new singular wave kinetics. We discuss approaches from pioneering 1971 work of Newell \\& Aucoin on multi-scale perturbation theory for acoustic waves and field-theoretic methods based on exact Schwinger-Dyson integral equations for the wave dynamics.

  14. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagayama, T; Florido, R; Mayes, D; Tommasini, R; Koch, J A; Delettrez, J A; Regan, S P; Smalyuk, V A

    2014-01-01

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  15. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Florido, R.; Mayes, D. [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)] [Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R.; Koch, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)] [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  16. First measurement of the Head-Tail directional nuclear recoil signature at energies relevant to WIMP dark matter searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Burgos; E. Daw; J. Forbes; C. Ghag; M. Gold; C. Hagemann; V. A. Kudryavtsev; T. B. Lawson; D. Loomba; P. Majewski; D. Muna; A. StJ. Murphy; G. G. Nicklin; S. M. Paling; A. Petkov; S. J. S. Plank; M. Robinson; N. Sanghi; D. P. Snowden-Ifft; N. J. C. Spooner; J. Turk; E. Tziaferi

    2008-09-10

    We present first evidence for the so-called Head-Tail asymmetry signature of neutron-induced nuclear recoil tracks at energies down to 1.5 keV/amu using the 1m^3 DRIFT-IIc dark matter detector. This regime is appropriate for recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMPs) but one where the differential ionization is poorly understood. We show that the distribution of recoil energies and directions induced here by Cf-252 neutrons matches well that expected from massive WIMPs. The results open a powerful new means of searching for a galactic signature from WIMPs.

  17. Chemomechanical mapping of ligandreceptor binding kinetics on cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Vliet, Krystyn J.

    Chemomechanical mapping of ligand­receptor binding kinetics on cells Sunyoung Lee, Jelena Mandic, Providence, RI, April 23, 2007 (received for review January 2, 2007) The binding kinetics between cell activity. Modeling and prediction of receptor-mediated cell func- tions are facilitated by measurement

  18. Direct measurements of growing amorphous order and non-monotonic dynamic correlations in a colloidal glass-former

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Hima Nagamanasa; Shreyas Gokhale; A. K. Sood; Rajesh Ganapathy

    2014-08-23

    While the transformation of flowing liquids into rigid glasses is omnipresent, a complete understanding of vitrification remains elusive. Of the numerous approaches aimed at solving the glass transition problem, the Random First-Order Theory (RFOT) is the most prominent. However, the existence of the underlying thermodynamic phase transition envisioned by RFOT remains debatable, since its key microscopic predictions concerning the growth of amorphous order and the nature of dynamic correlations lack experimental verification. Here, by using holographic optical tweezers, we freeze a wall of particles in an equilibrium configuration of a 2D colloidal glass-forming liquid and provide direct evidence for growing amorphous order in the form of a static point-to-set length. Most remarkably, we uncover the non-monotonic dependence of dynamic correlations on area fraction and show that this non-monotonicity follows directly from the change in morphology of cooperatively rearranging regions, as predicted by RFOT. Our findings suggest that the glass transition has a thermodynamic origin.

  19. Direct measurement of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? total cross section at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, H.; Sagara, K.; Fujita, K.; Kodama, D.; Narikiyo, Y.; Hamamoto, K.; Ban, T.; Tao, N.; Teranishi, T. [Department of Physics, Kyushu University (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    A fusion reaction of {sup 12}C+{sup 4}He?{sup 16}O+? is one of the main reactions in He-burning of stars and important for nucleosynthesis. The fusion cross section at stellar energy of E{sub cm}=0.3 MeV has not been determined precisely yet in spite of efforts for about 40 years. We plan to measure directly the total fusion cross section down to 0.7 MeV at Kyushu University Tandem accelerator Laboratory and to estimate the cross section at 0.3MeV by extrapolation. We have already measured the cross sections at 2.4 MeV and 1.5 MeV. The measurement at E{sub cm}=1.2 MeV is in progress.

  20. Combustion kinetics and reaction pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klemm, R.B.; Sutherland, J.W. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project is focused on the fundamental chemistry of combustion. The overall objectives are to determine rate constants for elementary reactions and to elucidate the pathways of multichannel reactions. A multitechnique approach that features three independent experiments provides unique capabilities in performing reliable kinetic measurements over an exceptionally wide range in temperature, 300 to 2500 K. Recent kinetic work has focused on experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the methane dissociation system (CH{sub 4} + Ar {yields} CH{sub 3} + H + Ar and H + CH{sub 4} {yields} CH{sub 3} + H{sub 2}). Additionally, a discharge flow-photoionization mass spectrometer (DF-PIMS) experiment is used to determine branching fractions for multichannel reactions and to measure ionization thresholds of free radicals. Thus, these photoionization experiments generate data that are relevant to both reaction pathways studies (reaction dynamics) and fundamental thermochemical research. Two distinct advantages of performing PIMS with high intensity, tunable vacuum ultraviolet light at the National Synchrotron Light Source are high detection sensitivity and exceptional selectivity in monitoring radical species.

  1. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Maclin S. (Marietta, GA); Jackson, Theodore G. (Atlanta, GA); Knerr, Christopher (Lawrenceville, GA)

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web.

  2. In-plane ultrasonic velocity measurement of longitudinal and shear waves in the machine direction with transducers in rotating wheels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, M.S.; Jackson, T.G.; Knerr, C.

    1998-02-17

    An improved system for measuring the velocity of ultrasonic signals within the plane of moving web-like materials, such as paper, paperboard and the like. In addition to velocity measurements of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web in the MD and CD, one embodiment of the system in accordance with the present invention is also adapted to provide on-line indication of the polar specific stiffness of the moving web. In another embodiment of the invention, the velocity of ultrasonic signals in the plane of the web are measured by way of a plurality of ultrasonic transducers carried by synchronously driven wheels or cylinders, thus eliminating undue transducer wear due to any speed differences between the transducers and the web. In order to provide relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the webs, the transducers are mounted in a sensor housings which include a spring for biasing the transducer radially outwardly. The sensor housings are adapted to be easily and conveniently mounted to the carrier to provide a relatively constant contact force between the transducers and the moving web. 37 figs.

  3. Oxidation characteristics of gasoline direct-injection (GDI)...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    characteristics of gasoline direct-injection (GDI) engine soot: Catalytic effects of ash and modified kinetic correlation Title Oxidation characteristics of gasoline...

  4. Paint decontamination kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, E.W.

    1984-04-01

    Decontamination kinetics of a high-gloss polyurethane paint have been investigated using a novel flow cell experiment where the sample was counted in situ during decontamination. The /sup 134/Cs, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 90/Y decontaminations follow a rate law that can be predicted theoretically for contaminant ion desorption from weakly heterogeneous random surface adsorption sites. Paint surfaces show the same decontamination kinetics after damage by abrasion or ultraviolet irradiation prior to contamination. The systems investigated exhibit Freundlich adsorption isotherm behavior during contamination; this is also characteristic of weakly heterogeneous random surfaces and is very commonly observed in ion adsorption studies at low concentrations.

  5. Mesoscale Equipartition of kinetic energy in Quantum Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salort, Julien; Lévêque, Emmanuel; 10.1209/0295-5075/94/24001

    2012-01-01

    The turbulence of superfluid helium is investigated numerically at finite temperature. Direct numerical simulations are performed with a "truncated HVBK" model, which combines the continuous description of the Hall-Vinen-Bekeravich-Khalatnikov equations with the additional constraint that this continuous description cannot extend beyond a quantum length scale associated with the mean spacing between individual superfluid vortices. A good agreement is found with experimental measurements of the vortex density. Besides, by varying the turbulence intensity only, it is observed that the inter-vortex spacing varies with the Reynolds number as $Re^{-3/4}$, like the viscous length scale in classical turbulence. In the high temperature limit, Kolmogorov's inertial cascade is recovered, as expected from previous numerical and experimental studies. As the temperature decreases, the inertial cascade remains present at large scales while, at small scales, the system evolves towards a statistical equipartition of kinetic ...

  6. Measurement of direct CP violation in b -> scc and b -> dcc quark transitions using B+ -> J/psiK+ and B+ -> J/psi pi+ decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holubyev, K.; /Lancaster U.

    2008-12-01

    This thesis describes the measurement of the direct CP violation in the b {yields} sc{bar c} transition using the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +}, and in the b {yields} dc{bar c} transition using the decay B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}. The decays of B{sup +} mesons are reconstructed in approximately 2.8 fb{sup -1} of data recorded by D0 detector in 2002-2007 during Run II of Fermilab Tevatron collider. Using the unbinned likelihood fit, a signal of 40,222 {+-} 242 of B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}K{sup +} and 1,578 {+-} 119 of B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}{pi}{sup +} events is obtained. The corresponding direct CP violation asymmetries are measured to be A{sub CP}(B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S)K{sup +}) = +0.0077 {+-} 0.0061(stat.) {+-} 0.0027(syst.), and A{sub CP}(B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S){pi}{sup +}) = - 0.089 {+-} 0.081(stat.) {+-} 0.028(syst.). The result on A{sub CP} (B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S)K{sup +}) is consistent with the 2007 world average and is the most precise measurement of this asymmetry, with uncertainty approaching the level of the Standard Model prediction. The result on A{sub CP} (B{sup +} {yields} J/{psi}(1S){pi}{sup +}) constitutes the first measurement of this asymmetry at the hadron collider, with uncertainty at the level of the 2007 world average. The measurement presented in this thesis has become possible due to the sophisticated online and offline tracking/vertexing implemented at D0, and the regular reversal of the polarities of the D0 detector magnets.

  7. PROBING THE NATURE OF THE HELIOSHEATH WITH THE NEUTRAL ATOM SPECTRA MEASURED BY IBEX IN THE VOYAGER 1 DIRECTION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Opher, M.; Prested, C.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N. A.; Drake, J. F.

    2013-10-20

    We are able to show by comparing modeled energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) spectra to those measured by Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) that the models along the Voyager 1 (V1) trajectory that best agree with the low energy IBEX data include extra heating due to ram and magnetic energy in the quasi-stagnation region or a kappa ion distribution (with ? = 2.0) in the outer heliosheath. The model explored is the multi-ion, multi-fluid (MI-MF) which treats the pick-up ions and the thermal ion fluids with separate Maxwellian distributions. These effects are included ad hoc in the modeled ENA since they are not present in the model. These results indicate that the low energy spectra of ENAs as measured by IBEX is sensitive to the physical nature of the heliosheath and to effects not traditionally present in current global models. Therefore, by comparing the low energy ENA spectra to models, we can potentially probe the heliosheath in locations beyond those probed by V1 and Voyager 2 (V2)

  8. Neptunium Binding Kinetics with Arsenazo(III)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh R. Martin; Aaron T. Johnson; Stephen P. Mezyk

    2014-08-01

    This document has been prepared to meet FCR&D level 2 milestone M2FT-14IN0304021, “Report on the results of actinide binding kinetics with aqueous phase complexants” This work was carried out under the auspices of the Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Advanced Separations Systems FCR&D work package. The report details kinetics experiments that were performed to measure rates of aqueous phase complexation for pentavalent neptunium with the chromotropic dye Arsenazo III (AAIII). The studies performed were designed to determine how pH, ionic strength and AAIII concentration may affect the rate of the reaction. A brief comparison with hexavalent neptunium is also made. It was identified that as pH was increased the rate of reaction also increased, however increasing the ionic strength and concentration of AAIII had the opposite effect. Interestingly, the rate of reaction of Np(VI) with AAIII was found to be slower than that of the Np(V) reaction.

  9. Resonance Van Hove Singularities in Wave Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Yi-Kang

    2015-01-01

    Wave kinetic theory has been developed to describe the statistical dynamics of weakly nonlinear, dispersive waves. However, we show that systems which are generally dispersive can have resonant sets of wave modes with identical group velocities, leading to a local breakdown of dispersivity. This shows up as a geometric singularity of the resonant manifold and possibly as an infinite phase measure in the collision integral. Such singularities occur widely for classical wave systems, including acoustical waves, Rossby waves, helical waves in rotating fluids, light waves in nonlinear optics and also in quantum transport, e.g. kinetics of electron-hole excitations (matter waves) in graphene. These singularities are the exact analogue of the critical points found by Van Hove in 1953 for phonon dispersion relations in crystals. The importance of these singularities in wave kinetics depends on the dimension of phase space $D=(N-2)d$ ($d$ physical space dimension, $N$ the number of waves in resonance) and the degree ...

  10. Directives Tools

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Useful links and resources for Directives Writers, Directives Point of Contact (DPCs), Subject Matter Experts (SMEs), and Draft Directive Reviewers.

  11. Kinetic freeze out

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magas, V K; Csernai, László P; Grassi, Frédérique; Greiner, W; Hama, Y; Kodama, T; Lázár, Z I; Stöcker, H; Lázár, Zs.I.

    1999-01-01

    Freeze out of particles across a space-time hypersurface is discussed in kinetic models. The calculation of final momentum distribution of emitted particles is described for freeze out surfaces, with spacelike normals. The resulting non-equilibrium distribution does not resemble, the previously proposed, cut Juttner distribution, and shows non-exponential p_t-spectra similar to the ones observed in experiments.

  12. Structural kinetics of myosin by transient time-resolved FRET

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    occurs before ATP is hydrolyzed, and two struc- tural states (relay helix straight and bent) are resolved structural data, determined primarily from static protein crystals, and kinetics, measured dur- ing

  13. LLNL Chemical Kinetics Modeling Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Mehl, M; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

    2008-09-24

    The LLNL chemical kinetics modeling group has been responsible for much progress in the development of chemical kinetic models for practical fuels. The group began its work in the early 1970s, developing chemical kinetic models for methane, ethane, ethanol and halogenated inhibitors. Most recently, it has been developing chemical kinetic models for large n-alkanes, cycloalkanes, hexenes, and large methyl esters. These component models are needed to represent gasoline, diesel, jet, and oil-sand-derived fuels.

  14. Kinetic equilibrium and relativistic thermodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Ván

    2011-02-01

    Relativistic thermodynamics is treated from the point of view of kinetic theory. It is shown that the generalized J\\"uttner distribution suggested in [1] is compatible with kinetic equilibrium. The requirement of compatibility of kinetic and thermodynamic equilibrium reveals several generalizations of the Gibbs relation where the velocity field is an independent thermodynamic variable.

  15. Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high efficiency clean combustion engines Multidimensional simulation and chemical kinetics development for high...

  16. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Ashok; Pino, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  17. Cosmological Kinetic Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashok Das; Jorge Gamboa; Miguel Pino

    2015-06-22

    In this paper we generalize the kinetic mixing idea to time reparametrization invariant theories, namely, relativistic point particles and cosmology in order to obtain new insights for dark matter and energy. In the first example, two relativistic particles interact through an appropriately chosen coupling term. It is shown that the system can be diagonalized by means of a non-local field redefinition, and, as a result of this procedure, the mass of one the particles gets rescaled. In the second case, inspired by the previous example, two cosmological models (each with its own scale factor) are made to interact in a similar fashion. The equations of motion are solved numerically in different scenarios (dust, radiation or a cosmological constant coupled to each sector of the system). When a cosmological constant term is present, kinetic mixing rescales it to a lower value which may be more amenable to observations.

  18. Fully kinetic simulations of megajoule-scale dense plasma focus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.; Link, A.; Tang, V.; Halvorson, C.; May, M.; Welch, D.; Meehan, B. T.; Hagen, E. C.

    2014-10-15

    Dense plasma focus (DPF) Z-pinch devices are sources of copious high energy electrons and ions, x-rays, and neutrons. Megajoule-scale DPFs can generate 10{sup 12} neutrons per pulse in deuterium gas through a combination of thermonuclear and beam-target fusion. However, the details of the neutron production are not fully understood and past optimization efforts of these devices have been largely empirical. Previously, we reported on the first fully kinetic simulations of a kilojoule-scale DPF and demonstrated that both kinetic ions and kinetic electrons are needed to reproduce experimentally observed features, such as charged-particle beam formation and anomalous resistivity. Here, we present the first fully kinetic simulation of a MegaJoule DPF, with predicted ion and neutron spectra, neutron anisotropy, neutron spot size, and time history of neutron production. The total yield predicted by the simulation is in agreement with measured values, validating the kinetic model in a second energy regime.

  19. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement ofmore »href='S2095471915000158_inline5' mime-subtype='gif' type='simple'/>${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.« less

  20. Measurements of the volt-ampere characteristics and the breakdown voltages of direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges in microgaps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klas, M.; Matej?ik, Š.; Radjenovi?, B.; Radmilovi?-Radjenovi?, M.

    2014-10-15

    The discharge phenomena for micro meter gap sizes include many interesting problems from engineering and physical perspectives. In this paper, the authors deal with the experimental and theoretical results of the breakdown voltage and current-voltage characteristics of the direct-current helium and hydrogen discharges. The measurements were performed at a constant pressure of around one atmosphere, while varying the gap size between two parallel plane tungsten electrodes between 1??m and 100??m. From the measured breakdown voltage curves, the effective yields and the ionization coefficients were derived for both gases. Present data for the ionization coefficients correlate with the data obtained for the breakdown voltage curves measured for fixed 100??m interelectrode separation. The current-voltage characteristics were plotted for the various gap sizes illustrating the role of the field emission effects in the microgaps. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim theory, the enhancement factors were determined. The gap spacing dependence of the field emission current can be explained by the introduction of two ideas, the first being a space charge effect by emitted electrons, and the second a change in the breakdown mechanism. Experimental results, presented here, demonstrate that Townsend phenomenology breaks down when field emission becomes the key mechanism affecting the breakdown and deforming the left hand side of the breakdown voltage curves.

  1. A direct measurement of rotatable and frozen CoO spins in exchange bias system of CoO/Fe/Ag(001)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, J.; Park, J. S.; Kim, W.; Arenholz, E.; Liberati, M.; Scholl, A.; Wu, Y. Z.; Hwang, C.; Qiu, Z. Q.

    2010-03-10

    The exchange bias of epitaxially grown CoO/Fe/Ag(001) was investigated using x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (XMLD) techniques. A direct XMLD measurement on the CoO layer during the Fe magnetization reversal shows that the CoO compensated spins are rotatable at thinner thickness and frozen at larger thickness. By a quantitative determination of the rotatable and frozen CoO spins as a function of the CoO film thickness, we find the remarkable result that the exchange bias is well established before frozen spins are detectable in the CoO film. We further show that the rotatable and frozen CoO spins are uniformly distributed in the CoO film.

  2. Direct observation of intrinsic piezoelectricity of Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} by time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurement using single-crystalline films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, Takashi; Ehara, Yoshitaka; Yasui, Shintaro; Kamo, Takafumi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Sakata, Osami

    2014-07-07

    Lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} or PZT, is one of the most widely investigated ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due to its superior properties. However, the intrinsic properties of PZT have not been directly measured due to the lack of fabrication of single crystals even though a basic understanding of intrinsic properties has been of interest developing lead-free piezoelectric materials. We demonstrated the direct observation of the intrinsic piezoelectric property by means of the detection of electric-field induced crystal lattice distortion of thick Pb(Zr{sub 0.35}Ti{sub 0.65})O{sub 3} single-crystalline films with single polar-axis orientation and negligible residual strain using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) together with the polarization response. Consequently, the effective converse piezoelectric response was experimentally revealed; hence, the electrostrictive coefficient, which is the conversion coefficient between the electrical and mechanical response, was determined. The obtained effective electrostrictive coefficient was 5.2–6.3?×?10{sup ?2} m{sup 4}/C{sup 2}, which agrees with theoretical prediction.

  3. Kinetic distance and kinetic maps from molecular dynamics simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noe, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing macromolecular kinetics from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations requires a distance metric that can distinguish slowly-interconverting states. Here we build upon diffusion map theory and define a kinetic distance for irreducible Markov processes that quantifies how slowly molecular conformations interconvert. The kinetic distance can be computed given a model that approximates the eigenvalues and eigenvectors (reaction coordinates) of the MD Markov operator. Here we employ the time-lagged independent component analysis (TICA). The TICA components can be scaled to provide a kinetic map in which the Euclidean distance corresponds to the kinetic distance. As a result, the question of how many TICA dimensions should be kept in a dimensionality reduction approach becomes obsolete, and one parameter less needs to be specified in the kinetic model construction. We demonstrate the approach using TICA and Markov state model (MSM) analyses for illustrative models, protein conformation dynamics in bovine...

  4. Chemical kinetics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project emphasizes numerical modeling of chemical kinetics of combustion, including applications in both practical combustion systems and in controlled laboratory experiments. Elementary reaction rate parameters are combined into mechanisms which then describe the overall reaction of the fuels being studied. Detailed sensitivity analyses are used to identify those reaction rates and product species distributions to which the results are most sensitive and therefore warrant the greatest attention from other experimental and theoretical research programs. Experimental data from a variety of environments are combined together to validate the reaction mechanisms, including results from laminar flames, shock tubes, flow systems, detonations, and even internal combustion engines.

