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1

Staged direct injection diesel engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A diesel engine having staged injection for using lower cetane number fuels than No. 2 diesel fuel. The engine includes a main fuel injector and a pilot fuel injector. Pilot and main fuel may be the same fuel. The pilot injector injects from five to fifteen percent of the total fuel at timings from 20.degree. to 180.degree. BTDC depending upon the quantity of pilot fuel injected, the fuel cetane number and speed and load. The pilot fuel injector is directed toward the centerline of the diesel cylinder and at an angle toward the top of the piston, avoiding the walls of the cylinder. Stratification of the early injected pilot fuel is needed to reduce the fuel-air mixing rate, prevent loss of pilot fuel to quench zones, and keep the fuel-air mixture from becoming too fuel lean to become effective. In one embodiment, the pilot fuel injector includes a single hole for injection of the fuel and is directed at approximately 48.degree. below the head of the cylinder.

Baker, Quentin A. (San Antonio, TX)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

3

A Detailed Multi-Zone Thermodynamic Simulation For Direct-Injection Diesel Engine Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed multi-zone thermodynamic simulation has been developed for the direct-injection (DI) diesel engine combustion process. For the purpose of predicting heterogeneous type combustion systems, the model explores the formation of pre-ignition radicals, start of combustion, and eventual heat release. These mechanisms are described based on the current understanding and knowledge of the diesel engine combustion acquired through advanced laser-based diagnostics. Six zones are developed to take into account the surrounding bulk gas, liquid- and vapor-phase fuel, pre-ignition mixing, fuel-rich combustion products as well as the diffusion flame combustion products. A three-step phenomenological soot model and a nitric oxide emission model are applied based on where and when each of these reactions mainly occurs within the diesel fuel jet evolution process. The simulation is completed for a 4.5 liter, inline four-cylinder diesel engine for a range of operating conditions. Specifically, the engine possesses a compression ratio of 16.6, and has a bore and stroke of 106 and 127 mm. The results suggest that the simulation is able to accurately reproduce the fuel jet evolution and heat release process for conventional diesel engine combustion conditions. The soot and nitric oxide models are able to qualitatively predict the effects of various engine parameters on the engine-out emissions. In particular, the detailed thermodynamics and characteristics with respect to the combustion and emission formation processes are investigated for different engine speed/loads, injection pressures and timings, and EGR levels. The local thermodynamic properties and energy, mass distributions obtained from the simulation offer some fundamental insights into heterogeneous type combustion systems. The current work provides opportunities to better study and understand the diesel engine combustion and emission formation mechanisms for conventional diesel engine combustion modes. The flexible, low computational cost features of this simulation result in a convenient tool for conducting parametric studies, and benefits for engine control and diagnostics.

Xue, Xingyu 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Development of Innovative Combustion Processes for a Direct-Injection Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In support of the Partnership for a New Generation Vehicle (PNGV) emissions and fuel economy goals, a small-bore, high-speed, direct-injection (HSDI) diesel facility in which to conduct research into the physics of the combustion process relevant to these engines has been developed. The characteristics of this facility are described, and the motivation for selecting these characteristics and their relation to high efficiency, low-emission HSDI engine technology is discussed.

John Dec; Paul Miles

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The influence of bowl offset on air motion in a direct injection diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The influence of bowl offset on motored mean flow and turbulence in a direct injection diesel engine has been examined with the aid of a multi-dimensional flow code. Results are presented for three piston geometries. The bowl geometry of each piston was the same, while the offset between the bowl and the cylinder axis was varied from 0.0 to 9.6% of the bore. The swirl ratio at intake valve closing was also varied from 2.60 to 4.27. It was found that the angular momentum of the air at TDC was decreased by less than 8% when the bowl was offset. Nevertheless, the mean (squish and swirl) flows were strongly affected by the offset. In addition, the distribution of turbulent kinetic energy (predicted by the /delta/-e model) was modified. Moderate increases (10% or less) in mass averaged turbulence intensity at TDC with offset were observed.

McKinley, T.L.; Primus, R.J

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

The effect of oxygenate molecular structure on soot production in direct-injection diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and kinetic modeling study of soot formation in diesel engine combustion has been used to study the addition of oxygenated species to diesel fuel to reduce soot emissions. This work indicates that the primary role of oxygen atoms in the fuel mixture is to reduce the levels of carbon atoms available for soot formation by fixing them in the form of CO or COz. When the structure of the oxygenate leads to prompt and direct formation of CO2, the oxygenate is less effective in reducing soot production than in cases when all fuel-bound 0 atoms produce only CO. The kinetic and molecular structure principles leading to this conclusion are described.

Westbrook, Charles K. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Pitz, William J. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Mueller, Charles J.; Martin, Glen M.; Pickett, Lyle M.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Efficiency evaluation of the DISC (direct-injection stratified charge), DHC (dilute homogeneous charge), and DI Diesel engines (direct-injection diesel)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermodynamic laws governing the Otto and diesel cycle engines and the possible approaches that might be taken to increase the delivered efficiency of the reciprocating piston engine are discussed. The generic aspects of current research are discussed and typical links between research and the technical barriers to the engines' development are shown. The advanced engines are discussed individually. After a brief description of each engine and its advantages, the major technical barriers to their development are discussed. Also included for each engine is a discussion of examples of the linkages between these barriers and current combustion and thermodynamic research. For each engine a list of questions is presented that have yet to be resolved and could not be resolved within the scope of this study. These questions partially indicate the limit to the state of knowledge regarding efficiency characteristics of the advanced engine concepts. The major technical barriers to each of the engines and their ranges of efficiency improvement are summarized.

Hane, G.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ignition assist systems for direct-injected, diesel cycle, medium-duty alternative fuel engines: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of Phase 1 of this contract. The objective was to evaluate the potential of assist technologies for direct-injected alternative fuel engines vs. glow plug ignition assist. The goal was to demonstrate the feasibility of an ignition system life of 10,000 hours and a system cost of less than 50% of the glow plug system, while meeting or exceeding the engine thermal efficiency obtained with the glow plug system. There were three tasks in Phase 1. Under Task 1, a comprehensive review of feasible ignition options for DING engines was completed. The most promising options are: (1) AC and the ''SmartFire'' spark, which are both long-duration, low-power (LDLP) spark systems; (2) the short-duration, high-power (SDHP) spark system; (3) the micropilot injection ignition; and (4) the stratified charge plasma ignition. Efforts concentrated on investigating the AC spark, SmartFire spark, and short-duration/high-power spark systems. Using proprietary pricing information, the authors predicted that the commercial costs for the AC spark, the short-duration/high-power spark and SmartFire spark systems will be comparable (if not less) to the glow plug system. Task 2 involved designing and performing bench tests to determine the criteria for the ignition system and the prototype spark plug for Task 3. The two most important design criteria are the high voltage output requirement of the ignition system and the minimum electrical insulation requirement for the spark plug. Under Task 3, all the necessary hardware for the one-cylinder engine test was designed. The hardware includes modified 3126 cylinder heads, specially designed prototype spark plugs, ignition system electronics, and parts for the system installation. Two 3126 cylinder heads and the SmartFire ignition system were procured, and testing will begin in Phase 2 of this subcontract.

Chan, A.K.

2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

9

Diesel engine emissions reduction by multiple injections having increasing pressure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiple fuel charges are injected into a diesel engine combustion chamber during a combustion cycle, and each charge after the first has successively greater injection pressure (a higher injection rate) than the prior charge. This injection scheme results in reduced emissions, particularly particulate emissions, and can be implemented by modifying existing injection system hardware. Further enhancements in emissions reduction and engine performance can be obtained by using known measures in conjunction with the invention, such as Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR).

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI); Thiel, Matthew P. (Madison, WI)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Examinatal Study on Common Rail Diesel Engine for Multi-injection Strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on diesel engine equipped with common rail, the multi-injection strategies common rail diesel engine test bed is established with NI test system. In this test bed, the influences of optimized multi-injection strategies to diesel engine performances ... Keywords: common rail, diesel engine, multi-injection, emission

An Shijie; Chang Hanbao; Xu Hongjun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. This project complements another ongoing project titled ''Development of a Dimethyl Ether (DME)-Fueled Shuttle Bus Demonstration Project''. The objectives of that research and demonstration program are to convert a campus shuttle bus to operation on dimethyl ether, a potential ultra-clean alternative diesel fuel. To accomplish this objective, this project includes laboratory evaluation of a fuel conversion strategy, as well as, field demonstration of the DME-fueled shuttle bus. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, they have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. The strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, they have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, the activities have covered two areas: development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre L. Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. Our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. The first two of these areas have resulted in valuable information about the limitations of lubricity and viscosity additives that are presently available in terms of their impact on the viscosity of DME and on wear rates on injector hardware. The third area, that of development of an injector durability test stand, has not resulted in a functioning experiment. Some information is provided in this report to identify the remaining tasks that need to be performed to make the injector stand operational. The key observations from the work are that when blended at 25 wt.% in either diesel fuel or Biodiesel fuel, DME requires more than 5 wt.% additive of all viscosity and lubricity additives tested here to even approach the lower limit of the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement. To treat neat DME sufficiently to make DME comply with the ASTM diesel fuel viscosity requirement would require a viscosity additive with 10{sup 45} cSt viscosity, which is not possible with current additive technologies.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research program are to develop information on lubricity and viscosity improvers and their impact on the wear mechanisms in fuel injectors operating on blends of dimethyl ether (DME) and diesel fuel. Since DME is a fuel with no lubricity (i.e., it does not possess the lubricating quality of diesel fuel), conventional fuel delivery and fuel injection systems are not compatible with dimethyl ether. Therefore, to operate a diesel engine on DME one must develop a fuel-tolerant injection system, or find a way to provide the necessary lubricity to the DME. In the shuttle bus project, we have chosen the latter strategy in order to achieve the objective with minimal need to modify the engine. Our strategy is to blend DME with diesel fuel, to obtain the necessary lubricity to protect the fuel injection system and to achieve low emissions. In this project, we have sought to develop methods for extending the permissible DME content in the DME-diesel blends without experiencing rapid injector failure due to wear. To date, our activities have covered three areas: examination of the impact of lubricity additives on the viscosity of DME, development of a high-pressure lubricity test apparatus for studies of lubricity and viscosity improvers and development of an injector durability stand for evaluation of wear rates in fuel injectors. This report provides summaries of the progress toward evaluation of the viscosity impacts of lubricity additives, completion of both experimental systems and a summary of the plan for completion of the project objectives.

Elana M. Chapman; Andre Boehman; Kimberly Wain; Wallis Lloyd; Joseph M. Perez; Donald Stiver; Joseph Conway

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

IMPACT OF DME-DIESEL FUEL BLEND PROPERTIES ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION SYSTEMS  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Annual Technical Progress Report for Project Entitled "Impact Annual Technical Progress Report for Project Entitled "Impact of DME-Diesel Fuel Blend Properties on Diesel Fuel Injection Systems" May 16, 2002 - May 15, 2003 Elana M. Chapman, Andre Boehman, Kimberly Wain, Wallis Lloyd, Joseph M. Perez, Donald Stiver, Joseph Conway Report Issue Date: June 2003 DOE Award Number: DE-FC26-01NT41115 The Pennsylvania State University The Energy Institute University Park, PA 16802 ii DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus,

15

[Martin high pressure common rail diesel engine injection system]. Technical progress report, August--October 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have a contract with Diesel Recerche of Trieste, Italy, and the Fincantier Group in Italy. They are naval ship builders. Our contract is to work with Diesel Recerche to design the `Martin` fuel injection system for their first test engine for a naval ship. Tiby Martin has been working in the design and detailed layout of the application drawings for Diesel Recerche.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Coal-fueled diesel technology development -- Fuel injection equipment for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Because of the abrasive and corrosive nature of coal water slurries, the development of coal-fueled diesel engine technology by GE-Transportation Systems (GE-TS) required special fuel injection equipment. GE-Corporate Research and Development (GE-CRD) undertook the design and development of fuel injectors, piston pumps, and check valves for this project. Components were tested at GE-CRD on a simulated engine cylinder, which included a cam-actuated jerk pump, prior to delivery to GE-TS for engine testing.

Johnson, R.N.; Hayden, H.L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

18

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Diesel Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Sprays Diesel Sprays Chris Powell and fuel spray xray beamline Christopher Powell, an engine research scientist, fits a specially designed X-ray pressure window to a high-pressure chamber used in diesel spray research. These windows allow Argonne researchers to use X-rays to probe diesel sprays under the high-density conditions found in diesel engines. Diesel sprays Diesel engines are significantly more fuel-efficient than their gasoline counterparts, so wider adoption of diesels in the U.S. would decrease the nationÂ’s petroleum consumption. However, diesels emit much higher levels of pollutants, especially particulate matter and NOx (nitrogen oxides). These emissions have prevented more manufacturers from introducing diesel passenger cars. Researchers are exploring ways to reduce pollution formation in the engine

19

Radial lean direct injection burner  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burner for use in a gas turbine engine includes a burner tube having an inlet end and an outlet end; a plurality of air passages extending axially in the burner tube configured to convey air flows from the inlet end to the outlet end; a plurality of fuel passages extending axially along the burner tube and spaced around the plurality of air passage configured to convey fuel from the inlet end to the outlet end; and a radial air swirler provided at the outlet end configured to direct the air flows radially toward the outlet end and impart swirl to the air flows. The radial air swirler includes a plurality of vanes to direct and swirl the air flows and an end plate. The end plate includes a plurality of fuel injection holes to inject the fuel radially into the swirling air flows. A method of mixing air and fuel in a burner of a gas turbine is also provided. The burner includes a burner tube including an inlet end, an outlet end, a plurality of axial air passages, and a plurality of axial fuel passages. The method includes introducing an air flow into the air passages at the inlet end; introducing a fuel into fuel passages; swirling the air flow at the outlet end; and radially injecting the fuel into the swirling air flow.

Khan, Abdul Rafey; Kraemer, Gilbert Otto; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

20

Study of diesel-spray characteristics at high injection. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The research was directed at investigating characteristics of diesel-fuel spray at high injection pressures. The characteristics investigated in this study are: spray penetration, spray cone angle and droplet sizes and their distribution. Measurement of diesel-fuel bulk modulus at high fuel pressures were also made during this investigation. Experiments were conducted by generating high fuel pressures using a pressure intensifier. Fuel was sprayed in a chamber containing nitrogen gas at different densities and room temperature. Based on the experimental results, correlations are derived to predict spray penetration and spray cone angles. Effects of operating and design parameters on droplet sizes are also discussed. Difficulties associated with droplet size measurements are also identified.

Varde, K.S.; Popa, D.M.; Varde, L.K.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Micronized-coal-water slurry sprays from a diesel engine positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been conducted to characterize the sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system for a diesel engine. Diesel fuel water and three concentrations of micronized-coal-water slurry were used in these experiments. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal slurry fuel from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and still photographs of the sprays were obtained. In addition, instaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. Data were acquired as a function of fluid, nozzle orifice diameter, rack setting and chamber conditions. The high speed movies were used to determine spray penetration and spray growth.

Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D.; Seshadri, A.K.; Zicterman, G. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

Just the Basics: Diesel Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Today's direct-injection diesel Today's direct-injection diesel engines are more rugged, powerful, durable, and reliable than gasoline engines, and use fuel much more efficiently, as well. Diesel Engines Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow Diesels are workhorse engines. That's why you find them powering heavy- duty trucks, buses, tractors, and trains, not to mention large ships, bulldozers, cranes, and other construction equipment. In the past, diesels fit the stereotype of muscle-bound behe- moths. They were dirty and sluggish, smelly and loud. That image doesn't apply to today's diesel engines, however, and tomorrow's diesels will show even greater improvements. They will be even more fuel efficient, more flexible in the fuels they can use, and also much cleaner in emissions. How Diesel Engines Work

23

European Lean Gasoline Direct Injection Vehicle Benchmark  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lean Gasoline Direct Injection (LGDI) combustion is a promising technical path for achieving significant improvements in fuel efficiency while meeting future emissions requirements. Though Stoichiometric Gasoline Direct Injection (SGDI) technology is commercially available in a few vehicles on the American market, LGDI vehicles are not, but can be found in Europe. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) obtained a European BMW 1-series fitted with a 2.0l LGDI engine. The vehicle was instrumented and commissioned on a chassis dynamometer. The engine and after-treatment performance and emissions were characterized over US drive cycles (Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test (HFET), and US06 Supplemental Federal Test Procedure (US06)) and steady state mappings. The vehicle micro hybrid features (engine stop-start and intelligent alternator) were benchmarked as well during the course of that study. The data was analyzed to quantify the benefits and drawbacks of the lean gasoline direct injection and micro hybrid technologies from a fuel economy and emissions perspectives with respect to the US market. Additionally that data will be formatted to develop, substantiate, and exercise vehicle simulations with conventional and advanced powertrains.

Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

An Innovative Injection and Mixing System for Diesel Fuel Reforming  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project focused on fuel stream preparation improvements prior to injection into a solid oxide fuel cell reformer. Each milestone and the results from each milestone are discussed in detail in this report. The first two milestones were the creation of a coking formation test rig and various testing performed on this rig. Initial tests indicated that three anti-carbon coatings showed improvement over an uncoated (bare metal) baseline. However, in follow-up 70 hour tests of the down selected coatings, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis revealed that no carbon was generated on the test specimens. These follow-up tests were intended to enable a down selection to a single best anti-carbon coating. Without the formation of carbon it was impossible to draw conclusions as to which anti-carbon coating showed the best performance. The final 70 hour tests did show that AMCX AMC26 demonstrated the lowest discoloration of the metal out of the three down selected anti-carbon coatings. This discoloration did not relate to carbon but could be a useful result when carbon growth rate is not the only concern. Unplanned variations in the series of tests must be considered and may have altered the results. Reliable conclusions could only be drawn from consistent, repeatable testing beyond the allotted time and funding for this project. Milestones 3 and 4 focused on the creation of a preheating pressure atomizer and mixing chamber. A design of experiment test helped identify a configuration of the preheating injector, Build 1, which showed a very uniform fuel spray flow field. This injector was improved upon by the creation of a Build 2 injector. Build 2 of the preheating injector demonstrated promising SMD results with only 22psi fuel pressure and 0.7 in H2O of Air. It was apparent from testing and CFD that this Build 2 has flow field recirculation zones. These recirculation zones may suggest that this Build 2 atomizer and mixer would require steam injection to reduce the auto ignition potential. It is also important to note that to achieve uniform mixing within a short distance, some recirculation is necessary. Milestone 5 generated CFD and FEA results that could be used to optimize the preheating injector. CFD results confirmed the recirculation zones seen in test data and confirmed that the flow field would not change when attached to a reformer. The FEA predicted fuel wetted wall temperatures which led to several suggested improvements that could possibly improve nozzle efficiency. Milestone 6 (originally an optional task) took a different approach than the preheating pressure atomizer. It focused on creation and optimization of a piezoelectric injector which could perform at extremely low fuel pressures. The piezoelectric atomizer showed acceptable SMD results with fuel pressure less than 1.0 psig and air pressure less than 1.0 in H2O. These SMD values were enhanced when a few components were changed, and it is expected would improve further still at elevated air temperatures. It was demonstrated that the piezoelectric injector could accomplish the desired task. The addition of phase tracking and a burst mode to the frequency controller increased the usability of the piezoelectric injector. This injector is ready to move on to the next phase of development. Engine Components has met the required program milestones of this project. Some of the Milestones were adjusted to allow Milestone 6 to be completed in parallel with the other Milestones. Because of this, Task 3.10 and 3.13 were made optional instead of Milestone 6. Engine Components was extremely grateful for the support that was provided by NETL in support of this work.

Spencer Pack

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

FUEL FORMULATION EFFECTS ON DIESEL FUEL INJECTION, COMBUSTION, EMISSIONS AND EMISSION CONTROL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes work under a U.S. DOE sponsored Ultra Clean Fuels project entitled ''Ultra Clean Fuels from Natural Gas,'' Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-01NT41098. In this study we have examined the incremental benefits of moving from low sulfur diesel fuel and ultra low sulfur diesel fuel to an ultra clean fuel, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel produced from natural gas. Blending with biodiesel, B100, was also considered. The impact of fuel formulation on fuel injection timing, bulk modulus of compressibility, in-cylinder combustion processes, gaseous and particulate emissions, DPF regeneration temperature and urea-SCR NOx control has been examined. The primary test engine is a 5.9L Cummins ISB, which has been instrumented for in-cylinder combustion analysis and in-cylinder visualization with an engine videoscope. A single-cylinder engine has also been used to examine in detail the impacts of fuel formulation on injection timing in a pump-line-nozzle fueling system, to assist in the interpretation of results from the ISB engine.

Boehman, A; Alam, M; Song, J; Acharya, R; Szybist, J; Zello, V; Miller, K

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

26

Controlling combustion characteristics using a slit nozzle in a direct-injection methanol engine  

SciTech Connect

A new type of fuel injection nozzle, called a `slit nozzle,` has been developed to improve poor ignitability and to stabilize combustion under low load conditions in direct-injection methanol diesel engines manufactured for medium-duty trucks. This nozzle has a single oblong vent like a slit. Engine test results indicate that the slit nozzle can improve combustion and thermal efficiency, especially at low loads and no load. This can be explained by the fact that the slit nozzle forms a more highly concentrated methanol spray around the glow-plug than do multi-hole nozzles. As a result, this nozzle improves flame propagation. 3 refs., 12 figs., 4 tabs.

Kusaka, Jin; Daisho, Yasuhiro; Saito, Takeshi; Kihara, Ryoji

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

Marshall, B.W.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Twelve-Month Evaluation of UPS Diesel Hybrid Electric Delivery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

truck Cummins Westport ISXG high- pressure, direct- injection, lique- fied natural gas (LNG) and diesel Completed in 2004 2 Project Design and Data Collection This report...

29

Ejector device for direct injection fuel jet  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed is a device for increasing entrainment and mixing in an air/fuel zone of a direct fuel injection system. The device comprises an ejector nozzle in the form of an inverted funnel whose central axis is aligned along the central axis of a fuel injector jet and whose narrow end is placed just above the jet outlet. It is found that effective ejector performance is achieved when the ejector geometry is adjusted such that it comprises a funnel whose interior surface diverges about 7.degree. to about 9.degree. away from the funnel central axis, wherein the funnel inlet diameter is about 2 to about 3 times the diameter of the injected fuel plume as the fuel plume reaches the ejector inlet, and wherein the funnel length equal to about 1 to about 4 times the ejector inlet diameter. Moreover, the ejector is most effectively disposed at a separation distance away from the fuel jet equal to about 1 to about 2 time the ejector inlet diameter.

Upatnieks, Ansis (Livermore, CA)

2006-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Advanced Production Surface Preparation Technology Development for Ultra-High Pressure Diesel Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 2007, An Ultra High Injection Pressure (UHIP) fueling method has been demonstrated by Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development, demonstrating ability to deliver U.S. Environment Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 4 Final diesel engine emission performance with greatly reduced emissions handling components on the engine, such as without NOx reduction after-treatment and with only a through-flow 50% effective diesel particulate trap (DPT). They have shown this capability using multiple multi-cylinder engine tests of an Ultra High Pressure Common Rail (UHPCR) fuel system with higher than traditional levels of CEGR and an advanced injector nozzle design. The system delivered better atomization of the fuel, for more complete burn, to greatly reduce diesel particulates, while CEGR or high efficiency NOx reduction after-treatment handles the NOx. With the reduced back pressure of a traditional DPT, and with the more complete fuel burn, the system reduced levels of fuel consumption by 2.4% for similar delivery of torque and horsepower over the best Tier 4 Interim levels of fuel consumption in the diesel power industry. The challenge is to manufacture the components in high-volume production that can withstand the required higher pressure injection. Production processes must be developed to increase the toughness of the injector steel to withstand the UHIP pulsations and generate near perfect form and finish in the sub-millimeter size geometries within the injector. This project resulted in two developments in 2011. The first development was a process and a machine specification by which a high target of compressive residual stress (CRS) can be consistently imparted to key surfaces of the fuel system to increase the toughness of the steel, and a demonstration of the feasibility of further refinement of the process for use in volume production. The second development was the demonstration of the feasibility of a process for imparting near perfect, durable geometry to these same feature surfaces to withstand the pulsating UHIP diesel injection without fatigue failure, through the expected life of the fuel system's components (10,000 hours for the pump and common rail, 5000 hours for the injector). The potential to Caterpillar of this fueling approach and the overall emissions reduction system is the cost savings of the fuel, the cost savings of not requiring a full emissions module and other emissions hardware, and the enabling of the use of biodiesel fuel due to the reduced dependency on after-treatment. A proprietary production CRS generating process was developed to treat the interior of the sac-type injector nozzle tip region (particularly for the sac region). Ninety-five tips passed ultra high pulsed pressure fatigue testing with no failures assignable to treated surfaces or materials. It was determined that the CRS impartation method does not weaken the tip internal seat area. Caterpillar Fuel Systems - Product Development accepts that the CRS method initial production technical readiness level has been established. A method to gage CRS levels in production was not yet accomplished, but it is believed that monitoring process parameters call be used to guarantee quality. A precision profiling process for injector seat and sac regions has been shown to be promising but not yet fully confirmed. It was demonstrated that this precision profiling process can achieve form and geometry to well under an aggressively small micron peak-to-valley and that there are no surface flaws that approach an even tighter micron peak-to-valley tolerance. It is planned to purchase machines to further develop and move the process towards production. The system is targeted towards the high-power diesel electric power generators and high-power diesel marine power generators, with displacement from 20 liters to 80 liters and with power from 800 brake horsepower (BHP) to 3200BHP (0.6 megawatts to 2.4 megawatts). However, with market adoption, this system has the potential to meet EPA exhaust standards for all diesel engines nine liters and up, or 300B

Grant, Marion B.

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

31

Direct liquid injection of liquid petroleum gas  

SciTech Connect

A fuel injector and injection system for injecting liquified petroleum gas (LPG) into at least one air/fuel mixing chamber from a storage means that stores pressurized LPG in its liquid state. The fuel injector (including a body), adapted to receive pressurized LPG from the storage means and for selectively delivering the LPG to the air/fuel mixing chamber in its liquified state. The system including means for correcting the injector activation signal for pressure and density variations in the fuel.

Lewis, D.J.; Phipps, J.R.

1984-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

32

Experimental Study of Non-thermal Plasma Injection System Converting NOx in Simulated Diesel Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to study the removal effect of non-thermal plasma (NTP) after-treatment system on diesel engine harmful emissions, a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma reactor is designed, and the NOx removal effect is studied under the conditions of ... Keywords: Non-thermal Plasma(NTP), Dielectric Barrier Discharge(DBD, Diesel Engine, Nox

Jing Wang; Yixi Cai; Jun Wang; Dongli Ran

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

NOx Sensor for Direct Injection Emission Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electricore/Delphi team continues to leverage the electrochemical planar sensor technology that has produced stoichiometric planar and wide range oxygen sensors as the basis for development of a NOx sensor. Zirconia cell technology with an integrated heater will provide the foundation for the sensor structure. Proven materials and packaging technology will help to ensure a cost-effective approach to the manufacture of this sensor. The electronics technique and interface is considered to be an area where new strategies need to be employed to produce higher S/N ratios of the NOx signal with emphasis on signal stability over time for robustness and durability Both continuous mode and pulse mode control techniques are being evaluated. Packaging the electronics requires careful design and circuit partitioning so that only the necessary signal conditioning electronics are coupled directly in the wiring harness, while the remainder is situated within the ECM for durability and costs reasons. This task continues to be on hold due to the limitation that the definition of the interface electronics was unavailable until very late in the project. The sense element is based on the amperometric method utilizing integrated alumina and zirconia ceramics. Precious metal electrodes are used to form the integrated heater, the cell electrodes and leads. Inside the actual sense cell structure, it is first necessary to separate NOx from the remaining oxygen constituents of the exhaust, without reducing the NOx. Once separated, the NOx will be measured using a measurement cell. Development or test coupons have been used to facilitate material selection and refinement, cell, diffusion barrier, and chamber development. The sense element currently requires elaborate interconnections. To facilitate a robust durable connection, mechanical and metallurgical connections are under investigation. Materials and process refinements continue to play an important role in the development of the sensor.

Betteridge, William J

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

34

Investigation of Diesel combustion using multiple injection strategies for idling after cold start of passenger-car engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive investigation was carried out in order to better understand the combustion behaviour in a low compression ratio DI Diesel engine when multiple injection strategies are applied just after the engine cold starts in low temperature conditions (idling). More specifically, the aim of this study was twofold: on one hand, to understand the effect of the multiple injection strategies on the indicated mean effective pressure; on the other hand, to contribute to the understanding of combustion stability characterized by the coefficient of variation of indicated mean effective pressure. The first objective was fulfilled by analyzing the rate of heat release obtained by in-cylinder pressure diagnosis. The results showed that the timing of the pilot injection closest to the main injection was the most influential parameter based on the behaviour of the rate of heat release (regardless of the multiple injection strategy applied). For the second objective, the combustion stability was found to be correlated with the combustion centroid angle. The results showed a trend between them and the existence of a range of centroid angles where the combustion stability is strong enough. In addition, it was also evident that convenient split injection allows shifting the centroid to such a zone and improves combustion stability after start. (author)

Payri, F.; Broatch, A.; Salavert, J.M.; Martin, J. [CMT-Motores Termicos, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, Aptdo. 22012, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicles Vehicles Audi A3 Diesel vehicles may be making a comeback. Diesel engines are more powerful and fuel-efficient than similar-sized gasoline engines (about 30-35% more fuel efficient). Plus, today's diesel vehicles are much improved over diesels of the past. Better Performance Improved fuel injection and electronic engine control technologies have Increased power Improved acceleration Increased efficiency New engine designs, along with noise- and vibration-damping technologies, have made them quieter and smoother. Cold-weather starting has been improved also. Cleaner Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC Today's diesels must meet the same emissions standards as gasoline vehicles. Advances in engine technologies, ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel, and improved exhaust treatment have made this possible.

36

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

37

Optical Diagnostics and Direct Injection of Liquid Fuel Sprays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research described here addresses the problem of a paucity of high quality data on the full field structure of high pressure liquid fuel sprays for gasoline direct injection, GDI, engines. The paper describes the application of phase Doppler anemometry, ... Keywords: GDI, PDA, laser sheet, spray, visualisation

G. K. Hargrave; G. Wigley; J. Allen; A. Bacon

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Field test of two high-pressure direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume II. Oxygen/diesel system  

SciTech Connect

A field test of an oxygen/diesel fuel, direct contact steam generator has been completed. The field test, which was a part of Project DEEP STEAM and was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, involved the thermal stimulation of a well pattern in the Tar Zone of the Wilmington Oil Field. The activity was carried out in cooperation with the City of Long Beach and the Long Beach Oil Development Company. The steam generator was operated at ground level, with the steam and combustion products delivered to the reservoir through 2022 feet of calcium-silicate insulated tubing. The objectives of the test included demonstrations of safety, operational ease, reliability and lifetime; investigations of reservoir response, environmental impact, and economics; and comparison of those points with a second generator that used air rather than oxygen. The test was extensively instrumented to provide the required data. Excluding interruptions not attributable to the oxygen/diesel system, steam was injected 78% of the time. System lifetime was limited by the combustor, which required some parts replacement every 2 to 3 weeks. For the conditions of this particular test, the use of trucked-in LOX resulted in liess expense than did the production of the equivalent amount of high pressure air using on site compressors. No statistically significant production change in the eight-acre oxygen system well pattern occurred during the test, nor were any adverse effects on the reservoir character detected. Gas analyses during the field test showed very low levels of SOX (less than or equal to 1 ppM) in the generator gaseous effluent. The SOX and NOX data did not permit any conclusion to be drawn regarding reservoir scrubbing. Appreciable levels of CO (less than or equal to 5%) were measured at the generator, and in this case produced-gas analyses showed evidence of significant gas scrubbing. 64 figures, 10 tables.

Moreno, J.B.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Late - Cycle Injection of Air/Oxygen - Enriched Air for Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reduce the ''Engine Out'' particulates using the ''In Cylinder'' technique of late cycle auxiliary gas injection (AGI). Reduce the ''Engine Out'' NOx by combining AGI with optimization of fuel injection parameters. Maintain or Improve the Fuel Efficiency.

Mather, Daniel

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Synchronized droplet size measurements for coal-water-slurry (CWS) diesel sprays of an electronically-controlled fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments were completed to study intermittent coal-water slurry (CWS) fuel sprays injected from an electronically-controlled accumulator injector system. A laser diffraction particle analyzing (LDPA) technique was used to measure the spray diameters (Sauter mean diameter, SMD) assuming the Rosin-Rammler two parameter model. In order to ensure an accurate synchronization of the measurement with the intermittent sprays, a new synchronization technique was developed using the light extinction signal as a triggering source for the data taking initiation. This technique allowed measurement of SMDs near the spray tip where the light extinction was low and the data were free from the multiscattering bias. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading in mass containing 5 {mu}m mass median diameter coal particulates was considered. Injection pressures ranging from 28 to 110 MPa, two different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2 ad 0.4 mm, and four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm from the nozzle orifice were studied. Measurements were made for pressurized (2.0 MPa in gauge) and for ambient chamber conditions. The spray SMD showed an increase with the distance of the axial measurement location and with the ambient gas density, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. A correlation of the Sauter mean diameter with the injection conditions was determined. The results were also compared with previous SMD correlations that were available only for diesel fuel sprays.

