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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2Flux) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind components and the virtual (sonic) temperature. An infrared gas analyzer is used to obtain the CO2 and H2O densities. A separate sub-system also collects half-hour average measures of meteorological and soil variables from separate 4-m towers.

Fischer, M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Micrometeorological Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes at a Municipal Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Micrometeorological Measurements of Methane and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes at a Municipal Landfill ... Of the global anthropogenic CH4 emissions, more than 10% originates from landfills (1). ... Landfills are the largest source of anthropogenic CH4 emissions to the atm. in the US; however, few measurements of whole landfill CH4 emissions have been reported. ...

Annalea Lohila; Tuomas Laurila; Juha-Pekka Tuovinen; Mika Aurela; Juha Hatakka; Tea Thum; Mari Pihlatie; Janne Rinne; Timo Vesala

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Long-Term Carbon Dioxide Fluxes from a Very Tall Tower in a Northern Forest: Flux Measurement Methodology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methodology for determining fluxes of CO2 and H2O vapor with the eddy-covariance method using data from instruments on a 447-m tower in the forest of northern Wisconsin is addressed. The primary goal of this study is the validation of the methods ...

Bradford W. Berger; Kenneth J. Davis; Chuixiang Yi; Peter S. Bakwin; Cong Long Zhao

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

5

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

6

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

7

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

8

Pulse flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring particle flux comprises first and second photodiode detectors for receiving flux from a source and first and second outputs for producing first and second signals representing the flux incident to the detectors. The device is capable of reducing the first output signal by a portion of the second output signal, thereby enhancing the accuracy of the device. Devices in accordance with the invention may measure distinct components of flux from a single source or fluxes from several sources.

Riggan, William C. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Time dependences of atmospheric Carbon dioxide fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the lifetime of CO2 in the atmosphere is critical for predictions regarding future climate changes. A simple mass conservation analysis presented here generates tight estimations for the atmosphere's retention time constant. The analysis uses a leaky integrator model that combines the observed deficit (only less than 40% of CO2 produced from combustion of fossil fuels is actually retained in the atmosphere, while more than 60% is continuously shed) with the exponential growth of fossil fuel burning. It reveals a maximum characteristic time of less than 23 year for the transfer of atmospheric CO2 to a segregation sink. This time constant is further constrained by the rapid disappearance of 14C after the ban of atmospheric atomic bomb tests, which provides a lower limit of 18 years for this transfer. The study also generates evaluations of other CO2 fluxes, exchange time constants and volumes exchanged. Analysis of large harmonic oscillations of atmospheric CO2 concentration, often neglected in th...

DeSalvo, Riccardo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Beta ray flux measuring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Long-term surface carbon dioxide flux monitoring at the Ketzin carbon dioxide storage test site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...measured in a northern Japan larch plantation using eddy covariance techniques...explained by variations in biomass and soil chemical and physical...fluxes from a boreal mixed wood forest ecosystem in Ontario...variations in a young ponderosa pine plantation in northern California: Global...

Martin Zimmer; Peter Pilz; Jörg Erzinger

12

AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research  

SciTech Connect

Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

Law, B E

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

13

Carbon Dioxide Emissions of the City Center of Firenze, Italy: Measurement, Evaluation, and Source Partitioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An eddy covariance station was installed in the city center of Firenze, Italy, to measure carbon fluxes at half-hourly intervals over a mostly homogeneous urban area. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission observations made over an initial period of 3.5 ...

A. Matese; B. Gioli; F. P. Vaccari; A. Zaldei; F. Miglietta

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Effects of large-scale Amazon forest degradation on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and isoprene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...The climate and air quality in Amazonia depend...on climate and air quality through fluxes of carbon dioxide, water, energy, mineral dust and...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

2, 10671085, 2005 Flux measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0.50 m. The study site consisted of grass (10% of area), bean5 (15%), corn (15%) and rice (60 in the components of the surface energy balance and in CO2 flux. Results show that the pattern of energy parti- tion suddenly increased after thunderstorm events. We examined the energy budget closure and found

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

16

Global patterns of landatmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived from eddy covariance,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(NEE), latent energy (LE), and sensible heat (H) based on remote sensing indices, climateGlobal patterns of landatmosphere fluxes of carbon dioxide, latent heat, and sensible heat derived

Chen, Jiquan

17

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments with CO2. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and laboratory experiments...

18

Instrument Development and Measurements of the Atmospheric Pollutants Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrate Radical, and Nitrous Acid by Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy and Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , A method of nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxidedetermination of nitrogen dioxide and sulfur dioxide in theDOAS) have measured nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ), nitrate

Medina, David Salvador

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise. NDP-052 (1995) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-052 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-052 image Contributed by Marilyn F. Lamb and Richard A. Feely Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Seattle, Washington and Lloyd Moore and Donald K. Atwood Atlantic Oceanographic and Meteorological Laboratory Miami, Florida Prepared by Alexander Kozyr* Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. *Energy, Environment, and Resources Center The University of Tennessee Knoxville, Tennessee Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 4420 Date Published: September 1995

20

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Direct Compressive Measurements of Individual Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Direct Compressive Measurements of Individual Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes Tolou Shokuhfar the syn- thesis of TiO2 nanotube arrays using an aqueous HF based electrolyte.5 The pH of F ion containing electrolytes was con- trolled to form nanotubes up to a few mi- crometers in length. They reported

Endres. William J.

22

Anthropogenic and Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Fluxes From Typical Land Uses in Houston, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor (Apogee) to measure incoming solar radiation, a heat flux plate sensor installed on a nearby shingle roof, and a rain gauge. Raw 3-D wind data and data from the gas analyzers were recorded in binary format on a CR... photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) sensor (Apogee) to measure incoming solar radiation, a heat flux plate sensor installed on a nearby shingle roof, and a rain gauge. Raw 3-D wind data and data from the gas analyzers were recorded in binary format on a CR...

Werner, Nicholas D

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extracting the Green's function from measurements of the energy flux Roel Sniedera) Center for Wave in acoustics from measurements of the energy flux through an arbitrary closed surface surrounding both sources locations, rA and rB. In these experiments one first measures the total energy flux through a closed surface

Snieder, Roel

24

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for measuring momentum flux from an intense plasma stream, comprising: refractory target means oriented normal to the flow of said plasma stream for bombardment by said plasma stream where said bombardment by said plasma stream applies a pressure to said target means, pendulum means for communicating a translational displacement of said target to a force transducer where said translational displacement of said target is transferred to said force transducer by an elongated member coupled to said target, where said member is suspended by a pendulum configuration means and where said force transducer is responsive to said translational displacement of said member, and force transducer means for outputting a signal representing pressure data corresponding to said displacement.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1993-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

Long-Term Assessment of Isotopic Exchange of Carbon Dioxide in a Subalpine Forest (Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux Site)  

SciTech Connect

In 2005 we began a long-term measurement program of CO{sub 2} and its stable isotopes at the Niwot Ridge AmeriFlux site. Measurements are ongoing.

Bowling, David [University of Utah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gamma-Ray Burst Measurements at Low Fluxes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 June 1981 research-article Gamma-Ray Burst Measurements at Low Fluxes K. Beurle A. Bewick J. S. Mills J. J. Quenby The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to...

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Design of a differential radiometer for atmospheric radiative flux measurements  

SciTech Connect

The Hemispherical Optimized NEt Radiometer (HONER) is an instrument under development at the Los Alamos National Laboratory for deployment on an unmanned aerospace vehicle as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM/UAV) program. HONER is a differential radiometer which will measure the difference between the total upwelling and downwelling fluxes and is intended to provide a means of measuring the atmospheric radiative flux divergence. Unlike existing instruments which measure the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately, HONER will achieve an optical difference by chopping the two fluxes alternately onto a common pyroelectric detector. HONER will provide data resolved into two spectral bands; one covering the solar dominated region from less than 0.4 micrometer to approximately 4.5 micrometers and the other covering the region from approximately 4.5 micrometers to greater than 50 micrometers, dominated by thermal radiation. The means of separating the spectral regions guarantees seamless summation to calculate the total flux. The fields-of-view are near-hemispherical, upward and downward. The instrument can be converted, in flight, from the differential mode to absolute mode, measuring the upwelling and downwelling fluxes separately and simultaneously. The instrument also features continuous calibration from on-board sources. We will describe the design and operation of the sensor head and the on-board reference sources as well as the means of deployment.

LaDelfe, P.C.; Weber, P.G.; Rodriguez, C.W.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Systematic biases in measurement of urban nitrogen dioxide using passive diffusion samplers   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement of nitrogen dioxide using passive diffusion tube over 22 months in Cambridge, U.K. are analysed as a function of sampler exposure time, and compared with NO2 concentrations obtained from a co-located ...

Heal, Mathew R; Kirby, C; Cape, Neil

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Fluid Phase Equilibria of Ethanol and Carbon Dioxide Mixtures with Concentration Measurements by Raman Spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Phase equilibria data for the system ethanol/carbon dioxide for T = 313.15 K and pressures up to p = 7.9 MPa are presented. The measurements were made by Raman...

Stratmann, A; Schweiger, G

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Technical Sessions Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Measurements of Surface Heat Flux Over Contrasting Surfaces R. L. Coulter J. D. Shannon T. J. Martin Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 In a multilaboratory field study held near Boardman in northeastern Oregon in June 1991 and described in greater detail elsewhere (Doran et al. 1991), various properties of the surface and lower atmospheric boundary layer over heavily irrigated cropland and adjacent desert steppe were investigated. The locale was selected because its disparate characteristics over various spatial scales stress the ability of general circulation models (GCMs) to describe lower boundary conditions, particularly across the discontinuity between desert (in which turbulent flux of heat must be primarily as sensible heat) and large irrigated tracts (in which turbulent flux of latent heat should be the larger term).

31

Solar Model Parameters and Direct Measurements of Solar Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore a novel possibility of determining the solar model parameters, which serve as input in the calculations of the solar neutrino fluxes, by exploiting the data from direct measurements of the fluxes. More specifically, we use the rather precise value of the $^8B$ neutrino flux, $\\phi_B$ obtained from the global analysis of the solar neutrino and KamLAND data, to derive constraints on each of the solar model parameters on which $\\phi_B$ depends. We also use more precise values of $^7Be$ and $pp$ fluxes as can be obtained from future prospective data and discuss whether such measurements can help in reducing the uncertainties of one or more input parameters of the Standard Solar Model.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami; S. T. Petcov

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

32

Aircraft Measurements of the Concentration and Flux of Agrochemicals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aircraft Measurements of the Concentration and Flux of Agrochemicals ... The use of agrochemicals, such as insecticides and herbicides, is of great environmental concern. ... To quantify and model the volatilization and deposition of these agrochemicals, measurements of the exchange rates between the atmosphere and different surfaces are required. ...