  5. Sandia Energy - Combustion Kinetics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) byMultidayAlumniProjects Caterpillar, SandiaCombustion Kinetics Home

  6. Evidence for Direct CP Violation in the Measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa Angle gamma with B-+ to D(*) K(*)-+ Decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Amo Sanchez, P.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; /Annecy, LAPP; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; /Barcelona U., ECM; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; /INFN, Bari /Bari U.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; /Bergen U.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D.N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L.T.; Kolomensky, Yu.G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I.L.; Tanabe, T.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UC, Riverside /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /INFN, Ferrara /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /INFN, Genoa /Genoa U. /Indian Inst. Tech., Guwahati /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Humboldt U., Berlin /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa State U. /Iowa State U. /Johns Hopkins U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Mainz U., Inst. Kernphys. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT /McGill U. /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /INFN, Milan /Milan U. /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /INFN, Naples /Naples U. /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /INFN, Padua /Padua U. /Paris U., VI-VII /INFN, Perugia /Perugia U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Pisa, Scuola Normale Superiore /INFN, Pisa /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Princeton U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /INFN, Rome /Rome U. /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /SLAC /South Carolina U. /Southern Methodist U. /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Albany /Tel Aviv U. /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /INFN, Turin /Turin U. /INFN, Trieste /Trieste U. /Valencia U. /Victoria U. /Warwick U. /Wisconsin U., Madison

    2011-08-19

    We report the measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa CP-violating angle {gamma} through a Dalitz plot analysis of neutral D meson decays to K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and K{sub S}{sup 0} K{sup +}K{sup -} produced in the processes B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK{sup {-+}}, B{sup {-+}} {yields} D* K{sup {-+}} with D* {yields} D{pi}{sup 0}, D{gamma}, and B{sup {-+}} {yields} DK*{sup {-+}} with K*{sup {-+}} {yields} K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {-+}}, using 468 million B{bar B} pairs collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e{sup +}e{sup -} collider at SLAC. We measure {gamma} = (68 {+-} 14 {+-} 4 {+-} 3){sup o} (modulo 180{sup o}), where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic uncertainty and the third reflects the uncertainty in the description of the neutral D decay amplitudes. This result is inconsistent with {gamma} = 0 (no direct CP violation) with a significance of 3.5 standard deviations.

  7. Measurements of the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity in direct-drive implosions using x-ray self-emission shadowgraphy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michel, D. T.; Davis, A. K.; Armstrong, W.; Bahr, R.; Epstein, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Hohenberger, M.; Igumenshchev, I. V.; Jungquist, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Radha, P. B.; Sangster, T. C.; Sorce, C.; Froula, D. H.

    2015-07-08

    Self-emission x-ray shadowgraphy provides a method to measure the ablation-front trajectory and low-mode nonuniformity of a target imploded by directly illuminating a fusion capsule with laser beams. The technique uses time-resolved images of soft x-rays (> 1 keV) emitted from the coronal plasma of the target imaged onto an x-ray framing camera to determine the position of the ablation front. Methods used to accurately measure the ablation-front radius (${\\it\\delta}R=\\pm 1.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$), image-to-image timing (${\\it\\delta}({\\rm\\Delta}t)=\\pm 2.5$ ps) and absolute timing (${\\it\\delta}t=\\pm 10$ ps) are presented. Angular averaging of the images provides an average radius measurement of${\\it\\delta}(R_{\\text{av}})=\\pm 0.15~{\\rm\\mu}\\text{m}$and an error in velocity of${\\it\\delta}V/V=\\pm 3\\%$. This technique was applied on the Omega Laser Facility and the National Ignition Facility.

  8. Kinetics of coal pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seery, D.J.; Freihaut, J.D.; Proscia, W.M. ); Howard, J.B.; Peters, W.; Hsu, J.; Hajaligol, M.; Sarofim, A. ); Jenkins, R.; Mallin, J.; Espindola-Merin, B. ); Essenhigh, R.; Misra, M.K. )

    1989-07-01

    This report contains results of a coordinated, multi-laboratory investigation of coal devolatilization. Data is reported pertaining to the devolatilization for bituminous coals over three orders of magnitude in apparent heating rate (100 to 100,000 + {degree}C/sec), over two orders of magnitude in particle size (20 to 700 microns), final particle temperatures from 400 to 1600{degree}C, heat transfer modes ranging from convection to radiative, ambient pressure ranging from near vacuum to one atmosphere pressure. The heat transfer characteristics of the reactors are reported in detail. It is assumed the experimental results are to form the basis of a devolatilization data base. Empirical rate expressions are developed for each phase of devolatilization which, when coupled to an awareness of the heat transfer rate potential of a particular devolatilization reactor, indicate the kinetics emphasized by a particular system reactor plus coal sample. The analysis indicates the particular phase of devolatilization that will be emphasized by a particular reactor type and, thereby, the kinetic expressions appropriate to that devolatilization system. Engineering rate expressions are developed from the empirical rate expressions in the context of a fundamental understanding of coal devolatilization developed in the course of the investigation. 164 refs., 223 figs., 44 tabs.

  9. Kinetic gating mechanism of DNA damage recognition by Rad4/XPC

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chen, Xuejing; Velmurugu, Yogambigai; Zheng, Guanqun; Park, Beomseok; Shim, Yoonjung; Kim, Youngchang; Liu, Lili; Van Houten, Bennett; He, Chuan; Ansari, Anjum; et al

    2015-01-06

    The xeroderma pigmentosum C (XPC) complex initiates nucleotide excision repair by recognizing DNA lesions before recruiting downstream factors. How XPC detects structurally diverse lesions embedded within normal DNA is unknown. Here we present a crystal structure that captures the yeast XPC orthologue (Rad4) on a single register of undamaged DNA. The structure shows that a disulphide-tethered Rad4 flips out normal nucleotides and adopts a conformations similar to that seen with damaged DNA. Contrary to many DNA repair enzymes that can directly reject non-target sites as structural misfits, our results suggest that Rad4/XPC uses a kinetic gating mechanism whereby lesion selectivitymore »arises from the kinetic competition between DNA opening and the residence time of Rad4/XPC per site. This mechanism is further supported by measurements of Rad4-induced lesion-opening times using temperature-jump pertubation spectroscopy. Kinetic gating may be a general mechanism used by site-specific DNA-binding proteins to minimize time-consuming interrogations of non-target sites.« less

  10. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Cyclohexane Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silke, E J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Ribaucour, M

    2006-11-10

    A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism has been developed and used to study the oxidation of cyclohexane at both low and high temperatures. Reaction rate constant rules are developed for the low temperature combustion of cyclohexane. These rules can be used for in chemical kinetic mechanisms for other cycloalkanes. Since cyclohexane produces only one type of cyclohexyl radical, much of the low temperature chemistry of cyclohexane is described in terms of one potential energy diagram showing the reaction of cyclohexyl radical + O{sub 2} through five, six and seven membered ring transition states. The direct elimination of cyclohexene and HO{sub 2} from RO{sub 2} is included in the treatment using a modified rate constant of Cavallotti et al. Published and unpublished data from the Lille rapid compression machine, as well as jet-stirred reactor data are used to validate the mechanism. The effect of heat loss is included in the simulations, an improvement on previous studies on cyclohexane. Calculations indicated that the production of 1,2-epoxycyclohexane observed in the experiments can not be simulated based on the current understanding of low temperature chemistry. Possible 'alternative' H-atom isomerizations leading to different products from the parent O{sub 2}QOOH radical were included in the low temperature chemical kinetic mechanism and were found to play a significant role.

  11. Dimensional enhancement of kinetic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. P. Schleich; J. P. Dahl

    2002-03-14

    Simple thermodynamics considers kinetic energy to be an extensive variable which is proportional to the number, N, of particles. We present a quantum state of N non-interacting particles for which the kinetic energy increases quadratically with N. This enhancement effect is tied to the quantum centrifugal potential whose strength is quadratic in the number of dimensions of configuration space.

  12. Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michalet, Xavier

    Femtomole Mixer for Microsecond Kinetic Studies of Protein Folding David E. Hertzog,, Xavier a microfluidic mixer for studying protein folding and other reactions with a mixing time of 8 µs and sample) measurements of single-stranded DNA. We also demon- strate the feasibility of measuring fast protein folding

  13. Direct electroplating on nonconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, D.; Landau, U. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-08-01

    Recently proposed processes for direct electroplating on nonconductive substrates offer numerous advantages. The industrial implementation of such processes is, however, hampered by lack of understanding. Presented here is a model for this class of processes based on three synergistic mechanisms: (i) stepwise propagation through the seed clusters that serve as sequentially activated microelectrodes, (ii) preferential accessibility to current of the sharp edge, and (iii) kinetics-based enhancement due to the fast propagation of an additive-free edge. The model has been computer simulated and verified by experiments of copper electroplating on nonconductive substrates.

  14. Solution of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations in three dimensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Donald Ross

    1971-01-01

    A general class of two-step alternating-direction semi-implicit methods is proposed for the approximate solution of the semi-discrete form of the space-dependent reactor kinetics equations. An exponential transformation ...

  15. Direct Photons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Reygers; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2009-08-17

    A brief overview of direct-photon measurements in p+p and Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV with the PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is given. Direct-photon yields for pT > 4 GeV/c and photon-hadron azimuthal correlations were determined with the aid of an electromagnetic calorimeter. By detecting e+e- pairs from the internal conversion of virtual photons direct-photon yields were measured between 1 photons from a quark-gluon plasma (QGP) are expected to contribute significantly to the total direct-photon yield in this range.

  16. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  17. Desorption and sublimation kinetics for fluorinated aluminum nitride surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W., E-mail: sean.king@intel.com; Davis, Robert F. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The adsorption and desorption of halogen and other gaseous species from surfaces is a key fundamental process for both wet chemical and dry plasma etch and clean processes utilized in nanoelectronic fabrication processes. Therefore, to increase the fundamental understanding of these processes with regard to aluminum nitride (AlN) surfaces, temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been utilized to investigate the desorption kinetics of water (H{sub 2}O), fluorine (F{sub 2}), hydrogen (H{sub 2}), hydrogen fluoride (HF), and other related species from aluminum nitride thin film surfaces treated with an aqueous solution of buffered hydrogen fluoride (BHF) diluted in methanol (CH{sub 3}OH). Pre-TPD XPS measurements of the CH{sub 3}OH:BHF treated AlN surfaces showed the presence of a variety of Al-F, N-F, Al-O, Al-OH, C-H, and C-O surfaces species in addition to Al-N bonding from the AlN thin film. The primary species observed desorbing from these same surfaces during TPD measurements included H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, HF, F{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3}OH with some evidence for nitrogen (N{sub 2}) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) desorption as well. For H{sub 2}O, two desorption peaks with second order kinetics were observed at 195 and 460?°C with activation energies (E{sub d}) of 51?±?3 and 87?±?5?kJ/mol, respectively. Desorption of HF similarly exhibited second order kinetics with a peak temperature of 475?°C and E{sub d} of 110?±?5?kJ/mol. The TPD spectra for F{sub 2} exhibited two peaks at 485 and 585?°C with second order kinetics and E{sub d} of 62?±?3 and 270?±?10?kJ/mol, respectively. These values are in excellent agreement with previous E{sub d} measurements for desorption of H{sub 2}O from SiO{sub 2} and AlF{sub x} from AlN surfaces, respectively. The F{sub 2} desorption is therefore attributed to fragmentation of AlF{sub x} species in the mass spectrometer ionizer. H{sub 2} desorption exhibited an additional high temperature peak at 910?°C with E{sub d}?=?370?±?10?kJ/mol that is consistent with both the dehydrogenation of surface AlOH species and H{sub 2} assisted sublimation of AlN. Similarly, N{sub 2} exhibited a similar higher temperature desorption peak with E{sub d}?=?535?±?40?kJ/mol that is consistent with the activation energy for direct sublimation of AlN.

  18. Equivalence of optical and electrical noise equivalent power of hybrid NbTiN-Al microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janssen, R. M. J.; Endo, A.; Visser, P. J. de; Klapwijk, T. M.; Baselmans, J. J. A.

    2014-11-10

    We have measured and compared the response of hybrid NbTiN-Al Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs) to changes in bath temperature and illumination by sub-mm radiation. We show that these two stimulants have an equivalent effect on the resonance feature of hybrid MKIDs. We determine an electrical noise equivalent power (NEP) from the measured temperature responsivity, quasiparticle recombination time, superconducting transition temperature, and noise spectrum, all of which can be measured in a dark environment. For the two hybrid NbTiN-Al MKIDs studied in detail, the electrical NEP is within a factor of two of the optical NEP, which is measured directly using a blackbody source.

  19. On the relationships between Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-09-03

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use which of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics, which is the first order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of enzyme-substrate complex exactly for a single enzyme single substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of quasi-steady-state formore »the enzyme-substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme-substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme-substrate complexes, substrates and enzymes. In particular, I showed that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently over-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [ E ]T and persistently under-predict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [ S ]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently under-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T, and persistently over-predicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. In contrast, the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [ E ]T and ? ln v / ? ln [ S ]T. Since the Equilibrium Chemistry Approximation kinetics includes the advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, soil biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  20. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  1. H. J. Sutherland and P. W. Carlin, "Damage Measurements on the NWTC Direct-Drive, Variable-Speed Test Bed," 1998 ASME Wind Energy Symposium, AIAA/ASME, 1998,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado 80401 Abstract The NWTC (National Wind Technology Center-Speed Test Bed," 1998 ASME Wind Energy Symposium, AIAA/ASME, 1998, pp. 315-322. DAMAGE MEASUREMENTS ON THE NWTC DIRECT-DRIVE, VARIABLE-SPEED TEST BED* Herbert J. Sutherland Wind Energy Department Sandia

  2. Measurement of the Cross Section for Direct-Photon Production in Association with a Heavy Quark in p[¯ over p] Collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez-Ceballos, Guillelmo

    We report on a measurement of the cross section for direct-photon production in association with a heavy quark using the full data set of ?s=1.96??TeV proton-antiproton collisions corresponding to 9.1??fb[superscript -1] ...

  3. Spatial mapping of ices in the Oph-F core: A direct measurement of CO depletion and the formation of CO2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M. Pontoppidan

    2006-05-22

    Aims: Ices in dense star-forming cores contain the bulk of volatile molecules apart from H2 and thus represent a large fraction of dark cloud chemistry budget.To directly constrain the freeze-out profile of CO, the formation route of CO2 and the carrier of the 6.8 micron band, the spatial distribution of the CO/CO2 ice system and the 6.8 micron band carrier are measured in a nearby dense core. Methods: VLT-ISAAC, ISOCAM-CVF and Spitzer-IRS archival mid-infrared (3-20 micron) spectroscopy of young stellar objects is used to construct a map of the abundances of CO and CO2 ices in the Oph-F star-forming core, probing core radii from 2 10^3 to 14 10^3 AU or densities from 5 10^4 to 5 10^5 cm^-3 with a resolution of ~ 3000 AU. Results: The line-of-sight averaged abundances relative to water ice of both CO and CO2 ices increase monotonously with decreasing distance to the core center. The map traces the shape of the CO abundance profile between freeze-out ratios of 5-60% and shows that the CO2 ice abundance increases by a factor of 2 as the CO freezes out. It is suggested that this indicates a formation route of CO2 on a CO ice surface to produce a CO2 component dilute in CO ice, in addition to a fraction of the CO2 formed at lower densities along with the water ice mantle. It is predicted that the CO2 bending mode band profile should reflect a high CO:CO2 number ratio in the densest parts of dark clouds. In contrast to CO and CO2, the abundance of the carrier of the 6.8 micron band remains relatively constant throughout the core. A simple freeze-out model of the CO abundance profile is used to estimate the binding energy of CO on a CO ice surface to 814+/-30 K.

  4. PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

    2008-04-24

    The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

  5. Enzyme Kinetics: Theory and Practice Alistair Rogers and Yves Gibon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Alistair

    to the right, and the reverse reaction is infinitesimally small. We can define the reaction rate or velocity (v Enzymes, like all positive catalysts, dramatically increase the rate of a given reaction. Enzyme kinetics is principally concerned with the measurement and math- ematical description of this reaction rate and its

  6. A Chemical Kinetic Model of Transcriptional Elongation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yujiro Richard Yamada; Charles S. Peskin

    2006-05-23

    A chemical kinetic model of the elongation dynamics of RNA polymerase along a DNA sequence is introduced. The proposed model governs the discrete movement of the RNA polymerase along a DNA template, with no consideration given to elastic effects. The model's novel concept is a ``look-ahead'' feature, in which nucleotides bind reversibly to the DNA prior to being incorporated covalently into the nascent RNA chain. Results are presented for specific DNA sequences that have been used in single-molecule experiments of the random walk of RNA polymerase along DNA. By replicating the data analysis algorithm from the experimental procedure, the model produces velocity histograms, enabling direct comparison with these published results.

  7. Spectroscopy, Kinetics, and Dynamics of Combustion Radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesbitt, David J.

    2013-08-06

    Spectroscopy, kinetics and dynamics of jet cooled hydrocarbon transients relevant to the DOE combustion mission have been explored, exploiting i) high resolution IR lasers, ii) slit discharge sources for formation of jet cooled radicals, and iii) high sensitivity detection with direct laser absorption methods and near the quantum shot noise limit. What makes this combination powerful is that such transients can be made under high concentrations and pressures characteristic of actual combustion conditions, and yet with the resulting species rapidly cooled (T ?10-15K) in the slit supersonic expansion. Combined with the power of IR laser absorption methods, this provides novel access to spectral detection and study of many critical combustion species.

  8. Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Directives System is the means by which DOE policies, requirements, and responsibilities are developed and communicated throughout the Department. Directives are used to inform, direct, and guide employees in the performance of their jobs, and to enable employees to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public. Cancels: DOE O 251.1, DOE M 251.1-1

  9. Chemical kinetics and combustion modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, J.A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to gain qualitative insight into how pollutants are formed in combustion systems and to develop quantitative mathematical models to predict their formation rates. The approach is an integrated one, combining low-pressure flame experiments, chemical kinetics modeling, theory, and kinetics experiments to gain as clear a picture as possible of the process in question. These efforts are focused on problems involved with the nitrogen chemistry of combustion systems and on the formation of soot and PAH in flames.

  10. Spectroscopy and kinetics of combustion gases at high temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, R.K.; Bowman, C.T. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program involves two complementary activities: (1) development and application of cw ring dye laser absorption methods for sensitive detection of radical species and measurement of fundamental spectroscopic parameters at high temperatures; and (2) shock tube studies of reaction kinetics relevant to combustion. Species currently under investigation in the spectroscopic portion of the research include NO and CH{sub 3}; this has necessitated the continued operated at wavelengths in the range 210-230 nm. Shock tube studies of reaction kinetics currently are focussed on reactions involving CH{sub 3} radicals.

  11. Superthermal electron distribution measurements from polarized electron cyclotron emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luce, T.C.; Efthimion, P.C.; Fisch, N.J.

    1988-06-01

    Measurements of the superthermal electron distribution can be made by observing the polarized electron cyclotron emission. The emission is viewed along a constant magnetic field surface. This simplifies the resonance condition and gives a direct correlation between emission frequency and kinetic energy of the emitting electron. A transformation technique is formulated which determines the anisotropy of the distribution and number density of superthermals at each energy measured. The steady-state distribution during lower hybrid current drive and examples of the superthermal dynamics as the runaway conditions is varied are presented for discharges in the PLT tokamak. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  12. Sutherland/Carlin, Wind Energy 1998, ASME/AIAA AIAA-98-0064 DAMAGE MEASUREMENTS ON THE NWTC DIRECT-DRIVE,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is equipped with a set of composite blades and a direct-coupled, permanent magnet, 20-kW generator-speed mode. In the variable- speed mode, the generator torque is regulated, using a discrete-stepped load, i.e., using the load bank to maintain either generator torque or (optionally) generator power

  13. Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; Krejci, Michael; Mathieu, Olivier; Vissotski, Andrew; Ravi, Sankat; Plichta, Drew; Sikes, Travis; Levacque, Anthony; Camou, Alejandro; Aul, Christopher

    2013-09-30

    This final report documents the technical results of the 3-year project entitled, “Turbulent Flame Speeds and NOx Kinetics of HHC Fuels with Contaminants and High Dilution Levels,” funded under the NETL of DOE. The research was conducted under six main tasks: 1) program management and planning; 2) turbulent flame speed measurements of syngas mixtures; 3) laminar flame speed measurements with diluents; 4) NOx mechanism validation experiments; 5) fundamental NOx kinetics; and 6) the effect of impurities on NOx kinetics. Experiments were performed using primary constant-volume vessels for laminar and turbulent flame speeds and shock tubes for ignition delay times and species concentrations. In addition to the existing shock- tube and flame speed facilities, a new capability in measuring turbulent flame speeds was developed under this grant. Other highlights include an improved NOx kinetics mechanism; a database on syngas blends for real fuel mixtures with and without impurities; an improved hydrogen sulfide mechanism; an improved ammonia kintics mechanism; laminar flame speed data at high pressures with water addition; and the development of an inexpensive absorption spectroscopy diagnostic for shock-tube measurements of OH time histories. The Project Results for this work can be divided into 13 major sections, which form the basis of this report. These 13 topics are divided into the five areas: 1) laminar flame speeds; 2) Nitrogen Oxide and Ammonia chemical kinetics; 3) syngas impurities chemical kinetics; 4) turbulent flame speeds; and 5) OH absorption measurements for chemical kinetics.

