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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel...

2

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

07 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems...

3

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the...

4

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...

5

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation reports on the status of mass production cost estimation for direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell systems.

6

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update This report is the fourth annual update of a comprehensive...

7

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Application: 2009 Update Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update This report is the third annual update of a...

8

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - I: DUPIC Fuel Fabrication Cost  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary conceptual design of a Direct Use of spent Pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel In Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactors (DUPIC) fuel fabrication plant was studied, which annually converts spent PWR fuel of 400 tonnes heavy element (HE) into CANDU fuel. The capital and operating costs were estimated from the viewpoint of conceptual design. Assuming that the annual discount rate is 5% during the construction (5 yr) and operation period (40 yr) and contingency is 25% of the capital cost, the levelized unit cost (LUC) of DUPIC fuel fabrication was estimated to be 616 $/kg HE, which is mostly governed by annual operation and maintenance costs that correspond to 63% of LUC. Among the operation and maintenance cost components being considered, the waste disposal cost has the dominant effect on LUC ({approx}49%). From sensitivity analyses of production capacity, discount rate, and contingency, it was found that the production capacity of the plant is the major parameter that affects the LUC.

Choi, Hangbok; Ko, Won Il; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update March 26, 2009 v.30.2021.052209 Prepared by: Brian D. James & Jeffrey A. Kalinoski One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared for: Contract No. GS-10F-0099J to the U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than

10

Direct costing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oau 5e reduced. Under the same oonOitions, even ~Me on a bread scale entails not mere1y the conduct of the direct oyeraticns cf yrccessing the materials into finished products, but also the performance of auxiliary functions. these may 'ba power y... purposes have been advanced as folkway le Most of a o03RyaxO' 8 products Grc usual13r sold at prices which oovex' full product costs y plus 861ling a%el administrative expenses, plus normal profit. The inventoi~ valuate. on should be consistent...

Browning, Donald Bullock

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

11

Direct Hydrogen PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Estimation for Automotive Applications: Fuel Cell Tech Team Review  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation reports on direct hydrogen PEMFC manufacturing cost estimation for automotive applications.

12

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application: 2009 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the third annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Directed Technologies (DTI), under contract to the US Department of Energy (DOE).

13

LMFBR fuel component costs  

SciTech Connect

A significant portion of the cost of fabricating LMFBR fuels is in the non-fuel components such as fuel pin cladding, fuel assembly ducts and end fittings. The contribution of these to fuel fabrication costs, based on FFTF experience and extrapolated to large LMFBR fuel loadings, is discussed. The extrapolation considers the expected effects of LMFBR development programs in progress on non-fuel component costs.

Epperson, E.M.; Borisch, R.R.; Rice, L.H.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - III: Spent DUPIC Fuel Disposal Cost  

SciTech Connect

The disposal costs of spent pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and DUPIC fuels have been estimated based on available literature data and the engineering design of a spent CANDU fuel disposal facility by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The cost estimation was carried out by the normalization concept of total electricity generation. Therefore, the future electricity generation scale was analyzed to evaluate the appropriate capacity of the high-level waste disposal facility in Korea, which is a key parameter of the disposal cost estimation. Based on the total electricity generation scale, it is concluded that the disposal unit costs for spent CANDU natural uranium, CANDU-DUPIC, and PWR fuels are 192.3, 388.5, and 696.5 $/kg heavy element, respectively.

Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Roh, Gyuhong; Yang, Myung Seung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

2001-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the sixth annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. This 2012 update will cover current status technology updates since the 2011 report, as well as introduce a 2012 bus system analysis considered alongside the automotive system.

16

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

17

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2008 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2006, 2010, and 2015, and is the second annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

18

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2007 Update  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This report estimates fuel cell system cost for systems produced in the years 2007, 2010, and 2015, and is the first annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis.

19

Direct/Indirect Costs  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

This chapter provides recommended categories for direct and indirect elements developed by the Committee for Cost Methods Development (CCMD) and describes various estimating techniques for direct and indirect costs.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

20

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H 2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Applications: 2010 Update September 30, 2010 Prepared by: Brian D. James, Jeffrey A. Kalinoski & Kevin N. Baum One Virginia Square 3601 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 650 Arlington, Virginia 22201 703-243-3383 Prepared under: Subcontract No. AGB-0-40628-01 to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 to the U.S. Department of Energy Foreword Energy security is fundamental to the mission of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles have the potential to eliminate the need for oil in the transportation sector. Fuel cell vehicles can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gasses and pollutants than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel CellCost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation - Compressed Hydrogen and PEM

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2013 Update  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report is the seventh annual update of a comprehensive automotive fuel cell cost analysis conducted by Strategic Analysis under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy. The 2013 update covers fuel cell cost analysis of both light duty vehicle (automotive) and transit bus applications for only the current year (i.e., 2013).

23

mMass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of energy sources can be used to produce hydrogen, including nuclear, coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, solar, and biomass. Thus, fuel cell vehicles offer an...

24

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of energy sources can be used to produce hydrogen, including nuclear, coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, solar, and biomass. Thus, fuel cell vehicles offer an...

25

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

portfolio of energy sources can be used to produce it, including nuclear, coal, natural gas, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, solar, and biomass. Thus fuel cell vehicles offer an...

26

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automotive Application  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

presentation presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information page 1 Overview * Base Period: - 100% complete * Manufacturing costs * Materials costs (particularly precious Timeline Barriers - Feb 17, 2006 to Feb. 16, 2008 * Option year 1 of 3: - 65% complete - Started Feb 16, 2008 metal catalysts) Characteristic Units 2008 2010 2015 Stack Cost $/kW e (net) - $25 $15 - $325K (2 year base period) - $182k (opt. yr. 1) - Contractor share: $0 * Funding for FY 2008 * Extensive interaction with Collaborations System Cost $/kW e (net) - $45 $30 * Funding for FY 2008 - $182k industry/researchers to solicit design & manufacturing metrics as input to cost analysis. page 2 Started Feb 16, 2008 Budget * Total project funding DOE Cost Targets

27

The train fueling cost minimization problem with fuzzy fuel prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The train fueling cost minimization problem is to find a scheduling and fueling strategy such that the fueling cost is minimized and no train runs out of fuel. Since fuel prices vary by location and time from mon...

Xiang Li; Chen-Fu Chien; Lixing Yang

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Low-cost, High-yield Process for the Direct Productin of High Energy Density Liquid Fuel from Biomass  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective and outcome of this project was the development and validation of a novel, low-cost, high-pressure fast-hydropyrolysis/hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) process (H{sub 2}Bioil) using supplementary hydrogen (H{sub 2}) to produce liquid hydrocarbons from biomass. The research efforts under the various tasks of the project have culminated in the first experimental demonstration of the H2Bioil process, producing 100% deoxygenated >C4+ hydrocarbons containing 36-40% of the carbon in the feed of pyrolysis products from biomass. The demonstrated H{sub 2}Bioil process technology (i.e. reactor, catalyst, and downstream product recovery) is scalable to a commercial level and is estimated to be economically competitive for the cases when supplementary H{sub 2} is sourced from coal, natural gas, or nuclear. Additionally, energy systems modeling has revealed several process integration options based on the H{sub 2}Bioil process for energy and carbon efficient liquid fuel production. All project tasks and milestones were completed or exceeded. Novel, commercially-scalable, high-pressure reactors for both fast-hydropyrolysis and hydrodeoxygenation were constructed, completing Task A. These reactors were capable of operation under a wide-range of conditions; enabling process studies that lead to identification of optimum process conditions. Model compounds representing biomass pyrolysis products were studied, completing Task B. These studies were critical in identifying and developing HDO catalysts to target specific oxygen functional groups. These process and model compound catalyst studies enabled identification of catalysts that achieved 100% deoxygenation of the real biomass feedstock, sorghum, to form hydrocarbons in high yields as part of Task C. The work completed during this grant has identified and validated the novel and commercially scalable H2Bioil process for production of hydrocarbon fuels from biomass. Studies on model compounds as well as real biomass feedstocks were utilized to identify optimized process conditions and selective HDO catalyst for high yield production of hydrocarbons from biomass. In addition to these experimental efforts, in Tasks D and E, we have developed a mathematical optimization framework to identify carbon and energy efficient biomass-to-liquid fuel process designs that integrate the use of different primary energy sources along with biomass (e.g. solar, coal or natural gas) for liquid fuel production. Using this tool, we have identified augmented biomass-to-liquid fuel configurations based on the fast-hydropyrolysis/HDO pathway, which was experimentally studied in this project. The computational approach used for screening alternative process configurations represents a unique contribution to the field of biomass processing for liquid fuel production.

Agrawal, Rakesh

2014-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

29

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

(DBA) Substrates Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

30

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Aluminum (DBA) Substrates Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

31

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reynolds Logistics Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs on AddThis.com... July 23, 2011 Reynolds Logistics Reduces Fuel Costs With EVs F ind out how Reynolds Logistics uses electric vehicles to offset petroleum

32

FOSSIL-FUEL COSTS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

FOSSIL-FUEL-BASED energy production, mostly from coal and oil, causes $120 billion worth of health and other non-climate-related damages in the U.S. each year that are not figured into the price of energy, says a National Research Council report ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 10 kW and 25 kW Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Material Handling Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report provides cost estimates for the manufacture of 10 kW and 25 kW PEM fuel cells designed for material handling applications.

34

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Cost Vehicle Cost Calculator to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator on AddThis.com... Vehicle Cost Calculator Vehicle Cost Calculator This tool uses basic information about your driving habits to calculate total cost of ownership and emissions for makes and models of most vehicles, including alternative fuel and advanced technology vehicles. Also

35

Evaluation of Stationary Fuel Cell Deployments, Costs, and Fuels (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation summarizes NREL's technology validation of stationary fuel cell systems and presents data on number of deployments, system costs, and fuel types.

Ainscough, C.; Kurtz, J.; Peters, M.; Saur, G.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

37

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with...

38

Costs Associated With Propane Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with propane vehicle fueling infrastructure. It provides an overview of the equipment and processes necessary to develop a propane fueling station and offers estimated cost ranges.

Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

LowerLower--Cost Fuel CellsCost Fuel Cells Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density 4 Hydrogen polymer electrolyteHydrogen polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)membrane fuel1 LowerLower--Cost Fuel CellsCost Fuel Cells Allen J. Bard, Arumugam Manthiram,Allen J. BardMaterials Science and Engineering Program 2 CONVENTIONAL POWER PLANT DIRECT FUEL CELL POWER PLANT Heat

Lightsey, Glenn

40

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehiclesthe societal cost of hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles with modelsand running costs) than hydrogen fuel-cell vehicles in 2030.

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

42

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop May 8 th , 2011, Arlington, VA Shimshon Gottesfeld, CTO The Fuel Cell Cost Challenge 2 CellEra's goal - achieve price parity with incumbents earlier on in market entry process ! Mainstream Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell ( PEM) Cost Barriers 3 Graphite / stainless steel hardware Acidic membrane Platinum based electrodes Cost barriers deeply embedded in core tech materials BOM-based cost barriers - 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2,500/Oz The possibility of an OH - ion conducting membrane 4 Non-acidic membrane CellEra Took Advantage of this Opportunity A new type of membrane component with potential for strong fuel cell cost cuts was revealed in 2006, but was accompanied by general industry skepticism

43

New MEA Materials for Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) Performance, Durability, and Cost - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report James Fletcher (Primary Contact), Philip Cox University of North Florida (UNF) 1 UNF Drive Jacksonville, FL 32224 Phone: (904) 620-1844 Email: jfletche@UNF.edu DOE Managers HQ: Donna Ho Phone: (202) 586-8000 Email: Donna.Ho@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000475 Subcontractors: * University of Florida, Gainesville, FL * Northeastern University, Boston, MA * Johnson Matthey Fuel Cells, Swindon, UK

44

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation covers the topic of the cost of fuel to general electricity for the Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting, held on November 18-19, 2009.

45

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

46

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

Not Available

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Societal lifecycle costs of cars with alternative fuels/engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effectively addressing concerns about air pollution (especially health impacts of small-particle air pollution), climate change, and oil supply insecurity will probably require radical changes in automotive engine/fuel technologies in directions that offer both the potential for achieving near-zero emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases and a diversification of the transport fuel system away from its present exclusive dependence on petroleum. The basis for comparing alternative automotive engine/fuel options in evolving toward these goals in the present analysis is the societal lifecycle cost of transportation, including the vehicle first cost (assuming large-scale mass production), fuel costs (assuming a fully developed fuel infrastructure), externality costs for oil supply security, and damage costs for emissions of air pollutants and greenhouse gases calculated over the full fuel cycle. Several engine/fuel options are consideredincluding current gasoline internal combustion engines and a variety of advanced lightweight vehicles: internal combustion engine vehicles fueled with gasoline or hydrogen; internal combustion engine/hybrid electric vehicles fueled with gasoline, compressed natural gas, Diesel, FischerTropsch liquids or hydrogen; and fuel cell vehicles fueled with gasoline, methanol or hydrogen (from natural gas, coal or wind power). To account for large uncertainties inherent in the analysis (for example in environmental damage costs, in oil supply security costs and in projected mass-produced costs of future vehicles), lifecycle costs are estimated for a range of possible future conditions. Under base-case conditions, several advanced options have roughly comparable lifecycle costs that are lower than for today's conventional gasoline internal combustion engine cars, when environmental and oil supply insecurity externalities are countedincluding advanced gasoline internal combustion engine cars, internal combustion engine/hybrid electric cars fueled with gasoline, Diesel, FischerTropsch liquids or compressed natural gas, and hydrogen fuel cell cars. The hydrogen fuel cell car stands out as having the lowest externality costs of any option and, when mass produced and with high valuations of externalities, the least projected lifecycle cost. Particular attention is given to strategies that would enhance the prospects that the hydrogen fuel cell car would eventually become the Car of the Future, while pursuing innovations relating to options based on internal combustion engines that would both assist a transition to hydrogen fuel cell cars and provide significant reductions of externality costs in the near term.

Joan M Ogden; Robert H Williams; Eric D Larson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DOE Hydrogen Program Record 10004, Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record Program Record Record #: 10004 Date: September 16, 2010 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2010 Update to: Record 9012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 16, 2010 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2010 technology and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $51/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2010, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2009 cost analyses of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2010 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. Both cost estimates are based on performance at beginning of life.

49

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program Record 12020: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Record Record Record #: 12020 Date: August 21, 2012 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2012 Update to: Record 11012 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 14, 2012 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2012 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $47/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Program supports analysis projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2012, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2011 cost analysis of an 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell system, based on 2012 technology and projected to a

50

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

upon fuel cell stack performance, catalyst cost, stackin 2025, the fuel cell system cost (stack and BOP) is aboutaffect the cost of fuel cell stack. In a recent report by

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier Presentation at the AMFC Workshop, May 8, Arlington, VA amfc050811gottesfeldcellera.pdf More Documents &...

52

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Workshop Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop This is the agenda from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop, held at the National Renewable...

53

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Production Costs of Alternative Transportation Fuels AgencyCompany...

54

Advanced direct methanol fuel cells. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the program was an advanced proton-exchange membrane (PEM) for use as the electrolyte in a liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell which provides reduced methanol crossover while simultaneously providing high conductivity and low membrane water content. The approach was to use a membrane containing precross-linked fluorinated base polymer films and subsequently to graft the base film with selected materials. Over 80 different membranes were prepared. The rate of methanol crossover through the advanced membranes was reduced 90%. A 5-cell stack provided stable performance over a 100-hour life test. Preliminary cost estimates predicted a manufacturing cost at $4 to $9 per kW.

Hamdan, Monjid; Kosek, John A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Workshop July 30, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Carbon Anode Electrochemistry Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells Coal Preprocessing Prior to Introduction Into the Fuel Cell Potential Market Applications for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells Discussion of Key R&D Needs Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

56

Emission Control Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative-Fuel Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1990. "lhe Economicsof Alternative Fuel Use: Subsfitt~/ingMcOartland. 1990. "Alternative Fuels for Pollution Control:Policy Levers for Alternative Fuels: Costs, Energy Security,

Wang, Quanlu; Sperling, Daniel; Olmstead, Janis

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is the list of attendees from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop.

58

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Cost Calculator Assumptions and Methodology on AddThis.com...

59

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses | Department...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses HEFA and Fischer-Tropsch Jet Fuel Cost Analyses This is a presentation from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative Fuels...

60

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Office Record Office Record Record #: 13012 Date: September 18, 2013 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 Update to: Record 12020 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 16, 2013 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2013 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $67/kW when manufactured at a volume of 100,000 units/year, and $55/kW at 500,000 units/year. Rationale: The DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) Office supports projects that perform detailed analysis to estimate cost status of fuel cell systems, updated on an annual basis [1]. In fiscal year 2013, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) updated their 2012 cost analysis of an 80-kW

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fuel Cell System Cost for Transporationa--2008 Cost Estimate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell System Cost for Fuel Cell System Cost for Transportation-2008 Cost Estimate National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard * Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Independent Review Published for the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen Program NREL/BK-6A1-45457 May 2009 NOTICE This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or

62

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Date: October 7, 2009 2 Date: October 7, 2009 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2009 Update to: Record 8019 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: October 7, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $61/kW for 2009 technology in 2009 dollars ($51/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2009, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2008 cost analyses of 80-kW direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2009 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2]. DTI and TIAX use Design for Manufacturing and Assembly

63

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 Date: August 17, 2011 2 Date: August 17, 2011 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2011 Update to: Record 10004 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 7, 2011 Item: The cost of an 80-kW net automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system based on 2011 technology 1 and operating on direct hydrogen is projected to be $49/kW when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units/year. Rationale: In fiscal year 2011, Strategic Analysis, Inc. (SA) 2 updated the 2010 Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) cost analysis of 80-kW net direct hydrogen PEM automotive fuel cell systems, based on 2011 technology and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year [1]. Results from the analysis were communicated to the DOE

64

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 8002: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

02 Date: October 31, 2008 02 Date: October 31, 2008 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2007 Update to: Record 5005 Originator: Nancy Garland and Jason Marcinkoski Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: April 3, 2009 Item: The cost of an 80-kW automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell system operating on direct hydrogen and projected to a manufacturing volume of 500,000 units per year is $94/kW for 2007 technology in 2007 dollars ($82/kW in 2002 dollars for comparison with targets). Rationale: In fiscal year 2007, TIAX LLC (TIAX) and Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) each updated their 2006 cost analyses of direct hydrogen, 80-kW, PEM automotive fuel cell systems based on 2007 technology and projected to manufacturing volumes of 500,000 units per year [1,2].

65

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes US Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Kickoff Meeting, Washington DC, February 13, 2007 Michel Fouré Project Objectives z To develop a low cost (vs. perfluorosulfonated ionomers), durable membrane. z To develop a membrane capable at 80°C at low relative humidity (25-50%). z To develop a membrane capable of operating at 120°C for brief periods of time. z To elucidate membrane degradation and failure mechanisms. U:jen/slides/pres.07/FC kickoff Washington DC 2-13-07 2 Technical Barriers Addressed z Membrane Cost z Membrane Durability z Membrane capability to operate at low relative humidity. z Membrane capability to operate at 120ºC for brief period of times.

66

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Find More Like This Return to Search Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Advancing the science of fuel...

67

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol

68

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Methods of Conditioning Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer

69

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slides from the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, held April 16, 2013.

70

Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

LPG Vehicles Fuel Displacement & Cost Potential of CNG, LNG, and LPG Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and...

71

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate Detection of Impurities in Hydrogen Fuel at Lower Cost Technology available for licensing: Two alternative strategies for detecting impurities in the hydrogen used in fuel...

72

Cost-effective fuel cycle closure  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. government is moving toward meeting its obligation to accept spent fuel from commercial light water reactors (LWRs) in 1998 by providing an interim storage facility. Site work and analysis of the deep, geologic repository at Yucca Mountain will continue at a reduced level of effort. This provides the time required to reevaluate the use of spent-fuel recycling instead of direct disposal. A preliminary assessment of this option is presented in this paper.

Ehrman, C.S. [Burns & Roe, Inc., Oradell, NJ (United States); Boardman, C.E. [General Electric Company, San Jose, CA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

CNG Shuttles Save Fuel CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: CNG Shuttles Save Fuel Costs for R&R Limousine and Bus on AddThis.com... June 1, 2013

74

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automotive and MHE Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) on AddThis.com...

75

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants - Energy Information...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants Report This report has been discontinued. Cost and quality of fuels for electric plant information can now be found in the detailed...

76

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis (Text Version) Below is the text version of the webinar titled...

77

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/Systems DE-FC02-99EE50587 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge in the development of fuel cell system technologies by providing cost and manufacturing analysis. · To develop ­ Presented results to the fuel cell industry for feedback and incorporated this into a revised baseline cost

78

Review of Fuels for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Review of Fuels for Direct Carbon Fuel Cells ... After optimization for minimum activation polarization, the authors then produced impedance spectra to assess cell performance and achieved a peak power density of around 18 and 53 mW cm2 at 700 and 800 C, respectively. ... solid oxide fuel cell system under 600 just by optimizing the anode microstructure and operating conditions. ...

Adam C. Rady; Sarbjit Giddey; Sukhvinder P. S. Badwal; Bradley P. Ladewig; Sankar Bhattacharya

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fuel cycle cost uncertainty from nuclear fuel cycle comparison  

SciTech Connect

This paper examined the uncertainty in fuel cycle cost (FCC) calculation by considering both model and parameter uncertainty. Four different fuel cycle options were compared in the analysis including the once-through cycle (OT), the DUPIC cycle, the MOX cycle and a closed fuel cycle with fast reactors (FR). The model uncertainty was addressed by using three different FCC modeling approaches with and without the time value of money consideration. The relative ratios of FCC in comparison to OT did not change much by using different modeling approaches. This observation was consistent with the results of the sensitivity study for the discount rate. Two different sets of data with uncertainty range of unit costs were used to address the parameter uncertainty of the FCC calculation. The sensitivity study showed that the dominating contributor to the total variance of FCC is the uranium price. In general, the FCC of OT was found to be the lowest followed by FR, MOX, and DUPIC. But depending on the uranium price, the FR cycle was found to have lower FCC over OT. The reprocessing cost was also found to have a major impact on FCC.

Li, J.; McNelis, D. [Institute for the Environment, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill (United States); Yim, M.S. [Department of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofeconomies of the direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicle withoutMaximizing Direct-Hydrogen Pem Fuel Cell Vehicle Efficiency-

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel-Cell/Reformer Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Car Technical Barriers Addressed: Fuel Flexible Processors Technical Barriers N: Cost Component designs of complete automotive FC power systems: · Onboard gasoline fuel processor and PEM fuel cell ·Fuel cell stacks ·Air supply and humidification ·Thermal management ·Water management ·Fuel Supply

83

(Coordinated research on fuel cycle cost)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) and the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) have been exploring the possibility of parallel studies on the externals costs of employing fuel cycles to deliver energy services. These studies are of particular importance following the activities of the US National Energy Strategy (NES), where the potential discrepancies between market prices and the social costs of energy services were raised as significant policy concerns. To respond to these concerns, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and Resources for the Future (RFF) have begun a collaborative effort for the DOE to investigate the external costs, or externalities, generated by cradle to grave fuel cycle activities. Upon initiating this project, the CEC expressed an interest to the DOE that Europe should conduct a parallel study and that the two studies should be highly coordinated for consistency in the results. This series of meetings with members of the CEC was undertaken to resolve some issues implied by pursuing parallel, coordinated studies; issues that were previously defined by the August meetings. In addition, it was an opportunity for some members of the US research team and the DOE sponsor to meet with their European counterparts for the study, as well as persons in charge of research areas that ultimately would play a key role in the European study.

Cantor, R.A.; Shelton, R.B.; Krupnick, A.J.

1990-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

84

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System  

SciTech Connect

PEMFC technology for transportation must be competitive with internal combustion engine powertrains in a number of key metrics, including performance, life, reliability, and cost. Demonstration of PEMFC cost competitiveness has its own challenges because the technology has not been applied to high volume automotive markets. The key stack materials including membranes, electrodes, bipolar plates, and gas diffusion layers have not been produced in automotive volumes to the exacting quality requirements that will be needed for high stack yields and to the evolving property specifications of high performance automotive stacks. Additionally, balance-of-plant components for air, water, and thermal management are being developed to meet the unique requirements of fuel cell systems. To address the question of whether fuel cells will be cost competitive in automotive markets, the DOE has funded this project to assess the high volume production cost of PEM fuel cell systems. In this report a historical perspective of our efforts in assessment of PEMFC cost for DOE is provided along with a more in-depth assessment of the cost of compressed hydrogen storage is provided. Additionally, the hydrogen storage costs were incorporated into a system cost update for 2004. Assessment of cost involves understanding not only material and production costs, but also critical performance metrics, i.e., stack power density and associated catalyst loadings that scale the system components. We will discuss the factors influencing the selection of the system specification (i.e., efficiency, reformate versus direct hydrogen, and power output) and how these have evolved over time. The reported costs reflect internal estimates and feedback from component developers and the car companies. Uncertainty in the cost projection was addressed through sensitivity analyses.

Eric J. Carlson

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Incremental Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the

86

Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects Directives and Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Transfers Involving Sponsored Projects Directives and Procedures Responsible Office: Office....................................................................................................................2 1.3 Cost Transfer..................................................................................................................................................2 4. Documentation of Cost Transfers

Jawitz, James W.

87

New fuel injector design lowers cost  

SciTech Connect

This article describes the Bendix Deka injector series. Bendix engineers have been striving to lessen costs of all portions of the injection equipment, especially single and multipoint injectors. Results of these efforts are advanced, thin-edged orifice and floating unitized armature designs. External configurations of both multipoint and single point Bendix Deka injectors are such that they can directly replace existing products. Both injector types are designed to be able to deliver any calibration within the currently-known requirements. Flow tolerances for Deka injectors match all known requirements, representing a good economic balance between performance and cost. Materials were carefully chosen for wear and corrosion resistance.

De Grace, L.G.; Bata, G.T.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Natural Gas Rate and Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Natural Gas Rate and Cost Recovery Authorization on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

89

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

liu. A parametric study of PEM fuel cell performances.economic design of PEM fuel cell systems by multi-objectiveEstimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

91

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge Presentation 3 A fuel cell vehicle would contain the PEMFC system modeled in this project along with additional

92

FUEL CELLS DIRECT ALCOHOL FUEL CELLS | Direct Ethylene Glycol Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Direct ethylene glycol fuel cells, in which the oxidation of ethylene glycol and the reduction of oxygen take place at the anode and the cathode, respectively, are promising candidates as electric power sources of portable devices such as the cellular phone and the laptop computer. The advantages of ethylene glycol are high activity, high energy density, low volatility, and high boiling point compared with other organic fuels such as methanol and ethanol. In this article, the construction of direct ethylene glycol fuel cells, the electrooxidation of ethylene glycol in acid and alkaline solutions, cathode catalysts, and operating conditions such as temperature, pH of the electrolytes, and the concentration of ethylene glycol are described.

Z. Ogumi; K. Miyazaki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Damodara Poojary, Jacques Nicole,...

94

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement Improved System Performance and...

95

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel-cell vehicles in 2030. This comparative analysis, based on costfuel cell or hydrogen ICE) and all-electric vehicles. According to the analysis, the societal cost

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants...  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Workshop Roster of Participants Sustainable Alternative Fuels Cost Workshop Roster of Participants This is the list of attendees from the November 27, 2012, Sustainable Alternative...

97

Webinar: Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Video recording and text version of the webinar titled, Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis, originally presented on April 16, 2013.

98

Future Directions in Engines and Fuels  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conference Future Direction in Engines and Fuels Mobility industry Challenges - CARB GHG Scenario CARB Board hearing Dec. 2009 GHG 1 GHG 2 GHG 0 September 28, 2010 0 40 80...

99

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles. Abstract: Low-cost...

100

Emission control cost-effectiveness of alternative-fuel vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Although various legislation and regulations have been adopted to promote the use of alternative-fuel vehicles for curbing urban air pollution problems, there is a lack of systematic comparisons of emission control cost-effectiveness among various alternative-fuel vehicle types. In this paper, life-cycle emission reductions and life-cycle costs were estimated for passenger cars fueled with methanol, ethanol, liquefied petroleum gas, compressed natural gas, and electricity. Vehicle emission estimates included both exhaust and evaporative emissions for air pollutants of hydrocarbon, carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, and air-toxic pollutants of benzene, formaldehyde, 1,3-butadiene, and acetaldehyde. Vehicle life-cycle cost estimates accounted for vehicle purchase prices, vehicle life, fuel costs, and vehicle maintenance costs. Emission control cost-effectiveness presented in dollars per ton of emission reduction was calculated for each alternative-fuel vehicle types from the estimated vehicle life-cycle emission reductions and costs. Among various alternative-fuel vehicle types, compressed natural gas vehicles are the most cost-effective vehicle type in controlling vehicle emissions. Dedicated methanol vehicles are the next most cost-effective vehicle type. The cost-effectiveness of electric vehicles depends on improvements in electric vehicle battery technology. With low-cost, high-performance batteries, electric vehicles are more cost-effective than methanol, ethanol, and liquified petroleum gas vehicles.