T. Zhu; R. L. Desjardins; J. I. MacPherson; E. Pattey; G. St. Amour

1998-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of uranium and thorium concentrations in geological reservoirs relies largely on geochemi- cal modelEstimating terrestrial uranium and thorium by antineutrino flux measurements Stephen T. Dye, and approved November 16, 2007 (received for review July 11, 2007) Uranium and thorium within the Earth produce

Mcdonough, William F.

34

Characteristic measurements of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas generated in a Planckian radiation environment  

SciTech Connect

The temporally and spatially resolved characteristics of silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas were studied using x-ray spectroscopy. The plasma was generated in the near-Planckian radiation environment within gold hohlraum targets irradiated by laser pulses with a total energy of 2.4 kJ in 1 ns. The contributions of silicon ions at different charge states to the specific components of the measured absorption spectra were also investigated. It was found that each main feature in the absorption spectra of the measured silicon dioxide aerogel plasmas was contributed by two neighboring silicon ionic species.

Dong Quanli; Wang Shoujun; Li Yutong; Zhang Yi; Zhao Jing [Beijing National Laboratory of Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Wei Huigang; Shi Jianrong; Zhao Gang [National Astronomical Observatories of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Zhang Jiyan; Gu Yuqiu; Ding Yongkun; Wen Tianshu; Zhang Wenhai; Hu Xin; Liu Shenye; Zhang Lin; Tang Yongjian; Zhang Baohan; Zheng Zhijian [Research Center for Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line and integrated off-line to obtain the magnetic flux in the steel yoke close to the muon chambers at full excitations of the solenoid. The 3-D Hall sensors installed on the steel-air interfaces give supplementary information on the components of magnetic field and permit to estimate the remanent field in steel to be added to the magnetic flux density obtained by the voltages integration. A TOSCA 3-D model of the CMS magnet is developed to describe the magnetic field everywhere outside the tracking volume measured with the field-mapping machine. The results of the measurements and calculations are presented, compared and discussed.

V. I. Klyukhin; N. Amapane; A. Ball; B. Curé; A. Gaddi; H. Gerwig; A. Hervé; M. Mulders; R. Loveless

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

36

Measurement of Surface Energy Fluxes from Two Rangeland Sites and Comparison with a Multilayer Canopy Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rangelands are often characterized by a patchy mosaic of vegetation types, making measurement and modeling of surface energy fluxes particularly challenging. The purpose of this study was to evaluate surface energy fluxes measured using three eddy ...

Gerald N. Flerchinger; Michele L. Reba; Danny Marks

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Measuring the Magnetic Flux Density in the CMS Steel Yoke  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a general purpose detector, designed to run at the highest luminosity at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Its distinctive features include a 4 T superconducting solenoid with 6-m-diameter by 12.5-m-length free bore, enclosed inside a 10000-ton return yoke made of construction steel. The return yoke consists of five dodecagonal three-layered barrel wheels and four end-cap disks at each end comprised of steel blocks up to 620 mm thick, which serve as the absorber plates of the muon detection system. Accurate characterization of the magnetic field everywhere in the CMS detector is required. To measure the field in and around the steel, a system of 22 flux-loops and 82 3-D Hall sensors is installed on the return yoke blocks. Fast discharges of the solenoid (190 s time-constant) made during the CMS magnet surface commissioning test at the solenoid central fields of 2.64, 3.16, 3.68 and 4.01 T were used to induce voltages in the flux-loops. The voltages are measured on-line a...

Klyukhin, V I; Ball, A; Curé, B; Gaddi, A; Gerwig, H; Hervé, A; Mulders, M; Loveless, R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Transient response of the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere model to increasing carbon dioxide. Part I: Control climate and flux adjustment  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control integration with respect to climate drift is assessed, and aspects of the model climatology relevant to the simulation of climate change are discussed. The observed variation of oceanic temperature with latitude and depth is basically well simulated, although, in common with other ocean models, the main thermocline is too diffuse. Nevertheless, it is found that large heat and water flux adjustments must be added to the surface layer of the ocean in order to prevent the occurrence of unacceptable climate drift. The ocean model appears to achieve insufficient meridional heat transport, and this is supported by the pattern of the heat flux adjustment term, although errors in the simulated atmosphere-ocean heat flux also contribute to the latter. The application of the flux adjustments restricts climate drift during the 75-year control experiment. However, a gradual warming still occurs in the surface layers of the Southern Ocean because the flux adjustments are inserted as additive terms in this integration and cannot therefore be guaranteed to prevent climate drift completely. 68 refs., 29 figs., 1 tab.

Murphy, J.M. [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)] [Hadley Centre for Climate Prediction and Research, Bracknell (United Kingdom)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Measurements of the total ion flux from vacuum arc cathodespots  

SciTech Connect

The ion flux from vacuum arc cathode spots was measured in two vacuum arc systems. The first was a vacuum arc ion source which was modified allowing us to collect ions from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The second discharge system essentially consisted of a cathode placed near the center of a spherically shaped mesh anode. In both systems, the ion current streaming through the mesh was measured by a biased collector. The mesh anodes had geometric transmittances of 60 percent and 72 percent, respectively, which were taken into account as correction factors. The ion current from different cathode materials was measured for 50-500 A of arc current. The ion current normalized by the arc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with values in the range from 5 percent to 19 percent. The normalized ion current is generally greater for elements of low cohesive energy. The ion erosion rates were determined from values of ion current and ion charge states, which were previously measured in the same ion source. The absolute ion erosion rates range from 16-173 mu g/C.

Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu; Savkin,Konstantin P.; Brown, Ian G.; Nikolaev, Alexey G.

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

40

Measurements and model calculations of radiative fluxes for the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of radiative fluxes for the Cabauw Experimental Site for Atmospheric Research, the Netherlands Knap, Wouter Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute KNMI Los, Alexander KNMI...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

42

Atomic flux measurement by diode-laser-based atomic absorption spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic flux measurement by diode-laser-based atomic absorption spectroscopy Weizhi Wang,a) R. H, California 94305 Received 5 May 1999; accepted 6 June 1999 Diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA sensors- quirements, and only the QCM measures the flux. Lamp- based atomic absorption AA sensors have been success

Fejer, Martin M.

43

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mt. Cimone Mt. Cimone Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Mt. Cimone graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Tiziano Colombo and Riccardo Santaguida Italian Meteorological Service, Via delle Ville, 100-41029 Sestola (MO), Italy Period of Record 1979-1997 Methods Continuous atmospheric CO2 measurements have been carried out at Mt. Cimone since 1979. Since December 1988, air samples have also been collected approximately once per week in a pair of 2-L, electropolished, stainless steel cylindrical flasks. From 1979 until December 1988, a Hartmann and Braun URAS-2T NDIR gas analyzer was used for CO2 determinations. Currently, CO2 determinations are made through the use of a Siemens Ultramat-5E NDIR gas analyzer. Water vapor is eliminated by passing the air through a U-tube

44

Investigation of Flux Linkage Profile Measurement Methods for Switched Reluctance Motors and Permanent Magnet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Investigation of Flux Linkage Profile Measurement Methods for Switched Reluctance Motors for switched reluctance motors (SRM's) and permanent magnet motors (PMM's). Various measurement methods have reluctance motors, permanent magnet motors. I. INTRODUCTION Switched Reluctance Motors (SRM's) have very

Lu, Kaiyuan

45

Remote measurement of sulfur dioxide emissions using an ultraviolet light sensitive video system  

SciTech Connect

Remote measurements of SO/sub 2/ emissions and plume velocities were made with a portable ultraviolet light-sensitive video system and compared with EPA in-stack compliance measurement methods. The instrument system measures the ultraviolet light absorption of SO/sub 2/ and movement of SO/sub 2/ fluctuations in the effluent plume and relates these measurements to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and velocity of the plume. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to establish the potential for using this technique for rapid surveillance of SO/sub 2/ emissions. The effects caused by submicron aerosols also were investigated. The field tests were performed on two occasions. On the first occasion, SO/sub 2/ and plume velocity measurements were made at a typical coal-fired power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) controls (concentrations ranged from 80 to 365 ppm). The second occasion involved participation in an urban particulate modeling study, which resulted in routine SO/sub 2/ emission measurements performed at 12 industrial sites. The results of smoke generator and field tests indicate that the sulfur dioxide concentration of smoke stack emissions can be made with an accuracy less than +/-120 ppm (relative to the EPA stack test compliance method), provided the particulate opacity of the emissions is less than 22 percent. The velocity measurement feature of the instrument correlated poorly with the EPA compliance method for stack gas velocity.

McElhoe, H.B.; Conner, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infrared sensing devices.

Duncan, R.V.

1993-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

47

Quantitative method for measuring heat flux emitted from a cryogenic object  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a quantitative method for measuring the total heat flux, and of deriving the total power dissipation, of a heat-fluxing object which includes the steps of placing an electrical noise-emitting heat-fluxing object in a liquid helium bath and measuring the superfluid transition temperature of the bath. The temperature of the liquid helium bath is thereafter reduced until some measurable parameter, such as the electrical noise, exhibited by the heat-fluxing object or a temperature-dependent resistive thin film in intimate contact with the heat-fluxing object, becomes greatly reduced. The temperature of the liquid helum bath is measured at this point. The difference between the superfluid transition temperature of the liquid helium bath surrounding the heat-fluxing object, and the temperature of the liquid helium bath when the electrical noise emitted by the heat-fluxing object becomes greatly reduced, is determined. The total heat flux from the heat-fluxing object is determined as a function of this difference between these temperatures. In certain applications, the technique can be used to optimize thermal design parameters of cryogenic electronics, for example, Josephson junction and infra-red sensing devices.

Duncan, Robert V. (Tijeras, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), for site-specific tower measurement years and a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Supplement Table 1. Mean environmental drivers at Brasil flux sites. Precipitation (Prec) from #12;Supplement Table 2. Brasil flux sites instrumentation and measuring methods. *: non aspirated

Malhi, Yadvinder

49

Linking flux network measurements to continental scale simulations: ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

¨rich, Switzerland, **School of Geography and Earth Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ***Harvard University, Harvard Forest, PO Box 68, 324 N. Main Street, Petersham, MA 01366, USA, www with an empirical rectangular hyperbolic light response model and a single layer two light-class carboxylase

50

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Baring Head Baring Head Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from In Situ Measurements at Baring Head graphics Graphics data Data Investigators M.R. Manning, A.J. Gomez, K.P. Pohl National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Ltd., Climate Division, Gracefield Road, Gracefield, P.O. Box 31-311, Lower Hutt, New Zealand Period of Record 1970-93 Methods Determinations of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios are made using a Siemens Ultramat-3 nondispersive infrared (NDIR) gas analyzer. The NDIR CO2 analyzer is connected via a gas manifold consisting of stainless steel tubing and computer-controlled solenoid switches to 12 gas cylinders and 2 sample air lines. The NDIR analyzer compares ambient air CO2 mixing ratios relative to known CO2 mixing ratios in tanks of compressed reference gases.