Kihm, K.D.; Terracina, D.P.; Payne, S.E.; Caton, J.A. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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41

Influence of water injection on performance and emissions of a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The application of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) as an internal combustion (IC) engine fuel has been under investigation for several decades. The favorable physical properties of hydrogen make it an excellent alternative fuel for IC engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Direct injection of hydrogen allows optimizing this potential as it provides multiple degrees of freedom to influence the in-cylinder combustion processes and consequently engine efficiency and exhaust emissions.

Nande, A. M.; Wallner, T.; Naber, J. (Energy Systems); (MIchigan Technological Univ.)

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Fuel Effects on Combustion and Emissions of a Direct-Inection Diesel Engine Operating at Moderate to High Engine Speed and Load  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is advantageous to increase the specific power output of diesel engines and to operate them at higher load for a greater portion of a driving cycle to achieve better thermal efficiency and thus reduce vehicle fuel consumption. Such operation is limited by excessive smoke formation at retarded injection timing and high rates of cylinder pressure rise at more advanced timing. Given this window of operation, it is desired to understand the influence of fuel properties such that optimum combustion performance and emissions can be retained over the range of fuels commonly available in the marketplace. It has been shown in previous studies that varying cetane number (CN) of diesel fuel has little effect on ignition delay at high engine load due to the domination of high cylinder temperature on ignition kinetics. The work here experimentally confirms that finding but also shows that emissions and combustion performance vary according to fuel reactivity. Data are examined from a direct-injection single cylinder research engine for eight common diesel fuels including soy-based biodiesel blends at two high load operating points with no exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and at a moderate load with four levels of EGR. It is shown in the work that at high engine load where combustion is controlled by mixing processes, CN and other fuel properties have little effect on engine performance, although lower CN fuels produce a small increase in noise, smoke and CO emissions. Biodiesel blends increase NOX emissions and decreases CO and smoke emissions at high load, but otherwise have little effect on performance. At moderate load, higher CN fuels are more tolerant to EGR due to their better chemical reactivity at retarded injection timing, but all fuels produce comparable thermal efficiency at advanced combustion phasing regardless of EGR. In contrast to the high load conditions, there was no increase in NOX emissions for biodiesel at the moderate load condition. It is concluded that although higher CN does not significantly alter ignition delay at moderate to high loads it has a dominant influence on the acceptable injection timing range. Apart from CN effects, fuel oxygen content plays an independent role in reducing some emissions. It is therefore recommended that compensation for fuel ignitability and oxygen content be included in combustion control strategies to optimize emissions and performance of future diesel engines.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Szymkowicz, Patrick G. [General Motors Corporation; Northrop, William F [General Motors Corporation

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Spray tip penetration and cone angles for coal-water slurry using a modified medium-speed diesel engine injection system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a medium-speed diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies, instantaneous fuel line pressures and needle lifts were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a correlations using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base case conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For the cases studied, the time-averaged cone angles ranged between 10.2 and 17.0{degree}.

Caton, J.a.; Seshadri, A.K.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transportation sector accounts for approximately 65% of US petroleum consumption. Consumption for light-duty vehicles has stabilized in the last 10--15 years; however, consumption in the heavy-duty sector has continued to increase. For various reasons, the US must reduce its dependence on petroleum. One significant way is to substitute alternative fuels (natural gas, propane, alcohols, and others) in place of petroleum fuels in heavy-duty applications. Most alternative fuels have the additional benefit of reduced exhaust emissions relative to petroleum fuels, thus providing a cleaner environment. The best long-term technology for heavy-duty alternative fuel engines is the 4-stroke cycle, direct injected (DI) engine using a single fuel. This DI, single fuel approach maximizes the substitution of alternative fuel for diesel and retains the thermal efficiency and power density of the diesel engine. This report summarizes the results of the first year (Phase 1) of this contract. Phase 1 focused on developing a 4-stroke cycle, DI single fuel, alternative fuel technology that will duplicate or exceed diesel power density and thermal efficiency, while having exhaust emissions equal to or less than the diesel. Although the work is currently on a 3500 Series DING engine, the work is viewed as a basic technology development that can be applied to any engine. Phase 1 concentrated on DING engine component durability, exhaust emissions, and fuel handling system durability. Task 1 focused on identifying primary areas (e.g., ignition assist and gas injector systems) for future durability testing. In Task 2, eight mode-cycle-averaged NO{sub x} emissions were reduced from 11.8 gm/hp-hr (baseline conditions) to 2.5 gm/hp-hr (modified conditions) on a 3501 DING engine. In Task 3, a state-of-the-art fuel handling system was identified.

NONE

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

45

Neural Predictive Controller Based Diesel Injection Management System for Emission Minimisation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid growth in production of automobiles has increased emissions. Automotive control engineers use innovative control techniques to meet the upcoming emission standards. This paper proposes a novel method of employing artificial neural network ANN based ... Keywords: Artificial Neural Network ANN, Common Rail System CRS, Control System Simulation, Emission Minimisation, Fuel Injection System, Green System Design, Green Technology

C. N. Arunaa; S. Babu Devasenapati; K. I. Ramachandran; K. Vishnuprasad; C. Surendra

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

UNPERMITTED INJECTION OF DIESEL FUELS THROUGH HYDRAULIC FRACTURING IS A VIOLATION...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (“EPA”) development of UIC Class II permitting guidance for hydraulic fracturing activities that use diesel fuels in fracturing fluids. The Natural Resources Defense Council (“NRDC”) is a national, non-profit legal and scientific organization with 1.3 million members and activists worldwide. Since its founding in 1970, NRDC has been active on a wide range of environmental issues, including fossil fuel extraction and drinking water protection. NRDC is actively engaged in issues surrounding oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing, particularly in the Rocky Mountain West and Marcellus Shale regions. Earthjustice is a non-profit public interest law firm originally founded in 1971. Earthjustice works to protect natural resources and the environment, and to defend the right of all people to a healthy environment. Earthjustice is actively addressing threats to air, water, public health and wildlife from oil and gas development and hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus Shale and Rocky Mountain regions. Founded in 1892, the Sierra Club works to protect communities, wild places, and the planet itself. With 1.4 million members and activists worldwide, the Club works to provide healthy communities in which to live, smart energy solutions to combat global warming, and an enduring legacy of for America’s wild

Ariel Rios Building

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Knock limits in spark ignited direct injected engines using gasoline/ethanol blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Fuel Injection (DI) extends engine knock limits compared to Port Fuel Injection (PFI) by utilizing the in-cylinder charge cooling effect due to fuel evaporation. The use of gasoline/ethanol blends in DI is therefore ...

Kasseris, Emmanuel P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Assessing the hydrocarbon emissions in a homogeneous direct injection spark ignited engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the purpose of researching hydrocarbon (HC) emissions in a direct-injection spark ignited (DISI) engine, five experiments were performed. These experiments clarified the role of coolant temperature, injection pressure, ...

Radovanovic, Michael S

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Testing of a new aftertreatment system for lean burn direct injected gasoline engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A gasoline direct injected engine operating under lean conditions can offer a reduction in fuel consumption and a reduction of CO2 emissions but meanwhile suffer… (more)

Thulin, Andeas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Evaluation of UHT milk processed by direct steam injection and steam infusion technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??UHT direct steam injection and steam infusion are widely used; however there is no comparison of their impact on milk components. This study evaluates the… (more)

Malmgren, Bozena

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Control strategy for hydrocarbon emissions in turbocharged direct injection spark ignition engines during cold-start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline consumption and pollutant emissions from transportation are costly and have serious, demonstrated environmental and health impacts. Downsized, turbocharged direct-injection spark ignition (DISI) gasoline engines ...

Cedrone, Kevin David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

METC research on coal-fired diesels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The METC in-house Coal-Fueled Diesel Research project is part of the overall DOE effort to develop a technology base for diesel engines capable of operating on coal, shale oil or low-cost coal-derived fuels. The in-house effort started in 1985 as a test-bed for coal-derived liquid fuels and will end this fiscal year with the successful completion of METC`s diesel R&D program. Currently METC in-house research and development efforts focus on pilot chamber combustion in METC`s coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. A novel pilot chamber for a direct-injected, coal-fueled diesel engine has been designed and is being tested in METC`s single cylinder research diesel engine. The pilot chamber configuration allows for operation at extended load and speed conditions using 100 percent CWS and no other pilot fuel. The concept involves the use of a small volume chamber exterior to the main cylinder in which approximately 5 percent of the total fuel energy at full load conditions is injected. Lower NO{sub X} levels may be obtained due to leaner burning as well as broader stable performance using only CWS fuel.

McMillian, M.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Robey, E.H.; Addis, R.E. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Synchronized droplet size measurements of intermittent coal-water slurry diesel sprays from an electronically-controlled accumulator fuel injection system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterize atomization of intermittent coal-water slurry sprays from an electronically controlled accumulator fuel injection system of a diesel fuel engine. A synchronized laser diffraction particle analyzer technique was used to measure the spray tip Sauter mean diameters (SMD). The Rosin-Rammler two parameter model was assumed for the droplet distribution. The measurements were made at the spray tip where laser obscuration was low and the chance of multiscattering bias was minimal. Coal-water slurry fuel with 50% coal loading by mass containing 5gm volume mean diameter coal particles was used. Injection pressures were ranged from 28 to II 0 MPa. Three different nozzle orifice diameters, 0.2, 0.4, and 0.6 mm, four axial measurement locations from 60 to 120 mm downstream of the nozzle tip were studied. Measurements were made for both pressurized (2.07 MPa, 300 psig) and unpressurized (ambient, 0 gage) chamber conditions. The spray tip SMD showed an increase with chamber gas density, and with axial measurement location, and showed a decrease with increasing injection pressure. The effect of nozzle orifice diameter on spray tip SMDs of completely developed sprays for such high pressure injections was found to be negligible. A regression equation for CWS-50 spray tip SMDs was determined as SMD = 0.279-P(inj).?702 r(amb) 2?85 x .521 where Pinj is the injection pressure in Mpa, r(amb) is the ambient density in kg/m3, and x is the axial measurement location downstream of the nozzle tip in mm. The equation shows very good agreement with the measured SMD data by having a Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.97. The results were also compared with previous SMD regression equations that were originally obtained for diesel fuel sprays.

Terracina, Dwayne Paul

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Compression-Ignition - diesel, fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compression Ignition Engines Clean Diesel Technologies for Greener Performance Mechanical engineer Alan Kastengren examines a diesel injection nozzle used in Argonne's X-ray spray...

57

PLIF flow visualization of methane gas jet from spark plug fuel injector in a direct injection spark ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Spark Plug Fuel Injection (SPFI), which is a combination of a fuel injector and a spark plug was developed with the aim to convert any gasoline port injection spark ignition engine to gaseous fuel direct injection [1]. A direct fuel injector is combined ... Keywords: air-fuel mixing, direct fuel injection, flow visualization, gaseous fuel, laser-induced fluorescent

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; How Heoy Geok

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

An Integrated Approach for Creating Model Diesel Fuels Ioannis P. Androulakis, Mark D. Weisel, Chang S. Hsu, Kuangnan Qian,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratories, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, New Jersey 08801 Kiyomi matter emissions in advanced diesel engines. This includes a sophisticated numerical optimization composition. Test results are discussed from an advanced high-speed direct injection diesel engine for several

Androulakis, Ioannis (Yannis)

59

Argonne Transportation - Diesel Award  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Team Receives DOE Award for Groundbreaking Diesel Fuel Spray Research Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti Recent DOE Award winners, (L-R) Jin Wang, Chris Powell, Yong Yue, and Steve Ciatti, stand in front of their fuel spray injection chamber. Using the synchrotron beam at the APS, the team is able to probe the fuel spray and study the process of combustion. A team of Argonne scientists (Jin Wang, Steve Ciatti, Chris Powell, and Yong Yue) recently won the 2002 National Laboratory Combustion and Emissions Control R&D Award for groundbreaking work in diesel fuel sprays. For the first time ever, the team used x-rays to penetrate through gasoline and diesel sprays and made detailed measurements of fuel injection systems for diesel engines. This technology uncovered a previously unknown

60

Feasibility study of repowering the USCGC vindicator (WMEC-3) with modular diesel fueled direct fuel cells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

In 1988, AEL was awarded a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) Phase I contract on Navy Topic N88-94 by the NAVSEA RD Officer, Code 03R. In 1990, this topic moved to Phase II with a contract involving the lab demonstration of the use of diesel type fuel in high temperature molten carbonate or Direct Fuel Cells (DFCs). The Phase II work was successfully completed in 1992. In 1995, Navy Code 03R agreed to transfer Topic N88-94 to the USCG RD Office, G-SIR. The Phase III Feasibility Study was awarded to AEL in 1996 to perform the work described in this report. The USCGC VINDICATOR (WMEC-3) has been evaluated as the candidate ship for fuel cell repowering at 2.58 MW. It is a former T-AGOS ship with diesel-electric propulsion and ship`s service. The four 600 kW diesel generators (2.4 MW) would be replaced with twelve 215 kW DFC one-sided-fit fuel cell modules embodying a `no-maintenance` rapid changeout approach. The repowered ship would be faster, consume half of the fuel for the equivalent range, be super-quiet, be air pollution-free, cut the crew complement and produce potable water onboard as a byproduct. The study evaluated technical aspects of fuel cells, naval architectural removals and additions, maintenance, risk and cost-effectiveness issues. The use of electric utility type DFCs, with the cost reduction and mass production advantages of this on-land marketplace will make possible early introduction of marine-derivative fuel cell power plants for ship applications. It is concluded that repowering ships with fuel cells is feasible and that the next step is a Preliminary Design.

Kumm, W.H.; Lisie, H.L.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recent Developments in BMW's Diesel Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The image of BMW is very strongly associated to high power, sports biased, luxury cars in the premium car segment, however, particularly in the United States and some parts of Asia, the combination of a car in this segment with a diesel engine was up until now almost unthinkable. I feel sure that many people in the USA are not even aware that BMW produces diesel-powered cars. In Europe there is a completely contrary situation which, driven by the relative high fuel price, and the noticeable difference between gasoline and diesel prices, there has been a continuous growth in the diesel market since the early eighties. During this time BMW has accumulated more then 20 years experience in developing and producing powerful diesel engines for sports and luxury cars. BMW started the production of its 1st generation diesel engine in 1983 with a 2,4 l, turbocharged IDI engine in the 5 series model range. With a specific power of 35 kW/l, this was the most powerful diesel engine on the market at this time. In 1991 BMW introduced the 2nd generation diesel engine, beginning with a 2,5 l inline six, followed in 1994 by a 1,7 l inline four. All engines of this 2nd BMW diesel engine family were turbocharged and utilized an indirect injection combustion system. With the availability of high-pressure injection systems such as the common rail system, BMW developed its 3rd diesel engine family which consists of four different engines. The first was the 4-cylinder for the 3 series car in the spring of 1998, followed by the 6-cylinder in the fall of 1998 and then in mid 1999 by the worlds first V8 passenger car diesel with direct injection. Beginning in the fall of 2001 with the 4-cylinder, BMW reworked this DI engine family fundamentally. Key elements are an improved core engine design, the use of the common rail system of the 2nd generation and a new engine control unit with even better performance. Step by step, these technological improvements were introduce d to production for all members of this engine family and in all the different vehicle applications. In the next slide you can see the production volume of diesel engines by BMW. From the 1st family we produced {approx} 260,000 units over eight years and from the 2nd family {approx} 630,000 units were produced also during an eight year period. How successful the actual engine family with direct injection is can be seen in the increase of the production volume to 330,000 units for the year 2002 alone. The reason for this is that, in addition to the very low fuel consumption, this new engines provide excellent driving characteristics and a significant improvement in the level of noise and vibration. Page 2 of 5 In 2002, 26% of all BMW cars worldwide, and nearly 40% in Europe, were produced with a diesel engine under the hood. In the X5 we can see the biggest diesel success rate. Of all the X5 vehicles produced, 35% Worldwide and 68% in Europe are powered by a diesel engine.

Steinparzer, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

62

Evaluation of the environmental viability of direct injection schemes for ocean carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the expected impact of several promising schemes for ocean carbon sequestration by direct injection of CO2, and serves as an update to the assessment by Auerbach et al. (1997) and Caulfield et al. ...

Israelsson, Peter H. (Peter Hampus), 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Effects of different fuels on a turbocharged, direct injection, spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The following pages describe the experimentation and analysis of two different fuels in GM's high compression ratio, turbocharged direct injection (TDI) engine. The focus is on a burn rate analysis for the fuels - gasoline ...

Negrete, Justin E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injection ISX G Natural Gas Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fact sheet details work by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Not Available

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Performance Characterization of a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine with Bio-Diesel and Petroleum Diesel Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the wake of global warming and fossil fuel depletion, renewed attention has been paid to shifting away from the use of petroleum based fuels. The world?s energy demand is commencing its dependency on alternative fuels. Such alternative fuels in use today consist of bio-alcohols (such as ethanol), hydrogen, biomass, and natural oil/fat derived fuels. However, in this study, the focus will be on the alternative fuel derived from natural oils and fats, namely biodiesel. The following study characterizes the performance of a medium-duty diesel engine fuelled with biodiesel and conventional diesel. The objective is accomplished by taking measurements of manifold pressure and temperature, fuel flow, air flow, and torque. The study first characterizes a John Deere 4.5 liter 4 cylinder direct injection engine with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), common rail fuel injection, and variable turbo-charging with conventional petroleum diesel to set a reference for comparison. The study then proceeds to characterize the differences in engine performance as a result of using biodiesel relative to conventional diesel. The results show that torque decreases with the use of biodiesel by about 10%. The evaluation of engine performance parameters shows that torque is decreased because of the lower heating value of biodiesel compared to conventional diesel. The insignificant difference between the other performance parameters shows that the ECM demands the same performance of the engine regardless of the fuel being combusted by the engine.

Esquivel, Jason

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Development of a direct-injected natural gas engine system for heavy-duty vehicles: Final report phase 2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of Phase 2 of this contract. The authors completed four tasks under this phase of the subcontract. (1) They developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a 3500 direct injected natural gas (DING) engine gas injection/combustion system and used it to identify DING ignition/combustion system improvements. The results were a 20% improvement in efficiency compared to Phase 1 testing. (2) The authors designed and procured the components for a 3126 DING engine (300 hp) and finished assembling it. During preliminary testing, the engine ran successfully at low loads for approximately 2 hours before injector tip and check failures terminated the test. The problems are solvable; however, this phase of the program was terminated. (3) They developed a Decision & Risk Analysis model to compare DING engine technology with various other engine technologies in a number of commercial applications. The model shows the most likely commercial applications for DING technology and can also be used to identify the sensitivity of variables that impact commercial viability. (4) MVE, Inc., completed a preliminary design concept study that examines the major design issues involved in making a reliable and durable 3,000 psi LNG pump. A primary concern is the life of pump seals and piston rings. Plans for the next phase of this program (Phase 3) have been put on indefinite hold. Caterpillar has decided not to fund further DING work at this time due to limited current market potential for the DING engine. However, based on results from this program, the authors believe that DI natural gas technology is viable for allowing a natural gas-fueled engine to achieve diesel power density and thermal efficiency for both the near and long terms.

Cox, G.B.; DelVecchio, K.A.; Hays, W.J.; Hiltner, J.D.; Nagaraj, R.; Emmer, C.

2000-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

67

Predicting and Evaluating the Effectiveness of Ocean Carbon Sequestration by Direct Injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct injection of CO{sub 2} into the ocean is a potentially effective carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection and develop the appropriate analytic framework to allow us to compare the effectiveness of this strategy with other carbon management options. Here, after a brief review of direct oceanic injection, we estimate the effectiveness of ocean carbon sequestration using one dimensional and three dimensional ocean models. We discuss a new measure of effectiveness of carbon sequestration in a leaky reservoir, which we denote sequestration potential. The sequestration potential is the fraction of global warning cost avoided by sequestration in a reservoir. We show how these measures apply to permanent sequestration and sequestration in leaky reservoirs, such as the oceans, terrestrial biosphere, and some geologic formations. Under the assumptions of a constant cost of carbon emission and a 4% discount rate, injecting 900 m deep in the ocean avoids {approx}90% of the global warming cost associated with atmospheric emission; an injection 1700 m deep would avoid > 99 % of the global warming cost. Hence, for discount rates in the range commonly used by commercial enterprises, oceanic direct injection may be nearly as economically effective as permanent sequestration at avoiding global warming costs.

Caldeira, K; Herzog, H J; Wickett, M E

2001-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

Beyond Diesel - Renewable Diesel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

CTTS fact sheet describing NREL's new Renewable Fuels and Lubricants (ReFUEL) Research Laboratory, which will be used to facilitate increased renewable diesel use in heavy-duty vehicles.

Not Available

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Evaluation of injector location and nozzle design in a direct-injection hydrogen research engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The favorable physical properties of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) make it an excellent alternative fuel for internal combustion (IC) engines and hence it is widely regarded as the energy carrier of the future. Hydrogen direct injection provides multiple degrees of freedom for engine optimization and influencing the in-cylinder combustion processes. This paper compares the results in the mixture formation and combustion behavior of a hydrogen direct-injected single-cylinder research engine using two different injector locations as well as various injector nozzle designs.

Wallner, T.; Nande, A. M.; Naber, J.; Energy Systems; Michigan Technological Univ.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Computational study of homogeneous and stratified combustion in a compressed natural gas direct injection engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, the type of combustion occurred within engine cylinder plays an important role determining the performance and emissions. In the present study, the computational investigation was performed in order to compare characteristics of homogeneous ... Keywords: compressed natural gas, direct injection, exhaust emissions, homogeneous combustion, stratified combustion

S. Abdullah; W. H. Kurniawan; M. A. Al-Rawi; Y. Ali; T. I. Mohamad

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Effects of Gasoline Direct Injection Engine Operating Parameters on Particle Number Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-cylinder, wall-guided, spark ignition direct injection engine was used to study the impact of engine operating parameters on engine-out particle number (PN) emissions. Experiments were conducted with certification gasoline and a splash blend of 20% fuel grade ethanol in gasoline (E20), at four steady-state engine operating conditions. Independent engine control parameter sweeps were conducted including start of injection, injection pressure, spark timing, exhaust cam phasing, intake cam phasing, and air-fuel ratio. The results show that fuel injection timing is the dominant factor impacting PN emissions from this wall-guided gasoline direct injection engine. The major factor causing high PN emissions is fuel liquid impingement on the piston bowl. By avoiding fuel impingement, more than an order of magnitude reduction in PN emission was observed. Increasing fuel injection pressure reduces PN emissions because of smaller fuel droplet size and faster fuel-air mixing. PN emissions are insensitive to cam phasing and spark timing, especially at high engine load. Cold engine conditions produce higher PN emissions than hot engine conditions due to slower fuel vaporization and thus less fuel-air homogeneity during the combustion process. E20 produces lower PN emissions at low and medium loads if fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl is avoided. At high load or if there is fuel liquid impingement on piston bowl and/or cylinder wall, E20 tends to produce higher PN emissions. This is probably a function of the higher heat of vaporization of ethanol, which slows the vaporization of other fuel components from surfaces and may create local fuel-rich combustion or even pool-fires.

He, X.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.

2012-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

72

Impact of Biofuel Blending on Diesel Soot Oxidation: Implications for Aftertreatment  

SciTech Connect

Control strategies for diesel particulate filters (DPFs) remain one of the most important aspects of aftertreatment research and understanding the soot oxidation mechanism is key to controlling regeneration. Currently, most DPF models contain simple, first order heterogeneous reactions oxidation models with empirically fit parameters. This work improves the understanding of fundamental oxidation kinetics necessary to advance the capabilities of predictive modeling, by leading to better control over regeneration of the device. This study investigated the effects of blending soybean-derived biodiesel fuel on diesel particulate emissions under conventional combustion from a 1.7L direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five biofuel blend levels were investigated and compared to conventional certification diesel for the nanostructure, surface chemistry and major constituents of the soluble organic fraction (SOF) of diesel particulate matter (PM), and the relationship between these properties and the particulate oxidation kinetics.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, David [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin; Vander Wal, Dr. Randy [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

FY2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPARK IGNITION, SPARK IGNITION, DIRECT INJECTION ENGINE R&D 2 0 0 1 A N N U A L P R O G R E S S R E P O R T U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of Transportation Technologies A C K N O W L E D G E M E N T We would like to express our sincere appreciation to Argonne National Laboratory and Computer Systems Management, Inc., for their artistic and technical contributions in preparing and publishing this report. In addition, we would like to thank all our program participants for their contributions to the programs and all the authors who prepared the project abstracts that comprise this report. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Transportation Technologies 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585-0121 FY 2001 Progress Report for the Spark Ignition Direct Injection R&D Program

74

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

75

Research and development of hydrogen direct-injection internal combustion engine system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research and development of hydrogen-internal combustion engine (ICE) system for heavy-duty trucks, with the goal of allowing carbon dioxide (CO2)-free operation in transportation department, has been carried out. The high-pressure hydrogen ... Keywords: NOx emission reduction, NOx storage reduction catalyst, carbon dioxide-free, direct injection, heavy-duty truck, high-pressure hydrogen injector, hydrogen, internal combustion engine

Yoshio Sato; Atsuhiro Kawamura; Tadanori Yanai; Kaname Naganuma; Kimitaka Yamane; Yasuo Takagi

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Modeling deposit formation in diesel injector nozzle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation of deposit in the diesel injector nozzle affects the injection behavior and hinders performance. Under running condition, deposit precursors are washed away by the ensuing injection. However, during the cool down ...

Sudhiesh Kumar, Chintoo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Planar velocity analysis of diesel spray shadow images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focus of this work is to demonstrate how spatially resolved image information from diesel fuel injection events can be obtained using a forward-scatter imaging geometry, and used to calculate the velocities of liquid structures on the periphery of the spray. In order to obtain accurate velocities directly from individual diesel spray structures, those features need to be spatially resolved in the measurement. The distributed structures measured in a direct shadowgraphy arrangement cannot be reliably analyzed for this kind of velocity information. However, by utilizing an intense collimated light source and adding imaging optics which modify the signal collection, spatially resolved optical information can be retrieved from spray edge regions within a chosen object plane. This work discusses a set of measurements where a diesel spray is illuminated in rapid succession by two ultrafast laser pulses generated by a mode-locked Ti-Sapphire oscillator seeding a matched pair of regenerative amplifiers. Light fro...

Sedarsky, David

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Coal-fueled diesel technology development: Nozzle development for coal-fueled diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

Direct injection of a micronized coal water mixture fuel into the combustion chambers of a diesel engine requires atomizing an abrasive slurry fuel with accurately sized orifices. Five injector orifice materials were evaluated: diamond compacts, chemical vapor deposited diamond tubes, thermally stabilized diamond, tungsten carbide with cobalt binder, and tungsten carbide with nickel binder with brazed and mechanically mounted orifice inserts. Nozzle bodies were fabricated of Armco 17-4 precipitation hardening stainless steel and Stellite 6B in order to withstand cyclic injection pressures and elevated temperatures. Based on a total of approximately 200 cylinder hours of engine operation with coal water mixture fuel diamond compacts were chosen for the orifice material.

Johnson, R.N.; Lee, M.; White, R.A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Caterpillar Light Truck Clean Diesel Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1998, light trucks accounted for over 48% of new vehicle sales in the U.S. and well over half the new Light Duty vehicle fuel consumption. The Light Truck Clean Diesel (LTCD) program seeks to introduce large numbers of advanced technology diesel engines in light-duty trucks that would improve their fuel economy (mpg) by at least 50% and reduce our nation's dependence on foreign oil. Incorporating diesel engines in this application represents a high-risk technical and economic challenge. To meet the challenge, a government-industry partnership (Department of Energy, diesel engine manufacturers, and the automotive original equipment manufacturers) is applying joint resources to meet specific goals that will provide benefits to the nation. [1] Caterpillar initially teamed with Ford Motor Company on a 5 year program (1997-2002) to develop prototype vehicles that demonstrate a 50% fuel economy improvement over the current 1997 gasoline powered light truck vehicle in this class while complying with EPA's Tier II emissions regulations. The light truck vehicle selected for the demonstration is a 1999 Ford F150 SuperCab. To meet the goals of the program, the 4.6 L V-8 gasoline engine in this vehicle will be replaced by an advanced compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engine. Key elements of the Caterpillar LTCD program plan to develop the advanced CIDI engine are presented in this paper.

Robert L. Miller; Kevin P. Duffy; Michael A. Flinn; Steve A. Faulkner; Mike A. Graham

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

Study of deposit formation inside diesel injectors nozzles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel engines are widely used in heavy duty transportation applications such as in trucks, buses and ships because of their reliability and high torque output. A key diesel technology is the injection system which is ...

Wang, YinChun, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Utilization of alternative fuels in diesel engines:  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thrust of this resarch program has been to determine the effect of various alternative and synthetic fuels on the performance and emissions from Diesel engines. The purpose of research was to investigate the various fuels for extension of existing supplies or as emergency substitutes for Diesel fuels. Thus, the work did not emphasize optimization of the engines for a given fuel;the engines were generally run at manufacturers specifications for conventional fuels. During the various studies, regulated and unregualted emissions were investigated and the biological activity of the soluble organics on the particulate emissions was determined using the Ames test procedure. During the present contract period, three experimental programs were carried out. The first program investigated the utilization of methane and propane in an indirect injection, multicylinder engine. In the other two studies, a single cylinder direct injection Diesel engine was used to investigate the performance and emission characteristics of synthetic fuels derived from tar sands and oil shale and of three fuels derived from coal by the Exxon Donor Solvent (EDS) process. The body of this report consists of three chapters which summarize the experimental equipment, procedures, and major results from the studies of methane and propane fumigation, of synthetic fuels from oil shale and tar sands and of the coal-derived fuels.

Not Available

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The organic gas emissions from a stoichiometric direct injection spark ignition engine operating on ethanol/gasoline blends have been assessed under warmed-up and cold idle conditions. The speciated emissions show that the ...

Kar, Kenneth

83

Development of the High-Pressure Direct-Injected, Ultra Low-NOx Natural Gas Engine: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Cummins and Westport Innovations to develop a heavy-duty, low-NOx, high-pressure direct-injection natural gas engine for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle activity.

Duggal, V. K.; Lyford-Pike, E. J.; Wright, J. F.; Dunn, M.; Goudie, D.; Munshi, S.

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

He, Xin (Denver, CO); Durrett, Russell P. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,'' describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Three dimensional modelling of combustion in a direct injection diesel engine using a new unstructured parallel solver  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new code for numerical simulation of transient three-dimensional chemically reacting fluid flows with sprays is presented. This code uses unstructured hexahedral grids, it has been optimized for superscalar machine and has been parallelized based on ...

Julien Bohbot; Marc Zolver; Diego Klahr; Arnaud Torres

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Particulate Characteristics for Varying Engine Operation in a Gasoline Spark Ignited, Direct Injection Engine  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is a detailed investigation of particulate sizing and number count from a direct-injection spark-ignited (DISI) engine at different operating conditions. The engine is a 549 [cc] single-cylinder, four valve engine with a flat-top piston, fueled by Tier II EEE. A baseline engine operating condition, with a low number of particulates, was established and repeatability at this condition was ascertained. This baseline condition is specified as 2000 rpm, 320 kPa IMEP, 280 [°bTDC] end of injection (EOI), and 25 [°bTDC] ignition timing. The particle size distributions were recorded for particle sizes between 7 and 289 [nm]. The baseline particle size distribution was relatively flat, around 1E6 [dN/dlogDp], for particle diameters between 7 and 100 [nm], before dropping off to decreasing numbers at larger diameters. Distributions resulting from a matrix of different engine conditions were recorded. These varied parameters include load, air-to-fuel ratio (A/F), spark timing, injection timing, fuel rail pressure, and oil and coolant temperatures. Most conditions resulted with uni-modal type distributions usually with an increase in magnitude of particles in comparison to the baseline, with the exception of lean operation with retarded ignition timing. Further investigation revealed high sensitivity of the particle number and size distribution to changes in the engine control parameters. There was also a high sensitivity of the particle size distributions to small variations in A/F, ignition timing, and EOI. Investigations revealed the possibility of emissions oxidation in the exhaust and engine combustion instability at later EOI timings which therefore ruled out late EOI as the benchmark condition. Attempts to develop this benchmark revealed engine sensitivity to A/F and ignition timing, especially at later EOI operation

Farron, Carrie; Matthias, Nick; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Mike; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun; Zelenyuk, Alla

2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

Diesel Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Links Links Exit Fueleconomy.gov The links below are to pages that are not part of the fueleconomy.gov Web site. We offer these external links for your convenience in accessing additional information that may be useful or interesting to you. Diesel Vehicles and Manufacturers Audi A3 (TDI models) A6 (TDI models) A7 (TDI models) A8 L (TDI model) Q5 (TDI models) Q7 (TDI models) BMW 328d Sedan 328d xDrive Sedan 328d xDrive Sports Wagon 535d Sedan 535d xDrive Sedan Chevrolet Cruze Turbo Diesel Jeep Grand Cherokee EcoDiesel Mercedes-Benz E250 BlueTEC GL350 BlueTEC GLK250 BlueTEC ML350 BlueTEC Porsche Cayenne Diesel Volkswagen Beetle (TDI models) Beetle Convertible (TDI models) Golf (TDI models) Jetta (TDI models) Jetta Sportwagen (TDI models) Passat (TDI models) Touareg (TDI models) Diesel-Related Information

89

Enlaces Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enlaces Diesel Enlaces Diesel Los siguientes enlaces no son parte del sitio ahorremosgasolina.gov. Le ofrecemos estos enlaces externos para que a su conveniencia tenga acceso a informaciĂłn adicional que puede serle Ăştil o interesante para usted. VehĂ­culos y Fabricantes Diesel Audi A3 (modelos TDI) Q7 (modelos TDI) Mercedes-Benz Mercedes E350 BlueTEC Mercedes GL350 BlueTEC Mercedes ML350 BlueTEC Mercedes R350 BlueTEC Volkswagen Golf (modelos TDI) Jetta (modelos TDI) Jetta Sportwagen (modelos TDI) Touareg (modelos TDI) InformaciĂłn Sobre el Diesel Biodiesel Abundante informaciĂłn sobre el biodiesel proporcionada por el Centro de Datos de Combustibles Alternativos y VehĂ­culos Avanzados (AFDC) Mezclas de Biodiesel ĂŤcono de Adobe Acrobat Informe sobre el debate de las mezclas de biodiesel desarrollado por el programa de Ciudades Limpias del EERE.