  14. Electron kinetics inferred from observations of microwave bursts during edge localised modes in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freethy, S J; Chapman, S C; Dendy, R O; Lai, W N; Pamela, S J P; Shevchenko, V F; Vann, R G L

    2014-01-01

    Recent measurements of microwave and X-ray emission during edge localised mode (ELM) activity in tokamak plasmas provide a fresh perspective on ELM physics. It is evident that electron kinetics, which are not incorporated in standard (fluid) models for the instability that drives ELMs, play a key role in the new observations. These effects should be included in future models for ELMs and the ELM cycle. The observed radiative effects paradoxically imply acceleration of electrons parallel to the magnetic field combined with rapid acquisition of perpendicular momentum. It is shown that this paradox can be resolved by the action of the anomalous Doppler instability which enables fast collective radiative relaxation, in the perpendicular direction, of electrons accelerated in the parallel direction by inductive electric fields generated by the initial ELM instability.

  15. Analysis of a direct energy conversion system using medium energy helium ions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, Jesse James

    2006-08-16

    A scaled direct energy conversion device was built to convert kinetic energy of singly ionized helium ions into an electric potential by the process of direct conversion. The experiments in this paper aimed to achieve higher potentials and higher...

  16. A new water anomaly: the temperature dependence of the proton mean kinetic energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davide Flammini; Fabio Bruni; Maria Antonietta Ricci

    2009-01-28

    The mean kinetic energy of protons in water is determined by Deep Inelastic Neutron Scattering experiments, performed above and below the temperature of maximum density and in the supercooled phase. The temperature dependence of this energy shows an anomalous behavior, as it occurs for many water properties. In particular two regions of maximum kinetic energy are identified: the first one, in the supercooled phase in the range 269 K - 272 K, and a second one above 273 K. In both these regions the measured proton kinetic energy exceedes the theoretical prediction based on a semi-classical model. Noteworthy, the proton mean kinetic energy has a maximum at 277 K, the temperature of the maximum density of water. In the supercooled metastable phase the measured mean kinetic energy and the proton momentum distribution clearly indicate proton delocalization between two H-bonded oxygens.

  17. Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    alternative fuel utilization: detailed kinetic combustion modeling & experimental testing Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Fuels Chemical Kinetic Research on HCCI & Diesel Fuels...

  18. Kinetics of the carbon monoxide oxidation reaction under microwave heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perry, W.L.; Katz, J.D.; Rees, D.; Paffett, M.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Datye, A. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-06-01

    915 MHz microwave heating has been used to drive the CO oxidation reaction over Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with out significantly affecting the reaction kinetics. As compared to an identical conventionally heated system, the activation energy, pre-exponential factor, and reaction order with respect to CO were unchanged. Temperature was measured using a thermocouple extrapolation technique. Microwave-induced thermal gradients were found to play a significant role in kinetic observations. The authors chose the CO oxidation reaction over a supported metal catalyst because the reaction kinetics are well known, and because of the diverse dielectric properties of the various elements in the system: CO is a polar molecule, O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} are non-polar, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a dielectric, and Pt and Pd are conductors.

  19. Medicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    Prof. Donald G. Truhlar, Department of Chemistry, February 2007 Recent Results ·Novel analytic functionMedicinal Chemistry and Enzyme Kinetics Elizabeth Amin and C. R. Wagner, Medicinal Chemistry Jiali Gao, Chemistry Don Truhlar, Chemistry February 2007 #12;Zn Metalloprotein Force Field Design ·Zn

  20. Aerial Measuring System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1991-09-20

    To establish policy for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Program. This directive does not cancel another directive. Canceled by DOE O 153.1.

  1. Application of kinetic isotope effects and theoretical calculations to interesting reaction mechanisms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hirschi, Jennifer Sue

    2009-05-15

    A variety of biological and organic reaction mechanisms are studied using powerful tools from experimental and theoretical chemistry. These tools include the precise measurement of kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) and the ...

  2. Aging Effects on the Kinetics of Cesium Desorption from Vermiculite And Contaminated Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Aging Effects on the Kinetics of Cesium Desorption from Vermiculite And Contaminated Soil A. M), it is important to determine how aging affects 137 Cs desorption. This study uses a batch technique to measure 0

  3. Assisted extraction of the energy level spacings and lever arms in direct current bias measurements of one-dimensional quantum wires, using an image recognition routine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesage, A. A. J.; Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    2015-01-06

    routines. An algorithm is developed to find the spacing between discrete energy levels, which form due to transverse confinement from the split gate. The lever arm, which relates split gate voltage to energy, is also found from the measured data...

  4. Direct electrical observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-based two-dimensional electron gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Y.; Chen, W.; Li, W.; Zhu, M.; Yue, Y.; Song, B.; Encomendero, J.; Xing, H.; Fay, P.; Sensale-Rodriguez, B.

    2014-10-27

    In this work, signatures of plasma waves in GaN-based high electron mobility transistors were observed by direct electrical measurement at room temperature. Periodic grating-gate device structures were fabricated and characterized by on-wafer G-band (140–220?GHz) s-parameter measurements as a function of gate bias voltage and device geometry. A physics-based equivalent circuit model was used to assist in interpreting the measured s-parameters. The kinetic inductance extracted from the measurement data matches well with theoretical predictions, consistent with direct observation of plasma wave-related effects in GaN-channel devices at room temperature. This observation of electrically significant room-temperature plasma-wave effects in GaN-channel devices may have implications for future millimeter-wave and THz device concepts and designs.

  5. Total Cross Sections as a Surrogate for Neutron Capture: An Opportunity to Accurately Constrain (n,?) Cross Sections for Nuclides Beyond the Reach of Direct Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koehler, Paul E.

    2014-03-05

    There are many (n,?) cross sections of great interest to radiochemical diagnostics and to nuclear astrophysics which are beyond the reach of current measurement techniques, and likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. In contrast, total neutron cross sections currently are feasible for many of these nuclides and provide almost all the information needed to accurately calculate the (n,?) cross sections via the nuclear statistical model (NSM). I demonstrate this for the case of 151Sm; NSM calculations constrained using average resonance parameters obtained from total cross section measurements made in 1975, are in excellent agreement with recent 151Sm (n,?) measurements across a wide range of energy. Furthermore, I demonstrate through simulations that total cross section measurements can be made at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for samples as small as 10?g. Samples of this size should be attainable for many nuclides of interest. Finally, I estimate that over half of the radionuclides identified ?20 years ago as having (n,?) cross sections of importance to s-process nucleosynthesis studies (24/43) and radiochemical diagnostics (11/19), almost none of which have been measured, can be constrained using this technique.

  6. Directives Help

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    All DOE directives are available through this site. While it may seem overwhelming, given the number of documents, we have provided a number of ways in which you may get to the information you need.

  7. Direct Photons at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. David; for the PHENIX Collaboration

    2008-10-21

    Direct photons are ideal tools to investigate kinematical and thermodynamical conditions of heavy ion collisions since they are emitted from all stages of the collision and once produced they leave the interaction region without further modification by the medium. The PHENIX experiment at RHIC has measured direct photon production in p+p and Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV over a wide transverse momentum ($p_T$) range. The $p$ + $p$ measurements allow a fundamental test of QCD, and serve as a baseline when we try to disentangle more complex mechanisms producing high $p_T$ direct photons in Au+Au. As for thermal photons in Au+Au we overcome the difficulties due to the large background from hadronic decays by measuring "almost real" virtual photons which appear as low invariant mass $e^+e^-$ pairs: a significant excess of direct photons is measured above the above next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. Additional insights on the origin of direct photons can be gained with the study of the azimuthal anisotropy which benefits from the increased statistics and reaction plane resolution achieved in RHIC Year-7 data.

  8. Directional recoil rates for WIMP direct detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alenazi, Moqbil S.; Gondolo, Paolo [Department of Physics, University of Utah, 115 S 1400 E Rm 201, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112-0830 (United States)

    2008-02-15

    New techniques for the laboratory direct detection of dark matter weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) are sensitive to the recoil direction of the struck nuclei. We compute and compare the directional recoil rates dR/dcos{theta} (where {theta} is the angle measured from a reference direction in the sky) for several WIMP velocity distributions including the standard dark halo and anisotropic models such as Sikivie's late-infall halo model and logarithmic-ellipsoidal models. Since some detectors may be unable to distinguish the beginning of the recoil track from its end (lack of head-tail discrimination), we introduce a folded directional recoil rate dR/d|cos{theta}|, where |cos{theta}| does not distinguish the head from the tail of the track. We compute the CS{sub 2} and CF{sub 4} exposures required to distinguish a signal from an isotropic background noise, and find that dR/d|cos{theta}| is effective for the standard dark halo and some but not all anisotropic models.

  9. A Direct Measurement of tan(beta): e+e- -> bb -> bbA at a Future e+e- Linear Collider

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Berggren; R. Keranen; A. Sopczak

    1999-11-13

    The experimental sensitivity of the reaction e+e- -> bb -> bbA has been studied with a full-statistics background simulation for sqrt(s) = 500 GeV and L = 500 fb-1. The simulation is based on a fast and realistic simulation of a TESLA detector. For the first time this reaction has been analysed for a future linear collider and we show that a signal could be observed. A significant signal over background is achieved by the application of an Iterative Discriminant Analysis (IDA). For a signal production cross section of only 2 fb, which is expected for a Higgs boson mass of 100 GeV and tan(beta) = 50, we achieve 100 signal over 100 background events, and obtain for a tan(beta) measurement: Delta(tan(beta)) / tan(beta) = 0.07. This measurement requires a high-luminosity future collider as proposed in the TESLA project.

  10. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry in storage rings: First direct mass measurement of the short-lived neutron-deficient $^{51}$Co nuclide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Shuai; H. S. Xu; X. L. Tu; Y. H. Zhang; B. H. Sun; Yu. A. Litvinov; X. L. Yan; K. Blaum; M. Wang; X. H. Zhou; J. J. He; Y. Sun; K. Kaneko; Y. J. Yuan; J. W. Xia; J. C. Yang; G. Audi; X. C. Chen; G. B. Jia; Z. G. Hu; X. W. Ma; R. S. Mao; B. Mei; Z. Y. Sun; S. T. Wang; G. Q. Xiao; X. Xu; T. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamaguchi; Y. D. Zang; H. W. Zhao; T. C. Zhao; W. Zhang; W. L. Zhan

    2014-04-08

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.

  11. Charge and frequency resolved isochronous mass spectrometry in storage rings: First direct mass measurement of the short-lived neutron-deficient $^{51}$Co nuclide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuai, P; Tu, X L; Zhang, Y H; Sun, B H; Litvinov, Yu A; Yan, X L; Blaum, K; Wang, M; Zhou, X H; He, J J; Sun, Y; Kaneko, K; Yuan, Y J; Xia, J W; Yang, J C; Audi, G; Chen, X C; Jia, G B; Hu, Z G; Ma, X W; Mao, R S; Mei, B; Sun, Z Y; Wang, S T; Xiao, G Q; Xu, X; Yamaguchi, T; Yamaguchi, Y; Zang, Y D; Zhao, H W; Zhao, T C; Zhang, W; Zhan, W L

    2014-01-01

    Revolution frequency measurements of individual ions in storage rings require sophisticated timing detectors. One of common approaches for such detectors is the detection of secondary electrons released from a thin foil due to penetration of the stored ions. A new method based on the analysis of intensities of secondary electrons was developed which enables determination of the charge of each ion simultaneously with the measurement of its revolution frequency. Although the mass-over-charge ratios of $^{51}$Co$^{27+}$ and $^{34}$Ar$^{18+}$ ions are almost identical, and therefore, the ions can not be resolved in a storage ring, by applying the new method the mass excess of the short-lived $^{51}$Co is determined for the first time to be ME($^{51}$Co)=-27342(48) keV. Shell-model calculations in the $fp$-shell nuclei compared to the new data indicate the need to include isospin-nonconserving forces.

  12. Measurements of charge and light in pure high pressure Xe towards the study of Xe+TMA mixtures with dark matter directionality sensitivity and supra-intrinsic energy resolution for 0??? decay searches

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Oliveira, C. A.B.; Gehman, V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Nygren, D.; Renner, J.

    2015-03-24

    Trimethylamine (TMA) may improve the energy resolution of gaseous xenon based detectors for 0??? decay searches through the reduction of the Fano factor by the Penning effect. This molecule may also be the key for sensing directionality of nuclear recoils induced by Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs) in monolithic massive (ton-scale) detectors, without the need of track imaging, by making use of columnar recombination. Nuclear recoil directionality may be the path for a definite discovery of the WIMP nature of Dark Matter. An ionization chamber has been constructed and operated to explore the properties of high pressure gaseous Xe +more »TMA mixtures for particle detection in rare-event experiments. The ionization, scintillation and electroluminescence (EL) signals are measured as function of pressure and electric field. We present results for pure xenon at pressures up to 8 bar. This work has been carried out within the context of the NEXT collaboration.« less

  13. Understanding S-shaped current-voltage characteristics of organic solar cells: Direct measurement of potential distributions by scanning Kelvin probe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saive, Rebecca Kowalsky, Wolfgang; Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig; Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg ; Mueller, Christian; Kirchhoff-Institute for Physics, Heidelberg University, 69120 Heidelberg ; Schinke, Janusz; Lovrincic, Robert; Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik, TU Braunschweig, 38106 Braunschweig

    2013-12-09

    We present a comparison of the potential distribution along the cross section of bilayer poly(3-hexylthiophene)/1-(3-methoxycarbonyl)propyl-1-phenyl[6,6]C61 (P3HT/PCBM) solar cells, which show normal and anomalous, S-shaped current-voltage (IV) characteristics. We expose the cross sections of the devices with a focussed ion beam and measure them with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy. We find that in the case of S-shaped IV-characteristics, there is a huge potential drop at the PCBM/Al top contact, which does not occur in solar cells with normal IV-characteristics. This behavior confirms the assumption that S-shaped curves are caused by hindered charge transport at interfaces.

  14. Eco Kinetics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek EuropeEPG|ElecSolutionsKinetics Jump

  15. Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Extinction and Ignition of Methyl Decanoate in Laminar Nonpremixed Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seshadri, K; Lu, T; Herbinet, O; Humer, S; Niemann, U; Pitz, W J; Law, C K

    2008-01-09

    Methyl decanoate is a large methyl ester that can be used as a surrogate for biodiesel. In this experimental and computational study, the combustion of methyl decanoate is investigated in nonpremixed, nonuniform flows. Experiments are performed employing the counterflow configuration with a fuel stream made up of vaporized methyl decanoate and nitrogen, and an oxidizer stream of air. The mass fraction of fuel in the fuel stream is measured as a function of the strain rate at extinction, and critical conditions of ignition are measured in terms of the temperature of the oxidizer stream as a function of the strain rate. It is not possible to use a fully detailed mechanism for methyl decanoate to simulate the counterflow flames because the number of species and reactions is too large to employ with current flame codes and computer resources. Therefore a skeletal mechanism was deduced from a detailed mechanism of 8555 elementary reactions and 3036 species using 'directed relation graph' method. This skeletal mechanism has only 713 elementary reactions and 125 species. Critical conditions of ignition were calculated using this skeletal mechanism and are found to agree well with experimental data. The predicted strain rate at extinction is found to be lower than the measurements. In general, the methyl decanoate mechanism provides a realistic kinetic tool for simulation of biodiesel fuels.

  16. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  17. Mechanism and kinetics of phase transitions and other reactions in solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuri Mnyukh

    2011-10-07

    The work is presented, leading to the universal contact molecular mechanism of phase transitions and other reactions in solid state. The two components of the mechanism - nucleation and interface propagation - are investigated in detail and their role in the kinetics is specified. They were shown to be peculiar: nucleation is "pre-coded", rather than resulted from a successful fluctuation, and the interface propagates by molecular filling of thin layers in the transverse direction. The structure of the nucleation sites is determined. The inherent instability and irreproducibility of the kinetics in question is revealed. A linear kinetics, as opposed to the bulk kinetics, is introduced and shown to be in accord with the contact mechanism. Ferromagnetic phase transition and magnetization are added to the list of solid-state reactions; neither occurs without structural rearrangement.

  18. Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma Kinetics Spanning Multiple Collisionality Regimes Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Multiscale Mathematics For Plasma...

  19. The Fractional Kinetic Equation and Thermonuclear Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    2000-01-16

    The paper discusses the solution of a simple kinetic equation of the type used for the computation of the change of the chemical composition in stars like the Sun. Starting from the standard form of the kinetic equation it is generalized to a fractional kinetic equation and its solutions in terms of H-functions are obtained. The role of thermonuclear functions, which are also represented in terms of G- and H-functions, in such a fractional kinetic equation is emphasized. Results contained in this paper are related to recent investigations of possible astrophysical solutions of the solar neutrino problem.

  20. DRIVING DIRECTIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent Bonding Low-Cost2 DOE HQSiteo n n eDPFJ.D.DRIVING DIRECTIONS

  1. Direct Frisk

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferences BetweenDirac ChargeSolarDirect

  2. Chemical kinetics and oil shale process design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burnham, A.K.

    1993-07-01

    Oil shale processes are reviewed with the goal of showing how chemical kinetics influences the design and operation of different processes for different types of oil shale. Reaction kinetics are presented for organic pyrolysis, carbon combustion, carbonate decomposition, and sulfur and nitrogen reactions.

  3. Nonequilibrium sensing and its analogy to kinetic proofreading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartich, David; Seifert, Udo

    2015-01-01

    For a paradigmatic model of chemotaxis, we analyze the effect how a nonzero affinity driving receptors out of equilibrium affects sensitivity. This affinity arises whenever changes in receptor activity involve ATP hydrolysis. The sensitivity integrated over a ligand concentration range is shown to be enhanced by the affinity, providing a measure of how much energy consumption improves sensing. With this integrated sensitivity we can establish an intriguing analogy between sensing with nonequilibrium receptors and kinetic proofreading: the increase in integrated sensitivity is equivalent to the decrease of the error in kinetic proofreading. The influence of the occupancy of the receptor on the phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reaction rates is shown to be crucial for the relation between integrated sensitivity and affinity. This influence can even lead to a regime where a nonzero affinity decreases the integrated sensitivity, which corresponds to anti-proofreading.

  4. RESOLUTION OF URANIUM ISOTOPES WITH KINETIC PHOSPHORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, Sarah M.; Hylden, Anne T.; Friese, Judah I.

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to test the ability of the Chemchek™ Kinetic Phosphorescence Analyzer Model KPA-11 with an auto-sampler to resolve the difference in phosphorescent decay rates of several different uranium isotopes, and therefore identify the uranium isotope ratios present in a sample. Kinetic phosphorescence analysis (KPA) is a technique that provides rapid, accurate, and precise determination of uranium concentration in aqueous solutions. Utilizing a pulsed-laser source to excite an aqueous solution of uranium, this technique measures the phosphorescent emission intensity over time to determine the phosphorescence decay profile. The phosphorescence intensity at the onset of decay is proportional to the uranium concentration in the sample. Calibration with uranium standards results in the accurate determination of actual concentration of the sample. Different isotopes of uranium, however, have unique properties which should result in different phosphorescence decay rates seen via KPA. Results show that a KPA is capable of resolving uranium isotopes.

  5. Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Xiaoming

    2012-09-26

    The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

  6. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vera Mikyoung Hur

    2015-09-01

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic.

  7. Kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of solitary waves in deep water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hur, Vera Mikyoung

    2015-01-01

    We present an exact relation among the kinetic, potential and surface tension energies of a solitary wave in deep water in all dimensions. We deduce its non-existence in the absence of the effects of surface tension, provided that gravity acts in a direction opposite to what is physically realistic.

  8. Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuwana, Eddy

    2005-08-29

    implant, the fluorescent decay kinetics can be sensitive to the tissue??s biochemical environment, providing quantitative in vivo information of the confined tissue site. The impact of light propagation and decay kinetics upon the measured signals...

  9. Measurements of Evaporation Kinetics of Pure Water and Salt Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drisdell, Walter

    2010-01-01

    sat is the equilibrium vapor pressure, and the accommodationB (1969) Algorithms For Vapor Pressure Of Water Over Aqueous= p 2 ? mkT , where p is the vapor pressure above the liquid

  10. Hydrogen pickup measurements in zirconium alloys: Relation to oxidation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    , Vacuum Hot Extraction, and a non-destructive one, Cold Neutron Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis, indicating that, if transport of charged species is rate limiting, oxide transport properties such as oxide transport. Ó 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Uniform corrosion of zirconium alloy

  11. Recent Advances in Detailed Chemical Kinetic Models for Large Hydrocarbon and Biodiesel Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Curran, H J; Herbinet, O; Mehl, M

    2009-03-30

    n-Hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane represent the primary reference fuels for diesel that are used to determine cetane number, a measure of the ignition property of diesel fuel. With the development of chemical kinetics models for these two primary reference fuels for diesel, a new capability is now available to model diesel fuel ignition. Also, we have developed chemical kinetic models for a whole series of large n-alkanes and a large iso-alkane to represent these chemical classes in fuel surrogates for conventional and future fuels. Methyl decanoate and methyl stearate are large methyl esters that are closely related to biodiesel fuels, and kinetic models for these molecules have also been developed. These chemical kinetic models are used to predict the effect of the fuel molecule size and structure on ignition characteristics under conditions found in internal combustion engines.