51

Measurement of the cosmic ray and neutrino-induced muon flux at the Sudbury neutrino observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are reported on the measurement of the atmospheric neutrino-induced muon flux at a depth of 2 kilometers below the Earth’s surface from 1229 days of operation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By measuring the flux of through-going muons as a function of zenith angle, the SNO experiment can distinguish between the oscillated and unoscillated portion of the neutrino flux. A total of 514 muonlike events are measured between -1?cos??zenith?0.4 in a total exposure of 2.30×1014??cm2?s. The measured flux normalization is 1.22±0.09 times the Bartol three-dimensional flux prediction. This is the first measurement of the neutrino-induced flux where neutrino oscillations are minimized. The zenith distribution is consistent with previously measured atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters. The cosmic ray muon flux at SNO with zenith angle cos??zenith>0.4 is measured to be (3.31±0.01(stat)±0.09(sys))×10-10???/s/cm2.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

52

``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes''  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

``Designing Lagrangian experiments to measure regional-scale trace gas fluxes'' J. C. Lin,1 C gas fluxes at the land surface is essential for understanding the impact of human activities as they travel over the landscape. Successful Lagrangian experiments depend critically on forecasts of air parcel

53

A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A multi-site analysis of random error2 in tower-based measurements of carbon and energy fluxes3 4 MEASUREMENTS Richardson et al. 1 January 13, 2006 Abstract1 Measured surface-atmosphere fluxes of energy open-path, gas analyzer is22 used.23 #12;RANDOM ERRORS IN ENERGY AND CO2 FLUX MEASUREMENTS Richardson

54

Measurement of the Speed of Light. I. Introduction and Frequency Measurement of a Carbon Dioxide Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 June 1977 research-article Measurement of the Speed of Light. I. Introduction and Frequency Measurement of a Carbon...part II following, describe a determination of the speed of light made by measuring the frequency and wavelength of radiation...

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measurements of the Solar Neutrino Flux from Super-Kamiokande's First 300 Days  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first results of the solar neutrino flux measurement from Super-Kamiokande are presented. The results shown here are obtained from data taken between the 31st of May, 1996, and the 23rd of June, 1997. Using our measurement of recoil electrons with energies above 6.5 MeV, we infer the total flux of 8B solar neutrinos to be 2.42+-0.06(stat.)+0.10-0.07(syst.)*10^6/cm^2/s. This result is consistent with the Kamiokande measurement and is 36% of the flux predicted by the BP95 solar model. The flux is also measured in 1.5 month subsets and shown to be consistent with a constant rate.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; Y. Fukuda et al

1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

56

Eddy covariance flux measurements of pollutant gases in urban Mexico City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements of the atmosphere/surface exchange of gases over an urban area are a direct way to improve and evaluate emissions inventories, and, in turn, to better understand urban atmospheric ...

Velasco, Erik

57

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

On the Results of Measurements of the Direct Sun Radiation Flux by Actinometer and of Maximal Polarization of Sky Brightness in the Solar Almucantar A. Kh. Shukurov, K. A....

58

Measured and Parameterized Energy Fluxes Estimated for Atlantic Transects of R/V Polarstern  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sensible and latent heat fluxes were estimated from turbulence measurements gathered during several Atlantic Ocean transects of the research vessel (R/V) Polarstern. The inertial dissipation method was used to analyze the data. Resulting bulk ...

Karl Bumke; Michael Schlundt; John Kalisch; Andreas Macke; Henry Kleta

2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Energetic ion diagnostics using neutron flux measurements during pellet injection  

SciTech Connect

Neutron measurements during injection of deuterium pellets into deuterium plasmas on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) indicate that the fractional increase in neutron emission about 0.5 msec after pellet injection is proportional to the fraction of beam-plasma reactions to total fusion reactions in the unperturbed plasma. These observations suggest three diagnostic applications of neutron measurements during pellet injection: (1) measurement of the beam-plasma reaction rate in deuterium plasmas for use in determining the fusion Q in an equivalent deuterium-tritium plasma, (2) measurement of the radial profile of energetic beam ions by varying the pellet size and velocity, and (3) measurement of the ''temperature'' of ions accelerated during wave heating. 18 refs., 3 figs.

Heidbrink, W.W.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Measurement of emission fluxes from Technical Area 54, Area G and L. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The emission flux (mass/time-area) of tritiated water from TA-54 was measured to support the characterization of radioactive air emissions from waste sites for the Radioactive Air Emissions Management (RAEM) program and for the Area G Performance Assessment. Measurements were made at over 180 locations during the summers of 1993 and 1994, including randomly selected locations across Area G, three suspected areas of contamination at Area G, and the property surrounding TA-54. The emission fluxes of radon were measured at six locations and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at 30 locations. Monitoring was performed at each location over a several-hour period using the U.S. EPA flux chamber approach. Separate samples for tritiated water, radon, and VOCs were collected and analyzed in off-site laboratories. The measured tritiated water emission fluxes varied over several orders of magnitude, from background levels of about 3 pCi/m{sup 2}-min to 9.69 x 10{sup 6} pCi/m{sup 2}-min near a disposal shaft. Low levels of tritiated water were found to have migrated into Pajarito Canyon, directly south of Area G. The tritium flux data were used to generate an estimated annual emission rate of 14 Curies/yr for all of Area G, with the majority of this activity being emitted from relatively small areas adjacent to several disposal shafts. The estimated total annual release is less than 1% of the total tritium release from all LANL in 1992 and results in a negligible off-site dose. Based on the limited data available, the average emission flux of radon from Area G is estimated to be 8.1 pCi/m{sup 2}-min. The measured emission fluxes of VOCs were < 100 {mu}g/m{sup 2}-min, which is small compared with fluxes typically measured at hazardous waste landfills. The air quality impacts of these releases were evaluated in a separate report.

Eklund, B. [Radian Corp., Austin, TX (United States)

1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon Dioxide Measurement and Tracking We are combining our expertise in remote sensing, measurement,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Measuring and quantifying a minute amount of human CO2 emissions against the huge background of natural CO2. Detecting, isolating, and quantifying the human contribution from a large natural background requires from nuclear tests and explosions using a network of satellites and ground-based sensors; this ability

62

8 - Measurement and monitoring technologies for verification of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in underground reservoirs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: The chapter reviews some of the current technologies available for storage site monitoring, focusing on a limited range of core monitoring technologies required to provide storage site assurance at the industrial scale. Monitoring strategy has two elements: deep-focused for storage performance testing and verification and the early detection of deviations from predicted behaviour; and shallow -focused for leakage detection, verification of emissions performance and public acceptance. Key deep-focused monitoring technologies include 3D time-lapse seismic and downhole pressure and temperature measurement. For shallow monitoring, key technologies include soil gas, surface flux and atmospheric measurement. Selection of suitable monitoring strategies is highly site-specific, and tool testing and development is ongoing.

R.A. Chadwick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Radon flux measurements on Gardinier and Royster phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida  

SciTech Connect

As part of the planned Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) radon flux monitoring program for the Florida phosphogypsum piles, Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), under contract to the EPA, constructed 50 large-area passive radon collection devices and demonstrated their use at two phosphogypsum piles near Tampa and Mulberry, Florida. The passive devices were also compared to the PNL large-area flow-through system. The main objectives of the field tests were to demonstrate the use of the large-area passive radon collection devices to EPA and PEI personnel and to determine the number of radon flux measurement locations needed to estimate the average radon flux from a phosphogypsum pile. This report presents the results of the field test, provides recommendations for long-term monitoring, and includes a procedure for making the radon flux measurements.

Hartley, J.N.; Freeman, H.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

{sup 36}Cl measurements of the unsaturated zone flux at Yucca Mountain  

SciTech Connect

Determining the unsaturated zone percolation rate, or flux, is an extremely important site characterization issue for the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository. A new technique that measures the {sup 36}Cl content of tuff from the Exploratory Shaft will be used to calculate flux through the unsaturated zone over longer times than could be measured by the more conventional {sup 14}C method. Measurements of the {sup 36}Cl "bomb pulse" in soil samples from Yucca Mountain have been used to confirm that infiltration is not an important recharge mechanism. 5 refs., 3 figs.

Norris, A.E.; Wolfsberg, K.; Gifford, S.K.

1985-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform in Houston, Texas: Trends and Tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and traffic counts except during variable working hours. To assign measured fluxes to local sources, we tested a bulk flux footprint model (Kormann and Meixner model) designed for uniform emission surface areas in this urban, heterogeneous landscape. Tracer...

Hale, Martin C

2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

66

Measurement of total ion flux in vacuum Arc discharges  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum arc ion source was modified allowing us to collections from arc plasma streaming through an anode mesh. The mesh had ageometric transmittance of 60 percent, which was taken into account as acorrection factor. The ion current from twenty-two cathode materials wasmeasured at an arc current of 100 A. The ion current normalized by thearc current was found to depend on the cathode material, with valuesinthe range from 5 percent to 11 percent. The normalized ion current isgenerally greater for light elements than for heavy elements. The ionerosion rates were determined fromvalues of ion currentand ion chargestates, which were previously measured in the same experimental system.The ion erosion rates range from 12-94 mu g/C.

Anders, Andre; Oks, Efim M.; Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Brown, Ian G.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessing net ecosystem carbon exchange of U S terrestrial ecosystems by integrating eddy covariance flux measurements and satellite observations  

SciTech Connect

More accurate projections of future carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere and associated climate change depend on improved scientific understanding of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Despite the consensus that U.S. terrestrial ecosystems provide a carbon sink, the size, distribution, and interannual variability of this sink remain uncertain. Here we report a terrestrial carbon sink in the conterminous U.S. at 0.63 pg C yr 1 with the majority of the sink in regions dominated by evergreen and deciduous forests and savannas. This estimate is based on our continuous estimates of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) with high spatial (1 km) and temporal (8-day) resolutions derived from NEE measurements from eddy covariance flux towers and wall-to-wall satellite observations from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We find that the U.S. terrestrial ecosystems could offset a maximum of 40% of the fossil-fuel carbon emissions. Our results show that the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink varied between 0.51 and 0.70 pg C yr 1 over the period 2001 2006. The dominant sources of interannual variation of the carbon sink included extreme climate events and disturbances. Droughts in 2002 and 2006 reduced the U.S. carbon sink by 20% relative to a normal year. Disturbances including wildfires and hurricanes reduced carbon uptake or resulted in carbon release at regional scales. Our results provide an alternative, independent, and novel constraint to the U.S. terrestrial carbon sink.

Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue University; Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State University; Baldocchi, Dennis [University of California, Berkeley; Ma, Siyan [University of California, Berkeley; Chen, Jiquan [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH; Richardson, Andrew [Harvard University; Melillo, Jerry [Marine Biological Laboratory; Davis, Ken J. [Pennsylvania State University; Hollinger, D. [USDA Forest Service; Wharton, Sonia [University of California, Davis; Falk, Matthias [University of California, Davis; Paw, U. Kyaw Tha [University of California, Davis; Oren, Ram [Duke University; Katulk, Gabriel G. [Duke University; Noormets, Asko [North Carolina State University; Fischer, Marc [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Verma, Shashi [University of Nebraska; Suyker, A. E. [University of Nebraska, Lincoln; Cook, David R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Sun, G. [USDA Forest Service; McNulty, Steven G. [USDA Forest Service; Wofsy, Steve [Harvard University; Bolstad, Paul V [University of Minnesota; Burns, Sean [University of Colorado, Boulder; Monson, Russell K. [University of Colorado, Boulder; Curtis, Peter [Ohio State University, The, Columbus; Drake, Bert G. [Smithsonian Environmental Research Center, Edgewater, MD; Foster, David R. [Harvard University; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hadley, Julian L. [Harvard University; Litvak, Marcy [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque; Martin, Timothy A. [University of Florida, Gainesville; Matamala, Roser [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Meyers, Tilden [NOAA, Oak Ridge, TN; Oechel, Walter C. [San Diego State University; Schmid, H. P. [Indiana University; Scott, Russell L. [USDA ARS; Torn, Margaret S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Measurements of solar flux density distribution on a plane receiver due to a flat heliostat  

SciTech Connect

An experimental facility is designed and manufactured to measure the solar flux density distribution on a central flat receiver due to a single flat heliostat. The tracking mechanism of the heliostat is controlled by two stepping motors, one for tilt angle control and the other for azimuth angle control. A x-y traversing mechanism is also designed and mounted on a vertical central receiver plane, where the solar flux density is to be measured. A miniature solar sensor is mounted on the platform of the traversing mechanism, where it is used to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver surface. The sensor is connected to a data acquisition card in a host computer. The two stepping motors of the heliostat tracking mechanism and the two stepping motors of the traversing mechanism are all connected to a controller card in the same host computer. A software `TOWER` is prepared to let the heliostat track the sun, move the platform of the traversing mechanism to the points of a preselected grid, and to measure the solar flux density distribution on the receiver plane. Measurements are carried out using rectangular flat mirrors of different dimensions at several distances from the central receiver. Two types of images were identified on the receiver plane - namely, apparent (or visible) and mirror-reflected radiation images. Comparison between measurements and a mathematical model validates the mathematical model. 13 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

Elsayed, M.M.; Fathalah, K.A.; Al-Rabghi, O.M. [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)] [King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The measurement of absolute thermal neutron flux using liquid scintillation counting techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was computed as the square root of the sum of the squares of the individual errors . The flux at the same location in the core and at the same reactor power level was measured by the conventional technique of gold foil 34 activation. This measurement... back to 1932 when the neutron was discovered by Chadwick. With the advent of the nuclear reactor in 1942 the problem of absolute neutron flux determination became increasingly important. Since the operating power of a thermal reactor is directly...

Walker, Jack Vernon

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

70

Measurement of Cosmic Ray Flux in China JinPing underground Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) is the deepest underground laboratory presently running in the world. In such a deep underground laboratory, the cosmic ray flux is a very important and necessary parameter for rare event experiments. A plastic scintillator telescope system has been set up to measure the cosmic ray flux. The performance of the telescope system has been studied using the cosmic ray on the ground laboratory near CJPL. Based on the underground experimental data taken from November 2010 to December 2011 in CJPL, which has effective live time of 171 days, the cosmic ray muon flux in CJPL is measured to be (2.0+-0.4)*10^(-10)/(cm^2)/(s). The ultra-low cosmic ray background guarantees CJPL's ideal environment for dark matter experiment.

Wu, Yu-Cheng; Yue, Qian; LI, Yuan-Jing; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Kang, Ke-Jun; Chen, Yun-Hua; Li, Jin; Li, Jian-Min; Li, Yu-Lan; Liu, Shu-Kui; Ma, Hao; Ren, Jin-Bao; Shen, Man-Bin; Wang, Ji-Min; Wu, Shi-Yong; Xue, Tao; YI, Nan; Zeng, Xiong-Hui; Zeng, Zhi; Zhu, Zhong-Hua

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Measurement of cosmic ray flux in the China JinPing underground laboratory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The China JinPing underground Laboratory (CJPL) is the deepest underground laboratory running in the world at present. In such a deep underground laboratory, the cosmic ray flux is a very important and necessary parameter for rare-event experiments. A plastic scintillator telescope system has been set up to measure the cosmic ray flux. The performance of the telescope system has been studied using the cosmic rays on the ground laboratory near the CJPL. Based on the underground experimental data taken from November 2010 to December 2011 in the CJPL, which has an effective live time of 171 days, the cosmic ray muon flux in the CJPL is measured to be (2.0±0.4)?10?10/(cm2s). The ultra-low cosmic ray background guarantees an ideal environment for dark matter experiments at the CJPL.

Wu Yu-Cheng (???); Hao Xi-Qing (???); Yue Qian (??); Li Yuan-Jing (???); Cheng Jian-Ping (???); Kang Ke-Jun (???); Chen Yun-Hua (???); Li Jin (??); Li Jian-Min (???); Li Yu-Lan (???); Liu Shu-Kui (???); Ma Hao (??); Ren Jin-Bao (???); Shen Man-Bin (???); Wang Ji-Min (???); Wu Shi-Yong (???); Xue Tao (??); Yi Nan (??); Zeng Xiong-Hui (???); Zeng Zhi (??); Zhu Zhong-Hua (???)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 A NOVEL MICROMEGAS DETECTOR FOR IN-CORE NUCLEAR REACTOR NEUTRON FLUX MEASUREMENTS S. ANDRIAMONJE Talence Cedex, France Future fast nuclear reactors designed for energy production and transmutation to neutron detection inside nuclear reactor is given. The advantage of this detector over conventional

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Flux Measurements of Volatile Organic Compounds from an Urban Tower Platform  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) and observe an integrated effect from what is called an upwind footprint area. Previous such studies have been limited to a few cities: Nemitz et al. (2002) and Dorsey et al. (2002) measured particle and CO 2 fluxes above the city of Edinburgh, UK, while M... intercomparison tests ..................................... 28 2.5.2. Quantification............................................................................. 30 2.5.3. Footprint analysis...

Park, Chang Hyoun

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Shipboard Measurements and Estimations of AirSea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ship­board Measurements and Estimations of Air­Sea Fluxes in the Western Tropical Pacific Ocean E dur­ ing the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) Coupled Ocean and Atmospheric Response of the surface­layer turbulence properties are compared with those from previous land and ocean results. Momentum

California at Irvine, University of

75

Pan-Arctic land–atmospheric fluxes of methane and carbon dioxide in response to climate change over the 21st century  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future changes of pan-Arctic land–atmospheric methane (CH[subscript 4]) and carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) depend on how terrestrial ecosystems respond to warming climate. Here, we used a coupled hydrology–biogeochemistry ...

Zhu, Xudong

76

Transient Response of the Hadley Centre Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Model to Increasing Carbon Dioxide. Part 1: Control Climate and Flux Adjustment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper describes the initialization of an experiment to study the time-dependent response of a high-resolution global coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation model to a gradual increase in carbon dioxide. The stability of the control ...

J. M. Murphy

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

An Experimental Study of Upward and Downward Flow of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in a Straight Pipe Heat Exchanger with Constant Wall Heat Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental analysis was conducted on a single circular tube heat exchanger using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid. The heat exchanger was operated in two different orientations: vertically upward and downward. The experimental...

Umrigar, Eric Dara

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Measurement of DDT Fluxes from a Historically Treated Agricultural Soil in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Measurement of DDT Fluxes from a Historically Treated Agricultural Soil in Canada ... a?Data from the 10-m meteorological tower at MCRS.b?Estimated value using average solar radiation data during study period. ... Background air concentrations were measured at the Canadian Atmospheric Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) site at the Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE), approximately 30 km NW of MCRS. ...

Perihan Binnur Kurt-Karakus; Terry F. Bidleman; Ralf M. Staebler; Kevin C. Jones

2006-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

79

Standard Test Method for Measuring Heat Flux Using Flush-Mounted Insert Temperature-Gradient Gages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method describes the measurement of the net heat flux normal to a surface using gages inserted flush with the surface. The geometry is the same as heat-flux gages covered by Test Method E 511, but the measurement principle is different. The gages covered by this standard all use a measurement of the temperature gradient normal to the surface to determine the heat that is exchanged to or from the surface. Although in a majority of cases the net heat flux is to the surface, the gages operate by the same principles for heat transfer in either direction. 1.2 This general test method is quite broad in its field of application, size and construction. Two different gage types that are commercially available are described in detail in later sections as examples. A summary of common heat-flux gages is given by Diller (1). Applications include both radiation and convection heat transfer. The gages used for aerospace applications are generally small (0.155 to 1.27 cm diameter), have a fast time response ...

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A Flux-Gradient System for Simultaneous Measurement of the CH4, CO2, and H2O Fluxes at a Lake–Air Interface  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study aims to test the performance of a flux-gradient system for simultaneous measurement of the fluxes of water vapor, CO2, and CH4 at a lake–air interface. ... The K parametrization(32) has been successfully deployed for flux observations in terrestrial ecosystems,(33) but to the best of the authors’ knowledge, extensive testing of this method for lake systems has not yet been reported in the published literature. ... This correction procedure has been thoroughly tested by the manufacturer up to a water vapor concentration of 1 %v. ...

Wei Xiao; Shoudong Liu; Hanchao Li; Qitao Xiao; Wei Wang; Zhenghua Hu; Cheng Hu; Yunqiu Gao; Jing Shen; Xiaoyan Zhao; Mi Zhang; Xuhui Lee

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

First-wall heat-flux measurements during ELMing H-mode plasma  

SciTech Connect

In this report we present measurements of the diverter heat flux in DIII-D for ELMing H-mode and radiative diverter conditions. In previous work we have examined heat flux profiles in lower single-null diverted plasmas and measured the scaling of the peak heat flux with plasma current and beam power. One problem with those results was our lack of good power accounting. This situation has been improved to better than 80--90% accountability with the installation of new bolometer arrays, and the operation of the entire complement of 5 Infrared (IR) TV cameras using the DAPS (Digitizing Automated Processing System) video processing system for rapid inter-shot data analysis. We also have expanded the scope of our measurements to include a wider variety of plasma shapes (e.g., double-null diverters (DND), long and short single-null diverters (SND), and inside-limited plasmas), as well as more diverse discharge conditions. Double-null discharges are of particular interest because that shape has proven to yield the highest confinement (VH-mode) and beta of all DIII-D plasmas, so any future diverter modifications for DIII-D will have to support DND operation. In addition, the proposed TPX tokamak is being designed for double-null operation, and information on the magnitude and distribution of diverter heat flux is needed to support the engineering effort on that project. So far, we have measured the DND power sharing at the target plates and made preliminary tests of heat flux reduction by gas injection.