Wang, Q. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sperling, D.; Olmstead, J. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Inst. of Transportation Studies

1993-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on fuel cell membranes, was given by Michel Foure of Arkema at a meeting on new fuel cell projects in February 2007.

102

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INDIRECT COST CALCULATION [IN REVERSE] YOU WANT TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT COSTS YOU KNOW WHAT THE TUITION, STIPEND AND EQUIPMENT COSTS ARE YOU KNOW WHAT THE TOTAL COST IS CALCULATION IS USING THE 2010 FED F&A RATE FOR WSU OF 52% (.52) [ DIRECT COST ­ TUITION ­ STIPEND ­ EQUIPMENT] (.52 ) + DIRECT

Finley Jr., Russell L.

103

Coal-Fueled Diesel Technology Assessment Study: systems performance and cost comparisons  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the performance of diesel engines operating on coal-based fuels and compares their power generation costs with those of corresponding oil-burning prime movers. Similar performance and cost comparisons are also presented for an alternative prime mover, the direct-fired gas turbine in both a simple-cycle and a regenerative-cycle configuration. The coal-based fuels under consideration include micronized coal, coal slurries, and coal-derived gaseous fuels. The study focuses on medium-speed diesel engines for locomotive, marine, small stationary power, and industrial cogeneration applications in the 1000 to 10,000 kW size range. This report reviews the domestic industrial and transportation markets for medium-speed engines currently using oil or gas. The major problem areas involving the operation of these engines on coal-based fuels are summarized. The characteristics of available coal-based fuels are discussed and the costs of various fuels are compared. Based on performance data from the literature, as well as updated cost estimates originally developed for the Total Energy Technology Alternatives Studies program, power generation costs are determined for both oil-fueled and coal-fueled diesel engines. Similar calculations are also performed for direct-fired gas turbines. The calculations illustrate the sensitivity of the power generation cost to the associated fuel cost for these prime movers. The results also show the importance of reducing the cost of available coal-based fuels, in order to improve the economic competitiveness of coal-fueled prime movers relative to engines operating on oil or gas. 50 refs., 9 figs., 11 tabs.

Holtz, R.E.; Krazinski, J.L.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Presentation...

105

Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel Technology Breakout Session 2: Frontiers and...

106

Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Bifunctional Anode Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells. Abstract: Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed...

107

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines...

108

Cost Principles Directives & Procedures Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date: November 1, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Cost Principles Directives & Procedures Responsible Office: Cost Analysis Effective Date....................................................................................................................... 2 2. Guiding Principles to Determine the Charge of a Cost to a Sponosred Agreement ................................................................................................. 5 5.1. Personnel Costs

Jawitz, James W.

109

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Flexible Fuel vehicle cost calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Flexible Fuel Vehicle Cost Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Department of Energy Phase: "Evaluate Options and Determine Feasibility" is not in the list of possible values (Bring the Right People Together, Create a Vision, Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Develop Finance and Implement Projects, Create Early Successes, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed) for this property. User Interface: Website Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/progs/cost_anal.php?0/E85 Calculate the cost to drive a flex-fueled vehicle (one that can run on either E85 Ethanol or gasoline) on each fuel type.

110

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of hydrogen production using low-cost natural gas.

111

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

112

Cost Analysis of Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cell Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Compressed Hydrogen and PEM Fuel Cell System Discussion Fuel Cell Tech Team FreedomCar Detroit. MI October 20, 2004 TIAX LLC Acorn Park Cambridge, Massachusetts 02140-2390 Ref D0006 SFAA No. DE-SCO2- 98EE50526 Topic 1 Subtopic 1C Agenda EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 1 1 Project Overview 2 Compressed Hydrogen Storage Cost 3 2004 System Cost Update 4 Appendix Project Overview Approach EC_2004 10 20 FC Tech Team Presentation 2 In our final year of the project, we assessed the cost of compressed hydrogen storage and updated the overall system cost projection. Task 1: PEMFC System Technology Synopsis Task 2: Develop Cost Model and Baseline Estimates Task 3: Identify Opportunities for System Cost Reduction Tasks 4, 5, 6 & 7: Annual Updates

113

Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

This document is designed to help fleets understand the cost factors associated with fueling infrastructure for compressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles. It provides estimated cost ranges for various sizes and types of CNG fueling stations and an overview of factors that contribute to the total cost of an installed station. The information presented is based on input from professionals in the natural gas industry who design, sell equipment for, and/or own and operate CNG stations.

Smith, M.; Gonzales, J.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM); Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

115

Cost Savings of Nuclear Power with Total Fuel Reprocessing  

SciTech Connect

The cost of fast reactor (FR) generated electricity with pyro-processing is estimated in this article. It compares favorably with other forms of energy and is shown to be less than that produced by light water reactors (LWR's). FR's use all the energy in natural uranium whereas LWR's utilize only 0.7% of it. Because of high radioactivity, pyro-processing is not open to weapon material diversion. This technology is ready now. Nuclear power has the same advantage as coal power in that it is not dependent upon a scarce foreign fuel and has the significant additional advantage of not contributing to global warming or air pollution. A jump start on new nuclear plants could rapidly allow electric furnaces to replace home heating oil furnaces and utilize high capacity batteries for hybrid automobiles: both would reduce US reliance on oil. If these were fast reactors fueled by reprocessed fuel, the spent fuel storage problem could also be solved. Costs are derived from assumptions on the LWR's and FR's five cost components: 1) Capital costs: LWR plants cost $106/MWe. FR's cost 25% more. Forty year amortization is used. 2) The annual O and M costs for both plants are 9% of the Capital Costs. 3) LWR fuel costs about 0.0035 $/kWh. Producing FR fuel from spent fuel by pyro-processing must be done in highly shielded hot cells which is costly. However, the five foot thick concrete walls have the advantage of prohibiting diversion. LWR spent fuel must be used as feedstock for the FR initial core load and first two reloads so this FR fuel costs more than LWR fuel. FR fuel costs much less for subsequent core reloads (< LWR fuel) if all spent fuel feedstock is from the fast reactor (i.e., Breeding Ratio =1). 4) Yucca Mountain storage of unprocessed LWR spent fuel is estimated as $360,000/MTHM. But this fuel can be processed to remove TRU for use as fast reactor fuel. The remaining fission products repository costs are only one fifth that of the original fuel. Storage of short half life fission products alone requires less storage time and long term integrity than LWR spent fuel (300 years storage versus 100,000 years.) 5) LWR decommissioning costs are estimated to be $0.3 x 10{sup 6}/MWe. The annual cost for a 40 year licensed plant would be 2.5 % of this or less if interest is taken into account. All plants will eventually have to replace those components which become radiation damaged. FR's should be designed to replace parts rather than decommission. The LWR costs are estimated to be 2.65 cents/kWh. FR costs are 2.99 cents/kWh for the first 7.5 years and 2.39 cents/kWh for the next 32.5 years. The average cost over forty years is 2.50 cents/kWh which is less than the LWR costs. These power costs are similar to coal power, are lower than gas, oil, and much lower than renewable power.(authors)

Solbrig, Charles W.; Benedict, Robert W. [Fuel Cycle Programs Division, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

PEM fuel cell cost minimization using ``Design For Manufacture and Assembly`` techniques  

SciTech Connect

Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells fueled with direct hydrogen have demonstrated substantial technical potential to replace Internal Combustion Engines (ICE`s) in light duty vehicles. Such a transition to a hydrogen economy offers the potential of substantial benefits from reduced criteria and greenhouse emissions as well as reduced foreign fuel dependence. Research conducted for the Ford Motor Co. under a US Department of Energy contract suggests that hydrogen fuel, when used in a fuel cell vehicle (FCV), can achieve a cost per vehicle mile less than or equal to the gasoline cost per mile when used in an ICE vehicle. However, fuel cost parity is not sufficient to ensure overall economic success: the PEM fuel cell power system itself must be of comparable cost to the ICE. To ascertain if low cost production of PEM fuel cells is feasible, a powerful set of mechanical engineering tools collectively referred to as Design for Manufacture and Assembly (DFMA) has been applied to several representative PEM fuel cell designs. The preliminary results of this work are encouraging, as presented.

Lomax, F.D. Jr.; James, B.D. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Mooradian, R.P. [Ford Motor Co., Dearborn, MI (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Breaking the Fuel Cell Cost Barrier AMFC Workshop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tech materials BOM-based cost barriers ­ 90% of stack cost Cost volatility - Platinum $500/Oz - $2 * present CCM has 265 cm2 active area Work initiated on scalable AMFC stack design & development Lab status #12;Processes in PEM and AEM Membrane Fuel Cells Anode: H2 +2OH- = 2H2O +2e Cathode: 2e + 0.5O2

118

MJG:TTM, 3/01 Plasma Fueling Program FIRE Fueling and Pumping Cost and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1887 WBS 2.1.3 Gas Fueling Includes: · Multiple gas injection stations (4) · D-T 200 torr-L/s for 20 ­ Pellet Fueling ­ Gas Fueling ­ Disruption Control · Pumping System Cost Estimate ­ High Vacuum Pumping Contingency 20% 1429 GRAND TOTAL 8574 WBS 2.1 Fueling Sys tem Gas Injection Pellet Injection Disrup- tion

119

Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs Energy Department Announces New Investment to Reduce Fuel Cell Costs August 1, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In support of the Obama Administration's all-of-the-above strategy to develop clean, domestic energy sources, the Energy Department today announced a $4.5 million investment in two projects-led by Minnesota-based 3M and the Colorado School of Mines-to lower the cost, improve the durability, and increase the efficiency of next-generation fuel cell systems. This investment is a part of the Energy Department's commitment to maintain American leadership in innovative clean energy technologies, give American businesses more options to cut energy costs, and reduce our reliance on imported oil. "Fuel cell technologies have an important role to play in diversifying

120

Automotive and MHE Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Vince Contini, Kathya Mahadevan, Fritz Eubanks, Jennifer Smith, Gabe Stout and Mike Jansen Battelle April 16, 2013 Manufacturing Cost Analysis of Fuel Cells for Material Handling Applications 2 Presentation Outline * Background * Approach * System Design * Fuel Cell Stack Design * Stack, BOP and System Cost Models * System Cost Summary * Results Summary 3 * 10 and 25 kW PEM Fuel Cells for Material Handling Equipment (MHE) applications Background 5-year program to provide feedback to DOE on evaluating fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent models and cost estimates * Applications - Primary (including CHP) power, backup power, APU, and material handling * Fuel Cell Types - 80°C PEM, 180°C PEM, SOFC technologies

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold

122

Fact #594: October 26, 2009 Fuel Economy and Annual Fuel Cost Ranges for Vehicle Classes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The graph below shows the range of the lowest and highest fuel economy for each vehicle class, along with the lowest and highest annual fuel cost (in parentheses). For example, the two-seater model...

123

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about the cost of automotive polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems.

124

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

125

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s pilot-scale PEM fuel cell manufactunng cost, and theproductaon, PEM fuel cell systems could cost $35 - 90/kW,is how PEM fuel cell system manufactunng costs might evolve

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement ID:23278) 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer...

127

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5005: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 versus 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 Date: March 20, 2005 5 Date: March 20, 2005 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2002 vs 2005 Originator: Patrick Davis Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: May 22, 2006 Item: "Reduced the high-volume cost of automotive fuel cells from $275/kW (50kW system) in 2002 to $110/kW (80kW system) in 2005." Supporting Information: In 2002, TIAX reported a cost of $324/kW for a 50-kW automotive PEM fuel cell system operating on gasoline reformate, based on their modeling of projected cost for 500,000 units per year. See Eric Carlson et al., "Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/System." U.S. DOE Hydrogen Program Annual Progress Report. (2002) at http://www.eere.energy.gov/hydrogenandfuelcells/pdfs/33098_sec4-1.pdf. Also see "Cost Modeling of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Automobiles," Eric Carlson et al., SAE

128

New Directions in Engines and Fuels | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Fuels New Directions in Engines and Fuels Mobility based predominately on petroleum faces severe and imminent constraints as petroleum production and deliverability are...

129

Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

or otherwise restricted information Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells Chris Roger and David Mountz October 1, 2009 2009 Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff...

130

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dinh (PI) Dinh (PI) Thomas Gennett National Renewable Energy Laboratory October 1, 2009 Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information Objectives Develop cost-effective, reliable, durable fuel cells for portable power applications (e.g., cell phones, computers, etc.) that meet all DOE targets. Note that the energy density (Wh/L), volumetric (W/L), and specific power (W/kg) all depend on knowing the weight and volume of the entire DMFC system as well as the volume and concentration of fuel, which are system specific (power application and manufacturer dependent). In our model study the surface power density levels on HOPG will allow for indirect evaluation of our system to DOE's energy density

131

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1] D.J. Friedman etc. , PEM Fuel Cell System Optimization,Pressure Operation of PEM Fuel Cell Systems, SAE 2001, 2001-Maximizing Direct-Hydrogen Pem Fuel Cell Vehicle Efficiency-

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

External Costs of Fossil Fuel Cycles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of energy causes damage to a wide range of receptors, including human health, natural ecosystems, and the built environment. Such damages are referred to as external costs, as they are not reflected in...

W. Krewitt; P. Mayerhofer; R. Friedrich; A. Trukenmller

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Direct Conversion of Biomass to Fuel | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Conversion of Biomass to Fuel UGA, ORNL research team engineers microbes for the direct conversion of biomass to fuel July 11, 2014 New research from the University of...

134

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for...

135

ORNL: Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates (Agreement...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates H. -T. Lin, A. A. Wereszczak, and S. Waters Oak Ridge National Laboratory This presentation does not contain any proprietary,...

136

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with the simple load following strategy (non-hybridizeda Direct-Hydrogen, Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle, SAE

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

SciTech Connect

Bipolar plate is an important component in fuel cell stacks and accounts for more than 75% of stack weight and volume. The technology development of metal bipolar plates can effectively reduce the fuel cells stack weight and volume over 50%. The challenge is the metal plate corrosion protection at low cost for the broad commercial applications. This project is aimed to develop innovative technological solutions to overcome the corrosion barrier of low cost metal plates. The feasibility of has been demonstrated and patented (US Patent 7,309,540). The plan is to further reduce the cost, and scale up the technology. The project is built on three pillars: 1) robust experimental evidence demonstrating the feasibility of our technology, 2) a team that consists of industrial leaders in fuel cell stack application, design, and manufactures; 3) a low-risk, significant-milestone driven program that proves the feasibility of meeting program objectives The implementation of this project will reduce the fuel cell stack metal bipolar separator plate cost which accounts 15-21% of the overall stack cost. It will contribute to the market adoption of fuel cell technologies. In addition, this corrosion protection technology can be used similar energy devices, such as batteries and electrolyzers. Therefore, the success of the project will be benefit in broad markets.

Wang, Conghua [TreadStone Technologies, Inc.

2013-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

138

Pulverizer performance upgrades lower fuel costs  

SciTech Connect

Between 2002 and 2005, combustion equipment modifications were carried out at St. Johns River Power Plant in Jacksonville, FL. The effort succeeded in obtaining the desired emission reductions and to increase petroleum coke consumption. Since 2005 the boilers typically fired a blend of 70% Colombia coal and 30% delayed petroleum coke. To realize significant fuel savings, the pulverizer capacity was increased by 14% to allow a lower grade coal to be used. The article describes the changes made to the pulverizer to allow 11,800 Btu/pound coal to be burnt, with annual savings of $6.3 m beginning in 2006. 4 figs., 1 tab.

Hansen, T.

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

139

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 March 2004 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Preface Background The Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2001 is prepared by the Electric Power Divi- sion; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); U.S.

140

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT Major: Maritime Administration April 2009 Submitted to the Office of Undergraduate Research Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the designation as UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH SCHOLAR A Senior Scholars Thesis by KIMBERLY GRESSLER THE EFFECT OF INCREASING TRANSPORTATION COST ON FOREIGN DIRECT INVESTMENT Approved by: Research Advisor: Joan Mileski...

Gressler, Kimberly

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Facts and issues of direct disposal of spent fuel; Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews those facts and issues that affect the direct disposal of spent reactor fuels. It is intended as a resource document for those impacted by the current Department of Energy (DOE) guidance that calls for the cessation of fuel reprocessing. It is not intended as a study of the specific impacts (schedules and costs) to the Savannah River Site (SRS) alone. Commercial fuels, other low enriched fuels, highly enriched defense-production, research, and naval reactor fuels are included in this survey, except as prevented by rules on classification.

Parks, P.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Hydrogen as a transportation fuel: Costs and benefits  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fuel and vehicles are assessed and compared to other alternative fuels and vehicles. The cost, efficiency, and emissions of hydrogen storage, delivery, and use in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs) are estimated. Hydrogen made thermochemically from natural gas and electrolytically from a range of electricity mixes is examined. Hydrogen produced at central plants and delivered by truck is compared to hydrogen produced on-site at filling stations, fleet refueling centers, and residences. The impacts of hydrogen HEVs, fueled using these pathways, are compared to ultra-low emissions gasoline internal-combustion-engine vehicles (ICEVs), advanced battery-powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and HEVs using gasoline or natural gas.

Berry, G.D.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

Murph, S.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

144

Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2}) that simulates the composition of the coal syngas. At 800 C, the stack achieved a power density of 1176 W, which represents the largest power level demonstrated for CO in the literature. Although the FB-DCFC performance results obtained in this project were definitely encouraging and promising for practical applications, DCFC approaches pose significant technical challenges that are specific to the particular DCFC scheme employed. Long term impact of coal contaminants, particularly sulfur, on the stability of cell components and cell performance is a critically important issue. Effective current collection in large area cells is another challenge. Lack of kinetic information on the Boudouard reactivity of wide ranging solid fuels, including various coals and biomass, necessitates empirical determination of such reaction parameters that will slow down development efforts. Scale up issues will also pose challenges during development of practical FB-DCFC prototypes for testing and validation. To overcome some of the more fundamental problems, initiation of federal support for DCFC is critically important for advancing and developing this exciting and promising technology for third generation electricity generation from coal, biomass and other solid fuels including waste.

Turgut Gur

2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

145

Aggressive fuel designs minimize fuel costs for the ANO-1 PWR  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cycle design objectives are influenced by the desire of utilities to attain top performer status in the industry and to become more cost competitive. At Energy, we are seeking aggressive fuel designs and core management schemes that reduce costs without compromising operating margins. Recent efforts at the Arkansas Nuclear One (ANO-1) plant demonstrated the effectiveness of this approach and led to important benefits for both the utility and the fuel vendor, Babcock Wilcox. With our acquisition of the CASMO-3/SIMULATE-3 advanced physics code, we initiated a proactive approach to the design of cycle 12 of ANO-1. The primary goal was to explore the use of advanced designs to reduce front-end fuel cycle costs for cycle 12. A secondary goal was to incorporate those features into cycle 12 that could lead to further cost or margin improvements in later cycles.

Ober, T.G.; Megehee, K.B.; Bencheikh, A.; Thompson, R.A. (Entergy Operations, Jackson, MS (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS -POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BIOMASS FOR HYDROGEN AND OTHER TRANSPORT FUELS - POTENTIALS, LIMITATIONS & COSTS Senior scientist - "Towards Hydrogen Society" ·biomass resources - potentials, limits ·biomass carbon cycle ·biomass for hydrogen - as compared to other H2- sources and to other biomass paths #12;BIOMASS - THE CARBON CYCLE

147

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 Tables 7 Tables May 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 1997 Tables ii Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

148

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop Strategic Directions for Hydrogen Delivery Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy sponsored a Hydrogen Delivery Workshop in Washington, DC, May 7-8, 2003. Attendees included researchers, government officials, and industry members. A key element of the overall hydrogen energy infrastructure is the delivery system that moves the hydrogen from its point of production to an end-use device. The DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office will initiate, in fiscal year 2004, a research program targeted specifically at addressing hydrogen transportation and delivery. This special workshop was held to outline the future technology and research needs for developing cost-effective, reliable, and safe hydrogen delivery systems. The proceedings of the Hydrogen Delivery Workshop, which include the presentations and the recommendations of the four breakout groups, are available as Adobe Acrobat PDFs. Download Adobe Reader.

149

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants, 1984  

SciTech Connect

Information on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts in 1984 to electric utility plants is presented, with some data provided for each year from 1979 through 1984. Data were collected on Forms FERC-423 and EIA-759. Fuels are coal, fuel oil, and natural gas. Data are reported by company and plant, by type of plant, and by State and Census Region, with US totals. This report contains information on fossil fuel receipts to electric utility plants with a combined steam capacity of 50 megawatts or larger. Previous reports contained data on all electric plants with a combined capacity of 25 megawatts or larger. All historical data in this publication have been revised to reflect the new reporting threshold. Peaking unit data are no longer collected. A glossary of terms, technical notes, and references are also provided. 7 figs., 62 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment (MHE, or more typically 'forklifts'). A number of fuel cell MHE deployments have received funding support from the federal government. Using data from these government co-funded deployments, DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has been evaluating the performance of fuel cells in material handling applications. NREL has assessed the total cost of ownership of fuel cell MHE and compared it to the cost of ownership of traditional battery-powered MHE. As part of its cost of ownership assessment, NREL looked at a range of costs associated with MHE operation, including the capital costs of battery and fuel cell systems, the cost of supporting infrastructure, maintenance costs, warehouse space costs, and labor costs. Considering all these costs, NREL found that fuel cell MHE can have a lower overall cost of ownership than comparable battery-powered MHE.

Ramsden, T.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7: January 16, 7: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #407: January 16, 2006 Vehicle Fuel Cost vs. Home Heating Cost: Which Causes More Concern? on Digg

152

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Managed by UT-Battelle for the Department of Energy Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates H. -T. Lin, A. A. Wereszczak, and S. Waters Oak Ridge National Laboratory This...

153

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Low-Cost Direct Bonded Aluminum (DBA) Substrates H. -T. Lin, A. A. Wereszczak, M. L. Santella, and G. Muralidharan Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) This presentation does not...

154

Spontaneous hydrogen evolution in direct methanol fuel cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an electrochemical energy conversion device that converts chemical energy of liquid methanol into electrical energy. Because of its (more)

Ye, Qiang

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Evaluation of Novel and Low-Cost Materials for Bipolar Plates in PEM Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bipolar plate material and fabrication costs make up a significant fraction of the total cost in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell stack. In an (more)

Desrosiers, Kevin Campbell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Survey Results and Analysis of the Cost and Efficiency of Various Operating Hydrogen Fueling Stations  

SciTech Connect

Existing Hydrogen Fueling Stations were surveyed to determine capital and operational costs. Recommendations for cost reduction in future stations and for research were developed.

Cornish, John

2011-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

157

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating conditions. Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell System Modelconditions for a direct hydrogen fuel cell system Table 1simulation tool for hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal of

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Stationery and Emerging Market Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Kathya Mahadevan (Primary Contact), VinceContini, Matt Goshe, and Fritz Eubanks Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 Phone: (614) 424-3197 Email: mahadevank@battelle.org DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Reg Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005250/001 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives To assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for stationary and emerging markets by developing independent cost models and costs estimates for manufacture and

159

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling...

160

On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications  

SciTech Connect

Power densities in electrolyte Direct Methanol Fuel Cells have been achieved which are only three times lower than those achieved with similar reformate/air fuel cells. Remaining issues are: improved anode catalyst activity, demonstrated long-term stable performance, and high fuel efficiencies.

Ren, Xiaoming; Wilson, M.S.; Gottesfeld, S.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, ``Monthly Power Plant Report.`` These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants 1991  

SciTech Connect

Data for 1991 and 1990 receipts and costs for fossil fuels discussed in the Executive Summary are displayed in Tables ES1 through ES7. These data are for electric generating plants with a total steam-electric and combined-cycle nameplate capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Data presented in the Executive Summary on generation, consumption, and stocks of fossil fuels at electric utilities are based on data collected on the Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-759, Monthly Power Plant Report.'' These data cover all electric generating plants. The average delivered cost of coal, petroleum, and gas each decreased in 1991 from 1990 levels. Overall, the average annual cost of fossil fuels delivered to electric utilities in 1991 was $1.60 per million Btu, a decrease of $0.09 per million Btu from 1990. This was the lowest average annual cost since 1978 and was the result of the abundant supply of coal, petroleum, and gas available to electric utilities. US net generation of electricity by all electric utilities in 1991 increased by less than I percent--the smallest increase since the decline that occurred in 1982.3 Coal and gas-fired steam net generation, each, decreased by less than I percent and petroleum-fired steam net generation by nearly 5 percent. Nuclear-powered net generation, however, increased by 6 percent. Fossil fuels accounted for 68 percent of all generation; nuclear, 22 percent; and hydroelectric, 10 percent. Sales of electricity to ultimate consumers in 1991 were 2 percent higher than during 1990.

Not Available

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

163

How to utilize hedging and a fuel surcharge program to stabilize the cost of fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper looks at some of these travails as well as the common tools used to approach a volatile priced commodity, diesel fuel. It focuses on the impacts of hedging for companies that are directly impacted through the ...

Shehadi, Charles A., III (Charles Anthony)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Direct methanol fuel cells for transportation applications. Quarterly technical report, June 1996--September 1996  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research and development effort is to advance the performance and viability of direct methanol fuel cell technology for light-duty transportation applications. For fuel cells to be an attractive alternative to conventional automotive power plants, the fuel cell stack combined with the fuel processor and ancillary systems must be competitive in terms of both performance and costs. A major advantage for the direct methanol fuel cell is that a fuel processor is not required. A direct methanol fuel cell has the potential of satisfying the demanding requirements for transportation applications, such as rapid start-up and rapid refueling. The preliminary goals of this effort are: (1) 310 W/l, (2) 445 W/kg, and (3) potential manufacturing costs of $48/kW. In the twelve month period for phase 1, the following critical areas will be investigated: (1) an improved proton-exchange membrane that is more impermeable to methanol, (2) improved cathode catalysts, and (3) advanced anode catalysts. In addition, these components will be combined to form membrane-electrode assemblies (MEA`s) and evaluated in subscale tests. Finally a conceptual design and program plan will be developed for the construction of a 5 kW direct methanol stack in phase II of the program.

Fuller, T.F.; Kunz, H.R.; Moore, R.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

Tao, Thomas

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

166

Forecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems: Using Bounded Manufacturing Progress Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel cell stacks (Savote (1998)) Estimating manufactunng costfuel cell stacks, $20/kWfor fuel processors, and $20/kWfor "balance of plant" auxlhary components These costCosts of Automotive PEM Fuel Cell Systems (PEM)fuel cell stack

Lipman, Timonthy E.; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A self-regulated passive fuel-feed system for passive direct methanol fuel cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Unlike active direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) that require liquid pumps and gas compressors to supply reactants, the design of passive DMFCs eliminates these ancillary (more)

Chan, Yeuk Him

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

Ramsey, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2007-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

169

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on Digg Find More places to share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Wind-to-Hydrogen Cost Modeling and Project Findings (Text Version) on

170

New Formic Acid Fuel Cell Orientations to Reduce the Cost of Cell Components.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Formic acid fuel cells show the potential of outperforming or replacing direct methanol fuel cells. A number of issues need to be overcome in order (more)

Holtkamp, John Calvin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

THE ECONOMICS OF REPROCESSING vs DIRECT DISPOSAL OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL  

SciTech Connect

This report assesses the economics of reprocessing versus direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel. The breakeven uranium price at which reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from existing light-water reactors (LWRs) and recycling the resulting plutonium and uranium in LWRs would become economic is assessed, using central estimates of the costs of different elements of the nuclear fuel cycle (and other fuel cycle input parameters), for a wide range of range of potential reprocessing prices. Sensitivity analysis is performed, showing that the conclusions reached are robust across a wide range of input parameters. The contribution of direct disposal or reprocessing and recycling to electricity cost is also assessed. The choice of particular central estimates and ranges for the input parameters of the fuel cycle model is justified through a review of the relevant literature. The impact of different fuel cycle approaches on the volume needed for geologic repositories is briefly discussed, as are the issues surrounding the possibility of performing separations and transmutation on spent nuclear fuel to reduce the need for additional repositories. A similar analysis is then performed of the breakeven uranium price at which deploying fast neutron breeder reactors would become competitive compared with a once-through fuel cycle in LWRs, for a range of possible differences in capital cost between LWRs and fast neutron reactors. Sensitivity analysis is again provided, as are an analysis of the contribution to electricity cost, and a justification of the choices of central estimates and ranges for the input parameters. The equations used in the economic model are derived and explained in an appendix. Another appendix assesses the quantities of uranium likely to be recoverable worldwide in the future at a range of different possible future prices.

Matthew Bunn; Steve Fetter; John P. Holdren; Bob van der Zwaan

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a small impact on the average price of jet fuel and carbon dioxide emissions. We also find thatMarket Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester, Dominic Mc on recycled paper #12;1 Market Cost of Renewable Jet Fuel Adoption in the United States Niven Winchester

173

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Energy for hydrogen and fuel cell vehicle markethybrid, electric and hydrogen fuel cell vehicles, Journal ofof the Transition to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles & the

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alternative Fuels Trade Model, ORNL-6771, SeptemberAssessing the Market Benefits of Alternative Motor Fuels Comparison of Cars with Alternative Fuels/Engines, Energy

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Perovskite-Based Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells ... The addition of Ru substantially improves the CO tolerance of the catalyst, and there has been a great deal of research on the optimization of the alloy composition and structure. ...