  12. Direct neutrino mass measurements after PLANCK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    The absolute mass scale of neutrinos remains an open question subject to experimental investigation from both particle physics and cosmology. Over the next decade, a number of experiments from both disciplines will attempt ...

  13. Direct measurement and characterization of active photosynthesis...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    process optimization. Authors: Bernstein, Hans C. ; Kesaano, Maureen ; Moll, Karen ; Smith, Terence ; Gerlach, Robin ; Carlson, Ross ; Miller, Charles D. ; Peyton, Brent ;...

  14. Direct measurement and analysis of cyclohexadienyl oxidation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, James Wagner

    2005-01-01

    The oxidation of cyclohexadienyl radical (c-C?H?) and similar resonantly stabilized radicals are important in an astonishing array of processes in nature. Cyclohexadienyl radical has been postulated to be significant in a ...

  15. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discoverydiffuse

  16. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave broadband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Data Discoverydiffusedirect normal

  17. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct downwelling irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling irradiance

  18. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave narrowband direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwelling irradiancenormal

  19. ARM - Measurement - Shortwave spectral direct normal irradiance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Homepolarization ARM Datadownwellingdownwellingdiffusedirect

  20. Physical limits on cellular directional mechanosensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouffanais, Roland

    Many eukaryotic cells are able to perform directional mechanosensing by directly measuring minute spatial differences in the mechanical stress on their membranes. Here, we explore the limits of a single mechanosensitive ...

  1. Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid Flow Variations. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidics: Kinetics of Hybridized DNA With Fluid...

  2. Model simplification of chemical kinetic systems under uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coles, Thomas Michael Kyte

    2011-01-01

    This thesis investigates the impact of uncertainty on the reduction and simplification of chemical kinetics mechanisms. Chemical kinetics simulations of complex fuels are very computationally expensive, especially when ...

  3. Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Large kinetic asymmetry in the metal-insulator transition nucleated at localized and extended defects Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Large kinetic...

  4. A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data A Study and Comparison of SCR Reaction Kinetics from Reactor and Engine Experimental Data...

  5. Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons Global kinetics for a commercial diesel oxidation catalyst with two exhaust hydrocarbons...

  6. Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC Improving Combustion Software to Solve Detailed Chemical Kinetics for HECC 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program...

  7. Modeling of Reactor Kinetics and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Johnson; Scott Lucas; Pavel Tsvetkov

    2010-09-01

    In order to model a full fuel cycle in a nuclear reactor, it is necessary to simulate the short time-scale kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the long time-scale dynamics that occur with fuel burnup. The former is modeled using the point kinetics equations, while the latter is modeled by coupling fuel burnup equations with the kinetics equations. When the equations are solved simultaneously with a nonlinear equation solver, the end result is a code with the unique capability of modeling transients at any time during a fuel cycle.

  8. Bench-scale Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Blythe; John Currie; David DeBerry

    2008-03-31

    This document is the final report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42314, 'Kinetics Study of Mercury Reactions in FGD Liquors'. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory and EPRI. The objective of the project has been to determine the mechanisms and kinetics of the aqueous reactions of mercury absorbed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems, and develop a kinetics model to predict mercury reactions in wet FGD systems. The model may be used to determine optimum wet FGD design and operating conditions to maximize mercury capture in wet FGD systems. Initially, a series of bench-top, liquid-phase reactor tests were conducted and mercury species concentrations were measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy to determine reactant and byproduct concentrations over time. Other measurement methods, such as atomic absorption, were used to measure concentrations of vapor-phase elemental mercury, that cannot be measured by UV/visible light spectroscopy. Next, a series of bench-scale wet FGD simulation tests were conducted. Because of the significant effects of sulfite concentration on mercury re-emission rates, new methods were developed for operating and controlling the bench-scale FGD experiments. Approximately 140 bench-scale wet FGD tests were conducted and several unusual and pertinent effects of process chemistry on mercury re-emissions were identified and characterized. These data have been used to develop an empirically adjusted, theoretically based kinetics model to predict mercury species reactions in wet FGD systems. The model has been verified in tests conducted with the bench-scale wet FGD system, where both gas-phase and liquid-phase mercury concentrations were measured to determine if the model accurately predicts the tendency for mercury re-emissions. This report presents and discusses results from the initial laboratory kinetics measurements, the bench-scale wet FGD tests, and the kinetics modeling efforts.

  9. On the relationships between the Michaelis–Menten kinetics, reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics, equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics, and quadratic kinetics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tang, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    The Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics are two popular mathematical formulations used in many land biogeochemical models to describe how microbes and plants would respond to changes in substrate abundance. However, the criteria of when to use either of the two are often ambiguous. Here I show that these two kinetics are special approximations to the equilibrium chemistry approximation (ECA) kinetics, which is the first-order approximation to the quadratic kinetics that solves the equation of an enzyme–substrate complex exactly for a single-enzyme and single-substrate biogeochemical reaction with the law of mass action and the assumption of a quasi-steadymore »state for the enzyme–substrate complex and that the product genesis from enzyme–substrate complex is much slower than the equilibration between enzyme–substrate complexes, substrates, and enzymes. In particular, I show that the derivation of the Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the substrate, and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics does not consider the mass balance constraint of the enzyme, whereas both of these constraints are taken into account in deriving the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics. By benchmarking against predictions from the quadratic kinetics for a wide range of substrate and enzyme concentrations, the Michaelis–Menten kinetics was found to persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k2+ of the reaction velocity v with respect to the maximum product genesis rate k2+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln k1+ of v with respect to the intrinsic substrate affinity k1+, persistently overpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [E]T of v with respect the total enzyme concentration [E]T, and persistently underpredict the normalized sensitivity ? ln v / ? ln [S]T of v with respect to the total substrate concentration [S]T. Meanwhile, the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics persistently underpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k2+ and ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and persistently overpredicts ? ln v / ? ln k1+ and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T. In contrast, the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics always gives consistent predictions of ? ln v / ? ln k2+, ? ln v / ? ln k1+, ? ln v / ? ln [E]T, and ? ln v / ? ln [S]T, indicating that ECA-based models will be more calibratable if the modeled processes do obey the law of mass action. Since the equilibrium chemistry approximation kinetics includes advantages from both the Michaelis–Menten kinetics and the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics and it is applicable for almost the whole range of substrate and enzyme abundances, land biogeochemical modelers therefore no longer need to choose when to use the Michaelis–Menten kinetics or the reverse Michaelis–Menten kinetics. I expect that removing this choice ambiguity will make it easier to formulate more robust and consistent land biogeochemical models.« less

  10. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission Measurements. A High Temperature Direct Vehicle Exhaust Flowmeter for Heavy Duty Diesel Emission...

  11. Relativistic theory of nuclear spin-rotation tensor with kinetically balanced rotational London orbitals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Zhang, Yong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-10-28

    Both kinetically balanced (KB) and kinetically unbalanced (KU) rotational London orbitals (RLO) are proposed to resolve the slow basis set convergence in relativistic calculations of nuclear spin-rotation (NSR) coupling tensors of molecules containing heavy elements [Y. Xiao and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 134104 (2013)]. While they perform rather similarly, the KB-RLO Ansatz is clearly preferred as it ensures the correct nonrelativistic limit even with a finite basis. Moreover, it gives rise to the same “direct relativistic mapping” between nuclear magnetic resonance shielding and NSR coupling tensors as that without using the London orbitals [Y. Xiao, Y. Zhang, and W. Liu, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 10, 600 (2014)].

  12. Nonlinear response theory in chemical kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kryvohuz, M; Mukamel, S

    2014-01-01

    ?D(t) are D 0 (t) = (1) Chemical reactions, N h i ( x , t) iOF NONLINEAR RESPONSE THEORY TO CHEMICAL KINETICS Equation (non- linear responses of chemical systems to perturbations

  13. Time integration methods for reactor kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nóbrega, José de Anchieta Wanderley da

    A technique based on the Padé approximations is applied to the solution of the point kinetics equations. The method consists of treating explicitly the roots of the inhour formula which would make the Padé approximations ...

  14. Kinetics of Anionic Surfactant Anoxic Degradation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, Julianna G.

    2010-07-14

    The biodegradation kinetics of Geropon TC-42 (trademark) by an acclimated culture was investigated in anoxic batch reactors to determine biokinetic coefficients to be implemented in two biofilm mathematical models. Geropon ...

  15. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  16. Kinetic decoupling of WIMPs: analytic expressions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visinelli, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present a general expression for the values of the average kinetic energy and of the temperature of kinetic decoupling of a WIMP, valid for any cosmological model. We show an example of the usage of our solution when the Hubble rate has a power-law dependence on temperature, and we show results for the specific cases of kination cosmology and low- temperature reheating cosmology.

  17. A Characterization and Evaluation of Coal Liquefaction Process Streams The Kinetics of Coal Liquefaction Distillation Resid Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.Campbell; D.G. Nichols; D.J. Pazuchanics; H.Huang; M.T.Klein; R.A. Winschel; S.D. Brandes; S.Wang; W.H. Calkins

    1998-06-04

    Under subcontract from CONSOL Inc. (DOE Contract N o. DE- AC22- 94PC93054), the University of Delaware studied the mechanism and kinetics of coal liquefaction resid conversion. Th e program at Delaware was conducted be tween August 15, 1994, and April 30, 1997. It consisted of two primary tasks. The first task was to develop an empirical test to measure the reactivit y toward hydrocracking of coal- derived distillation resids. The second task was to formulate a computer model to represent the structure of the resids and a kinetic and mechanistic model of resid reactivity based on the structural representations. An Introduction and Summary of th e project authored by CONSOL and a report of the program findings authored by the University of Delaware researchers are presented here. INTRODUCTION Resid hydrocracking is a key reaction of modern (i. e., distillate- producing) coal liquefactio n processes. Coals are readily converted to resid a nd lighter products in the liquefaction process. The resid is combined with fr esh coal in a ratio often greater than 1: 1, and some vacuum gas oil and is recycled to be further converted. Understanding the chemistry of resids and resi d reactivity is important to improve direct liquefaction process design and to achieve economi c objectives for direct coal liquefaction. Computational models that predict resid conversion from the chemical characteristics of the resids and reaction conditions would be a cost- efficient way to explore process variables. Implementation of such models could aid in the design an d operation of liquefaction facilities.

  18. Bio-butanol: Combustion properties and detailed chemical kinetic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, G.; Curran, H.J.; Pichon, S.; Simmie, J.M.; Zhukov, V.

    2010-02-15

    Autoignition delay time measurements were performed at equivalence ratios of 0.5, 1 and 2 for butan-1-ol at reflected shock pressures of 1, 2.6 and 8 atm at temperatures from 1100 to 1800 K. High-level ab initio calculations were used to determine enthalpies of formation and consequently bond dissociation energies for each bond in the alcohol. A detailed chemical kinetic model consisting of 1399 reactions involving 234 species was constructed and tested against the delay times and also against recent jet-stirred reactor speciation data with encouraging results. The importance of enol chemistry is highlighted. (author)

  19. A microfluidic device for investigating crystal nucleation kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Laval; Jean-Baptiste Salmon; Mathieu Joanicot

    2006-12-20

    We have developed an original setup using microfluidic tools allowing one to produce continuously monodisperse microreactors ($\\approx 100$ nL), and to control their temperatures as they flow in the microdevice. With a specific microchannels geometry, we are able to apply large temperature quenches to droplets containing a KNO$_3$ solution (up to 50$^{\\circ}$C in 10 s), and then to follow nucleation kinetics at high supersaturations. By measuring the probability of crystal presence in the droplets as a function of time, we estimate the nucleation rate for different supersaturations, and confront our results to the classical nucleation theory.

  20. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  1. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  2. Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Chernogolovka, July 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Kinetic equation for a soliton gas Gennady El Chernogolovka, July 2009 Gennady El Kinetic equation, Kinetic equation for solitons, JETP (1971) Here we consider only strongly integrable systems (like KdV, NLS etc.) Gennady El Kinetic equation for a soliton gas #12;From N-solitons/N-gap potentials

  3. Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Extending Newton's Law from Nonlocal-in-Time Kinetic Energy J.A.K. Suykens K.U. Leuven, ESAT: nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy, higher order Euler-Lagrange equation, Newton's sec- ond law of motion the kinetic energy with a form of nonlocal-in-time kinetic energy. It leads to a hypothetical extension

  4. Mechanism and kinetics of peptide partitioning into membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulmschneider, Martin [University of Oxford; Killian, J Antoinette [University of Utrecht; Doux, Jacques P. F. [University of Utrecht; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL; Ulmschneider, Jakob [University of Heidelberg

    2010-02-01

    Partitioning properties of transmembrane (TM) polypeptide segments directly determine membrane protein folding, stability, and function, and their understanding is vital for rational design of membrane active peptides. However, direct determination of water-to-bilayer transfer of TM peptides has proved difficult. Experimentally, sufficiently hydrophobic peptides tend to aggregate, while atomistic computer simulations at physiological temperatures cannot yet reach the long time scales required to capture partitioning. Elevating temperatures to accelerate the dynamics has been avoided, as this was thought to lead to rapid denaturing. However, we show here that model TM peptides (WALP) are exceptionally thermostable. Circular dichroism experiments reveal that the peptides remain inserted into the lipid bilayer and are fully helical, even at 90 C. At these temperatures, sampling is 50 500 times faster, sufficient to directly simulate spontaneous partitioning at atomic resolution. A folded insertion pathway is observed, consistent with three-stage partitioning theory. Elevated temperature simulation ensembles further allow the direct calculation of the insertion kinetics, which is found to be first-order for all systems. Insertion barriers are Hin = 15 kcal/mol for a general hydrophobic peptide and 23 kcal/mol for the tryptophan-flanked WALP peptides. The corresponding insertion times at room temperature range from 8.5 s to 163 ms. High-temperature simulations of experimentally validated thermostable systems suggest a new avenue for systematic exploration of peptide partitioning properties.

  5. Alfvenic Turbulence in the Extended Solar Corona: Kinetic Effects and Proton Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. Cranmer; A. A. van Ballegooijen

    2003-05-08

    We present a model of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the extended solar corona that contains the effects of collisionless dissipation and anisotropic particle heating. Measurements made by UVCS/SOHO have revived interest in the idea that ions are energized by the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant waves, but such high-frequency (i.e., small wavelength) fluctuations have not been observed. A turbulent cascade is one possible way of generating small-scale fluctuations from a pre-existing population of low-frequency MHD waves. We model this cascade as a combination of advection and diffusion in wavenumber space. The dominant spectral transfer occurs in the direction perpendicular to the background magnetic field. As expected from earlier models, this leads to a highly anisotropic fluctuation spectrum with a rapidly decaying tail in parallel wavenumber. The wave power that decays to high enough frequencies to become ion cyclotron resonant depends on the relative strengths of advection and diffusion in the cascade. For the most realistic values of these parameters, though, there is insufficient power to heat protons and heavy ions. The dominant oblique fluctuations (with dispersion properties of kinetic Alfven waves) undergo Landau damping, which implies strong parallel electron heating. We discuss the probable nonlinear evolution of the electron velocity distributions into parallel beams and discrete phase-space holes (similar to those seen in the terrestrial magnetosphere) which can possibly heat protons via stochastic interactions.

  6. Position and energy-resolved particle detection using phonon-mediated microwave kinetic inductance detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, D. C.; Golwala, S. R.; Cornell, B. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Bumble, B.; Day, P. K.; LeDuc, H. G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Zmuidzinas, J. [Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2012-06-04

    We demonstrate position and energy-resolved phonon-mediated detection of particle interactions in a silicon substrate instrumented with an array of microwave kinetic inductance detectors (MKIDs). The relative magnitude and delay of the signal received in each sensor allow the location of the interaction to be determined with < or approx. 1mm resolution at 30 keV. Using this position information, variations in the detector response with position can be removed, and an energy resolution of {sigma}{sub E} = 0.55 keV at 30 keV was measured. Since MKIDs can be fabricated from a single deposited film and are naturally multiplexed in the frequency domain, this technology can be extended to provide highly pixelized athermal phonon sensors for {approx}1 kg scale detector elements. Such high-resolution, massive particle detectors would be applicable to rare-event searches such as the direct detection of dark matter, neutrinoless double-beta decay, or coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering.

  7. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-08-16

    The Order is the primary directive for administering the Department's directives Program. Cancels: DOE O 251.1A

  8. Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Advanced Transportation Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PItz, W J; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O

    2009-01-20

    Development of detailed chemical kinetic models for advanced petroleum-based and nonpetroleum based fuels is a difficult challenge because of the hundreds to thousands of different components in these fuels and because some of these fuels contain components that have not been considered in the past. It is important to develop detailed chemical kinetic models for these fuels since the models can be put into engine simulation codes used for optimizing engine design for maximum efficiency and minimal pollutant emissions. For example, these chemistry-enabled engine codes can be used to optimize combustion chamber shape and fuel injection timing. They also allow insight into how the composition of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels affect engine performance characteristics. Additionally, chemical kinetic models can be used separately to interpret important in-cylinder experimental data and gain insight into advanced engine combustion processes such as HCCI and lean burn engines. The objectives are: (1) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for components of advanced petroleum-based and non-petroleum based fuels. These fuels models include components from vegetable-oil-derived biodiesel, oil-sand derived fuel, alcohol fuels and other advanced bio-based and alternative fuels. (2) Develop detailed chemical kinetic reaction models for mixtures of non-petroleum and petroleum-based components to represent real fuels and lead to efficient reduced combustion models needed for engine modeling codes. (3) Characterize the role of fuel composition on efficiency and pollutant emissions from practical automotive engines.

  9. Observation of a crossover in kinetic aggregation of Palladium colloids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ghafari; M. Ranjbar; S. Rouhani

    2014-12-27

    We use field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) to investigate the growth of palladium colloids over the surface of thin films of WO3/glass. The film is prepared by Pulsed Laser Deposition (PLD) at different temperatures. A PdCl2 (aq) droplet is injected on the surface and in the presence of steam hydrogen the droplet is dried through a reduction reaction process. Two distinct aggregation regimes of palladium colloids are observed over the substrates. We argue that the change in aggregation dynamics emerges when the measured water drop Contact Angel (CA) for the WO3/glass thin films passes a certain threshold value, namely CA = 46 degrees, where a crossover in kinetic aggregation of palladium colloids occurs. Our results suggest that the mass fractal dimension of palladium aggregates follows a power-law behavior. The fractal dimension (Df) in the fast aggregation regime, where the measured CA values vary from 27 up to 46 degrees, according to different substrate deposition temperatures, is Df = 1.75 (0.02). This value of Df is in excellent agreement with kinetic aggregation of other colloidal systems in fast aggregation regime. Whereas for the slow aggregation regime, with CA = 58 degrees, the fractal dimension changes abruptly to Df=1.92 (0.03). We have also used a modified Box-Counting method to calculate fractal dimension of gray-level images and observe that the crossover at around CA = 46 degrees remains unchanged.

  10. Kinetic Model Development for the Combustion of Particulate Matter from Conventional and Soy Methyl Ester Diesel Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strzelec, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    The primary objective of this research has been to investigate how the oxidation characteristics of diesel particulate matter (PM) are affected by blending soy-based biodiesel fuel with conventional ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel. PM produced in a light duty engine from different biodiesel-conventional fuel blends was subjected to a range of physical and chemical measurements in order to better understand the mechanisms by which fuel-related changes to oxidation reactivity are brought about. These observations were then incorporated into a kinetic model to predict PM oxidation. Nanostructure of the fixed carbon was investigated by HR-TEM and showed that particulates from biodiesel had a more open structure than particulates generated from conventional diesel fuel, which was confirmed by BET surface area measurements. Surface area evolution with extent of oxidation reaction was measured for PM from ULSD and biodiesel. Biodiesel particulate has a significantly larger surface area for the first 40% of conversion, at which point the samples become quite similar. Oxidation characteristics of nascent PM and the fixed carbon portion were measured by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO) and it was noted that increased biodiesel blending lowered the light-off temperature as well as the temperature where the peak rate of oxidation occurred. A shift in the oxidation profiles of all fuels was seen when the mobile carbon fraction was removed, leaving only the fixed carbon, however the trend in temperature advantage of the biofuel blending remained. The mobile carbon fraction was measured by temperature programmed desorption found to generally increase with increasing biodiesel blend level. The relative change in the light-off temperatures for the nascent and fixed carbon samples was found to be related to the fraction of mobile carbon. Effective Arrhenius parameters for fixed carbon oxidation were directly measured with isothermal, differential oxidation experiments. Normalizing the reaction rate to the total carbon surface area available for reaction allowed for the definition of a single reaction rate with constant activation energy (112.5 {+-} 5.8 kJ/mol) for the oxidation of PM, independent of its fuel source. A kinetic model incorporating the surface area dependence of fixed carbon oxidation rate and the impact of the mobile carbon fraction was constructed and validated against experimental data.