Lasnier, C.J.; Allen, S.L.; Hill, D.N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Leonard, A.W.; Petrie, T.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

1994-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Direct ion flux measurements at high-pressure-depletion conditions for microcrystalline silicon deposition  

SciTech Connect

The contribution of ions to the growth of microcrystalline silicon thin films has been investigated in the well-known high-pressure-depletion (HPD) regime by coupling thin-film analysis with plasma studies. The ion flux, measured by means of a capacitive probe, has been studied in two regimes, i.e., the amorphous-to-microcrystalline transition regime and a low-to-high power regime; the latter regime had been investigated to evaluate the impact of the plasma power on the ion flux in collisional plasmas. The ion flux was found not to change considerably under the conditions where the deposited material undergoes a transition from the amorphous to the microcrystalline silicon phase; for solar-grade material, an ion-to-Si deposition flux of ?0.30 has been determined. As an upper-estimation of the ion energy, a mean ion energy of ?19 eV has been measured under low-pressure conditions (<1 mbar) by means of a retarding field energy analyzer. Combining this upper-estimate with an ion per deposited Si atom ratio of ?0.30, it is concluded that less than 6 eV is available per deposited Si atom. The addition of a small amount of SiH{sub 4} to an H{sub 2} plasma resulted in an increase of the ion flux by about 30% for higher power values, whereas the electron density, deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, decreased. The electron temperature, also deduced from optical emission spectroscopy analysis, reveals a slight decrease with power. Although the dominant ion in the HPD regime is SiH{sub 3}{sup +}, i.e., a change from H{sub 3}{sup +} in pure hydrogen HPD conditions, the measured larger ion loss can be explained by assuming steeper electron density profiles. These results, therefore, confirm the results reported so far: the ion-to-Si deposition flux is relatively large but has neither influence on the microcrystalline silicon film properties nor on the phase transition. Possible explanations are the reported high atomic hydrogen to deposition flux ratio, mitigating the detrimental effects of an excessive ion flux.

Bronneberg, A. C.; Kang, X.; Palmans, J.; Janssen, P. H. J.; Lorne, T. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)] [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Creatore, M. [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands) [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Solliance Solar Research, High Tech Campus 5, 5656AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Sanden, M. C. M. van de [Applied Physics Department, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research (DIFFER), P.O. Box 1207, 3430BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

2013-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

83

Measuring proton energies and fluxes using EIT (SOHO) CCD areas outside the solar disk images  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An indirect proton flux measuring tool based on discrimination of the energy deposited by protons in 128 x 128 pixel EIT CCD areas outside the solar disk images is presented. Single pixel intensity events are converted into proton incident energy flux using modeled energy deposition curves for angles of incidence 60 deg in four EIT spatial areas with different proton stopping power. The extracted proton flux is corrected for both the loss of one-pixel events in the range of angles of incidence as well as for the contribution to the single pixel events resulting from scattered middle-energy protons (low-energy or high-energy particles are stopped by the EIT components or pass through them, accordingly). A simple geometrical approach was found and applied to correct for a non-unique relation between the proton-associated CCD output signal and the incident proton energy. With this geometrical approximation four unique proton incident energy ranges were determined as 45--49, 145--154, 297--335, and 390--440 MeV. The indirect proton flux measuring tool has been tested by comparing Solar Energetic Particles (SEP) flux temporal profiles extracted from the EIT CCD frames and downloaded from the GOES database for the Bastille Day (BD) of 2000 July 14 and the more recent 2005 January 20 events. The SEP flux temporal profiles and proton spectra extracted from the EIT in the relatively narrow energy ranges between 45 and 440 MeV reported here are consistent with the related GOES profiles. The four additional EIT extracted ranges provide higher energy resolution of the SEP data.

L. V. Didkovsky; D. L. Judge; A. R. Jones; E. J. Rhodes, Jr.; J. B. Gurman

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

84

Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thunderhead Radiation Thunderhead Radiation Measurements and Radiative Flux Analysis in Support of STORMVEX Chuck Long Jay Mace Intent * Provide downwelling broadband radiation measurements at Thunderhead * Physically small footprint portable system * Designed to provide inputs necessary for Radiative Flux Analysis Basic RFA System COPS Hornisgrinde Deployment 1200m elevation System Components * Eppley ventilated PSP * Eppley ventilated PIR * Delta-T SPN-1 * Vaisala HMP-50 T/RH probe * Campbell CR23X datalogger SPN-1 Radiometer * Uses 7 thermopile detectors and a patented shading pattern * Measures Total and Diffuse SW with no moving parts * Includes internal heaters Relative accuracy StDev = 13.6 Winter Mountain Deployment Frost/Snow Mitigation * NSA Heated Ventilator Evaluation IOP - Testing various configurations and

85

Measurement of the 8B Solar Neutrino Flux with KamLAND  

SciTech Connect

We report a measurement of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate from {sup 8}B solar neutrinos based on a 123 kton-day exposure of KamLAND. The background-subtracted electron recoil rate, above a 5.5-MeV analysis threshold is 1.49 {+-} 0.14(stat) {+-} 0.17(syst) events per kton-day. Interpreted as due to a pure electron flavor flux with a {sup 8}B neutrino spectrum, this corresponds to a spectrum integrated flux of 2.77 {+-} 0.26(stat) {+-} 0.32(syst) x 10{sup 6} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}. The analysis threshold is driven by {sup 208}Tl present in the liquid scintillator, and the main source of systematic uncertainty is due to background from cosmogenic {sup 11}Be. The measured rate is consistent with existing measurements and with standard solar model predictions which include matter-enhanced neutrino oscillation.

Abe, S.; Furuno, K.; Gando, A.; Gando, Y.; Ichimura, K.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, K.; Kibe, Y.; Kimura, W.; Kishimoto, Y.; Koga, M.; Minekawa, Y.; Mitsui, T.; Morikawa, T.; Nagai, N.; Nakajima, K.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, M.; Narita, K.; Shimizu, I.; Shimizu, Y.; Shirai, J.; Suekane, F.; Suzuki, A.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, N.; Takemoto, Y.; Tamae, K.; Watanabe, H.; Xu, B.D.; Yabumoto, H.; Yonezawa, E.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, S.; Enomoto, S.; Kozlov, A.; Murayama, H.; Grant, C.; Keefer, G.; McKee, D.; Piepke, A.; Banks, T.I.; Bloxham, T.; Detwiler, J.A.; Freedman, S.J.; Fujikawa, B.K.; Han, K.; Kadel, R.; O'Donnell, T.; Steiner, H.M.; Winslow, L.A.; Dwyer, D.A.; Mauger, C.; McKeown, R.D.; Zhang, C.; Berger, B.E.; Lane, C.E.; Maricic, J.; Miletic, T.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J.G.; Matsuno, S.; Pakvasa, S.; Sakai, M.; Horton-Smith, G.A.; Tang, A.; Downum, K.E.; Gratta, G.; Tolich, K.; Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Perevozchikov, O.; Karwowski, H.J.; Markoff, D.M.; Tornow, W.; Heeger, K.M.; Piquemal, F.; Ricol, J.-S.; Decowski, M.P.

2011-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

86

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael Berhanu, and Eric Falcon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence Luc Deike, Michael the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

87

Gap Filling and Quality Assessment of CO2 and Water Vapour Fluxes above an Urban Area with Radial Basis Function Neural Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Vertical turbulent fluxes of water vapour, carbon dioxide, and sensible heat were measured from 16 August to the 28 September 2006 near the city centre of Münster in north-west Germany. In comparison to result...

A. Schmidt; T. Wrzesinsky; O. Klemm

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Measurement of Neutron and Muon Fluxes 100~m Underground with the SciBath Detector  

SciTech Connect

The SciBath detector is an 80 liter liquid scintillator detector read out by a three dimensional grid of 768 wavelength-shifting fibers. Initially conceived as a fine-grained charged particle detector for neutrino studies that could image charged particle tracks in all directions, it is also sensitive to fast neutrons (15-200 MeV). In fall of 2011 the apparatus performed a three month run to measure cosmic-induced muons and neutrons 100~meters underground in the FNAL MINOS near-detector area. Data from this run has been analyzed and resulted in measurements of the cosmic muon flux as \

Garrison, Lance

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Use of sensitivity and uncertainty analysis in reactor design verification Part II: Flux measurement analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As for any new reactor design, the ACR-1000® design has to go through a comprehensive design verification process. One of the activities for supporting the ACR physics design calculations using the ACR physics code toolset, namely WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP, is to compare the flux distributions resulting from the calculation using this toolset at various power calibration monitor (PCM) detector locations against the flux measurement data from the Japanese Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR) FUGEN. The discussion of this particular design verification exercise will be presented in a two-part paper. The usage of data from the FUGEN reactor qualifies this exercise as design verification by alternate analysis. In order to have meaningful results at the end of the design verification process, the similarity between the ACR-1000 and FUGEN reactors has to be demonstrated. It is accomplished through the sensitivity and uncertainty analysis using the TSUNAMI (Tools for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis Methodology Implementation) methodology. The results from the similarity comparison have been presented in Part I of the paper. In Part II, results from flux distribution comparison will be presented. Favourable results from this design verification exercise give a high level of confidence that using the same physics toolset in calculating the flux distribution for ACR-1000 reactor will produce results with acceptable fidelity. In addition, the results will also give an indication of expected margins in the design calculations, not only at the locations of the PCM detectors but also at the derived bundle and channel powers obtained through the flux mapping calculation.

Doddy Kastanya; Mohamed Dahmani

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Bisphosphine dioxides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of organic bisphosphine dioxides from organic bisphosphonates. The organic bisphosphonate is reacted with a Grignard reagent to give relatively high yields of the organic bisphosphine dioxide.

Moloy, K.G.

1990-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

91

?erenkov Counter Flux Measurement of Cosmic-Ray Alphas at 41°  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A ?erenkov counter inside a Geiger counter telescope was flown by balloon to a residual atmospheric depth of 16 g/cm2. The purpose of the experiment was to measure the flux of cosmic-ray alpha particles and to investigate the usefulness of a ?erenkov counter for flux measurements on the more heavily charged cosmicray components. A ?erenkov counter was used because of its inherent discrimination against slow secondary particles. The pulse height distribution obtained showed a partially resolved peak at approximately 4 h0, where h0 is the mean pulse height corresponding to a fast proton. This is experimental confirmation of the Z2 dependence for ?erenkov radiation. There were 3024 events which gave pulse heights corresponding to alphas. There is evidence that 451 were due to side showers, 651 were due to nuclear interactions, an additional 478 were due to either side showers or interactions, and 1444 were due to primary alphas. This leads to the value 99±16 particles/m2-steradian-second, as the extrapolated flux at the top of the atmosphere. There is also an indication of peaks corresponding to carbon and oxygen. There is evidence that the geometry factor of the telescope was appreciably increased for the heavy components due to the action of delta rays.