Aidong Lan; Alexander S. Mukasyan

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

176

UNDERSTANDING DIRECT BOROHYDRIDE - HYDROGEN PEROXIDE FUEL CELL PERFORMANCE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Direct borohydride fuel cells (DBFCs) generate electrical power by oxidizing aqueous BH4- at the anode and reducing an oxidizer, like aqueous H2O2 for an all-liquid (more)

Stroman, Richard O'Neil

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a Direct-Hydrogen, Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle, SAEversus a Direct-Hydrogen Load-Following Fuel Cell Vehicle,vehicle model of a load-following direct hydrogen fuel cell

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Direct methanol fuel cell and system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

2004-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

179

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation DMFCC Jump to: navigation, search Name Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Corporation (DMFCC) Place Altadena, California Zip 91001 Product DMFCC is focused on providing intellectual property protection and disposable fuel cartridge for the direct methanol fuel cell industry. Coordinates 34.185405°, -118.131529° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.185405,"lon":-118.131529,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

180

SciTech Connect: Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Crude Glycerol as Cost-Effective Fuel for Combined Heat and Power to Replace Fossil Fuels, Final Technical Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Crude Glycerol as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkemas approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are packaged in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkemas approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton conductivity. Optimizing the processing of M41 was found to increase its proton conductivity by almost an order of magnitude at 50% RH. Characterization of the membrane morphology with Karren More at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the membrane morphology was complex. This technology platform was dubbed M43 and was used as a baseline in the majority of the work on the project. Although its performance was superior to M41, M43 still showed proton conductivity an order of magnitude lower than that of a PFSA membrane at 50% RH. The MEA performance of M43 could be increased by reducing the thickness from 1 to 0.6 mils. However, the performance of the thinner M43 still did not match that of a PFSA membrane.

Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

182

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NRELTP-5600-56408...

183

Energy Department Invests Over $7 Million to Commercialize Cost-Effective Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

The Energy Department announced more than $7 million for projects that will help bring cost-effective, advanced hydrogen and fuel cell technologies online faster.

184

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen. DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013 More Documents & Publications Hydrogen Delivery Roadmap US...

185

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report by NREL discusses an analysis of the total cost of ownership of fuel cell-powered and traditional battery-powered material handling equipment.

186

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13013: H2 Delivery Cost Projections 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office provides information about past, current, and projected costs for delivering and dispensing hydrogen.

187

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogen fuel by electrolysis meeting equal consumer costhydrogen fuel production by water electrolysis to provide lower fuel costFig. 2: Cost hydrogen bywater of (Coil) electrolysis as

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

1366 Direct Wafer: Demolishing the Cost Barrier for Silicon Photovoltaics  

SciTech Connect

The goal of 1366 Direct Wafer is to drastically reduce the cost of silicon-based PV by eliminating the cost barrier imposed by sawn wafers. The key characteristics of Direct Wafer are 1) kerf-free, 156-mm standard silicon wafers 2) high throughput for very low CAPEX and rapid scale up. Together, these characteristics will allow Direct Wafer to become the new standard for silicon PV wafers and will enable terawatt-scale PV a prospect that may not be possible with sawn wafers. Our single, high-throughput step will replace the expensive and rate-limiting process steps of ingot casting and sawing, thereby enabling drastically lower wafer cost. This High-Impact PV Supply Chain project addressed the challenges of scaling Direct Wafer technology for cost-effective, high-throughput production of commercially viable 156 mm wafers. The Direct Wafer process is inherently simple and offers the potential for very low production cost, but to realize this, it is necessary to demonstrate production of wafers at high-throughput that meet customer specifications. At the start of the program, 1366 had demonstrated (with ARPA-E funding) increases in solar cell efficiency from 10% to 15.9% on small area (20cm2), scaling wafer size up to the industry standard 156mm, and demonstrated initial cell efficiency on larger wafers of 13.5%. During this program, the throughput of the Direct Wafer furnace was increased by more than 10X, simultaneous with quality improvements to meet early customer specifications. Dedicated equipment for laser trimming of wafers and measurement methods were developed to feedback key quality metrics to improve the process and equipment. Subsequent operations served both to determine key operating metrics affecting cost, as well as generating sample product that was used for developing downstream processing including texture and interaction with standard cell processing. Dramatic price drops for silicon wafers raised the bar significantly, but the developments made under this program have increased 1366 confidence that Direct Wafers can be produced for ~$0.10/W, still nearly 50% lower than current industry best practice. Wafer quality also steadily improved throughout the program, both in electrical performance and geometry. The improvements to electrical performance were achieved through a combination of optimized heat transfer during growth, reduction of metallic impurities to below 10 ppbw total metals, and lowering oxygen content to below 2e17 atoms/cc. Wafer average thickness has been reduced below 200m with standard deviation less than 20m. Measurement of spatially varying thickness shortly after wafer growth is being used to continually improve uniformity by adjusting thermal conditions. At the conclusion of the program, 1366 has developed strong relationships with four leading Tier1 cell manufactures and several have demonstrated 17% cell efficiency on Direct Wafer. Sample volumes were limited, with the largest trial consisting of 300 Direct Wafers, and there remains strong pull for larger quantities necessary for qualification before sales contracts can be signed. This will be the focus of our pilot manufacturing scale up in 2014.

Lorenz, Adam [1366 Technologies] [1366 Technologies

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

189

Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

190

CostPerformance Analysis and Optimization of Fuel-Burning Thermoelectric Power Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy cost analysis and optimization of thermoelectric (TE) power generators burning fossil fuel show a lower initial cost ... The produced heat generates electric power. Unlike waste heat recovery systems, the ...

Kazuaki Yazawa; Ali Shakouri

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Potential Benefits of Utilizing Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units in Lieu of Heavy-Duty Truck Engine Idling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Estimates for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cellsmanufacturing costs of automotive PEM fuel cell systems incosts of different sizes of direct-hydrogen PEM fuel cell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gamma Ray Mirrors for Direct Measurement of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Direct measurement of the amount of Pu and U in spent nuclear fuel represents a challenge for the safeguards community. Ideally, the characteristic gamma-ray emission lines from different isotopes provide an observable suitable for this task. However, these lines are generally lost in the fierce flux of radiation emitted by the fuel. The rates are so high that detector dead times limit measurements to only very small solid angles of the fuel. Only through the use of carefully designed view ports and long dwell times are such measurements possible. Recent advances in multilayer grazing-incidence gamma-ray optics provide one possible means of overcoming this difficulty. With a proper optical and coating design, such optics can serve as a notch filter, passing only narrow regions of the overall spectrum to a fully shielded detector that does not view the spent fuel directly. We report on the design of a mirror system and a number of experimental measurements.

Pivovaroff, Dr. Michael J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Ziock, Klaus-Peter [ORNL] [ORNL; Harrison, Mark J [ORNL] [ORNL; Soufli, Regina [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

A Cost Benefit Analysis of California's Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

s Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks (LUFTs). Submitted to theCalifornias Underground Storage Tank Program. Submitted tos Leaking Underground Fuel Tanks by Samantha Carrington

Carrington-Crouch, Robert

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

High efficiency direct fuel cell hybrid power cycle for near term application  

SciTech Connect

Direct carbonate fuel cells being developed by Energy Research Corporation can generate power at an efficiency approaching 60% LHV. This unique fuel cell technology can consume natural gas and other hydrocarbon based fuels directly without requiring an external reformer, thus providing a simpler and inherently efficient power generation system. A 2 MW power plant demonstration of this technology has been initiated at an installation in the city of Santa Clara in California. A 2.85 MW commercial configuration shown in Figure 1 is presently being developed. The complete plant includes the carbonate fuel cell modules, an inverter, transformer and switchgear, a heat recovery unit and supporting instrument air and water treatment systems. The emission levels for this 2.85 MW plant are projected to be orders of magnitude below existing or proposed standards. The 30 year levelized cost of electricity, without inflation, is projected to be approximately 5{cents}/kW-h assuming capital cost for the carbonate fuel cell system of $1000/kW.

Steinfeld, G.; Maru, H.C. [Energy Research Corp., Danbury, CT (United States); Sanderson, R.A. [Fuel Cell Systems Consultant, Wethersfield, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

196

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 October 1, 2009

197

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Stories of Discovery & Innovation From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass Enlarge Photo Image by Eric Steen, JBEI Once E. coli have secreted oil, they sequester themselves from the droplets as shown by this optical image, thereby facilitating oil recovery. Currently, biochemical processing of cellulosic biomass requires costly enzymes for sugar liberation. By giving the E. coli the capacity to ferment both cellulose and hemicellulose without the 03.28.11 From Gasoline to Grassoline: Microbes Produce Fuels Directly from Biomass A microbe that can produce an advanced biofuel directly from biomass was developed by researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy's Joint BioEnergy

198

Determination of the optimum fuel burn-up and energy intensities of nuclear fuel by the method of cost calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This report gives the procedure for determining the economical efficiency of the utilization of nuclear fuel in a reactor on the basis of calculated costs. The expression obtained for the fuet constituent of the

Yu. I. Koryakin; V. V. Batov; V. G. Smirnov

1964-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cells for Transportation FY 2001 Progress Report 113 V. PEM STACK COMPONENT COST REDUCTION1 A. High-Performance, Matching PEM Fuel Cell Components and Integrated Pilot Manufacturing Processes Mark K polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell components and pilot manufacturing processes to facilitate

200

Low-cost, non-precious metal/polymer composite catalysts for fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will fuel cells take their place as a centerpiece of a hydrogen economy and position hydrogen as a major) activity in known-to-date non- precious metal. Fuel cell testing of the composite Figure 2 shows a hydrogenLow-cost, non-precious metal/polymer composite catalysts for fuel cells R. Bashyam and P. Zelenay 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AURORA Program Overview Topic 4A. Transport within the PEM Stack / Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell Stacks Award#: DE-EE0000472 US DOE Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting Washington, DC September 30, 2009 Program Objectives The objective of this program is to optimize the efficiency of a stack technology meeting DOE cost targets. As cost reduction is of central importance in commercialization, the objective of this program addresses all fuel cell applications. AURORA C. Performance Technical Barriers Premise: DOE cost targets can be met by jointly exceeding both the Pt loading (1.0 W/cm2) targets.

202

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity H2 Gasoline, bio-fuel, H2, electricity Gasoline,bio-diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline, electricity, H2 Powertrains ICE, hybrid, plug-in hybrid, battery, fuel

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

204

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane May 15, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000

205

Cost analysis of air cargo transport and effects of fluctuations in fuel price  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study developed a model with cost functions formulated for different stages of cargo transport operation. A case analysis was performed with actual data from four air cargo traffic routes and eight aircraft types to validate the applicability of the model. The results show that the optimal payloads for various aircraft types vary with fuel price fluctuations. Furthermore, this study determined optimal types of freighter aircraft for different routes. Freight rates increase with rises in fuel price due to the corresponding increase in the fuel surcharge, thus bringing in higher total revenue. When the increase in total revenue exceeds the rise in fuel cost, the optimal payload will drop. Not only can the cost functions reveal the impact of fuel price fluctuations on different aspects of air cargo transport, they can also assist airlines in selecting the aircraft type with the best fuel economy for different route distances and cargo volumes.

Ching-Cheng Chao; Ching-Wen Hsu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane Clean Cities Helps Nonprofit Cut Fuel Costs with Propane May 15, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000 a year. | Photo courtesy of Community Counseling Services. Shannon Brescher Shea Communications Manager, Clean Cities Program What are the key facts? Mississippi's Community Counseling Services converted 29 vans to run on propane, saving more than $1.50 per gallon on fuel or more than $60,000

207

Molten Metal Anodes for Direct Carbon-Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis was to enable the direct utilization of solid carbonaceous fuels like coal and biomass, in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). (more)

Jayakumar, Abhimanyu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Choices of Marine Fuels in a Carbon-Constrained World: Results from a Global Energy Model ... Department

Maria Taljegard; Selma Brynolf; Maria Grahn; Karin Andersson; Hannes Johnson

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect

For the foreseeable future, liquid hydrocarbon fuels will play a significant role in the transportation sector of both the United States and the world. Factors favoring these fuels include convenience, high energy density, and the vast existing infrastructure for their production and use. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports from countries with developing economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be allieviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. One option is direct coal conversion to liquid transportation fuels. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology will results in improved technical readiness that can significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically in a time frame to address the shortfall.

Srivastava, R.D.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D. [Mitre Corp, McLean, VA (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Cost and quality of fuels for electric utility plants: Energy data report. 1980 annual  

SciTech Connect

In 1980 US electric utilities reported purchasng 594 million tons of coal, 408.5 million barrels of oil and 3568.7 billion ft/sup 3/ of gas. As compared with 1979 purchases, coal rose 6.7%, oil decreased 20.9%, and gas increased for the fourth year in a row. This volume presents tabulated and graphic data on the cost and quality of fossil fuel receipts to US electric utilities plants with a combined capacity of 25 MW or greater. Information is included on fuel origin and destination, fuel types, and sulfur content, plant types, capacity, and flue gas desulfurization method used, and fuel costs. (LCL)

Not Available

1981-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

211

An exergy based approach to determine production cost and CO2 allocation for petroleum derived fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The renewable and non-renewable exergy and CO2 costs of petroleum derived fuels produced in Brazil are evaluated using exergoeconomy to rationally distribute the exergy costs and the CO2 emitted in processes with more than one product. An iterative procedure is used to take into account the cyclic interactions of the processed fuels. The renewable and non-renewable exergy costs together with the CO2 cost provide a reasonable way to compare different fuels and can be used to assess an enormous quantity of processes that make use of petroleum derived products. The system considers Brazilian typical processes and distances: offshore oil and gas production, transportation by shuttle tankers and pipelines, and refining. It was observed that the renewable exergy cost contribution in the total exergy cost of petroleum derived fuels is negligible. On average, the refining process is responsible, for 85% of the total unit exergy cost. Total unit exergy costs of gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, natural gas and fuel oil were found to be: 1.081MJ/MJ, 1.074MJ/MJ, 1.064MJ/MJ, 1.05MJ/MJ, respectively. The hydrotreatment process increases diesel cost from 1.038MJ/MJ to 1.11MJ/MJ in order to decrease its sulphur content. The CO2 cost reflects the extent of processing as well as the C/H ratio of the used fuel. Hence, coke followed by hydrotreated diesel have the largest CO2 cost among the fuels, 91gCO2/MJ and 79gCO2/MJ, respectively.

J.A.M. Silva; D. Flrez-Orrego; S. Oliveira Jr.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Developing Low-Cost, Highly Efficient Heat Recovery for Fuel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy is utilizing its current commercialization channels to market the new hybrid fuel cell technologies. Distribution partners LOGAN Energy, Pfister Energy, and PPL Energy Plus...

213

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biogas, LPG, ethanol, bio-diesel, DME, CH2/LH2 Gasoline,Gasoline, bio-fuel, H2, electricity Gasoline, diesel, CNG,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fuel Consumption and Cost Benefits of DOE Vehicle Technologies...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2012. Status: 50% complete. Budget FY12 390K (Vehicle System) 50K (Fuel Cell Specific runs) 75K (link with market analysis) Barriers Evaluate the...

215

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10,000-psi tank cost $2,458, or $11.1/kWh. Carbon fiber wastank cost is in the range of $10-$17/kWh and carbon fiber

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

SciTech Connect

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

SciTech Connect

The results of sensitivity and Monte Carlo analyses on PEM fuel cell components and the overall system are presented including the most important cost factors and the effects of selected scenarios.

Carlson, E. J.; Kopf, P.; Sinha, J.; Sriramulu, S.; Yang, Y.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 11007: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Record 11007 from the U.S. Department of Energy Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate the hydrogen threshold cost of $2.00 to $4.00 per gasoline gallon equivalent.

219

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A network approach for identifying minimum-cost aircraft routing and fuel-allocating decisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1988 Major Subject: Industrial Engineering A NETWORK APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING MINIMUM-COST AIRCRAFT ROUTING AJVD FUEL-ALLOCATING DECISIONS A Thesis by NADER MAHMOUD KABBAVI Approved as to style and content by...A NETWORK APPROACH FOR IDENTIFYING MINIMUM-COST AIRCRAFT ROUTING AND FUEL-ALLOCATING DECISIONS A Thesis by NADER MAHMOUD KABBANI Submitted to the OIIice of Graduate Studies of Texas AkM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement...

Kabbani, Nader Mahmoud

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12001: H2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

01 Date: May 14, 2012 01 Date: May 14, 2012 Title: H 2 Production and Delivery Cost Apportionment Originator: Scott Weil, Sara Dillich, Fred Joseck, and Mark Ruth Approved by: Sunita Satyapal and Rick Farmer Date: December 14, 2012 Item: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the untaxed cost of hydrogen (H 2 ) (produced, delivered, and dispensed) at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a $/mile basis with competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. As established in Record 11007 [1], this cost ranges from $2.00-$4.00/gge a of H 2 (based on $2007). The threshold cost can be apportioned into its constituent H 2 production and delivery costs, which can then serve as the respective cost targets for multi-year planning of the Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT)

222

A PRODUCTIVITY AND COST COMPARISON OF TWO NON-COMMERCIAL FOREST FUEL REDUCTION MACHINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A PRODUCTIVITY AND COST COMPARISON OF TWO NON-COMMERCIAL FOREST FUEL REDUCTION MACHINES M. Chad-commercial equipment designs in a fuel reduction treatment. The machines were: 1) a swing-boom excavator (SBE) equipped with a rotary disc mulching head, and 2) a drive-to- tree flexible tracked machine (FTM) with a rotating drum

Bolding, M. Chad

223

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

system cost model, and oil security metrics model (OSMM).the Energy Security Benefits of Reduced U.S. Oil Imports,

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicle -$1,612 No engine Vehicle retail cost to consumercosts, for hydrogen FCVs and conventional gasoline internal combustion engine vehicles (

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Fuel cycle cost, reactor physics and fuel manufacturing considerations for Erbia-bearing PWR fuel with > 5 wt% U-235 content  

SciTech Connect

The efforts to reduce fuel cycle cost have driven LWR fuel close to the licensed limit in fuel fissile content, 5.0 wt% U-235 enrichment, and the acceptable duty on current Zr-based cladding. An increase in the fuel enrichment beyond the 5 wt% limit, while certainly possible, entails costly investment in infrastructure and licensing. As a possible way to offset some of these costs, the addition of small amounts of Erbia to the UO{sub 2} powder with >5 wt% U-235 has been proposed, so that its initial reactivity is reduced to that of licensed fuel and most modifications to the existing facilities and equipment could be avoided. This paper discusses the potentialities of such a fuel on the US market from a vendor's perspective. An analysis of the in-core behavior and fuel cycle performance of a typical 4-loop PWR with 18 and 24-month operating cycles has been conducted, with the aim of quantifying the potential economic advantage and other operational benefits of this concept. Subsequently, the implications on fuel manufacturing and storage are discussed. While this concept has certainly good potential, a compelling case for its short-term introduction as PWR fuel for the US market could not be determined. (authors)

Franceschini, F.; Lahoda, E. J.; Kucukboyaci, V. N. [Westinghouse Electric Co. LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Perovskite anode electrocatalysis for direct methanol fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

This investigation explores direct methanol fuel cells incorporating perovskite anode electrocatalysts. Preliminary electrochemical performance was addressed following incorporation of electrocatalysts into polymer electrolyte (Nafion 417) fuel cells. Perovskite electrocatalysts demonstrating activity towards direct methanol oxidation during cyclic voltammetry measurements included, respectively, SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrRu[sub 0.5]Pd[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], SrPdO[sub 3], SmCoO[sub 3], SrRuO[sub 3], La[sub 0.8]Ce[sub 0.2]CoC[sub 3],SrCo[sub 0.5]Ti[sub 0.5]O[sub 3], and La[sub 0.8]Sr[sub 0.2]CoO[sub 3] where SrRu[sub 0.5]Pt[sub 0.5]P[sub 3] gave methanol oxidation currents up to 28 mA/cm[sup 2] at 0.45 V vs. SCE. Correlations were found between electrocatalyst solid-state and thermodynamic parameters corresponding to, respectively, molecular electronic polarizability, the optical dielectric constant, the perovskite spin-only magnetic moment, the number of d-electrons in perovskite A and B lattice sites, and the average metal-oxygen binding energy for the perovskite lattice, and corresponding fuel cell performance. This may have future merit for the prediction of new electrocatalyst family members for promoting direct methanol oxidation. Methanol diffusion from anode to cathode compartments appears to be a major obstacle to the development of polymer electrolyte methanol fuel cells.

White, J.H.; Sammells, A.F. (Eltron Research, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

228

2004 DOE Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Review Presentation COST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective is to assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This presentation is a summary of a Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts.

Dinh, H.; Gennett, T.

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic costs and environmental impacts of alternative fuel vehicle fleets in local government: An interim assessment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic costs and environmental impacts of alternative fuel vehicle fleets in local government. This paper examines the cost effectiveness and environmental impact of the conversion of a 180 plus vehicle of Civil and Materials Engineering, and Institute for Environmental Science and Policy, University

Illinois at Chicago, University of

231

Cost Estimating Guide - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

G 413.3-21, Cost Estimating Guide by Ruben Sanchez Functional areas: Budget and Financial Management, Financial Management This Guide provides uniform guidance and best practices...

232

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

SciTech Connect

A total cost of ownership model is described for low temperature proton exchange membrane stationary fuel cell systems for combined heat and power (CHP) applications from 1-250kW and backup power applications from 1-50kW. System designs and functional specifications for these two applications were developed across the range of system power levels. Bottom-up cost estimates were made for balance of plant costs, and detailed direct cost estimates for key fuel cell stack components were derived using design-for-manufacturing-and-assembly techniques. The development of high throughput, automated processes achieving high yield are projected to reduce the cost for fuel cell stacks to the $300/kW level at an annual production volume of 100 MW. Several promising combinations of building types and geographical location in the U.S. were identified for installation of fuel cell CHP systems based on the LBNL modelling tool DER CAM. Life-cycle modelling and externality assessment were done for hotels and hospitals. Reduced electricity demand charges, heating credits and carbon credits can reduce the effective cost of electricity ($/kWhe) by 26-44percent in locations such as Minneapolis, where high carbon intensity electricity from the grid is displaces by a fuel cell system operating on reformate fuel. This project extends the scope of existing cost studies to include externalities and ancillary financial benefits and thus provides a more comprehensive picture of fuel cell system benefits, consistent with a policy and incentive environment that increasingly values these ancillary benefits. The project provides a critical, new modelling capacity and should aid a broad range of policy makers in assessing the integrated costs and benefits of fuel cell systems versus other distributed generation technologies.

University of California, Berkeley; Wei, Max; Lipman, Timothy; Mayyas, Ahmad; Chien, Joshua; Chan, Shuk Han; Gosselin, David; Breunig, Hanna; Stadler, Michael; McKone, Thomas; Beattie, Paul; Chong, Patricia; Colella, Whitney; James, Brian

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

233

High Specific Power, Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt...

234

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough On the Path to Low Cost Renewable Fuels, an Important Breakthrough April 18, 2013 - 4:10pm Addthis NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. NREL Scientist Bryon Donohoe looks at different views of ultra structures of pre-treated biomass materials in the Cellular Visualization room of the Biomass Surface Characterization Lab. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL. A researcher examines a strain of the fermentation microorganism Zymomonas mobilis on a culture plate. NREL has genetically engineered and patented its own strains of Zymomonas mobilis to more effectively ferment the multiple sugars found in biomass as part of the cellulosic ethanol-to-renewable fuel conversion process. | Photo by Dennis Schroeder, NREL.

235

Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kick-off Meeting, Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers Prime Contractor: W. L. Gore & Associates Elkton, MD Principal Investigator: William B. Johnson Sub-Contractor: dPoint Technologies Vancouver, BC W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Ahluwalia, et. al, ibid. Mirza, Z. DOE Hydrogen Program Review, June 9-13, 2008; Washington, DC Background W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc. DOE Kick-off Meeting, Wash. D.C - 10/01/2009 Objective and Technical Barriers Addressed More efficient, low-cost humidifiers can increase fuel cell inlet humidity: Reduce system cost and size of balance of plant; Improve fuel cell performance; Improve fuel cell durability. OBJECTIVE: Demonstrate a durable, high performance water

236

Comparison of costs for automobile energy conservation vs synthetic fuel production  

SciTech Connect

This preliminary analysis suggests that there are a large number of potential technical options for reducing energy consumption in automobiles. Furthermore, the cost to the user of purchasing these conservation options is less than the discounted cost of purchasing the additional fuel required if the conservation option is not chosen. There is a significant cost savings even if fuel costs remain at current levels. These savings would increase if fuel prices continue to rise or if more costly than synthetic fuels, at least for another 15 to 20 years. Cost-effective conservation could enable new vehicles to reach 40 to 50 mpg corporate average fuel economy by the year 2000. It is clear that the potential for making these changes exists, but better data are needed to evaluate many of these options and to ensure the development and implementation of those that are desirable. Specifically, there is a need for more applied research in government and industry laboratories. Key areas for this work are discussed here for: (1) optimized engine designs, and (2) efficient vehicle body structures. 10 references, 10 figures, 3 tables.

Gorman, R.; Heitner, K.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Societal lifetime cost of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total oil increase in oil prices. demand; thus, we assume6), which results from oil price changes, is a real cost toanalysis when we use low-oil-price case and high-oil-price

Sun, Yongling; Ogden, J; Delucchi, Mark

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

NETL: News Release - Full Scale Direct FuelCell? Completes One Year of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March 31, 2000 March 31, 2000 Full Scale Direct FuelCellTM Completes One Year of Operation Confirms Performance and Durability of New Energy Generating Technology A commercial design of an advanced fuel cell - the building block of a family of environmentally super-clean, fuel-flexible power plants - has passed several milestones in a joint public-private development effort. FuelCell Energy's Direct Fuel Cell The Direct FuelCell is a versatile, combustion-less power source being developed in the Department of Energy's fuel cell research program. It can use natural gas, methanol, ethanol, bio-gas or other hydrogen-rich fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has completed one year of commercial design validation and endurance testing of a 250 kilowatt-class Direct FuelCellTM

239

Low Cost PEM Fuel Cell Metal Bipolar Plates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

manufacture. - Demonstrate our metal plate application in portable, stationary and automobile fuel cell systems. 0.00 0.05 0.10 0.15 0.20 0.25 0.30 0.35 0.40 0.45 0.50...

240

Flex Fuel Polygeneration: Optimizing Cost, Sustainability, and Resiliency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Energy sources · Energy carriers 2 #12;Initial Analysis of FFPG Systems · Design power plants;Conventional Approaches to Energy Conversion (Coal, Biomass, Wind, Natural Gas, Photons) ( Fuel, Chemicals, Electricity, Biochar, Heat) Energy Source Energy Carrier Energy Carrier Energy Source Energy Carrier 5 #12;The

Daniels, Thomas E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Cost-effective policy instruments for greenhouse gas emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution through bioenergy production in Austria  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change mitigation and security of energy supply are important targets of Austrian energy policy. Bioenergy production based on resources from agriculture and forestry is an important option for attaining these targets. To increase the share of bioenergy in the energy supply, supporting policy instruments are necessary. The cost-effectiveness of these instruments in attaining policy targets depends on the availability of bioenergy technologies. Advanced technologies such as second-generation biofuels, biomass gasification for power production, and bioenergy with carbon capture and storage (BECCS) will likely change the performance of policy instruments. This article assesses the cost-effectiveness of energy policy instruments, considering new bioenergy technologies for the year 2030, with respect to greenhouse gas emission (GHG) reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Instruments that directly subsidize bioenergy are compared with instruments that aim at reducing GHG emissions. A spatially explicit modeling approach is used to account for biomass supply and energy distribution costs in Austria. Results indicate that a carbon tax performs cost-effectively with respect to both policy targets if BECCS is not available. However, the availability of BECCS creates a trade-off between GHG emission reduction and fossil fuel substitution. Biofuel blending obligations are costly in terms of attaining the policy targets.

Johannes Schmidt; Sylvain Leduc; Erik Dotzauer; Erwin Schmid

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct-Injection Flex-Fuel Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modeling the Effect of Fuel Ethanol Concentration on Cylinder Pressure Evolution in Direct the fuel vaporization pro- cess for ethanol-gasoline fuel blends and the associated charge cooling effect experimental cylinder pressure for different gasoline-ethanol blends and various speeds and loads on a 2.0 L

Stefanopoulou, Anna

243

Can slow steaming lower cost impacts of sulphur directive - shippers' perspective  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) (2013, 2014) and the European Parliament (EP) (2005, 2012) have addressed the matter that harmful air emissions should be decreased in shipping transportation. The purpose of this empirical case study is to examine and anticipate in detail if slow steaming in freight shipping can bring any economically positive effects to shippers in the new fuel situation of 2015, where the sulphur directive is to be followed. As research data for our analysis, we used information on the cost management and transportation of a paper mill. The data was used to study how slow steaming would impact the gross margins of a large paper mill in different markets in 2015. The results of this study can be summarised as the notion that the negative economic impacts of the sulphur directive can be lowered to some extent by using slow steaming on short sea shipping routes. The positive impacts gained from slow steaming will vary largely from market to market. We determined that a case study is a relevant method to study and to reveal economic consequences produced by environmental directives as well as how much slow steaming can remove presupposed negative impacts.