90

DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

Qu, Jun [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Ethanol Blend Effects On Direct Injection Spark-Ignition Gasoline Vehicle Particulate Matter Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct injection spark-ignition (DISI) gasoline engines can offer better fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected counterparts, and are now appearing increasingly in more U.S. vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged DISI engines are likely to be used in lieu of large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, to meet fuel economy standards for 2016. In addition to changes in gasoline engine technology, fuel composition may increase in ethanol content beyond the 10% allowed by current law due to the Renewable Fuels Standard passed as part of the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA). In this study, we present the results of an emissions analysis of a U.S.-legal stoichiometric, turbocharged DISI vehicle, operating on ethanol blends, with an emphasis on detailed particulate matter (PM) characterization. Gaseous species, particle mass, and particle number concentration emissions were measured for the Federal Test Procedure urban driving cycle (FTP 75) and the more aggressive US06 cycle. Particle number-size distributions and organic to elemental carbon ratios (OC/EC) were measured for 30 MPH and 80 MPH steady-state operation. In addition, particle number concentration was measured during wide open throttle accelerations (WOTs) and gradual accelerations representative of the FTP 75. For the gaseous species and particle mass measurements, dilution was carried out using a full flow constant volume sampling system (CVS). For the particle number concentration and size distribution measurements, a micro-tunnel dilution system was employed. The vehicles were fueled by a standard test gasoline and 10% (E10) and 20% (E20) ethanol blends from the same supplier. The particle mass emissions were approximately 3 and 7 mg/mile for the FTP75 and US06, respectively, with lower emissions for the ethanol blends. During steady-state operation, the geometric mean diameter of the particle-number size distribution remained approximately the same (50 nm) but the particle number concentration decreased with increasing ethanol content in the fuel. In addition, increasing ethanol content significantly reduced the number concentration of 50 and 100 nm particles during gradual and WOT accelerations.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Hydrocarbon emissions in a homogeneous direct-injection spark engine : gasoline and gasohol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to better understand the effects on hydrocarbon emissions of loading, engine temperature, fuel type, and injection timing, a series of experiments was performed. The effect of loading was observed by running the ...

Tharp, Ronald S

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Effect of Biodiesel Blending on the Speciation of Soluble Organic Fraction from a Light Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel was volumetrically blended with 2007 certification ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel and run in a 1.7L direct-injection common rail diesel engine at one speed-load point (1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP). Engine fueling rate and injection timing were adjusted to maintain a constant load, while particulate samples were collected in a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and with a dilution tunnel sampling train. The samples collected at these two locations were found to contain different levels of soluble organic fraction (SOF) and the different hydrocarbon species in the SOF. This observation indicates that traditional SOF measurements, in light of the specific sampling procedure used, may not be appropriate to DPF applications.

Strzelec, Andrea [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Foster, Prof. Dave [University of Wisconsin; Rutland, Prof. Christopher J. [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Effects of Injector Conditions on the Flame Lift-Off Length of DI Diesel Sprays  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of injection pressure and orifice diameter on the lift-off length of a direct-injection (DI) diesel spray (defined as the farthest upstream location of high temperature combustion) were investigated using a natural light emission imaging technique. The lift-off length experiments were conducted in a constant-volume combustion vessel under quiescent, heavy-duty DI diesel engine conditions using a Phillips research grade No.2 diesel fuel. The results show that natural light emission at 310 nm provides an excellent marker of the lift-off length. At this location, natural light emission at 310 nm is dominated by OH chemiluminescence generated by high-temperature combustion chemistry. Lift-off lengths determined from images of natural light emission at 310 nm show that as either injection pressure (i.e., injection velocity) or orifice diameter increase, the lift-off length increases. The observed lift-off length increase was linearly dependent on injection velocity, the same dependency as previously noted for gas jets. The lift-off length increase with increasing orifice diameter, however, is different than the independence of lift-off length on orifice diameter noted for gas jets An important overall observation was made by considering the lift-off length data in conjunction with data from recent investigations of liquid-phase fuel penetration and spray development. The combined data suggests that a systematic evolution of the relationship and interaction between various processes in a DI diesel spray has been occurring over time, as injection pressures have been increased and orifice diameters reduced as part of efforts to meet emissions regulations. The trends observed may eventually help explain effects of parameters such as injection pressure and orifice diameter on emissions.

D. L. Siebers; B. S. Higgins

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Novel injector techniques for coal-fueled diesel engines. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report, entitled ``Novel Injector Techniques for Coal-Fueled Diesel Engines,`` describes the progress and findings of a research program aimed at development of a dry coal powder fuel injector in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of dry powdered coal in a single-cylinder high speed diesel engine. The basic program consisted of concept selection, analysis and design, bench testing and single cylinder engine testing. The coal injector concept which was selected was a one moving part dry-coal-powder injector utilizing air blast injection. Adiabatics has had previous experience running high speed diesel engines on both direct injected directed coal-water-slurry (CWS) fuel and also with dry coal powder aspirated into the intake air. The Thermal Ignition Combustion System successfully ignited these fuels at all speeds and loads without requiring auxiliary ignition energy such as pilot diesel fuel, heated intake air or glow or spark plugs. Based upon this prior experience, it was shown that the highest efficiency and fastest combustion was with the dry coal, but that the use of aspiration of coal resulted in excessive coal migration into the engine lubrication system. Based upon a desire of DOE to utilize a more modern test engine, the previous naturally-aspirated Caterpillar model 1Y73 single cylinder engine was replaced with a turbocharged (by use of shop air compressor and back pressure control valve) single cylinder version of the Cummins model 855 engine.

Badgley, P.R.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effects of diesel fuel combustion-modifier additives on In-cylinder soot formation in a heavy-duty Dl diesel engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a phenomenological model of diesel combustion and pollutant-formation processes, a number of fuel additives that could potentially reduce in-cylinder soot formation by altering combustion chemistry have been identified. These fuel additives, or ''combustion modifiers'', included ethanol and ethylene glycol dimethyl ether, polyethylene glycol dinitrate (a cetane improver), succinimide (a dispersant), as well as nitromethane and another nitro-compound mixture. To better understand the chemical and physical mechanisms by which these combustion modifiers may affect soot formation in diesel engines, in-cylinder soot and diffusion flame lift-off were measured, using an optically-accessible, heavy-duty, direct-injection diesel engine. A line-of-sight laser extinction diagnostic was employed to measure the relative soot concentration within the diesel jets (''jetsoot'') as well as the rates of deposition of soot on the piston bowl-rim (''wall-soot''). An OH chemiluminescence imaging technique was utilized to measure the lift-off lengths of the diesel diffusion flames so that fresh oxygen entrainment rates could be compared among the fuels. Measurements were obtained at two operating conditions, using blends of a base commercial diesel fuel with various combinations of the fuel additives. The ethanol additive, at 10% by mass, reduced jet-soot by up to 15%, and reduced wall-soot by 30-40%. The other fuel additives also affected in-cylinder soot, but unlike the ethanol blends, changes in in-cylinder soot could be attributed solely to differences in the ignition delay. No statistically-significant differences in the diesel flame lift-off lengths were observed among any of the fuel additive formulations at the operating conditions examined in this study. Accordingly, the observed differences in in-cylinder soot among the fuel formulations cannot be attributed to differences in fresh oxygen entrainment upstream of the soot-formation zones after ignition.

Musculus, Mark P. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Dietz, Jeff (The Lubrizol Corp.)

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Wear, durability, and lubricating oil performance of a straight vegetable oil (Karanja) blend fueled direct injection compression ignition engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and resulting associated environmental degradation has motivated search for alternative transportation fuels. Blending small quantity of Karanja oil (straight vegetable oil) with mineral diesel is one of the simplest available alternatives

Avinash Kumar Agarwal; Atul Dhar

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Effects of 2-Ethylhexyl Nitrate on Diesel-Spray Processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel fuel ignition-enhancing additives, such as 2-ethylhexyl nitrate, are known to reduce emissions from diesel engines; however, the mechanisms by which the emissions reduction occur are not understood. This report covers the first phase of a research project supported by Ethyl Corporation that is aimed at developing a detailed understanding of how 2-ethylhexyl nitrate alters in-cylinder injection, ignition, and combustion processes to reduce diesel engine emissions.

Higgins, B.; Mueller, C.; Siebers, D.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

An In-Cylinder Study of Soot and NO in a DI Diesel Engine. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Clearly the reduction of NOx and particulate emissions remains a major challenge to Diesel engine manufacturers due to increasingly stringent emission standards in the US and other countries. The well documented NOx/particulate trade-off observed in Diesel engines makes the simultaneous reduction of both emissions particularly difficult for manufacturers to achieve. In an effort to provide an improved understanding of the fundamental processes which result in this trade-off, a program was carried out at Penn State to develop the appropriate engine facilities and laser diagnostics to permit in-cylinder studies of Diesel combustion and emissions production with the support of the Department of Energy Advanced Industrial Technology Division . This work has also been supported by the Cummins Engine Company, Lubrizol Corporation and the National Science Foundation. An optically accessible, direct injection, Diesel engine was constructed for these studies. The major objective of the, design of the engine was to maximize optical access under conditions representative of Diesel engine combustion in small bore, commercial engines. Intake air is preheated and boosted in pressure to make the in-cylinder conditions of heat release and pressure as realistic as possible. Another important objective of the design was flexibility in combustion chamber geometry to permit a variety of head and bowl geometries to be studied. In all the results reported in this report a square bowl was used to simplify the introduction of laser light sheets into the engine.

Litzinger, T.A.

1995-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Performance and Economics of Catalytic Glow Plugs and Shields in Direct Injection Natural Gas Engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by TIAX and Westport to test and perform cost analysis for catalytic glow plugs and shields for direct-injection natural gas engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Mello, J. P.; Bezaire, D.; Sriramulu, S.; Weber, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

JET BREAKUP AND SPRAY FORMATION IN A DIESEL ENGINE.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The breakup of injected fuel into spray is of key interest to the design of a fuel efficient, nonpolluting diesel engine. We report preliminary progress on the numerical simulation of diesel fuel injection spray with the front tracking code FronTier. Our simulation design is set to match experiments at ANL, and our present agreement is semi-quantitative. Future efforts will include mesh refinement studies, which will better model the turbulent flow.

GLIMM,J.; LI,X.; KIM,M.N.; OH,W.; MARCHESE,A.; SAMULYAK,R.; TZANOS,C.

2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

Effect of E85 on RCCI Performance and Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine - SAE World Congress  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the effect of E85 on load expansion and FTP modal point emissions indices under reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) operation on a light-duty multi-cylinder diesel engine. A General Motors (GM) 1.9L four-cylinder diesel engine with the stock compression ratio of 17.5:1, common rail diesel injection system, high-pressure exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system and variable geometry turbocharger was modified to allow for port fuel injection with gasoline or E85. Controlling the fuel reactivity in-cylinder by the adjustment of the ratio of premixed low-reactivity fuel (gasoline or E85) to direct injected high reactivity fuel (diesel fuel) has been shown to extend the operating range of high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) compared to the use of a single fuel alone as in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) or premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). The effect of E85 on the Ad-hoc federal test procedure (FTP) modal points is explored along with the effect of load expansion through the light-duty diesel speed operating range. The Ad-hoc FTP modal points of 1500 rpm, 1.0bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP); 1500rpm, 2.6bar BMEP; 2000rpm, 2.0bar BMEP; 2300rpm, 4.2bar BMEP; and 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP were explored. Previous results with 96 RON unleaded test gasoline (UTG-96) and ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) showed that with stock hardware, the 2600rpm, 8.8bar BMEP modal point was not obtainable due to excessive cylinder pressure rise rate and unstable combustion both with and without the use of EGR. Brake thermal efficiency and emissions performance of RCCI operation with E85 and ULSD is explored and compared against conventional diesel combustion (CDC) and RCCI operation with UTG 96 and ULSD.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Hanson, Reed M [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.05 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

104

Diesel prices decrease slightly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease slightly The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3-tenths of a penny from a week ago,...

105

Diesel prices rise slightly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices rise slightly The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 4.16 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2-tenths of a penny from a week ago, based...

106

Diesel prices flat  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices flat The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel saw no movement from last week. Prices remained flat at 3.89 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly...

107

Diesel prices slightly decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3, 2013 Diesel prices slightly decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago, based on...

108

Diesel prices slightly decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices slightly decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's down 8-tenths of a penny from a week ago,...

109

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's down a penny from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

110

Diesel prices increase nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the...

111

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

112

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2.1 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

113

Diesel prices flat nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices flat nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel remained the same from a week ago at 3.98 a gallon on Monday, based on the weekly price...

114

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

115

Diesel prices increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.84 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price...

116

DIESEL FUEL TANK FOUNDATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to design structural foundations for the Diesel Fuel Tank and Fuel Pumps.

M. Gomez

1995-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

117

Particulate Matter Sampling and Volatile Organic Compound Removal for Characterization of Spark Ignited Direct Injection Engine Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More stringent emissions regulations are continually being proposed to mitigate adverse human health and environmental impacts of internal combustion engines. With that in mind, it has been proposed that vehicular particulate matter (PM) emissions should be regulated based on particle number in addition to particle mass. One aspect of this project is to study different sample handling methods for number based aerosol measurements, specifically, two different methods for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). One method is a thermodenuder (TD) and the other is an evaporative chamber/diluter (EvCh). These sample handling methods have been implemented in an engine test cell with a spark ignited direct injection (SIDI) engine. The engine was designed for stoichiometric, homogeneous combustion. SIDI is of particular interest for improved fuel efficiency compared to other SI engines, however, the efficiency benefit comes with greater PM emissions and may therefore be subject to the proposed number based PM regulation. Another aspect of this project is to characterize PM from this engine in terms of particle number and composition.

Matthias, Nicholas; Farron, Carrie; Foster, David E.; Andrie, Michael; Krieger, Roger; Najt, Paul M.; Narayanaswamy, Kushal; Solomon, Arun S.; Zelenyuk, Alla

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel ULSD LSD Off-Road Ultra-Low Sulfur Highway Diesel Fuel (15 ppm Sulfur Maximum). Required for use in all model year 2007 and later highway diesel vehicles...

119

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

120

A comparison of ethanol and butanol as oxygenates using a direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate a 'what if' scenario in terms of using butanol as an oxygenate in place of ethanol in an engine calibrated for gasoline operation. No changes to the stock engine calibration were performed for this study. Combustion analysis, efficiency, and emissions of pure gasoline, 10% ethanol, and 10% butanol blends in a modern direct-injection four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were analyzed. Data were taken at engine speeds of 1000 rpm up to 4000 rpm with load varying from 0 N m (idle) to 150 N m. Relatively minor differences existed between the three fuels for the combustion characteristics such as heat release rate, 50% mass fraction burned, and coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure at low and medium engine loads. However at high engine loads the reduced knock resistance of the butanol blend forced the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing substantially, compared with the gasoline baseline and, even more pronounced, compared with the ethanol blend. Brake specific volumetric fuel consumption, which represented a normalized volumetric fuel flow rate, was lowest for the gasoline baseline fuel due to the higher energy density. The 10% butanol blend had a lower volumetric fuel consumption compared with the ethanol blend, as expected, based on energy density differences. The results showed little difference in regulated emissions between 10% ethanol and 10% butanol. The ethanol blend produced the highest peak specific NO{sub x} due to the high octane rating of ethanol and effective antiknock characteristics. Overall, the ability of butanol to perform equally as well as ethanol from an emissions and combustion standpoint, with a decrease in fuel consumption, initially appears promising. Further experiments are planned to explore the full operating range of the engine and the potential benefits of higher blend ratios of butanol.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.; McConnell, S. (Energy Systems)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effects of piston surface treatments on performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct injection, stratified charge engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of thermal barrier coatings and/or surface treatments on the performance and emissions of a methanol-fueled, direct-injection, stratified-charge (DISC) engine. A Ricardo Hydra Mark III engine was used for this work and in previous experiments at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The primary focus of the study was to examine the effects of various piston insert surface treatments on hydrocarbon (HC) and oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) emissions. Previous studies have shown that engines of this class have a tendency to perform poorly at low loads and have high unburned fuel emissions. A blank aluminum piston was modified to employ removable piston bowl inserts. Four different inserts were tested in the experiment: aluminum, stainless steel with a 1.27-mm (0.050-in.) air gap (to act as a thermal barrier), and two stainless steel/air-gap inserts with coatings. Two stainless steel inserts were dimensionally modified to account for the coating thickness (1.27-mm) and coated identically with partially stabilized zirconia (PSZ). One of the coated inserts then had an additional seal-coat applied. The coated inserts were otherwise identical to the stainless steel/air-gap insert (i.e., they employed the same 1.27-mm air gap). Thermal barrier coatings were employed in an attempt to increase combustion chamber surface temperatures, thereby reducing wall quenching and promoting more complete combustion of the fuel in the quench zone. The seal-coat was applied to the zirconia to reduce the surface porosity; previous research suggested that despite the possibly higher surface temperatures obtainable with a ceramic coating, the high surface area of a plasma-sprayed coating may actually allow fuel to adhere to the surface and increase the unburned fuel emissions and fuel consumption.

West, B.; Green, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Injection Timing Effects on Brake Fuel Conversion Efficiency and Engine System's Respones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal concerns on combustion-based fuel consumption are ever-increasing. With respect to internal combustion engines, this translates to a need to increase brake fuel conversion efficiency (BFCE). Diesel engines are a relatively efficient internal combustion engine to consider for numerous applications, but associated actions to mitigate certain exhaust emissions have generally deteriorated engine efficiency. Conventionally, diesel engine emission control has centered on in-cylinder techniques. Although these continue to hold promise, the industry trend is presently favoring the use of after-treatment devices which create new opportunities to improve the diesel engine's brake fuel conversion efficiency. This study focuses on injection timing effects on the combustion processes, engine efficiency, and the engine system's responses. The engine in the study is a medium duty diesel engine (capable of meeting US EPA Tier III off road emission standards) equipped with common rail direct fuel injection, variable geometry turbo charging, and interfaced with a custom built engine controller. The study found that injection timing greatly affected BFCE by changing the combustion phasing. BFCE would increase up to a maximum then begin to decrease as phasing became less favorable. Combustion phasing would change from being mostly mixing controlled combustion to premixed combustion as injection timing would advance allowing more time for fuel to mix during the ignition delay. Combustion phasing, in turn, would influence many other engine parameters. As injection timing is advanced, in-cylinder temperatures and pressures amplify, and intake and exhaust manifold pressures deteriorate. Rate of heat release and rate of heat transfer increase when injection timing is advanced. Turbocharger speed falls with the advancing injection timing. Torque, however, rose to a maximum then fell off again even though engine speed and fueling rate were held constant between different injection timings. Interestingly, the coefficient of heat transfer changes from a two peak curve to a smooth one peak curve as the injection timing is advanced further. The major conclusion of the study is that injection advance both positively and negatively influences the diesel engine's response which contributes to the brake fuel conversion efficiency.

McLean, James Elliott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Common Rail Injection System Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The collaborative research program between the Department of energy and Electro-Motive Diesels, Inc. on the development of common rail fuel injection system for locomotive diesel engines that can meet US EPA Tier 2 exhaust emissions has been completed. This final report summarizes the objectives of the program, work scope, key accomplishments and research findings. The major objectives of this project encompassed identification of appropriate injection strategies by using advanced analytical tools, development of required prototype hardware/controls, investigations of fuel spray characteristics including cavitation phenomena, and validation of hareware using a single-cylinder research locomotive diesel engine. Major milestones included: (1) a detailed modeling study using advanced mathematical models - several various injection profiles that show simultaneous reduction of NOx and particulates on a four stroke-cycle locomotive diesel engine were identified; (2) development of new common rail fuel injection hardware capable of providing these injection profiles while meeting EMD engine and injection performance specifications. This hardware was developed together with EMD's current fuel injection component supplier. (3) Analysis of fuel spray characteristics. Fuel spray numerical studies and high speed photographic imaging analyses were performed. (4) Validation of new hardware and fuel injection profiles. EMD's single-cylinder research diesel engine located at Argonne National Laboratory was used to confirm emissions and performacne predictions. These analytical ane experimental investigations resulted in optimized fuel injection profiles and engine operating conditions that yield reductions in NOx emissions from 7.8 g/bhp-hr to 5.0 g/bhp-hr at full (rated) load. Additionally, hydrocarbon and particulate emissions were reduced considerably when compared to baseline Tier I levels. The most significant finding from the injection optimization process was a 2% to 3% improvement in fuel economy over EMD's traditional Tier I engine hardware configuration. the common rail fuel injection system enabled this added benefit by virtue of an inherent capability to provide multiple injections per power stroke at high fuel rail pressures. On the basis of the findings in this study, EMD concludes that the new electronically-controlled high-pressure common rail injection system has the potential to meet locomotive Tier 2 NOx and particulates emission standards without sacrificing the fuel economy. A number of areas to further improve the injection hardware and engine operating characteristics to further exploit the benefits of common rail injection system have also been identified.

Electro-Motive,

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO{sub 2} and 85% for NO{sub x} were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop an emissions control system for a GE locomotive powered by a Coal Water Slurry (CWS) fuel diesel engine. The development effort is directed toward reducing particulate matter, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions from the engine exhaust gas at 700--800F and 1-2 psig. The commercial system should be economically attractive while subject to limited space constraints. After testing various alternatives, a system composed of a barrier filter with sorbent injection ups was selected for controlling particulates, SO[sub 2] and NO[sub x] emissions. In bench scale and 500 acfm slip s tests, removal efficiencies greater than 90% for SO[sub 2] and 85% for NO[sub x] were achieved. Particulate emissions from the barrier filter are within NSPS limits.

Cook, C.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Van Kleunen, W.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Second law analysis of premixed compression ignition combustion in a diesel engine using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A second law analysis of compression ignition engine was completed using a thermodynamic engine cycle simulation. The major components of availability destruction and transfer for an entire engine cycle were identified and the influence of mode of combustion, injection timing and EGR on availability balance was evaluated. The simulation pressure data was matched with the available experimental pressure data gathered from the tests on the Isuzu 1.7 L direct injection diesel engine. Various input parameters of the simulation were changed to represent actual engine conditions. Availability destruction due to combustion decreases with advanced injection timing and under premixed compression ignition (PCI) modes; but it is found to be insensitive to the level of EGR. Similarly, trends (or lack of trends) in the other components of availability balance were identified for variation in injection timing, EGR level and mode of combustion. Optimum strategy for efficient combustion processes was proposed based on the observed trends.

Oak, Sushil Shreekant

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a five-year Low Emissions Aftertreatment and Diesel Emissions Reduction (LEADER) program under a DOE project entitled: ''Research and Development for Compression-Ignition Direct-Injection Engines (CIDI) and Aftertreatment Sub-Systems''. The objectives of the LEADER Program were to: Demonstrate technologies that will achieve future federal Tier 2 emissions targets; and Demonstrate production-viable technical targets for engine out emissions, efficiency, power density, noise, durability, production cost, aftertreatment volume and weight. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the LEADER program The most noteworthy achievements in this program are listed below: (1) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a PNGV-mule Neon passenger car, utilizing a CSF + SCR system These aggressive emissions were obtained with no ammonia (NH{sub 3}) slip and a combined fuel economy of 63 miles per gallon, integrating FTP75 and highway fuel economy transient cycle test results. Demonstrated feasibility to achieve Tier 2 Bin 8 emissions levels without active NOx aftertreatment. (2) Demonstrated Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions target over the FTP75 cycle on a light-duty truck utilizing a CSF + SCR system, synergizing efforts with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. This aggressive reduction in tailpipe out emissions was achieved with no ammonia slip and a 41% fuel economy improvement, compared to the equivalent gasoline engine-equipped vehicle. (3) Demonstrated Tier 2 near-Bin 9 emissions compliance on a light-duty truck, without active NOx aftertreatment devices, in synergy with the DOE-DDC DELTA program. (4) Developed and applied advanced combustion technologies such as ''CLEAN Combustion{copyright}'', which yields simultaneous reduction in engine out NOx and PM emissions while also improving engine and aftertreatment integration by providing favorable exhaust species and temperature characteristics. These favorable emissions characteristics were obtained while maintaining performance and fuel economy. These aggressive emissions and performance results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. This systems approach benefits substantially from an integrated experimental and analytical approach to technology development, which is one of DDCs core competencies Also, DDC is uniquely positioned to undertake such a systems technology development approach, given its vertically integrated commercial structure within the DaimlerChrysler organization. State-of-the-art analytical tools were developed targeting specific LEADER program objectives and were applied to guide system enhancements and to provide testing directions, resulting in a shortened and efficient development cycle. Application examples include ammonia/NO{sub x} distribution improvement and urea injection controls development, and were key contributors to significantly reduce engine out as well as tailpipe out emissions. Successful cooperation between DDC and Engelhard Corporation, the major subcontractor for the LEADER program and provider of state-of-the-art technologies on various catalysts, was another contributing factor to ensure that both passenger car and LD truck applications achieved Tier 2 Bin 3 emissions levels. Significant technical challenges, which highlight barriers of commercialization of diesel technology for passenger cars and LD truck applications, are presented at the end of this report.

None

2005-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Investigation of impact of fuel injection strategy and biodiesel fueling on engine emissions and performance.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Both biodiesel fueling and changes of fuel injection pressure have significant impacts on diesel engine emissions. The investigations of their impacts on engine exhaust NOx… (more)

Ye, Peng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: LIF, air-to-fuel mixing, gasoline direct injection engine, image analysis, intensified image acquisition, laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Use of LIF image acquisition and analysis in developing a calibrated technique for in-cylinder investigation of the spatial distribution of air-to-fuel mixing in direct injection gasoline engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the role of image acquisition and analysis in the development of a new strategy for the calibration of measurements of fuel distribution in gasoline direct injection engines. Images are acquired from a motored experimental engine ... Keywords: Air-to-fuel mixing, Gasoline direct injection engine, Image analysis, Intensified image acquisition, LIF, Laser-induced fluorescence

Guillaume de Sercey; Graeme Awcock; Morgan Heikal

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Diesel fuel filtration system  

SciTech Connect

The American nuclear utility industry is subject to tight regulations on the quality of diesel fuel that is stored at nuclear generating stations. This fuel is required to supply safety-related emergency diesel generators--the backup power systems associated with the safe shutdown of reactors. One important parameter being regulated is the level of particulate contamination in the diesel fuel. Carbon particulate is a natural byproduct of aging diesel fuel. Carbon particulate precipitates from the fuel`s hydrocarbons, then remains suspended or settles to the bottom of fuel oil storage tanks. If the carbon particulate is not removed, unacceptable levels of particulate contamination will eventually occur. The oil must be discarded or filtered. Having an outside contractor come to the plant to filter the diesel fuel can be costly and time consuming. Time is an even more critical factor if a nuclear plant is in a Limiting Condition of Operation (LCO) situation. A most effective way to reduce both cost and risk is for a utility to build and install its own diesel fuel filtration system. The cost savings associated with designing, fabricating and operating the system inhouse can be significant, and the value of reducing the risk of reactor shutdown because of uncertified diesel fuel may be even higher. This article describes such a fuel filtering system.

Schneider, D. [Wisconsin Fuel and Light, Wausau, WI (United States)

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

American Agri diesel LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

diesel LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name American Agri-diesel LLC Place Colorado Springs, Colorado Product Biodiesel producer in Colorado. References American Agri-diesel LLC1...

133

IMPACT OF OXYGENATED FUEL ON DIESEL ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND EMISSIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As evidenced by recent lawsuits brought against operators of large diesel truck fleets [1] and by the Consent Decree brought against the heavy-duty diesel manufacturers [2], the environmental and health effects of diesel engine emissions continue to be a significant concern. Reduction of diesel engine emissions has traditionally been achieved through a combination of fuel system, combustion chamber, and engine control modifications [3]. Catalytic aftertreatment has become common on modern diesel vehicles, with the predominant device being the diesel oxidation catalytic converter [3]. To enable advanced after-treatment devices and to directly reduce emissions, significant recent interest has focused on reformulation of diesel fuel, particularly the reduction of sulfur content. The EPA has man-dated that diesel fuel will have only 15 ppm sulfur content by 2007, with current diesel specifications requiring around 300 ppm [4]. Reduction of sulfur will permit sulfur-sensitive aftertreatment devices, continuously regenerating particulate traps, NOx control catalysts, and plasma assisted catalysts to be implemented on diesel vehicles [4]. Another method of reformulating diesel fuel to reduce emissions is to incorporate oxygen in the fuel, as was done in the reformulation of gasoline. The use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) in reformulated gasoline has resulted in contamination of water resources across the country [5]. Nonetheless, by relying on the lessons learned from MTBE, oxygenation of diesel fuel may be accomplished without compromising water quality. Oxygenation of diesel fuel offers the possibility of reducing particulate matter emissions significantly, even for the current fleet of diesel vehicles. The mechanism by which oxygen content leads to particulate matter reductions is still under debate, but recent evidence shows clearly that ''smokeless'' engine operation is possible when the oxygen content of diesel fuel reaches roughly 38% by weight [6]. The potential improvements in energy efficiency within the transportation section, particularly in sport utility vehicles and light-duty trucks, that can be provided by deployment of diesel engines in passenger cars and trucks is a strong incentive to develop cleaner burning diesel engines and cleaner burning fuels for diesel engines. Thus, serious consideration of oxygenated diesel fuels is of significant practical interest and value to society. In the present work, a diesel fuel reformulating agent, CETANERTM, has been examined in a popular light-medium duty turbodiesel engine over a range of blending ratios. This additive is a mixture of glycol ethers and can be produced from dimethyl ether, which itself can be manufactured from synthesis gas using Air Products' Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME TM) technology. CETANERTM is a liquid, has an oxygen content of 36 wt.%, has a cetane number over 100 and is highly miscible in diesel fuel. This combination of physical and chemical properties makes CETANERTM an attractive agent for oxygenating diesel fuel. The present study considered CETANERTM ratios from 0 to 40 wt.% in a California Air Resources Board (CARB) specification diesel fuel. Particulate matter emissions, gaseous emissions and in-cylinder pressure traces were monitored over the AVL 8-Mode engine test protocol [7]. This paper presents the results from these measurements and discusses the implications of using high cetane number oxygenates in diesel fuel reformulation.

Boehman, Andre L.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

Völk, S; Schülein, F J R; Truong, T A; Kim, H; Petroff, P M; Wixforth, A; Krenner, H J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Direct observation of dynamic surface acoustic wave controlled carrier injection into single quantum posts using phase-resolved optical spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A versatile stroboscopic technique based on active phase-locking of a surface acoustic wave to picosecond laser pulses is used to monitor dynamic acoustoelectric effects. Time-integrated multi-channel detection is applied to probe the modulation of the emission of a quantum well for different frequencies of the surface acoustic wave. For quantum posts we resolve dynamically controlled generation of neutral and charged excitons and preferential injection of holes into localized states within the nanostructure.

S. Völk; F. Knall; F. J. R. Schülein; T. A. Truong; H. Kim; P. M. Petroff; A. Wixforth; H. J. Krenner

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

136

Experimental Investigation of Fuel-Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) Combustion Mode in a Multi-Cylinder, Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to provide the combustion and emission characteristics resulting from fuel-reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI) combustion mode utilizing dual-fuel approach in a light-duty, multi-cylinder diesel engine. In-cylinder fuel blending using port fuel injection of gasoline before intake valve opening (IVO) and early-cycle, direct injection of diesel fuel was used as the charge preparation and fuel blending strategy. In order to achieve the desired auto-ignition quality through the stratification of the fuel-air equivalence ratio ( ), blends of commercially available gasoline and diesel fuel were used. Engine experiments were performed at an engine speed of 2300rpm and an engine load of 4.3bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). It was found that significant reduction in both nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was realized successfully through the RCCI combustion mode even without applying exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). However, high carbon monoxide (CO) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions were observed. The low combustion gas temperature during the expansion and exhaust processes seemed to be the dominant source of high CO emissions in the RCCI combustion mode. The high HC emissions during the RCCI combustion mode could be due to the increased combustion quenching layer thickness as well as the -stratification at the periphery of the combustion chamber. The slightly higher brake thermal efficiency (BTE) of the RCCI combustion mode was observed than the other combustion modes, such as the conventional diesel combustion (CDC) mode, and single-fuel, premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI) combustion mode. The parametric study of the RCCI combustion mode revealed that the combustion phasing and/or the peak cylinder pressure rise rate of the RCCI combustion mode could be controlled by several physical parameters premixed ratio (rp), intake swirl intensity, and start of injection (SOI) timing of directly injected fuel unlike other low temperature combustion (LTC) strategies.

Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

HYDROGEN ASSISTED DIESEL COMBUSTION.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this study, the effect of hydrogen assisted diesel combustion on conventional and advanced combustion modes was investigated on a DDC/VM Motori 2.5L, 4-cylinder, turbocharged,… (more)

Lilik, Gregory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Diesel prices decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's down 0.4 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly price survey by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Diesel prices were highest in...

139

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - Gasoline Sprays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasoline Sprays Gasoline Sprays Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector Animated image of fuel emerging from a gasoline injector (simulated environment). Some newer automobiles in the U.S. use gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines. These advanced gasoline engines inject the fuel directly into the engine cylinder rather than into the intake port. These engines can achieve higher fuel efficiency, but they depend on a precise fuel/air mixture at the spark plug to initiate ignition. This leads to more stringent requirements on spray quality and reproducibility. GDI also enables new combustion strategies for gasoline engines such as lean burn engines that use less fuel and air. Lean burn engines may achieve efficiencies near those of diesels while producing low emissions. This

140

The diesel approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Whether for standby or baseload capacity, diesel generator sets are being used in markets worldwide. Companies are taking a variety of approaches to tapping these markets. The markets for diesel generators follow two basic paths. In the US, they are used primarily for standby or peaking applications. Outside the US, the market includes standby applications but is more often for baseload or prime-power applications.

Anderson, J.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Diesel Engine Analysis Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides a thorough background on diesel engine analysis including combustion, vibration, and ultrasonic analysis theory. Interpretation of results is also provided. This guide is intended to enable nuclear utility personnel to make informed decisions regarding the nature and use of diesel engine analysis, including how to set up an effective program, how to establish analysis guidelines, how to make use of the resulting data to plan maintenance, determine the causes of off-design operating co...

1997-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

142

Adaptive engine injection for emissions reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

NOx and soot emissions from internal combustion engines, and in particular compression ignition (diesel) engines, are reduced by varying fuel injection timing, fuel injection pressure, and injected fuel volume between low and greater engine loads. At low loads, fuel is injected during one or more low-pressure injections occurring at low injection pressures between the start of the intake stroke and approximately 40 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke. At higher loads, similar injections are used early in each combustion cycle, in addition to later injections which preferably occur between about 90 degrees before top dead center during the compression stroke, and about 90 degrees after top dead center during the expansion stroke (and which most preferably begin at or closely adjacent the end of the compression stroke). These later injections have higher injection pressure, and also lower injected fuel volume, than the earlier injections.

Reitz, Rolf D. (Madison, WI): Sun, Yong (Madison, WI)

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

143

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Emissions Control - Advanced Diesel Particulate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems Development of Advanced Diesel Particulate Filtration Systems The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that on-highway diesel vehicles have filtration systems to reduce tail-pipe soot emissions, known as particulate matter (PM). Diesel particulate filtration (DPF) systems are currently the most efficient at directly controlling PM. Argonne researchers, working with Corning, Inc., and Caterpillar, Inc., through a cooperative research and development agreement, are exploiting previously unavailable technology and research results on diesel PM filtration and regeneration processes, aiming to the technology transfer of advanced PM emission control to industry. Argonne's Research In operation of DPF systems, the filtration and regeneration of particulate emissions are the key processes to be controlled for high efficiency. Due to difficulties in accessing the micro-scaled structures of DPF membranes and monitoring particulate filtration and high-temperature thermal processes, however, research has been limited to macroscopic observation for the product.

144

Advanced radiation techniques for inspection of diesel engine combustion chamber materials components. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heavy duty truck engines must meet stringent life cycle cost and regulatory requirements. Meeting these requirements has resulted in convergence on 4-stroke 6-in-line, turbocharged, and after-cooled engines with direct-injection combustion systems. These engines provide much higher efficiencies (42%, fuel consumption 200 g/kW-hr) than automotive engines (31%, fuel consumption 270 g/kW-hr), but at higher initial cost. Significant near-term diesel engine improvements are necessary and are spurred by continuing competitive, Middle - East oil problems and Congressional legislation. As a result of these trends and pressures, Caterpillar has been actively pursuing a low-fuel consumption engine research program with emphasis on product quality through process control and product inspection. The goal of this project is to combine the nondestructive evaluation and computational resources and expertise available at LLNL with the diesel engine and manufacturing expertise of the Caterpillar Corporation to develop in-process monitoring and inspection techniques for diesel engine combustion chamber components and materials. Early development of these techniques will assure the optimization of the manufacturing process by design/inspection interface. The transition from the development stage to the manufacturing stage requires a both a thorough understanding of the processes and a way of verifying conformance to process standards. NDE is one of the essential tools in accomplishing both elements and in this project will be integrated with Caterpillar`s technological and manufacturing expertise to accomplish the project goals.

NONE

1995-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

145

100 area diesel performance data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance data for diesel engine-generator sets was collected to aid an analysis of the electric power system being conducted by an offsite consultant. Diesels in three different services were studied: emergency power (GM) diesels, 903 fan backup diesels and the Caterpillar diesels that power the dc motors for the D/sub 2/O pumps. It was convenient to collect data for the ECS booster pump diesel at the same time, even though it is not part of the electric power system. The results are published here to make them more widely available.

Smith, J.A.; Tudor, A.A.

1984-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Saskatchewan Renewable Diesel Program (Saskatchewan, Canada)...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Renewable Diesel Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) Saskatchewan Renewable Diesel Program (Saskatchewan, Canada) Eligibility Agricultural Maximum Rebate 40 million litres of renewable...

147

Operational test report for WESF diesel generator diesel tank installation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The WESF Backup Generator Underground Diesel Tank 101 has been replaced with a new above ground 1000 gallon diesel tank. Following the tank installation, inspections and tests specified in the Operational Test Procedure, WHC-SD-WM-OTP-155, were performed. Inspections performed by a Quality Control person indicated the installation was leak free and the diesel generator/engine ran as desired. There were no test and inspection exceptions, therefore, the diesel tank installation is operable.

Schwehr, B.A.

1994-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

148

Diesel Nuevos y Por Venir  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Nuevos y Por Venir Nuevos Modelos Diesel del 2014 Vehculo Estimados de MPG de la EPA Precios (MSRP) Audi A8 L Automvil Grande Audi A8 L Chart: Ciudad, 24; Carretera, 36;...

149

Diesel prices slightly decrease nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices slightly decrease nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.97 a gallon on Monday. That's down 7-tenths of a penny from a week...

150

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.3 cents from a week ago, based on the...

151

Diesel prices see slight drop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices see slight drop The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell slightly to 3.91 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week ago,...

152

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.98 a gallon on Labor Day Monday. That's up 6.8 cents from a week ago, based...

153

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.92 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 cents from a week ago based on the...

154

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.6 cents from a week ago, based on the...

155

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 2013 Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.94 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3 12 cents from a week ago, based...

156

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.98 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.6 cents from a week ago, based on the...

157

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.1 cents from a week ago based on the...

158

Diesel prices remain fairly stable  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices remain fairly stable The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel slightly fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 6-tenths of a penny from a week...

159

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's down 5 12 cents from a week ago, based on the...

160

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.01 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.1 cents from a week ago, based on the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Diesel prices slightly increase nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices slightly increase nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose slightly to 3.90 a gallon on Monday. That's up 4-tenths of a penny from a...

162

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.87 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

163

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.92 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

164

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.89 a gallon on Monday. That's up 2.4 cents from a week ago, based on the...

165

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.82 a gallon on Monday. That's down a penny from a week ago, based on the...

166

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.83 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago, based on the...

167

Diesel prices continue to increase  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to increase The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.88 a gallon on Monday. That's up 3.9 cents from a week ago, based on the...

168

Diesel prices continue to decrease  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4, 2013 Diesel prices continue to decrease The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.86 a gallon on Monday. That's down 1.3 cents from a week ago, based...

169

Diesel fuel oils, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1983 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Tests of 192 samples of diesel fuel oils from 87 refineries throughout the country were made by 31 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the two grades of diesel fuels. Summaries of the results of the 1983 survey, compared with similar data for 1982, are shown in Tables 1 and 2 of the report. 3 figures, 4 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Diesel fuel oils, 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of diesel fuels produced during 1982 were submitted for study and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Tests of 184 samples of diesel fuel oils from 83 refineries throughout the country were made by 27 petroleum groups according to type of diesel fuel. Each group of analyses is subdivided into five tabulations according to five general regions of the country where the fuels are marketed. The regions, containing a total of 16 districts, are shown on a map in the report. Data from 13 laboratory tests on each individual diesel fuel sample are listed and arranged by geographic marketing districts in decreasing order of sales volumes. Charts are included showing trends of averages of certain properties for the four types of diesel fuels for the years 1960 to 1982. Summaries of the results of the 1982 survey, compared with similar data for 1981, are shown in Tables 1 through 4 of the report. A summary of 1-D and 2-D fuels are presented in Tables 5 and 6 respectively.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Infrared measurements of soot formation and droplet sizes in diesel sprays. Final report, June 6, 1987--December 31, 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation of diesel sprays using a combination of infrared wavelength optical diagnostics to probe the high droplet number density region surrounding the injector tip. Infrared wavelengths were shown to be more effective than visible or ultraviolet wavelength light at penetrating this region of the spray. This success is easily explained by the decrease in optical cross section of small diameter drops (less than 10 {mu}m) for a wavelength shift from the visible to wavelengths near 10 {mu}m. Two types of diagnostics were implemented. First, a custom manufactured, high speed infrared spectrometer was used to monitor the spectral region between 6 and 12 {mu}m in 0.5 {mu}m intervals. Spectra from this instrument, for specific locations in the combusting spray were used to monitor the development of soot in the spray. The second diagnostic technique used three collinear laser beams focussed into a 0.25 mm beam to monitor the droplet size in the spray. This measurement uses a ratio of signals to remove the droplet number density as a variable and the observed signal ratio is a direct indication of the average (using an approximate radius to the fourth power weighting function) droplet size. The experiments were performed using a shock tube to simulate the conditions typical of diesel combustion (700 to 900 K in temperature and approximately 3.0 MPa in pressure) and a custom manufactured single shot fuel injection system. Optical access in the shock tube included visible and infrared transmissive windows arranged to provide orthogonal access in two directions and perpendicular to the spray axis. The fuel injection system for this work was configured to produce approximately 20 MPa of injection pressure and produced a single injection approximately 2 ms after the injection trigger. This system could therefore be controlled to inject into the quiescent reflected region of the shock tube after the incident shock reflection from the end wall.

Parker, T.E.; Morency, J.R.; Foutter, R.R.; Rawlins, W.T.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Soybean and Coconut Biodiesel Fuel Effects on Combustion Characteristics in a Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigated the effects of soybean- and coconut-derived biodiesel fuels on combustion characteristics in a 1.7-liter direct injection, common rail diesel engine. Five sets of fuels were studied: 2007 ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD), 5% and 20% volumetric blends of soybean biodiesel with ULSD (soybean B5 and B20), and 5% and 20% volumetric blends of coconut biodiesel with ULSD (coconut B5 and B20). In conventional diesel combustion mode, particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO/dx) emissions were similar for all fuels studied except soybean B20. Soybean B20 produced the lowest PM but the highest NO/dx emissions. Compared with conventional diesel combustion mode, high efficiency clean combustion (HECC) mode, achieved by increased EGR and combustion phasing, significantly reduced both PM and NO/dx emissions for all fuels studied at the expense of higher hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions and an increase in fuel consumption (less than 4%). ULSD, soybean B5, and coconut B5 showed no difference in exhaust emissions. However, PM emissions increased slightly for soybean B20 and coconut B20. NO/dx emissions increased significantly for soybean B20, while those for coconut B20 were comparable to ULSD. Differences in the chemical and physical properties of soybean and coconut biodiesel fuels compared with ULSD, such as higher fuel-borne oxygen, greater viscosity, and higher boiling temperatures, play a key role in combustion processes and, therefore, exhaust emissions. Furthermore, the highly unsaturated ester composition in soybean biodiesel can be another factor in the increase of NO/dx emissions.

Han, Manbae [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

OH radical imaging in a DI diesel engine and the structure of the early diffusion flame  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laser-sheet imaging studies have considerably advanced our understanding of diesel combustion; however, the location and nature of the flame zones within the combusting fuel jet have been largely unstudied. To address this issue, planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging of the OH radical has been applied to the reacting fuel jet of a direct-injection diesel engine of the ``heavy-duty`` size class, modified for optical access. An Nd:YAG-based laser system was used to pump the overlapping Q{sub 1}9 and Q{sub 2}8 lines of the (1,0) band of the A{yields}X transition at 284.01 nm, while the fluorescent emission from both the (0,O) and (1, I) bands (308 to 320 nm) was imaged with an intensified video camera. This scheme allowed rejection of elastically scattered laser light, PAH fluorescence, and laser-induced incandescence. OH PLIF is shown to be an excellent diagnostic for diesel diffusion flames. The signal is strong, and it is confined to a narrow region about the flame front because the threebody recombination reactions that reduce high flame-front OH concentrations to equilibrium levels occur rapidly at diesel pressures. No signal was evident in the fuel-rich premixed flame regions where calculations and burner experiments indicate that OH concentrations will be below detectable limits. Temporal sequences of OH PLIF images are presented showing the onset and development of the early diffusion flame up to the time that soot obscures the images. These images show that the diffusion flame develops around the periphery of the-downstream portion of the reacting fuel jet about half way through the premixed burn spike. Although affected by turbulence, the diffusion flame remains at the jet periphery for the rest of the imaged sequence.

Dec, J.E.; Coy, E.B.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Diesel hybridization and emissions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CTR Vehicle Systems and Fuels team a diesel hybrid powertrain. The goal of this experiment was to investigate and demonstrate the potential of diesel engines for hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) in a fuel economy and emissions. The test set-up consisted of a diesel engine coupled to an electric motor driving a Continuously Variable Transmission (CVT). This hybrid drive is connected to a dynamometer and a DC electrical power source creating a vehicle context by combining advanced computer models and emulation techniques. The experiment focuses on the impact of the hybrid control strategy on fuel economy and emissions-in particular, nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM). The same hardware and test procedure were used throughout the entire experiment to assess the impact of different control approaches.

Pasquier, M.; Monnet, G.

2004-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

175

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with 'engine grade' coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO[sub x] control, sodium sorbent injection for SO[sub x] control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. (Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States)); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. (Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States)); Kimberley, J. (AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States)); Itse, D. (PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Testing of a coal-fired diesel power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The POC coal-fired power plant consists of a Cooper-Bessemer LSC-6 engine (15.5 inch bore, 22 inch stroke) rated at 400 rev/min and 208 psi bmep producing approximately 1.8 MW of power. The power plant is fueled with `engine grade` coal slurry which has been physically cleaned to an ash level of approximately 1.5 to 2% (dry basis) and has a mean particle size of approximately 12 micron. CWS is injected directly into the combustion chamber through a fuel injector (one per cylinder) which was designed and developed to be compatible with the fuel. Each injector is fitted with a 19 orifice nozzle tip made with sapphire inserts in each orifice. The combustion chambers are fitted with twin diesel pilot injectors which provide a positive ignition source and substantially shorten the ignition delay period of the CWS fuel. Durable coatings (typically tungsten carbide) are used for the piston rings and cylinder liners to reduce wear rates. The emission control system consists of SCR for NO{sub x} control, sodium sorbent injection for SO{sub x} control, and a cyclone plus baghouse for particulate capture. The cyclone is installed upstream of the engine turbocharger which helps protect the turbine blades.

Wilson, R.P.; Balles, E.N.; Benedek, K.R.; Benson, C.E. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, K.; Schaub, F. [Cooper-Bessemer, Mount Vernon, OH (United States); Kimberley, J. [AMBAC, West Springfield, MA (United States); Itse, D. [PSI Technology Co., Andover, MA (United States)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Data Collection Procedures Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, retail on-highway diesel prices are collected by telephone and fax from a sample of approximately 350 retail diesel outlets, including truck stops and service stations. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) requires that all on-highway diesel sold be ULSD by December 1, 2010 (September 1, 2006 in California). In January 2007, the weekly on-highway diesel price survey began collecting diesel prices for low sulfur diesel (LSD) which contains between 15 and 500 parts-per-million sulfur and ULSD separately. Prior to January 2007, EIA collected the price of on-highway fuel without distinguishing the sulfur

179

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Diesel fuel is bascially the same product as home heating oil. The primary difference is that diesel has a lower sulfur content. When heating oil is in short supply, low sulfur diesel fuel can be diverted to heating oil supply. Thus, diesel fuel prices rise with heating heating oil prices. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. But prices in the Northeast jumped dramatically in the third week of January. Diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent, between January 17 and February 7. While EIA does not have

180

Diesel Engine Alternatives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are basically three different modes of combustion possible for use in reciprocating engines. These include, diffusion burning, as occurs in current diesel engines, flame propagation combustion such as used in conventional SI engines, and homogeneous combustion such as is used in the SwRI HCCI engine. Diesel engines currently offer significant fuel consumption benefits relative to other powerplants for on and off road applications; however, costs and efficiency may become problems as the emissions standards become even more stringent. This presentation presents a discussion of the potentials of HCCI and flame propagation engines as alternatives to the diesel engines. It is suggested that as the emissions standards become more and more stringent, the advantages of the diesel may disappear. The potential for HCCI is limited by the availability of the appropriate fuel. The potential of flame propagation engines is limited by several factors including knock, EGR tolerance, high BMEP operation, and throttling. These limitations are discussed in the context of potential for improvement of the efficiency of the flame propagation engine.

Ryan, T

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Definition: Diesel fuel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel fuel Diesel fuel Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Diesel fuel A liquid fuel produced from petroleum; used in diesel engines.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Diesel oil and Gazole (fuel) redirect here. Sometimes "diesel oil" is used to mean lubricating oil for diesel engines. Diesel fuel in general is any liquid fuel used in diesel engines. The most common is a specific fractional distillate of petroleum fuel oil, but alternatives that are not derived from petroleum, such as biodiesel, biomass to liquid (BTL) or gas to liquid (GTL) diesel, are increasingly being developed and adopted. To distinguish these types, petroleum-derived diesel is increasingly called petrodiesel. Ultra-low-sulfur diesel (ULSD) is a standard for defining diesel fuel with substantially lowered sulfur contents. As of 2007, almost

182

VARIABLE CHARGE MOTION FOR 2007-2010 DIESEL ENGINES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of direct injection diesel engines in US heavy duty pickup truck applications is becoming increasingly popular with over 250,000 produced in 2002. The high torque density and greatly improved fuel consumption offer distinct advantages to the end user. 2007 and 2010 emissions legislation will present another set of technical and product cost challenges to this type of powertrain. The introduction of efficient aftertreatment systems is mandatory to the success of these engines but optimization of engine-out emissions is also a critical element. Much has been written on the improvements in modern fuel systems which offer great flexibility for the direct introduction of fuel into the cylinder. This paper presents complementary technologies which allow improved air/fuel mixing processes by the additional flexibility of variable in-cylinder charge motion. This approach is particularly applicable to pick-up truck engines, which require high BMEP levels across a wide engine speed range to offer the driveability demanded by the consumer. Design solutions for 2 valve and 4 valve engines are presented along with the potential emissions and fuel consumption benefits.

Maier, J

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

183

Coal-fueled diesel locomotive test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The biggest challenges to the development of a commercially-acceptable coal-fueled diesel-electric locomotive are integrating all systems into a working unit that can be operated in railroad service. This involves mainly the following three systems: (1) the multi-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine, (2) the locomotive and engine controls, and (3) the CWS fuel supply system. Consequently, a workable 12-cylinder coal-fueled diesel engine was considered necessary at this stage to evolve the required locomotive support systems, in addition to gaining valuable multi-cylinder engine operating experience. The CWS fuel used during this project was obtained from Otisca, Inc. (Syracuse, NY). It was prepared from micronized and deashed Kentucky Blue Gem coal to 49.0% coal loading by weight, with less than 1% ash and 5 micron mean diameter particle size. Its higher heating value was analyzed at approximately 34630 kJ/k. Anti-agglomerating additive Triton X-114 was added to the CWS at GE Transportation Systems at 2% of coal weight. The nature of the Otisca CWS fuel makes it inherently more difficult to store, pump, and inject than diesel fuel, since concepts which govern Newtonian or normally viscous liquids do not apply entirely to CWS. Otisca CWS tends to be unstable and to settle in tanks and lines after a period of time, making it necessary to provide a means of agitation during storage. To avoid long term settling problems and to minimize losses, piping velocities were designed to be in the 60-90 m/min range.

Hsu, B.D.; McDowell, R.E.; Confer, G.L.; Basic, S.L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Methodology For Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Pump Components Methodology For Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Pump Components The components for the gasoline and diesel fuel pumps are calculated in the following manner in cents per gallon and then converted into a percentage: Crude Oil - the monthly average of the composite refiner acquisition cost, which is the average price of crude oil purchased by refiners. Refining Costs & Profits - the difference between the monthly average of the spot price of gasoline or diesel fuel (used as a proxy for the value of gasoline or diesel fuel as it exits the refinery) and the average price of crude oil purchased by refiners (the crude oil component). Distribution & Marketing Costs & Profits - the difference between the average retail price of gasoline or diesel fuel as computed from EIA's

186

Southeast BioDiesel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioDiesel Jump to: navigation, search Name Southeast BioDiesel Place Charleston, South Carolina Product Biodiesel producer based in South Carolina References Southeast BioDiesel1...

187

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur content. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency requires 80% of the highway diesel fuel refined in or...

188

diesel | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

diesel diesel Dataset Summary Description The JodiOil World Database is freely available from the Joint Organisations Data Initiative (JODI) and is updated on or around the 20th of each month. Source JODI Date Released October 01st, 2004 (10 years ago) Date Updated March 21st, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords crude oil diesel fuel oil gasoline kerosene LPG Data application/zip icon Text file, all JODI Database data: Jan 2002 - Jan 2011 (zip, 14.5 MiB) application/pdf icon Definitions of Abbreviations and Codes (pdf, 698.3 KiB) application/pdf icon Column Headings for Dataset (pdf, 13.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Some of the data has "some review" and some of the data has "no review"; the supplemental documentation provides definitions for the assessment codes for each piece of data in the datasets (essentially, 1 = some review, 2 = use with caution, 3 = not reviewed)

189

Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo Diesel de Azufre Ultra Bajo ULSD LSD Off-Road Diesel para Carretera de Azufre Ultra Bajo (máximo de 15 ppm de azufre). Se requiere su uso en todos los motores y vehículos diesel de carretera modelos 2007 y posteriores. También se recomienda su uso en todos los vehículos y motores diesel. Diesel para Carretera Bajo en Azufre (máximo de 500 ppm de azufre). Aviso: La ley federal prohíbe su uso en vehículos y motores modelos 2007 y posteriores, su uso podría dañarlos. Combustible Diesel que no es para Carretera (puede exceder 500 ppm de azufre). Aviso: La ley federal prohíbe su uso en vehículos y motores que no son de carretera, su uso podría dañarlos. Los consumidores con vehículos modelo 2007 ó posteriores deben utilizar solo diesel ultra bajo de azufre (ULSD). El ULSD es un diesel de

190

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

FOR IN A GALLON OF DIESEL FUEL Mon-yr Retail Price (Dollars per gallon) Refining (percentage) Distribution & Marketing (percentage) Taxes (percentage) Crude Oil (percentage)...

191

Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Diesel Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Diesel Idling Reduction AgencyCompany...

192

Retail Prices for Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Beginning July 26, 2010 publication of Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel (ULSD) price became fully represented by the Diesel Average All Types price. As of December 1, ...

193

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Get the RSS feed. Release Schedule. Details... Procedures, Methodology & CV's Gasoline Diesel fuel. ... How do I calculate/find diesel fuel surcharges? ...

194

Available Technologies: Alternative Diesel Fuel from Biosynthetic ...  

Imaging Tools; Lasers; ... Cold weather anticlouding additive for diesel fuels ; Diesel or jet fuel alternative; Platform for advanced biosynthetic fuels development ;

195

Louisiana Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Diesel Fuel Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Louisiana Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

196

Coal-fueled diesel engines for locomotive applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GE Transportation Systems (GE/TS) completed a two and one half year study into the economic viability of a coal fueled locomotive. The coal fueled diesel engine was deemed to be one of the most attractive options. Building on the BN-NS study, a proposal was submitted to DOE to continue researching economic and technical feasibility of a coal fueled diesel engine for locomotives. The contract DE-AC21-85MC22181 was awarded to GE Corporate Research and Development (GE/CRD) for a three year program that began in March 1985. This program included an economic assessment and a technical feasibility study. The economic assessment study examined seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal fueled diesels. These areas included impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The results of the study indicated the merits for development of a coal-water slurry (CWS) fueled diesel engine. The technical feasibility study examined the combustion of CWS through lab and bench scale experiments. The major accomplishments from this study have been the development of CWS injection hardware, the successful testing of CWS fuel in a full size, single cylinder, medium speed diesel engine, evaluation of full scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions.

Hsu, B.D.; Najewicz, D.J.; Cook, C.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Effect of carbon coating on scuffing performance in diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Low-sulfur and low-aromatic diesel fuels are being introduced in order to reduce various types of emissions in diesel engines to levels in compliance with current and impending US federal regulations. The low lubricity of these fuels, however, poses major reliability and durability problems for fuel injection components that depend on diesel fuel for their lubrication. In the present study, the authors evaluated the scuff resistance of surfaces in regular diesel fuel containing 500 ppm sulfur and in Fischer-Tropsch synthetic diesel fuel containing no sulfur or aromatics. Tests were conducted with the high frequency reciprocating test rig (HFRR) using 52100 steel balls and H-13 tool-steel flats with and without Argonne's special carbon coatings. Test results showed that the sulfur-containing fuels provide about 20% higher scuffing resistance than does fuel without sulfur. Use of the carbon coating on the flat increased scuffing resistance in both regular and synthetic fuels by about ten times, as measured by the contact severity index at scuffing. Scuffing failure in tests conducted with coated surfaces did not occur until the coating had been removed by the two distinct mechanisms of spalling and wear.

Ajayi, O. O.; Alzoubi, M. F.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2000-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

198

Aftertreatment Technologies for Off-Highway Heavy-Duty Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to explore a combination of advanced injection control and urea-selective catalytic reduction (SCR) to reduce the emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from a Tier 2 off-highway diesel engine to Tier 3 emission targets while maintaining fuel efficiency. The engine used in this investigation was a 2004 4.5L John Deere PowerTechTM; this engine was not equipped with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Under the original CRADA, the principal objective was to assess whether Tier 3 PM emission targets could be met solely by increasing the rail pressure. Although high rail pressure will lower the total PM emissions, it has a contrary effect to raise NOx emissions. To address this effect, a urea-SCR system was used to determine whether the enhanced NOx levels, associated with high rail pressure, could be reduced to Tier 3 levels. A key attraction for this approach is that it eliminates the need for a Diesel particulate filter (DPF) to remove PM emissions. The original CRADA effort was also performed using No.2 Diesel fuel having a maximum sulfur level of 500 ppm. After a few years, the CRADA scope was expanded to include exploration of advanced injection strategies to improve catalyst regeneration and to explore the influence of urea-SCR on PM formation. During this period the emission targets also shifted to meeting more stringent Tier 4 emissions for NOx and PM, and the fuel type was changed to ultra-low sulfur Diesel (ULSD) having a maximum sulfur concentration of 15 ppm. New discoveries were made regarding PM formation at high rail pressures and the influences of oxidation catalysts and urea-SCR catalysts. These results are expected to provide a pathway for lower PM and NOx emissions for both off- and on-highway applications. Industrial in-kind support was available throughout the project period. Review of the research results were carried out on a regular basis (annual reports and meetings) followed by suggestions for improvement in ongoing work and direction for future work. A significant portion of the industrial support was in the form of experimentation, data analysis, data exchange, and technical consultation.

Kass, M.D.

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

199

Smart Materials for Fuel Injection Actuation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The demands of stringent emissions and a robust engine dynamic torque response characteristic require innovative, accurate and repeatable control of the fuel injection event. Recent advances in piezo-material actuators have warranted the pursuit of its application to advanced heavy-duty truck fuel injection systems. This presentation will report on design and testing of an advanced electronic unit injector for the Detroit Diesel Series 60 truck engine.

Hakim, Nabil

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

200

Development of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment System for Tier II Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to their excellent fuel efficiency, reliability, and durability, compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) engines have been used extensively to power almost all highway trucks, urban buses, off-road vehicles, marine carriers, and industrial equipment. CIDI engines burn 35 to 50% less fuel than gasoline engines of comparable size, and they emit far less greenhouse gases (Carbon Dioxides), which have been implicated in global warming. Although the emissions of CIDI engines have been reduced significantly over the last decade, there remains concern with the Nitrogen Oxides (NOX) and Particulate Matter (PM) emission levels. In 2000, the US EPA proposed very stringent emissions standards to be introduced in 2007 along with low sulfur (< 15ppm) diesel fuel. The California Air Resource Board (CARB) has also established the principle that future diesel fueled vehicles should meet the same emissions standards as gasoline fueled vehicles and the EPA followed suit with its Tier II emissions regulations. Meeting the Tier II standards requires NOX and PM emissions to be reduced dramatically. Achieving such low emissions while minimizing fuel economy penalty cannot be done through engine development and fuel reformulation alone, and requires application of NOX and PM aftertreatment control devices. A joint effort was made between Cummins Inc. and the Department of Energy to develop the generic aftertreatment subsystem technologies applicable for Light-Duty Vehicle (LDV) and Light-Duty Truck (LDT) engines. This paper provides an update on the progress of this joint development program. Three NOX reduction technologies including plasmaassisted catalytic NOX reduction (PACR), active lean NOX catalyst (LNC), and adsorber catalyst (AC) technology using intermittent rich conditions for NOX reduction were investigated in parallel in an attempt to select the best NOX control approach for light-duty aftertreatment subsystem integration and development. Investigations included system design and analysis, critical lab/engine experiments, and ranking then selection of NOX control technologies against reliability, up-front cost, fuel economy, service interval/serviceability, and size/weight. The results of the investigations indicate that the best NOX control approach for LDV and LDT applications is a NOX adsorber system. A greater than 83% NOX reduction efficiency is required to achieve 0.07g/mile NOX Tier II vehicle-out emissions. Both active lean NOX and PACR technology are currently not capable of achieving the high conversion efficiency required for Tier II, Bin 5 emissions standards. In this paper, the NOX technology assessment and selection is first reviewed and discussed. Development of the selected NOX technology (NOX adsorber) and PM control are then discussed in more detail. Discussion includes exhaust sulfur management, further adsorber formulation development, reductant screening, diesel particulate filter development & active regeneration, and preliminary test results on the selected integrated SOX trap, NOX adsorber, and diesel particulate filter system over an FTP-75 emissions cycle, and its impact on fuel economy. Finally, the direction of future work for continued advanced aftertreatment technology development is discussed. (SAE Paper SAE-2002-01-1867 © 2002 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Yu, R. C.; Cole, A. S., Stroia, B. J.; Huang, S. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Howden, Kenneth C.; Chalk, Steven (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number Emissions (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Start of injection can improve environmental performance of fuel-efficient gasoline direct injection engines.

Not Available

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Effects of natural gas composition on ignition delay under diesel conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of variations in natural gas composition on autoignition of natural gas under direct-injection (DI) diesel engine conditions were studied experimentally in a constant-volume combustion vessel and computationally using a chemical kinetic model. Four fuel blends were investigated: pure methane, a capacity weighted mean natural gas, a high ethane content natural gas, and a natural gas with added propane typical of peak shaving conditions. Experimentally measured ignition delays were longest for pure methane and became progressively shorter as ethane and propane concentrations increased. At conditions characteristic of a DI compression ignition natural gas engine at Top Dead Center (CR=23:1, p = 6.8 MPa, T = 1150K), measured ignition delays for the four fuels varied from 1.8 ms for the peak shaving and high ethane gases to 2.7 ms for pure methane. Numerically predicted variations in ignition delay as a function of natural gas composition agreed with these measurements.

Naber, J.D.; Siebers, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Di Julio, S.S. [California State Univ., Northridge, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

203

Diesel prices continue to fall  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to fall The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 4.09 a gallon on Monday. That's down 4.2 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

204

Diesel prices continue to rise  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to rise The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 4.16 a gallon on Monday. That's up 5.3 cents from a week ago, based on the weekly...

205

Diesel prices up this week  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices up this week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose sharply to 4.10 a gallon on Monday. That's up 8.2 cents from a week ago and 17.7 cents...