Nahmin Horwitz

1955-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products  

SciTech Connect

An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study experimentally the influence of dissipation on stationary capillary wave turbulence on the surface of a fluid by changing its viscosity. We observe that the frequency power law scaling of the capillary spectrum departs significantly from its theoretical value when the dissipation is increased. The energy dissipated by capillary waves is also measured and found to increase nonlinearly with the mean power injected within the fluid. Here, we propose an experimental estimation of the energy flux at every scale of the capillary cascade. The latter is found to be non constant through the scales. For fluids of low enough viscosity, we found that both capillary spectrum scalings with the frequency and the newly defined mean energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant is then experimentally estimated and compared to its theoretical value.

Luc Deike; Michaël Berhanu; Eric Falcon

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

94

PHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy flux are in good agreement with wave turbulence theory. The Kolmogorov-Zakharov constant waves interact with each other, they can develop a regime of wave turbulence where the wave energyPHYSICAL REVIEW E 89, 023003 (2014) Energy flux measurement from the dissipated energy in capillary

Falcon, Eric

95

Spectroscopic measurement of ion temperature and ion velocity distributions in the flux-coil generated FRC  

SciTech Connect

One aim of the flux-coil generated field reversed configuration at Tri Alpha Energy (TAE) is to establish the plasma where the ion rotational energy is greater than the ion thermal energy. To verify this, an optical diagnostic was developed to simultaneously measure the Doppler velocity-shift and line-broadening using a 0.75 m, 1800 groves/mm, spectrometer. The output spectrum is magnified and imaged onto a 16-channel photomultiplier tube (PMT) array. The individual PMT outputs are coupled to high-gain, high-frequency, transimpedance amplifiers, providing fast-time response. The Doppler spectroscopy measurements, along with a survey spectrometer and photodiode-light detector, form a suite of diagnostics that provide insights into the time evolution of the plasma-ion distribution and current when accelerated by an azimuthal-electric field.

Gupta, D.; Gota, H.; Hayashi, R.; Kiyashko, V.; Morehouse, M.; Primavera, S. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Bolte, N. [Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Marsili, P. [Department of Physics, University of Pisa, Largo B. Pontecorvo 3, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Roche, T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Wessel, F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States); Tri Alpha Energy, Inc., Rancho Santa Margarita, California 92688 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Air/water subchannel measurements of the equilibrium quality and mass-flux distribution in a rod bundle. [BWR  

SciTech Connect

Subchannel measurements were performed in order to determine the equilibrium quality and mass flux distribution in a four rod bundle, using air/water flow. An isokinetic technique was used to sample the flow in the center, side and corner subchannels of this test section. Flow rates of the air and water in each sampled subchannel were measured. Experiments were performed for two test-section-average mass fluxes (0.333x10/sup 6/ and 0.666x10/sup 6/ lb/sub m//h-ft/sup 2/), and the test-section-average quality was varied from 0% to 0.54% for each mass flux. Single-phase liquid, bubbly, slug and churn-turbulent two-phase flow regimes were achieved. The observed data trends agreed with previous diabatic measurements in which the center subchannel had the highest quality and mass flux, while the corner subchannel had the lowest.

Sterner, R.W.; Lahey, R.T. Jr.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Evaluation of method of preparation of passive diffusion tubes for measurement of ambient nitrogen dioxide   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study was carried out in response to suggestions that the measurement of NO2 by Palmes-type passive diffusion tubes (PDT) is affected by the method of preparation of the triethanolamine (TEA) absorbent coating on the ...

Hamilton, Richard P; Heal, Mathew R

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Field Testing of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Analyzers Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prevalent methods for making high-accuracy tower-based measurements of the CO2 mixing ratio, notably nondispersive infrared spectroscopy (NDIR), require frequent system calibration and sample drying. Wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down ...

Scott J. Richardson; Natasha L. Miles; Kenneth J. Davis; Eric R. Crosson; Chris W. Rella; Arlyn E. Andrews

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Remote Sensing and Sea-Truth Measurements of Methane Flux to the Atmosphere (HYFLUX project)  

SciTech Connect

A multi-disciplinary investigation of distribution and magnitude of methane fluxes from seafloor gas hydrate deposits in the Gulf of Mexico was conducted based on results obtained from satellite synthetic aperture radar (SAR) remote sensing and from sampling conducted during a research expedition to three sites where gas hydrate occurs (MC118, GC600, and GC185). Samples of sediments, water, and air were collected from the ship and from an ROV submersible using sediments cores, niskin bottles attached to the ROV and to a rosette, and an automated sea-air interface collector. The SAR images were used to quantify the magnitude and distribution of natural oil and gas seeps that produced perennial oil slicks on the ocean surface. A total of 176 SAR images were processed using a texture classifying neural network algorithm, which segmented the ocean surface into oil-free and oil-covered water. Geostatistical analysis indicates that there are a total of 1081 seep formations distributed over the entire Gulf of Mexico basin. Oil-covered water comprised an average of 780.0 sq. km (sd 86.03) distributed with an area of 147,370 sq. km. Persistent oil and gas seeps were also detected with SAR sampling on other ocean margins located in the Black Sea, western coast of Africa, and offshore Pakistan. Analysis of sediment cores from all three sites show profiles of sulfate, sulfide, calcium and alkalinity that indicated anaerobic oxidation of methane with precipitation of authigenic carbonates. Difference among the three sampling sites may reflect the relative magnitude of methane flux. Methane concentrations in water column samples collected by ROV and rosette deployments from MC118 ranged from {approx}33,000 nM at the seafloor to {approx}12 nM in the mixed layer with isolated peaks up to {approx}13,670 nM coincident with the top of the gas hydrate stability field. Average plume methane, ethane, and propane concentrations in the mixed layer are 7, 630, and 9,540 times saturation, respectively. Based on the contemporaneous wind speeds at this site, contemporary estimates of the diffusive fluxes from the mixed layer to the atmosphere for methane, ethane, and propane are 26.5, 2.10, and 2.78 {micro}mol/m{sup 2}d, respectively. Continuous measurements of air and sea surface concentrations of methane were made to obtain high spatial and temporal resolution of the diffusive net sea-to-air fluxes. The atmospheric methane fluctuated between 1.70 ppm and 2.40 ppm during the entire cruise except for high concentrations (up to 4.01 ppm) sampled during the end of the occupation of GC600 and the transit between GC600 and GC185. Results from interpolations within the survey areas show the daily methane fluxes to the atmosphere at the three sites range from 0.744 to 300 mol d-1. Considering that the majority of seeps in the GOM are deep (>500 m), elevated CH{sub 4} concentrations in near-surface waters resulting from bubble-mediated CH4 transport in the water column are expected to be widespread in the Gulf of Mexico.

Ian MacDonald

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

100

Measurement of FLux Fluctuations in Diffusion in the Small-Numbers Limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a microfluidics device filled with a colloidal suspension of microspheres, we test the laws of diffusion in the limit of small particle numbers. Our focus is not just on average properties such as the mean flux, but rather on the features of the entire distribution of allowed microscopic trajectories that are possible during diffusive dynamics. The experiments show that: (1) the flux distribution is Gaussian; (2) Fick's Law --- that the average flux is proportional to the particle gradient --- holds even for particle gradients down to one or zero particles; (3) the variance in the flux is proportional to the sum of the particle numbers; and (4) there are backwards flows, where particles flow up a concentration gradient, rather than down it, and their numbers are well-predicted by theory and consistent with a new Flux Fluctuation Theorem.

Effrosyni Seitaridou; Mandar M. Inamdar; Rob Phillips; Kingshuk Ghosh; Ken Dill

2006-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Measurements of net radiation, ground heat flux and surface temperature in an urban canyon  

SciTech Connect

The Joint Urban 2003 (JU2003) field study was conducted in Oklahoma City in July 2003 to collect data to increase our knowledge of dispersion in urban areas. Air motions in and around urban areas are very complicated due to the influence of urban structures on both mechanical and thermal forcing. During JU2003, meteorological instruments were deployed at various locations throughout the urban area to characterize the processes that influence dispersion. Some of the instruments were deployed to characterize urban phenomena, such as boundary layer development. In addition, particular sites were chosen for more concentrated measurements to investigate physical processes in more detail. One such site was an urban street canyon on Park Avenue between Broadway and Robinson Avenues in downtown Oklahoma City. The urban canyon study was designed to examine the processes that control dispersion within, into and out of the urban canyon. Several towers were deployed in the Park Avenue block, with multiple levels on each tower for observing the wind using sonic anemometers. Infrared thermometers, net radiometers and ground heat flux plates were deployed on two of the towers midway in the canyon to study the thermodynamic effects and to estimate the surface energy balance. We present results from the surface energy balance observations.

Gouveia, F J; Leach, M J; Shinn, J H

2003-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

102

Measurement of the Flux of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Monocular Observations by the High Resolution Fly's Eye  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Physics and Nevis Laboratory, New York, New York, USA 6) University of New Mexico, Department of PhysicsMeasurement of the Flux of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays from Monocular Observations by the High of Utah, Department of Physics and High Energy Astrophysics Institute, Salt Lake City, Utah, USA 2

103

84Unit Conversions Energy, Power, Flux Energy is measured in a number of ways depending on what property is being  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

property is being represented. Total Energy - Joules and ergs - The total amount of energy in various forms is left on for 1 hour: Convert its energy consumption of 5 watt-hours to Joules. 1 Joule 3,600 sec 5 Watt84Unit Conversions ­ Energy, Power, Flux Energy is measured in a number of ways depending on what

104

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A high-speed data acquisition system to measure low-level current from self-powered flux detectors in CANDU nuclear reactors

Lawrence, C B

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

106

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Measurements of Plasma Jets and Collimated Flux Tubes that are the Precursors of Spheromak Self-organization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A magnetized planar coaxial plasma gun is used to study the physics of spheromak formation. Eight magnetic flux tubes spanning from...the pile-up of this flux in the flux tube causes the flux tube to become colli...