Esa Hämäläinen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Costs Associated With Compressed Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling...  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

stations, vehicles are generally filled directly from the compressor, not from storage tanks. At fast-fill stations, vehicles are filled from high-pressure storage tanks or...

245

Performance and Emissions of Direct Injection Diesel Engine Fueled with Diesel Fuel Containing Dissolved Methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

State Key Laboratory of Multiphase Flow in Power Engineering, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an 710049, People's Republic of China ... soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solns., one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liq. ... (16)?Heywood, J. B. Internal Combustion Engine Fundamentals; McGraw-Hill:? New York, 1988. ...

Junqiang Zhang; Deming Jiang; Zuohua Huang; Xibin Wang; Qi Wei

2006-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Selecting the proper fuel gas for cost-effective oxyfuel cutting  

SciTech Connect

The motivating factor behind recent research and development efforts in metal cutting has been the growing need for companies everywhere to embrace emerging technologies if they are to complete in the global economy. To quickly implement these productivity improvements and gain lower bottom line costs for welding and cutting operations, rapid commercialization of these process advancements is needed. Although initially more expensive, additive-enhanced fuel gases may be the most cost-effective choice for certain cutting applications. The cost of additive-enhanced fuel gases can be justified where oxygen pricing is low (such as with bulk oxygen). Propylene exhibited equal cutting speeds to acetylene and improved cutting economy under specific conditions, which involved longer cuts on thicker base materials. With a longer cut distance, the extra time required to reach the kindling temperature (when compared to acetylene) becomes less critical. It is important to note that kindling temperature was reached more rapidly with propylene than it was with propane, but both fuel gases were slower than acetylene. When factors such as these are considered, many applications are found to be more cost effectively performed with the more expensive acetylene or propylene fuel gases. Each individual application must be studied on a singular basis to determine the most cost-effective choice when selecting the fuel gas.

Lyttle, K.A.; Stapon, W.F.G. [Praxair, Inc., Danbury, CT (United States); Guimaraes, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Multi objective optimization of solid oxide fuel cell stacks considering parameter effects: Fuel utilization and hydrogen cost  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the context of stationary power generation fuel cell based systems are being predicted as a valuable option to tabernacle the thermodynamic cycle based power plants. In this paper multi objective optimization approach is used to optimize the planer solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks performance using genetic algorithm technique. Multi objective optimization generates the most attractive operating conditions of a SOFC system. This allows performing the optimization of the system regarding to two different objectives. Two pairs of different objectives are considered in this paper as distinguished strategies. In the first strategy minimization of the breakeven per-unit energy cost ($/kWh) and maximization of the output power is considered. Similarly two other objectives are also considered in the second strategy as minimization of the breakeven per-unit energy cost ($/kWh) and maximization of the electrical efficiency. Optimization of the first strategy predicts a maximum power output of 108.33?kW at a breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.51 $/kWh and minimum breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.30 $/kWh at a power of 42.18?kW. In the second strategy maximum efficiency of 63.93% at a breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.42$/kWh is predicted while minimum breakeven per-unit energy cost of 0.25 $/kWh at efficiency of 48.3% is obtained. At the end evaluation of parameter effects on multi objective optimization regarding different hydrogen costs and fuel utilization factors are presented. It is worthy to note that the sensitivity analysis for multi objective optimization can be considered both as an advanced analysis tool and as support to technology managers engineers and decision makers when working by such as systems.

Atefeh Behzadi Forough; Ramin Roshandel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this type of fuel cell become a lead- ing candidate to replace batteries in portable applications includA sandwich structured membrane for direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu October 2012 Received in revised form 4 December 2012 Accepted 3 January 2013 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct

Zhao, Tianshou

249

Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Transient Hydrogen Evolution/Oxidation Reactions on the OCV of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells in the mass transport of various species and electrochemical reactions in DMFCs compared with hydrogen- fueled of a direct methanol fuel cell DMFC was observed to undergo an overshoot before it stabilized during

Zhao, Tianshou

250

Hydrogen milestone could help lower fossil fuel refining costs  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Hydrogen researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory have reached another milestone on the road to reducing carbon emissions and protecting the nation against the effects of peaking world oil production. Stephen Herring, laboratory fellow and technical director of the INL High Temperature Electrolysis team, today announced that the latest fuel cell modification has set a new mark in endurance. The group's Integrated Laboratory Scale experiment has now operated continuously for 2,583 hours at higher efficiencies than previously attained. Learn more about INL research at http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

McGraw, Jennifer

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

251

Cost Study for Manufacturing of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems can be designed to produce electricity from fossil fuels at extremely high net efficiencies, approaching 70%. However, in order to penetrate commercial markets to an extent that significantly impacts world fuel consumption, their cost will need to be competitive with alternative generating systems, such as gas turbines. This report discusses a cost model developed at PNNL to estimate the manufacturing cost of SOFC power systems sized for ground-based distributed generation. The power system design was developed at PNNL in a study on the feasibility of using SOFC power systems on more electric aircraft to replace the main engine-mounted electrical generators [Whyatt and Chick, 2012]. We chose to study that design because the projected efficiency was high (70%) and the generating capacity was suitable for ground-based distributed generation (270 kW).

Weimar, Mark R.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Gotthold, David W.; Whyatt, Greg A.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

252

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

253

Optimum Performance of Direct Hydrogen Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

kW) Vehicle Mass (kg) Electric Motor (kW) Fuel Cell StackkW) Vehicle Mass (kg) Electric Motor (kW) Fuel Cell Stack

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partners Budget Colorado School of Mines (CSM) Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) BASF Fuel Cells (BASF) MTI MicroFuel Cells (MTI) Timeline 2009 - 2011 2009 (Aug) 2011 2010...

255

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

the purpose of producing or blending diesel fuel containing at least 2% biodiesel or green diesel. Eligible direct costs must have been incurred after December 31, 2002. A...

256

Transportation costs for new fuel forms produced from low rank US coals  

SciTech Connect

Transportation costs are examined for four types of new fuel forms (solid, syncrude, methanol, and slurry) produced from low rank coals found in the lower 48 states of the USA. Nine low rank coal deposits are considered as possible feedstocks for mine mouth processing plants. Transportation modes analyzed include ship/barge, pipelines, rail, and truck. The largest potential market for the new fuel forms is coal-fired utility boilers without emission controls. Lowest cost routes from each of the nine source regions to supply this market are determined. 12 figs.

Newcombe, R.J.; McKelvey, D.G. (TMS, Inc., Germantown, MD (USA)); Ruether, J.A. (USDOE Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center, PA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Design of high-ionic conductivity electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon-supported porous electrodes are used in low-temperature fuel cells to provide maximum catalyst surface area, while taking up little volume and using minimum catalyst material. In Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFCs), ...

Schrauth, Anthony J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A new principle for low-cost hydrogen sensors for fuel cell technology safety  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen sensors are of paramount importance for the safety of hydrogen fuel cell technology as result of the high pressure necessary in fuel tanks and its low explosion limit. I present a novel sensor principle based on thermal conduction that is very sensitive to hydrogen, highly specific and can operate on low temperatures. As opposed to other thermal sensors it can be operated with low cost and low power driving electronics. On top of this, as sensor element a modified standard of-the shelf MEMS thermopile IR-sensor can be used. The sensor principle presented is thus suited for the future mass markets of hydrogen fuel cell technology.S.

Liess, Martin [Rhein Main University of Applied Sciences, Rsselsheim, Wiesbaden (Germany)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

259

Efforts intensify to convert methane to fuels directly  

SciTech Connect

Until now the assumption has been that synthesis gas - mixtures of carbon monoxide and hydrogen - would be the principal source for many of the chemicals and fuels to be made via C/sub 1/ chemistry. Efforts to make cheap synthesis gas continue. But the pressure to circumvent the stranglehold that OPEC has on petroleum has caused other avenues to be explored. The current oversupply of natural gas offers an interim solution to the problem of nonpetroleum alternate source materials for C/sub 1/ chemicals production. The paper discusses the constraints and advantages of four processes: conventional steam reforming, steam reforming with oxygen secondary, partial oxidation, and catalytic partial oxidation. The end product in all cases is methanol. Direct use of methanol as a fuel has encountered numerous difficulties. conversion of methanol is, thus, of more immediate interest in C/sub 1/ chemistry. The Mobil MTG process and its second-generation modifications, both producing high-grade gasoline, are discussed. Also, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, and the Sasol coal liquefaction processes are summarized.

Haggin, J.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 October 1, 2009

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Novel Approach to Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 October 1, 2009

262

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The DOE is conducting a comprehensive technical analysis of a flexible-fuel transportation system in the United States -- that is, a system that could easily switch between petroleum and another fuel, depending on price and availability. The DOE Alternative Fuels Assessment is aimed directly at questions of energy security and fuel availability, but covers a wide range of issues. This report examines environmental, health, and safety concerns associated with a switch to alternative- and flexible-fuel vehicles. Three potential alternatives to oil-based fuels in the transportation sector are considered: methanol, compressed natural gas (CNG), and electricity. The objective is to describe and discuss qualitatively potential environmental, health, and safety issues that would accompany widespread use of these three fuels. This report presents the results of exhaustive literature reviews; discussions with specialists in the vehicular and fuel-production industries and with Federal, State, and local officials; and recent information from in-use fleet tests. Each chapter deals with the end-use and process emissions of air pollutants, presenting an overview of the potential air pollution contribution of the fuel --relative to that of gasoline and diesel fuel -- in various applications. Carbon monoxide, particulate matter, ozone precursors, and carbon dioxide are emphasized. 67 refs., 6 figs. , 8 tabs.

Not Available

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

REDUCING ULTRA-CLEAN TRANSPORTATION FUEL COSTS WITH HYMELT HYDROGEN  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the third quarter of work performed under this agreement. Atmospheric testing was conducted as scheduled on June 5 through June 13, 2003. The test results were encouraging, however, the rate of carbon dissolution was below expectations. Additional atmospheric testing is scheduled for the first week of September 2003. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consists of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product stream. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream will be gasified. DOE and EnviRes will evaluate the results of this work to determine the feasibility and desirability of proceeding to Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, which is gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

Capturing the impact of fuel price on jet aircraft operating costs with Leontief technology and econometric models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigation of the airline response to a fuel price increase is in effect an investigation of the role of variable interactions in aircraft cost models. We examine the impact of fuel price on aircraft costs and airline operational strategies by developing two classes of operating cost models for jet aircraft and comparing the results. The translog operating cost model is a flexible functional form that provides a detailed representation of the empirical relationship between fuel cost and operating cost, allowing for substitution, scale, aircraft age, and variable interactions to be captured. The simpler Leontief model assumes that inputs of a cost model must be used in fixed proportions regardless of their prices. While it does not capture variable interactions, the Leontief model is more transparent, requires fewer inputs, and allows the contribution of a single factor, such as fuel price, to operating cost to be more easily isolated. An analysis of the translog operating cost model reveals that as fuel price increases, airlines will take steps to use fuel more efficiently by leveraging other inputs; a comparison of the translog and the Leontief technology models, however, show that the potential for this supplier input substitution for fuel is rather modest. By building the two operating cost models and comparing their predictions, we illustrate a method to determine the prediction potential of a Leontief technology model and assess the importance of input substitution at the vehicle level.

Megan Smirti Ryerson; Mark Hansen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Author's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of this, a 1987 amendment to the US Nuclear Waste Policy Act mandates the Secretary of Energy to report on a site for a second repository by 2010 (Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act, 1987). HoweverAuthor's personal copy Cost analysis of the US spent nuclear fuel reprocessing facility E

Deinert, Mark

266

Use of wood as fuel in the aluminate recovery process provides cost savings  

SciTech Connect

The aluminate recovery process in its original concept is reviewed. Recent developments built around the use of groundwood or bark are discussed with results from laboratory, pilot plant, and full-scale trials. Fuel cost savings are obvious. Significant improvements in feed preparation, materials handling, improved chemistry, reaction efficiency, and reactor capacity are presented. (Refs. 6).

Cook, W.R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0) 0) Distribution Category UC-950 Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants 2000 Tables August 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts The annual publication Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Utility Plants (C&Q) is no longer published by the EIA. The tables presented in this document are intended to replace that annual publication. Questions

268

Production and Optimization of Direct Coal Liquefaction derived Low Carbon-Footprint Transportation Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes works conducted under DOE Contract No. DE-FC26-05NT42448. The work scope was divided into two categories - (a) experimental program to pretreat and refine a coal derived syncrude sample to meet transportation fuels requirements; (b) system analysis of a commercial scale direct coal liquefaction facility. The coal syncrude was derived from a bituminous coal by Headwaters CTL, while the refining study was carried out under a subcontract to Axens North America. The system analysis included H{sub 2} production cost via six different options, conceptual process design, utilities requirements, CO{sub 2} emission and overall plant economy. As part of the system analysis, impact of various H{sub 2} production options was evaluated. For consistence the comparison was carried out using the DOE H2A model. However, assumptions in the model were updated using Headwaters database. Results of Tier 2 jet fuel specifications evaluation by the Fuels & Energy Branch, US Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL/RZPF) located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Ohio) are also discussed in this report.

Steven Markovich

2010-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell-Powered Material Handling Equipment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of the Total Cost Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408 April 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 An Evaluation of the Total Cost of Ownership of Fuel Cell- Powered Material Handling Equipment Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory Prepared under Task No. HT12.8610 Technical Report NREL/TP-5600-56408

270

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost and equipment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel switch could bring big savings for HECO Liquefied natural gas beats low-sulfur oil in cost gas instead of continuing to burn low-sulfur fuel oil, a report said. Switching to liquefied natural who switch from gasoline-powered vehicles to ones fueled by compressed natural gas could save as much

271

Premixed direct injection nozzle for highly reactive fuels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fuel/air mixing tube for use in a fuel/air mixing tube bundle is provided. The fuel/air mixing tube includes an outer tube wall extending axially along a tube axis between an inlet end and an exit end, the outer tube wall having a thickness extending between an inner tube surface having a inner diameter and an outer tube surface having an outer tube diameter. The tube further includes at least one fuel injection hole having a fuel injection hole diameter extending through the outer tube wall, the fuel injection hole having an injection angle relative to the tube axis. The invention provides good fuel air mixing with low combustion generated NOx and low flow pressure loss translating to a high gas turbine efficiency, that is durable, and resistant to flame holding and flash back.

Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Johnson, Thomas Edward; Lacy, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Uhm, Jong Ho; Zuo, Baifang

2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

272

Turbocharged Spark Ignited Direct Injection- A Fuel Economy Solution for The US  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Turbocharged SIDI is the most promising advanced gasoline technology; combines existing & proven technologies in a synergistic manner, offers double digit fuel economy benefits, much lower cost than diesel or hybrid.

273

New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- srpported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

Adzic, Radoslav

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

FY2002 Progress Report for Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuels for Advanced Compression Fuels for Advanced Compression Ignition Direct Injection (CIDI) Engines Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Approved by Stephen Goguen November 2002 Fuels for Advanced CIDI Engines FY 2002 Progress Report iii CONTENTS CONTENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . iii INDEX OF PRIMARY CONTACTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . v I. INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 II. FUEL/LUBRICANT EFFECTS TESTING ON ENGINE PERFORMANCE . . . . . . . . . 13 A. Oil Consumption Contribution to CIDI PM Emissions during Transient Operation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13

275

US Spent (Used) Fuel Status, Management and Likely Directions- 12522  

SciTech Connect

As of 2010, the US has accumulated 65,200 MTU (42,300 MTU of PWR's; 23,000 MTU of BWR's) of spent (irradiated or used) fuel from 104 operating commercial nuclear power plants situated at 65 sites in 31 States and from previously shutdown commercial nuclear power plants. Further, the Department of Energy (DOE) has responsibility for an additional 2458 MTU of DOE-owned defense and non defense spent fuel from naval nuclear power reactors, various non-commercial test reactors and reactor demonstrations. The US has no centralized large spent fuel storage facility for either commercial spent fuel or DOE-owned spent fuel. The 65,200 MTU of US spent fuel is being safely stored by US utilities at numerous reactor sites in (wet) pools or (dry) metal or concrete casks. As of November 2010, the US had 63 'independent spent fuel storage installations' (or ISFSI's) licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission located at 57 sites in 33 states. Over 1400 casks loaded with spent fuel for dry storage are at these licensed ISFSI's; 47 sites are located at commercial reactor sites and 10 are located 'away' from a reactor (AFR's) site. DOE's small fraction of a 2458 MTU spent fuel inventory, which is not commercial spent fuel, is with the exception of 2 MTU, being stored at 4 sites in 4 States. The decades old US policy of a 'once through' fuel cycle with no recycle of spent fuel was set into a state of 'mass confusion or disruption' when the new US President Obama's administration started in early 2010 stopping the only US geologic disposal repository at the Yucca Mountain site in the State of Nevada from being developed and licensed. The practical result is that US nuclear power plant operators will have to continue to be responsible for managing and storing their own spent fuel for an indefinite period of time at many different sites in order to continue to generate electricity because there is no current US government plan, schedule or policy for taking possession of accumulated spent fuel from the utilities. There are technical solutions for continuing the safe storage of spent fuel for 100 years or more and these solutions will be implemented by the US utilities that need to keep their nuclear power plants operating while the unknown political events are played out to establish future US policy decisions that can remain in place long enough regarding accumulated spent fuel inventories to implement any new US spent fuel centralized storage or disposition policy by the US government. (author)

Jardine, Leslie J. [L. J. Jardine Services, Consultant, Dublin CA, 94568 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Dry low NOx combustion system with pre-mixed direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A combustion system includes a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber. The second combustion chamber is positioned downstream of the first combustion chamber. The combustion system also includes a pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle. The pre-mixed, direct-injection secondary fuel nozzle extends through the first combustion chamber into the second combustion chamber.

Zuo, Baifang; Johnson, Thomas; Ziminsky, Willy; Khan, Abdul

2013-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

277

Cost of Adding E85 Fuel Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search (Fact Sheet)  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search The cost of purchasing and installing E85 fueling equip- ment varies widely, yet station owners need to have an idea of what to expect when budgeting or reviewing bids for this upgrade. The purpose of this document is to provide a framework for station owners to assess what a reason- able cost would be. This framework was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) by surveying actual costs for stations, conducting a literature search, not- ing the major cost-affecting variables, addressing anomalies in the survey, and projecting changes in future costs. The findings of NREL's survey and literature search are shown in the table below. This table divides the study's

278

Turbocharged Spark Ignited Direct Injection - A Fuel Economy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

- A Fuel Economy Solution for The US Turbocharged SIDI is the most promising advanced gasoline technology; combines existing & proven technologies in a synergistic manner, offers...

279

Commercialization of IH2 Biomass Direct-to-Hydrocarbon Fuel...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

60.9 vs 66.4mln galyear; 4500bblday * Equipment cost - HMU is largest @ 55mln 45% TIC * Feed Stock 55% of Operating Cost * No subsidies, tax, RIN or carbon credits...

280

Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation: September 30, 2005  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Subcontract Report Subcontract Report Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell NREL/SR-560-39104 Systems for Transportation December 2005 September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL is operated by Midwest Research Institute ● Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Cost Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation September 30, 2005 E.J. Carlson, P. Kopf, J. Sinha, S. Sriramulu, and Y. Yang TIAX LLC Cambridge, Massachusetts NREL Technical Monitor: K. Wipke Prepared under Subcontract No. KACX-5-44452-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-560-39104 December 2005 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Low-cost and durable catalyst support for fuel cells: graphite submicronparticles  

SciTech Connect

Low-cost graphite submicronparticles (GSP) are employed as a possible catalyst support for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Platinum nanoparticles are deposited on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black (XC-72), carbon nanotubes (CNT), and GSP via ethylene glycol (EG) reduction method. The morphologies and the crystallinity of Pt/XC-72, Pt/CNT, and Pt/GSP are characterized with X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope, which shows that Pt nanoparticles (~ 3.5 nm) are uniformly dispersed on GSP support. Pt/GSP exhibits the highest activity towards oxygen reduction reactions. The durability study indicates that Pt/GSP is 2 ~ 3 times durable than Pt/CNT and Pt/XC-72. The enhanced durability of Pt/GSP catalyst is attributed to the higher corrosion resistance of graphite submicronparticles, which results from higher graphitization degree of GSP support. Considering its low production cost, graphite submicronparticles are promising electrocatalyst support for fuel cells.

Zhang, Sheng; Shao, Yuyan; Li, Xiaohong; Nie, Zimin; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun; Yin, Geping; Lin, Yuehe

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Evaluation of Fuel Cell Auxiliary Power Units for Heavy-Duty Diesel Trucks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cost Estimates for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cellsmanufacturing costs of automotive PEM fuel cell systems incosts of di?erent sizes of direct-hydrogen PEM fuel cell

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Cost-Benefit Analysis of Flexibility Retrofits for Coal and Gas-Fueled Power Plants: August 2012 - December 2013  

SciTech Connect

High penetrations of wind and solar power plants can induce on/off cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generators. This can lead to wear-and-tear costs and changes in emissions for fossil-fueled generators. Phase 2 of the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study (WWSIS-2) determined these costs and emissions and simulated grid operations to investigate the full impact of wind and solar on the fossil-fueled fleet. This report studies the costs and benefits of retrofitting existing units for improved operational flexibility (i.e., capability to turndown lower, start and stop faster, and ramp faster between load set-points).

Venkataraman, S.; Jordan, G.; O'Connor, M.; Kumar, N.; Lefton, S.; Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Palchak, D.; Cochran, J.

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5040: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

40 Date: December 12, 2008 40 Date: December 12, 2008 Title: 2005 Hydrogen Cost from Water Electrolysis Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: December 19, 2008 Item: The 2005 cost status for hydrogen produced from distributed water electrolysis is $5.90 / gge. Assumptions and References: The H2A analysis used to determine the projected cost of $5.88/gge (rounded up to $5.90/gge) was performed by Directed Technologies, Inc. and can be found in Record 5040a. The increase in cost compared to the 2004 analysis ($5.45/gge) is due to two assumptions changed in the model: (a) an increase in the industrial electricity price from 5¢/kWh to 5.5¢/kWh from the EIA Annual Energy Outlook, and (b) an increase in the capital cost estimate of the electrolyzer. The other assumptions in the analysis used standard values

285

New Directions in Fuels Technology | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

All fuels have their pros and cons that become evident at large scale, and while biofuels are a critical part of the energy future, they are not the only solution...

286

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5014: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5014 Date: December 15, 2005 5014 Date: December 15, 2005 Title: Electricity Price Effect on Electrolysis Cost Originator: Roxanne Garland Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Date: January 2, 2006 Item: Effect of Electricity Price on Distributed Hydrogen Production Cost (Assumes: 1500 GGE/day, electrolyzer at 76% efficiency, and capital cost of $250/kW) The graph is based on the 2010 target of a 1500 kg/day water electrolysis refueling station described on page 3-12 of the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan, February 2005. The graph uses all the same assumptions associated with the target, except for electricity price: Reference: - 76% efficient electrolyzer - 75% system efficiency

287

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mass transport phenomena in direct methanol fuel cells T.S. Zhao*, C. Xu, R. Chen, W.W. Yang January 2009 Available online 20 February 2009 Keywords: Fuel cell Direct methanol fuel cell Mass efficient energy production has long been sought to solve energy and environmental problems. Fuel cells

Zhao, Tianshou

288

Performance and cost of automotive fuel cell systems with ultra-low platinum loadings.  

SciTech Connect

An automotive polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) system with ultra-low platinum loading (0.15 mg-Pt cm{sup -2}) has been analyzed to determine the relationship between its design-point efficiency and the system efficiency at part loads, efficiency over drive cycles, stack and system costs, and heat rejection. The membrane electrode assemblies in the reference PEFC stack use nanostructured, thin-film ternary catalysts supported on organic whiskers and a modified perfluorosulfonic acid membrane. The analyses show that the stack Pt content can be reduced by 50% and the projected high-volume manufacturing cost by >45% for the stack and by 25% for the system, if the design-point system efficiency is lowered from 50% to 40%. The resulting penalties in performance are a <1% reduction in the system peak efficiency; a 2-4% decrease in the system efficiency on the urban, highway, and LA92 drive cycles; and a 6.3% decrease in the fuel economy of the modeled hybrid fuel-cell vehicle on the combined cycle used by EPA for emission and fuel economy certification. The stack heat load, however, increases by 50% at full power (80 kW{sub e}) but by only 23% at the continuous power (61.5 kW{sub e}) needed to propel the vehicle on a 6.5% grade at 55 mph. The reduced platinum and system cost advantages of further lowering the design-point efficiency from 40% to 35% are marginal. The analyses indicate that thermal management in the lower efficiency systems is very challenging and that the radiator becomes bulky if the stack temperature cannot be allowed to increase to 90-95 C under driving conditions where heat rejection is difficult.

Ahluwalia, R.; Wang, X.; Kwon, K.; Rousseau, A.; Kalinoski, J.; James, B.; Marcinkoski, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE); (Directed Technologies Inc.); (ED)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This program record from the Department of Energy's Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program provides information about the projected performance and cost parameters of on-board hydrogen storage systems.

290

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Activities: Progress and Future Directions Total Energy USA Houston, Texas Dr. Sunita Satyapal 11/27/2012 Director, Office of Fuel Cell Technologies Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy U.S. Department of Energy Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry United States 46% Germany 7% Korea 7% Canada 3% Taiwan 1% Great Britain 1% France 1% Other 3% Japan 31% Fuel Cell Patents Geographic Distribution 2002-2011 Top 10 companies: GM, Honda, Samsung, Toyota, UTC Power, Nissan, Ballard, Plug Power, Panasonic, Delphi Technologies Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Source: Clean Energy Patent Growth Index Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011.

291

Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs … Cost Accounting Standard 418 … at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, OAS-L-13-07  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Allocation of Direct and Indirect Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418 - at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OAS-L-13-07 April 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 11, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE MANAGER, LIVERMORE SITE OFFICE FROM: Rickey R. Hass Deputy Inspector General for Audits and Inspections Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on the "Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418 - at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory" BACKGROUND The attached report presents the results of the audit of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (Livermore) Allocation of Direct and Indirect Costs - Cost Accounting Standard 418, conducted to address the performance audit objective described below. The Office of

292

High Fuel Costs Spark Increased Use of Wood for Home Heating by Brian Handwerk for National Geographic News  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

families reducing their costly household oil or gas dependence by turning to a traditional fuel is typically delivered to homes in tanks, and is almost as expensive as heating oil. Berry manages the EIA Hampshire. Just last week, Erik said, he had a discussion with his fuel-oil supplier about how little oil

South Bohemia, University of

293

Assessment of costs and benefits of flexible and alternative fuel use in the US transportation sector  

SciTech Connect

The Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-494), Section 400EE, states that the Secretary of Energy ...shall study methanol plants, including the costs and practicability of such plants that are (A) capable of utilizing current domestic supplies of unutilized natural gas; (B) relocatable; or (C) suitable for natural gas to methanol conversion by natural gas distribution companies...'' The purpose of this report is to characterize unutilized gas within the lower 48 states and to perform an economic analysis of methanol plants required by the act. The approach with regard to unutilized lower 48 gas is to (1) compare the costs of converting such gas to methanol against the expected price of gasoline over the next 20 years, and (2) compare the economics of converting such gas to methanol against the economics of using the gas as a pipeline-transported fuel. This study concludes that remote gas and low-Btu gas generally cannot be converted to methanol at costs near the expected competitive value of gasoline because of the poor economies of scale of small methanol plants.

Not Available

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Performance of a direct ethylene glycol fuel cell with an anion-exchange membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an anion-exchange membrane with non-platinum electrocatalysts at both the anode and cathode on the development and performance test of an alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cell. The fuel cell consists with the existing electrocatalysts at low temperatures; as a result, the main product of ethanol oxidation reaction

Zhao, Tianshou

295

Stationary Fuel Cell System Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Technical Advisor Bryan Pivovar Phone: (303) 275-3809 Email: bryan.pivovar@nrel.gov Sub-Contract Number No: AGB-0-40628-01 under Prime Contract No. DE-AC36-08G028308 Project Start Date: July 8, 2010 Project End Date: September 7, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Perform Design for Manufacturing and Assembly * (DFMA ® ) cost analysis for low-temperature (LT)

296

Conductivity measurements of molten metal oxides and their evaluation in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Since Direct Carbon Fuel Cell (DCFC) technology is in a beginning stage, emphasis should be laid on addressing the fundamental aspects. A molten electrolyte is required to facilitate ionic contact between solid ...

Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

Burning of Hydrocarbon Fuels Directly in a Water-Based Heat Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A principal possibility of burning hydrocarbon fuels directly in a water-based heat carrier is demonstrated. The first experimental results are presented by an example of burning acetylene in water with initia...