  11. Kinetics and Equilibrium of Gas Adsorption on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    Kinetics and Equilibrium of Gas Adsorption on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC Metal-Organic Frameworks and equilibrium adsorption measurements for two gases, CF4 and Ar, on RPM1-Co and Cu-BTC metal-organic framework.597) on both adsorbents. The results show that both gases behave differently on Cu-BTC from the way they do

  12. CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal degrees of freedom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Persson, Mats

    CO2 sticking on Pt(111); the role of kinetic energy and internal, S-412 96, G"oteborg, Sweden Abstract CO2 adsorbed measurements of non-dissociative sticking coefficient, S0, of CO2 on the Pt(111) surfac* *e

  13. Directional detection of galactic dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayet, F; Santos, D

    2012-01-01

    Directional detection is a promising Dark Matter search strategy. Taking advantage on the rotation of the Solar system around the galactic center through the Dark Matter halo, it allows to show a direction dependence of WIMP events that may be a powerful tool to identify genuine WIMP events as such. Directional detection strategy requires the simultaneous measurement of the energy and the 3D track of low energy recoils, which is a common challenge for all current projects of directional detectors.

  14. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-03-14

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  15. Energy dissipation in magnetic null points at kinetic scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olshevsky, Vyacheslav; Eriksson, Elin; Markidis, Stefano; Lapenta, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    We use kinetic particle-in-cell and magnetohydrodynamic simulations supported by an observational dataset to investigate magnetic reconnection in clusters of null points in space plasma. The magnetic configuration under investigation is driven by fast adiabatic flux rope compression that dissipates almost half of the initial magnetic field energy. In this phase powerful currents are excited producing secondary instabilities, and the system is brought into a state of `intermittent turbulence' within a few ion gyro-periods. Reconnection events are distributed all over the simulation domain and energy dissipation is rather volume-filling. Numerous spiral null points interconnected via their spines form null lines embedded into magnetic flux ropes; null point pairs demonstrate the signatures of torsional spine reconnection. However, energy dissipation mainly happens in the shear layers formed by adjacent flux ropes with oppositely directed currents. In these regions radial null pairs are spontaneously emerging an...

  16. Diffusion Controlled Reactions, Fluctuation Dominated Kinetics, and Living Cell Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konkoli, Zoran

    2009-01-01

    In recent years considerable portion of the computer science community has focused its attention on understanding living cell biochemistry and efforts to understand such complication reaction environment have spread over wide front, ranging from systems biology approaches, through network analysis (motif identification) towards developing language and simulators for low level biochemical processes. Apart from simulation work, much of the efforts are directed to using mean field equations (equivalent to the equations of classical chemical kinetics) to address various problems (stability, robustness, sensitivity analysis, etc.). Rarely is the use of mean field equations questioned. This review will provide a brief overview of the situations when mean field equations fail and should not be used. These equations can be derived from the theory of diffusion controlled reactions, and emerge when assumption of perfect mixing is used.

  17. An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study of Methyl Decanoate Combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarathy, S M; Thomson, M J; Pitz, W J; Lu, T

    2010-02-19

    Biodiesel is typically a mixture of long chain fatty acid methyl esters for use in compression ignition engines. Improving biofuel engine performance requires understanding its fundamental combustion properties and the pathways of combustion. This research study presents new combustion data for methyl decanoate in an opposed-flow diffusion flame. An improved detailed chemical kinetic model for methyl decanoate combustion is developed, which serves as the basis for deriving a skeletal mechanism via the direct relation graph method. The novel skeletal mechanism consists of 648 species and 2998 reactions. This mechanism well predicts the methyl decanoate opposed-flow diffusion flame data. The results from the flame simulations indicate that methyl decanoate is consumed via abstraction of hydrogen atoms to produce fuel radicals, which lead to the production of alkenes. The ester moiety in methyl decanoate leads to the formation of low molecular weight oxygenated compounds such as carbon monoxide, formaldehyde, and ketene.

  18. Kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durant, J.L. Jr. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This program concerning kinetic studies of elementary chemical reactions is presently focussed on understanding reactions of NH{sub x} species. To reach this goal, the author is pursuing experimental studies of reaction rate coefficients and product branching fractions as well as using electronic structure calculations to calculate transition state properties and reaction rate calculations to relate these properties to predicted kinetic behavior. The synergy existing between the experimental and theoretical studies allow one to gain a deeper insight into more complex elementary reactions.

  19. Plasma turbulence and kinetic instabilities at ion scales in the expanding solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hellinger, Petr; Landi, Simone; Verdini, Andrea; Franci, Luca; Travnicek, Pavel M

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between a decaying strong turbulence and kinetic instabilities in a slowly expanding plasma is investigated using two-dimensional (2-D) hybrid expanding box simulations. We impose an initial ambient magnetic field perpendicular to the simulation box, and we start with a spectrum of large-scale, linearly-polarized, random-phase Alfv\\'enic fluctuations which have energy equipartition between kinetic and magnetic fluctuations and vanishing correlation between the two fields. A turbulent cascade rapidly develops, magnetic field fluctuations exhibit a Kolmogorov-like power-law spectrum at large scales and a steeper spectrum at ion scales. The turbulent cascade leads to an overall anisotropic proton heating, protons are heated in the perpendicular direction, and, initially, also in the parallel direction. The imposed expansion leads to generation of a large parallel proton temperature anisotropy which is at later stages partly reduced by turbulence. The turbulent heating is not sufficient to overco...

  20. Isopiestic Kinetics of Powdered Pd/C/DPB Composite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinh, L; Saab, A

    2008-05-30

    In a 2006 LLNL internal report, a study of DEB and DPB based hydrogen getter materials was described. The materials, consisting of DEB or DPB physically blended with amorphous carbon on which palladium nanoparticle catalyst was supported, were studied during the course of reaction with fixed aliquots of hydrogen gas in order to observe their hydrogen consumption capacities as a function of ambient hydrogen pressure. The experiments demonstrated that the getter capacity was directly proportional to hydrogen fugacity: the lower the initial hydrogen pressure, the lower the resultant capacity at correspondingly low steady-state pressures. In the course of these experiments, further interesting observations were made of DEB and DPB reduction by hydrogen gas that painted a picture of a complicated reaction mechanism. To summarize, it was determined that reaction rate was controlled partly by diffusion of the organic diacetylene toward the catalyst surface. The results indicated this diffusion was in turn enhanced by phase changes in the course of the reaction that result in a liquid phase of the getter, and also by the heat of reaction, itself being proportional to initial reaction rate. However, these same two terms were speculated to have negative impacts on the net reaction kinetics, as well. It was suggested the liquid phase served to block gas access, and that excessively fast initial rates limited rate and capacity at later times by creating a depletion zone of reactant around the catalyst. Because of the nature of the experiments, whereby both hydrogen pressure and getter activity were changing in time, actual kinetic information could not be gathered. Knowledge of the reaction rate characteristics of these materials as a function of pressure and temperature is crucial to understanding the overall behavior of this material in service. Further, direct observation of the reaction rate can permit estimates of the diffusion of the reactive species. The present work centers on the development of an understanding of the kinetics for the hydrogenation of DPB and DEB as a function of temperature and pressure.

  1. Proton Kinetic Effects and Turbulent Energy Cascade Rate in the Solar Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osman, Kareem T; Kiyani, Khurom H; Hnat, Bogdan; Chapman, Sandra C

    2013-01-01

    The first observed connection between kinetic instabilities driven by proton temperature anisotropy and estimated energy cascade rates in the turbulent solar wind is reported using measurements from the Wind spacecraft at 1 AU. We find enhanced cascade rates are concentrated along the boundaries of the ($\\beta_{\\parallel}$, $T_{\\perp}/T_{\\parallel}$)-plane, which includes regions theoretically unstable to the mirror and firehose instabilities. A strong correlation is observed between the estimated cascade rate and kinetic effects such as temperature anisotropy and plasma heating, resulting in protons 5-6 times hotter and 70-90% more anisotropic than under typical isotropic plasma conditions. These results offer new insights into kinetic processes in a turbulent regime.

  2. Pattern Formation and Growth Kinetics in Eutectic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jing Teng

    2007-12-01

    Growth patterns during liquid/solid phase transformation are governed by simultaneous effects of heat and mass transfer mechanisms, creation of new interfaces, jump of the crystallization units from liquid to solid and their rearrangement in the solid matrix. To examine how the above processes influence the scale of microstructure, two eutectic systems are chosen for the study: a polymeric system polyethylene glycol-p-dibromobenzene (PEG-DBBZ) and a simple molecular system succinonitrile (SCN)-camphor. The scaling law for SCN-camphor system is found to follow the classical Jackson-Hunt model of circular rod eutectic, where the diffusion in the liquid and the interface energy are the main physics governing the two-phase pattern. In contrast, a significantly different scaling law is observed for the polymer system. The interface kinetics of PEG phase and its solute concentration dependence thus have been critically investigated for the first time by directional solidification technique. A model is then proposed that shows that the two-phase pattern in polymers is governed by the interface diffusion and the interface kinetics. In SCN-camphor system, a new branch of eutectic, elliptical shape rodl, is found in thin samples where only one layer of camphor rods is present. It is found that the orientation of the ellipse can change from the major axis in the direction of the thickness to the direction of the width as the velocity and/or the sample thickness is decreased. A theoretical model is developed that predicts the spacing and orientation of the elliptical rods in a thin sample. The single phase growth patterns of SCN-camphor system were also examined with emphasis on the three-dimensional single cell and cell/dendrite transition. For the 3D single cell in a capillary tube, the entire cell shape ahead of the eutectic front can be described by the Saffmann-Taylor finger only at extremely low growth rate. A 3D directional solidification model is developed to characterize the cell shape and tip undercooling and the experimental results are compared with the predictions of the model. From the investigation of cell/dendrite transition, a model is proposed, from which the condition for the onset of the transition can be obtained.

  3. DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meller, Amit

    DNA Nanomechanical Switches under Folding Kinetics Control Virgile Viasnoff,, Amit Meller operate at equilibrium under changes in solution composition. We propose an alternative DNA switch design after heat denaturation drives the switch to its lowest energy conformation, while rapid cooling (>100

  4. Nonlocal kinetic equation: integrable hydrodynamic reductions, symmetries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Troitsk, Moscow Region, Russia Lebedev Physical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow § SISSA, Trieste, Italy, and Institute of Metal Physics, Urals Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg, Russia We study a new class of nonlinear kinetic equations recently derived in the context

  5. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinner, Aaron

    STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF PROTEIN FOLDING KINETICS AARON R. DINNER New Chemistry Laboratory for Protein Folding: Advances in Chemical Physics, Volume 120. Edited by Richard A. Friesner. Series Editors Experimental and theoretical studies have led to the emergence of a unified general mechanism for protein

  6. Calcite Reaction Kinetics in Saline Waters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finneran, David

    2012-02-14

    The effect of ionic strength (I), pCO2, and temperature on the reaction kinetics of calcite was investigated in magnesium-free, phosphate-free, low calcium (mCa^2 ? 0.01 – 0.02 molal) simple KCl and NaCl solutions from both undersaturated...

  7. CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEM 6471 CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS AND KINETICS Class Meetings 9:35 ­ 10:55 am, Tuesday and Thursday of October 22-26 Textbooks Molecular Thermodynamics by D.A McQuarrie and J.D. Simon, University Science Books the laws of classical thermodynamics and some of their chemical applications. It also covers basic

  8. Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Scott

    Computationally Efficient Model for Dopant Precipitation Kinetics Iuval Clejan and Scott T. Dunham and precipitates. Dopant deactivation is typically modeled using a steady­state solid solubility or clustering such as dopant activation/deactivation, it is essential to consider the fact that precipitation involves a range

  9. Nonlinear regression technique to estimate kinetic parameters and confidence intervals in unsteady-state conduction-heated foods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be heated in a pressure vessel or oil bath, and some temperature-measuring device (e.g., a thermocouple, there is no standard method to estimate kinetic parameters in low-moisture, conduction-heated foods subject and maintain pressure. As temperatures and pressure increase, measuring sample temperature may become

  10. Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Wenpeng Liu*,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Three-Dimensional Simulations of Liquid Feed Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Wenpeng Liu*,a and Chao that performance and design of a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell DMFC is controlled not only by electrochemical kinetics and methanol crossover but also by water transport and by their complex interactions

  11. Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking: Extended

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmead, Christopher James

    Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking: Extended Abstract Abstract. We present a novel approach for predicting protein folding kinetics using techniques from checking. We tested our method on 19 test proteins. The quantitative predictions regarding folding rates

  12. Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jeff Haack: Applications of computational kinetic theory Jan 28 2014 10:15 AM - 11:15 AM ORNL CONTACT : Email: Billy Fields Phone: Add to Calendar SHARE Kinetic theory describes...

  13. “Batch” Kinetics in Flow: Online IR Analysis and Continuous Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason S.

    Currently, kinetic data is either collected under steady-state conditions in flow or by generating time-series data in batch. Batch experiments are generally considered to be more suitable for the generation of kinetic ...

  14. Ethylbenzene dehydrogenation into styrene: kinetic modeling and reactor simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Won Jae

    2007-04-25

    A fundamental kinetic model based upon the Hougen-Watson formalism was derived as a basis not only for a better understanding of the reaction behavior but also for the design and simulation of industrial reactors. Kinetic ...

  15. Reflected kinetics model for nuclear space reactor kinetics and control scoping calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model that offers an alternative to the point kinetics (PK) modelling approach in the analysis of space reactor kinetics and control studies. Modelling effort will focus on the explicit treatment of control drums as reactivity input devices so that the transition to automatic control can be smoothly done. The proposed model is developed for the specific integration of automatic control and the solution of the servo mechanism problem. The integration of the kinetics model with an automatic controller will provide a useful tool for performing space reactor scoping studies for different designs and configurations. Such a tool should prove to be invaluable in the design phase of a space nuclear system from the point of view of kinetics and control limitations.

  16. Directives Quarterly Updates

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly.

  17. Kinetic neoclassical transport in the H-mode pedestal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battaglia, D. J.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S.; Grierson, B. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Grassie, J. S. de

    2014-07-15

    Multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport through the QH-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D is calculated using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density, and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. The radial electric field (E{sub r}) that maintains ambipolar transport across flux surfaces and to the wall is computed self-consistently on closed and open magnetic field lines and is in excellent agreement with experiment. The E{sub r} inside the separatrix is the unique solution that balances the outward flux of thermal tail deuterium ions against the outward neoclassical electron flux and inward pinch of impurity and colder deuterium ions. Particle transport in the pedestal is primarily due to anomalous transport, while the ion heat and momentum transport are primarily due to the neoclassical transport. The full-f treatment quantifies the non-Maxwellian energy distributions that describe a number of experimental observations in low-collisionallity pedestals on DIII-D, including intrinsic co-I{sub p} parallel flows in the pedestal, ion temperature anisotropy, and large impurity temperatures in the scrape-off layer.

  18. Evaluation of a hybrid kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion model for turbulent premixed and diffusion combustion using KIVA-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, H.L.; Wey, Mingjyh.

    1990-01-01

    Two dimensional calculations were made of spark ignited premixed-charge combustion and direct injection stratified-charge combustion in gasoline fueled piston engines. Results are obtained using kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction or a hybrid laminar kinetics/mixing-controlled combustion submodel that accounts for laminar kinetics and turbulent mixing effects. The numerical solutions are obtained by using KIVA-2 computer code which uses a kinetic-controlled combustion submodel governed by a four-step global chemical reaction (i.e., it assumes that the mixing time is smaller than the chemistry). A hybrid laminar/mixing-controlled combustion submodel was implemented into KIVA-2. In this model, chemical species approach their thermodynamics equilibrium with a rate that is a combination of the turbulent-mixing time and the chemical-kinetics time. The combination is formed in such a way that the longer of the two times has more influence on the conversion rate and the energy release. An additional element of the model is that the laminar-flame kinetics strongly influence the early flame development following ignition.

  19. Chemical Kinetics Research on HCCI and Diesel Fuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses detailed chemical kinetics mechanisms for complex hydrocarbon fuels and computationally efficiecnt, accurate methodologies for modeling advanced combustion strategies.

  20. A continuum theory of phase separation kinetics for active Brownian particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joakim Stenhammar; Adriano Tiribocchi; Rosalind J. Allen; Davide Marenduzzo; Michael E. Cates

    2013-10-03

    Active Brownian particles (ABPs), when subject to purely repulsive interactions, are known to undergo activity-induced phase separation broadly resembling an equilibrium (attraction-induced) gas-liquid coexistence. Here we present an accurate continuum theory for the dynamics of phase-separating ABPs, derived by direct coarse-graining, capturing leading-order density gradient terms alongside an effective bulk free energy. Such gradient terms do not obey detailed balance; yet we find coarsening dynamics closely resembling that of equilibrium phase separation. Our continuum theory is numerically compared to large-scale direct simulations of ABPs and accurately accounts for domain growth kinetics, domain topologies and coexistence densities.

  1. Measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Willis, W.L.

    1980-10-01

    The discussion will be restricted to measurements of voltage and current. Also, although the measurements themselves should be as quantitative as possible, the discussion is rather nonquantitative. Emphasis is on types of instruments, how they may be used, and the inherent advantages and limitations of a given technique. A great deal of information can be obtained from good, clean voltage and current data. Power and impedance are obviously inherent if the proper time relationships are preserved. Often an associated, difficult-to-determine, physical event can be evaluated from the V-I data, such as a time-varying load characteristic, or the time of light emission, etc. The lack of active high voltage devices, such as 50-kV operational amplifiers, restricts measurement devices to passive elements, primarily R and C. There are a few more exotic techniques that are still passive in nature. There are several well-developed techniques for voltage measurements. These include: spark gaps; electrostatic meters; capacitive dividers; mixed RC dividers; and the electro-optic effect. Current is measured by either direct measurement of charge flow or by measuring the resulting magnetic field.

  2. MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyer, Christian

    MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin Submitted in partial and Sciences COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY 2006 #12;MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE;ABSTRACT MODELING OF HYDRATION KINETICS AND SHRINKAGE OF PORTLAND CEMENT PASTE Feng Lin A mathematical

  3. Harvesting Kinetic Energy with Switched-Inductor DCDC Converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rincon-Mora, Gabriel A.

    energy in motion may not compete with solar power but, in contrast to indoor lighting and thermal sources- power piezoelectric and electrostatic kinetic-harvesting sources. I. HARVESTING KINETIC ENERGY temperature gradients, the fundamental source from which the device draws energy [3]. Harvesting the kinetic

  4. Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Correlation and Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Topic 4 Correlation and Regression Transformed Variables 1 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Outline Worldwide Oil Production Michaelis-Menten Kinetics Lineweaver-Burke double reciprocal plot 2 / 13 #12;Worldwide Oil Production

  5. Kinetics of solid-gas reactions characterized by scanning AC nano-calorimetry with application to Zr oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Kechao; Lee, Dongwoo; Vlassak, Joost J., E-mail: vlassak@esag.harvard.edu [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, 29 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

    2014-10-27

    Scanning AC nano-calorimetry is a recently developed experimental technique capable of measuring the heat capacity of thin-film samples of a material over a wide range of temperatures and heating rates. Here, we describe how this technique can be used to study solid-gas phase reactions by measuring the change in heat capacity of a sample during reaction. We apply this approach to evaluate the oxidation kinetics of thin-film samples of zirconium in air. The results confirm parabolic oxidation kinetics with an activation energy of 0.59?±?0.03 eV. The nano-calorimetry measurements were performed using a device that contains an array of micromachined nano-calorimeter sensors in an architecture designed for combinatorial studies. We demonstrate that the oxidation kinetics can be quantified using a single sample, thus enabling high-throughput mapping of the composition-dependence of the reaction rate.

  6. Cyclization and Catenation Directed by Molecular Self-Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Li Q.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Exarhos, Gregory J.; Li, Alexander D.

    2006-08-30

    We report here that molecular self-assembly can effectively direct and enhance specific reaction pathways. Using perylene??-??stacking weak attractive forces, we succeeded in synthesizing perylene bisimide macrocyclic dimer and a concatenated dimer-dimer ring from dynamic self-assembly of monomeric bis-N, N’-(2-(2-(2-(2-thioacetyl ethoxy) ethoxy) ethoxy) ethyl) perylene tetracarboxylic diimide. The monocyclic ring closure and the dimer-dimer ring concatenation were accomplished through formation of disulfide bonds, which was readily triggered by air oxidization under basic deacetylation conditions. The perylene cyclic dimer and its concatenated tetramer were characterized using both structural methods (NMR, mass spectroscopy) and photophysical measurements (UV-vis spectroscopy). Kinetic analyses offer informative insights about reaction pathways and possible mechanisms, which lead to the formation of fascinating concatenated rings. Molecular dynamic behaviors of both the monocyclic dimer and the concatenated dimer-dimer ring were modeled with the NWChem molecular dynamics software module, which shows distinct stacking activities for the monocyclic dimer and the concatenated tetramer.

  7. HTP kinetics studies on isolated elementary combustion reactions over wide temperature ranges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fontijn, A.; Adusei, G.Y.; Hranisavlevic, J.; Bajaj, P.N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goals of this project are to provide accurate data on the temperature dependence of the kinetics of elementary combustion reactions, (i) for use by combustion modelers, and (ii) to gain a better fundamental understanding of, and hence predictive ability for, the chemistry involved. Experimental measurements are made mainly by using the pseudo-static HTP (high-temperature photochemistry) technique. While continuing rate coefficient measurements, further aspects of kinetics research are being explored. Thus, starting from the data obtained, a method for predicting the temperature dependence of rate coefficients of oxygen-atom olefin experiment and confirms the underlying mechanistic assumptions. Mechanistic information of another sort, i.e. by product analysis, has recently become accessible with the inauguration of our heated flow tube mass spectrometer facility; early results are reported here. HTP experiments designed to lead to measurements of product channels by resonance fluorescence have started.