P. M. Bellan; S. You; G. S. Yun

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Search for periodicities in the B8 solar neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A search has been made for sinusoidal periodic variations in the B8 solar neutrino flux using data collected by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory over a 4-year time interval. The variation at a period of 1 yr is consistent with modulation of the B8 neutrino flux by the Earth’s orbital eccentricity. No significant sinusoidal periodicities are found with periods between 1 d and 10 years with either an unbinned maximum likelihood analysis or a Lomb-Scargle periodogram analysis. The data are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the results of the recent analysis by Sturrock et al., based on elastic scattering events in Super-Kamiokande, can be attributed to a 7% sinusoidal modulation of the total B8 neutrino flux.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

MERCURY FLUX MEASUREMENTS OVER AIR AND WATER IN KEJIMKUJIK NATIONAL PARK, NOVA SCOTIA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Dalhousie University, Halifax, N.S., Canada, B3H 4J1; 2 Atmospheric Science Division, Atmospheric Environment Branch, Environment Canada, 45 Alderney Drive, Dartmouth, N.S., Canada, B2Y 2N6 ( author the two lakes were most strongly correlated with solar radiation, although the flux was also significantly

Folkins, Ian

110

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sandia National Laboratories: reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide emissions Measurements of Thermal Stratification in a Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition Engine On February 27, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

112

Systematic Uncertainties in the Spectroscopic Measurements of Neutron-Star Masses and Radii from Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts. III. Absolute Flux Calibration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many techniques for measuring neutron star radii rely on absolute flux measurements in the X-rays. As a result, one of the fundamental uncertainties in these spectroscopic measurements arises from the absolute flux calibrations of the detectors being used. Using the stable X-ray burster, GS 1826-238, and its simultaneous observations by Chandra HETG/ACIS-S and RXTE/PCA as well as by XMM-Newton EPIC-pn and RXTE/PCA, we quantify the degree of uncertainty in the flux calibration by assessing the differences between the measured fluxes during bursts. We find that the RXTE/PCA and the Chandra gratings measurements agree with each other within their formal uncertainties, increasing our confidence in these flux measurements. In contrast, XMM-Newton EPIC-pn measures 14.0$\\pm$0.3% less flux than the RXTE/PCA. This is consistent with the previously reported discrepancy with the flux measurements of EPIC-pn, compared to EPIC-MOS1, MOS2 and ACIS-S detectors. We also address the calibration uncertainty in the RXTE/PCA int...

Guver, Tolga; Marshall, Herman; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Guainazzi, Matteo; Diaz-Trigo, Maria

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Regional CO2 and latent heat surface fluxes in the Southern Great Plains: Measurements, modeling, and scaling  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing net ecosystem exchanges (NEE) of CO{sub 2} and sensible and latent heat fluxes in heterogeneous landscapes is difficult, yet critical given expected changes in climate and land use. We report here a measurement and modeling study designed to improve our understanding of surface to atmosphere gas exchanges under very heterogeneous land cover in the mostly agricultural U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP). We combined three years of site-level, eddy covariance measurements in several of the dominant land cover types with regional-scale climate data from the distributed Mesonet stations and Next Generation Weather Radar precipitation measurements to calibrate a land surface model of trace gas and energy exchanges (isotope-enabled land surface model (ISOLSM)). Yearly variations in vegetation cover distributions were estimated from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer normalized difference vegetation index and compared to regional and subregional vegetation cover type estimates from the U.S. Department of Agriculture census. We first applied ISOLSM at a 250 m spatial scale to account for vegetation cover type and leaf area variations that occur on hundred meter scales. Because of computational constraints, we developed a subsampling scheme within 10 km 'macrocells' to perform these high-resolution simulations. We estimate that the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Climate Research Facility SGP region net CO{sub 2} exchange with the local atmosphere was -240, -340, and -270 gC m{sup -2} yr{sup -1} (positive toward the atmosphere) in 2003, 2004, and 2005, respectively, with large seasonal variations. We also performed simulations using two scaling approaches at resolutions of 10, 30, 60, and 90 km. The scaling approach applied in current land surface models led to regional NEE biases of up to 50 and 20% in weekly and annual estimates, respectively. An important factor in causing these biases was the complex leaf area index (LAI) distribution within cover types. Biases in predicted weekly average regional latent heat fluxes were smaller than for NEE, but larger than for either ecosystem respiration or assimilation alone. However, spatial and diurnal variations of hundreds of W m{sup -2} in latent heat fluxes were common. We conclude that, in this heterogeneous system, characterizing vegetation cover type and LAI at the scale of spatial variation are necessary for accurate estimates of bottom-up, regional NEE and surface energy fluxes.

Riley, W. J.; Biraud, S.C.; Torn, M.S.; Fischer, M.L.; Billesbach, D.P.; Berry, J.A.

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Concentrated solar-flux measurements at the IEA-SSPS solar-central-receiver power plant, Tabernas - Almeria (Spain). Final report. Technical report No. 2/82  

SciTech Connect

A flux analyzing system (F.A.S.) was installed at the central receiver system of the SSPS project to determine the relative flux distribution of the heliostat field and to measure the entire optical solar flux reflected from the heliostat field into the receiver cavity. The functional principles of the F.A.S. are described. The raw data and the evaluation of the measurements of the entire heliostat field are given, and an approach to determine the actual fluxes which hit the receiver tube bundle is presented. A method is described to qualify the performance of each heliostat using a computer code. The data of the measurements of the direct radiation are presented. (LEW)

von Tobel, G.; Schelders, C.; Real, M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Direct atomic flux measurement of electron-beam evaporated yttrium with a diode-laser-based atomic absorption monitor at 668 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with a diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA monitor at 668 nm. Atomic number density and velocity were measured through absorption and Doppler shift measurements to provide the atomic flux. The AA previously developed diode-laser-based atomic absorption AA monitors for atomic density measurements

Fejer, Martin M.

116

A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of 1 < cos([theta]zenith) ...

Sonley, Thomas John

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The Lyman-? forest in three dimensions: measurements of large scale flux correlations from BOSS 1st-year data  

SciTech Connect

Using a sample of approximately 14,000 z > 2.1 quasars observed in the first year of the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), we measure the three-dimensional correlation function of absorption in the Lyman-? forest. The angle-averaged correlation function of transmitted flux (F = e{sup ??}) is securely detected out to comoving separations of 60 h{sup ?1}Mpc, the first detection of flux correlations across widely separated sightlines. A quadrupole distortion of the redshift-space correlation function by peculiar velocities, the signature of the gravitational instability origin of structure in the Lyman-? forest, is also detected at high significance. We obtain a good fit to the data assuming linear theory redshift-space distortion and linear bias of the transmitted flux, relative to the matter fluctuations of a standard ?CDM cosmological model (inflationary cold dark matter with a cosmological constant). At 95% confidence, we find a linear bias parameter 0.16 < b < 0.24 and redshift-distortion parameter 0.44 < ? < 1.20, at central redshift z = 2.25, with a well constrained combination b(1+?) = 0.336±0.012. The errors on ? are asymmetric, with ? = 0 excluded at over 5? confidence level. The value of ? is somewhat low compared to theoretical predictions, and our tests on synthetic data suggest that it is depressed (relative to expectations for the Lyman-? forest alone) by the presence of high column density systems and metal line absorption. These results set the stage for cosmological parameter determinations from three-dimensional structure in the Lyman-? forest, including anticipated constraints on dark energy from baryon acoustic oscillations.

Slosar, Anže [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Blgd 510, Upton NY 11375 (United States); Font-Ribera, Andreu [Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (CSIC-IEEC), Campus UAB, Fac. Ciències, torre C5 parell 2, Bellaterra, Catalonia (Spain); Pieri, Matthew M. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Rich, James; Goff, Jean-Marc Le; Charlassier, Romain [CEA, Centre de Saclay, IRFU, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Aubourg, Éric; Busca, Nicolas; Hamilton, Jean-Christophe [APC, Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, CNRS/IN2P3, CEA, Observatoire de Paris, 10, rue A. Domon and L. Duquet, Paris (France); Brinkmann, Jon [Apache Point Observatory, P.O. Box 59, Sunspot, NM 88349 (United States); Carithers, Bill; Cortês, Marina; Ho, Shirley; McDonald, Patrick [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Croft, Rupert [Bruce and Astrid McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Dawson, Kyle S. [University of Utah, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, 115 S 1400 E, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Eisenstein, Daniel [Harvard College Observatory, 60 Garden St., Cambridge MA 02138 (United States); Lee, Khee-Gan; Lupton, Robert [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Medolin, Bumbarija, E-mail: anze@bnl.gov [104-20 Queens Blvd 17A, Forest Hills, NY 11375 (United States); and others

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Fabrication and measurements of hybrid Nb/Al Josephson junctions and flux qubits with pi-shifters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe fabrication and testing of composite flux qubits combining Nb- and Al-based superconducting circuit technology. This hybrid approach to making qubits allows for employing pi-phase shifters fabricated using well-established Nb-based technology of superconductor-ferromagnet-superconductor Josephson junctions. The important feature here is to obtain high interface transparency between Nb and Al layers without degrading sub-micron shadow mask. We achieve this by in-situ Ar etching using e-beam gun. Shadow-evaporated Al/AlOx/Al Josephson junctions with Nb bias pads show the expected current-voltage characteristics with reproducible critical currents. Using this technique, we fabricated composite Nb/Al flux qubits with Nb/CuNi/Nb pi-shifters and measured their magnetic field response. The observed offset between the field responses of the qubits with and without pi-junction is attributed to the pi phase shift. The reported approach can be used for implementing a variety of hybrid Nb/Al superconducting quantum circuits.

A. V. Shcherbakova; K. G. Fedorov; K. V. Shulga; V. V. Ryazanov; V. V. Bolginov; V. A Oboznov; S. V. Egorov; V. O. Shkolnikov; M. J. Wolf; D. Beckmann; A. V. Ustinov

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

120

Isotopic Ratio Measurements of Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Using a 4.3 ?m Pulsed Quantum Cascade Laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report CO2 isotopic ratios (13C, 18O) measured in air using a pulsed quantum cascade laser at 2310 cm-1. Performance is...

Nelson, David; McManus, John B; Zahniser, Mark S; Tuzson, Bela; Emmenegger, Lukas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Method and apparatus for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux for analysis of same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A charged particle detector and method are disclosed providing for simultaneous detection and measurement of charged particles at one or more levels of particle flux in a measurement cycle. The detector provides multiple and independently selectable levels of integration and/or gain in a fully addressable readout manner.

Denton, M. Bonner (Tucson, AZ); Sperline, Roger (Tucson, AZ), Koppenaal, David W. (Richland, WA), Barinaga, Charles J. (Richland, WA), Hieftje, Gary (Bloomington, IN), Barnes, IV, James H. (Santa Fe, NM); Atlas, Eugene (Irvine, CA)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

122

Response of a tundra ecosystem to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide and CO{sub 2}-induced climate change  

SciTech Connect

A proposal for continuation of research on net ecosystem carbon dioxide and methane flux and sampling and analysis of soil samples from arctic tundra regions is presented.

Oechel, W.