V. S. Teslenko; V. I. Manzhalei; R. N. Medvedev

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHAPTER 9 Two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport in direct methanol fuel cells G. Lu & C, including two-phase microfluidics, heat and mass transport. We explain how the better understanding

299

DEVELOPMENT OF LOW-COST MANUFACTURING PROCESSES FOR PLANAR, MULTILAYER SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL ELEMENTS  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a four-year project, entitled, ''Low-Cost Manufacturing Of Multilayer Ceramic Fuel Cells'', jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, the State of Ohio, and by project participants. The project was led by NexTech Materials, Ltd., with subcontracting support provided by University of Missouri-Rolla, Michael A. Cobb & Co., Advanced Materials Technologies, Inc., Edison Materials Technology Center, Gas Technology Institute, Northwestern University, and The Ohio State University. Oak Ridge National Laboratory, though not formally a subcontractor on the program, supported the effort with separate DOE funding. The objective of the program was to develop advanced manufacturing technologies for making solid oxide fuel cell components that are more economical and reliable for a variety of applications. The program was carried out in three phases. In the Phase I effort, several manufacturing approaches were considered and subjected to detailed assessments of manufacturability and development risk. Estimated manufacturing costs for 5-kW stacks were in the range of $139/kW to $179/kW. The risk assessment identified a number of technical issues that would need to be considered during development. Phase II development work focused on development of planar solid oxide fuel cell elements, using a number of ceramic manufacturing methods, including tape casting, colloidal-spray deposition, screen printing, spin-coating, and sintering. Several processes were successfully established for fabrication of anode-supported, thin-film electrolyte cells, with performance levels at or near the state-of-the-art. The work in Phase III involved scale-up of cell manufacturing methods, development of non-destructive evaluation methods, and comprehensive electrical and electrochemical testing of solid oxide fuel cell materials and components.

Scott Swartz; Matthew Seabaugh; William Dawson; Harlan Anderson; Tim Armstrong; Michael Cobb; Kirby Meacham; James Stephan; Russell Bennett; Bob Remick; Chuck Sishtla; Scott Barnett; John Lannutti

2004-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

300

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experimental Study of Diesel Fuel Effects on Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Performance and Pollutant Emissions ... The test fuels indicate variable hydrocarbon composition and physical and chemical properties, and they were prepared under a European Union research program aiming to identify future fuel formulations for use in modern DI diesel engines. ... 1,2,4-9,13,14,16,17,24-26 In general, there is an interrelation between the molecular structure (paraffins, olefins, napthenes, and aromatic hydrocarbons), the chemical properties (cetane number, ignition point, etc.), and the physical properties (density, viscosity, surface tension, etc.) of the diesel fuel. ...

Theodoros C. Zannis; Dimitrios T. Hountalas; Roussos G. Papagiannakis

2007-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Exploratory fuel-cell research: I. Direct-hydrocarbon polymer-electrolyte fuel cell. II. Mathematical modeling of fuel-cell cathodes  

SciTech Connect

A strong need exists today for more efficient energy-conversion systems. Our reliance on limited fuel resources, such as petroleum for the majority of our energy needs makes it imperative that we utilize these resources as efficiently as possible. Higher-efficiency energy conversion also means less pollution, since less fuel is consumed and less exhaust created for the same energy output. Additionally, for many industrialized nations, such as the United States which must rely on petroleum imports, it is also imperative from a national-security standpoint to reduce the consumption of these precious resources. A substantial reduction of U.S. oil imports would result in a significant reduction of our trade deficit, as well as costly military spending to protect overseas petroleum resources. Therefore, energy-conversion devices which may utilize alternative fuels are also in strong demand. This paper describes research on fuel cells for transportation.

Perry, M.L.; McLarnon, F.R.; Newman, J.S.; Cairns, E.J.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Hydrogen Refueling Infrastructure Cost Analysis - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Marc W. Melaina (Primary Contact), Michael Penev and Darlene Steward National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3836 Email: Marc.Melaina@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: IDC Energy Insights, Framingham, MA Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: September 28, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Identify the capacity (kg/day) and capital costs * associated with "Early Commercial" hydrogen stations (defined below) Identify cost metrics for larger numbers of stations and * larger capacities Technical Barriers This project addresses the following technical barriers

303

Implementation of direct LSC method for diesel samples on the fuel market  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The European Union develops common EU policy and strategy on biofuels and sustainable bio-economy through several documents. The encouragement of biofuel?s consumption is therefore the obligation of each EU member state. The situation in Slovenian fuel market is presented and compared with other EU countries in the frame of prescribed values from EU directives. Diesel is the most common fuel for transportation needs in Slovenia. The study was therefore performed on diesel. The sampling net was determined in accordance with the fuel consumption statistics of the country. 75 Sampling points were located on different types of roads. The quantity of bio-component in diesel samples was determined by direct LSC method through measurement of C-14 content. The measured values were in the range from 0 up to nearly 6 mass percentage of bio-component in fuel. The method has proved to be appropriate, suitable and effective for studies on the real fuel market.

Romana Kritof; Marko Hirsch; Jasmina Koar Logar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Direct production of fractionated and upgraded hydrocarbon fuels from biomass  

SciTech Connect

Multistage processing of biomass to produce at least two separate fungible fuel streams, one dominated by gasoline boiling-point range liquids and the other by diesel boiling-point range liquids. The processing involves hydrotreating the biomass to produce a hydrotreatment product including a deoxygenated hydrocarbon product of gasoline and diesel boiling materials, followed by separating each of the gasoline and diesel boiling materials from the hydrotreatment product and each other.

Felix, Larry G.; Linck, Martin B.; Marker, Terry L.; Roberts, Michael J.

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: PEMFC Manufacturing Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PEMFC Manufacturing Cost PEMFC Manufacturing Cost Project Summary Full Title: Manufacturing Cost of Stationary Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems Project ID: 85 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; fuel cells; stationary Performer Principal Investigator: Brian James Organization: Directed Technologies, Inc. (DTI) Address: 3601 Wilson Blvd., Suite 650 Arlington, VA 22201 Telephone: 703-243-3383 Email: brian_james@directedtechnologies.com Period of Performance End: November 1999 Project Description Type of Project: Analysis Category: Cross-Cutting Objectives: Estimate the cost of the fuel cell system using the Directed Technologies, Inc. cost database built up over the several years under U.S. Department of Energy and Ford Motor Company contracts.

306

Preprint of a paper to be presented at UUVS 2005, Southampton, Sept 2005 Cost vs. performance for fuel cells and batteries within AUVs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that secondary lithium batteries offer the lowest energy cost. PEM fuel cells should produce energy at a lower integrators, we are in a position to make estimates of the cost of energy from a marinised fuel cell for fuel cells and batteries within AUVs Gwyn Griffiths National Oceanography Centre, Southampton

Griffiths, Gwyn

307

Assessing the Role of Operating, Passenger, and Infrastructure Costs in Fleet Planning under Fuel Price Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICKET . Aircraft Category Fuel Price (FP) Coefficient SL*FPin Fleet Planning under Fuel Price Uncertainty Megan Smirti,in Fleet Planning under Fuel Price Uncertainty Megan Smirti,

Smirti, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Journal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Published by Elsevier B.V. Keywords: Fuel cell; Hydrogen peroxide; Regenerative fuel cell; Sodium) /hydrogen per- oxide (H2O2) fuel cell (FC) is under development jointly by the University of IllinoisJournal of Power Sources 165 (2007) 509­516 Direct NaBH4/H2O2 fuel cells George H. Mileya,e,, Nie

Carroll, David L.

309

Cost effectiveness of converting to alternative motor vehicle fuels. A technical assistance study for the City of Longview  

SciTech Connect

The City of Longview can obtain significant fuel savings benefits by converting a portion of their vehicle fleet to operate on either compressed natural gas (CNG) or liquid petroleum gas (LPG) fuels. The conversion of 41 vehicles including police units, sedans, pickups, and light duty trucks to CNG use would offset approximately 47% of the city's 1982 gasoline consumption. The CNG conversion capital outlay of $115,000 would be recovered through fuel cost reductions. The Cascade Natural Gas Corporation sells natural gas under an interruptible tariff for $0.505 per therm, equivalent to slightly less than one gallon of gasoline. The city currently purchases unleaded gasoline at $1.115 per gallon. A payback analysis indicates that 39.6 months are required for the CNG fuel savings benefits to offset the initial or first costs of the conversion. The conversion of fleet vehicles to liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or propane produces comparable savings in vehicle operating costs. The conversion of 59 vehicles including police units, pickup and one ton trucks, street sweepers, and five cubic yard dump trucks would cost approximately $59,900. The annual purchase of 107,000 gallons of propane would offset the consumption of 96,300 gallons of gasoline, or approximately 67% of the city's 1982 usage. Propane is currently retailing for $0.68 to $0.74 per gallon. A payback analysis indicates that 27.7 months are required for the fuel savings benefits to offset the initial LPG conversion costs.

McCoy, G.A.

1983-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

310

Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Material Handling Equipment Demonstration - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Todd Ramsden National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 275-3704 Email: todd.ramsden@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Peter Devlin Phone: (202) 586-4905 Email: Peter.Devlin@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Oorja Protonics, Inc., Fremont, CA Project Start Date: June 1, 2010 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Operate and maintain fuel-cell-powered material * handling equipment (MHE) using direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. Compile operational data of DMFCs and validate their * performance under real-world operating conditions. Provide an independent technology assessment that * focuses on DMFC system performance, operation, and

311

Levelized costs of electricity and direct-use heat from Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

GEOPHIRES (GEOthermal energy for the Production of Heat and Electricity (IR) Economically Simulated) is a software tool that combines reservoir wellbore and power plant models with capital and operating cost correlations and financial levelized cost models to assess the technical and economic performance of Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). It is an upgrade and expansion of the MIT-EGS program used in the 2006 Future of Geothermal Energy study. GEOPHIRES includes updated cost correlations for well drilling and completion resource exploration and Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) and flash power plants. It also has new power plant efficiency correlations based on AspenPlus and MATLAB simulations. The structure of GEOPHIRES enables feasibility studies of using geothermal resources not only for electricity generation but also for direct-use heating and combined heat and power (CHP) applications. Full documentation on GEOPHIRES is provided in the supplementary material. Using GEOPHIRES the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) and the levelized cost of heat (LCOH) have been estimated for 3 cases of resource grade (low- medium- and high-grade resource corresponding to a geothermal gradient of 30 50 and 70?C/km) in combination with 3 levels of technological maturity (today's mid-term and commercially mature technology corresponding to a productivity of 30 50 and 70?kg/s per production well and thermal drawdown rate of 2% 1.5% and 1%). The results for the LCOE range from 4.6 to 57 /kWhe and for the LCOH from 3.5 to 14 $/MMBTU (1.2 to 4.8 /kWhth). The results for the base-case scenario (medium-grade resource and mid-term technology) are 11 /kWhe and 5 $/MMBTU (1.7 /kWhth) respectively. To account for parameter uncertainty a sensitivity analysis has been included. The results for the LCOE and LCOH have been compared with values found in literature for EGS as well as other energy technologies. The key findings suggest that given today's technology maturity electricity and direct-use heat from EGS are not economically competitive under current market conditions with other energy technologies. However with moderate technological improvements electricity from EGS is predicted to become cost-effective with respect to other renewable and non-renewable energy sources for medium- and high-grade geothermal resources. Direct-use heat from EGS is calculated to become cost-effective even for low-grade resources. This emphasizes that EGS for direct-use heat may not be neglected in future EGS development.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Projected Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Hydrogen Technologies for Fuel Cell Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Each combination of technologies necessary to produce, deliver, and distribute hydrogen for transportation use has a corresponding levelized cost, energy requirement, and greenhouse gas emission profile depending upon the technologies' efficiencies and costs. Understanding the technical status, potential, and tradeoffs is necessary to properly allocate research and development (R&D) funding. In this paper, levelized delivered hydrogen costs, pathway energy use, and well-to-wheels (WTW) energy use and emissions are reported for multiple hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. Technologies analyzed include both central and distributed reforming of natural gas and electrolysis of water, and central hydrogen production from biomass and coal. Delivery options analyzed include trucks carrying liquid hydrogen and pipelines carrying gaseous hydrogen. Projected costs, energy use, and emissions for current technologies (technology that has been developed to at least the bench-scale, extrapolated to commercial-scale) are reported. Results compare favorably with those for gasoline, diesel, and E85 used in current internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, gasoline hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), and flexible fuel vehicles. Sensitivities of pathway cost, pathway energy use, WTW energy use, and WTW emissions to important primary parameters were examined as an aid in understanding the benefits of various options. Sensitivity studies on production process energy efficiency, total production process capital investment, feed stock cost, production facility operating capacity, electricity grid mix, hydrogen vehicle market penetration, distance from the hydrogen production facility to city gate, and other parameters are reported. The Hydrogen Macro-System Model (MSM) was used for this analysis. The MSM estimates the cost, energy use, and emissions trade offs of various hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways under consideration. The MSM links the H2A Production Model, the Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM), and the Greenhouse Gas, Regulated Emission, and Energy for Transportation (GREET) Model. The MSM utilizes the capabilities of each component model and ensures the use of consistent parameters between the models to enable analysis of full hydrogen production, delivery, and distribution pathways. To better understand spatial aspects of hydrogen pathways, the MSM is linked to the Hydrogen Demand and Resource Analysis Tool (HyDRA). The MSM is available to the public and enables users to analyze the pathways and complete sensitivity analyses.

Ruth, M. F.; Diakov, V.; Laffen, M. J.; Timbario, T. A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Final Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Project Report Project Report INERT-MATRIX FUEL: ACTINIDE "BURNING" AND DIRECT DISPOSAL Nuclear Engineering Education Research Program (grant # DE-FG07-99ID13767) Rodney C. Ewing (co-PI) Lumin Wang (co-PI) October 30,2002 For the Period of 07/01/1999 to 06/30/2002 Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences University of Michigan Ann Arbor, MI 48109 1 1. Background Excess actinides result from the dismantlement of nuclear weapons (239Pu) and the reprocessing of commercial spent nuclear fuel (mainly 241Am, Cm and 237Np). In Europe, Canada and Japan studies have determined much improved efficiencies for burn- up of actinides using inert-matrix fuels. This innovative approach also considers the properties of the inert-matrix fuel as a nuclear waste form for direct disposal after one-

314

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Exhaust Emissions and Combustion Characteristics of a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Methanol?Diesel Fuel Blends at Different Injection Timings ... Because of their fuel economy and high reliability, compression-ignition (CI) engines known as diesel engines have been penetrating a number of markets around the world. ...

Mustafa Canakci; Cenk Sayin; Metin Gumus

2008-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

315

Performance of a direct diesel engine using aviation fuels blended with biodiesel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, jet fuel (JF) and railroad fuel (D2) with SME blends (5%, 20%, 50%) were used in a four-cylinder, naturally aspirated, direct (DI) diesel engine. The engine was operated under full load and tested at various speeds to determine the engine's performance and exhaust emission characteristics. The experimental results show that as the SME ratio of the fuels increases, the break specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and exhaust temperature increase; the SME and its blends show a slight drop in engine performance. In this experiment, carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and smoke opacity values were measured for each fuel. The results of the emission tests revealed that the oxygen content of SME provided a significant reduction in CO and smoke opacity emissions. However, when the test engine was fuelled by SME and its blends, NOx emissions increased.

Burak Gökalp; Hakan Serhad Soyhan; Halil ?brahim Sarac

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

THE IMPACT OF VARIOUS OXIDIZERS ON THE OVERALL PERFORMACE OF A DIRECT FLAME SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The power output of a direct-flame solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) was studied using hydrogen (H2) as the fuel for the flame and various oxidizers, (more)

Donadio, Nicholas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Advanced Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) Engine...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

in Gasoline Turbocharged Direct Injection (GTDI) engine technology in the near term as a cost effective, high volume, fuel economy solution, marketed globally as EcoBoost...

318

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 12024: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2024 Date: September 19, 2012 2024 Date: September 19, 2012 Title: Hydrogen Production Cost Using Low-Cost Natural Gas Originator: Sara Dillich, Todd Ramsden & Marc Melaina Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: September 24, 2012 Item: Hydrogen produced and dispensed in distributed facilities at high-volume refueling stations using current technology and DOE's Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 projected prices for industrial natural gas result in a hydrogen levelized cost of $4.49 per gallon-gasoline-equivalent (gge) (untaxed) including compression, storage and dispensing costs. The hydrogen production portion of this cost is $2.03/gge. In comparison, current analyses using low-cost natural gas with a price of $2.00 per MMBtu can decrease the hydrogen levelized cost to $3.68 per gge (untaxed) including

319

A Total Cost of Ownership Model for Low Temperature PEM Fuel Cells in Combined Heat and Power and Backup Power Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This report prepared by the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory describes a total cost of ownership model for emerging applications in stationary fuel cell systems.

320

Mass-Production Cost Estimation for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Kevin Baum, Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 Email: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Jason Marcinkoski, Phone: (202) 586-7466 Email: Jason.Marcinkoski@ee.doe.gov GO: Gregory Kleen Phone: (720) 356-1672 Email: Gregory.Kleen@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005236 Project Start Date: September 30, 2011 Project End Date: September 30, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Update 2011 automotive fuel cell cost model to include * latest performance data and system design information. Examine costs of fuel cell systems (FCSs) for light-duty * vehicle and bus applications.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

An Econometric Analysis of the Elasticity of Vehicle Travel with Respect to Fuel Cost per Mile Using RTEC Survey Data  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the results of econometric estimation of the ''rebound effect'' for household vehicle travel in the United States based on a comprehensive analysis of survey data collected by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) at approximately three-year intervals over a 15-year period. The rebound effect is defined as the percent change in vehicle travel for a percent change in fuel economy. It summarizes the tendency to ''take back'' potential energy savings due to fuel economy improvements in the form of increased vehicle travel. Separate vehicles use models were estimated for one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-vehicle households. The results are consistent with the consensus of recently published estimates based on national or state-level data, which show a long-run rebound effect of about +0.2 (a ten percent increase in fuel economy, all else equal, would produce roughly a two percent increase in vehicle travel and an eight percent reduction in fuel use). The hypothesis that vehicle travel responds equally to changes in fuel cost-per-mile whether caused by changes in fuel economy or fuel price per gallon could not be rejected. Recognizing the interdependency in survey data among miles of travel, fuel economy and price paid for fuel for a particular vehicle turns out to be crucial to obtaining meaningful results.

Greene, D.L.; Kahn, J.; Gibson, R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Rheology and stability kinetics of bare silicon nanoparticle inks for low-cost direct printing  

SciTech Connect

Highly dispersed and stable silicon nanoparticles ink is formulated for its application in direct printing or printable electronics. These dispersions are prepared from free-standing silicon nanoparticles which are not capped with any organic ligand, making it suitable for electronic applications. Silicon nanoparticles dispersions are prepared by suspending the nanoparticles in benzonitrile or ethanol by using polypropylene glycol (PPG) as a binder. All the samples show typical shear thinning behavior while the dispersion samples show low viscosities signifying good quality dispersion. Such thinning behavior favors in fabrication of dense films with spin-coating or patterns with drop casting. The dispersion stability is monitored by turbiscan measurements showing good stability for one week. A low-cost direct printing method for dispersion samples is also demonstrated to obtain micro-sized patterns. Low electrical resistivity of resulting patterns, adjustable viscosity and good stability makes these silicon nanoparticles dispersions highly applicable for direct printing process.

More, Priyesh V.; Jeong, Sunho; Seo, Yeong-Hui; Ryu, Beyong-Hwan; Choi, Youngmin [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Jip [Advanced Materials Division, Korea Research Institute of Chemical Technology 141 Gajeong-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-600 Korea and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Nahm, Sahn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea University 5-1 Anam-Dong, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operating Costs with Engineering and Econometric Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Capturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft OperatingCapturing the Impact of Fuel Price on Jet Aircraft Operatingare in part due to fuel price uncertainty. To address this

Smirti Ryerson, Megan; Hansen, Mark

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Final Report of On-Board Vehicle, Cost Effective Hydrogen Enhancement Technology for Transportation PEM Fuel Cells. The objective of this effort was to technologically enable a compact, fast start-up integrated Water Gas Shift-Pd membrane reactor for integration into an On Board Fuel Processing System (FPS) for an automotive 50 kWe PEM Fuel Cell (PEM FC). Our approach was to: (1) use physics based reactor and system level models to optimize the design through trade studies of the various system design and operating parameters; and (2) synthesize, characterize and assess the performance of advanced high flux, high selectivity, Pd alloy membranes on porous stainless steel tubes for mechanical strength and robustness. In parallel and not part of this program we were simultaneously developing air tolerant, high volumetric activity, thermally stable Water Gas Shift catalysts for the WGS/membrane reactor. We identified through our models the optimum WGS/membrane reactor configuration, and best Pd membrane/FPS and PEM FC integration scheme. Such a PEM FC power plant was shown through the models to offer 6% higher efficiency than a system without the integrated membrane reactor. The estimated FPS response time was < 1 minute to 50% power on start-up, 5 sec transient response time, 1140 W/L power density and 1100 W/kg specific power with an estimated production cost of $35/kW. Such an FPS system would have a Catalytic Partial Oxidation System (CPO) rather than the slower starting Auto-Thermal Reformer (ATR). We found that at optimum WGS reactor configuration that H{sub 2} recovery efficiencies of 95% could be achieved at 6 atm WGS pressure. However optimum overall fuel to net electrical efficiency ({approx}31%) is highest at lower fuel processor efficiency (67%) with 85% H{sub 2} recovery because less parasitic power is needed. The H{sub 2} permeance of {approx}45 m{sup 3}/m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5} at 350 C was assumed in these simulations. In the laboratory we achieved a H{sub 2} permeance of 50 m{sup 3}/(m{sup 2}-hr-atm{sup 0.5}) with a H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} selectivity of 110 at 350 C with pure Pd. We also demonstrated that we could produce Pd-Ag membranes. Such alloy membranes are necessary because they aren't prone to the Pd-hydride {alpha}-{beta} phase transition that is known to cause membrane failure in cyclic operation. When funding was terminated we were on track to demonstrated Pd-Ag alloy deposition on a nano-porous ({approx}80 nm) oxide layer supported on porous stainless steel tubing using a process designed for scale-up.

Thomas H. Vanderspurt; Zissis Dardas; Ying She; Mallika Gummalla; Benoit Olsommer

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of Novel Nanomaterials for High-Performance and Low-Cost Fuel Cell Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are promising energy converting technologies to generate electricity by mainly using hydrogen as a fuel, producing water as the (more)

Sun, Shuhui

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Comparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life-Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from Coal and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coal and Natural Gas Figure S1 shows a graphical description of the life cycle of coal-to-liquids (CTL) and gas-to-liquids (GTL). Figure S1: Life Cycle of Coal-Based and Natural Gas-Based Fischer-Tropsch LiquidComparative Analysis of the Production Costs and Life- Cycle GHG Emissions of FT-Liquid Fuels from

Jaramillo, Paulina

327

2010-01-0166 Ethanol Content Estimation in Flex Fuel Direct Injection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2010-01-0166 Ethanol Content Estimation in Flex Fuel Direct Injection Engines Using In (FFVs) are able to operate on a blend of ethanol and gasoline in any volumetric concen- tration of up to 85% ethanol (93% in Brazil). The estima- tion of ethanol content is crucial for optimized and robust

Stefanopoulou, Anna

328

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

$ b materials cost, % a Fuel cell stack cost only. Includesof the cost of fuel-cell stacks, 1990$ Cost item GE Swan cAnnual maintenance cost of fuel cell stack and auxiliaries (

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 9017: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems … Projected Performance and Cost Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record Record #: 9017 Date: July 02, 2010 Title: On-Board Hydrogen Storage Systems - Projected Performance and Cost Parameters Originators: Robert C. Bowman and Ned Stetson Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: August 10, 2010 This record summarizes the current technical assessments of hydrogen (H 2 ) storage system capacities and projected manufacturing costs for the scenario of high-volume production (i.e., 500,000 units/year) for various types of "on-board" vehicular storage systems. These analyses were performed within the Hydrogen Storage sub-program of the DOE Fuel Cell Technologies (FCT) program of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Item: It is important to note that all system capacities are "net useable capacities" able to be delivered to the

330

Materials and Modules for Low Cost, High Performance Fuel Cell Humidifiers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presented at the Department of Energy Fuel Cell Projects Kickoff Meeting, September 1 October 1, 2009

331

Environmental Impacts, Health and Safety Impacts, and Financial Costs of the Front End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

FEFC processes, unlike many of the proposed fuel cycles and technologies under consideration, involve mature operational processes presently in use at a number of facilities worldwide. This report identifies significant impacts resulting from these current FEFC processes and activities. Impacts considered to be significant are those that may be helpful in differentiating between fuel cycle performance and for which the FEFC impact is not negligible relative to those from the remainder of the full fuel cycle. This report: Defines representative processes that typify impacts associated with each step of the FEFC, Establishes a framework and architecture for rolling up impacts into normalized measures that can be scaled to quantify their contribution to the total impacts associated with various fuel cycles, and Develops and documents the bases for estimates of the impacts and costs associated with each of the representative FEFC processes.

Brett W Carlsen; Urairisa Phathanapirom; Eric Schneider; John S. Collins; Roderick G. Eggert; Brett Jordan; Bethany L. Smith; Timothy M. Ault; Alan G. Croff; Steven L. Krahn; William G. Halsey; Mark Sutton; Clay E. Easterly; Ryan P. Manger; C. Wilson McGinn; Stephen E. Fisher; Brent W. Dixon; Latif Yacout

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Degradation Mechanism in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Operated with Demineralised Brown Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The performance of a demineralised and devolatilised coal from the Morwell mine in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, has been investigated in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) operated at 850C. The focus of the investigation has been on understanding degradation issues as a function of time involving a sequence of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltage-current characteristic. Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N2 atmosphere, however, these decrease substantially in the presence of CO2 as the anode chamber purge gas, due to in situ generation of fuel species by the reaction of CO2 with carbon. Post-mortem analysis of anode by SEM and XRD revealed only a minor degradation due to its reduction, particle agglomeration as well as the formation of small quantity of new phases. However, major fuel cell performance degradation (increase of ohmic resistive and electrode polarisation losses) occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts and a reduction in the electron-conducting pathways as the fuel was consumed. The investigations revealed that the demineralised coal char can be used as a viable fuel for DCFC, however, further developments on anode materials and fuel feed mechanism would be required to achieve long-term sustained performance.

Adam C. Rady; Sarbjit Giddey; Aniruddha Kulkarni; Sukhvinder P.S. Badwal; Sankar Bhattacharya

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the...

334

Analysis of ignition behavior in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine using propane and methane as primary fuels  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental analyses of the ignition delay (ID) behavior for diesel-ignited propane and diesel-ignited methane dual fuel combustion. Two sets of experiments were performed at a constant speed (1800 rev/min) using a 4-cylinder direct injection diesel engine with the stock ECU and a wastegated turbocharger. First, the effects of fuel-air equivalence ratios (???© pilot ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.6 and ???© overall ?¢???¼ 0.2-0.9) on IDs were quantified. Second, the effects of gaseous fuel percent energy substitution (PES) and brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) (from 2.5 to 10 bar) on IDs were investigated. With constant ???© pilot (> 0.5), increasing ???© overall with propane initially decreased ID but eventually led to premature propane autoignition; however, the corresponding effects with methane were relatively minor. Cyclic variations in the start of combustion (SOC) increased with increasing ???© overall (at constant ???© pilot), more significantly for propane than for methane. With increasing PES at constant BMEP, the ID showed a nonlinear (initially increasing and later decreasing) trend at low BMEPs for propane but a linearly decreasing trend at high BMEPs. For methane, increasing PES only increased IDs at all BMEPs. At low BMEPs, increasing PES led to significantly higher cyclic SOC variations and SOC advancement for both propane and methane. Finally, the engine ignition delay (EID) was also shown to be a useful metric to understand the influence of ID on dual fuel combustion.

Polk, A. C.; Gibson, C. M.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

335

adopt our eco-driving top tips to reduce fuel costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air conditioning sparingly · All ancillary loads, particularly air conditioning, add to fuel air resistance and fuel consumption at higher speeds. · Keep windows shut at high speed. Lose weight

Harman, Neal.A.

336

Equipment Arrangement Planning of a Fuel Cell Energy Network Optimized for Cost Minimization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, uses of the distribution of fuel cells have been studied [9, 10]. Furthermore, fuel cell systems are connected by a network and the micro-grid of the electrical power operated in cooperation ... ...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Investigation and Development of Low Cost Hardware Components for Proton-Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell components, which would have a low-cost structure in mass production, were fabricated and tested. A fuel cell electrode structure, comprising a thin layer of graphite (50 microns) and a front-loaded platinum catalyst layer (600 angstroms), was shown to produce significant power densities. In addition, a PEM bipolar plate, comprising flexible graphite, carbon cloth flow-fields and an integrated polymer gasket, was fabricated. Power densities of a two-cell unit using this inexpensive bipolar plate architecture were shown to be comparable to state-of-the-art bipolar plates.