  8. An experimental and kinetic modelling study of the oxidation of the four isomers of butanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moss, J T; Oehlschlaeger, M A; Biet, Joffrey; Warth, Valérie; Glaude, Pierre-Alexandre; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; 10.1021/jp806464p

    2008-01-01

    Butanol, an alcohol which can be produced from biomass sources, has received recent interest as an alternative to gasoline for use in spark ignition engines and as a possible blending compound with fossil diesel or biodiesel. Therefore, the autoignition of the four isomers of butanol (1-butanol, 2-butanol, iso-butanol, and tert-butanol) has been experimentally studied at high temperatures in a shock tube and a kinetic mechanism for description of their high-temperature oxidation has been developed. Ignition delay times for butanol/oxygen/argon mixtures have been measured behind reflected shock waves at temperatures and pressures ranging from approximately 1200 to 1800 K and 1 to 4 bar. Electronically excited OH emission and pressure measurements were used to determine ignition delay times. A detailed kinetic mechanism has been developed to describe the oxidation of the butanol isomers and validated by comparison to the shock tube measurements. Reaction flux and sensitivity analysis indicate that the consumpti...

  9. The Autoignition of iso-Cetane: Shock Tube Experiments and Kinetic Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oehlschlaeger, M A; Steinberg, J; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J

    2009-02-25

    Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {Phi} = 0.5 and 1.0 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 953 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements and detailed kinetic mechanism for isocetane presented here are the first of their kind.

  10. Stepping and crowding of molecular motors: statistical kinetics from an exclusion process perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Ciandrini; M. Carmen Romano; A. Parmeggiani

    2014-05-26

    Motor enzymes are remarkable molecular machines that use the energy derived from the hydrolysis of a nucleoside triphosphate to generate mechanical movement, achieved through different steps that constitute their kinetic cycle. These macromolecules, nowadays investigated with advanced experimental techniques to unveil their molecular mechanisms and the properties of their kinetic cycles, are implicated in many biological processes, ranging from biopolymerisation (e.g. RNA polymerases and ribosomes) to intracellular transport (motor proteins such as kinesins or dyneins). Although the kinetics of individual motors is well studied on both theoretical and experimental grounds, the repercussions of their stepping cycle on the collective dynamics still remains unclear. Advances in this direction will improve our comprehension of transport process in the natural intracellular medium, where processive motor enzymes might operate in crowded conditions. In this work, we therefore extend the current statistical kinetic analysis to study collective transport phenomena of motors in terms of lattice gas models belonging to the exclusion process class. Via numerical simulations, we show how to interpret and use the randomness calculated from single particle trajectories in crowded conditions. Importantly, we also show that time fluctuations and non-Poissonian behavior are intrinsically related to spatial correlations and the emergence of large, but finite, clusters of co-moving motors. The properties unveiled by our analysis have important biological implications on the collective transport characteristics of processive motor enzymes in crowded conditions.

  11. Temperature estimates from zircaloy oxidation kinetics and microstructures. [PWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    This report reviews state-of-the-art capability to determine peak zircaloy fuel rod cladding temperatures following an abnormal temperature excursion in a nuclear reactor, based on postirradiation metallographic analysis of zircaloy microstructural and oxidation characteristics. Results of a comprehensive literature search are presented to evaluate the suitability of available zircaloy microstructural and oxidation data for estimating anticipated reactor fuel rod cladding temperatures. Additional oxidation experiments were conducted to evaluate low-temperature zircaloy oxidation characteristics for postirradiation estimation of cladding temperature by metallographic examination. Results of these experiments were used to calculate peak cladding temperatures of electrical heater rods and nuclear fuel rods that had been subjected to reactor temperature transients. Comparison of the calculated and measured peak cladding temperatures for these rods indicates that oxidation kinetics is a viable technique for estimating peak cladding temperatures over a broad temperature range. However, further improvement in zircaloy microstructure technology is necessary for precise estimation of peak cladding temperatures by microstructural examination.

  12. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Sandoval-Villalbazo; A. R. Sagaceta-Mejia; A. L. Garcia-Perciante

    2015-02-20

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowksi space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  13. On the kinetic foundations of Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandoval-Villalbazo, A; Garcia-Perciante, A L

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has shown the existence of a relativistic effect present in a single component non-equilibrium fluid, corresponding to a heat flux due to an electric field. The treatment in that work was limited to a four-dimensional Minkowksy space-time in which the Boltzmann equation was treated in a special relativistic approach. The more complete framework of general relativity can be introduced to kinetic theory in order to describe transport processes associated to electromagnetic fields. In this context the original Kaluza's formalism is a promising approach. The present work contains a kinetic theory basis for Kaluza's magnetohydrodynamics and gives a novel description for the establishment of thermodynamic forces beyond the special relativistic description.

  14. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sircar, S

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of el...

  15. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lionel Foret; Pierre Sens

    2008-07-28

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also triggered by factors such as the presence of cargo and variation of the membrane mechanical tension, allows for efficient regulation of vesicle secretion. We propose a model, supported by different experimental observations, in which vesiculation of secretory membranes is impaired by the energy consuming desorption of coat proteins, until the presence of cargo or other factors triggers a dynamical switch into a vesicle producing state.

  16. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howes, G G

    2007-01-01

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the ther...

  17. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  18. Departmental Directives Program - DOE Directives, Delegations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE O 251.1C, Departmental Directives Program and Conforming Changes to DOE O 252.1, Technical Standards Program Redline of DOE O 251.1D - First Draft Comment Response Report...

  19. Direct/Indirect Costs

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28

    This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

  20. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1998-01-30

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1A, Directives System, dated 1-30-98.

  1. The Excitation Energy Dependence of the Total Kinetic Energy Release in 235U(n,f)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Yanez; L. Yao; J. King; W. Loveland; F. Tovesson; N. Fotiades

    2014-03-18

    The total kinetic energy release in the neutron induced fission of $^{235}$U was measured (using white spectrum neutrons from LANSCE) for neutron energies from E$_{n}$ = 3.2 to 50 MeV. In this energy range the average post-neutron total kinetic energy release drops from 167.4 $\\pm$ 0.7 to 162.1 $\\pm$ 0.8 MeV, exhibiting a local dip near the second chance fission threshold. The values and the slope of the TKE vs. E$_{n}$ agree with previous measurements but do disagree (in magnitude) with systematics. The variances of the TKE distributions are larger than expected and apart from structure near the second chance fission threshold, are invariant for the neutron energy range from 11 to 50 MeV. We also report the dependence of the total excitation energy in fission, TXE, on neutron energy.

  2. Phi-values in protein folding kinetics have energetic and structural components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudia Merlo; Ken A. Dill; Thomas R. Weikl

    2005-07-14

    Phi-values are experimental measures of how the kinetics of protein folding is changed by single-site mutations. Phi-values measure energetic quantities, but are often interpreted in terms of the structures of the transition state ensemble. Here we describe a simple analytical model of the folding kinetics in terms of the formation of protein substructures. The model shows that Phi-values have both structural and energetic components. In addition, it provides a natural and general interpretation of "nonclassical" Phi-values (i.e., less than zero, or greater than one). The model reproduces the Phi-values for 20 single-residue mutations in the alpha-helix of the protein CI2, including several nonclassical Phi-values, in good agreement with experiments.

  3. Pedestal Fueling Simulations with a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D.P. Stotler, C.S. Chang, S.H. Ku, J. Lang and G.Y. Park

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  4. Energy Conservation Tests of a Coupled Kinetic-kinetic Plasma-neutral Transport Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stotler, D. P.; Chang, C. S.; Ku, S. H.; Lang, J.; Park, G.

    2012-08-29

    A Monte Carlo neutral transport routine, based on DEGAS2, has been coupled to the guiding center ion-electron-neutral neoclassical PIC code XGC0 to provide a realistic treatment of neutral atoms and molecules in the tokamak edge plasma. The DEGAS2 routine allows detailed atomic physics and plasma-material interaction processes to be incorporated into these simulations. The spatial pro le of the neutral particle source used in the DEGAS2 routine is determined from the uxes of XGC0 ions to the material surfaces. The kinetic-kinetic plasma-neutral transport capability is demonstrated with example pedestal fueling simulations.

  5. Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Combustion of Hydrocarbon and Other Types of Chemical Fuels

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Reaction mechanisms have been tested and validated extensively through comparisons between computed results and measured data from laboratory experiments (e.g., shock tubes, laminar flames, rapid compression machines, flow reactors, stirred reactors) and from practical systems (e.g., diesel engines, spark-ignition engines, homogeneous charge, compression ignition (HCCI) engines). These kinetic models are used to examine a wide range of combustion systems.

  6. Aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis: carbon-13 kinetic isotope effect and deuterium exchange experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, R.M.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1985-03-26

    The authors have measured the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect at pH 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 6.5 and in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 and the rate of D-H exchange of the alpha and beta protons of aspartic acid in D/sub 2/O at pH 5.0 for the reaction catalyzed by the enzyme aspartate beta-decarboxylase from Alcaligenes faecalis. The /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect, with a value of 1.0099 +/- 0.0002 at pH 5.0, is less than the intrinsic isotope effect for the decarboxylation step, indicating that the decarboxylation step is not entirely rate limiting. The authors have been able to estimate probable values of the relative free energies of the transition states of the enzymatic reaction up to and including the decarboxylation step from the /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effect and the rate of D-H exchange of alpha-H. The pH dependence of the kinetic isotope effect reflects the pKa of the pyridine nitrogen of the coenzyme pyridoxal 5'-phosphate but not that of the imine nitrogen. A mechanism is proposed for the exchange of aspartate beta-H that is consistent with the stereochemistry suggested earlier.

  7. Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped Ge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhaohong

    Direct band gap narrowing in highly doped n-type Ge is observed through photoluminescence measurements by determining the spectrum peak shift. A linear relationship between the direct band gap emission and carrier concentration ...

  8. Studies of combustion kinetics and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutman, D. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The objective of the current research is to gain new quantitative knowledge of the kinetics and mechanisms of polyatomic free radicals which are important in hydrocarbon combustion processes. The special facility designed and built for these (which includes a heatable tubular reactor coupled to a photoionization mass spectrometer) is continually being improved. Where possible, these experimental studies are coupled with theoretical ones, sometimes conducted in collaboration with others, to obtain an improved understanding of the factors determining reactivity. The decomposition of acetyl radicals, isopropyl radicals, and n-propyl radicals have been studied as well as the oxidation of methylpropargyl radicals.

  9. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0.76. Silicone rubber based DEB getters hydride at a much lower rate, have little dependence on reaction extent, have a higher kinetic order in pressure (0.87), and have a lower activation energy. The kinetics of the reaction as a function of hydrogen pressure, stoichiometry, and temperature for hydrogen and deuterium near ambient temperature (0 to 75 C) for pressures near or below 100 Pa over a wide range (in some cases, the complete) hydrogenation range are presented along with multi-dimensional rate models.

  10. Ionization based multi-directional flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Casleton, Kent H. (Morgantown, WV)

    2009-04-28

    A method, system, and apparatus for conducting real-time monitoring of flow (airflow for example) in a system (a hybrid power generation system for example) is disclosed. The method, system and apparatus measure at least flow direction and velocity with minimal pressure drop and fast response. The apparatus comprises an ion source and a multi-directional collection device proximate the ion source. The ion source is configured to generate charged species (electrons and ions for example). The multi-directional collection source is configured to determine the direction and velocity of the flow in real-time.

  11. Directives Tools - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeetingDifferencesPlatinumDirections New
Directives &

  12. Directives - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections &Directions

  13. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    -- Washington D.C. es17sastry.pdf More Documents & Publications Modeling-Thermo-electrochemistry, Capacity Degradation and Mechanics with SEI Layer Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and...

  14. Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Evaluation of Thermal Evolution Profiles and Estimation of Kinetic Parameters for Pyrolysis of CoalCorn Stover Blends Using Thermogravimetric Analysis Citation Details...

  15. Pressure Dependent Decomposition Kinetics of the Energetic Material...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Org: USDOE Country of Publication: United States Language: English Subject: 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ACCELERATION; DIAMONDS; KINETICS; PYROLYSIS...

  16. Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    subsequent to shock in an unreacted, oxygen balanced mixture of nitromethane and hydrogen peroxide Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ultrafast kinetics subsequent to...

  17. Microscale Electrode Design Using Coupled Kinetic, Thermal and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    geothermal systems (EGS) | geothermal 2015 peer review Coupled Kinetic, Thermal, and Mechanical Modeling of FIB Micro-machined Electrodes 2015 GTO Peer Review | Poster Session...

  18. Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Uranium and Strontium Batch Sorption and Diffusion Kinetics into Mesoporous Silica Friday, February 27, 2015 Figure 1 Figure 1. Transmission electron microscopy images of (A)...

  19. Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intercalation Kinetics and Ion Mobility in Electrode Materials for Advanced Lithium Ion Batteries 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  20. Ion mediated crosslink driven mucous swelling kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sircar; A. J. Roberts

    2015-01-20

    We present an experimentally guided, multi-phasic, multi-species ionic gel model to compare and make qualitative predictions on the rheology of mucus of healthy individuals (Wild Type) versus those infected with Cystic Fibrosis. The mixture theory consists of the mucus (polymer phase) and water (solvent phase) as well as several different ions: H+, Na+ and Ca++. The model is linearized to study the hydration of spherically symmetric mucus gels and calibrated against the experimental data of mucus diffusivities. Near equilibrium, the linearized form of the equation describing the radial size of the gel, reduces to the well-known expression used in the kinetic theory of swelling hydrogels. Numerical studies reveal that the Donnan potential is the dominating mechanism driving the mucus swelling/deswelling transition. However, the altered swelling kinetics of the Cystic Fibrosis infected mucus is not merely governed by the hydroelectric composition of the swelling media, but also due to the altered movement of electrolytes as well as due to the defective properties of the mucin polymer network.

  1. Kinetic modelling of runaway electron avalanches in tokamak plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nilsson, E; Peysson, Y; Granetz, R S; Saint-Laurent, F; Vlainic, M

    2015-01-01

    Runaway electrons (REs) can be generated in tokamak plasmas if the accelerating force from the toroidal electric field exceeds the collisional drag force due to Coulomb collisions with the background plasma. In ITER, disruptions are expected to generate REs mainly through knock-on collisions, where enough momentum can be transferred from existing runaways to slow electrons to transport the latter beyond a critical momentum, setting off an avalanche of REs. Since knock-on runaways are usually scattered off with a significant perpendicular component of the momentum with respect to the local magnetic field direction, these particles are highly magnetized. Consequently, the momentum dynamics require a full 3-D kinetic description, since these electrons are highly sensitive to the magnetic non-uniformity of a toroidal configuration. A bounce-averaged knock-on source term is derived. The generation of REs from the combined effect of Dreicer mechanism and knock-on collision process is studied with the code LUKE, a s...

  2. Directional detection of dark matter streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciaran A. J. O'Hare; Anne M. Green

    2014-11-11

    Directional detection of WIMPs, in which the energies and directions of the recoiling nuclei are measured, currently presents the only prospect for probing the local velocity distribution of Galactic dark matter. We investigate the extent to which future directional detectors would be capable of probing dark matter substructure in the form of streams. We analyse the signal expected from a Sagittarius-like stream and also explore the full parameter space of stream speed, direction, dispersion and density. Using a combination of non-parametric directional statistics, a profile likelihood ratio test and Bayesian parameter inference we find that within acceptable exposure times (O(10) kg yr for cross sections just below the current exclusion limits) future directional detectors will be sensitive to a wide range of stream velocities and densities. We also examine and discuss the importance of the energy window of the detector.

  3. Kinetic extensions of magnetohydrodynamic models for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1989-04-01

    A nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K) has been developed to integrate a set of non-Hermitian integro-differential eigenmode equations due to energetic particles for axisymmetric toroidal plasmas in a general flux coordinate system with an arbitrary Jacobian. The NOVA-K code employs the Galerkin method involving Fourier expansions in the generalized poloidal angle theta and generalized toroidal angle /zeta/ directions, and cubic-B spline finite elements in the radial /Psi/ direction. Extensive comparisons with the existing variational ideal MHD codes show that the ideal MHD version of the NOVA-K code converges faster and gives more accurate results. The NOVA-K code is employed to study the effects of energetic particles on MHD-type modes: the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of ''fishbone'' internal kink modes; and the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are also presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n = 1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beta space exists even in the absence of the core ion finite Larmor radius effect. On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to have negligible effects on the stability of the n = 1 internal kink mode, but the circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 60 refs., 24 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, R.D.; Heck, G.M.; Kohler, S.M.; Watts, A.C.

    1982-09-08

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single offshore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on an electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block about the gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to te gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and angular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors. 25 figures.

  5. Wellbore inertial directional surveying system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andreas, Ronald D. (Albuquerque, NM); Heck, G. Michael (Albuquerque, NM); Kohler, Stewart M. (Albuquerque, NM); Watts, Alfred C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A wellbore inertial directional surveying system for providing a complete directional survey of an oil or gas well borehole to determine the displacement in all three directions of the borehole path relative to the well head at the surface. The information generated by the present invention is especially useful when numerous wells are drilled to different geographical targets from a single off-shore platform. Accurate knowledge of the path of the borehole allows proper well spacing and provides assurance that target formations are reached. The tool is lowered down into a borehole on the electrical cable. A computer positioned on the surface communicates with the tool via the cable. The tool contains a sensor block which is supported on a single gimbal, the rotation axis of which is aligned with the cylinder axis of the tool and, correspondingly, the borehole. The gyroscope measurement of the sensor block rotation is used in a null-seeking servo loop which essentially prevents rotation of the sensor block aboutthe gimbal axis. Angular rates of the sensor block about axes which are perpendicular to the gimbal axis are measured by gyroscopes in a manner similar to a strapped-down arrangement. Three accelerometers provide acceleration information as the tool is lowered within the borehole. The uphole computer derives position information based upon acceleration information and anular rate information. Kalman estimation techniques are used to compensate for system errors.

  6. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2014-10-16

    To establish directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors.

  7. Directives System Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-16

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 251.1, which establishes requirements for the development, coordination, and sunset review of DOE directives.

  8. Cancellation of Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-01-26

    Effective immediately the following Department of Energy directive is canceled. DOE M 452.2-2, Nuclear Explosive Safety Evaluation Processes, dated 04-14-2009.

  9. Direct-fired biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The direct-fired biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  10. Directional Dark Matter Detection Beyond the Neutrino Bound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philipp Grothaus; Malcolm Fairbairn; Jocelyn Monroe

    2014-09-30

    Coherent scattering of solar, atmospheric and diffuse supernovae neutrinos creates an irreducible background for direct dark matter experiments with sensitivities to WIMP-nucleon spin-independent scattering cross-sections of 10^(-46)-10^(-48) cm^2, depending on the WIMP mass. Even if one could eliminate all other backgrounds, this "neutrino floor" will limit future experiments with projected sensitivities to cross-sections as small as 10^(-48) cm^2. Direction-sensitive detectors have the potential to study dark matter beyond the neutrino bound by fitting event distributions in multiple dimensions: recoil kinetic energy, recoil track angle with respect to the sun, and event time. This work quantitatively explores the impact of direction-sensitivity on the neutrino bound in dark matter direct detection.

  11. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, F. H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Amendt, P. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Atzeni, S. [Dipartimento SBAI, Università di Roma “La Sapienza” and CNISM, Roma (Italy); Rinderknecht, H. G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hoffman, N. M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zylstra, A. B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sio, H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, J. A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Petrasso, R. D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, W. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Marshall, F. J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Delettrez, J. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623, USA; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672); Betti, R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pino, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kagan, G. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Molvig, K. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  12. Diesel combustion: an integrated view combining laser diagnostics, chemical kinetics, and empirical validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akinyami, O C; Dec, J E; Durrett, R P; Flynn, P F; Hunter, G L; Loye, A O; Westbrook, C

    1999-02-01

    This paper proposes a structure for the diesel combustion process based on a combination of previously published and new results. Processes are analyzed with proven chemical kinetic models and validated with data from production-like direct injection diesel engines. The analysis provides new insight into the ignition and particulate formation processes, which combined with laser diagnostics, delineates the two-stage nature of combustion in diesel engines. Data are presented to quantify events occurring during the ignition and initial combustion processes that form soot precursors. A framework is also proposed for understanding the heat release and emission formation processes.

  13. Kinetic model for quartz and spinel dissolution during melting of high-level-waste glass batch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorny, Richard; Rice, Jarrett A.; Crum, Jarrod V.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2013-07-24

    The dissolution of quartz particles and the growth and dissolution of crystalline phases during the conversion of batch to glass potentially affects both the glass melting process and product quality. Crystals of spinel exiting the cold cap to molten glass below can be troublesome during the vitrification of iron-containing high-level wastes. To estimate the distribution of quartz and spinel fractions within the cold cap, we used kinetic models that relate fractions of these phases to temperature and heating rate. Fitting the model equations to data showed that the heating rate, apart from affecting quartz and spinel behavior directly, also affects them indirectly via concurrent processes, such as the formation and motion of bubbles. Because of these indirect effects, it was necessary to allow one kinetic parameter (the pre-exponential factor) to vary with the heating rate. The resulting kinetic equations are sufficiently simple for the detailed modeling of batch-to-glass conversion as it occurs in glass melters. The estimated fractions and sizes of quartz and spinel particles as they leave the cold cap, determined in this study, will provide the source terms needed for modeling the behavior of these solid particles within the flow of molten glass in the melter.