206

High-speed four-color infrared digital imaging for study in-cylinder processes in a di diesel engine  

SciTech Connect

The study was to investigate in-cylinder events of a direct injection-type diesel engine by using a new high-speed infrared (IR) digital imaging systems for obtaining information that was difficult to achieve by the conventional devices. For this, a new high-speed-dual-spectra infrared digital imaging system was developed to simultaneously capture two geometrically identical (in respective spectral) sets of IR images having discrete digital information in a (64x64) matrix at rates as high as over 1,800 frames/sec each with exposure period as short as 20 usec. At the same time, a new advanced four-color IR imaging system was constructed. The first two sets of spectral data were the radiation from water vapor emission bands to compute the distributions of temperature and specie in the gaseous mixture and the remaining two sets of data were to find the instantaneous temperature distribution over the cylinder surface. More than eight reviewed publications have been produced to report many new findings including: Distributions of Water Vapor and Temperature in a Flame; End Gas Images Prior to Onset of Knock; Effect of MTBE on Diesel Combustion; Impact of Oxygen Enrichment on In-cylinder Reactions; Spectral IR Images of Spray Plume; Residual Gas Distribution; Preflame Reactions in Diesel Combustion; Preflame Reactions in the End Gas of an SI Engine; Postflame Oxidation; and Liquid Fuel Layers during Combustion in an SI Engine. In addition, some computational analysis of diesel combustion was performed using KIVA-II program in order to compare results from the prediction and the measurements made using the new IR imaging diagnostic tool.

Rhee, K.T.

1995-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Procedures, Methodology, and Coefficients of Variation Procedures, Methodology, and Coefficients of Variation Diesel Fuel Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, cash self-serve on-highway diesel prices (including taxes) are collected from a sample of approximately 400 retail diesel outlets in the continental U.S. The sample includes a combination of truck stops and service stations that sell on-highway diesel fuel. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The prices are collected via telephone, fax, email, or the internet from participating outlets. All collected prices are subjected to automated edit checks during data collection and data processing. Data flagged by the edits are verified with the respondents. Imputation is used for companies

208

Retail Diesel Fuel Oil Prices  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has Along with heating oil prices, the distillate supply squeeze has severely impacted diesel fuel prices, especially in the Northeast. Retail diesel price data are available sooner than residential heating oil data. This graph shows that diesel prices turned the corner sometime after February 7 and are heading down. Retail diesel fuel prices nationally, along with those of most other petroleum prices, increased steadily through most of 1999. Prices jumped dramatically (by over 11 cents per gallon) in the third week of January, and rose 2 or more cents a week through February 7. The increases were much more rapid in the Northeast. From January 17 through February 7, diesel fuel prices in New England rose nearly 68 cents per gallon, or 47 percent. Prices in the Mid-Atlantic region rose about 58

209

Federal Tax Credit for Diesels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesels Diesels Diesel Vehicle Federal tax credit up to $3,400! Some diesels purchased or placed into service after December 31, 2005 may be eligible for a federal income tax credit of up to $3,400. (No eligible vehicles were manufactured for sale until 2008.) Credit amounts begin to phase out for a given manufacturer once it has sold over 60,000 eligible hybrid and diesel vehicles. Vehicles purchased after December 31, 2010 are not eligible for this credit. The information below is provided for those filing amended tax returns for previous years. Audi BMW Mercedes-Benz Volkswagen All Vehicle Make & Model Full Credit Phase Out No Credit 50% 25% Audi Jan. 1, 2006 July 1 - Dec. 31, 2010 Not Applicable Jan. 1, 2011 Audi A3 TDI 2010-11 Audi A3 2.0L TDI $1,300 $650 -- $0

210

Plasma Catalysis for NOx Reduction from Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The control of NOx (NO and NO2) emissions from so-called ‘lean-burn’ vehicle engines remains a challenge. In this program, we have been developing a novel plasma/catalyst technology for the remediation of NOx under lean (excess oxygen) conditions, specifically for compression ignition direct injection (CIDI) diesel engines that have significant fuel economy benefits over conventional stoichiometric gasoline engines. Program efforts included: (1) improving the catalyst and plasma reactor efficiencies for NOx reduction; (2) studies to reveal important details of the reaction mechanism(s) that can then guide our catalyst and reactor development efforts; (3) evaluating the performance of prototype systems on real engine exhaust; and (4) studies of the effects of the plasma on particulate matter (PM) in real diesel engine exhaust. Figure 1 is a conceptual schematic of a plasma/catalyst device, which also shows our current best understanding of the role of the various components of the overall device for reducing NOx from the exhaust of a CIDI engine. When this program was initiated, it was not at all clear what the plasma was doing and, as such, what class of catalyst materials might be expected to produce good results. With the understanding of the role of the plasma (as depicted in Figure 1) obtained in this program, faujasite zeolite-based catalysts were developed and shown to produce high activity for NOx reduction of plasma-treated exhaust in a temperature range expected for light-duty diesel engines. These materials are the subject of a pending patent application, and were recognized with a prestigious R&D100 Award in 2002. In addition, PNNL staff were awarded a Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) Award in 2003 “For Excellence in Technology Transfer”. The program also received the DOE’s 2001 CIDI Combustion and Emission Control Program Special Recognition Award and 2004 Advanced Combustion Engine R&D Special Recognition Award.

Barlow, Stephan E.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Howden, Ken; Hoard, John W.; Cho, Byong; Schmieg, Steven J.; Brooks, David J.; Nunn, Steven; Davis, Patrick

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Portec Voltage Regulators: for Emergency Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains information to help utilities address emergency diesel generator voltage regulator issues.

2004-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Diesel Vehicle Diesel Vehicle Availability to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Availability on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions Laws & Incentives Diesel Vehicle Availability According to J.D. Power Automotive Forecasting, demand for light-duty diesel vehicles might double in the next 10 years. More auto manufacturers

213

Combustion optimization studies for stratified charge and diesel engines. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of the program are to assess the feasibility and operating characteristics of the following high compression, spark ignition (or self ignition), stratified charge (or diesel) engine configuration: compression ratio: 16; open chember; direct fuel injection; unthrottled operation; 615 cc/cylinder; explored speed range 1000 to 4000 rpm (expected practical range 600 to 6000 rpm); fuels: ethanol-diesel mixtures; spark ignition (stratified charge) or self ignition (diesel), to continue the development and the testing of physical and numerical aspects of multi-dimensional combustion models in order to assess and improve their accuracy and to reduce their computation time, and to contribute to the achievement of a more fundamental and detailed understanding, characterization, and command of the processes wich control efficiency and emissions in internal combustion engines. Progress to date includes: engine modifications to obtain a transparent-piston, transparent-head configuration have been implemented; a gaseous fuel injection system has been designed, built, and operated; shadowgraph records of engine combustion have been obtained; a LDV system for in-cylinder gas velocity measurements has been selected; progress has been made toward measuring in-cylinder pressure, temperature, and composition for complete characterization of the charge; modeling of unsteady gaseous jets has yielded results which match asymptotically known steady state solutions; comparison with unsteady, two-dimensional bomb flames has yielded general scaling procedures for the computation of laminar flames; studies toward modeling of thick sprays have continued; DISC and other technical meetings have been attended and the results of the program made known to researchers and automotive industries; a very promising technique to apply television to unsteady events with short characteristic time (< 30 ms) has been developed and applied to obtain records of engine flames.

Steinberger, R.L.; Bracco, F.V.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Clean Diesel Engine Component Improvement Program Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) is currently developing four different auxiliary generator designs that are used to convert a portion (5 to 20%) of the waste heat from vehicle engines exhaust directly to electricity. The four designs range from 200 Watts to 10 kW. The furthest along is the 1 kW Diesel Truck Thermoelectric Generator (DTTEG) for heavy duty Class 8 Diesel trucks, which, under this program, has been subjected to 543,000 equivalent miles of bouncing and jarring on PACCARâ??s test track. Test experience on an earlier version of the DTTEG on the same track showed the need for design modifications incorporated in DTTEG Mod 2, such as a heavy duty shock mounting system and reinforcement of the electrical leads mounting system, the thermocouple mounting system and the thermoelectric module restraints. The conclusion of the 543,000 mile test also pointed the way for an upgrading to heavy duty hose or flex connections for the internal coolant connections for the TEG, and consideration of a separate lower temperature cooling loop with its own radiator. Fuel savings of up to $750 per year and a three to five year payback are believed to be possible with the 5 % efficiency modules. The economics are expected to improve considerably to approach a two year payback when the 5 kW to 10 kW generators make it to the market in a few years with a higher efficiency (20%) thermoelectric module system called Quantum Wells, which are currently under development by Hi-Z. Ultimately, as automation takes over to reduce material and labor costs in the high volume production of QW modules, a one year payback for the 5 kW to10 kW generator appears possible. This was one of the stated goals at the beginning of the project. At some future point in time, with the DTTEG becoming standard equipment on all trucks and automobiles, fuel savings from the 25% conversion of exhaust heat to useable electricity nationwide equates to a 10% reduction in the 12 to 15 million barrels per day of imported oil, that much less air pollution, and an equivalent reduction in the trade deficit, which is expected to lower the inflation rate.

N.B. Elsner; J.C. Bass; S. Ghamaty; D. Krommenhoek; A. Kushch; D. Snowden; S. Marchetti

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

A homogenous combustion catalyst for fuel efficiency improvements in diesel engines fuelled with diesel and biodiesel.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??[Truncated abstract] The ferrous picrate based homogeneous combustion catalyst has been claimed to promote diesel combustion and improve fuel efficiency in diesel engines. However, the… (more)

Zhu, Mingming

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Materials - Catalysts for Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing Argonne's deNOx Catalyst Begins Extensive Diesel Engine Exhaust Testing denox monolith Argonne's deNOx catalyst can be prepared as a powder or a monolith. chris marshall Principal investigator Chris Marshall shows the monolith form of the Argonne deNOx catalyst with a sensor inserted for testing. doug longman Mechanical engineer Doug Longman inserts the instrumented deNOx catalyst monolith into the aftertreatment chamber of Argonne's heavy-duty Caterpillar diesel test engine. Background Diesel engines, while efficient, produce many undesirable combustion byproducts in their exhaust. While we tend to think of the sooty exhaust products we see as the bad stuff, it is the less-visible exhaust products such as nitrogen oxides (NOx) that create bigger problems.

217

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Price Data Collection Procedures Price Data Collection Procedures Every Monday, cash self-serve on-highway diesel prices (including taxes) are collected from a sample of approximately 400 retail diesel outlets in the continental U.S. The sample includes a combination of truck stops and service stations that sell on-highway diesel fuel. The data represent the price of ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) which contains less than 15 parts-per-million sulfur. The prices are collected via telephone, fax, email, or the internet from participating outlets. All collected prices are subjected to automated edit checks during data collection and data processing. Data flagged by the edits are verified with the respondents. Imputation is used for companies that cannot be contacted and for reported prices that are extreme outliers.

218

New and Upcoming Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2014 Model Year Diesels Vehicle EPA MPG Estimates Price (MSRP) Audi A6 quattro Midsize Car Audi A6 quattro Chart: City, 24; Highway, 38; Combined, 29 45,200-57,500 Audi A7...

219

VehĂ­culos Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehículos Diesel Vehículos Diesel Audi A3 Los vehículos Diesel podrían estar de regreso. Los motores de Diesel son más poderosos y ahorradores de gasolina en comparación con los motores de gasolina del mismo tamaño (un 30-35% aprox. más eficientes en su consumo). Además, los vehículos diesel son mejores que los que se fabricaban en el pasado. Mejor Desempeño Tienen mejores inyectores de combustible y tecnologías electrónicas en sus controles Más poder Aceleración Mejorada Más Eficiencia Los nuevos diseños en los motores, además de las tecnologías de reducción de ruido y vibración, los han hecho silenciosos y suaves en su manejo. El arranque en clima-frío también ha sido mejorado. Más Limpios Mercedes ML320 BlueTEC En la actualidad los diesels deben cumplir con los mismos estándares de

220

Experimental evaluation of oxygen-enriched air and emulsified fuels in a single-cylinder diesel engine. Volume 1, Concept evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The performance of a single-cylinder, direct-injection diesel engine was measured with intake oxygen levels of up to 35% and fuel water contents of up to 20%. Because a previous study indicated that the use of a less-expensive fuel would be more economical, two series of tests with No. 4 diesel fuel and No. 2 diesel fuel were conducted. To control the emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), water was introduced into the combustion process in the form of water-emulsified fuel, or the fuel injection timing was retarded. In the first series of tests, compressed oxygen was used; in the second series of tests, a hollow-tube membrane was used. Steady-state engine performance and emissions data were obtained. Test results indicated a large increase in engine power density, a slight improvement in thermal efficiency, and significant reductions in smoke and particulate-matter emissions. Although NO{sub x} emissions increased, they could be controlled by introducing water and retarding the injection timing. The results further indicated that thermal efficiency is slightly increased when moderately water-emulsified fuels are used, because a greater portion of the fuel energy is released earlier in the combustion process. Oxygen-enriched air reduced the ignition delay and caused the heat-release rate and cumulative heat-release rates to change measurably. Even at higher oxygen levels, NO{sub x} emissions decreased rapidly when the timing was retarded, and the amount of smoke and the level of particulate-matter emissions did not significantly increase. The single-cylinder engine tests confirmed the results of an earlier technical assessment and further indicated a need for a low-pressure-drop membrane specifically designed for oxygen enrichment. Extension data set indexed separately. 14 refs.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J.

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel August 20, 2013 - 8:53am Addthis Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur...

222

Energy Basics: Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hydrogen Natural Gas Propane Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Vehicles Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur...

223

Engines - Fuel Injection and Spray Research - X-rays, Diesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

procedure since the physics of spray atomization and its influence on combustion, pollutant formation and fuel efficiency are not well understood. A deeper...

224

Safety and Performance Assessment of Ethanol/Diesel Blends (E-Diesel)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontract report discussing safety concerns of ethanol-diesel blends and pathways to reducing risks.

Waterland, L. R.; Venkatesh, S.; Unnasch, S.

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Compare New and Used Diesel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

City 35 30 25 20 15 10 Combined 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 Highway Your Selections Search Diesel Vehicles & Fuels Compare Side by Side About Diesel Vehicles New & Upcoming Ultra-Low...

226

Diesel prices top $4 per gallon  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices top 4 per gallon The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel surpassed the four dollar mark for the first time this year. Prices rose to 4.02 a gallon...

227

Diesel prices continue to decrease nationally  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices continue to decrease nationally The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.95 a gallon on Monday. That's down 2 cents from a week ago...

228

Best practices for underground diesel emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US NIOSH and the Coal Diesel Partnership recommend practices for successfully using ceramic filters to control particulate emitted from diesel-powered equipment used in underground coal mines. 3 tabs.

Patts, L.; Brnich, M. Jr. [NIOSH Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Diesel Power: Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Power: Diesel Power: Clean Vehicles for Tomorrow July 2010 VEHICLE TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Vehicle Technologies Program The diesel engine has changed significantly over the last quarter-century, in terms of technology and performance. For this reason, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has created this series of documents about the history of the diesel engine, its current uses in transportation vehicles,

230

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

231

Elastomer Compatibility Testing of Renewable Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, the integrity and performance of six elastomers were tested with ethanol-diesel and biodiesel fuel blends.

Frame, E.; McCormick, R. L.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Diesel Brewing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel Brewing Diesel Brewing Jump to: navigation, search Name Diesel Brewing Place Salem, Oregon Zip 97302 Sector Biomass Product Oregon-based company that uses gasification to produce liquid fuels and electricity from non-food-based biomass sources, including wood wastes, agricultural residues, and manure. Coordinates 42.554485°, -88.110549° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.554485,"lon":-88.110549,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

233

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Learn more... Learn more... Price trends and regional differences What causes fluctuations in motor gasoline prices? Retail gasoline prices are mainly affected by crude oil prices and the level of gasoline supply relative to demand. Strong and increasing demand for gasoline and other petroleum products in the United States and the rest of the world at times places intense pressure on available supplies. Even when crude oil prices are stable... read more in Gasoline Explained What causes fluctuations in diesel fuel oil prices? The retail price of a gallon of diesel fuel reflects the underlying costs and profits (or losses) of producing and delivering the product to customers. The price of diesel at the pump reflects the costs and profits of the entire production and distribution chain, including... read more in

234

Clean Coal Diesel Demonstration Project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Clean Coal Diesel project was undertaken to demonstrate a new Clean Coal Technology that offers technical, economic and environmental advantages over conventional power generating methods. This innovative technology (developed to the prototype stage in an earlier DOE project completed in 1992) enables utilization of pre-processed clean coal fuel in large-bore, medium-speed, diesel engines. The diesel engines are conventional modern engines in many respects, except they are specially fitted with hardened parts to be compatible with the traces of abrasive ash in the coal-slurry fuel. Industrial and Municipal power generating applications in the 10 to 100 megawatt size range are the target applications. There are hundreds of such reciprocating engine power-plants operating throughout the world today on natural gas and/or heavy fuel oil.

Robert Wilson

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

235

Diesel Exhaust Emissions Control for Light-Duty Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to present the results of diesel exhaust aftertreatment testing and analysis done under the FreedomCAR program. Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) adsorber technology was selected based on a previous investigation of various NOx aftertreatment technologies including non-thermal plasma, NOx adsorber and active lean NOx. Particulate Matter (PM) emissions were addressed by developing a catalyzed particulate filter. After various iterations of the catalyst formulation, the aftertreatment components were integrated and optimized for a light duty vehicle application. This compact exhaust aftertreatment system is dual leg and consists of a sulfur trap, NOx adsorbers, and catalyzed particulate filters (CPF). During regeneration, supplementary ARCO ECD low-sulfur diesel fuel is injected upstream of the adsorber and CPF in the exhaust. Steady state and transient emission test results with and without the exhaust aftertreatment system (EAS) are presented. Results of soot filter regeneration by injecting low-sulfur diesel fuel and slip of unregulated emissions, such as NH3, are discussed. Effects of adsorber size and bypass strategy on NOx conversion efficiency and fuel economy penalty are also presented in this paper. The results indicate that if the supplementary fuel injection is optimized, NH3 slip is negligible. During the FTP cycle, injection of low sulfur diesel fuel can create temperature exotherms high enough to regenerate a loaded CPF. With the optimized NOx adsorber regeneration strategies the fuel injection penalty can be reduced by 40 to 50%. Results for various other issues like low temperature light off, reductant optimization, exhaust sulfur management, system integration and design trade-off, are also presented and discussed in this paper. (SAE Paper SAE-2003-01-0041 © 2003 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Mital, R.; Li, J.; Huang, S. C.; Stroia, B. J.; Yu, R. C. (Cummins, Inc.); Anderson, J.A. (Argonne National Laboratory); Howden, Kenneth C. (U.S. Department of Energy)

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Clean Diesel Component Improvement Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research conducted in this program significantly increased the knowledge and understanding in the fields of plasma physics and chemistry in diesel exhaust, the performance and characteristics of multifunctional catalysts in diesel exhaust, and the complexities of controlling a combination of such systems to remove NOx. Initially this program was designed to use an in-line plasma system (know as a plasma assisted catalyst system or PAC) to convert NO {yields} NO{sub 2}, a more catalytically active form of nitrogen oxides, and to crack hydrocarbons (diesel fuel in particular) into active species. The NO{sub 2} and the cracked hydrocarbons were then flowed over an in-line ceramic NOx catalyst that removed NO{sub 2} from the diesel exhaust. Even though the PAC system performed well technically and was able to remove over 95% of NOx from diesel exhaust the plasma component proved not to be practical or commercially feasible. The lack of practical and commercial viability was due to high unit costs and lack of robustness. The plasma system and its function was replaced in the NOx removal process by a cracking reforming catalyst that converted diesel fuel to a highly active reductant for NOx over a downstream ceramic NOx catalyst. This system was designated the ceramic catalyst system (CCS). It was also determined that NO conversion to NO{sub 2} was not required to achieve high levels of NOx reduction over ceramic NOx catalyst if that catalyst was properly formulated and the cracking reforming produced a reductant optimized for that NOx catalyst formulation. This system has demonstrated 92% NOx reduction in a diesel exhaust slipstream and 65% NOx reduction from the full exhaust of a 165 hp diesel engine using the FTP cycle. Although this system needs additional development to be commercial, it is simple, cost effective (does not use precious metals), sulfur tolerant, operates at high space velocities, does not require a second fluid be supplied as a reductant, has low parasitic loss of 2-3% and achieves high levels of NOx reduction. This project benefits the public by providing a simple low-cost technology to remove NOx pollutants from the exhaust of almost any combustion source. The reduction of NOx emissions emitted into the troposphere provides well documented improvement in health for the majority of United States citizens. The emissions reduction produced by this technology helps remove the environmental constraints to economic growth.

None

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Biodiesel and Other Renewable Diesel Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Present federal tax incentives apply to certain types of biomass-derived diesel fuels, which in energy policy and tax laws are described either as renewable diesel or biodiesel. To understand the distinctions between these diesel types it is necessary to understand the technologies used to produce them and the properties of the resulting products. This fact sheet contains definitions of renewable and biodiesel and discusses the processes used to convert biomass to diesel fuel and the properties of biodiesel and renewable diesel fuels.

Not Available

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Physical properties of bio-diesel & Implications for use of bio-diesel in diesel engines  

SciTech Connect

In this study we identify components of a typical biodiesel fuel and estimate both their individual and mixed thermo-physical and transport properties. We then use the estimated mixture properties in computational simulations to gauge the extent to which combustion is modified when biodiesel is substituted for conventional diesel fuel. Our simulation studies included both regular diesel combustion (DI) and premixed charge compression ignition (PCCI). Preliminary results indicate that biodiesel ignition is significantly delayed due to slower liquid evaporation, with the effects being more pronounced for DI than PCCI. The lower vapor pressure and higher liquid heat capacity of biodiesel are two key contributors to this slower rate of evaporation. Other physical properties are more similar between the two fuels, and their impacts are not clearly evident in the present study. Future studies of diesel combustion sensitivity to both physical and chemical properties of biodiesel are suggested.

Chakravarthy, Veerathu K [ORNL; McFarlane, Joanna [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Ra, Youngchul [ORNL; Griffin, Jelani K [ORNL; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

MotorWeek Video Transcript: BlueTec Clean Diesel and GM's Cylinder Cut-off  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BlueTec Clean Diesel and GM's Cylinder Cut-off BlueTec Clean Diesel and GM's Cylinder Cut-off Jessica Shea Choksey:Mercedes-Benz has over 80 years of diesel experience. So it's no surprise they are on the cutting edge of making them environmentally friendly. The full-size seven-passenger 2007 Mercedes-Benz GL320 BlueTec is the cleanest diesel sport-utility vehicle in the world. Named after the color of the emission reducing urea fluid injected into the catalyst system, BlueTec is the technology that can ultimately make clean diesels the obvious choice for Americans. Using Mercedes latest 3.2 liter Turbo diesel V-6, the GL320 will also be the most efficient big SUV with an anticipated highway fuel economy of over 25 miles per gallon. The GL BlueTec goes on sale in January. Also making fuel-saving automotive news is General Motors. As part of

240

Interpretation of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Diesel Exhaust Photooxidation in an Environmental Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from diesel exhaust in a smog chamber was investigated. Particle volume measurement based on mobility diameter is shown to underestimate SOA formation from diesel exhaust due to the external void space of agglomerate particles, in which case mass-based measurement technique is necessary. Rapid determination of particle effective density as a function of particle mass was performed by an Aerosol Particle Mass analyzer – Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (APM-SMPS) to obtain particle mass concentration and fractal dimension. Continuous aging of aerosol was observed in terms of atomic ratio (O/C), from 0.05 to 0.25 in 12 hours, underscoring the importance of multi-generational oxidation of low-volatile organic vapors emitted from diesel engine as the significant source of oxygenated SOA. Experimental conditions possibly have strong impacts on physical evolution of diesel particulates in a smog chamber. Higher particle effective densities were observed when raw exhaust was injected into a full bag as opposed to filling a bag with diluted exhaust using an ejector diluter. When longer transfer line was used for injecting diesel exhaust into the smog chamber, rapid particle coagulation was observed, leading to increasing particle volume concentration in dark while its mass concentration is decreasing.

Nakao, Shunsuke; Shrivastava, ManishKumar B.; Nguyen, Anh; Jung, Hee-Jung; Cocker, David R.

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Federal Tax Credit for Diesels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuevos Reembolsos de impuestos en Materia de Energía para Nuevos Reembolsos de impuestos en Materia de Energía para Diesels Vehículo Diesel ¡Reembolso Federal de hasta $3,400! Algúnos diesels comprados o puestos en servicio después del 31 de diciembre del 2005 pueden ser elegibles para un reembolso de impuestos sobre la renta federal de hasta 3,400 dólares. (Ningún vehículo elegible fue fabricado para la venta hasta el 2008.) Las cantidades del reembolso comienzan a disminuir progresivamente para los fabricantes que hayan vendido más de 60,000 vehículos híbridos y diesel elegibles. Los vehículos adquiridos después de Diciembre 31 no son elegibles para este crédito. Audi BMW Mercedes-Benz Volkswagen All Marca y Modelo del Vehículo Reembolso Completo Desfase Sin Reembolso 50% 25% Audi ene. 1, 2006 jul. 1 - dic. 31, 2010 No aplica ene. 1, 2011

242

Hydrogen supplemented diesel electric locomotive  

SciTech Connect

A system is disclosed for using internally generated electricity as the power to operate an electrolysis cell for the production of hydrogen gas. This hydrogen gas would be stored under pressure and used on demand as a fuel supplement as for hill ascension by a diesel locomotive.

Wilson, J.B.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Tribological behavior of near-frictionless carbon coatings in high- and low-sulfur diesel fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sulfur content in diesel fuel has a significant effect on diesel engine emissions, which are currently subject to environmental regulations. It has been observed that engine particulate and gaseous emissions are directly proportional to fuel sulfur content. With the introduction of low-sulfur fuels, significant reductions in emissions are expected. The process of sulfur reduction in petroleum-based diesel fuels also reduces the lubricity of the fuel, resulting in premature failure of fuel injectors. Thus, another means of preventing injector failures is needed for engines operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels. In this study, the authors evaluated a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coating (developed at Argonne National Laboratory) as a possible solution to the problems associated with fuel injector failures in low-lubricity fuels. Tribological tests were conducted with NFC-coated and uncoated H13 and 52100 steels lubricated with high- and low- sulfur diesel fuels in a high-frequency reciprocating test machine. The test results showed that the NFC coatings reduced wear rates by a factor of 10 over those of uncoated steel surfaces. In low-sulfur diesel fuel, the reduction in wear rate was even greater (i.e., by a factor of 12 compared to that of uncoated test pairs), indicating that the NFC coating holds promise as a potential solution to wear problems associated with the use of low-lubricity diesel fuels.

Alzoubi, M. F.; Ajayi, O. O.; Eryilmaz, O. L.; Ozturk, O.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Lubricity of deeply hydrogenated diesel fuels. The Swedish experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmentally adapted diesel fuels defined by the Swedish Government contain extremely low levels of sulphur and have limited aromatics contents. Road trials and pump durability tests of these fuels revealed unacceptable wear in injection pumps due to low lubricity. Additive solutions were identified using bench tests and then proven in field trials. Market experience has substantiated the findings that fuels using the chosen additive give fully satisfactory performance. This paper illustrates how practical solutions to lubricity questions can be found, and is applicable wherever specifications demand fuels requiring a high degree of hydroprocessing. 19 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Tucker, R.F.; Stradling, R.J.; Wolveridge, P.E.; Rivers, K.J.; Ubbens, A.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Demonstration of a NOx Control System for Stationary Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

California has over 26,000 stationary diesel engines, mostly in emergency power and direct drive applications. In the past few years, various incentive programs in the state have resulted in the change-out of older, dirtier engines for newer, cleaner models or replacement with electric motors. Emissions reductions can be accomplished by equipping existing engines with controls for nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM). The retrofit systems currently available, however, either are not cost com...

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

247

OVERVIEW OF EMERGING CLEAN DIESEL ENGINE TECHNOLOGY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines are the most realistic technology to achieve a major improvement in fuel economy in the next decade. In the US light truck market, i.e. Sport Utility Vehicles , pick-up trucks and mini-vans, diesel engines can more than double the fuel economy of similarly rated spark ignition (SI) gasoline engines currently in these vehicles. These new diesel engines are comparable to the SI engines in noise levels and 0 to 60 mph acceleration. They no longer have the traditional ''diesel smell.'' And the new diesel engines will provide roughly twice the service life. This is very significant for resale value which could more than offset the initial premium cost of the diesel engine over that of the SI gasoline engine. So why are we not seeing more diesel engine powered personal vehicles in the U.S.? The European auto fleet is comprised of a little over 30 percent diesel engine powered vehicles while current sales are about 50 percent diesel. In France, over 70 percent of the luxury class cars i.e. Mercedes ''S'' Class, BMW 700 series etc., are sold with the diesel engine option selected. Diesel powered BMW's are winning auto races in Germany. These are a typical of the general North American perspective of diesel powered autos. The big challenge to commercial introduction of diesel engine powered light trucks and autos is compliance with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Tier 2, 2007 emissions standards. Specifically, 0.07gm/mile Oxides of Nitrogen (NOx) and 0.01 gm/mile particulates (PM). Although the EPA has set a series of bins of increasing stringency until the 2007 levels are met, vehicle manufacturers appear to want some assurance that Tier 2, 2007 can be met before they commit an engine to a vehicle.

Fairbanks, John

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

248

Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development Program, final report - tasks 4-14  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Diesel Engine Component Development (ADECD) Program is a multi-year, multi-phase effort to develop and demonstrate the critical technology needed to advance the heavy-duty low heat rejection (LHR) engine concept for the long-haul, heavy-duty truck market. The ADECD Program has been partitioned into two phases. The first phase, Phase 1, was completed in 1986, resulting in definition of the Advanced Diesel Reference Engine (ADRE)III. The second phase, Phase 11/111, examines the feasibility of the ADRE concepts for application to the on-highway diesel engine. Phase 11/111 is currently underway. This project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies. The work has been performed by the Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) under Contract DEN3-329 with the NASA Lewis Research Center, who provide project management and technical direction.

Kaushal, T.S.; Weber, K.E.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Five Kilowatt Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Diesel Reformer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reducing fossil fuel consumption both for energy security and for reduction in global greenhouse emissions has been a major goal of energy research in the US for many years. Fuel cells have been proposed as a technology that can address both these issues--as devices that convert the energy of a fuel directly into electrical energy, they offer low emissions and high efficiencies. These advantages are of particular interest to remote power users, where grid connected power is unavailable, and most electrical power comes from diesel electric generators. Diesel fuel is the fuel of choice because it can be easily transported and stored in quantities large enough to supply energy for small communities for extended periods of time. This projected aimed to demonstrate the operation of a solid oxide fuel cell on diesel fuel, and to measure the resulting efficiency. Results from this project have been somewhat encouraging, with a laboratory breadboard integration of a small scale diesel reformer and a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell demonstrated in the first 18 months of the project. This initial demonstration was conducted at INEEL in the spring of 2005 using a small scale diesel reformer provided by SOFCo and a fuel cell provided by Acumentrics. However, attempts to integrate and automate the available technology have not proved successful as yet. This is due both to the lack of movement on the fuel processing side as well as the rather poor stack lifetimes exhibited by the fuel cells. Commercial product is still unavailable, and precommercial devices are both extremely expensive and require extensive field support.

Dennis Witmer; Thomas Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

250

Diesel cars in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to develop a better understanding of the causes of the recent increased interest in diesel cars, thereby providing insight into the related behavior of institutions and individuals. This knowledge may improve the formulation of federal policies for diesel, electric, and other more energy-efficient car systems. The study describes developments in the diesel car field over the past few years, and discusses the present status of diesel cars. Historical data were assembled on diesel car sales and on parameters that might have affected the sales. Information is included on the following items related to diesel cars: buyers preferences and why; fuel economy and availability; energy conservation potential; and exhaust emissions, their control and air pollution effects. (LCL)

Not Available

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

TransForum v4n2 - Diesel Reformer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 ARGONNE SCIENTISTS TEAM UP TO DEVELOP NEW DIESEL REFORMER Liu tests diesel reformer Argonne's Di-Jia Liu conducted extensive testing of the diesel reformer; his experiments are...

252

Energy Basics: Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EERE: Energy Basics Ultra-Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel Ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) is diesel fuel with 15 parts per million or lower sulfur content. The U.S. Environmental Protection...

253

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sampling Methodology Sampling Methodology The sample design for the weekly diesel price survey was a two-phase design. The first phase constituted construction of a frame of 2,207 company-State units (CSUs) from the combination of two sample cycles of the EIA-782A and EIA-782B surveys that collected monthly petroleum products' sales at the State level. For sampling purposes, any combination of State and company where diesel was sold through retail outlets as reported on the EIA-782 surveys defined a CSU, the sampling unit. For the second phase, a sub-sample of the 2,207 CSUs from phase 1 was selected using probability proportional to size (PPS). The measure of size for each of the two sample cycles separately was normalized using the annual State sales' volumes from the monthly survey divided by the unit's

254

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sampling Methodology Sampling Methodology The respondents reporting to the weekly diesel price survey represent a stratified probability proportional to size (PPS) sample selected from a frame list of retail outlets. The outlet sampling frame was constructed using commercially available lists from several sources in order to provide comprehensive coverage of truck stops and service stations that sell on-highway diesel fuel in the United States. The frame includes about 62,000 service stations and 4,000 truck stops. Due to statistical and operational considerations, outlets in the States of Alaska and Hawaii are excluded from the target population. The primary publication cells of the survey include Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts (PADDs) 2-4, three sub-PADDs within

255

Diesel Engine Light Truck Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Engine Light Truck Application (DELTA) program consists of two major contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). The first one under DE-FC05-97-OR22606, starting from 1997, was completed in 2001, and consequently, a final report was submitted to DOE in 2003. The second part of the contract was under DE-FC05-02OR22909, covering the program progress from 2002 to 2007. This report is the final report of the second part of the program under contract DE-FC05-02OR22909. During the course of this contract, the program work scope and objectives were significantly changed. From 2002 to 2004, the DELTA program continued working on light-duty engine development with the 4.0L V6 DELTA engine, following the accomplishments made from the first part of the program under DE-FC05-97-OR22606. The program work scope in 2005-2007 was changed to the Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF) soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment. This final report will cover two major technical tasks. (1) Continuation of the DELTA engine development to demonstrate production-viable diesel engine technologies and to demonstrate emissions compliance with significant fuel economy advantages, covering progress made from 2002 to 2004. (2) DPF soot layer characterization and substrate material assessment from 2005-2007.