George A. Marchetti

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

338

On the effect of gas diffusion layers hydrophobicity on direct methanol fuel cell performance and degradation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Degradation and mass transport phenomena management are two of the main issues hindering direct methanol fuel cell commercialization. Water and methanol crossover through the membrane, regulated by both anode and cathode gas diffusion layers hydrophobic properties, is widely studied in the literature, while the effect of mass transport phenomena evolution on the direct methanol fuel cell degradation has not been investigated yet. This work aims to present a combined experimental and modeling analysis on the effect of the gas diffusion layers hydrophobicity on DMFC degradation, through the comparison of performance characterization and degradation tests of two different fuel cells. In one of them, the lower diffusion layer hydrophobicity and the absence of anode microporous layer determines the onset of cathode flooding, negatively affecting performance and degradation. However, the cathode surface area loss is similar between the two fuel cells, meaning that flooding does not involve modifications in cathode permanent degradation mechanisms, but it mainly determines the amplification of the cathode surface area loss effects.

F. Bresciani; C. Rabissi; M. Zago; R. Marchesi; A. Casalegno

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Comparison of propane and methane performance and emissions in a turbocharged direct injection dual fuel engine  

SciTech Connect

With increasingly restrictive NO x and particulate matter emissions standards, the recent discovery of new natural gas reserves, and the possibility of producing propane efficiently from biomass sources, dual fueling strategies have become more attractive. This paper presents experimental results from dual fuel operation of a four-cylinder turbocharged direct injection (DI) diesel engine with propane or methane (a natural gas surrogate) as the primary fuel and diesel as the ignition source. Experiments were performed with the stock engine control unit at a constant speed of 1800 rpm, and a wide range of brake mean effective pressures (BMEPs) (2.7-11.6 bars) and percent energy substitutions (PESs) of C 3 H 8 and CH 4. Brake thermal efficiencies (BTEs) and emissions (NO x, smoke, total hydrocarbons (THCs), CO, and CO 2) were measured. Maximum PES levels of about 80-95% with CH 4 and 40-92% with C 3 H 8 were achieved. Maximum PES was limited by poor combustion efficiencies and engine misfire at low loads for both C 3 H 8 and CH 4, and the onset of knock above 9 bar BMEP for C 3 H 8. While dual fuel BTEs were lower than straight diesel BTEs at low loads, they approached diesel BTE values at high loads. For dual fuel operation, NO x and smoke reductions (from diesel values) were as high as 66-68% and 97%, respectively, but CO and THC emissions were significantly higher with increasing PES at all engine loads

Gibson, C. M.; Polk, A. C.; Shoemaker, N. T.; Srinivasan, K. K.; Krishnan, S. R.

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

340

Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

Frey, H.C. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Williams, R.B. [Carneigie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Direct electrochemical conversion of carbon anode fuels in molton salt media  

SciTech Connect

We are conducting research into the direct electrochemical conversion of reactive carbons into electricity--with experimental evidence of total efficiencies exceeding 80% of the heat of combustion of carbon. Together with technologies for extraction of reactive carbons from broad based fossil fuels, direct carbon conversion addresses the objectives of DOE's ''21st Century Fuel Cell'' with exceptionally high efficiency (>70% based on standard heat of reaction, {Delta}H{sub std}), as well as broader objectives of managing CO{sub 2} emissions. We are exploring the reactivity of a wide range of carbons derived from diverse sources, including pyrolyzed hydrocarbons, petroleum cokes, purified coals and biochars, and relating their electrochemical reactivity to nano/microstructural characteristics.

Cherepy, N; Krueger, R; Cooper, J F

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

342

2005 DOE Hydrogen Program Review PresentationCOST AND PERFORMANCE ENHANCEMENTS FOR A PEM FUEL CELL TURBOCOMPRESSOR  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the program during the past year was to complete Technical Objectives 2 and 3 and initiate Technical Objective 4 are described. To assist the Department of Energy in the development of a low cost, reliable and high performance air compressor/expander. Technical Objective 1: Perform a turbocompressor systems PEM fuel cell trade study to determine the enhanced turbocompressor approach. Technical Objective 2: Using the results from technical objective 1, an enhanced turbocompressor will be fabricated. The design may be modified to match the flow requirements of a selected fuel cell system developer. Technical Objective 3: Design a cost and performance enhanced compact motor and motor controller. Technical Objective 4: Turbocompressor/motor controller development.

Mark K. Gee

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Manufacturing Facility Opened Using EERE-Supported Low-Cost Fuel...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and institutional barriers to the widespread commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cells. Addthis Related Articles Nebraska: Company More than Doubles Annual Sales and...

344

Carbon emission and mitigation cost comparisons between fossil fuel, nuclear and renewable energy resources for electricity generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A study was conducted to compare the electricity generation costs of a number of current commercial technologies with technologies expected to become commercially available within the coming decade or so. The amount of greenhouse gas emissions resulting per kWh of electricity generated were evaluated. A range of fossil fuel alternatives (with and without physical carbon sequestration), were compared with the baseline case of a pulverised coal, steam cycle power plant. Nuclear, hydro, wind, bioenergy and solar generating plants were also evaluated. The objectives were to assess the comparative costs of mitigation per tonne of carbon emissions avoided, and to estimate the total amount of carbon mitigation that could result from the global electricity sector by 2010 and 2020 as a result of fuel switching, carbon dioxide sequestration and the greater uptake of renewable energy. Most technologies showed potential to reduce both generating costs and carbon emission avoidance by 2020 with the exception of solar power and carbon dioxide sequestration. The global electricity industry has potential to reduce its carbon emissions by over 15% by 2020 together with cost saving benefits compared with existing generation.

Ralph E.H. Sims; Hans-Holger Rogner; Ken Gregory

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 13010: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record #: 13010 Date: June 11, 2013 Title: Onboard Type IV Compressed Hydrogen Storage Systems - Current Performance and Cost Originators: Scott McWhorter and Grace Ordaz Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: July 17, 2013 Item: This record summarizes the current status of the projected capacities and manufacturing costs of Type IV, 350- and 700-bar compressed hydrogen storage systems, storing 5.6 kg of usable hydrogen, for onboard light-duty automotive applications when manufactured at a volume of 500,000 units per year. The current projected performance and cost of these systems are presented in Table 1 against the DOE Hydrogen Storage System targets. These analyses were performed in support of the Hydrogen Storage

346

Summary report : direct approaches for recycling carbon dioxide into synthetic fuel.  

SciTech Connect

The consumption of petroleum by the transportation sector in the United States is roughly equivalent to petroleum imports into the country, which have totaled over 12 million barrels a day every year since 2004. This reliance on foreign oil is a strategic vulnerability for the economy and national security. Further, the effect of unmitigated CO{sub 2} releases on the global climate is a growing concern both here and abroad. Independence from problematic oil producers can be achieved to a great degree through the utilization of non-conventional hydrocarbon resources such as coal, oil-shale and tarsands. However, tapping into and converting these resources into liquid fuels exacerbates green house gas (GHG) emissions as they are carbon rich, but hydrogen deficient. Revolutionary thinking about energy and fuels must be adopted. We must recognize that hydrocarbon fuels are ideal energy carriers, but not primary energy sources. The energy stored in a chemical fuel is released for utilization by oxidation. In the case of hydrogen fuel the chemical product is water; in the case of a hydrocarbon fuel, water and carbon dioxide are produced. The hydrogen economy envisions a cycle in which H{sub 2}O is re-energized by splitting water into H{sub 2} and O{sub 2}, by electrolysis for example. We envision a hydrocarbon analogy in which both carbon dioxide and water are re-energized through the application of a persistent energy source (e.g. solar or nuclear). This is of course essentially what the process of photosynthesis accomplishes, albeit with a relatively low sunlight-to-hydrocarbon efficiency. The goal of this project then was the creation of a direct and efficient process for the solar or nuclear driven thermochemical conversion of CO{sub 2} to CO (and O{sub 2}), one of the basic building blocks of synthetic fuels. This process would potentially provide the basis for an alternate hydrocarbon economy that is carbon neutral, provides a pathway to energy independence, and is compatible with much of the existing fuel infrastructure.

Allendorf, Mark D. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Ambrosini, Andrea; Diver, Richard B., Jr.; Siegel, Nathan Phillip; Miller, James Edward; Gelbard, Fred; Evans, Lindsey R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 for the First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration, Washington D.C. May 14-17, 2001 US DoE-NETL Progress in Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO 2 Peter G. Brewer (brpe@mbari.org; 831-626-6618) Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute 7700 Sandholdt Road Moss Landing CA 95039 Introduction. My laboratory has now been engaged in carrying out small scale controlled field experiments on the ocean sequestration of fossil fuel CO 2 for about five years, and the field has changed enormously in that time. We have gone from theoretical assessments to experimental results, and from cartoon sketches of imagined outcomes to high-resolution video images of experiments on the ocean floor shared around the world. It seems appropriate therefore to give a brief review, albeit one very much from a

348

Experimental investigation of methanol crossover evolution during direct methanol fuel cell degradation tests  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Methanol crossover and severe degradation are two of the most critical issues hindering the commercialization of direct methanol fuel cells. The experimental investigations found in the literature show that degradation has both permanent and temporary contributions; the latter can be recovered thanks to a suitable operation interruption. This work reports the experimental characterization of methanol crossover and water content in cathode exhaust during different degradation tests performed in continuous and cycling operation modes. Such investigation evidences a reduction of methanol crossover during the DMFC degradation tests that can be partially restored. Methanol crossover reduction presents both temporary and permanent contributions: the latter could be related to membrane degradation. Moreover the effect of both methanol crossover and electric power reduction on fuel cell efficiency are discussed.

A. Casalegno; F. Bresciani; M. Zago; R. Marchesi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Multiple Injection and Boosting Benefits for Improved Fuel Consumption on a Spray Guided Direct Injection Gasoline Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The combination of turbocharging and direct injection offers a significant potential for SI engines to improve fuel consumption, specific power output, raw emissions and ... shows the latest results of the T-SGDI...

Jason King; Oliver Bcker

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Effect of stratified water injection on exhaust gases and fuel consumption of a direct injection diesel engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct injection Diesel engine with its specific fuel consumption of about 200 g/kWh is one of the most efficient thermal engines. However in case of relatively low CH...x...concentration in the exhaust gas t...

Rainer Pauls; Christof Simon

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

352

Hour-by-Hour Cost Modeling of Optimized Central Wind-Based Water Electrolysis Production - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Genevieve Saur (Primary Contact), Chris Ainscough. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3783 Email: genevieve.saur@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 1, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Corroborate recent wind electrolysis cost studies using a * more detailed hour-by-hour analysis. Examine consequences of different system configuration * and operation for four scenarios, at 42 sites in five

353

Infrastructure Costs Associated with Central Hydrogen Production from Biomass and Coal - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Darlene Steward (Primary Contact), Billy Roberts, Karen Webster National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden, CO 80401-3305 Phone: (303) 275-3837 Email: Darlene.Steward@nrel.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: Fiscal Year (FY) 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE FY 2012 Objectives Elucidate the location-dependent variability of * infrastructure costs for biomass- and coal-based central hydrogen production and delivery and the tradeoffs inherent in plant-location choices Provide modeling output and correlations for use in other * integrated analyses and tools

354

Direct oxidation of hydrocarbons in a solid oxide fuel cell. I. Methane oxidation  

SciTech Connect

The performance of Cu cermets as anodes for the direct oxidation of CH{sub 4} in solid oxide fuel cells was examined. Mixtures of Cu and yttria-stabilized zirconia (YAZ) were found to give similar performance to Ni-YSZ cermets when H{sub 2} was used as the fuel, but did not deactivate in dry CH{sub 4}. While Cu-YSZ was essentially inert to methane, the addition of ceria to the anode gave rise to reasonable power densities and stable operation over a period of at least 3 days. Proof of direct oxidation of CH{sub 4} came from chemical analysis of the products leaving the cell. The major carbon-containing product was CO{sub 2}, with only traces of CO observed, and there was excellent agreement between the actual cell current and that predicted by the methane conversion. These results demonstrate that direct, electrocatalytic oxidation of dry methane is possible, with reasonable performance.

Park, S.; Craciun, R.; Vohs, J.M.; Gorte, R.J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Fuel Cells Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Storage DELIVERY FUEL CELLS STORAGE PRODUCTION TECHNOLOGY VALIDATION CODES & STANDARDS SYSTEMS INTEGRATION / ANALYSES SAFETY EDUCATION RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT Economy Pat Davis 2 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Goal : Develop and demonstrate fuel cell power system technologies for transportation, stationary, and portable applications. 3 Fuel Cells Technical Goals & Objectives Objectives * Develop a 60% efficient, durable, direct hydrogen fuel cell power system for transportation at a cost of $45/kW (including hydrogen storage) by 2010. * Develop a 45% efficient reformer-based fuel cell power system for transportation operating on clean hydrocarbon or alcohol based fuel that meets emissions standards, a start-up time of 30 seconds, and a projected manufactured cost of $45/kW by

356

Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

357

Cost-benefit analysis of ultra-low sulfur jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of aviation has spurred increased study of its environmental impacts and the possible mitigation thereof. One emissions reduction option is the introduction of an Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) jet fuel standard for ...

Kuhn, Stephen (Stephen Richard)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) blend membrane technology Overview of membrane properties and performance Summary 3 Membrane Technology Polymer Blend * Kynar ® PVDF * Chemical and electrochemical stability * Mechanical strength * Excellent barrier against methanol * Polyelectrolyte * H + conduction and water uptake Flexible Blending Process  PVDF can be compatibilized with a number of polyelectrolytes  Process has been scaled to a pilot line Property Control * Morphology: 10-100s nm domains * Composition can be tailored to minimize methanol permeation, while optimizing

359

Performance of a low-cost iron ore as an oxygen carrier for Chemical Looping Combustion of gaseous fuels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work evaluates the performance of an iron ore, mainly composed of Fe2O3, as an oxygen carrier (OC) for Chemical Looping Combustion (CLC) with gaseous fuels. The OC was characterized by TGA and evaluated in a continuous 500Wth CLC unit, using CH4, syngas and a PSA off-gas as fuels. The OC was able to fully convert syngas at 880C. However, lower conversion rates were observed with methane-containing fuels. The addition of a Ni-based OC was evaluated in order to increase the reactivity of the OC with methane. In spite of this, an absence of catalytic effect was observed for the Ni-based OC. A deep analysis was carried out into the reasons for the absence of catalytic effect of the Ni-based OC. The performance of the iron ore with regard to attrition and fluidization behaviour was satisfactory throughout 50h of hot operation in the continuous CLC plant. Thus, this low cost material is a suitable OC for gaseous fuels mainly composed of H2 and CO.

Miguel A. Pans; Pilar Gayn; Luis F. de Diego; Francisco Garca-Labiano; Alberto Abad; Juan Adnez.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 13013: Hydrogen Delivery Cost Projections - 2013  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3013 Date: September 26, 2013 3013 Date: September 26, 2013 Title: H 2 Delivery Cost Projections - 2013 Originator: E. Sutherland, A. Elgowainy and S. Dillich Approved by: R. Farmer and S. Satyapal Date: December 18, 2013 Item: Reported herein are past 2005 and 2011 estimates, current 2013 estimates, 2020 projected cost estimates and the 2015 and 2020 target costs for delivering and dispensing (untaxed) H 2 to 10%- 15% of vehicles within a city population of 1.2M from a centralized H 2 production plant located 100 km from the city gate. The 2011 volume cost estimates are based on the H2A Hydrogen Delivery Scenario Analysis Model (HDSAM) V2.3 projections and are employed as the basis for defining the cost and technical targets of delivery components in Table 3.2.4 in the 2012 Delivery

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Rationale for continuing R&D in direct coal conversion to produce high quality transportation fuels  

SciTech Connect

Liquid hydrocarbon fuels will continue to play a significant role in the transportation sector in the future of both the world and the United States because of the their convenience, high energy density, and vast existing infrastructure. At present the U.S. consumes about 26% of the world supply of petroleum, but this situation is expected to change because of declining domestic production and increasing competition for imports by developing overseas economies. A scenario and time frame are developed in which declining world resources will generate a shortfall in petroleum supply that can be alleviated in part by utilizing the abundant domestic coal resource base. Continued R&D in coal conversion technology is expected to significantly reduce costs so that synfuels can compete economically at a much earlier date than previously forecast.

Srivastava, R.; McIlvried, H.G. [Burns and Roe Services Co., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Gray, D.; Klunder, E.B.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell Systems...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

can operate on hydrogen, which can be produced domestically, emitting less greenhouse gas and pollutants than conventional internal combustion engine (ICE), advanced ICE, hybrid...

363

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct thin-film path towards low-cost large-area III-V photovoltaics Rehan Kapadia1,2 *, Zhibin-V photovoltaics (PVs) have demonstrated the highest power conversion efficiencies for both single- and multi times, and large equipment investments restrict applications to concentrated and space photovoltaics

California at Irvine, University of

364

Fault (In)Dependent Cost Estimates and Conflict-Directed Backtracking to Guide Sequential Circuit Test Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The search for tests for sequential circuits (STPG) by deterministic test pattern generation is a process of alternately performing mandatory assignments and heuristic decisions on signal lines. We have observed problems in the decision-making process ... Keywords: ATPG, sequential circuit TPG, cost estimates, back-jumping, conflict-directed backtrack, three-state (tri-state) circuit TPG

Mario Konijnenburg; Hans Van der Linden; Ad van de Goor

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

High performance of a carbon supported ternary PdIrNi catalyst for ethanol electro-oxidation in anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including methanol, ethanol, glycerol, ethylene glycol, and so on, ethanol is the best choice, as it has abundant than Pt and has a much lower price, and thus the cost of fuel cell technology can be greatly. Secondly, Pd is more abundant than Pt and has a much lower price, and thus the cost of fuel cell technology

Zhao, Tianshou

366

Hydrogen Storage Cost Analysis, Preliminary Results - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Brian D. James (Primary Contact), Andrew B. Spisak, Whitney G. Colella Strategic Analysis, Inc. 4075 Wilson Blvd. Suite 200 Arlington, VA 22203 Phone: (703) 778-7114 E-mail: bjames@sainc.com DOE Managers HQ: Grace Ordaz Phone: (202) 586-8350 Email: Grace.Ordaz@ee.doe.gov GO: Katie Randolph Phone: (720) 356-1759 Email: Katie.Randolph@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0005253 Project Start Date: September 30, 2012 Project End Date: September 29, 2016 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop cost models of carbon fiber hydrogen storage * pressure vessels. Explore the sensitivity of pressure vessel cost to design * parameters including hydrogen storage quantity, storage

367

Fermentation and costs of fuel ethanol from corn with quick-germ process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Quick-Germ process developed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is a way to obtain corn oil, but with lower capital costs than the traditional wet-milling process. Quick-Germ has the potential ...

Frank Taylor; Andrew J. Mcaloon

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cost-Effective Abatement of Acidifying Emissions with Flue Gas Cleaning Vs. Fuel Switching in Finland  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acidifying emissions from energy production and industry have decreased considerably during the...e.g. flue gas desulphurization. In this study the Finnish cost curves for SO2 and NOx...were first calculated to p...

N. Karvosenoja; P. Hillukkala; M. Johansson; S. Syril

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Control for PEM Fuel Cell Stack System, Proceedings ofmodel for an automotive PEM fuel cell system with imbedded 1Friedman and R.M. Moore, PEM Fuel Cell System Optimization,

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Program Record 13006 (Offices of Vehicle Technologies and Fuel Cell Technologies: Life-Cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Program Record (Offices of Vehicle Technologies & Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 13006 Date: April 24, 2013 Title: Life-cycle Costs of Mid-Size Light-Duty Vehicles Originator: Tien Nguyen & Jake Ward Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Pat Davis Date: April 25, 2013 Items: DOE is pursuing a portfolio of technologies with the potential to significantly reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions and petroleum consumption while being cost-effective. This record documents the assumptions and results of analyses conducted to estimate the life-cycle costs resulting from several fuel/vehicle pathways, for a future mid-size car. The results are summarized graphically in the following figure. Costs of Operation for Future Mid-Size Car

371

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Download the presentation slides from Arkema at the July 17, 2012, Fuel Cell Technologies Program webina, Fuel Cells for Portable Power.

372

A Two Dimensional Model of a Direct Propane Fuel Cell with an Interdigitated Flow Field .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Increasing environmental concerns as well as diminishing fossil fuel reserves call for a new generation of energy conversion technologies. Fuel cells, which convert the chemical (more)

Khakdaman, Hamidreza

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Catalytically upgraded landfill gas as a cost-effective alternative for fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The potential use of landfill gas as feeding fuel for the so-called molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) imposes the need for new upgrading technologies in order to meet the much tougher feed gas specifications of this type of fuel cells in comparison to gas engines. Nevertheless, MCFC has slightly lower purity demands than low temperature fuel cells. This paper outlines the idea of a new catalytic purification process for landfill gas conditioning, which may be supposed to be more competitive than state-of-the-art technologies and summarises some lab-scale results. This catalytic process transforms harmful landfill gas minor compounds into products that can be easily removed from the gas stream by a subsequent adsorption step. The optimal process temperature was found to be in the range 250400C. After a catalyst screening, two materials were identified, which have the ability to remove all harmful minor compounds from landfill gas. The first material was a commercial alumina that showed a high activity towards the removal of organic silicon compounds. The alumina protects both a subsequent catalyst for the removal of other organic minor compounds and the fuel cell. Due to gradual deactivation caused by silica deposition, the activated alumina needs to be periodically replaced. The second material was a commercial V2O5/TiO2-based catalyst that exhibited a high activity for the total oxidation of a broad spectrum of other harmful organic minor compounds into a simpler compound class acid gases (HCl, HF and SO2), which can be easily removed by absorption with, e.g. alkalised alumina. The encouraging results obtained allow the scale-up of this LFG conditioning process to test it under real LFG conditions.

W. Urban; H. Lohmann; J.I. Salazar Gmez

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the membrane for a PEM fuel cell would cost $5/ft (1990$) inmass-produced PEM fuel cell could cost $10/kW or less. Totalparameter for PEM fuel cells: thinner membranes cost less

Delucchi, Mark

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Status and Outlook for the U.S. Non-Automotive Fuel Cell Industry...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Mass Production Cost Estimation of Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Applications: 2012 Update Before Senate Committee...

376

Optical-Engine Study of a Low-Temperature Combustion Strategy Employing a Dual-Row, Narrow-Included-Angle Nozzle and Early, Direct Injection of Diesel Fuel  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Insight into mechanisms causing observed sharp emissions increase with diesel fuel injection is gained through experiments in an optical engine employing a similar low-temperature combustion strategy of early, direct injection of diesel fuel.

377

Near-frictionless carbon coatings for spark-ignited direct-injected fuel systems. Final report, January 2002.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an investigation by the Tribology Section of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) into the use of near-frictionless carbon (NFC) coatings for spark-ignited, direct-injected (SIDI) engine fuel systems. Direct injection is being pursued in order to improve fuel efficiency and enhance control over, and flexibility of, spark-ignited engines. SIDI technology is being investigated by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV) as one route towards meeting both efficiency goals and more stringent emissions standards. Friction and wear of fuel injector and pump parts were identified as issues impeding adoption of SIDI by the OTT workshop on ''Research Needs Related to CIDI and SIDI Fuel Systems'' and the resulting report, Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines. The following conclusions were reached: (1) Argonne's NFC coatings consistently reduced friction and wear in existing and reformulated gasolines. (2) Compared to three commercial DLC coatings, NFC provided the best friction reduction and protection from wear in gasoline and alternative fuels. (3) NFC was successfully deposited on production fuel injectors. (4) Customized wear tests were performed to simulate the operating environment of fuel injectors. (5) Industry standard lubricity test results were consistent with customized wear tests in showing the friction and wear reduction of NFC and the lubricity of fuels. (6) Failure of NFC coatings by tensile crack opening or spallation did not occur, and issues with adhesion to steel substrates were eliminated. (7) This work addressed several of the current research needs of the OAAT SIDI program, as defined by the OTT report Research Needs Related to Fuel Injection Systems in CIDI and SIDI Engines.

Hershberger, J.; Ozturk, O.; Ajayi, O. O.; Woodford, J. B.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

2002-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Catalyst inks and method of application for direct methanol fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Inks are formulated for forming anode and cathode catalyst layers and applied to anode and cathode sides of a membrane for a direct methanol fuel cell. The inks comprise a Pt catalyst for the cathode and a Pt--Ru catalyst for the anode, purified water in an amount 4 to 20 times that of the catalyst by weight, and a perfluorosulfonic acid ionomer in an amount effective to provide an ionomer content in the anode and cathode surfaces of 20% to 80% by volume. The inks are prepared in a two-step process while cooling and agitating the solutions. The final solution is placed in a cooler and continuously agitated while spraying the solution over the anode or cathode surface of the membrane as determined by the catalyst content.

Zelenay, Piotr (Los Alamos, NM); Davey, John (Los Alamos, NM); Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Sharon C. (Vancouver, CA)

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

379

SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

Murph, S.

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on the Emissions of a Direct-Injection (DI) Diesel Engine Fueled with Canola Oil Methyl Ester?Diesel Fuel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

(3, 4) A lot of researchers have reported that using biodiesel as a fuel in diesel engines causes a diminution in harmful exhaust emissions as well as equivalent engine performance with diesel fuel. ... Engine tests have been carried out with the aim of obtaining comparative measures of torque, power, specific fuel consumption and emissions such as CO, smoke d. and NOx to evaluate and compute the behavior of the diesel engine running on the above-mentioned fuels. ... Ma, Z.; Huang, Z. H.; Li, C.; Wang, X. B.; Miao, H.Effects of fuel injection timing on combustion and emission characteristics of a diesel engine fueled with diesel?propane blends Energy Fuels 2007, 21 ( 3) 1504 1510 ...

Cenk Sayin; Metin Gumus; Mustafa Canakci

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) on Mono-uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications  

SciTech Connect

The US National Energy Policy of 2001 advocated the development of advanced fuel and fuel cycle technologies that are cleaner, more efficient, less waste-intensive, and more proliferation resistant. The need for advanced fuel development is emphasized in on-going DOE-supported programs, e.g., Global Nuclear Energy Initiative (GNEI), Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), and GEN-IV Technology Development. The Directorates of Energy & Environment (E&E) and Chemistry & Material Sciences (C&MS) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are interested in advanced fuel research and manufacturing using its multi-disciplinary capability and facilities to support a design concept of a small, secure, transportable, and autonomous reactor (SSTAR). The E&E and C&MS Directorates co-sponsored this Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) Project on Mono-Uranium Nitride Fuel Development for SSTAR and Space Applications. In fact, three out of the six GEN-IV reactor concepts consider using the nitride-based fuel, as shown in Table 1. SSTAR is a liquid-metal cooled, fast reactor. It uses nitride fuel in a sealed reactor vessel that could be shipped to the user and returned to the supplier having never been opened in its long operating lifetime. This sealed reactor concept envisions no fuel refueling nor on-site storage of spent fuel, and as a result, can greatly enhance proliferation resistance. However, the requirement for a sealed, long-life core imposes great challenges to research and development of the nitride fuel and its cladding. Cladding is an important interface between the fuel and coolant and a barrier to prevent fission gas release during normal and accidental conditions. In fabricating the nitride fuel rods and assemblies, the cladding material should be selected based on its the coolant-side corrosion properties, the chemical/physical interaction with the nitride fuel, as well as their thermal and neutronic properties. The US NASA space reactor, the SP-100 was designed to use mono-uranium nitride fuel. Although the SP-100 reactor was not commissioned, tens of thousand of nitride fuel pellets were manufactured and lots of them, cladded in Nb-1-Zr had been irradiated in fast test reactors (FFTF and EBR-II) with good irradiation results. The Russian Naval submarines also use nitride fuel with stainless steel cladding (HT-9) in Pb-Bi coolant. Although the operating experience of the Russian submarine is not readily available, such combination of fuel, cladding and coolant has been proposed for a commercial-size liquid-metal cooled fast reactor (BREST-300). Uranium mono-nitride fuel is studied in this LDRD Project due to its favorable properties such as its high actinide density and high thermal conductivity. The thermal conductivity of mono-nitride is 10 times higher than that of oxide (23 W/m-K for UN vs. 2.3 W/m-K for UO{sub 2} at 1000 K) and its melting temperature is much higher than that of metal fuel (2630 C for UN vs. 1132 C for U metal). It also has relatively high actinide density, (13.51 gU/cm{sup 3} in UN vs. 9.66 gU/cm{sup 3} in UO{sub 2}) which is essential for a compact reactor core design. The objective of this LDRD Project is to: (1) Establish a manufacturing capability for uranium-based ceramic nuclear fuel, (2) Develop a computational capability to analyze nuclear fuel performance, (3) Develop a modified UN-based fuel that can support a compact long-life reactor core, and (4) Collaborate with the Nuclear Engineering Department of UC Berkeley on nitride fuel reprocessing and disposal in a geologic repository.

Choi, J; Ebbinghaus, B; Meiers, T; Ahn, J

2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effect of directed port air flow on liquid fuel transport in a port fuel injected spark ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With highly efficient modem catalysts, startup HC emissions have become a significant portion of the trip total. Liquid fuel is a major source of HC emissions during the cold start and fast idle period. Thus the control ...