  14. Kinetic and mechanistic studies of free-radical reactions in combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tully, F.P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Combustion is driven by energy-releasing chemical reactions. Free radicals that participate in chain reactions carry the combustion process from reactants to products. Research in chemical kinetics enables us to understand the microscopic mechanisms involved in individual chemical reactions as well as to determine the rates at which they proceed. Both types of information are required for an understanding of how flames burn, why engines knock, how to minimize the production of pollutants, and many other important questions in combustion. In this program the authors emphasize accurate measurements over wide temperature ranges of the rates at which ubiquitous free radicals react with stable molecules. The authors investigate a variety of OH, CN, and CH + stable molecule reactions important to fuel conversion, emphasizing application of the extraordinarily precise technique of laser photolysis/continuous-wave laser-induced fluorescence (LP/cwLIF). This precision enables kinetic measurements to serve as mechanistic probes. Since considerable effort is required to study each individual reaction, prudent selection is critical. Two factors encourage selection of a specific reaction: (1) the rates and mechanisms of the subject reaction are required input to a combustion model; and (2) the reaction is a chemical prototype which, upon characterization, will provide fundamental insight into chemical reactivity, facilitate estimation of kinetic parameters for similar reactions, and constrain and test the computational limits of reaction-rate theory. Most studies performed in this project satisfy both conditions.

  15. Departmental Directives System

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1983-04-07

    The order establishes the directives system to be used for publishing permanent and temporary directives issued by DOE Headquarters and addressed to Headquarters and/or field elements. Chg 1 dated 3-14-85. Cancels DOE 1321.1A.

  16. The solubility and kinetics of minerals under CO2-EGS geothermal conditions: Comparison of experimental and modeling results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2014-01-01

    of rate parameters of water-mineral interaction kinetics forKinetic rate law for mineral dissolution and precipitationwhere n denotes kinetic mineral index, positive values of r

  17. An action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2007-11-02

    At first, we state some results in arXiv: 0707.2639, and then, using a positive kinetic energy coordinate condition given by arXiv: 0707.2639, we present an action with positive kinetic energy term for general relativity. Based on this action, the corresponding theory of canonical quantization is discussed.

  18. Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Microdroplet fusion mass spectrometry for fast reaction kinetics Jae Kyoo Leea,b , Samuel Kima,b,1 investigated the fusion of high-speed liquid droplets as a way to record the kinetics of liquid-phase chemical between the mass spec- trometer inlet and the droplet fusion center. Fused droplet trajec- tories were

  19. Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predicting Protein Folding Kinetics via Temporal Logic Model Checking Christopher James Langmead award from the U.S. Department of Energy. #12;Keywords: protein folding, model checking, temporal logic #12;Abstract We present a novel approach for predicting protein folding kinetics using techniques from

  20. Radon transform and kinetic equations in tomographic representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. N. Chernega; V. I. Man'ko; B. I. Sadovnikov

    2009-11-01

    Statistical properties of classical random process are considered in tomographic representation. The Radon integral transform is used to construct the tomographic form of kinetic equations. Relation of probability density on phase space for classical systems with tomographic probability distributions is elucidated. Examples of simple kinetic equations like Liouville equations for one and many particles are studied in detail.

  1. Kinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters II. Klimontovich Equation Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bonitz, Michael

    is then applied to write a formal kinetic theory for electrons in a strong electromagnetic field. SinceKinetic Theory for Metallic Clusters II. Klimontovich Equation Approach James W Dufty Department on the microscopic phase space density as the fundamental variable in terms of which all other properties

  2. A kinetic model for anisotropic reactions in amorphous solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Wei

    , and does not need to introduce kinetic-dependent plasticity or modify basic thermodynamic quantities models either attribute such deformation to the plastic flow driven by the stress exceeding a non1 A kinetic model for anisotropic reactions in amorphous solids Wei Hong* Department of Aerospace

  3. Hydraulic design of leaves: insights from rehydration kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    Hydraulic design of leaves: insights from rehydration kinetics MACIEJ A. ZWIENIECKI1 , TIMOTHY J design in 10 species based on their rehydration kinetics. In all cases, a biphasic response described extension; tran- spiration stream; hydraulic compartmentalization. INTRODUCTION Leaves of terrestrial plants

  4. Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Zinc Adsorption Effects on Arsenite Oxidation Kinetics at the Birnessite-Water Interface L A U R(III) oxidation. Accordingly, the effects of adsorbed and nonadsorbed Zn on arsenite (As(III)) oxidation kinetics Arsenic often occurs in aquatic/terrestrial environments because of anthropogenic inputs (e.g., use

  5. Detailed Kinetic Modeling of Gasoline Surrogate Mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

    2009-03-09

    Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. It is generally agreed that their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. In this work, a recently revised version of the kinetic model by the authors is used to analyze the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation. Particular attention is devoted to linear and branched saturated hydrocarbons (PRF mixtures), olefins (1-hexene) and aromatics (toluene). Model predictions for pure components, binary mixtures and multi-component gasoline surrogates are compared with recent experimental information collected in rapid compression machine, shock tube and jet stirred reactors covering a wide range of conditions pertinent to internal combustion engines. Simulation results are discussed focusing attention on the mixing effects of the fuel components.

  6. Kinetics of wet sodium vapor complex plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishra, S. K., E-mail: nishfeb@rediffmail.com [Institute for Plasma Research (IPR), Gandhinagar 382428 (India); Sodha, M. S. [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)] [Centre of Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi (IITD), New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2014-04-15

    In this paper, we have investigated the kinetics of wet (partially condensed) Sodium vapor, which comprises of electrons, ions, neutral atoms, and Sodium droplets (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated by light. The formulation includes the balance of charge over the droplets, number balance of the plasma constituents, and energy balance of the electrons. In order to evaluate the droplet charge, a phenomenon for de-charging of the droplets, viz., evaporation of positive Sodium ions from the surface has been considered in addition to electron emission and electron/ion accretion. The analysis has been utilized to evaluate the steady state parameters of such complex plasmas (i) in thermal equilibrium and (ii) when irradiated; the results have been graphically illustrated. As a significant outcome irradiated, Sodium droplets are seen to acquire large positive potential, with consequent enhancement in the electron density.

  7. Active Polymers Confer Fast Reorganization Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Swanson; Ned S. Wingreen

    2011-10-02

    Many cytoskeletal biopolymers are "active," consuming energy in large quantities. In this Letter, we identify a fundamental difference between active polymers and passive, equilibrium polymers: for equal mean lengths, active polymers can reorganize faster than equilibrium polymers. We show that equilibrium polymers are intrinsically limited to linear scaling between mean lifetime and mean length, MFPT ~ , by analogy to 1-d Potts models. By contrast, we present a simple active-polymer model that improves upon this scaling, such that MFPT ~ ^{1/2}. Since to be biologically useful, structural biopolymers must typically be many monomers long, yet respond dynamically to the needs of the cell, the difference in reorganization kinetics may help to justify active polymers' greater energy cost. PACS numbers: 87.10.Ed, 87.16.ad, 87.16.Ln

  8. Brittle failure kinetics model for concrete

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silling, S.A.

    1997-03-01

    A new constitutive model is proposed for the modeling of penetration and large stress waves in concrete. Rate effects are incorporated explicitly into the damage evolution law, hence the term brittle failure kinetics. The damage variable parameterizes a family of Mohr-Coulomb strength curves. The model, which has been implemented in the CTH code, has been shown to reproduce some distinctive phenomena that occur in penetration of concrete targets. Among these are the sharp spike in deceleration of a rigid penetrator immediately after impact. Another is the size scale effect, which leads to a nonlinear scaling of penetration depth with penetrator size. This paper discusses the theory of the model and some results of an extensive validation effort.

  9. A Kinetic Theory Approach to Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. L. Hu

    2002-04-22

    We describe a kinetic theory approach to quantum gravity -- by which we mean a theory of the microscopic structure of spacetime, not a theory obtained by quantizing general relativity. A figurative conception of this program is like building a ladder with two knotted poles: quantum matter field on the right and spacetime on the left. Each rung connecting the corresponding knots represent a distinct level of structure. The lowest rung is hydrodynamics and general relativity; the next rung is semiclassical gravity, with the expectation value of quantum fields acting as source in the semiclassical Einstein equation. We recall how ideas from the statistical mechanics of interacting quantum fields helped us identify the existence of noise in the matter field and its effect on metric fluctuations, leading to the establishment of the third rung: stochastic gravity, described by the Einstein-Langevin equation. Our pathway from stochastic to quantum gravity is via the correlation hierarchy of noise and induced metric fluctuations. Three essential tasks beckon: 1) Deduce the correlations of metric fluctuations from correlation noise in the matter field; 2) Reconstituting quantum coherence -- this is the reverse of decoherence -- from these correlation functions 3) Use the Boltzmann-Langevin equations to identify distinct collective variables depicting recognizable metastable structures in the kinetic and hydrodynamic regimes of quantum matter fields and how they demand of their corresponding spacetime counterparts. This will give us a hierarchy of generalized stochastic equations -- call them the Boltzmann-Einstein hierarchy of quantum gravity -- for each level of spacetime structure, from the macroscopic (general relativity) through the mesoscopic (stochastic gravity) to the microscopic (quantum gravity).

  10. Experimental observation of controllable kinetic constraints in a cold atomic gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valado, M M; Hoogerland, M D; Lesanovsky, I; Garrahan, J P; Arimondo, E; Ciampini, D; Morsch, O

    2015-01-01

    Many-body systems relaxing to equilibrium can exhibit complex dynamics even if their steady state is trivial. At low temperatures or high densities their evolution is often dominated by steric hindrances affecting particle motion [1,2,3]. Local rearrangements are highly constrained, giving rise to collective - and often slow - relaxation.This dynamics can be difficult to analyse from first principles, but the essential physical ingredients are captured by idealized lattice models with so- called kinetic constraints [4]. Here we experimentally realize a many-body system exhibiting manifest kinetic constraints and measure its dynamical properties. In the cold Rydberg gas used in our experiments, the nature of the constraints can be tailored through the detuning of the excitation lasers from resonance [5,6,7,8], which controls whether the system undergoes correlated or anti- correlated dynamics. Our results confirm recent theoretical predictions [5,6], and highlight the analogy between the dynamics of interactin...

  11. Thermodynamics of accuracy in kinetic proofreading: Dissipation and efficiency trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riccardo Rao; Luca Peliti

    2015-04-09

    The high accuracy exhibited by biological information transcription processes is due to kinetic proofreading, i.e., by a mechanism which reduces the error rate of the information-handling process by driving it out of equilibrium. We provide a consistent thermodynamic description of enzyme-assisted assembly processes involving competing substrates, in a Master Equation framework. We introduce and evaluate a measure of the efficiency based on rigorous non-equilibrium inequalities. The performance of several proofreading models are thus analyzed and the related time, dissipation and efficiency vs. error trade-offs exhibited for different discrimination regimes. We finally introduce and analyze in the same framework a simple model which takes into account correlations between consecutive enzyme-assisted assembly steps. This work highlights the relevance of the distinction between energetic and kinetic discrimination regimes in enzyme-substrate interactions.

  12. Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for Biodiesel Components Methyl Stearate and Methyl Oleate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naik, C; Westbrook, C K; Herbinet, O; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

    2010-01-22

    New chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms are developed for two of the five major components of biodiesel fuel, methyl stearate and methyl oleate. The mechanisms are produced using existing reaction classes and rules for reaction rates, with additional reaction classes to describe other reactions unique to methyl ester species. Mechanism capabilities were examined by computing fuel/air autoignition delay times and comparing the results with more conventional hydrocarbon fuels for which experimental results are available. Additional comparisons were carried out with measured results taken from jet-stirred reactor experiments for rapeseed methyl ester fuels. In both sets of computational tests, methyl oleate was found to be slightly less reactive than methyl stearate, and an explanation of this observation is made showing that the double bond in methyl oleate inhibits certain low temperature chain branching reaction pathways important in methyl stearate. The resulting detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism includes more approximately 3500 chemical species and more than 17,000 chemical reactions.

  13. Catalytic liquid-phase hydrogenation of aqueous nitrate solutions: A kinetic investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pintar, A.; Batista, J.; Levec, J. [National Inst. of Chemistry, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kajiuchi, Toshio [Tokyo Inst. of Technology, Yokohama (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Liquid-phase reduction using a solid Pd/Cu bimetallic catalyst provides a potential technique for the removal of nitrates from waters. Kinetic measurements were performed in an isothermal semi-batch slurry reactor operating at atmospheric pressure. The proposed intrinsic rate expression for nitrate disappearance is based on the conventional Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach, considering both equilibrium nitrate as well as dissociative hydrogen adsorption processes to different types of active sites, and assuming an irreversible bimolecular surface reaction between adsorbed reactant species to be the rate-controlling step. The apparent activation energy for catalytic liquid-phase nitrate reduction and the heat of nitrate adsorption, in the temperature range 280.5-293 K, were found to be 47 and -22 kJ/mol, respectively. 6 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Negative kinetic energy term of general relativity and its removing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Mei

    2009-03-30

    We first present a new Lagrangian of general relativity, which can be divided into kinetic energy term and potential energy term. Taking advantage of vierbein formalism, we reduce the kinetic energy term to a sum of five positive terms and one negative term. Some gauge conditions removing the negative kinetic energy term are discussed. Finally, we present a Lagrangian that only include positive kinetic energy terms. To remove the negative kinetic energy term leads to a new field equation of general relativity in which there are at least five equations of constraint and at most five dynamical equations, this characteristic is different from the normal Einstein field equation in which there are four equations of constraint and six dynamical equations.

  15. Elementary gas kinetic theory. Today we will give kinetic theory definitions to main macroscopic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexeenko, Alina

    proportional to mean kinetic energy of thermal motion. p= nmv- v0 2 3 = nm v 2 3 . #12;7 Derivation of Avogadro . #12;8 Avogadro's Law Number of molecules in a volume of gas is a quantity of particles in a given of C12 =6.022x1023 atoms. NA =6.022x1023 ­ Avogadro number. The volume V0 occupied by a mole of ideal

  16. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections Management's

  17. Directives Templates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections

  18. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (IFC) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  19. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore »of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  20. Directed evolution of specific receptorligand pairs for use in the creation of gene switches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Huimin

    Directed evolution of specific receptor­ligand pairs for use in the creation of gene switches in the creation of gene switches for the control of heterologous gene expression in applications such as gene switch-like'' attributes: rapid induction kinetics (6­8), dose-dependent ligand response, and readily

  1. Current measurement apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umans, Stephen D. (Belmont, MA)

    2008-11-11

    Apparatus and methods are provided for a system for measurement of a current in a conductor such that the conductor current may be momentarily directed to a current measurement element in order to maintain proper current without significantly increasing an amount of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element or adding resistance to assist in current measurement. The apparatus and methods described herein are useful in superconducting circuits where it is necessary to monitor current carried by the superconducting elements while minimizing the effects of power dissipation attributable to the current measurement element.

  2. Guest Molecule Exchange Kinetics for the 2012 Ignik Sikumi Gas Hydrate Field Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Lee, Won Suk

    2014-05-14

    A commercially viable technology for producing methane from natural gas hydrate reservoirs remains elusive. Short-term depressurization field tests have demonstrated the potential for producing natural gas via dissociation of the clathrate structure, but the long-term performance of the depressurization technology ultimately requires a heat source to sustain the dissociation. A decade of laboratory experiments and theoretical studies have demonstrated the exchange of pure CO2 and N2-CO2 mixtures with CH4 in sI gas hydrates, yielding critical information about molecular mechanisms, recoveries, and exchange kinetics. Findings indicated the potential for producing natural gas with little to no production of water and rapid exchange kinetics, generating sufficient interest in the guest-molecule exchange technology for a field test. In 2012 the U.S. DOE/NETL, ConocoPhillips Company, and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corporation jointly sponsored the first field trial of injecting a mixture of N2-CO2 into a CH4-hydrate bearing formation beneath the permafrost on the Alaska North Slope. Known as the Ignik Sikumi #1 Gas Hydrate Field Trial, this experiment involved three stages: 1) the injection of a N2-CO2 mixture into a targeted hydrate-bearing layer, 2) a 4-day pressurized soaking period, and 3) a sustained depressurization and fluid production period. Data collected during the three stages of the field trial were made available after an extensive quality check. These data included continuous temperature and pressure logs, injected and recovered fluid compositions and volumes. The Ignik Sikumi #1 data set is extensive, but contains no direct evidence of the guest-molecule exchange process. This investigation is directed at using numerical simulation to provide an interpretation of the collected data. A numerical simulator, STOMP-HYDT-KE, was recently completed that solves conservation equations for energy, water, mobile fluid guest molecules, and hydrate guest molecules, for up to three gas hydrate guest molecules: CH4, CO2, and N2. The independent tracking of mobile fluid and hydrate guest molecules allows for the kinetic exchange of guest molecules between the mobile fluids and hydrate. The particular interest of this numerical investigation is to determine whether kinetic exchange parameters, determined from laboratory-scale experiments, are directly applicable to interpreting the Ignik Sikumi #1 data.

  3. Modeling Momentum Transfer from Kinetic Impacts: Implications for Redirecting Asteroids

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stickle, A. M.; Atchison, J. A.; Barnouin, O. S.; Cheng, A. F.; Crawford, D. A.; Ernst, C. M.; Fletcher, Z.; Rivkin, A. S.

    2015-05-19

    Kinetic impactors are one way to deflect a potentially hazardous object headed for Earth. The Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA) mission is designed to test the effectiveness of this approach and is a joint effort between NASA and ESA. The NASA-led portion is the Double Asteroid Redirect Test (DART) and is composed of a ~300-kg spacecraft designed to impact the moon of the binary system 65803 Didymos. The deflection of the moon will be measured by the ESA-led Asteroid Impact Mission (AIM) (which will characterize the moon) and from ground-based observations. Because the material properties and internal structure ofmore »the target are poorly constrained, however, analytical models and numerical simulations must be used to understand the range of potential outcomes. Here, we describe a modeling effort combining analytical models and CTH simulations to determine possible outcomes of the DART impact. We examine a wide parameter space and provide predictions for crater size, ejecta mass, and momentum transfer following the impact into the moon of the Didymos system. For impacts into “realistic” asteroid types, these models produce craters with diameters on the order of 10 m, an imparted ?v of 0.5–2 mm/s and a momentum enhancement of 1.07 to 5 for a highly porous aggregate to a fully dense rock.« less

  4. Kinetic Turbulence in the Terrestrial Magnetosheath: Cluster Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, S Y; Deng, X H; He, J S; Yuan, Z G; Zhou, M; Pang, Y; Fu, H S

    2013-01-01

    We present a first statistical study of subproton and electron scales turbulence in the terrestrial magnetosheath using the Cluster Search Coil Magnetometer (SCM) waveforms of the STAFF instrument measured in the frequency range [1,180] Hz. It is found that clear spectral breaks exist near the electron scale, which separate two power-law like frequency bands referred to as the dispersive and the electron dissipation ranges. The frequencies of the breaks f_b are shown to be well correlated with the electron gyroscale \\rho_e rather than with the electron inertial length de. The distribution of the slopes below fb was found to be narrow and peaks near -2.9, while that of the slopes above fb was found broader, peaks near -5.2 and has values as low as -7.5. This is the first time that such steep power-law spectra are reported in space plasma turbulence. These observations provide strong constraints on theoretical modeling of kinetic turbulence and dissipation in collisionless magnetized plasmas.

  5. dfield8 Direction Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-08-05

    dfield8 Direction Fields. • The routine dfield8 is already loaded on all ITaP machines as standard software. To access MAtlAB from any ITaP machine: Start

  6. Art Directable Tornadoes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dwivedi, Ravindra

    2011-08-08

    ......................................................................... 25 2. Directional Force ........................................................... 26 3. Vortex Force .................................................................. 26 4. Lattice... ................................................................... 7 7 Tornado in its rope stage before disappearing ........................................... 9 8 Fire vortex and Waterspout ........................................................................ 10 9 Landspout and Gustnado...

  7. Direct nuclear pumped laser

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miley, George H. (Champagne, IL); Wells, William E. (Urbana, IL); DeYoung, Russell J. (Hampton, VA)

    1978-01-01

    There is provided a direct nuclear pumped gas laser in which the lasing mechanism is collisional radiated recombination of ions. The gas laser active medium is a mixture of the gases, with one example being neon and nitrogen.

  8. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Mark D. Miller, R.S., M.P.H. The Role control/ handwashing, solid waste disposal, vector control, general safety, sewage disposal, and adequate

  9. Departmental Directives Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-08-13

    The order establishes directives as the primary means to set, communicate, and institutionalize policies, requirements, responsibilities, and procedures for Departmental elements and contractors. The second draft is being submitted for review owing to extensive revisions to the first draft.