None

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

256

Emergency Diesel Generator Voltage Regulator Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This product kit, containing six separate documents, provides information to help utilities address emergency diesel generator voltage regulator issues and maintenance.

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

257

Pyrochem Catalysts for Diesel Fuel Reforming - Energy ...  

Summary. Converting heavy hydrocarbons, such as diesel and coal-based fuels, into hydrogen-rich synthesis gas is a necessary step for fuel cells and ...

258

Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Notes: Conventional area is any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. ... Publication of Low Sulfur On-Highway Diesel (LSD) ...

259

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

260

Trends and Transitions in the Diesel Market  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

A presentation at the 2007 NPRA Annual Meeting focusing on trends in the diesel market. The presentation reviews the status of the ULSD program and highlights recent ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

BPM Diesel Engineering | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel Engineering" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBPMDieselEngineering&oldid342997" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations...

262

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations on

263

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2006 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions...

264

TransForum v3n4 - Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ZEROING IN ON DIESEL PARTICULATE EMISSIONS Thick clouds of soot particles no longer billow from new bus and truck exhaust pipes, thanks to today's advanced diesel engines, which...

265

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel Vehicle Emission Factors Derived from Coefficient of Haze Measurements in California: 1967-2003 Title Black Carbon Concentrations and Diesel...

266

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method Title Cellular Response to Diesel Exhaust Particles Strongly Depends on the Exposure Method...

267

Engines - Emissions Control - cerium-oxide catalyst, diesel,...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Control Heavy duty diesel vehicles product particulate matter emissions. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations require that heavy-duty diesel vehicles have...

268

Engines - 3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3-D Animation Shows Complex Geometry of Diesel Particulates Diesel particulate matter has a very complex geometry Most studies have observed these three-dimensional structures in...

269

Performance evaluation of diesel particulate filters on heavy duty vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel particulate filters, or DPFs, are exhaust aftertreatment devices used to reduce exhaust emissions from diesel powered vehicles. Typical designs have a wall flow filter… (more)

Rosepiler, Stephen G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Midwest (PADD 2) Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Diesel Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Midwest (PADD 2) Downstream Charge Capacity of ...

271

U.S. Refinery Catalytic Hydrotreating, Diesel Fuel Downstream ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; Cat. Hydro. Diesel Fuel Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD ; U.S. Downstream Charge Capacity of Operable ...

272

Why has diesel fuel been more expensive than gasoline? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why has diesel fuel been more expensive than gasoline? On-highway diesel fuel prices have been higher than regular gasoline prices almost continuously ...

273

Biodiesel Effects on Diesel Particle Filter Performance: Milestone Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research results on the performance of biodiesel and biodiesel blends with ultra-low sulfur diesel (ULSD) and a diesel particle filter (DPF).

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R.; Ireland, J.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2002 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Medium-Duty Diesel Engine Shawn Whitacre National Renewable Energy Lab (PDF 356 KB) Natural Oils -- The Next Generation of Diesel Engine Lubricants? Joe Perez The...

275

Effect of Biodiesel Blends on Diesel Particulate Filter Performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents results of tests of ultra-low sulfur diesel blended with soy-biodiesel at 5 percent using a Cummins ISB engine with a diesel particulate filter.

Williams, A.; McCormick, R. L.; Hayes, R. R.; Ireland, J.; Fang, H. L.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Diesel Fuel - Energy Explained, Your Guide To Understanding ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... and electric utilities have diesel generators for backup and emergency power supply. Most remote villages in Alaska use diesel generators for ...

277

Educating Consumers: New Content on Diesel Vehicles, Diesel Exhaust Fluid, and Selective Catalytic Reduction Technologies on the AFDC (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation covers new content available on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicle Data Center regarding diesel vehicles, diesel exhaust fluid, and selective catalytic reduction technologies.

Brodt-Giles, D.

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

278

Biomass to Gasoline and DIesel Using Integrated Hydropyrolysis and Hydroconversion  

SciTech Connect

Cellulosic and woody biomass can be directly converted to hydrocarbon gasoline and diesel blending components through the use of integrated hydropyrolysis plus hydroconversion (IH2). The IH2 gasoline and diesel blending components are fully compatible with petroleum based gasoline and diesel, contain less than 1% oxygen and have less than 1 total acid number (TAN). The IH2 gasoline is high quality and very close to a drop in fuel. The DOE funding enabled rapid development of the IH2 technology from initial proof-of-principle experiments through continuous testing in a 50 kg/day pilot plant. As part of this project, engineering work on IH2 has also been completed to design a 1 ton/day demonstration unit and a commercial-scale 2000 ton/day IH2 unit. These studies show when using IH2 technology, biomass can be converted directly to transportation quality fuel blending components for the same capital cost required for pyrolysis alone, and a fraction of the cost of pyrolysis plus upgrading of pyrolysis oil. Technoeconomic work for IH2 and lifecycle analysis (LCA) work has also been completed as part of this DOE study and shows IH2 technology can convert biomass to gasoline and diesel blending components for less than $2.00/gallon with greater than 90% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. As a result of the work completed in this DOE project, a joint development agreement was reached with CRI Catalyst Company to license the IH2 technology. Further larger-scale, continuous testing of IH2 will be required to fully demonstrate the technology, and funding for this is recommended. The IH2 biomass conversion technology would reduce U.S. dependence on foreign oil, reduce the price of transportation fuels, and significantly lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. It is a breakthrough for the widespread conversion of biomass to transportation fuels.

Marker, Terry; Roberts, Michael; Linck, Martin; Felix, Larry; Ortiz-Toral, Pedro; Wangerow, Jim; Tan, Eric; Gephart, John; Shonnard, David

2013-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

279

An Estimate of Diesel High-Efficiency Clean Combustion Impacts on FTP-75 Aftertreatment Requirements (SAE Paper Number 2006-01-3311)  

SciTech Connect

A modified Mercedes 1.7-liter, direct-injection diesel engine was operated in both normal and high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) combustion modes. Four steady-state engine operating points that were previously identified by the Ad-hoc fuels working group were used as test points to allow estimation of the hot-start FTP-75 emissions levels in both normal and HECC combustion modes. The results indicate that operation in HECC modes generally produce reductions in NOX and PM emissions at the expense of CO, NMHC, and H2CO emissions. The FTP emissions estimates indicate that aftertreatment requirements for NOX are reduced, while those for PM may not be impacted. Cycle-average aftertreatment requirements for CO, NMHC, and H2CO may be challenging, especially at the lowest temperature conditions.

Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Trends and Transitions in the Diesel Market  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

A presentation at the 2007 NPRA Annual Meeting focusing on trends in the diesel market. The presentation reviews the status of the ULSD program and highlights recent changes and trends in the distillate market that point towards continued strength in diesel prices relative to gasoline for some time.

Information Center

2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Modeling Injection and Ignition in Direct Injection Natural Gas Engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With increasing concerns about the harmful effects of conventional liquid fossil fuel emissions, natural gas has become a very attractive alternative fuel to power prime… (more)

Cheng, Xu Jr.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Clean Diesel Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Diesel Technologies Inc Diesel Technologies Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Diesel Technologies Inc Place Stamford, Connecticut Zip 6901 Product Clean Diesel Technologies Inc is a specialty chemical company with patented products that reduce emissions from diesel engines while simultaneously improving fuel economy and power. Coordinates 42.75294°, -73.068531° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.75294,"lon":-73.068531,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

Simulating flame lift-off characteristics of diesel and biodiesel fuels using detailed chemical-kinetic mechanisms and LES turbulence model.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combustion in direct-injection diesel engines occurs in a lifted, turbulent diffusion flame mode. Numerous studies indicate that the combustion and emissions in such engines are strongly influenced by the lifted flame characteristics, which are in turn determined by fuel and air mixing in the upstream region of the lifted flame, and consequently by the liquid breakup and spray development processes. From a numerical standpoint, these spray combustion processes depend heavily on the choice of underlying spray, combustion, and turbulence models. The present numerical study investigates the influence of different chemical kinetic mechanisms for diesel and biodiesel fuels, as well as Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) and large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence models on predicting flame lift-off lengths (LOLs) and ignition delays. Specifically, two chemical kinetic mechanisms for n-heptane (NHPT) and three for biodiesel surrogates are investigated. In addition, the RNG k-{epsilon} (RANS) model is compared to the Smagorinsky based LES turbulence model. Using adaptive grid resolution, minimum grid sizes of 250 {micro}m and 125 {micro}m were obtained for the RANS and LES cases respectively. Validations of these models were performed against experimental data from Sandia National Laboratories in a constant volume combustion chamber. Ignition delay and flame lift-off validations were performed at different ambient temperature conditions. The LES model predicts lower ignition delays and qualitatively better flame structures compared to the RNG k-{epsilon} model. The use of realistic chemistry and a ternary surrogate mixture, which consists of methyl decanoate, methyl 9-decenoate, and NHPT, results in better predicted LOLs and ignition delays. For diesel fuel though, only marginal improvements are observed by using larger size mechanisms. However, these improved predictions come at a significant increase in computational cost.

Som, S; Longman, D. E.; Luo, Z; Plomer, M; Lu, T; Senecal, P.K.; Pomraning, E (Energy Systems); (Univ. of Connecticut); (CONVERGENT Science)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF  

SciTech Connect

A study of in-cylinder fuel-air mixing distributions in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine is reported using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging. A multi-component fuel synthesised from three pairs of components chosen to simulate light, medium and heavy fractions was seeded with one of three tracers, each chosen to co-evaporate with and thus follow one of the fractions, in order to account for differential volatility of such components in typical gasoline fuels. In order to make quantitative measurements of fuel-air ratio from PLIF images, initial calibration was by recording PLIF images of homogeneous fuel-air mixtures under similar conditions of in-cylinder temperature and pressure using a re-circulation loop and a motored engine. This calibration method was found to be affected by two significant factors. Firstly, calibration was affected by variation of signal collection efficiency arising from build-up of absorbing deposits on the windows during firing cycles, which are not present under motored conditions. Secondly, the effects of residual exhaust gas present in the firing engine were not accounted for using a calibration loop with a motored engine. In order to account for these factors a novel method of PLIF calibration is presented whereby 'bookend' calibration measurements for each tracer separately are performed under firing conditions, utilising injection into a large upstream heated plenum to promote the formation of homogeneous in-cylinder mixtures. These calibration datasets contain sufficient information to not only characterise the quantum efficiency of each tracer during a typical engine cycle, but also monitor imaging efficiency, and, importantly, account for the impact of exhaust gas residuals (EGR). By use of this method EGR is identified as a significant factor in quantitative PLIF for fuel mixing diagnostics in firing engines. The effects of cyclic variation in fuel concentration on burn rate are analysed for different fuel injection strategies. Finally, mixture distributions for late injection obtained using quantitative PLIF are compared to predictions of computational fluid dynamics calculations. (author)

Williams, Ben; Ewart, Paul [Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Wang, Xiaowei; Stone, Richard [Department of Engineering Science, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PJ (United Kingdom); Ma, Hongrui; Walmsley, Harold; Cracknell, Roger [Shell Global Solutions (UK), Shell Research Centre Thornton, P. O. Box 1, Chester, CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Stevens, Robert; Richardson, David; Fu, Huiyu; Wallace, Stan [Jaguar Cars, Engineering Centre, Abbey Road, Whitley, Coventry, CV3 4LF (United Kingdom)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ralphs Grocery EC-Diesel Truck Fleet: Final Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies sponsored a research project with Ralphs Grocery Company to collect and analyze data on the performance and operation of 15 diesel trucks fueled with EC-Diesel in commercial service. These trucks were compared to 5 diesel trucks fueled with CARB diesel and operating on similar routes. This document reports this evaluation.

Not Available

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

AT GUANTANAMO BAY: A HYBRID WIND-DIESEL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laboratory and are actively developing what will be the world's largest wind-diesel hybrid electric plant. The pending installation of four 950-kW wind turbines to supplement the 22.8 MW diesel electricity plant diesel fuel usage in the base, while not adversely affecting the power grid or the diesels. The reduced

Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

287

Diesel Reforming for Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses the development of a diesel reforming catalyst and catalytic system development.

Liu, D-J.; Sheen, S-H.; Krumpelt, M.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO[sub x] concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Characterization and control of exhaust gas from diesel engine firing coal-water mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exhaust from the GE-TS single cylinder diesel engine, fitted with hardened metal, and diamond-tipped metal fuel injection nozzles, and firing coal-water mixture (CWM) has been characterized with respect to gas composition, particulate size distribution, and particulate filtration characteristics. The measured flue gas compositions are roughly in keeping with results from combustion calculations. The time variations of the hydrocarbon, CO, and NO{sub x} concentrations are also understood in terms of known reaction mechanisms.

Samuel, E.A.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Diesel 7 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg

291

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Biodiesel Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicles Using Biodiesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biodiesel Basics Benefits & Considerations Stations Vehicles Availability Emissions

292

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Diesel 8 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Diesel Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference Presentations on Digg

293

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Diesel Fuel Blend Tax Exemption The biodiesel or ethanol portion of blended fuel containing taxable diesel

294

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development: A status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the last progress report, a 500 acfm system treating a slip stream from a single cylinder CWS fuel diesel engine was designed, constructed and tested. The system, as installed in the engine test laboratory, is shown in Figure 1. The system consists of a 6 in. diameter pipe with a flow control valve which diverts up to 500 acfm of exhaust gas from the single cylinder engine exhaust manifold. A gravity feeder injects sorbent into the exhaust gas stream which flows into the filter. In addition, anhydrous ammonia is injected into the gas stream from a pressurized cylinder to control NO[sub x] emission. The gas enters the filter housing from the top. Turning vanes direct the flow downwards toward the filter elements. The gas leaves the filter from the side. A detailed drawing of the filter, a filter element and compressed air system for cleaning the filters elements are shown in Figure 2. The filter media elements are closely spaced to increase the surface area-to-cloth ratio and to meet the space constraints. The filter media is composed of fiber metal with 3-5 micron fibers exhibiting good filtration characteristics. The fiber metal elements are relatively light and are constructed of Iconel or 316 SS, and can operate in the exhaust gas environment. High removal efficiency of particulate matter and S0[sub 2] was achieved using the barrier filter. The NO[sub x] removal efficiency was somewhat lower than was achieved in the bench scale tests, yet more than 85 % reduction of NO[sub x] level could be achieved.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M; van Kleunen, W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Coal-fueled diesel emissions control technology development: A status report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the last progress report, a 500 acfm system treating a slip stream from a single cylinder CWS fuel diesel engine was designed, constructed and tested. The system, as installed in the engine test laboratory, is shown in Figure 1. The system consists of a 6 in. diameter pipe with a flow control valve which diverts up to 500 acfm of exhaust gas from the single cylinder engine exhaust manifold. A gravity feeder injects sorbent into the exhaust gas stream which flows into the filter. In addition, anhydrous ammonia is injected into the gas stream from a pressurized cylinder to control NO{sub x} emission. The gas enters the filter housing from the top. Turning vanes direct the flow downwards toward the filter elements. The gas leaves the filter from the side. A detailed drawing of the filter, a filter element and compressed air system for cleaning the filters elements are shown in Figure 2. The filter media elements are closely spaced to increase the surface area-to-cloth ratio and to meet the space constraints. The filter media is composed of fiber metal with 3-5 micron fibers exhibiting good filtration characteristics. The fiber metal elements are relatively light and are constructed of Iconel or 316 SS, and can operate in the exhaust gas environment. High removal efficiency of particulate matter and S0{sub 2} was achieved using the barrier filter. The NO{sub x} removal efficiency was somewhat lower than was achieved in the bench scale tests, yet more than 85 % reduction of NO{sub x} level could be achieved.

Cook, C.S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M; van Kleunen, W.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

Measurement of Fuel Dilution of Oil in a Diesel Engine using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technique for measuring the fuel dilution of oil in a diesel engine is presented. Fuel dilution can occur when advanced in-cylinder fuel injection techniques are employed for the purpose of producing rich exhaust for lean NOx trap catalyst regeneration. Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is used to monitor the oil in a Mercedes 1.7-liter engine operated on a dynamometer platform. A fluorescent dye suitable for use in diesel fuel and oil systems is added to the engine fuel. The LIF spectra are monitored to detect the growth of the dye signal relative to the background fluorescence of the oil; fuel mass concentration is quantified based on a known sample set. The technique was implemented with fiber optic probes which can be inserted at various points in the oil system of the engine. A low cost 532-nm laser diode was used for excitation of the fluorescence. Measurements of fuel dilution of oil are presented for various in-cylinder injection strategies for rich operation of the diesel engine. Rates of fuel dilution increase for all strategies relative to normal lean operation, and higher fuel dilution rates are observed when extra fuel injection occurs later in the combustion cycle when fuel penetration into the cylinder wall oil film is more likely.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Coal-fueled diesel technology development Emissions Control  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GEESI Emissions Control program activity ranged from control concept testing of 10 CFM slipstream from a CWS fuel single cylinder research diesel engine to the design, installation, and operation of a full-size Emissions Control system for a full-size CWS fuel diesel engine designed for locomotive operation.Early 10 CFM slipstream testing program activity was performed to determine Emissions Characteristics and to evaluate Emissions Control concepts such a Barrier filtration, Granular bed filtration, and Cyclone particulate collection for reduction of particulate and gaseous emissions. Use of sorbent injection into the engine exhaust gas upstream of the barrier filter or use of sorbent media in the granular bed filter were found to provide reduction of exhaust gas SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} in addition to collection of ash particulate. Emergence of the use of barrier filtration as a most practical Emissions Control concept disclosed a need to improve cleanability of the filter media in order to avoid reduction of turbocharger performance by excessive barrier filter pressure drop. The next progression of program activity, after the slipstream feasibility state, was 500 CFM cold flow testing of control system concepts. The successful completion of 500 CFM cold flow testing of the Envelope Filter led to a subsequent progression to a similar configuration Envelope Filter designed to operate at 500 CFM hot gas flow from the CWS fuel research diesel engine in the GETS engine test laboratory. This Envelope Filter included the design aspect proven by cold flow testing as well as optimization of the selection of the installed filter media.

Van Kleunen, W.; Kaldor, S.; Gal, E.; Mengel, M.; Arnold, M.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

The effects of diesel injector needle motion on spray structure.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The internal structure of diesel fuel injectors is known to have a significant impact on the steady-state fuel distribution within the spray. However, little experimental or computational work has been performed on the dynamics of fuel injectors. Recent studies have shown that it is possible to measure the three-dimensional geometry of the injector nozzle, and to track changes in that geometry as the needle opens and closes in real time. This has enabled the dynamics of the injector to be compared with the dynamics of the spray, and allows computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to use realistic time-dependent flow passage geometries. In this study, X-ray phase-enhanced imaging has been used to perform time-resolved imaging of the needle seat area in several common-rail diesel injection nozzles. The fuel distributions of the sprays emitted by these injectors were also studied with fast X-ray radiography. Correlations between eccentric motions of the injector needle valve and oscillations in the fuel density as it emerges from the nozzle are examined. CFD modeling is used to interpret the effect of needle motion on fuel flow.

Powell, C. F.; Kastengren, A. L.; Liu, Z.; Fezzaa, K. (Energy Systems); ( XSD)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

In-Cylinder Fuel Blending of Gasoline/Diesel for Improved Efficiency and Lowest Possible Emissions on a Multi-Cylinder Light-Duty Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In-cylinder fuel blending of gasoline/diesel fuel is investigated on a multi-cylinder light-duty diesel engine as a potential strategy to control in-cylinder fuel reactivity for improved efficiency and lowest possible emissions. This approach was developed and demonstrated at the University of Wisconsin through modeling and single-cylinder engine experiments. The objective of this study is to better understand the potential and challenges of this method on a multi-cylinder engine. More specifically, the effect of cylinder-to-cylinder imbalances, heat rejection, and in-cylinder charge motion as well as the potential limitations imposed by real-world turbo-machinery were investigated on a 1.9-liter four-cylinder engine. This investigation focused on one engine condition, 2300 rpm, 4.2 bar brake mean effective pressure (BMEP). Gasoline was introduced with a port-fuel-injection system. Parameter sweeps included gasoline-to-diesel fuel ratio, intake air mixture temperature, in-cylinder swirl number, and diesel start-of-injection phasing. In addition, engine parameters were trimmed for each cylinder to balance the combustion process for maximum efficiency and lowest emissions. An important observation was the strong influence of intake charge temperature on cylinder pressure rise rate. Experiments were able to show increased thermal efficiency along with dramatic decreases in oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM). However, indicated thermal efficiency for the multi-cylinder experiments were less than expected based on modeling and single-cylinder results. The lower indicated thermal efficiency is believed to be due increased heat transfer as compared to the model predictions and suggest a need for improved cylinder-to-cylinder control and increased heat transfer control.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Cho, Kukwon [ORNL; Sluder, Scott [ORNL; Kokjohn, Sage [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Reitz, Rolf [University of Wisconsin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compare vehículos diesel nuevos y usados  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Por Galn Por lo menos... 35 30 25 20 15 10 Ciudad 35 30 25 20 15 10 Combinado 45 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 Carretera Sus Selecciones Bsque Vehculos y Combustible Diesel Compare de...

302

Jet Fuel from Bio-Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jet Fuel from Bio-Diesel Background Due to concerns with limited resources of petroleum-based fuels, the demand for using renewable feedstocks, such as vegetable oils and animal...

303

An improved visualization of diesel particulate filter/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The prevalence of diesel particulate filters (DPF) is increasing as emissions standards worldwide evolve to match current technologies. Since the first application of DPFs in the 1980's, PM trapping effectiveness has ...

Boehm, Kevin (Kevin W.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Massachusetts Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

305

San Francisco Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

306

Cleveland Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

307

Chicago Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

308

Washington Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

309

Colorado Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

310

New York Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

311

Minnesota Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

312

Houston Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

313

Florida Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

314

Seattle Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

315

Los Angeles Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

316

Denver Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

EIA continued to collect LSD prices from retail outlets and included them in the Diesel Average All Types price until July 26, 2010, when no more outlets reported LSD ...

317

JatroDiesel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:www.jatrodiesel.com References JatroDiesel1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI...

318

Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Over the past several years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has extensively studied the relationships between wholesale and retail markets for petroleum products. This article representsthe extension of this type of analysis and modeling into the diesel fuel markets.

Michael Burdette

2002-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

319

Coal-fueled high-speed diesel engine development. Final report, September 28, 1990--November 30, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program was to study the feasibility of operating a Detroit Diesel Series 149 engine at high speeds using a Coal-Water-Slurry (CWS) fuel. The CWS-fueled 149 engine is proposed for the mine-haul off-highway truck and work boat marine markets. Economic analysis studies indicate that, for these markets, the use of CWS fuel could have sufficient operating cost savings, depending upon the future diesel fuel price, emission control system capital and operating costs, and maintenance and overhaul costs. A major portion of the maintenance costs is expected to be due to lower life and higher cost of the CWS injectors. Injection and combustion systems were specially designed for CWS, and were installed in one cylinder of a Detroit Diesel 8V-149TI engine for testing. The objective was to achieve engine operation for sustained periods at speeds up to 1,900 rpm with reasonable fuel economy and coal burnout rate. A computer simulation predicted autoignition of coal fuel at 1,900 rpm would require an average droplet size of 18 microns and 19:1 compression ratio, so the injection system, and pistons were designed accordingly. The injection system was capable of supplying the required volume of CWS/injection with a duration of approximately 25 crank angle degrees and peak pressures on the order of 100 mpa. In addition to the high compression ratio, the combustion system also utilized hot residual gases in the cylinder, warm inlet air admission and ceramic insulated engine components to enhance combustion. Autoignition of CWS fuel was achieved at 1900 rpm, at loads ranging from 20--80 percent of the rated load of diesel-fuel powered cylinders. Limited emissions data indicates coal burnout rates in excess of 99 percent. NO{sub x} levels were significantly lower, while unburned hydrocarbon levels were higher for the CWS fueled cylinder than for corresponding diesel-fuel powered cylinders.

Kakwani, R.M.; Winsor, R.E.; Ryan, T.W. III; Schwalb, J.A.; Wahiduzzaman, S.; Wilson, R.P. Jr.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Diesel particulate filter with zoned resistive heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A diesel particulate filter assembly comprises a diesel particulate filter (DPF) and a heater assembly. The DPF filters a particulate from exhaust produced by an engine. The heater assembly has a first metallic layer that is applied to the DPF, a resistive layer that is applied to the first metallic layer, and a second metallic layer that is applied to the resistive layer. The second metallic layer is etched to form a plurality of zones.

Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Diesel Fleet Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Clean Diesel Fleet Vehicle Grants The Oklahoma Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Air Quality Division

322

Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

National Clean Diesel National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type National Clean Diesel Campaign (NCDC) The NCDC was established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to

323

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Michigan Fleet Reduces Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use on AddThis.com... Feb. 11, 2010 Michigan Fleet Reduces Gasoline and Diesel Use D iscover how the City of Ann Arbor reduced municipal fleet gas and diesel

324

Coal-water slurry spray characteristics of a positive displacement fuel injection system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experiments have been completed to characterized coal-water slurry sprays from a modified positive displacement fuel injection system of a diesel engine. The injection system includes an injection jerk pump driven by an electric motor, a specially designed diaphragm to separate the abrasive coal from the pump, and a single-hole fuel nozzle. The sprays were injected into a pressurized chamber equipped with windows. High speed movies and instantaneous fuel line pressures were obtained. For injection pressures of order 30 MPa or higher, the sprays were similar for coal-water slurry, diesel fuel and water. The time until the center core of the spray broke-up (break-up time) was determined from both the movies and from a model using the fuel line pressures. Results from these two independent procedures were in good agreement. For the base conditions, the break-up time was 0.58 and 0.50 ms for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively. The break-up times increased with increasing nozzle orifice size and with decreasing chamber density. The break-up time was not a function of coal loading for coal loadings up to 53%. Cone angles of the sprays were dependent on the operating conditions and fluid, as well as on the time and location of the measurement. For one set of cases studied, the time-averaged cone angle was 15.9{degree} and 16.3{degree} for coal-water slurry and diesel fuel, respectively.

Seshadri, A.K.; Caton, J.A.; Kihm, K.D. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effectiveness of Diesel Oxidation Catalyst in Reducing HC and CO Emissions from Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Reactivity Controlled Compression Ignition (RCCI) has been shown to allow for diesel-like or better brake thermal efficiency with significant reductions in nitrogen oxide (NOX) particulate matter (PM) emissions. Hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emission levels, on the other hand, are similar to those of port fuel injected gasoline engines. The higher HC and CO emissions combined with the lower exhaust temperatures with RCCI operation present a challenge for current exhaust aftertreatments. The reduction of HC and CO emissions in a lean environment is typically achieved with an oxidation catalyst. In this work, several diesel oxidation catalysts (DOC) with different precious metal loadings were evaluated for effectiveness to control HC and CO emissions from RCCI combustion in a light-duty multi-cylinder engine operating on gasoline and diesel fuels. Each catalyst was evaluated in a steady-state engine operation with temperatures ranging from 160 to 260 C. A shift to a higher light-off temperature was observed during the RCCI operation. In addition to the steady-state experiments, the performances of the DOCs were evaluated during multi-mode engine operation by switching from diesel-like combustion at higher exhaust temperature and low HC/CO emissions to RCCI combustion at lower temperature and higher HC/CO emissions. High CO and HC emissions from RCCI generated an exotherm keeping the catalyst above the light-off temperature.

Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Curran, Scott [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Demand, Supply, and Price Outlook for Low-Sulfur Diesel Fuel  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not To help ensure that sulfates in engine exhaust do not prevent manufacturers of heavy-duty diesel engines from meeting new particulate emissions standards for 1994 and later model years, 1 the Clean Air Act Amend- ments of 1990 (CAAA90) require refiners to reduce the sulfur content of on-highway diesel fuel from current average levels of 0.30 percent by weight to no more than 0.05 percent by weight. The new standard, which goes into effect October 1, 1993, also requires that on-highway diesel fuel have a minimum cetane index of 40 or a maximum aromatic content of 35 percent by volume. 2 (See list of terms and definitions on the fol- lowing page.) This provision is designed to prevent any future rises in aromatics levels. 3 Since the direct mea- surement of aromatics is complex, a minimum cetane

327

Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Attenuating Diesel Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Attenuating Diesel Engine Emissions Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Early this decade, Argonne chemists developed a special catalyst that can

328

Reliability technology to improve and/or maintain emergency diesel generator performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews a report that demonstrates that an emergency diesel generator reliability program can be developed using risk- and reliability-based techniques that can be integrated within current plant operational activities to (a) analyze problems that have affected emergency diesel generator (EDG) performances, (b) forecast the onset of potential problems, and (c) suggest actions that could eliminate or reduce their occurrence. With only a few exceptions, commercial NPPs in the United States use EDG units as backup sources. These EDG units consist of a diesel engine connected directly to an ac generator. They are safety grade and are normally arranged so that separate EDGs supply each of the two, three, or four redundant electrical divisions of the NPP. The EDGs are typically designed to start automatically, to be at rated speed and voltage in 10 s, and to accept full load within 1 min.

Karimian, S.; Taylor, J.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Characterization of in-cylinder techniques for thermal management of diesel aftertreatment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One challenge in meeting emission regulations with catalytic aftertreatment systems is maintaining the proper catalyst temperatures that enable the catalytic devices to perform the emissions reduction. In this study, in-cylinder techniques are used to actively control the temperature of a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF) in order to raise the DPF temperature to induce particulate oxidation. The performance of four strategies is compared for two different starting DPF temperatures (150 C and 300 C) on a 4-cylinder, 1.7-liter diesel engine. The four strategies include: (1) addition of extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (2) addition of extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle for all four cylinders, (3) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection early in the combustion cycle, and (4) operating one-cylinder with extra fuel injection late in the combustion cycle. In cases (3) and (4), the cylinder operating with extra fuel injection is changed frequently to avoid oil dilution complications. In addition to the in-cylinder strategies, an in-pipe fuel addition technique for thermal management was studied for comparison. Results show that at starting temperatures above 300 C, late cycle injection strategies that cause temperature rise from exotherms created by unburned fuel components result in higher temperature rise for a given fuel penalty. At the low temperature of 150 C, early injection strategies that create temperature rise from both combustion and light reductant exotherms are preferred due to the inability of the catalyst to oxidize unburned fuel from late injection strategies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions,  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Renewable Diesel Definitions, Registration, and Labeling Requirements on Digg

331

THE DIESEL ENGINE'S CHALLENGE IN THE NEW MILLENIUM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines are the dominant propulsion engine of choice for most of the commercial surface transportation applications in the world. Consider agricultural uses: Diesel engine power is used to prepare the soil, transport the bulk seed or seedlings, pump irrigation water, and spray fertilizers, mechanically harvest some crops and distribute the produce to market. Diesel engines power virtually all of the off-highway construction equipment. Deep water commercial freighters or containerships are almost all diesel engine powered. The passenger ships are primarily either diesel or a combination of diesel and gas turbine, referred to as CODAG or CODOG.

Fairbanks, John W.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using1997), “Emission from CNG and diesel Refuse Haulers Using

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Assessment of the O2Diesel Operational Safety Program: December 23, 2002 -- June 30, 2007  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report assesses O2Diesel's operational safety program using its ethanol-diesel blended fuel product.

TIAX LLC

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Intelligent Study on Diesel-LNG Dual Fuel Marine Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a diesel engine named "X6170ZC" has been converted into a dual-fuel engine of diesel and liquefied natural gas (LNG). The principle, composition and characteristics of electronic control system for the engine have been introduced. An ... Keywords: engine, dual-fuel, intelligent

Zhang Liang

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Synergies of PCCI-Type Combustion and Lean NOx Trap Catalysis for Diesel Engines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that future NOx and PM emission targets for diesel engines cannot be met solely via advanced combustion over the full engine drive cycle. Therefore some combination of advanced combustion methodology with an aftertreatment technology will be required. In this study, NOx reduction, fuel efficiency, and regeneration performance of lean NOx trap (LNT) were evaluated for four operating conditions. The combustion approaches included baseline engine operation with and without EGR, two exhaust enrichment methods (post injection and delayed injection), and one advanced combustion mode to enable high efficiency clean combustion (HECC). A 1.7 liter 4-cylinder diesel engine was operated under five conditions, which represent key interest points for light-duty diesel operation. At the low load setting the exhaust temperature was too low to enable LNT regeneration and oxidation; however, HECC (low NOx) was achievable. HECC was also reached under more moderate loads and the exhaust temperatures were high enough to enable even further NOx reductions by the LNT. At high loads HECC becomes difficult but the LNT performance improves and acceptable regeneration can be met with enrichment methodologies.

Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Kass, Michael D [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Effect of Temperature on NOx Reduction by Nitrogen Atom Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical reduction of NO{sub x} can be accomplished by injection of nitrogen atoms into the diesel engine exhaust stream. The nitrogen atoms can be generated from a separate stream of pure N{sub 2} by means of plasma jets or non-thermal plasma reactors. This paper examines the effect of exhaust temperature on the NO{sub x} reduction efficiency that can be achieved by nitrogen atom injection. It is shown that to achieve a high NO{sub x} reduction efficiency at a reasonable power consumption penalty, the exhaust temperature needs to be 100 C or less.

Penetrante, B

1999-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

337

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Clean Diesel Retrofit Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Clean Diesel Retrofit and Idle Reduction Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

338

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Green Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel and Green Diesel Definitions Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is comprised of mono-alkyl esters of

339

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biofuels and Green Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biofuels and Green Diesel Definitions Advanced biofuels are defined as fuels derived from any cellulose,

340

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Diesel Vehicle Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Diesel Vehicle Retrofit and Improvement Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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341

Diesel prices decrease for the ninth consecutive week  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease for the ninth consecutive week The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell to 3.85 a gallon on Monday. That's down 3.6 cents from a week...

342

Diesel prices dip below the 4 dollar mark  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices dip below the 4 dollar mark The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel dipped below the 4-dollar mark for the first time since late January to 3.99 a...

343

Diesel prices decrease for first time in seven weeks  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices decrease for first time in seven weeks The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel fell for the first time in seven weeks to 4.13 a gallon on Monday....

344

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #496: November 19, 2007 Diesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: November 19, 2007 Diesel Prices in the U.S. and Selected Countries: Cost and Taxes to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 496: November 19, 2007 Diesel...

345

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #650: November 22, 2010 Diesel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: November 22, 2010 Diesel Fuel Prices hit a Two-Year High to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact 650: November 22, 2010 Diesel Fuel Prices hit a Two-Year...

346

BioDiesel One Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

One Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name BioDiesel One, Ltd. Place Southington, Connecticut Zip 6489 Product BioDiesel One plans to develop a biodiesel plant in Southington,...

347

Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity - Diesel Engine Idling Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diesel Engine Idling Test In support of the Department of Energys FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of...

348

Coal-fueled diesel technology development. Final report, March 3, 1988--January 31, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since 1979, the US Department of Energy has been sponsoring Research and Development programs to use coal as a fuel for diesel engines. In 1984, under the partial sponsorship of the Burlington Northern and Norfolk Southern Railroads, GE completed a 30-month study on the economic viability of a coal-fueled locomotive. In response to a GE proposal to continue researching the economic and technical feasibility of a coal-fueled diesel engine for locomotives, DOE awarded a contract to GE Corporate Research and Development for a three-year program that began in March 1985 and was completed in 1988. That program was divided into two parts: an Economic Assessment Study and a Technical Feasibility Study. The Economic Assessment Study evaluated the benefits to be derived from development of a coal-fueled diesel engine. Seven areas and their economic impact on the use of coal-fueled diesels were examined; impact on railroad infrastructure, expected maintenance cost, environmental considerations, impact of higher capital costs, railroad training and crew costs, beneficiated coal costs for viable economics, and future cost of money. The Technical Feasibility Study used laboratory- and bench-scale experiments to investigate the combustion of coal. The major accomplishments of this study were the development of injection hardware for coal water slurry (CWS) fuel, successful testing of CWS fuel in a full-size, single-cylinder, medium-speed diesel engine, evaluation of full-scale engine wear rates with metal and ceramic components, and the characterization of gaseous and particulate emissions. Full combustion of CWS fuel was accomplished at full and part load with reasonable manifold conditions.

Not Available

1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through EIA Home > Petroleum > Petroleum Feature Articles Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through Printer-Friendly PDF Diesel Fuel Price Pass-through by Michael Burdette and John Zyren* Over the past several years, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) has extensively studied the relationships between wholesale and retail markets for petroleum products. Beginning with gasoline, we looked at the two ends of the pricing structure in the U.S. market: daily spot prices, which capture sales of large quantities of product between refiners, importers/exporters, and traders; and weekly retail prices, measured at local gasoline outlets nationwide. In the course of this analysis, EIA has found that the relationships between spot and retail prices are consistent and predictable, to the extent that changes in spot prices can be used to forecast subsequent changes in retail prices for the appropriate regions. This article represents the extension of this type of analysis and modeling into the diesel fuel markets.

350

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update Data Revision Notice  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. ...

351

Progress in Understanding the Toxicity of Gasoline and Diesel Engine Exhaust Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help guide heavy vehicle engine, fuel, and exhaust after-treatment technology development, the U.S. Department of Energy and the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute are conducting research not addressed elsewhere on aspects of the toxicity of particulate engine emissions. Advances in these technologies that reduce diesel particulate mass emissions may result in changes in particle composition, and there is concern that the number of ultrafine (<0.1 micron) particles may increase. All present epidemiological and laboratory data on the toxicity of diesel emissions were derived from emissions of older-technology engines. New, short-term toxicity data are needed to make health-based choices among diesel technologies and to compare the toxicity of diesel emissions to those of other engine technologies. This research program has two facets: (1) development and use of short-term in vitro and in vivo toxicity assays for comparing the toxicities of gasoline and diesel exhaust emissions; and (2) determination of the disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles deposited in the lung. Responses of cultured cells, cultured lung slices, and rodent lungs to various types of particles were compared to develop an improved short-term toxicity screening capability. To date, chemical toxicity indicators of cultured human A549 cells and early inflammatory and cytotoxic indicators of rat lungs have given the best distinguishing capability. A study is now underway to determine the relative toxicities of exhaust samples from in-use diesel and gasoline engines. The samples are being collected under the direction of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory with support from DOE's Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies. The ability to generate solid ultrafine particles and to trace their movement in the body as particles and soluble material was developed. Data from rodents suggest that ultrafine particles can move from the lung to the liver in particulate form. The quantitative disposition of inhaled ultrafine particles will be determined in rodents and nonhuman primates.

Kristen J. Nikula; Gregory L. Finch; Richard A. Westhouse; JeanClare Seagrave; Joe L. Mauderly; Doughlas R. Lawson; Michael Gurevich

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

352

High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when they are opened. As a result of this effort, we have devised a new design and have filed for a patent on a method of control which is believed to overcome this problem. The engine we have been working with originally had a single camshaft which controlled both the intake and exhaust valves. Single cycle lift and timing control was demonstrated with this system. (3) Large eddy simulations and KIVA based simulations were used in conjunction with flow visualizations in an optical engine to study fuel air mixing. During this effort we have devised a metric for quantifying fuel distribution and it is described in several of our papers. (4) A control system has been developed to enable us to test the benefits of the various technologies. This system used is based on Opal-RT hardware and is being used in a current DOE sponsored program.

Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

Alternatives to conventional diesel fuel-some potential implications of California's TAC decision on diesel particulate.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Limitations on the use of petroleum-based diesel fuel in California could occur pursuant to the 1998 declaration by California's Air Resources Board (CARB) that the particulate matter component of diesel exhaust is a carcinogen, therefore a toxic air contaminant (TAC) subject to provisions of the state's Proposition 65. It is the declared intention of CARB not to ban or restrict diesel fuel, per se, at this time. Assuming no total ban, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) explored two feasible ''mid-course'' strategies. (1) Increased penetration of natural gas and greater gasoline use in the transportation fuels market, to the extent that some compression-ignition (CI) applications revert to spark-ignition (SI) engines. (2) New specifications requiring diesel fuel reformulation based on exhaust products of individual diesel fuel constituents. Each of these alternatives results in some degree of (conventional) diesel displacement. In the first case, diesel fuel is assumed admissible for ignition assistance as a pilot fuel in natural gas (NG)-powered heavy-duty vehicles, and gasoline demand in California increases by 32.2 million liters per day overall, about 21 percent above projected 2010 baseline demand. Natural gas demand increases by 13.6 million diesel liter equivalents per day, about 7 percent above projected (total) consumption level. In the second case, compression-ignition engines utilize substitutes for petroleum-based diesel having similar ignition and performance properties. For each case we estimated localized air emission plus generalized greenhouse gas and energy changes. Economic implications of vehicle and engine replacement were not evaluated.

Eberhardt, J. J.; Rote, D. M.; Saricks, C. L.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Emissions from Trucks using Fischer-Tropsch Diesel Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) catalytic conversion process can be used to synthesize diesel fuels from a variety of feedstocks, including coal, natural gas and biomass. Synthetic diesel fuels can have very low sulfur and aromatic content, and excellent autoignition characteristics. Moreover, Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuels may also be economically competitive with California B- diesel fuel if produced in large volumes. overview of Fischer-Tropsch diesel fuel production and engine emissions testing is presented. Previous engine laboratory tests indicate that F-T diesel is a promising alternative fuel because it can be used in unmodified diesel engines, and substantial exhaust emissions reductions can be realized. The authors have performed preliminary tests to assess the real-world performance of F-T diesel fuels in heavy-duty trucks. Seven White-GMC Class 8 trucks equipped with Caterpillar 10.3 liter engines were tested using F-T diesel fuel. Vehicle emissions tests were performed using West Virginia University's unique transportable chassis dynamometer. The trucks were found to perform adequately on neat F-T diesel fuel. Compared to a California diesel fuel baseline, neat F-T diesel fuel emitted about 12% lower oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and 24% lower particulate matter over a five-mile driving cycle.

Paul Norton; Keith Vertin; Brent Bailey; Nigel N. Clark; Donald W. Lyons; Stephen Goguen; James Eberhardt

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

355

NON-SOOTING, LOW FLAME TEMPERATURE MIXING-CONTROLLED DI DIESEL COMBUSTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods of producing non-sooting, low flame temperature diesel combustion were investigated in an optically-accessible, quiescent constant-volume combustion vessel under mixing-controlled diesel combustion conditions. Combustion and soot processes of single, isolated fuel jets were studied after auto-ignition and transient premixed combustion and while the injector was fully-open (i.e. during the mixing-controlled phase of heat release for diesel combustion). The investigation showed that small injector tip orifices could be used to produce non-sooting and low flame temperature combustion simultaneously. The use of small orifices was shown to enable non-sooting and low flame temperature combustion in two different ways as summarized below. A more detailed description of the experimental methods and results is provided in Ref. [1-3]. First, using an injector tip with a 50 micron orifice and ambient oxygen concentrations as low as 10% (simulating the use of extensive EGR), a fuel jet was non-sooting at typical diesel ambient temperatures (1000 K). Second, using the same injector tip at a reduced ambient gas temperature (850 K), but with 21% oxygen, it was shown that non-sooting, mixing-controlled combustion occurred at the lift-off length in a fuel-air mixture with a cross-sectional average equivalence ratio of approximately 0.6-suggesting that the quasi-steady combustion was fuel-lean and thereby avoided the formation of a diffusion flame. The adiabatic flame temperature with reduced ambient oxygen concentration or fuel-lean combustion was approximately 2000 K, compared to typical diesel flame temperatures that exceed 2600 K. The 50 micron orifice results above were obtained using a No.2 diesel fuel. However, using an oxygenated fuel (20 wt% oxygen), the investigation showed that the same low temperature combustion, either with reduced ambient oxygen concentration or fuel-lean combustion, was realized with a 100 micron orifice. Although these single, isolated jets do not have jet-jet interactions that would occur in realistic engines, the results are useful for understanding limiting-case behavior of single-jet mixing and combustion during an injection event. The non-sooting and low flame temperature mixing-controlled combustion realized using small orifice tips suggests that the use of small orifices offers the potential for a simultaneous soot and NOx reduction in an engine, much like diesel HCCI combustion. However, further research is needed to determine whether these methods could be successfully implemented in real engines.

Pickett, L; Siebers, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

356

Clean Diesel Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Clean Diesel Technologies Clean Diesel Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Diesel Technologies Address 10 Middle Street Place Bridgeport, Connecticut Zip 06604 Sector Carbon Product Solutions for emissions and carbon reduction Website http://www.cdti.com/ Coordinates 41.178468°, -73.188243° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.178468,"lon":-73.188243,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

357

Earthship BioDiesel | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Earthship BioDiesel Earthship BioDiesel Jump to: navigation, search Name Earthship BioDiesel Place Taos, New Mexico Zip 87571 Product Supplier and retailer of biodiesel made from Waste Vegetable Oil. Coordinates 36.4116°, -105.574251° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.4116,"lon":-105.574251,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

358

9th Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Workshop 2003  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The PowerTrap{trademark} is a non-exhaust temperature dependent system that cannot become blocked and features a controlled regeneration process independent of the vehicle's drive cycle. The system has a low direct-current power source requirement available in both 12-volt and 24-volt configurations. The system is fully programmable, fully automated and includes Euro IV requirements of operation verification. The system has gained European component-type approval and has been tested with both on- road and off-road diesel fuel up to 2000 parts per million. The device is fail-safe: in the event of a device malfunction, it cannot affect the engine's performance. Accumulated mileage testing is in excess of 640,000 miles to date. Vehicles include London-type taxicabs (Euro 1 and 2), emergency service fire engines (Euro 1, 2, and 3), inner city buses, and light-duty locomotives. Independent test results by Shell Global Solutions have consistently demonstrated 85-99 percent reduction of ultrafines across the 7-35 nanometer size range using a scanning mobility particle sizer with both ultra-low sulfur diesel and off-road high-sulfur fuel.

Kukla, P; Wright, J; Harris, G; Ball, A; Gu, F

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

359

Engines - Particulate Studies - Revealing the True Nature of Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Engine Nanoparticle Research: Revealing the True Nature of Diesel Particulates Thermophoretic sampling device Argonne's test engine with the thermophoretic sampling device attached. Nanostructure of graphitic diesel soot under high engine load A transmission electron microscope reveals the nanostructures of graphitic diesel soot sampled under high engine loads. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combustion with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Morphology of particles collected from diesel combution with iso-paraffin-enriched fuel. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion undera low-temperature condition. Amorphous soot particle collected from biodiesel combustion under low temperature conditions. Researchers have many ideas about how to reduce the soot produced by diesel

360

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel and Green Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel and Green Diesel Fuel Use Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emerging Fuels Emerging Fuels Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hydrogenation-Derived Renewable Diesel on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol

362

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply Diamond Green Diesel: Diversifying Our Transportation Fuel Supply January 20, 2011 - 3:48pm Addthis Jonathan Silver Jonathan Silver Executive Director of the Loan Programs Office What does this project do? Nearly triples the amount of renewable diesel produced domestically Diversifies the U.S. fuel supply Today, Secretary Chu announced the offer of a conditional commitment for a $241 million loan guarantee to Diamond Green Diesel, LLC., the DOE Loan Program's first conditional commitment for an advanced biofuels plant. The loan guarantee will support the construction of a 137-million gallon per year renewable diesel facility that will produce renewable diesel fuel primarily from animal fats, used cooking oil and other waste grease

363

A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Partner: New York Planning Federation Sector: Climate, Energy Focus Area: Transportation Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.nyserda.org/publications/09-06GuidetoDieselIdlingReduction.pdf Language: English References: A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction[1] References ↑ "A Municipal Official's Guide to Diesel Idling Reduction" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_Municipal_Official%27s_Guide_to_Diesel_Idling_Reduction&oldid=390471"

364

Soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed optically accessible D.I. diesel engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-dimensional (2-D) laser-sheet imaging has been used to examine the soot and liquid-phase fuel distributions in a newly designed, optically accessible, direct-injection Diesel engine of the heavy-duty size class. The design of this engine preserves the intake port geometry and basic dimensions of a Cummins N-series production engine. It also includes several unique features to provide considerable optical access. Liquid-phase fuel and soot distribution studies were conducted at a medium speed (1,200 rpm) using a Cummins closed-nozzle fuel injector. The scattering was used to obtain planar images of the liquid-phase fuel distribution. These images show that the leading edge of the liquid-phase portion of the fuel jet reaches a maximum length of 24 mm, which is about half the combustion bowl radius for this engine. Beyond this point virtually all the fuel has vaporized. Soot distribution measurements were made at a high load condition using three imaging diagnostics: natural flame luminosity, 2-D laser-induced incandescence, and 2-D elastic scattering. This investigation showed that the soot distribution in the combusting fuel jet develops through three stages. First, just after the onset of luminous combustion, soot particles are small and nearly uniformly distributed throughout the luminous region of the fuel jet. Second, after about 2 crank angle degrees a pattern develops of a higher soot concentration of larger sized particles in the head vortex region of the jet and a lower soot concentration of smaller sized particles upstream toward the injector. Third, after fuel injection ends, both the soot concentration and soot particle size increase rapidly in the upstream portion of the fuel jet.

Dec, J.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Espey, C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

Perez, J. M.

2000-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Fluidized bed injection assembly for coal gasification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A coaxial feed system for fluidized bed coal gasification processes including an inner tube for injecting particulate combustibles into a transport gas, an inner annulus about the inner tube for injecting an oxidizing gas, and an outer annulus about the inner annulus for transporting a fluidizing and cooling gas. The combustibles and oxidizing gas are discharged vertically upward directly into the combustion jet, and the fluidizing and cooling gas is discharged in a downward radial direction into the bed below the combustion jet.

Cherish, Peter (Bethel Park, PA); Salvador, Louis A. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Fuel Sulfur Effects on a Medium-Duty Diesel Pick-Up with a NOx Adsorber, Diesel Particle Filter Emissions Control System: 2000-Hour Aging Results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the emission results of a nitrogen oxide adsorber catalyst and a diesel particle filter in a medium-duty, diesel pick-up truck.

Thornton, M.; Webb, C. C.; Weber, P. A.; Orban, J.; Slone, E.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Oxygen-enriched diesel engine performance: A comparison of analytical and experimental results  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of oxygen-enriched combustion air in diesel engines can lead to significant improvements in power density, as well as reductions in particulate emissions, but at the expense of higher NO{sub x} emissions. Oxygen enrichment would also lead to lower ignition delays and the opportunity to burn lower grade fuels. Analytical and experimental studies are being conducted in parallel to establish the optimal combination of oxygen level and diesel fuel properties. In this paper, cylinder pressure data acquired on a single-cylinder engine are used to generate heat release rates for operation under various oxygen contents. These derived heat release rates are in turn used to improve the combustion correlation -- and thus the prediction capability -- of the simulation code. It is shown that simulated and measured cylinder pressures and other performance parameters are in good agreement. The improved simulation can provide sufficiently accurate predictions of trends and magnitudes to be useful in parametric studies assessing the effects of oxygen enrichment and water injection on diesel engine performance. Measured ignition delays, NO{sub x} emissions, and particulate emissions are also compared with previously published data. The measured ignition delays are slightly lower than previously reported. Particulate emissions measured in this series of tests are significantly lower than previously reported. 14 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

Sekar, R.R.; Marr, W.W.; Cole, R.L.; Marciniak, T.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Assanis, D.N. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Schaus, J.E. (Autoresearch Labs., Inc., Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Clean and Efficient Diesel Engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1 was to design study for fuel-efficient system configuration. The objective of task 1 was to perform a system design study of locomotive engine configurations leading to a 5% improvement in fuel efficiency. Modeling studies were conducted in GT-Power to perform this task. GT-Power is an engine simulation tool that facilitates modeling of engine components and their system level interactions. It provides the capability to evaluate a variety of engine technologies such as exhaust gas circulation (EGR), variable valve timing, and advanced turbo charging. The setup of GT-Power includes a flexible format that allows the effects of variations in available technologies (i.e., varying EGR fractions or fuel injection timing) to be systematically evaluated. Therefore, development can be driven by the simultaneous evaluation of several technology configurations.

None

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies ( 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

371

Slit injection device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser cavity electron beam injection device provided with a single elongated slit window for passing a suitably shaped electron beam and means for varying the current density of the injected electron beam.

Alger, Terry W. (Livermore, CA); Schlitt, Leland G. (Livermore, CA); Bradley, Laird P. (Livermore, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Rich catalytic injection  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

Veninger, Albert (Coventry, CT)

2008-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

373

Study Reveals Fuel Injection Timing Impact on Particle Number...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In an ongoing quest to meet ever-more-rigorous fuel economy and emissions requirements, vehicle manufacturers are increasingly turning to gasoline direct injection (GDI) coupled...

374

Cermet Filters To Reduce Diesel Engine Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pollution from diesel engines is a significant part of our nation's air-quality problem. Even under the more stringent standards for heavy-duty engines set to take effect in 2004, these engines will continue to emit large amounts of nitrogen oxides and particulate matter, both of which affect public health. To address this problem, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) invented a self-cleaning, high temperature, cermet filter that reduces heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. The main advantage of the INEEL cermet filter, compared to current technology, is its ability to destroy carbon particles and NOx in diesel engine exhaust. As a result, this technology is expected to improve our nation's environmental quality by meeting the need for heavy-duty diesel engine emissions control. This paper describes the cermet filter technology and the initial research and development effort.Diesel engines currently emit soot and NOx that pollute our air. It is expected that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will begin tightening the regulatory requirements to control these emissions. The INEEL's self-cleaning, high temperature cermet filter provides a technology to clean heavy-duty diesel engine emissions. Under high engine exhaust temperatures, the cermet filter simultaneously removes carbon particles and NOx from the exhaust gas. The cermet filter is made from inexpensive starting materials, via net shape bulk forming and a single-step combustion synthesis process, and can be brazed to existing structures. It is self-cleaning, lightweight, mechanically strong, thermal shock resistant, and has a high melting temperature, high heat capacity, and controllable thermal expansion coefficient. The filter's porosity is controlled to provide high removal efficiency for carbon particulate. It can be made catalytic to oxidize CO, H2, and hydrocarbons, and reduce NOx. When activated by engine exhaust, the filter produces NH3 and light hydrocarbon gases that can effectively destroy the NOx in the exhaust. The following sections describe cermet filter technology and properties of the INEEL filter.

Kong, Peter

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Beam injection into RHIC  

SciTech Connect

During the RHIC sextant test in January 1997 beam was injected into a sixth of one of the rings for the first time. The authors describe the injection zone and its bottlenecks. They report on the commissioning of the injection system, on beam based measurements of the kickers and the application program to steer the beam.

Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Tsoupas, N.; Zhang, W.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Geothermal injection monitoring project  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Background information is provided on the geothermal brine injection problem and each of the project tasks is outlined in detail. These tasks are: evaluation of methods of monitoring the movement of injected fluid, preparation for an eventual field experiment, and a review of groundwater regulations and injection programs. (MHR)

Younker, L.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for use in fuel injectors and pump systems operating with low-sulfur diesel fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While sulfur in diesel fuels helps reduce friction and prevents wear and galling in fuel pump and injector systems, it also creates environmental pollution in the form of hazardous particulates and SO{sub 2} emissions. The environmental concern is the driving force behind industry's efforts to come up with new alternative approaches to this problem. One such approach is to replace sulfur in diesel fuels with other chemicals that would maintain the antifriction and antiwear properties provided by sulfur in diesel fuels while at the same time reducing particulate emissions. A second alternative might be to surface-treat fuel injection parts (i.e., nitriding, carburizing, or coating the surfaces) to reduce or eliminate failures associated with the use of low-sulfur diesel fuels. This research explores the potential usefulness of a near-frictionless carbon (NFC) film developed at Argonne National Laboratory in alleviating the aforementioned problems. The lubricity of various diesel fuels (i.e., high-sulfur, 500 ppm; low sulfur, 140 ppm; ultra-clean, 3 ppm; and synthetic diesel or Fischer-Tropsch, zero sulfur) were tested by using both uncoated and NFC-coated 52100 steel specimens in a ball-on-three-disks and a high-frequency reciprocating wear-test rig. The test program was expanded to include some gasoline fuels as well (i.e., regular gasoline and indolene) to further substantiate the usefulness of the NFC coatings in low-sulfur gasoline environments. The results showed that the NFC coating was extremely effective in reducing wear and providing lubricity in low-sulfur or sulfur-free diesel and gasoline fuels. Specifically, depending on the wear test rig, test pair, and test media, the NFC films were able to reduce wear rates of balls and flats by factors of 8 to 83. These remarkable reductions in wear rates raise the prospect for using the ultra slick carbon coatings to alleviate problems that will be caused by the use of low sulfur diesel and gasoline fuels. Surfaces of the wear scars and tracks were characterized by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and by Raman spectroscopy.

Erdemir, A.; Ozturk, O.; Alzoubi, M.; Woodford, J.; Ajayi, L.; Fenske, G.

2000-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fuel Economy of Hybrids, Diesels, and Alternative Fuel Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here: Find a Car - Home > Hybrids, Diesels, and Alternative Fuel You are here: Find a Car - Home > Hybrids, Diesels, and Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hybrids, Diesels, and Alternative Fuel Vehicles Search by Vehicle Type 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 Select Vehicle Type Diesel Electric Ethanol-Gasoline Hybrid Plug-in Hybrid Natural Gas Bifuel Natural Gas Bifuel Propane Go More Search Options Browse New Cars Hybrid Vehicles Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Battery Electric Vehicles Diesel Vehicles Flex-Fuel Vehicles CNG Vehicles Related Information How Hybrid Vehicles Work How Fuel Cell Vehicles Work MotorWeek Videos Compare Hybrids Compare Diesels Extreme MPG Tax Incentive Information Center Alternative Fuel Station Locator Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicle Data Center | Share I want to... Compare Side-by-Side

379

DOE/VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization VTP Light-Duty Diesel Engine Commercialization Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) spearheaded the development of clean diesel engine technologies for passenger vehicles in the 1990s, spurring the current reintroduction of highly efficient diesel vehicles into the passenger market. Cummins partnered with VTP to develop a diesel engine that meets the 50-state 2010 emissions standards while boosting vehicle fuel economy by 30% over comparable gasoline-powered vehicles. The Cummins engine is scheduled to debut in 2010 Chrysler sport utility vehicles and pickup trucks. VTP-sponsored research demonstrated the ability of diesel passenger vehicles with advanced aftertreatment to meet EPA's stringent Tier II Bin 5 standards, representing an 83% reduction in NOx and more than 87% reduction in

380

DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel DOE Awarded Patent for Reformulated Diesel Fuel May 19, 2006 - 10:46am Addthis Available free of Licensing Fees, Cleaner for the Environment WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced that it has developed, patented, and made commercially available reformulated diesel fuels which when used can reduce nitrogen oxides up to 10% and particulate matter up to 22% compared to those currently available. The diesel fuel formulations covered under this patent will be commercially available for use without licensing or royalty fees. This reformulated diesel fuel patent resulted from research conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and its subcontractors. "DOE's personnel continue to bring to the forefront technologies and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Argonne TTRDC - Feature - Five Myths About Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Five Myths About Diesel Engines Five Myths About Diesel Engines by Louise Lerner Steve Ciatti Steve Ciatti in the Engine Research Facility Diesel engines, long confined to trucks and ships, are garnering more interest for their fuel efficiency and reduced carbon dioxide emissions relative to gasoline engines. Argonne mechanical engineer Steve Ciatti takes a crack at some of the more persistent myths surrounding the technology. Myth #1: Diesel is dirty. "We all have this image of trucks belching out dirty black smoke," Ciatti said. This smoke is particulate matter from diesel exhaust: soot and small amounts of other chemicals produced by the engine. But EPA emissions requirements have significantly tightened, and diesel engines now have to meet the same criteria as gasoline engines. They do

382

Affordable, Low-Carbon Diesel Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affordable, Low-Carbon Diesel Fuel Affordable, Low-Carbon Diesel Fuel from Domestic Coal and Biomass January 14, 2009 DOE/NETL-2009/1349 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement,

383

Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL/TM-200015 ORNL/TM-200015 MANAGED BY UT-BATTELLE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY A Vector Approach to Regression Analysis and Its Implications to Heavy-Duty Diesel Emissions November 2000 Prepared by H. 1. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrolton, Illinois R. W. Crawford R.W. Crawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee - UT-BATTELLE -. ORNL-27 (4.00) II ORNL/TM-200015 A VECTOR APPROACH TO REGRESSION ANALYSIS AND ITS APPLICATION TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS H. T. McAdams AccaMath Services Carrollton, Illinois R. W. Crawford RWCrawford Energy Systems Tucson, Arizona G. R. Hadder Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee November 2000 Prepared for Office of Energy Effkiency and Renewable Energy

384

Nonthermal aftertreatment of diesel engine exhaust  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ultimate objective of this work has been to develop a nonthermal plasma process to reduce NO{sub x} in diesel exhaust gas. A secondary objective has been to study the possibility of particulate matter (soot) reduction by the same technique. The early work revealed a fundamental difficulty with this NO{sub x} reduction approach in the gas environment of the diesel engine exhaust. These observations necessitated a thorough study of the unfavorable chemistry in the hope that knowledge of the chemical mechanism would offer an opportunity to make the approach useful for NO{sub x} reduction. Whereas fundamental understanding of the mechanism has been obtained, the authors have not found any measure that would make the approach meet its original objective.

Wallman, P.H.; Hsiao, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Penetrante, B.M.; Vogtlin, G.E.

1995-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

385

Review of Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Programs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The DOE Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) and its predecessor organizations have maintained aggressive projects in diesel exhaust aftertreatment since 1993. The Energy Policy Act of 1992, Section 2027, specifically authorized DOE to help accelerate the ability of U. S. diesel engine manufacturers to meet emissions regulations while maintaining the compression ignition engines inherently high efficiency. A variety of concepts and devices have been evaluated for NOx and Particulate matter (PM) control. Additionally, supporting technology in diagnostics for catalysis, PM measurement, and catalyst/reductant systems are being developed. This paper provides a summary of technologies that have been investigated and provides recent results from ongoing DOE-sponsored R and D. NOx control has been explored via active NOx catalysis, several plasma-assisted systems, electrochemical cells, and fuel additives. Both catalytic and non-catalytic filter technologies have been investigated for PM control.

Ronald L. Graves

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

386

Diesel Aerosol Sampling in the Atmosphere  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Minnesota Center for Diesel Research along with a research team including Caterpillar, Cummins, Carnegie Mellon University, West Virginia University (WVU), Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland, and Tampere University in Finland have performed measurements of Diesel exhaust particle size distributions under real-world dilution conditions. A mobile aerosol emission laboratory (MEL) equipped to measure particle size distributions, number concentrations, surface area concentrations, particle bound PAHs, as well as CO 2 and NO x concentrations in real time was built and will be described. The MEL was used to follow two different Cummins powered tractors, one with an older engine (L10) and one with a state-of-the-art engine (ISM), on rural highways and measure particles in their exhaust plumes. This paper will describe the goals and objectives of the study and will describe representative particle size distributions observed in roadway experiments with the truck powered by the ISM engine.

David Kittelson; Jason Johnson; Winthrop Watts; Qiang Wei; Marcus Drayton; Dwane Paulsen; Nicolas Bukowiecki

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

X-Ray Absorption Characterization of Diesel Exhaust Particulates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We have characterized particulates from a 1993 11.1 Detroit Diesel Series 60 engine with electronic unit injectors operated using fuels with and without methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT) and overbased calcium sulfonate added. X-ray photoabsorption (XAS) spectroscopy was used to characterize the diesel particulates. Results reveal a mixture of primarily Mn-phosphate with some Mn-oxide, and Ca-sulfate on the surface of the filtered particulates from the diesel engine.

Nelson, A J; Ferreira, J L; Reynolds, J G; Roos, J W

1999-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Utiization of alternate fuels in diesel engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accomplishments during three years entitled The Utilization of Alternate Fuels in Diesel Engines are summarized. Experiments were designed and test equipment set-up for the purpose of evaluating the use of methanol as a fumigant for light-duty Diesel engine service. The major experimental results were obtained from a multicylinder automotive Diesel engine. However, fundamental studies employing a GC/micro-reactor and a constant volume combustion bomb were also started. The purpose of this work was to measure some of the chemical and physical properties of methanol and methanol-air mixtures. The laminar flame velocity for various mixtures has been measured in the combustion bomb and thermal degradation studies have begun in the GC/micro-reactor. An Oldsmobile 5.7 liter V/8 Diesel engine was fumigated with methanol in amounts up to 40% of the fuel energy. The primary objectives of the study were to determine the effect of methanol fumigation on fuel efficiency, smoke, nitric oxide emission, and the occurrence of severe knock. An assessment of the biological activity for samples of the raw exhaust particulate and its soluble organic extract was also made using boh the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test and the B. subtilis Comptest. Generally, methanol fumigation was found to decrease NO emission for all conditions, to have a slight effect on smoke opacity, and to have a beneficial effect on fuel efficiency at higher loads. Also at higher loads, the methanol was found to induce what was defined as knock limited operation. The biological activity of the raw particulate matter was fond to be less than that of its soluble organic extract. However, for both the fumigation of methanol did enhance the biological activity.

Lestz, S.S.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Microwave-Regenerated Diesel Exhaust Particulate Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of a microwave-regenerated particulate filter system has evolved from bench scale work to actual diesel engine experimentation. The filter system was initially evaluated on a stationary mounted 1.2-L diesel engine and was able to remove a significant amount of carbon particles from the exhaust. The ability of the microwave energy to regenerate or clean the filter was also demonstrated on this engine under idle conditions. Based on the 1.2-L experiments, improvements to the filter design and materials were implemented and the system was re-evaluated on a vehicle equipped with a 7.3-L diesel engine. The 7.3-L engine was selected to achieve heavy filter loading in a relatively short period of time. The purpose of these experiments was to evaluate filter-loading capacity, power requirements for regeneration, and filter regeneration efficiency. A more detailed evaluation of the filter was performed on a stationary mounted 1.9-L diesel engine. The effect of exhaust flow rate, loading, transients, and regeneration on filter efficiency was evaluated with this setup. In addition, gaseous exhaust emissions were investigated with and without an oxidation catalyst on the filter cartridge during loading and regeneration. (SAE Paper SAE-2001-01-0903 © 2001 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.)