Scaringe, Robert J. (Robert Joseph)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Comparative analysis of the production costs and life-cycle GHG emissions of FT liquid fuels from coal and natural gas  

SciTech Connect

Liquid transportation fuels derived from coal and natural gas could help the United States reduce its dependence on petroleum. The fuels could be produced domestically or imported from fossil fuel-rich countries. The goal of this paper is to determine the life-cycle GHG emissions of coal- and natural gas-based Fischer-Tropsch (FT) liquids, as well as to compare production costs. The results show that the use of coal- or natural gas-based FT liquids will likely lead to significant increases in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions compared to petroleum-based fuels. In a best-case scenario, coal- or natural gas-based FT-liquids have emissions only comparable to petroleum-based fuels. In addition, the economic advantages of gas-to-liquid (GTL) fuels are not obvious: there is a narrow range of petroleum and natural gas prices at which GTL fuels would be competitive with petroleum-based fuels. CTL fuels are generally cheaper than petroleum-based fuels. However, recent reports suggest there is uncertainty about the availability of economically viable coal resources in the United States. If the U.S. has a goal of increasing its energy security, and at the same time significantly reducing its GHG emissions, neither CTL nor GTL consumption seem a reasonable path to follow. 28 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Small-Scale Low Cost Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Systems  

SciTech Connect

Progress in tasks seeking greater cell power density and lower cost through new cell designs, new cell materials and lower operating temperature is summarized. The design of the program required Proof-of-Concept unit of residential capacity scale is reviewed along with a summary of results from its successful test. Attachment 1 summarizes the status of cell development. Attachment 2 summarizes the status of generator design, and Attachment 3 of BOP design.

S. D. Vora

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

motor fuel containing at least 10% alcohol) or alternative fuels whenever feasible and cost effective. DOA must place a list of gasohol and alternative fueling station locations...

386

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

would in turn lower PHEV fuel costs and make them morestretches from fossil-fuel- powered conventional vehiclesbraking, as do Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions Making Plug-

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1990. These many alternative-fuel initiatives failed tolow-cost, low-carbon alternative fuels would thrive. Theto introduce low-carbon alternative fuels. Former Federal

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operaated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are being developed for integrated gasification power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but test data from direct coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This effort evaluates the significance of performance losses associated with exposure to direct coal syngas. Specimen are operated in a unique mobile test skid that is deployed to the research gasifier at NCCC in Wilsonville, AL. The test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas to a parallel array of twelve SOFCs. During the 500 h test period, all twelve cells are monitored for performance at four current densities. Degradation is attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that is accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that are operated at 0 and 125 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 h, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA cm{sup 2} degrade at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 h, respectively. Spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, G.; Gerdes, K.; Song, X.; Chen, Y.; Shutthanandan, V.; Englehard, M.; Zhu, Z.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gemmen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2009 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2009 Annual Progress Report V. Fuel Cells This section of the 2009 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Program Element Introduction, Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 262 KB) A. Analysis/Characterization Fuel Cell Systems Analysis (PDF 560 KB), Rajesh Ahluwalia, Argonne National Laboratory Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive Applications (PDF 1.4 MB), Brian James, Directed Technologies, Inc. Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/Systems (PDF 724 KB), Jayanti Sinha , TIAX LLC Fuel Cell Testing at Argonne National Laboratory (PDF 458 KB), Ira

390

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: 2008 Annual Progress Report - Fuel  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Printable Version 2008 Annual Progress Report V. Fuel Cells This section of the 2008 Progress Report for the DOE Hydrogen Program focuses on fuel cells. Each technical report is available as an individual Adobe Acrobat PDF. Download Adobe Reader. Fuel Cells Sub-Program Overview, Nancy Garland, U.S. Department of Energy (PDF 204 KB) A. Analysis/Characterization Fuel Cell Systems Analysis, Rajesh Ahluwalia, Argonne National Laboratory (PDF 375 KB) Mass Production Cost Estimation for Direct H2 PEM Fuel Cell System for Automotive Applications, Brian James, Directed Technologies, Inc. (PDF 1.0 MB) Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stack/Systems, Jayanti Sinha, TIAX LLC (PDF 437 KB) Microstructural Characterization Of PEM Fuel Cell MEAs, Karren More, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (PDF 414 KB)

391

Mixing Correlations for Smoke and Fuel Consumption of Direct Injection Engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mixing of fuel with air in a diesel engine strongly dictates the specific fuel consumption and exhaust smoke. Many experimental studies reported the optimum swirl for a given diesel engine at a given operatin...

P. A. Lakshminarayanan; Yogesh V. Aghav

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Direction and Management of Water Movement in Solid-State Alkaline Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thus, optimization is required to establish design methodology for SAFCs. ... membrane fuel cells - performances are currently limited by the electrode architectures that have been optimized for use in PEM fuel cells but not alk. ...

Han Zhang; Hidenori Ohashi; Takanori Tamaki; Takeo Yamaguchi

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

393

Performance of solid oxide fuel cells operated with coal syngas provided directly from a gasification process  

SciTech Connect

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for gasification integrated power plants that generate electricity from coal at 50+% efficiency. The interaction of trace metals in coal syngas with the Ni-based SOFC anodes is being investigated through thermodynamic analyses and in laboratory experiments, but direct test data from coal syngas exposure are sparsely available. This research effort evaluates the significance of SOFC performance losses associated with exposure of a SOFC anode to direct coal syngas. SOFC specimen of industrially relevant composition are operated in a unique mobile test skid that was deployed to the research gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) in Wilsonville, AL. The mobile test skid interfaces with a gasifier slipstream to deliver hot syngas (up to 300C) directly to a parallel array of 12 button cell specimen, each of which possesses an active area of approximately 2 cm2. During the 500 hour test period, all twelve cells were monitored for performance at four discrete operating current densities, and all cells maintained contact with a data acquisition system. Of these twelve, nine demonstrated good performance throughout the test, while three of the cells were partially compromised. Degradation associated with the properly functioning cells was attributed to syngas exposure and trace material attack on the anode structure that was accelerated at increasing current densities. Cells that were operated at 0 and 125 mA/cm degraded at 9.1 and 10.7% per 1000 hours, respectively, while cells operated at 250 and 375 mA/cm degraded at 18.9 and 16.2% per 1000 hours, respectively. Post-trial spectroscopic analysis of the anodes showed carbon, sulfur, and phosphorus deposits; no secondary Ni-metal phases were found.

Hackett, Gregory A.; Gerdes, Kirk R.; Song, Xueyan; Chen, Yun; Shutthanandan, V.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gemmen, Randall

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 5 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations. This report describes activities for the thirteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that they were having difficulty with refractory vendors meeting specifications for the lining of the pressure vessel. EnviRes is working to resolve this issue.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Investigation of MEA degradation in a passive direct methanol fuel cell under different modes of operation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) durability tests were conducted in three different operational modes: continuous operation with constant load (LT1), onoff operation with constant load (LT2) and onoff operation with variable load (LT3). Porous carbon nanofiber (CNF) anode layers were employed in three sets of single passive DMFCs; each membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was run continuously in durability testing for 3000h. The objective of this study is to investigate the degradation mechanisms in an MEA with a porous CNF anode layer under different modes of operation. The polarization curves of single passive \\{DMFCs\\} before and after durability tests were compared. The degradation of DMFC performance under the cyclic LT1 mode was much more severe than that of LT2 and LT3 operation. The loss of maximum power density after degradation tests was 49.5%, 28.4% and 43.7% for LT1, LT2 and LT3, respectively. TEM, SEM and EDS mapping were used to investigate the causes of degradation. The lower power loss for LT2 was mainly attributed to the reversible degradation caused by poor water discharge, which thus reduced the air supply. Catalyst agglomeration was especially observed in LT1 and LT3 and is related to carbon corrosion due to possible fuel starvation. The loss of active catalyst area was a major cause of performance degradation in LT1 and LT3. In addition to this, the dissolution and migration of Ru catalyst from the anode to cathode was identified and correlated with degraded cell performance. In the DMFC, the carbon nanofiber anode catalyst support exhibited higher performance stability with less catalyst agglomeration than the cathode catalyst support, carbon black. This study helps understand and elucidate the failure mechanism of MEAs, which could thus help to increase the lifetime of DMFCs.

A.M. Zainoodin; S.K. Kamarudin; M.S. Masdar; W.R.W. Daud; A.B. Mohamad; J. Sahari

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

SPOUTED BED ELECTRODES (SBE) FOR DIRECT UTILIZATION OF CARBON IN FUEL CELLS  

SciTech Connect

This Phase I project was focused on an investigation of spouted bed particulate electrodes for the direct utilization of solid carbon in fuel cells. This approach involves the use of a circulating carbon particle/molten carbonate slurry in the cell that provides a few critical functions: it (1) fuels the cell continuously with entrained carbon particles; (2) brings particles to the anode surfaces hydrodynamically; (3) removes ash from the anode surfaces and the cell hydrodynamically; (4) provides a facile means of cell temperature control due to its large thermal capacitance; (5) provides for electrolyte maintenance and control in the electrode separator(s); and (6) can (potentially) improve carbon conversion rates by ''pre-activating'' carbon particle surfaces via formation of intermediate oxygen surface complexes in the bulk molten carbonate. The approach of this scoping project was twofold: (1) adaptation and application of a CFD code, originally developed to simulate particle circulation in spouted bed electrolytic reactors, to carbon particle circulation in DCFC systems; and (2) experimental investigation of the hydrodynamics of carbon slurry circulation in DCFC systems using simulated slurry mixtures. The CFD model results demonstrated that slurry recirculation can be used to hydrodynamically feed carbon particles to anode surfaces. Variations of internal configurations were investigated in order to explore effects on contacting. It was shown that good contacting with inclined surfaces could be achieved even when the particles are of the same density as the molten carbonate. The use of CO{sub 2} product gas from the fuel cell as a ''lift-gas'' to circulate the slurry was also investigated with the model. The results showed that this is an effective method of slurry circulation; it entrains carbon particles more effectively in the draft duct and produces a somewhat slower recirculation rate, and thus higher residence times on anode surfaces, and can be controlled completely via pressure balance. Experimental investigations in a rectangular spouted vessel hydrodynamics apparatus (SVHA) showed that hydrodynamics can be used to control the circulation, residence time, and distribution of carbon within the spouted bed, as well as provide good particle contact with anode surfaces. This was shown to be a function of viscosity, carbon loading, and particle size, as well as relative densities. Higher viscosities and smaller particle sizes favor more efficient particle entrainment in the draft duct, and particle recirculation. Both the computational and experimental results are consistent with each another and exhibit the same general qualitative behavior. Based upon this work, a design of a prototype SBE/DCFC cell was developed and is presented.

J.M. Calo

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Effect of direct liquid water injection and interdigitated flow field on the performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

70-108B One Cyclotron Road Berkeley, California 94720 December 2, 1997 Key Words: Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cells, humidification, gas distribution, direct liquid water injection, interdigitated flow fields. * Corresponding... of the catalyst layers were made of waterproof, carbon fiber cloths. Liquid water was injected by two metering pumps into two heated stainless steel coils, where it was preheated to the cell operating temperatures, and then directly into the gas streams...

Wood, D. L.; Yi, Y. S.; Nguyen, Trung Van

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Analysis of environmental factors impacting the life cycle cost analysis of conventional and fuel cell/battery-powered passenger vehicles. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the further developments and testing of the Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Model previously developed by Engineering Systems Management, Inc. (ESM) on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) under contract No. DE-AC02-91CH10491. The Model incorporates specific analytical relationships and cost/performance data relevant to internal combustion engine (ICE) powered vehicles, battery powered electric vehicles (BPEVs), and fuel cell/battery-powered electric vehicles (FCEVs).

NONE

1995-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Control-theoretic cyber-physical system modeling and synthesis: A case study of an active direct methanol fuel cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A joint optimization of the physical system and the cyber world is one of the key problems in the design of a cyber-physical system (CPS). The major mechanical forces and/or chemical reactions in a plant are commonly modified by actuators in the balance-of-plant ... Keywords: Balance of plants system, Cyber-physical systems, Direct methanol fuel cell

Donghwa Shin; Jaehyun Park; Younghyun Kim; Jaeam Seo; Naehyuck Chang

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Effect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significantly increase the methanol-crossover rate, producing an unfavorable * Corresponding author. DepartmentEffect of water concentration in the anode catalyst layer on the performance of direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu a , S.Y. Shen a , Y.L. He b , T.S. Zhao a

Zhao, Tianshou

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401

Complex SrRuO3?Pt and LaRuO3?Pt Catalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Complex SrRuO3?Pt and LaRuO3?Pt Catalysts for Direct Alcohol Fuel Cells ... While currently LaRuO3/Pt composition possesses the highest activity, optimization of perovskite structure (by doping from A and B sites) may lead even to more advanced catalysts. ...

Aidong Lan; Alexander S. Mukasyan

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

402

To build a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system that produces hydrogen fuel directly from water using sunlight as the energy source.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 SS H2 O2 metaloxide GoalGoal To build a photoelectrochemical (PEC) system that produces hydrogen fuel directly from water using sunlight as the energy source. Approach: development of a multi provides voltage assist using lower-energy photons catalyst surface optimized for hydrogen evolution UH

403

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Fuels  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Goals > Fuels Goals > Fuels XMAT for nuclear fuels XMAT is ideally suited to explore all of the radiation processes experienced by nuclear fuels.The high energy, heavy ion accleration capability (e.g., 250 MeV U) can produce bulk damage deep in the sample, achieving neutron type depths (~10 microns), beyond the range of surface sputtering effects. The APS X-rays are well matched to the ion beams, and are able to probe individual grains at similar penetrations depths. Damage rates to 25 displacements per atom per hour (DPA/hr), and doses >2500 DPA can be achieved. MORE» Fuels in LWRs are subjected to ~1 DPA per day High burn-up fuel can experience >2000 DPA. Traditional reactor tests by neutron irradiation require 3 years in a reactor and 1 year cool down. Conventional accelerators (>1 MeV/ion) are limited to <200-400 DPAs, and

405

Making Fischer?Tropsch Fuels and Electricity from Coal and Biomass: Performance and Cost Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We employ a unified analytical framework to systematically analyze 16 separate process designs, simulating for each detailed mass/energy balances using Aspen Plus software, and calculating their full lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. ... In the plant designs with electricity as a major coproduct, designated as once-through (OT) configurations (Figure 1b), the syngas passes only once through the synthesis reactor, and all of the unconverted syngas plus light gases from FTL refining are compressed and supplied to the power island where a gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle (GTCC) provides the power needed to operate the plant, as well as a substantial amount of export power (up to 37% of the total plant output of fuel (LHV) and powersee Table 3). ... (27) The gasifier is followed by a tar cracking unit, modeled as an ATR with a syngas exit temperature of 882 C that converts into syngas the heavy hydrocarbons that form at typical biomass gasification temperatures and that would otherwise condense and cause operating difficulties downstream. ...

Guangjian Liu; Eric D. Larson; Robert H. Williams; Thomas G. Kreutz; Xiangbo Guo

2010-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

406

Reducing Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuel Costs with HyMelt Hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

This report describes activities for the sixteenth quarter of work performed under this agreement. MEFOS, the gasification testing subcontractor, reported to EnviRes that the vendor for the pressure vessel for above atmospheric testing now plans to deliver it by November 20, 2006 instead of October 20, 2006 as previously reported. MEFOS performed a hazardous operation review of pressurized testing. The current schedule anticipates above atmospheric pressure testing to begin during the week of April 16, 2007. Phase I of the work to be done under this agreement consisted of conducting atmospheric gasification of coal using the HyMelt technology to produce separate hydrogen rich and carbon monoxide rich product streams. In addition smaller quantities of petroleum coke and a low value refinery stream were gasified. Phase II of the work to be done under this agreement, consists of gasification of the above-mentioned feeds at a gasifier pressure of approximately 3 bar. The results of this work will be used to evaluate the technical and economic aspects of producing ultra-clean transportation fuels using the HyMelt technology in existing and proposed refinery configurations.

Donald P. Malone; William R. Renner

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Direct conversion of methane to C sub 2 's and liquid fuels  

SciTech Connect

Objectives of the project are to discover and evaluate novel catalytic systems for the conversion of methane or by-product light hydrocarbon gases either indirectly (through intermediate light gases rich in C{sub 2}'s) or directly to liquid hydrocarbon fuels, and to evaluate, from an engineering perspective, different conceptualized schemes. The approach is to carry out catalyst testing on several specific classes of potential catalysts for the conversion of methane selectively to C{sub 2} products. Promoted metal oxide catalysts were tested. Several of these exhibited similar high ethylene to ethane ratios and low carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratios observed for the NaCl/{alpha}-alumina catalyst system reported earlier. Research on catalysts containing potentially activated metals began with testing of metal molecular sieves. Silver catalysts were shown to be promising as low temperature catalysts. Perovskites were tested as potential methane coupling catalysts. A layered perovskite (K{sub 2}La{sub 2}Ti{sub 3}O{sub 10}) gave the highest C{sub 2} yield. Work continued on the economic evaluation of a hypothetical process converting methane to ethylene. An engineering model of the methane coupling system has been prepared. 47 refs., 17 figs., 57 tabs.

Warren, B.K.; Campbell, K.D.

1989-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel Cell Systems Sensors Air Management Benchmarking Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Systems F u e l P r o c e s s o r Sensors Air Management Benchmarking Modeling Patrick Davis Patrick Davis Targets and Status 50 kWe (net) Integrated Fuel Cell Power System 5000 2000 1000 Hours Durability 45 125 275 $/kW Cost (including H2 storage) 650 500 400 W/L Power density (w/o H2 stor) Operating on direct hydrogen 5000 2000 1000 Hours Durability 45 125 325 $/kW Cost 325 250 140 W/L Power density Operating on Tier 2 gasoline containing 30 ppm sulfur, average 2010 2005 2003 status Units Characteristics Projects Fuel Cell Power Systems Analysis ANL NREL TIAX Directed Technologies, Inc. TIAX TIAX * Fuel Cell Systems Analysis * Fuel Cell Vehicle Systems Analysis * Cost Analyses of Fuel Cell Stacks/ Systems * DFMA Cost Estimates of Fuel Cell/ Reformer Systems at Low, Medium, & High Production Rates * Assessment of Fuel Cell Auxiliary

409

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composites for Aerospace and Transportation As the fuel costs and environment concerns continue to increase, so does the demand for composite materials for aerospace and transportation applications. Polymer composites are inherited lighter than their metallic counterparts resulting in significant weight reduction

Li, Mo

410

Power, Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Power, Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling BY Jonathan Michael Stearns Mattson Submitted to the graduate degree program..., Efficiency, and Emissions Optimization of a Single Cylinder Direct-Injected Diesel Engine for Testing of Alternative Fuels through Heat Release Modeling BY Jonathan Michael Stearns Mattson...

Mattson, Jonathan Michael Stearns

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

411

Assessment of the impacts on health due to the emissions of Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high content of sulfur. Estimation of external costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel electricity generation has been demonstrated to be a main source of atmospheric pollution. The necessity of finding out a balance between the costs of achieving a lower level of environmental and health injury and the benefits of providing electricity at a reasonable cost have lead to the process of estimating the external costs derived from these impacts and not included in the electricity prices as a quantitative measure of it that, even when there are large uncertainties involved, can be used by decision makers in the process of achieving a global sustainable development. The external costs of the electricity generation in three Cuban power plants that use fossil fuel oils with high sulfur content have been assessed. With that purpose a specific implementation of the Impact Pathways Methodology for atmospheric emissions was developed. Dispersion of atmospheric pollutants is modeled at local and regional scales in a detailed way. Health impacts include mortality and those morbidity effects that showed relation with the increment of selected pollutant concentration in national studies. The external cost assessed for the three plants was 40,588,309USDyr?1 (min./max.: 10,194,833/169,013,252), representing 1.06USDCentkWh?1. Costs derived from sulfur species (SO2 and sulfate aerosol) stand for 93% of the total costs.

L. Turts Carbonell; E. Meneses Ruiz; M. Snchez Gcita; J. Rivero Oliva; N. Daz Rivero

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Direct Investigations of the Immobilization of Radionuclides in the Alteration Products of Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect

Safe disposal of the nation's nuclear waste in a geological repository involves unique scientific and engineering challenges owing to the very long-lived radioactivity of the waste. The repository must retain a variety of radionuclides that have vastly different chemical characters for several thousand years. Most of the radioactivity that will be housed in the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain will be associated with spent nuclear fuel, much of which is derived from commercial reactors. DOE is custodian of approximately 8000 tons of spent nuclear fuel that is also intended for eventual disposal in a geological repository. Unlike the spent fuel from commercial reactors, the DOE fuel is diverse in composition with more than 250 varieties. Safe disposal of spent fuel requires a detailed knowledge of its long-term behavior under repository conditions, as well as the fate of radionuclides released from the spent fuel as waste containers are breached.

Peter C. Burns; Robert J. Finch; David J. Wronkiewicz

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

413

GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW-GTR-245 Forest Fuel Characterization Using Direct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the plantation was 53.65 ton/ha; wood fuels accounted for 70% of this accumulation with 39.62 tons

Standiford, Richard B.

414

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This document provides information about near-term markets (such as for forklifts and telecommunications) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

415

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Markets  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document provides information about near-term markets (such as for forklifts and telecommunications) for proton exchange membrane fuel cells.

416

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 1: Distributed Hydrogen Fueling Systems Analysis Project ID: 78 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Hydrogen infrastructure; costs; methanol; hydrogen fueling Purpose As the DOE considers both direct hydrogen and reformer-based fuel cell vehicles, it is vital to have a clear perspective of the relative infrastructure costs to supply each prospective fuel (gasoline, methanol, or hydrogen). Consequently, this analysis compares these infrastructure costs as well as the cost to remove sulfur from gasoline (as will most likely be required for use in fuel cell systems) and the cost implications for several hydrogen tank filling options. This analysis supports Analysis

417

Market penetration scenarios for fuel cell vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell vehicles may create the first mass market for hydrogen as an energy carrier. Directed Technologies, Inc., working with the US Department of Energy hydrogen systems analysis team, has developed a time-dependent computer market penetration model. This model estimates the number of fuel cell vehicles that would be purchased over time as a function of their cost and the cost of hydrogen relative to the costs of competing vehicles and fuels. The model then calculates the return on investment for fuel cell vehicle manufacturers and hydrogen fuel suppliers. The model also projects the benefit/cost ratio for government--the ratio of societal benefits such as reduced oil consumption, reduced urban air pollution and reduced greenhouse gas emissions to the government cost for assisting the development of hydrogen energy and fuel cell vehicle technologies. The purpose of this model is to assist industry and government in choosing the best investment strategies to achieve significant return on investment and to maximize benefit/cost ratios. The model can illustrate trends and highlight the sensitivity of market penetration to various parameters such as fuel cell efficiency, cost, weight, and hydrogen cost. It can also illustrate the potential benefits of successful R and D and early demonstration projects. Results will be shown comparing the market penetration and return on investment estimates for direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles compared to fuel cell vehicles with onboard fuel processors including methanol steam reformers and gasoline partial oxidation systems. Other alternative fueled vehicles including natural gas hybrids, direct injection diesels and hydrogen-powered internal combustion hybrid vehicles will also be analyzed.

Thomas, C.E.; James, B.D.; Lomax, F.D. Jr. [Directed Technologies, Inc., Arlington, VA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

418

Hydrogen as a fuel for fuel cell vehicles: A technical and economic comparison  

SciTech Connect

All fuel cells currently being developed for near term use in vehicles require hydrogen as a fuel. Hydrogen can be stored directly or produced onboard the vehicle by reforming methanol, ethanol or hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil (e.g., Diesel, gasoline or middle distillates). The vehicle design is simpler with direct hydrogen storage, but requires developing a more complex refueling infrastructure. In this paper, the authors compare three leading options for fuel storage onboard fuel cell vehicles: compressed gas hydrogen storage; onboard steam reforming of methanol; onboard partial oxidation (POX) of hydrocarbon fuels derived from crude oil. Equilibrium, kinetic and heat integrated system (ASPEN) models have been developed to estimate the performance of onboard steam reforming and POX fuel processors. These results have been incorporated into a fuel cell vehicle model, allowing us to compare the vehicle performance, fuel economy, weight, and cost for various fuel storage choices and driving cycles. A range of technical and economic parameters were considered. The infrastructure requirements are also compared for gaseous hydrogen, methanol and hydrocarbon fuels from crude oil, including the added costs of fuel production, storage, distribution and refueling stations. Considering both vehicle and infrastructure issues, the authors compare hydrogen to other fuel cell vehicle fuels. Technical and economic goals for fuel cell vehicle and hydrogen technologies are discussed. Potential roles for hydrogen in the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles are sketched.

Ogden, J.; Steinbugler, M.; Kreutz, T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Center for Energy and Environmental Studies

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 This program record from the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell...

420

Evaluation of Oxydiesel as a Fuel for Direct-Injection Compression-Ignition Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

speed and maximum power for 500 hours on a blend of ethanol, No. 2 diesel, and an additive as compared and diesel with a special additive, has been shown to be a promising new alternative fuel for existing diesel the mixing of diesel fuel with ethanol. The Illinois DCCA has embarked on a widespread research program

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Measuring the Costs and Economic, Social, and Environmental Benefits of Nationwide Geothermal Heat Pump Deployment and The Potential Employment, Energy, and Environmental Impacts of Direct Use Applications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project objectives: To measure the costs and economic; social; and environmental benefits of nationwide geothermal heat pump (GHP) deployment; and To survey selected states as to their potential employment; energy use and savings; and environmental impact for direct use applications.

422

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop capital assets ­ Three main· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable) costs apply

Boisvert, Jeff

423

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Revenue Relationships · Capital Costs (or first cost or capital investment): ­ Expenditures made to acquire or develop05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408 ­ off-site management or corporate level expenditure · Direct vs. Indirect Costs ­ Direct (or variable

Boisvert, Jeff

424

Hydrogen refueling station costs in Shanghai  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis Costs of storing and transporting hydrogen A comprehensive comparison of fuel options for fuel cell vehicles

Weinert, Jonathan X.; Shaojun, Liu; Ogden, Joan M; Jianxin, Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Multi-criteria comparison of fuel policies: Renewable fuel mandate, fuel emission-standards, and fuel carbon tax  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

security, renewable energy, bio- fuel, carbon tax, mandate,and taxpayer cost of bio- fuel excise tax credits dwarf the

Rajagopal, Deepak; Hochman, G.; Zilberman, D.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Impact of DOE Program Goals on Hydrogen Vehicles: Market Prospect, Costs, and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9 9 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Zhenhong Lin (Primary Contact), David Greene, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1308 Email: linz@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Project Start Date: October 2011 Project End Date: September 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market penetrations of hydrogen vehicles under * varied assumptions on processes of achieving the DOE program goals for fuel cells, hydrogen storage, batteries, motors, and hydrogen supply. Estimate social benefits and public costs under different *

427

Modeling and Optimization of PEMFC Systems and its Application to Direct Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cell System Water Management Motor Cooling HumidifierComp. Motor Power SM Outlet Mass Flow -C- Desired RH WaterP motor , 0 k comp = P comp P comp , 0 Thermal and water

Zhao, Hengbing; Burke, Andy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Development of Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

429

Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

430

Development of a Low-Cost 3-10 kW Tubular SOFC Power System - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Norman Bessette Acumentrics Corporation 20 Southwest Park Westwood, MA 02090 Phone: (781) 461-8251; Email: nbessette@acumentrics.com DOE Managers HQ: Dimitrios Papageorgopoulos Phone: (202) 586-5463 Email: Dimitrios.Papageorgopoulos@ee.doe.gov GO: Reginald Tyler Phone: (720) 356-1805 Email: Reginald.Tyler@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FC36-03NT41838 Project Start Date: April 1, 2008 Project End Date: March 31, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives The goal of the project is to develop a low-cost 3-10 kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power generator capable of meeting multiple market applications. This is accomplished by: Improving cell power and stability * Cost reduction of cell manufacturing

431

Fuel Processing Valri Lightner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Hydrogen · Fuel Processors for PEM Fuel Cells Nuvera Fuel Cells, Inc. GE Catalytica ANL PNNL University-Board Fuel Processing Barriers $35/kW Fuel Processor $10/kW Fuel Cell Power Systems $45/kW by 2010 BARRIERS · Fuel processor start-up/ transient operation · Durability · Cost · Emissions and environmental issues

432

Ultra compact direct hydrogen fuel cell prototype using a metal hydride hydrogen storage tank for a mobile phone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The small fuel cell is being researched as an alternative power source to the Li-ion battery in mobile phone. In this paper, a direct hydrogen fuel cell system which powers a mobile phone without a supplementary battery is compactly integrated below 25ml volume at the backside of the phone. The system consists of a small (8ml) metal hydride hydrogen storage tank with 4L hydrogen storage or an energy density of ?640Wh/L, a thin air-breathing planar polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack (13.44cm2נ3mm for a volumetric power density of 335W/L), miniature pressure regulator, and a high efficiency DCDC voltage converting circuitry. The hydrogen storage tank is packed with the AB5 type metal hydride alloy. The eight-cell air-breathing planar stack (8ml) is very thin (3mm) due to a thin flexible printed circuit board current collectors as well as a unique riveting assembly and is capable of a robust performance of 2.68W (200mW/cm2). A miniature pressure regulator is compact with fluidic and electrical connections within 4ml. A miniature DCDC voltage converter operates at an overall efficiency of 90%. Consequently, the estimated energy density of a fully integrated fuel cell system is 205Wh/L (70.5Wh/kg).