  10. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Seiber, Larry E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlino, Laura D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Ayers, Curtis W. (Kingston, TN)

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  11. Reaction kinetics relevant to the recycle hydride-dehydride process for plutonium recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haschke, J.M.; Allen, T.H.

    1997-10-01

    Objectives of this one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project were the expansion of fundamental knowledge of plutonium chemistry and the development of information for enhancing plutonium recovery methods and weapons safety. Results of kinetic studies demonstrate that the monoxide monohydride, PuO(H), formed during corrosion of plutonium by water in pyrophoric when dry and acts as an initiator for hydride-catalyzed reaction of the metal with air. The catalyzed corrosion rate of Pu is 10{sup 8} times faster than that in dry air and transforms plutonium into a readily aerosolized material. A potential application for the catalytic reaction is in the direct recovery of plutonium as oxide. Wet PuO(H) is non-pyrophoric and the safety hazard posed by its formation is reduced if the material is not allowed to dry.

  12. Direct CP violation in B decays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Kreps

    2008-07-01

    We review recent experimental results on direct CP violation. The hot topic is a measurement in charmless two-body decays of B0, B+. In connection to this the first analogous measurements in Bs0 and Lambda_b0 decays are now available. Furthermore first evidence for direct CP violation in B+ decays is obtained from Dalitz plot analyzes of the K+pi-pi+ final state at B-factories. The last group of discussed results probes the b -> c\\bar{c}d transition in attempt to resolve the discrepancy between Belle and BABAR experiments in CP violation in the B0 -> D+D- decays.

  13. Validity of the Taylor hypothesis for linear kinetic waves in the weakly collisional solar wind

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howes, G. G.; Klein, K. G.; TenBarge, J. M.

    2014-07-10

    The interpretation of single-point spacecraft measurements of solar wind turbulence is complicated by the fact that the measurements are made in a frame of reference in relative motion with respect to the turbulent plasma. The Taylor hypothesis—that temporal fluctuations measured by a stationary probe in a rapidly flowing fluid are dominated by the advection of spatial structures in the fluid rest frame—is often assumed to simplify the analysis. But measurements of turbulence in upcoming missions, such as Solar Probe Plus, threaten to violate the Taylor hypothesis, either due to slow flow of the plasma with respect to the spacecraft or to the dispersive nature of the plasma fluctuations at small scales. Assuming that the frequency of the turbulent fluctuations is characterized by the frequency of the linear waves supported by the plasma, we evaluate the validity of the Taylor hypothesis for the linear kinetic wave modes in the weakly collisional solar wind. The analysis predicts that a dissipation range of solar wind turbulence supported by whistler waves is likely to violate the Taylor hypothesis, while one supported by kinetic Alfvén waves is not.

  14. ROLES OF THE KINETIC AND DYNAMIC MECHANISMS IN THE L{sub p} -E{sub p} RELATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qin, Yi-Ping; Chen, Zhi-Fu

    2013-04-10

    The L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation is a well-known relation in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Its implication remains unclear. We propose to investigate the underlying mechanisms of this relation by considering the corresponding kinetic and dynamic mechanisms separately. In this way, one can tell how much the kinetic or dynamic mechanism contributes to the index of the relationship. Our analysis gives rise to several conclusions. (1) The index of the kinetic effect in the L{sub p} -E{sub p} relation can simply be derived from the theory of special relativity, which is generally larger than 2, depending on the situation concerned. (2) The index of the dynamic effect in the relation can be deduced from observation once a model of jets is adopted. According to current GRB data, we find that the dynamic effect alone tends to give rise to an anti-correlation between L{sub p} and E{sub p} ; in terms of statistics, the dynamic effect is obviously smaller than the kinetic effect; in the situation of jets with moving discrete radio clouds that move directly toward the observer, the index of the dynamic effect is currently constrained within (- 1.6, -1), while in other situations of jets, the constraints are different; both internal and external shocks can account for the current data.

  15. 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -4 , autothermal reforming of biogas5 or hexadecane6 with very simple kinetic mechanism. CFD-kinetics models have

  16. High-Pressure Turbulent Flame Speeds and Chemical Kinetics of Syngas Blends with and without Impurities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Eric; Mathieu, Olivier; Morones, Anibal; Ravi, Sankar; Keesee, Charles; Hargis, Joshua; Vivanco, Jose

    2014-12-01

    This Topical Report documents the first year of the project, from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014. Efforts for this project included experiments to characterize the atmospheric-pressure turbulent flame speed vessel over a range of operating conditions (fan speeds and turbulent length scales). To this end, a new LDV system was acquired and set up for the detailed characterization of the turbulence field. Much progress was made in the area of impurity kinetics, which included a numerical study of the effect of impurities such as NO2, NO, H2S, and NH3 on ignition delay times and laminar flame speeds of syngas blends at engine conditions. Experiments included a series of laminar flame speed measurements for syngas (CO/H2) blends with various levels of CH4 and C2H6 addition, and the results were compared to the chemical kinetics model of NUI Galway. Also, a final NOx kinetics mechanism including ammonia was assembled, and a journal paper was written and is now in press. Overall, three journal papers and six conference papers related to this project were published this year. Finally, much progress was made on the design of the new high-pressure turbulent flame speed facility. An overall design that includes a venting system was decided upon, and the detailed design is in progress.

  17. Direct conversion technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Massier, P.F.; Back, L.H.; Ryan, M.A.; Fabris, G.

    1992-01-07

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. This report contains progress of research on the Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and on the Two-Phase Liquid-Metal MHD Electrical Generator (LMMHD) for the period January 1, 1991 through December 31, 1991. Research on AMTEC and on LMMHD was initiated during October 1987. Reports prepared on previous occasions (Refs. 1--5) contain descriptive and performance discussions of the following direct conversion concepts: thermoelectric, pyroelectric, thermionic, thermophotovoltaic, thermoacoustic, thermomagnetic, thermoelastic (Nitionol heat engine); and also, more complete descriptive discussions of AMTEC and LMMHD systems.

  18. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  19. THERMOSTATICS AND KINETICS OF TRANSFORMATIONS IN PU-BASED ALLOYS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, P; Kaufman, L; Liu, Z

    2006-06-30

    CALPHAD assessment of the thermodynamic properties of a series of Pu-based alloys is briefly presented together with some results on the kinetics of phase formation and transformations in Pu-Ga alloys.

  20. Uncertainty analysis of multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    multi-rate kinetics of uranium desorption from sediments A multi-rate expression for uranyl U(VI) surface complexation reactions has been proposed to describe diffusion-limited...

  1. Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations of nanocrystalline film deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruan, Shiyun

    A full diffusion kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm is used to model nanocrystalline film deposition, and study the mechanisms of grain nucleation and microstructure formation in such films. The major finding of this work is ...

  2. Kinetic modeling and automated optimization in microreactor systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jason Stuart

    2013-01-01

    The optimization, kinetic investigation, or scale-up of a reaction often requires significant time and materials. Silicon microreactor systems have been shown advantageous for studying chemical reactions due to their small ...

  3. Benchmark Reaction Mechanisms and Kinetics for Lean NOx Traps...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. acep01larson.pdf More Documents & Publications Development of Chemical Kinetic Models for...

  4. Kinetic studies of isoprene reactions with hydroxyl and chlorine radicals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suh, Inseon

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic studies of the isoprene oxidation reactions initiated by the hydroxyl radical OH and the chlorine atom Cl have been investigated using a fast-flow reactor in conjunction with chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) and using laser...

  5. Elucidating Hydrogen Oxidation/Evolution Kinetics in Base and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Elucidating Hydrogen OxidationEvolution Kinetics in Base and Acid by Enhanced Activities at the Optimized Pt Shell Thickness on the Ru Core Citation Details In-Document Search...

  6. Integrating Acclimated Kinetic Envelopes into Sustainable Building Design 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jialiang

    2014-05-28

    affects the energy usage of a building. In an effort to simultaneously consider and satisfy all of the various indoor comfort requirements, changing climatic conditions can generate conflicting conditions. Acclimated Kinetic Envelope (AKE) is a notion...

  7. Cellular Senescence: Ex Vivo p53-Dependent Asymmetric Cell Kinetics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rambhatla, Lakshmi

    2001-01-01

    Although senescence is a defining property of euploid mammalian cells, its physiologic basis remains obscure. Previously, cell kinetics properties of normal tissue cells have not been considered in models for senescence. ...

  8. Mechanistic kinetic modeling of the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Hans

    2009-05-15

    Two separate mechanistic kinetic models have been developed for the hydrocracking of complex feedstocks. The first model is targeted for the hydrocracking of vacuum gas oil. The second one addresses specifically the hydrocracking of long...

  9. Active shapes : introducing guidelines for designing kinetic architectural structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Zanfaly, Dina E

    2011-01-01

    This thesis proposes guidelines for designing kinetic architectural structures, in which rules based on shape grammars, are used for motion capturing and design. There is an increasing demand for adaptive architecture that ...

  10. Topobo : a 3-D constructive assembly system with kinetic memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raffle, Hayes Solos, 1974-

    2004-01-01

    We introduce Topobo, a 3-D constructive assembly system em- bedded with kinetic memory, the ability to record and playback physical motion. Unique among modeling systems is Topobo's coincident physical input and output ...

  11. Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Thermodynamic and kinetic analyses of the CO2 chemisorption mechanism on Na2TiO3: Experimental and theoretical evidences Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  12. Energy landscapes, folding mechanisms and kinetics of RNA tetraloop hairpins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakraborty, Debayan; Collepardo-Guevara, Rosana; Wales, David J.

    2014-12-02

    of its biological functions, are poorly understood. In this work, we use the discrete path sampling (DPS) approach to explore the energy landscapes of two RNA tetraloop hairpins, and provide insights into their folding mechanisms and kinetics in atomistic...

  13. Dissolution Kinetics of Pyrochlore Ceramics for the Disposition of Plutonium.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhower, Jonathan P.; Strachan, Denis M.; McGrail, B. Peter; Scheele, Randall D.; Rodriguez, Elsa A.; Steele, Jackie L.; Legore, Virginia L.

    2006-01-30

    This is an article in which the dissolution kinetics of titanate ceramics are reported and discussed. These ceramics are made with non-radioactive elements as analogues to those made with Pu.

  14. Crystallization Kinetics of Thermosensitive Colloids Probed by Transmission Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianzhong

    Crystallization Kinetics of Thermosensitive Colloids Probed by Transmission Spectroscopy Shijun hard spheres, soft spheres, and PNIPAM spheres. Introduction Crystallization of colloidal systems systems.1-15 In recent years, colloidal crystals have been used extensively for the fabrication

  15. Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx Traps for Design and Optimization Kinetic and Performance Studies of the Regeneration Phase of Model PtRhBa NOx...

  16. Directed Quantum Chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efetov, K.B. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)] [Max-Planck Institut fuer Physik komplexer Systeme, Heisenbergstrasse 1, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); [L.D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Moscow (Russia)

    1997-07-01

    Quantum disordered problems with a direction (imaginary vector potential) are discussed and mapped onto a supermatrix {sigma} model. It is argued that the 0D version of the {sigma} model may describe a broad class of phenomena that can be called directed quantum chaos. It is demonstrated by explicit calculations that these problems are equivalent to those of random asymmetric or non-Hermitian matrices. A joint probability of complex eigenvalues is obtained. The fraction of states with real eigenvalues proves to be always finite for time reversal invariant systems. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Direct Conversion Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, L.H.; Fabris, G.; Ryan, M.A.

    1992-07-01

    The overall objective of the Direct Conversion Technology task is to develop an experimentally verified technology base for promising direct conversion systems that have potential application for energy conservation in the end-use sectors. Initially, two systems were selected for exploratory research and advanced development. These are Alkali Metal Thermal-to-Electric Converter (AMTEC) and Two-Phase Liquid Metal MD Generator (LMMHD). This report describes progress that has been made during the first six months of 1992 on research activities associated with these two systems. (GHH)

  18. Directed Relativistic Blast Wave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Gruzinov

    2007-04-23

    A spherically symmetrical ultra-relativistic blast wave is not an attractor of a generic asymmetric explosion. Spherical symmetry is reached only by the time the blast wave slows down to non-relativistic velocities, when the Sedov-Taylor-von Neumann attractor solution sets in. We show however, that a directed relativistic explosion, with the explosion momentum close to the explosion energy, produces a blast wave with a universal intermediate asymptotic -- a selfsimilar directed ultra-relativistic blast wave. This universality might be of interest for the astrophysics of gamma-ray burst afterglows.

  19. Directions & Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections & Maps Directions

  20. Directions to Berkeley Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB PacketDiesel prices continueDileepDirections & MapsDirections

  1. Consistent description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Markiv, B.; Tokarchuk, M.; National University “Lviv Polytechnic,” 12 Bandera St., 79013 Lviv

    2014-02-15

    A consistent statistical description of kinetics and hydrodynamics of dusty plasma is proposed based on the Zubarev nonequilibrium statistical operator method. For the case of partial dynamics, the nonequilibrium statistical operator and the generalized transport equations for a consistent description of kinetics of dust particles and hydrodynamics of electrons, ions, and neutral atoms are obtained. In the approximation of weakly nonequilibrium process, a spectrum of collective excitations of dusty plasma is investigated in the hydrodynamic limit.

  2. Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics of Mercury(II) Adsorption and Desorption on Soil Y U J U N Y I N , H E R B E R T E . A L L of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Department of Plant and Soil Sciences kinetics of Hg(II) on four soils at pH 6 were investigated to discern the mechanisms controlling

  3. Precipitation kinetics in ultra-high lime softening 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peacock, Edward Dale

    1986-01-01

    PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ABM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August l986 Major... Subject: Civil Engineering PRECIPITATION KINETICS IN ULTRA-HIGH LIME SOFTENING A Thesis by EDWARD DALE PEACOCK Approved as to style and content by: Bill Batchelor (Chair of Commi e) T D. eynol s (Member) Michael T. Lo necker (Member) Donald Mc...

  4. Point kinetics calculations with fully coupled thermal fluids reactivity feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, H.; Zou, L.; Andrs, D.; Zhao, H.; Martineau, R.

    2013-07-01

    The point kinetics model has been widely used in the analysis of the transient behavior of a nuclear reactor. In the traditional nuclear reactor system safety analysis codes such as RELAP5, the reactivity feedback effects are calculated in a loosely coupled fashion through operator splitting approach. This paper discusses the point kinetics calculations with the fully coupled thermal fluids and fuel temperature feedback implemented into the RELAP-7 code currently being developed with the MOOSE framework. (authors)

  5. Peptide concentration alters intermediate species in amyloid ? fibrillation kinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garvey, M., E-mail: megan.garvey@molbiotech.rwth-aachen.de [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Morgado, I., E-mail: immorgado@ualg.pt [Max-Planck Research Unit for Enzymology of Protein Folding, Weinbergweg 22, 06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: ? A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro has been monitored at different concentrations. ? A?(1–40) fibrillation does not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms. ? We demonstrate non-linear features in the kinetics of A?(1–40) fibril formation. ? At high A?(1–40) concentrations secondary processes dictate fibrillation speed. ? Intermediate species may play significant roles on final amyloid fibril development. -- Abstract: The kinetic mechanism of amyloid aggregation remains to be fully understood. Investigations into the species present in the different kinetic phases can assist our comprehension of amyloid diseases and further our understanding of the mechanism behind amyloid ? (A?) (1–40) peptide aggregation. Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) have been used in combination to monitor A?(1–40) aggregation in vitro at both normal and higher than standard concentrations. The observed fibrillation behaviour deviates, in several respects, from standard concepts of the nucleation–polymerisation models and shows such features as concentration-dependent non-linear effects in the assembly mechanism. A?(1–40) fibrillation kinetics do not always follow conventional kinetic mechanisms and, specifically at high concentrations, intermediate structures become populated and secondary processes may further modify the fibrillation mechanism.

  6. Determination of thermodynamic and kinetic properties of grain boundaries using high temperature calorimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, C.D.; Chiang, Y.M. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Eastman, J.A.; Liao, Y. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1991-06-01

    This work explores the use of high temperature differential scanning calorimetry as a novel way in which to measure thermodynamic and kinetic properties of grain boundaries in ceramics. A calorimetric study of grain growth has become practical only recently, with the development of processing methods for nanocrystalline materials (10--50 nm grain size) that have enough grain boundary area and thus grain boundary excess properties to be detected by commercial calorimeters. Here we report results from experiments on nanocrystalline silicon and titanium dioxide. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  7. Final Report: Mechanisms of sputter ripple formation: coupling among energetic ions, surface kinetics, stress and composition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chason, Eric; Shenoy, Vivek

    2013-01-22

    Self-organized pattern formation enables the creation of nanoscale surface structures over large areas based on fundamental physical processes rather than an applied template. Low energy ion bombardment is one such method that induces the spontaneous formation of a wide variety of interesting morphological features (e.g., sputter ripples and/or quantum dots). This program focused on the processes controlling sputter ripple formation and the kinetics controlling the evolution of surfaces and nanostructures in high flux environments. This was done by using systematic, quantitative experiments to measure ripple formation under a variety of processing conditions coupled with modeling to interpret the results.

  8. Directed Regression Stanford University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Roy, Ben

    Directed Regression Yi-hao Kao Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305 yihaokao Stanford, CA 94305 xyan@stanford.edu Abstract When used to guide decisions, linear regression analysis typically involves esti- mation of regression coefficients via ordinary least squares and their subsequent

  9. Deregulation Direct Access

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    AB 1890 AB1X Aggregator Blue Book CEC CPUC CTC Deregulation Direct Access Divestiture DWR EOB EPAct an initiative on the ballot in response to the energy crisis. www.ftcr.org ESPs that sell electricity generated of peak demand. Investor Owned Utility. A private electric utility (owned by shareholders) regulated

  10. Directed Diffusion Fabio Silva

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidemann, John

    nodes can cache, or transform data, and may direct interests based on previously cached data (Section 3 University of Southern California Los Angeles, CA, USA 90089 ¶ Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA, USA 90095 {fabio,johnh,govindan,estrin}@isi.edu February 10, 2004 1

  11. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-08-12

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-05: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Security Systems, dated 11-1-99 and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11-23-99. No cancellations.

  12. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-02-24

    This Notice extends the following directives until 2/16/04: DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, and DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99-7/1/00.

  13. Extension of DOE Directives

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-02-12

    The following directives are extended until 8-12-04. DOE N 205.2, Foreign National Access to DOE Cyber Systems, dated 11/1/99. DOE N 205.3, Password Generation, Protection, and Use, dated 11/23/99.

  14. Direct fired heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

    1986-01-01

    A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

  15. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Daniel M. Harper, M.P.H. A Diverse Environmental Public Health Workforce to Meet the Diverse Environmental Health Challenges on environmental health and to build part nerships in the profession. In pursuit of these goals, we will feature

  16. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Brian Hubbard, M.P.H. Editor the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Con trol and Prevention (CDC) in every environmental health programs and professionals to antici pate, identify, and respond to adverse envi ronmental

  17. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch Daneen Farrow Collier, M.S.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to pro vide up-to-date and relevant informa tion on environmental health the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers for Disease Control and Pre vention (CDC) in every

  18. Direct from CDC's Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT John Sarisky, R.S., M.P.H. Developing Environmental Public Health Leadership Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up to of these goals, we will feature a column from the Environmental Health Services Branch (EHSB) of the Centers

  19. Carbon kinetic isotope effects on the hydration of carbon dioxide and the dehydration of bicarbonate ion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marlier, J.F.; O'Leary, M.H.

    1984-09-05

    /sup 13/C kinetic isotope effects on the hydration of CO/sub 2/ and the dehydration of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ in aqueous solution have been measured by rapid removal of the product and conversion to an isotopically stable form, followed by isotope-ratio analysis. The isotope effect on hydration is k/sup 12//k/sup 13/ = 1.0069 +/- 0.0003 at 24/sup 0/C. The isotope effect on dehydration is 1.0147 +/- 0.0007. The ratio of these two values gives an equilibrium isotope effect of K/sup 12//K/sup 13/ = 1.0077, in good agreement with previously measured values. The small magnitudes of the kinetic isotope effects indicate that the transition state for conversion of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ to CO/sub 2/ is very similar to that of HCO/sub 3//sup -/. This information together with previously measured solvent isotope effects indicates that the mechanism of HCO/sub 3//sup -/ dehydration probably involves general-acid-catalyzed donation of a proton from H/sub 3/O/sup +/ to the departing oxygen, rather than unimolecular decomposition of the zwitterion H/sub 2/O/sup +/-CO/sub 2//sup -/ in the rate-determining step. 21 references, 2 figures.

  20. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, George P. (Arlington, VA)

    1988-01-01

    A high-power-density laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor system maximizes the directed kinetic energy imparted to a large mass of liquid lithium by a centrally located fusion target. A fusion target is embedded in a large mass of lithium, of sufficient radius to act as a tritium breeding blanket, and provided with ports for the access of beam energy to implode the target. The directed kinetic energy is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed magnetic field applied exterior to the lithium. Because the system maximizes the blanket thickness per unit volume of lithium, neutron-induced radioactivities in the reaction chamber wall are several orders of magnitude less than is typical of other fusion reactor systems.