Nixdorf, Richard D. (Industrial Ceramic Solution, LLC); Green, Johney Boyd; Story, John M.; Wagner, Robert M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

2001-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

390

Electrical diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration  

SciTech Connect

An exhaust system that processes exhaust generated by an engine includes a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that is disposed downstream of the engine and that filters particulates from the exhaust. An electrical heater is disposed upstream of the DPF and selectively heats the exhaust to initiate combustion of the particulates within the exhaust as it passes therethrough. Heat generated by combustion of the particulates induces combustion of particulates within the DPF.

Gonze, Eugene V; Ament, Frank

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

391

Diesel exhaust filter uses steel wool  

SciTech Connect

Researchers are experimenting with a diesel exhaust filter which can use either steel wool or wire mesh as the filter medium. By using alumina coated metal wool as the filter matrix, submicron-sized particulate emissions may be recovered. The particulate trapping efficiency of this kind of filter depends on the amount of alumina applied to it, and its physical dimensions. Surface area, which is a function of all of these, correlates well with trapping efficiency.

Not Available

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

McAdams, H.T.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Jet-wall interaction effects on diesel combustion and soot formation.  

SciTech Connect

The effects of wall interaction on combustion and soot formation processes of a diesel fuel jet were investigated in an optically-accessible constant-volume combustion vessel at experimental conditions typical of a diesel engine. At identical ambient and injector conditions, soot processes were studied in free jets, plane wall jets, and 'confined' wall jets (a box-shaped geometry simulating secondary interaction with adjacent walls and jets in an engine). The investigation showed that soot levels are significantly lower in a plane wall jet compared to a free jet. At some operating conditions, sooting free jets become soot-free as plane wall jets. Possible mechanisms to explain the reduced or delayed soot formation upon wall interaction include an increased fuel-air mixing rate and a wall-jet-cooling effect. However, in a confined-jet configuration, there is an opposite trend in soot formation. Jet confinement causes combustion gases to be redirected towards the incoming jet, causing the lift-off length to shorten and soot to increase. This effect can be avoided by ending fuel injection prior to the time of significant interaction with redirected combustion gases. For a fixed confined-wall geometry, an increase in ambient gas density delays jet interaction, allowing longer injection durations with no increase in soot. Jet interaction with redirected combustion products may also be avoided using reduced ambient oxygen concentration because of an increased ignition delay. Although simplified geometries were employed, the identification of important mechanisms affecting soot formation after the time of wall interaction is expected to be useful for understanding these processes in more complex and realistic diesel engine geometries.

Pickett, Lyle M.; Lopez, J. Javier (Polytechnic University of Valencia)

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Heating Fuels and Diesel Update - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

395

REQUEST BY DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DETROIT DIESEL CORPORATION FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN RIGHTS IN SUBJECT INVENTIONS MADE IN THE COURSE OF OR UNDER DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CONTRACT NO....

396

EIA: diesel prices - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

397

Carbonyl Emissions from Gasoline and Diesel Motor Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbonyl compounds present in motor vehicle exhaust, rangingfrom gasoline and diesel motor vehicles. Environ. Sci. Tech.composition and toxicity of motor vehicle emission samples.

Jakober, Chris A.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Diesel Fuel Release Date: November 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: December 2, 2013 Reformulated Gasoline. States in each PADD Region. Procedures & Methodology ...

399

Heavy-duty diesel engine oil aging effects on emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel engines are highly reliable, durable and are used for wide range of applications with low fuel usage owing to its higher thermal efficiency compared… (more)

Dam, Mrinmoy.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, ... 2013 | Next Release Date: November 18, 2013 Diesel Fuel Release Date: November 12, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Chinese tallow seed oil as a diesel fuel extender  

SciTech Connect

Chinese tallow and stillingia oil are products obtained from the seed of the unmerchantable, but high yielding Chinese tallow tree. Short-term diesel engine performance tests using mixtures 25%:75% and 50%:50% of Chinese tallow tree seed oil and tallow to diesel fuel gave engine power output, brake thermal efficiencies, and fuel consumption rates within 7% of those obtained using pure diesel fuel. Fuel property values of the extended fuels were found to be within limits proposed for diesel engines. 12 references.

Samson, W.D.; Vidrine, C.G.; Robbins, J.W.D.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

403

California's efforts to clean up diesel engines have helped reduce...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contacts California's efforts to clean up diesel engines have helped reduce impact of climate change on state, study finds CARB black carbon study shows decrease in emissions...

404

Proceedings of the 1998 diesel engine emissions reduction workshop [DEER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop was held July 6--9, 1998 in Castine, Maine. The purpose of this workshop was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on reduction of diesel engine emissions. Attention was focused on the following: agency/organization concerns on engine emissions; diesel engine issues and challenges; health risks from diesel engines emissions; fuels and lubrication technologies; non-thermal plasma and urea after-treatment technologies; and diesel engine technologies for emission reduction 1 and 2.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

405

Diesel DeNOx Catalyst - Energy Innovation Portal  

Because diesel engines are more fuel-efficient than gasoline engines, ... Fossil fuel power plants; Chemical plants; Patents and Patent Applications. ID Number.

406

Price of No. 2 Diesel Fuel Through Retail Outlets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

(Dollars per Gallon Excluding Taxes) Data ... total No. 2 diesel fuel has been eliminated to help ensure that sensitive data reported to EIA by ...

407

Status of Wind-Diesel Applications in Arctic Climates: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rising cost of diesel fuel and the environmental regulation for its transportation, use, and storage, combined with the clear impacts of increased arctic temperatures, is driving remote communities to examine alternative methods of providing power. Over the past few years, wind energy has been increasingly used to reduce diesel fuel consumption, providing economic, environmental, and security benefits to the energy supply of communities from Alaska to Antarctica. This summary paper describes the current state of wind-diesel systems, reviews the operation of wind-diesel plants in cold climates, discusses current research activities pertaining to these systems, and addresses their technical and commercial challenges. System architectures, dispatch strategies, and operating experience from a variety of wind-diesel systems in Alaska will be reviewed. Specific focus will also be given to the control of power systems with large amounts of wind generation and the complexities of replacing diesel engine waste heat with excess wind energy, a key factor in assessing power plants for retrofit. A brief overview of steps for assessing the viability of retrofitting diesel power systems with wind technologies will also be provided. Because of the large number of isolated diesel minigrids, the market for adding wind to these systems is substantial, specifically in arctic climates and on islands that rely on diesel-only power generation.

Baring-Gould, I.; Corbus, D.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Vehicle Technologies Office: 2003 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: Fuels and Lubrication, Part 2 Emissions from Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine with Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) using Oil Sands Derived Fuels Stuart Neill National Research...

409

Diesel Reforming for Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This objective of this project was to develop technology suitable for onboard reforming of diesel. The approach was to examine catalytic partial oxidation and steam reforming.

Borup, R.; Parkinson, W. J.; Inbody, M.; Brosha, E.L.; Guidry, D.R.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Investigation of Bio-Diesel Fueled Engines under Low-Temperature Combustion Strategies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In accordance with meeting DOE technical targets this research was aimed at developing and optimizing new fuel injection technologies and strategies for the combustion of clean burning renewable fuels in diesel engines. In addition a simultaneous minimum 20% improvement in fuel economy was targeted with the aid of this novel advanced combustion system. Biodiesel and other renewable fuels have unique properties that can be leveraged to reduce emissions and increase engine efficiency. This research is an investigation into the combustion characteristics of biodiesel and its impacts on the performance of a Low Temperature Combustion (LTC) engine, which is a novel engine configuration that incorporates technologies and strategies for simultaneously reducing NOx and particulate emissions while increasing engine efficiency. Generating fundamental knowledge about the properties of biodiesel and blends with petroleum-derived diesel and their impact on in-cylinder fuel atomization and combustion processes was an important initial step to being able to optimize fuel injection strategies as well as introduce new technologies. With the benefit of this knowledge experiments were performed on both optical and metal LTC engines in which combustion and emissions could be observed and measured under realistic conditions. With the aid these experiments and detailed combustion models strategies were identified and applied in order to improve fuel economy and simultaneously reduce emissions.

Chia-fon F. Lee; Alan C. Hansen

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

How many gallons of diesel fuel does one barrel of oil ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels ... How many gallons of diesel fuel does one ... and consumed in the ...

412

EA-1183: Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

83: Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska EA-1183: Coal-fired Diesel Generator University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska SUMMARY This EA evaluates the...

413

What are projected diesel fuel prices for 2013 and for 2014? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, ... Why don't fuel prices change as quickly as crude oil prices? Why has diesel fuel been more expensive than gasoline?

414

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Can U.S. Supply Accommodate Shifts to Diesel-Fueled Light-Duty Vehicles? ... the automobile manufacturers probably face the largest diesel-vehicle challenges in the ...

415

TransForum v3n2 - Ethanol Additive for Diesel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETHANOL FUEL ADDITIVE MAY HELP SOLVE THE DIESEL EMISSIONS PUZZLE The quest to reduce atmospheric emissions associated with diesel-fueled vehicles has faced a longstanding...

416

Investigation Of The Ion Current Signal In Gen-Set Turbocharged Diesel Engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Diesel powered generator sets have traditionally been and remain the number-one choice for standby and emergency power systems. As an established engine technology, diesel engines… (more)

Badawy, Tamer Hassan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Retail prices: diesel outpaces gasoline - Today in Energy - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Since mid-2009 the price of retail diesel has been consistently higher than the price of retail regular grade gasoline. Strong diesel demand in emerging economies and ...

418

2011 Brief: U.S. average gasoline and diesel prices over $3 per ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel ... record U.S. diesel exports and higher diesel fuel demand from truckers transporting more finished goods and raw materials as the ...

419

Investigation of diesel soot mediated oils and additive package on wear.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Contamination of lubricating oil by diesel soot is one of the major causes of increased engine wear. The diesel soot interacts with the engine oil… (more)

Balla, Santhosh Kumar.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

How do I calculate diesel fuel surcharges? - FAQ - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How do I calculate diesel fuel surcharges? The U.S. Energy Information Administration does not calculate, assess, or regulate diesel fuel surcharges.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Application of Gaseous Sphere Injection Method for Modeling Under-expanded H2 Injection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A methodology for modeling gaseous injection has been refined and applied to recent experimental data from the literature. This approach uses a discrete phase analogy to handle gaseous injection, allowing for addition of gaseous injection to a CFD grid without needing to resolve the injector nozzle. This paper focuses on model testing to provide the basis for simulation of hydrogen direct injected internal combustion engines. The model has been updated to be more applicable to full engine simulations, and shows good agreement with experiments for jet penetration and time-dependent axial mass fraction, while available radial mass fraction data is less well predicted.

Whitesides, R; Hessel, R P; Flowers, D L; Aceves, S M

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

422

System modeling, analysis, and optimization methodology for diesel exhaust after-treatment technologies; Diesel exhaust after-treatment technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Developing new aftertreatment technologies to meet emission regulations for diesel engines is a growing problem for many automotive companies and suppliers. Balancing manufacturing cost, meeting… (more)

Graff, Christopher Dominic

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gasoline Sampling Methodology Gasoline Sampling Methodology The sample for the Motor Gasoline Price Survey was drawn from a frame of approximately 115,000 retail gasoline outlets. The gasoline outlet frame was constructed by combining information purchased from a private commercial source with information contained on existing EIA petroleum product frames and surveys. Outlet names, and zip codes were obtained from the private commercial data source. Additional information was obtained directly from companies selling retail gasoline to supplement information on the frame. The individual frame outlets were mapped to counties using their zip codes. The outlets were then assigned to the published geographic areas as defined by the EPA program area, or for conventional gasoline areas, as defined by the Census Bureau's Standard Metropolitan

424

Geysers injection modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our research is concerned with mathematical modeling techniques for engineering design and optimization of water injection in vapor-dominated systems. The emphasis in the project has been on the understanding of physical processes and mechanisms during injection, applications to field problems, and on transfer of numerical simulation capabilities to the geothermal community. This overview summarizes recent work on modeling injection interference in the Southeast Geysers, and on improving the description of two-phase flow processes in heterogeneous media.

Pruess, K.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

An indirect sensing technique for diesel fuel quantity control. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work has proceeded intensely with the objective of completing the commercial prototype system prior to the end of the contract period. At the time of this report, testing and refinement of the commercial version of the system has not been completed. During this reporting period, several major milestones were reached and many significant lessons were learned. These are described. The experimental retrofit system has achieved all performance objectives in engine dynamometer tests. The prototype commercial version of the system will begin demonstration service on the first of several Santa Maria Area Transit (SMAT) transit buses on February 1, 1999. The commercial system has been redesignated the Electronic Diesel Smoke Reduction System (EDSRS) replacing the original internal pseudonym ADSC. The focus has been narrowed to a retrofit product suitable for installation on existing mechanically-governed diesel engines. Included in this potential market are almost all diesel-powered passenger cars and light trucks manufactured prior to the introduction of the most recent clean diesel engines equipped with particulate traps and electronic controls. Also included are heavy-duty trucks, transit vehicles, school buses, and agricultural equipment. This system is intended to prevent existing diesel engines from overfueling to the point of visible particulate emissions (smoke), while allowing maximum smoke-limited torque under all operating conditions. The system employs a microcontroller and a specialized exhaust particulate emission sensor to regulate the maximum allowable fuel quantity via an adaptive throttle-limit map. This map specifies a maximum allowable throttle position as a function of engine speed, turbocharger boost pressure and engine coolant temperature. The throttle position limit is mechanized via a servo actuator inserted in the throttle cable leading to the injection pump.

MacCarley, C.A.

1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

426

Underground Injection Control (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Injection and Mining Division (IMD) has the responsibility of implementing two major federal environmental programs which were statutorily charged to the Office of Conservation: the Underground...

427

Regulated and Unregulated Exhaust Emissions Comparison for Three Tier II Non-Road Diesel Engines Operating on Ethanol-Diesel Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Regulated and unregulated emissions (individual hydrocarbons, ethanol, aldehydes and ketones, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), nitro-PAH, and soluble organic fraction of particulate matter) were characterized in engines utilizing duplicate ISO 8178-C1 eight-mode tests and FTP smoke tests. Certification No. 2 diesel (400 ppm sulfur) and three ethanol/diesel blends, containing 7.7 percent, 10 percent, and 15 percent ethanol, respectively, were used. The three, Tier II, off-road engines were 6.8-L, 8.1-L, and 12.5-L in displacement and each had differing fuel injection system designs. It was found that smoke and particulate matter emissions decreased with increasing ethanol content. Changes to the emissions of carbon monoxide and oxides of nitrogen varied with engine design, with some increases and some decreases. As expected, increasing ethanol concentration led to higher emissions of acetaldehyde (increases ranging from 27 to 139 percent). Benzene emissions were reduced by up to 50 percent with the ethanol-blended fuels. Emissions of 1,3-butadiene were also substantially decreased, with reductions ranging from 24 to 82 percent. Isolated trends were noted for certain PAHs. There was a decrease in 1-nitropyrene with use of ethanol in all cases. Particulate phase 1-nitropyrene was reduced from 18 to 62 percent. There was also a general increase in the proportion of heavy PAHs in the particulate phase with ethanol use, and although less pronounced, a general decrease in light PAHs in the particulate phase.

Merritt, P. M.; Ulmet, V.; McCormick, R. L.; Mitchell, W. E.; Baumgard, K. J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

429

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Miniaturized flow injection analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis is described, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38{times}25{times}3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction. 9 figs.

Folta, J.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Yong Shang; Fu-shui Liu; Xiang-rong Li

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Comparative Analysis on the Effects of Diesel Particulate Filter and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with no aftertreatment devices to establish a baseline measurement and also on the same engine equipped first with a DPF and secondary emissions significantly. Introduction Advances in diesel engine and aftertreatment technologies, samples were first collected from a heavy-duty diesel engine with no aftertreatment system to establish

Wu, Mingshen

433

Diesel prices increase for first time in six weeks  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Diesel prices increase for first time in six weeks The U.S. average retail price for on-highway diesel fuel rose to 3.83 a gallon on Monday. That's up 1.1 cents from a week ago,...

434

Numerical Simulation on Forced Swirl Combustion Chamber in Diesel Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concept of forced swirl combustion chamber in diesel engine is proposed in this paper. It can be used to enhance the intensity of swirl flow in the cylinder and accelerate the rate of air-fuel mixture process by designing the special structure in the ... Keywords: diesel engine, forced swirl, combustion chamber, simulation

Shang Yong; Liu Fu-shui; Li Xiang-rong

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Biodiesel: The clean, green fuel for diesel engines (fact sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Natural, renewable resources such as vegetable oils and recycled restaurant greases can be chemically transformed into clean-burning biodiesel fuels. As its name implies, biodiesel is like diesel fuel except that it's organically produced. It's also safe for the environment, biodegradable, and produces significantly less air pollution than diesel fuel.

Tyson, K.S.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

436

Research Approach for Aging and Evaluating Diesel Exhaust catalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emissions control devices that could lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOX) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks and buses in the 2002-2004 model years. West Virginia University is evaluating: - Diesel Oxidation Catalysts - Lean NOX Catalysts

Wayne, Scott

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

437

Trimode Power Converter optimizes PV, diesel and battery energy sources  

SciTech Connect

Conservatively, there are 100,000 localities in the world waiting for the benefits that electricity can provide, and many of these are in climates where sunshine is plentiful. With these locations in mind a prototype 30 kW hybrid system has been assembled at Sandia to prove the reliability and economics of photovoltaic, diesel and battery energy sources managed by an autonomous power converter. In the Trimode Power Converter the same power parts, four IGBT`s with an isolation transformer and filter components, serve as rectifier and charger to charge the battery from the diesel; as a stand-alone inverter to convert PV and battery energy to AC; and, as a parallel inverter with the diesel-generator to accommodate loads larger than the rating of the diesel. Whenever the diesel is supplying the load, an algorithm assures that the diesel is running at maximum efficiency by regulating the battery charger operating point. Given the profile of anticipated solar energy, the cost of transporting diesel fuel to a remote location and a five year projection of load demand, a method to size the PV array, battery and diesel for least cost is developed.

O`Sullivan, G. [Abacus Controls, Inc., Somerville, NJ (United States); Bonn, R.; Bower, W. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Computer simulation of wind/diesel system operation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports on a computer code, SOLSTOR W/D, that determines --- for a site's wind energy resources, load requirements, and economic constraints --- the components and sizes for a wind/diesel system that result in the lowest cost of energy. Wind diesel systems are defined here as electricity generation stations in the 50-kW to 1-MW range that (1) are not connected to another electricity network, (2) use wind energy as the first source of supply to meet demand, and (3) contain sufficient energy storage and/or backup diesel electric generators to compensate for lapses in wind energy. The computer code also determines, for the same input load, the requirements and economics that are the best number and size for an isolated diesel(s) system so that comparisons for wind/diesel systems and diesel-only systems can be made. SOLSTOR W/D provides a systematic method to show whether wind-diesel systems can be an attractive means of saving fossil fuel without significantly affecting electricity quality or production cost. 12 refs., 66 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Innovative coal-fueled diesel engine injector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this research investigation was to develop an electronic coal water slurry injection system in conjunction with the Thermal Ignition Combustion System (TICS) concept to achieve autoignition of CWS at various engine load and speed conditions without external ignition sources. The combination of the new injection system and the TICS is designed to reduce injector nozzle spray orifice wear by lowering the peak injection pressure requirements. (VC)

Badgley, P.; Doup, D.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Argonne TTRDC - Feature - Combining Gas and Diesel Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combining Gas and Diesel Engines Could Yield the Best of Both Worlds Combining Gas and Diesel Engines Could Yield the Best of Both Worlds by Louise Lerner Steve Ciatti Steve Ciatti in the Engine Research Facility It may be hard to believe, but the beloved gasoline engine that powers more than 200 million cars across America every day didn't get its status because it's the most efficient engine. Diesel engines can be more than twice as efficient, but they spew soot and pollutants into the air. Could researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratory engineer a union between the two-combining the best of both? Steve Ciatti, a mechanical engineer at Argonne, is heading a team to explore the possibilities of a gasoline-diesel engine. The result, so far, is cleaner than a diesel engine and almost twice as efficient as a typical

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct injection diesel" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Energy Secretary Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks, Buses Energy Secretary Bodman Showcases Advanced Clean Diesel and Hybrid Trucks, Buses May 10, 2005 - 12:45pm Addthis Says Energy Bill Essential to Develop Clean Diesel Technology WASHINGTON, D.C. - Highlighting the promise of alternative fuel trucks and buses, Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman today opened an exhibition of energy-efficient, clean diesel and advanced hybrid commercial vehicles at a press conference in Washington, D.C. Secretary Bodman also underscored the need to pass an energy bill that encourages the use of renewable fuels and new technologies to provide the United States with greater energy independence. "Industry and government are working hand-in-hand to develop technologies

442

Diesel fuels from shale oil. [Review of selected research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High-boiling shale oil produced from Rocky Mountain oil shale can be reduced in molecular weight by recycle thermal cracking and by coking. Selected research on the production of diesel fuels from shale oil is reviewed. Diesel fuels of good quality have been made from cracked shale oil by acid and caustic treating. Diesel oil made by this process performed acceptably in an in-service test for powering a railroad engine in a 750-hour test. Better quality diesel fuels were made by hydrogenation of a coker distillate. Even better quality diesel fuels, suitable also for use as high-quality distillate burner fuels, have been made by hydrocracking of a crude shale oil from underground in-situ retorting experiments.

Cottingham, P.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Assessing economic impacts of clean diesel engines. Phase 1 report: U.S.- or foreign-produced clean diesel engines for selected light trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Light trucks' share of the US light vehicle market rose from 20% in 1980 to 41% in 1996. By 1996, annual energy consumption for light trucks was 6.0 x 10{sup 15} Btu (quadrillion Btu, or quad), compared with 7.9 quad for cars. Gasoline engines, used in almost 99% of light trucks, do not meet the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards. These engines have poor fuel economy, many getting only 10--12 miles per gallon. Diesel engines, despite their much better fuel economy, had not been preferred by US light truck manufacturers because of problems with high NO{sub x} and particulate emissions. The US Department of Energy, Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies, has funded research projects at several leading engine makers to develop a new low-emission, high-efficiency advanced diesel engine, first for large trucks, then for light trucks. Recent advances in diesel engine technology may overcome the NO{sub x} and particulate problems. Two plausible alternative clean diesel (CD) engine market penetration trajectories were developed, representing an optimistic case (High Case) and an industry response to meet the CAFE standards (CAFE Case). However, leadership in the technology to produce a successful small, advanced diesel engine for light trucks is an open issue between U.S. and foreign companies and could have major industry and national implications. Direct and indirect economic effects of the following CD scenarios were estimated by using the Standard and Poor's Data Resources, Inc., US economy model: High Case with US Dominance, High Case with Foreign Dominance, CAFE Case with US Dominance, and CAFE Case with Foreign Dominance. The model results demonstrate that the economic activity under each of the four CD scenarios is higher than in the Base Case (business as usual). The economic activity is highest for the High Case with US dominance, resulting in maximum gains in such key indicators as gross domestic product, total civilian employment, and federal government surplus. Specifically, the cumulative real gross domestic product surplus over the Base Case during the 2000--2022 period is about $56 x 10{sup 9} (constant 1992 dollars) under this high US dominance case. In contrast, the real gross domestic product gains under the high foreign dominance case would be only about half of the above gains with US dominance.

Teotia, A.P.; Vyas, A.D.; Cuenca, R.M.; Stodolsky, F.

1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

444

Demonstrating Ultra-Low Diesel Vehicle Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Evaluate performance of near-term exhaust emissions control technologies on a modern diesel vehicle over transient drive cycles; Phase 1: Independent (separate) evaluations of engine-out, OEM catalysts, CDPF, and NOx adsorber (Completed March 2000); Phase 2: Combine NOx adsorber and CDPF to evaluate/demonstrate simultaneous reduction of NOx and PM (Underway--interim results available); Establish potential for these technologies to help CIDI engines meet emission reduction targets; and Investigate short-term effects of fuel sulfur on emissions performance

McGill, R.N.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

445

Vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paths of vibrational energy transfer in a diesel engine were investigated in order to obtain insight into ways of reducing this transfer to the exterior surfaces and thereby reduce the radiated noise. The engine was tested in a nonrunning condition with simulated internal forces in order to study the different transfer paths separately. Vibration response measurements were made of individual engine components and lumped?parameter models were developed to simulate this response. These models were then used to determine component design changes that would reduce the energy transfer. Two design changes were implemented in the engine and a reduction of the energy transfer was achieved as predicted.

R. G. DeJong; R. H. Lyon

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd EditionChapter 3 The Basics of Diesel Engines and Diesel Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Biodiesel Handbook, 2nd Edition Chapter 3 The Basics of Diesel Engines and Diesel Fuels Biofuels and Bioproducts and Biodiesel Biofuels - Bioproducts eChapters AOCS 14987AFD8C4C7FBFCBA3FD4D98DB9DC5 Press   ...

447

Emissions of Transport Refrigeration Units with CARB Diesel, Gas-to-Liquid Diesel, and Emissions Control Devices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel in situ method was used to measure emissions and fuel consumption of transport refrigeration units (TRUs). The test matrix included two fuels, two exhaust configurations, and two TRU engine operating speeds. Test fuels were California ultra low sulfur diesel and gas-to-liquid (GTL) diesel. Exhaust configurations were a stock muffler and a Thermo King pDPF diesel particulate filter. The TRU engine operating speeds were high and low, controlled by the TRU user interface. Results indicate that GTL diesel fuel reduces all regulated emissions at high and low engine speeds. Application of a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions, sometimes almost entirely. The application of both GTL diesel and a Thermo King pDPF reduced regulated emissions at high engine speed, but showed an increase in oxides of nitrogen at low engine speed.

Barnitt, R. A.; Chernich, D.; Burnitzki, M.; Oshinuga, A.; Miyasato, M.; Lucht, E.; van der Merwe, D.; Schaberg, P.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Data Report No. 4: Diesel Particulate Filters -- Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This is the fourth and final report for the DPF test program and covers the effect of diesel sulfur level on: a catalyzed diesel particulate filter (CDPF), and a continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CR-DPF).

DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

The Detroit Diesel DELTA Engine for Light Trucks and SUVs - Year 2000 Update  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) is developing the DELTA 4.0L V6 engine, specifically for the North American light truck market. This market poses unique requirements for a diesel engine, necessitating a clean sheet engine design. DELTA was developed from a clean sheet of paper, with the first engine firing just 228 days later. The process began with a Quality Function Deployment (QFD) analysis, which prioritized the development criteria. The development process integrated a co-located, fully cross-functional team. Suppliers were fully integrated and maintained on-site representation. The first demonstration vehicle moved under its own power 12 weeks after the first engine fired. It was demonstrated to the automotive press 18 days later. DELTA has repeatedly demonstrated its ability to disprove historical North American diesel perceptions and compete directly with gasoline engines. This paper outlines the Generation 0.0 development process and briefly defines the engine. A brief indication of the Generation 0.5 development status is given.

Nabil S. Hakim; Charles E. Freese; Stanley P. Miller

2000-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, Larry W. (Oswego, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fuel injection device and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel injection system and method provide for shaping a combustion plume within a combustion chamber to effectively recirculate hot combustion gases for stable combustion conditions while providing symmetrical combustion conditions. Char and molten slag are passed to the outer boundary layer to complete combustion of char while permitting initial substoichiometric combustion in a reductive atmosphere for reducing discharge of nitrogen oxides. Shaping of the plume is accomplished by an axially adjustable pintle which permits apportionment of driving pressure between elements which contribute tangential and those which contribute radial directional components to oxidant flow entering the combustion chamber.

Carlson, L.W.

1983-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

452

Yet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

expensive fault injection tech- niques, like clock or voltage glitches, are well taken into accountYet Another Fault Injection Technique : by Forward Body Biasing Injection K. TOBICH1,2, P. MAURINE1 Injection, Electromag- netic Attacks, RSA, Chinese Remainder Theorem 1 Introduction Fault injection

453

Getting the Word Out: Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Locator, Mapping Tools, and Outreach Activities (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation covers diesel exhaust fluid resources on the Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center.

Brodt-Giles, Debbie

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Infrared optical properties of diesel smoke plumes  

SciTech Connect

Far IR optical properties have been measured for smoke from diesel fires. Concentrations of both gaseous and particulate combustion products have been measured and chemical species contributing to the optical effects identified. To obtain these results, a variety of sampling instruments were lofted into large plumes on a mobile and open structure. The smoke plumes of diesel fires have been found to consist largely of carbonaceous material (in fibrous form) and heavy liquid hydrocarbons infused with the expected gaseous products of the combustion process. Strong attenuation at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m is found to be due largely to the carbonaceous aerosol. The absorption coefficient is typically {similar to}500 km{sup {minus}1} at 10 m from the source with a variable but often comparable total scattering coefficient. The extinction coefficient, normalized to the mass density of the aerosol in a unit volume of space, is found to be 1.2 m{sup 2}-g{sup {minus}1} with an estimated variance of 20%. Fluctuational spectra of the attenuation follow a form similar to turbulence spectra.

Bruce, C.W.; Crow, S.B.; Yee, Y.P.; Hinds, B.D. (U.S. Army Atmospheric Sciences Laboratory, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico 88002 (US)); Marlin, D. (New Mexico State University, Physical Science Department, University Park, New Mexico 88003); Jelinek, A. (Optimetrics, Inc., 106 E. Idaho, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88001)

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Low heat rejection diesel ceramic coupon tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are reported from studies in which several monolithic ceramic materials in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars were exposed for 100 h to the combustion conditions found in either a small single- or two-cylinder diesel engine. Fuels included a standard Phillips D-2 diesel or synthetic mixture of the Phillips D-2 and an aromatic blend. The ceramics included two commercial grades of partially stabilized zirconia: (1) PSZ-TS and (2) PSZ-MS and silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000 and Norton NT-154). Significant reductions in postexposure four-point bend fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-TS material irrespective of whether it was exposed in the single- or two-cylinder engine. Only a small decrease in fracture strength occurred in the PSZ-MS material, and essentially no decrease in fracture strength occurred in the silicon nitride (GTE WESGO SNW-1000) when tested at room temperature. The Norton NT-154 silicon nitride was tested at both room temperature and at 700{degree}C over several strain rates ranging from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} to 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}7}S{sup {minus}1}. Room temperature tests showed that the engine exposed bars actually showed a slight increase in average strength, 830 MPa, versus 771 MPa for the unexposed material. 6 figs., 1 tab.

Brinkman, C.R.; Liu, K.C.; Graves, R.L.; West, B.H.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

,"U.S. On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices" On-Highway Diesel Fuel Prices" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","W Diesel Prices - All Types",11,"Weekly","12/16/2013","3/21/1994" ,"Data 2","M Diesel Prices - All Types",11,"Monthly","11/2013","3/15/1994" ,"Data 3","W Diesel Prices-Low ",1,"Weekly","12/1/2008","2/5/2007" ,"Data 4","M Diesel Prices-Low ",1,"Monthly","12/2008","2/15/2007" ,"Data 5","W Diesel Prices-Ultra-Low",11,"Weekly","12/16/2013","2/5/2007"

457

THE RHIC INJECTION SYSTEM.  

SciTech Connect

The RHIC injection system has to transport beam from the AGS-to-RHIC transfer line onto the closed orbits of the RHIC Blue and Yellow rings. This task can be divided into three problems. First, the beam has to be injected into either ring. Second, once injected the beam needs to be transported around the ring for one turn. Third, the orbit must be closed and coherent beam oscillations around the closed orbit should be minimized. We describe our solutions for these problems and report on system tests conducted during the RHIC Sextant test performed in 1997. The system will be fully commissioned in 1999.

FISCHER,W.; GLENN,J.W.; MACKAY,W.W.; PTITSIN,V.; ROBINSON,T.G.; TSOUPAS,N.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

458

West Virginia Diesel Study, CRADA MC96-034, Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The global objective of the recently completed Phase 1 of the West Virginia Diesel Study, at West Virginia University, was to evaluate mass emission rates of exhaust emissions from diesel powered equipment specified by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission. The experimental data generated in this study has been utilized by the West Virginia Diesel Equipment Commission to promulgate initial rules, requirements and standards governing the operation of diesel equipment in underground coal mines.

M. Gautam

1998-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

459

HEALTH EFFECTS OF DIESEL EXHAUST: AN HEI PERSPECTIVE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Diesel engines have many advantages, including good fuel economy, power, durability, lower emissions of some pollutants (such as carbon monoxide) and of carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas). However, there are a number of concerns that need to be addressed: (1) emissions of nitrogen oxides (which contribute to ozone formation) and of particulate matter (PM); (2) questions about cancer and other health effects from exposure to diesel PM; and (3) as efforts to decrease emissions progress, a need to understand whether the nature and toxicity of the PM emitted has changed. This paper focuses on (1) carcinogenicity data, (2) noncancer effects, and (3) diesel as part of the complex ambient mixture of PM.

Warren, Jane

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Light-duty diesel engine development status and engine needs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report reviews, assesses, and summarizes the research and development status of diesel engine technology applicable to light-duty vehicles. In addition, it identifies specific basic and applied research and development needs in light-duty diesel technology and related health areas where initial or increased participation by the US Government would be desirable. The material presented in this report updates information provided in the first diesel engine status report prepared by the Aerospace Corporation for the Department of Energy in September, 1978.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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