Sung Han Kim; Craig M. Miesse; Hee Bum Lee; Ik Whang Chang; Yong Sheen Hwang; Jae Hyuk Jang; Suk Won Cha

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) evaluation of the Super-Mag Fuel Extender under Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. Technical report  

SciTech Connect

This document announces the conclusions of the EPA evaluation of the 'Super-Mag Fuel Extender' device under provisions of Section 511 of the Motor Vehicle Information and Cost Savings Act. On December 10, 1980, the EPA received a written request from the Metropolitan Denver District Attorney's Office of Consumer Fraud and Economic Crime to test at least one 'cow magnet' type of fuel economy device. Following a survey of devices being marketed, the Metropolitan Denver District Attorney's Office selected the 'Super-Mag' device as typical of its category and on April 13, 1981 provided EPA with units for testing. The EPA evaluation of the device using three vehicles showed neither fuel economy nor exhaust emissions were affected by the installation of the 'Super-Mag' device. In addition, any differences between baseline test results and results from tests with the device installed were within the range of normal test variability.

Ashby, H.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Cost evaluation of a novel 5-kW diesel-powered solid oxide fuel cell auxiliary power unit (APU).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Idling heavy-duty trucks result in poor fuel consumption and harmful emissions. The Auxiliary Power Unit (APU) is one of the methods to reduce idling. The (more)

Pillala, Chakradhar.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station  

SciTech Connect

For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

school districts must pay for the alternative fueling infrastructure, the incremental cost between a conventional and alternative fuel bus, and training for bus maintenance...

437

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

biodiesel fuel will be considered commercially available if the incremental purchase cost compared to conventional diesel fuel is not more than 0.25. To the maximum extent...

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Government fleets may finance the lease or purchase cost of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fueling infrastructure through energy performance contracts where vehicle...

439

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

that the alternative fuel is not available within a reasonable distance andor the price of the alternative fuel is cost prohibitive, as determined by DOER. (Reference...

440

Advantages of Oxygenates Fuels over Gasoline in Direct Injection Spark Ignition Engines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Poster presented at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SDSU RESEARCH FOUNDATION COST SHARING POLICY AND PROCEDURES The purpose of these guidelines is to provide direction in accumulating and reporting cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SDSU RESEARCH FOUNDATION COST SHARING POLICY AND PROCEDURES PURPOSE The purpose of these guidelines represent the recipient's (that is, SDSU, the Campanile Foundation, or SDSU Research Foundation) cash outlay and/or non-Federal third parties. POLICY: It is the policy of the Foundation and the University

Ponce, V. Miguel

442

Characterisation of large solid recovered fuel particles for direct co-firing in large PF power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solid Recovered Fuels (SRF) are solid fuels prepared from high calorific fractions of non-hazardous waste materials intended to be co-fired in coal power plants and industrial furnaces (CEN/TC 343, Solid Recovered Fuels, 2003). They are composed of variety of materials of which some, although recyclable in theory, may have become in forms that made their recycling an unsound option. The SRF with an equivalent median diameter D50 of 6.8mm are to be directly co-fired in an existing pulverised coal power plant. In comparison to pulverised coal, the particle size distribution of the SRF is of several magnitudes higher, resulting in a different burnout behaviour. Size reduction of the SRF to a fraction similar to coal is not economically feasible. As such, the idea is to co-fire SRF without any further size reduction, and of course this proceeding bears the risk of incomplete combustion. Accordingly, the prediction of the burner levels at which the SRF should be injected and whether or not a complete combustion will be achieved under full and part load conditions are the primary objectives of this paper. In this work, laboratory experiments have been conducted to forecast the success of co-firing the SRF in a commercial pulverised coal power plant. It involves the analyses of the fuel and its intermediate chars, generated at conditions comparable to boiler conditions, to determine some characteristic parameters, namely the burnout time, the aerodynamic lift velocity (ALV), and the apparent densities. The information gathered from the lab experiments are correlated to boiler conditions to determine the possible distances they are likely to travel under various regimes, full load and part load, before they are completely consumed. Different scenarios are examined, and based on the results, the optimal boiler injection points are predicted.

Gregory Dunnu; Jrg Maier; Thomas Hilber; Gnter Scheffknecht

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Market Concepts, Competing Technologies and Cost Challenges for Automotive and Stationary Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

term) due to high fuel cell stack costs, but it would alsoto refuel; cost reductions in fuel cell stacks, auxiliaries,

Lipman, Todd; Sperling, Daniel

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Direct  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

interactions, and the pollutant emission is hence directly proportional to the bulk neutral density. Simultaneously monitoring the total emission at 1040 nm and the...

445

Improved System Performance and Reduced Cost of a Fuel Reformer, LNT, and SCR Aftertreatment System Meeting Emissions Useful Life Requirement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

An advanced exhaust aftertreatment system developed to meet EPA 2010 and final Tier 4 emission regulations show substantial improvements in system performance while reducing system cost

446

Cost of Adding E85 Fueling Capability to Existing Gasoline Stations: NREL Survey and Literature Search (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet provides framework for gas station owners to access what a reasonable cost would be to install E85 infrastructure.

Not Available

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Carbon Capture and Storage From Fossil Fuels and Biomass Costs and Potential Role in Stabilizing the Atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The capture and storage of CO2 from combustion of fossil fuels is gaining attraction as a means to deal with climate change. CO2...emissions from biomass conversion processes can also be captured. If that is done...

Christian Azar; Kristian Lindgren; Eric Larson; Kenneth Mllersten

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Study of multi-component fuel premixed combustion using direct numerical simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of and the relative species proportions in these gases however vary considerably. The Syngas obtained by coal gasification is mostly composed of hydrogen and carbon monoxide with varying levels of carbon dioxide, water and other trace species [2, 3]. The relative... proportions of the predominant gases vary widely depending on the gasification process and the ratio of hydrogen to carbon monoxide mole fractions in the fuel, fH2 = XH2/XCO, is typically larger than 0.1 and it can be as high as 3 [1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8...

Nikolaou, Zacharias M.

2014-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

449

High Speed, Low Cost Fabrication of Gas Diffusion Electrodes for Membrane Electrode Assemblies - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Emory S. De Castro BASF Fuel Cell, Inc. 39 Veronica Avenue Somerset, NJ 08873 Phone: (732) 545-5100 ext 4114 Email: Emory.DeCastro@BASF.com DOE Managers HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov GO: Jesse Adams Phone: (720) 356-1421 Email: Jesse.Adams@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE0000384 Subcontractor: Dr. Vladimir Gurau Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio Project Start Date: July 1, 2009 Project End Date: June 30, 2013 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Reduce cost in fabricating gas diffusion electrodes * through the introduction of high speed coating technology, with a focus on materials used for the high- temperature membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs)

450

Cost of Ownership and Well-to-Wheels Carbon Emissions/Oil Use of Alternative Fuels and Advanced Light-Duty Vehicle Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne), and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) updated their analysis of the well-to-wheels (WTW) greenhouse gases (GHG) emissions, petroleum use, and the cost of ownership (excluding insurance, maintenance, and miscellaneous fees) of vehicle technologies that have the potential to significantly reduce GHG emissions and petroleum consumption. The analyses focused on advanced light-duty vehicle (LDV) technologies such as plug-in hybrid, battery electric, and fuel cell electric vehicles. Besides gasoline and diesel, alternative fuels considered include natural gas, advanced biofuels, electricity, and hydrogen. The Argonne Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) and Autonomie models were used along with the Argonne and NREL H2A models.

Elgowainy, Mr. Amgad [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Rousseau, Mr. Aymeric [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wang, Mr. Michael [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ruth, Mr. Mark [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Andress, Mr. David [David Andress & Associates, Inc.; Ward, Jacob [U.S. Department of Energy; Joseck, Fred [U.S. Department of Energy; Nguyen, Tien [U.S. Department of Energy; Das, Sujit [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicle Incremental Cost Allocation The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) must allocate the incremental cost of purchasing alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) across the...

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

to cover the incremental cost of purchasing biodiesel as compared to the cost of petroleum diesel fuel. If in any fiscal year, insufficient funds are available to provide...

453

Consideration of critically when directly disposing highly enriched spent nuclear fuel in unsaturated tuff: Bounding estimates  

SciTech Connect

This report presents one of 2 approaches (bounding calculations) which were used in a 1994 study to examine the possibility of a criticality in a repository. Bounding probabilities, although rough, point to the difficulty of creating conditions under which a critical mass could be assembled (container corrosion, separation of neutron absorbers from fissile material, collapse or precipitation of fissile material) and how significant the geochemical and hydrologic phenomena are. The study could not conceive of a mechanism consistent with conditions under which an atomic explosion could occur. Should a criticality occur in or near a container in the future, boundary consequence calculations showed that fissions from one critical event (<10{sup 20} fissions, if similar to aqueous and metal accidents and experiments) are quite small compared to the amount of fissions represented by the spent fuel itself. If it is assumed that the containers necessary to hold the highly enriched spent fuel went critical once per day for 1 million years, creating an energy release of about 10{sup 20} fissions, the number of fissions equals about 10{sup 28}, which corresponds to only 1% of the fission inventory in a repository containing 70,000 metric tons of heavy metal, the expected size for the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada.

Rechard, R.P.; Tierney, M.S.; Sanchez, L.C.; Martell, M.-A.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Effects of Fuel-Shell Mix upon Direct-Drive, Spherical Implosions on OMEGA C. K. Li, F. H. Seguin, J. A. Frenje, S. Kurebayashi, and R. D. Petrasso*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Fuel-Shell Mix upon Direct-Drive, Spherical Implosions on OMEGA C. K. Li, F. H. Se September 2002) Fuel-shell mix and implosion performance are studied for many capsule types in direct shortfalls are likely to be caused by fuel-shell mix. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.89.165002 PACS numbers: 52

455

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Record 5038: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Date: May 22, 2006 8 Date: May 22, 2006 Title: Hydrogen Cost Competitive on a Cents per Mile Basis - 2006 Originator: Patrick Davis & Steve Chalk Approved by: JoAnn Milliken Approval Date: May 22, 2006 Item : Lower the cost of hydrogen from natural gas to be competitive on a cents per mile basis with conventional gasoline vehicles. Supporting Information: The results of a 2003 economic analysis were used to estimate the cost of hydrogen produced from distributed natural gas reforming at $5 per gallon of gasoline equivalent (gge) (See U.S. DOE Record 5030: Hydrogen Baseline Cost of $5 per gge in 2003; available at http://www.hydrogen.energy.gov/program_records). Since the original analysis, DOE-sponsored R&D has resulted in significant cost reductions,

456

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This presentation, which focuses on low cost, durable seals, was given by George Roberts of UTC Power at a February 2007 meeting on new fuel cell projects.

457

Molecular modeling of the morphology and transport properties of two direct methanol fuel cell membranes: phenylated sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone ketone) versus Nafion  

SciTech Connect

We have used molecular dynamics simulations to examine membrane morphology and the transport of water, methanol and hydronium in phenylated sulfonated poly ether ether ketone ketone (Ph-SPEEKK) and Nafion membranes at 360 K for a range of hydration levels. At comparable hydration levels, the pore diameter is smaller, the sulfonate groups are more closely packed, the hydronium ions are more strongly bound to sulfonate groups, and the diffusion of water and hydronium is slower in Ph-SPEEKK relative to the corresponding properties in Nafion. The aromatic carbon backbone of Ph-SPEEKK is less hydrophobic than the fluorocarbon backbone of Nafion. Water network percolation occurs at a hydration level ({lambda}) of {approx}8 H{sub 2}O/SO{sub 3}{sup -}. At {lambda} = 20, water, methanol and hydronium diffusion coefficients were 1.4 x 10{sup -5}, 0.6 x 10{sup -5} and 0.2 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s, respectively. The pore network in Ph-SPEEKK evolves dynamically and develops wide pores for {lambda} > 20, which leads to a jump in methanol crossover and ion transport. This study demonstrates the potential of aromatic membranes as low-cost challengers to Nafion for direct methanol fuel cell applications and the need to develop innovative strategies to combat methanol crossover at high hydration levels.

Devanathan, Ramaswami; Idupulapati, Nagesh B.; Dupuis, Michel

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

458

Evidence for Direct Electron Transfer by a Gram-Positive Bacterium Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...vol/vol) from microbial fuel cells. Effects on the rate...experiments with Shewanella algae strain BRY, Geothrix fermentans...glucose in mediatorless microbial fuel cells. Nat. Biotechnol. 21...electricity generation at microbial fuel cell anodes via excretion of...

K. C. Wrighton; J. C. Thrash; R. A. Melnyk; J. P. Bigi; K. G. Byrne-Bailey; J. P. Remis; D. Schichnes; M. Auer; C. J. Chang; J. D. Coates

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

459

Influence of Biodiesel Fuel on the Combustion and Emission Formation in a Direct Injection (DI) Diesel Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The injector needle lift trace at low engine speed was almost identical for both fuels, while at maximum engine speed, a shorter injection delay was observed for biodiesel fuel and the injector needle opened earlier as with D2 fuel. ... Figure 1 Comparison of the engine torque (M), fuel consumption (Gh), and brake specific energy consumption (ge) at full load for biodiesel fuel (BD) and D2 fuel in (a) TAM and (b) MAN engines. ... (7)?Sanatore, A.; Cardone, M.; Rocco, V.; Prati, M. V. A comparative analysis of combustion process in DI diesel engine fueled with biodiesel and diesel fuel. ...

Ales Hribernik; Breda Kegl

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Manganite nanorods supported palladium - a facile electrocatalyst for direct glycerol fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manganite (MnOOH) nanorods were synthesised by a hydrothermal method and then used as a supportive material for Palladium towards glycerol electrooxidation in alkaline medium. The smaller quantities (5 and 15 weight %) of palladium are coated on the manganite nanorods by in situ reduction method. The electrooxidation of glycerol at Pd/Manganite electrode exhibits peak current vertexes at ?0.2 V, which is lower than Pd/C. By varying the alkali (KOH) and glycerol concentrations the electrocatalytic behaviour has been changed considerably and was discussed. The present study reveals that the manganite nanorods act as active support material for Pd. The support material will help to oxidise the intermediates formed during electrooxidation of fuel. The possibilities for the removal of poisonous intermediates were also discussed. The effect of support material on the electrooxidation reaction was explained by proper mechanism.

Ramanujam Kannan; Palanisamy Ravichandiran; Kulandaivelu Karunakaran

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Electricity costs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... index is used to correct for inflation. The short answer is given by the Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The ... Generating Board's (CEGB's) 1980-81 report, paragraph 168. "The cost per kWh of fuel. . . rose by 18.6 per cent (between 1979 ...

J.W. JEFFERY

1982-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

462

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduced Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Fueling Infrastructure Lease - AGL Atlanta Gas Light (AGL) offers a reduced cost lease on the BRC FuelMaker Phill CNG vehicle home fueling...

463

PNNL Advances Hydrogen-Fueled Vehicle Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

EERE-funded PNNL projects are improving performance and decreasing production costs of hydrogen fuel and fuel cell technologies.

464

Journal of Power Sources 196 (2011) 18021807 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cell (AEM DEFC) that uses a low-cost AEM, rather than a proton-exchange membrane (PEM), for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs), makes it possible to achieve on performance of anion-exchange membrane direct ethanol fuel cells Y.S. Li, T.S. Zhao , J.B. Xu, S.Y. Shen, W

Zhao, Tianshou

465

Improving gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine efficiency and emissions with hydrogen from exhaust gas fuel reforming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Exhaust gas fuel reforming has been identified as a thermochemical energy recovery technology with potential to improve gasoline engine efficiency, and thereby reduce CO2 in addition to other gaseous and particulate matter (PM) emissions. The principle relies on achieving energy recovery from the hot exhaust stream by endothermic catalytic reforming of gasoline and a fraction of the engine exhaust gas. The hydrogen-rich reformate has higher enthalpy than the gasoline fed to the reformer and is recirculated to the intake manifold, i.e. reformed exhaust gas recirculation (REGR). The REGR system was simulated by supplying hydrogen and carbon monoxide (CO) into a conventional EGR system. The hydrogen and CO concentrations in the REGR stream were selected to be achievable in practice at typical gasoline exhaust temperatures. Emphasis was placed on comparing REGR to the baseline gasoline engine, and also to conventional EGR. The results demonstrate the potential of REGR to simultaneously increase thermal efficiency, reduce gaseous emissions and decrease PM formation.

Daniel Fennell; Jose Herreros; Athanasios Tsolakis

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells Converting chemical energy of hydrogenated fuels into electricity Project Description Invented in 1839, fuels cells powered the Gemini and Apollo space missions, as well as the space shuttle. Although fuel cells have been successfully used in such applications, they have proven difficult to make more cost-effective and durable for commercial applications, particularly for the rigors of daily transportation. Since the 1970s, scientists at Los Alamos have managed to make various scientific breakthroughs that have contributed to the development of modern fuel cell systems. Specific efforts include the following: * Finding alternative and more cost-effective catalysts than platinum. * Enhancing the durability of fuel cells by developing advanced materials and

467

Sensitivity Analysis of H2-Vehicles' Market Prospects, Costs and Benefits - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program David L. Greene (Primary Contact), Zhenhong Lin, Jing Dong Oak Ridge National Laboratory National Transportation Research Center 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 Phone: (865) 946-1310 Email: dlgreene@ornl.gov DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@hq.doe.gov Subcontractor: Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN Project Start Date: October, 2010 Project End Date: Project continuation and direction determined annually by DOE Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Project market shares of hydrogen fuel cell vehicles * (FCVs) under varying market conditions using the Market Acceptance of Advanced Automotive Technologies (MA3T) model.

468

A comparison of direct and indirect liquefaction technologies for making fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

direct liquefaction conversion processes might be more energy- efficient, overall system efficiencies fuels derived from crude oil with regard to both air-pollutant and greenhouse-gas emissions, but direct at costs competitive with crude oil-derived liquid fuels. An important finding is the potential

469

Costing plutonium: economics of reprocessing in India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relative merits of reprocessing and direct disposal of spent nuclear fuel have been widely debated in Europe and the USA. An important aspect of the debate has been the economics of reprocessing. So far there have been no studies of the subject in the Indian context. This study assesses the economics of reprocessing in India and the cost of producing plutonium for the fast breeder reactor programme. Our results suggest that the cost of reprocessing each kilogram of spent fuel would cost approximately Rs. 26,000 (approx. $600) with assumptions favourable to reprocessing, and close to Rs. 30,000 (approx. $675) under other assumptions. These costs are lower than the corresponding figures for reprocessing plants in Europe, the USA, and Japan. As in their case, however, it is unlikely to be an economically viable method of waste disposal.

M.V. Ramana; J.Y. Suchitra

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

An Assessment of the Near-Term Costs of Hydrogen Refueling Stations and Station Components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cell_PAFC Fuel Cell_PEM Cost ($/kW) Primary Author YearForecasting the Costs of Automotive PEM Fuel Cells UsingThe operating cost for the PEM Fuel Cell/Reformer energy

Lipman, T E; Weinert, Jonathan X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

472

Low Temperature Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Balance-of-Plant Manufactur...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan - Section 3.5 Manufacturing R&D Manufacturing Cost Analysis of 10 kW and 25 kW Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Material Handling Applications...

473

New York: EERE-Supported Catalyst Licensed for Use in Fuel Cell Hybrid Advanced Vehicles  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

EERE-funding directly resulted in a cost-effective commercial electrocatalyst product for fuel cells that is now being manufactured with plans to be used in hybrid vehicles.

474

Pore Formation by In Situ Etching of Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman,* and D. Gallz  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pore Formation by In Situ Etching of Nanorod PEM Fuel Cell Electrodes M. D. Gasda, G. A. Eisman a significant fraction of the overall cost of the fuel cell system, and much effort has therefore been directed electrolyte membranes for testing as cathode electrodes in fuel cells. The rods were etched within fully

Gall, Daniel

475

A Two-Phase Pressure Drop Model Incorporating Local Water Balance and Reactant Consumption in PEM Fuel Cell Gas Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and directly affects cost and sizing of fuel cell subsystems. Within several regions of PEMFC operating Fuel Cell Gas Channels E. J. See and S. G. Kandlikar Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rochester in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). The ability to model two-phase flow and pressure drop

Kandlikar, Satish

476

High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Dr. Katherine Ayers (Primary Contact), Andy Roemer Proton Energy Systems d/b/a Proton OnSite 10 Technology Drive Wallingford, CT 06492 Phone: (203) 678-2190 Email: kayers@protononsite.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: Dave Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-EE000276 Subcontractors: * Entegris, Inc., Chaska, MN * The Electrochemical Engine Center at Penn State, University Park, PA * Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN Project Start Date: September 1, 2009

477

PEM Electrolyzer Incorporating an Advanced Low-Cost Membrane - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Monjid Hamdan (Primary Contact), Tim Norman Giner, Inc. (Formerly Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC.) 89 Rumford Ave. Newton, MA 02466 Phone: (781) 529-0526 Email: mhamdan@ginerinc.com DOE Managers HQ: Erika Sutherland Phone: (202) 586-3152 Email: Erika.Sutherland@ee.doe.gov GO: David Peterson Phone: (720) 356-1747 Email: David.Peterson@go.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-FG36-08GO18065 Subcontractors: * Virginia Polytechnic Institute and University, Blacksburg, VA * Parker Hannifin Ltd domnick hunter Division, Hemel Hempstead, United Kingdom Project Start Date: May 1, 2008

478

Fuel cell systems for personal and portable power applications  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are devices that electrochemically convert fuel, usually hydrogen gas, to directly produce electricity. Fuel cells were initially developed for use in the space program to provide electricity and drinking water for astronauts. Fuel cells are under development for use in the automobile industry to power cars and buses with the advantage of lower emissions and higher efficiency than internal combustion engines. Fuel cells also have great potential to be used in portable consumer products like cellular phones and laptop computers, as well as military applications. In fact, any products that use batteries can be powered by fuel cells. In this project, we examine fuel cell system trade-offs between fuel cell type and energy storage/hydrogen production for portable power generation. The types of fuel cells being examined include stored hydrogen PEM (polymer electrolyte), direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) and indirect methanol fuel cells, where methanol is reformed producing hydrogen. These fuel cells systems can operate at or near ambient conditions, which make them potentially optimal for use in manned personal power applications. The expected power production for these systems is in the range of milliwatts to 500 watts of electrical power for either personal or soldier field use. The fuel cell system trade-offs examine hydrogen storage by metal hydrides, carbon nanotubes, and compressed hydrogen tanks. We examine the weights each system, volume, fuel storage, system costs, system peripherals, power output, and fuel cell feasibility in portable devices.

Fateen, S. A. (Shaheerah A.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

DOE Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record 14012: Fuel Cell System...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fuel Cell Technologies Office Record Record : 14012 Date: June 12, 2014 Title: Fuel Cell System Cost - 2013 Update to: Record 12020 Originator: Jacob Spendelow and Jason...

480

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "direct fuel costs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Requirements for status for volume fuel cell manufacturing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Status for Volume Status for Volume Fuel Cell Manufacturing DOE Hydrogen Program, Washington, DC July 13-14, 2005 Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Customer Requirements: Commercial Plant Study - Volume: 250,000 fuel stacks per year - Cost: $30/kw net Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Commercial Volume Manufacturing - Material Utilization: >85% - Controlled Environments (Humidity, temperature, dust) - Environmentally safe direct and indirect materials - Hydrogen safety - Make or Buy Decisions on non/proprietary unit cell components - Integrated strategic supply chain - Design for Manufacturing, Assembly, and Service Requirements for Manufactured Fuel Cells Quality Control & Assurance - Accelerated tests and process parameters correlated to key product requirements (QFD)

482

Effects of Technology Cost Parameters on Hydrogen Pathway Succession - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5 5 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Victor Diakov*, Brian James † , Julie Perez ‡ , Andrew Spisak † *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov and Victor.Diakov@nrel.gov † Strategic Analysis, Inc. ‡ New West Technologies DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Subcontractor: Strategic Analysis, Inc., Arlington, VA Project Start Date: February 1, 2009 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models -

483

Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Cells Fuel Cells The Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) program is responsible for coordinating Federal efforts to facilitate development of a commercially relevant and robust solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system. Specific objectives include achieving an efficiency of greater than 60 percent, meeting a stack cost target of $175 per kW, and demonstrating lifetime performance degradation of less than 0.2 percent per

484

A Low-Cost Soft-Switched DC/DC Converter for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

A highly efficient DC to DC converter has been developed for low-voltage high-current solid oxide fuel cells. The newly developed 'V6' converter resembles what has been done in internal combustion engine that split into multiple cylinders to increase the output capacity without having to increase individual cell size and to smooth out the torque with interleaving operation. The development was started with topology overview to ensure that all the DC to DC converter circuits were included in the study. Efficiency models for different circuit topologies were established, and computer simulations were performed to determine the best candidate converter circuit. Through design optimization including topology selection, device selection, magnetic component design, thermal design, and digital controller design, a bench prototype rated 5-kW, with 20 to 50V input and 200/400V output was fabricated and tested. Efficiency goal of 97% was proven achievable through hardware experiment. This DC to DC converter was then modified in the later stage to converter 35 to 63 V input and 13.8 V output for automotive charging applications. The complete prototype was tested at Delphi with their solid oxide fuel cell test stand to verify the performance of the modified DC to DC converter. The output was tested up to 3-kW level, and the efficiency exceeded 97.5%. Multiple-phase interleaving operation design was proved to be reliable and ripple free at the output, which is desirable for the battery charging. Overall this is a very successful collaboration project between the SECA Core Technology Team and Industrial Team.

Jason Lai

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

485

Fuel control system  

SciTech Connect

A fuel control system is described comprising: a fuel rack movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; a rack control member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; servo system means for moving the fuel rack in response to movement of the rack control member an electrically energizable member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions, the electrically energizable member being urged to move in its fuel-decreasing direction when energized; first coupling means for connecting the electrically energizable member to the rack control member to move the rack control member in its fuel-decreasing direction in response to movement of the electrically energizable member in its fuel-decreasing direction; a mechanical governor control having a member movable in opposite fuel-increasing and fuel-decreasing directions; second coupling means for connecting the mechanical governor to the rack control member to move the rack control member in its fuel-decreasing direction in response to movement of the mechanical governor member in its fuel-decreasing direction; bias means for biasing the rack control member to move in its fuel-increasing direction.

Staniak, W.A.; Samuelson, R.E.; Moncelle, M.E.

1986-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

486

New High Performance Water Vapor Membranes to Improve Fuel Cell Balance of Plant Efficiency and Lower Costs (SBIR Phase I) - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0 0 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report Earl H. Wagener (Primary Contact), Brad P. Morgan, Jeffrey R. DiMaio Tetramer Technologies L.L.C. 657 S. Mechanic St. Pendleton, SC 29670 Phone: (864) 646-6282 Email: earl.wagener@tetramertechnologies.com DOE Manager HQ: Nancy Garland Phone: (202) 586-5673 Email: Nancy.Garland@ee.doe.gov Contract Number: DE-SC0006172 Project Start Date: June 17, 2011 Project End Date: March 16, 2012 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Demonstrate water vapor transport membrane with * >18,000 gas permeation units (GPU) Water vapor membrane with less than 20% loss in * performance after stress tests Crossover leak rate: <150 GPU * Temperature Durability of 90°C with excursions to * 100°C Cost of <$10/m

487

Development of a silicon-based passive gas-liquid separation system for microscale direct methanol fuel cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The design, fabrication and performance characterisation of a passive gas-liquid separation system is presented in this paper. The gas-liquid separation system is silicon-based and its fabrication is compatible with the existing CMU design of the microscale direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). Both gas and liquid separators consist of staggered arrays of etched-through holes fabricated by deep reactive ion etching (DRIE). The gas separator is coated with a thin layer of hydrophobic polymer to substantiate the gas-liquid separation. To visually characterise the system performance, the gas-liquid separation system is made on a single wafer with a glass plate bonded on the top to form a separation chamber with a narrow gap in between. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) is applied for the low-temperature bonding. The maximum pressure for the liquid leakage of the gas separators is experimentally determined and compared with the values predicted theoretically. Several successful gas-liquid separations are observed at liquid pressures between 14.2 cmH2O and 22.7 cmH2O, liquid flow rates between 0.705 cc/min and 1.786 cc/min, and CO2 flow rates between 0.15160 cc/min to 0.20435 cc/min.

C.C. Hsieh; S.C. Yao; Yousef Alyousef

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Alternative Fuel Study Alternative Fuel Study to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Study on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Alternative Fuel Study As directed by the Nevada Legislature, the Legislative Commission (Commission) conducted an interim study in 2011 concerning the production and use of energy in the state. The study included information on the use

489

Measurement of Petroleum Fuel Contamination in Water by Solid-Phase Microextraction with Direct Raman Spectroscopic Detection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is described for determining petroleum fuel contamination in water based on solid-phase microextraction and Raman spectroscopy (SPME/Raman). In this method, contaminants are...

Jager, Michael J; McClintic, Daniel P; Tilotta, David C

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

491

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PHEV Battery Cost Assessment PHEV Battery Cost Assessment 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

492

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

493

Low Carbon Fuel Standards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S O N I A YE H Low Carbon Fuel Standards The most direct andalternative transportation fuels is to spur innovation withstandard for upstream fuel producers. hen it comes to energy

Sperling, Dan; Yeh, Sonia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z