1990-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

123

Nitrogen dioxide detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for detecting the presence of gaseous nitrogen dioxide and determining the amount of gas which is present. Though polystyrene is normally an insulator, it becomes electrically conductive in the presence of nitrogen dioxide. Conductance or resistance of a polystyrene sensing element is related to the concentration of nitrogen dioxide at the sensing element.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Agnew, Stephen F. (Los Alamos, NM); Christensen, William H. (Buena Park, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Validation of a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology via High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU post-irradiation examination measurements  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this study is to validate a Monte Carlo based depletion methodology by comparing calculated post-irradiation uranium isotopic compositions in the fuel elements of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core to values measured using uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. Three fuel plates were analyzed: two from the outer fuel element (OFE) and one from the inner fuel element (IFE). Fuel plates O-111-8, O-350-1, and I-417-24 from outer fuel elements 5-O and 21-O and inner fuel element 49-I, respectively, were selected for examination. Fuel elements 5-O, 21-O, and 49-1 were loaded into HFIR during cycles 4, 16, and 35, respectively (mid to late 1960s). Approximately one year after each of these elements were irradiated, they were transferred to the High Radiation Level Examination Laboratory (HRLEL) where samples from these fuel plates were sectioned and examined via uranium mass-spectrographic analysis. The isotopic composition of each of the samples was used to determine the atomic percent of the uranium isotopes. A Monte Carlo based depletion computer program, ALEPH, which couples the MCNP and ORIGEN codes, was utilized to calculate the nuclide inventory at the end-of-cycle (EOC). A current ALEPH/MCNP input for HFIR fuel cycle 400 was modified to replicate cycles 4, 16, and 35. The control element withdrawal curves and flux trap loadings were revised, as well as the radial zone boundaries and nuclide concentrations in the MCNP model. The calculated EOC uranium isotopic compositions for the analyzed plates were found to be in good agreement with measurements, which reveals that ALEPH/MCNP can accurately calculate burn-up dependent uranium isotopic concentrations for the HFIR core. The spatial power distribution in HFIR changes significantly as irradiation time increases due to control element movement. Accurate calculation of the end-of-life uranium isotopic inventory is a good indicator that the power distribution variation as a function of space and time is accurately calculated, i.e. an integral check. Hence, the time dependent heat generation source terms needed for reactor core thermal hydraulic analysis, if derived from this methodology, have been shown to be accurate for highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel.

Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set  

SciTech Connect

This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

ARM - Measurement - Horizontal wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsHorizontal wind govMeasurementsHorizontal wind ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Horizontal wind The horizontal wind in terms of either speed and direction, or the zonal (u) and meridional (v) components. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer

127

ARM - Measurement - Vertical velocity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVertical velocity govMeasurementsVertical velocity ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Vertical velocity The component of the velocity vector, along the local vertical. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System KAZR : Ka ARM Zenith Radar MMCR : Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar SODAR : Mini Sound Detection and Ranging

128

Los Alamos probes mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of nuclear materials into the hands of terrorists and other non-state actors. The depleted uranium dioxide crystals used for the thermal conductivity measurements were...

129

Viscosity of tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Measurement of the ?e and total 8B solar neutrino fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory phase-III data set  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of 3He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water target to measure precisely the rate of neutrino-deuteron neutral-current interactions. This technique to determine the total active 8B solar neutrino flux was largely independent of the methods employed in previous phases. The total flux of active neutrinos was measured to be 5.54?0.31+0.33(stat.)?0.34+0.36(syst.)×106 cm?2 s?1, consistent with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino mixing parameters yielded the best-fit values of ?m2=7.59?0.21+0.19×10?5eV2 and ?=34.4?1.2+1.3degrees.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2013-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

131

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

132

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

133

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

temperature temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric temperature The temperature indicated by a thermometer exposed to the air in a place sheltered from direct solar radiation. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AERI : Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

134

Neutron reflectometry characterization of interface width between sol-gel titanium dioxide and silicon dioxide thin films  

SciTech Connect

Neutron reflectometry (NR) was used to directly measure the interface width between a titanium dioxide and a silicon dioxide film deposited by sol-gel processing. In a bilayer heated to 450 C, NR measurements showed that the interface width is 0.8 nm. This width is the same as the roughness of a sol-gel silicon dioxide surface after the same heat treatment, suggesting no interdiffusion or mixing at the bilayer interface.

Keddie, J.L.; Norton, L.J.; Kramer, E.J.; Giannelis, E.P. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Independent Measurement of the Total Active B8 Solar Neutrino Flux Using an Array of He3 Proportional Counters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) used an array of He3 proportional counters to measure the rate of neutral-current interactions in heavy water and precisely determined the total active (?x) B8 solar neutrino flux. This technique is independent of previous methods employed by SNO. The total flux is found to be 5.54-0.31+0.33(stat)-0.34+0.36(syst)×106??cm-2?s-1, in agreement with previous measurements and standard solar models. A global analysis of solar and reactor neutrino results yields ?m2=7.59-0.21+0.19×10-5??eV2 and ?=34.4-1.2+1.3 degrees. The uncertainty on the mixing angle has been reduced from SNO’s previous results.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2008-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

136

Meson cascade in the atmosphere, uncertainties in calculating the fluxes of high-energy muons, and data of direct measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new calculation of the atmospheric fluxes of cosmic-ray hadrons and muons in the energy range 10–104...GeV is performed on the basis of the method for solving nuclear-cascade equations with allowance for a nons...

A. A. Kochanov; T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of airsea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related physical processes and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High latitudes present extreme conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice of the Earth's climate. HigH-LatitudE OcEan and SEa icE SurfacE fLuxES: cHaLLEngES fOr cLimatE rESEarcH by Mark change can manifest itself in astonishing ways. Arctic sea ice extent at the end of the melt season

Renfrew, Ian

138

What's Next for Vanadium Dioxide?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide How Atomic Vibrations Transform Vanadium Dioxide Calculations Confirm Material's Potential for Next-Generation Electronics, Energy...

139

Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Modeling Measurement and Modeling of Vertically Resolved Aerosol Optical Properties and Radiative Fluxes Over the ARM SGP Site During the May 2003 Aerosol IOP B. Schmid and J. Redemann Bay Area Environmental Research Institute National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames Research Center Moffett Field, California W. P. Arnott Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada A. Bucholtz and J. Reid Naval Research Laboratory Monterey, California P. Colarco Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center University of Maryland College Park, Maryland D. Covert and R. Elleman University of Washington Seattle, Washington J. Eilers, P. Pilewskie, and A. Strawa National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ames, Research Center Moffett Field, California R. A. Ferrare

140

Sediment-water chemical exchange in the coastal zone traced by in situ radon-222 flux measurements  

SciTech Connect

In situ radon-222 flux experiments conducted in benthic chambers in Cape Lookout Bight, a small marine basin on the North Carolina coast, reveal that enhanced chemical transport across the sediment-water interface during summer months is caused by abiogenic bubble tube structures. Transport rates for dissolved radon, methane, and ammonium more than three times greater than those predicted on the basis of molecular diffusion occur when open tubes are maintained by semidiurnal low-tide bubbling.

Martens, C.S. (Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill); Kipphut, G.W.; Klump, J.V.

1980-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Quantifying the flux of CaCO3 and organic carbon from the surface ocean using in situ measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) determined from in situ measurements of oxygen and nitrogen gas concentrations measured on the same mooring; Wong et al., 1999] and by sediment water dissolution and burial measurements [Hales and Emerson, 1997

142

Technical Data Sheet: TDS 15 DIFRAM100: RAPID AIR MONITOR -NITROGEN DIOXIDE (NO2).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technical Data Sheet: TDS 15 DIFRAM100: RAPID AIR MONITOR - NITROGEN DIOXIDE (NO2). Description: A plastic (H.D.P.E.) circular diffusive sampler containing a sorbent for measuring gaseous nitrogen dioxide

Short, Daniel

143

Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as temperature anomalies, on NEE and carbon sequestration of ecosystems at interannual timescales have beenLETTERS Prolonged suppression of ecosystem carbon dioxide uptake after an anomalously warm year , Yiqi Luo5 & David S. Schimel6 Terrestrial ecosystems control carbon dioxide fluxes to and from

Cai, Long

144

GLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global Dry Deposition of Nitrogen Dioxide and1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-DERIVED NO2 AND SO2 DRY DEPOSITION 1. Introduction Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) haveGLOBAL BIOGEOCHEMICAL CYCLES, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global Dry Deposition of Nitrogen Dioxide and1 Sulfur Dioxide Inferred from Space-Based2 Measurements3 C. R. Nowlan, 1,2 R. V. Martin, 1,2 S

Martin, Randall

145

Fiscal Year 1998 Annual Report, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, World Data Center -- A for Atmospheric Trace Gases  

SciTech Connect

Once again, the most recent fiscal year was a productive one for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), as well as a year for change. The FY 1998 in Review section in this report summarizes quite a few new and updated data and information products, and the ''What's Coming in FY 1999'' section describes our plans for this new fiscal year. During FY 1998, CDIAC began a data-management system for AmeriFlux, a long-term study of carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere of the Western Hemisphere and the atmosphere. The specific objectives of AmeriFlux are to establish an infrastructure for guiding, collecting, synthesizing, and disseminating long-term measurements of CO{sub 2}, water, and energy exchange from a variety of ecosystems; collect critical new information to help define the current global CO{sub 2} budget; enable improved predictions of future concentrations of atmospheric CO{sub 2}; and enhance understanding of carbon fluxes. Net Ecosystem Production (NEP), and carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere. The data-management system, available from CDIAC'S AmeriFlux home page (http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/programs/ameriflux/ ) is intended to provide consistent, quality-assured, and documented data across all AmeriFlux sites in the US, Canada, Costa Rica, and Brazil. It is being developed by Antoinette Brenkert and Tom Boden, with assistance from Susan Holladay (who joined CDIAC specifically to support the AmeriFlux data-management effort).

Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Hook, L.A.; Jones, S.B.; Kaiser, D.P.; Nelson, T.R.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Piperazine/Methyldiethanolamine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption of Carbon Dioxide in Aqueous Piperazine/Methyldiethanolamine Sanjay Bishnoi and Gary T dioxide absorption in 0.6 M piperazine PZ r4 M methyldiethanolamine ( )MDEA was measured in a wetted wall loading. The absorption rate did not follow pseudo first-order beha®ior except at ®ery low loading. All

Rochelle, Gary T.

147

Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

148

An experimental measurement of metal multilayer x-ray reflectivity degradation due to intense x-ray flux  

SciTech Connect

The degradation of the x-ray reflection characteristics of metal multilayer Bragg diffractors due to intense x-ray flux was investigated. The Z-pinch plasma produced by PROTO II of Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico, was used as the source. The plasma generated total x-ray yields of as much as 40 kJ with up to 15 kJ in the neon hydrogen- and helium-like resonance lines in nominal 20-ns pulses. Molybdenum-carbon, palladium-carbon, and tungsten-carbon metal multilayers were placed at 15 and 150 cm from the plasma center. The multilayers were at nominal angles of 5/sup 0/ and 10/sup 0/ to diffract the neon resonance lines. The time-integrated x-ray reflection of the metal multilayers was monitored by x-ray film. A fluorescer-fiber optic-visible streak camera detector system was then used to monitor the time-resolved x-ray reflection characteristics of 135 A- 2d tungsten-carbon multilayers. A large specular component in the reflectivity prevented determination of the rocking curve of the multilayer. For a neon implosion onto a vanadium-doped polyacrylic acid foam target shot, detailed modeling was attempted. The spectral flux was determined with data from 5 XRD channels and deconvolved using the code SHAZAM. The observed decay in reflectivity was assumed to correspond to the melting of the first tungsten layer. A ''conduction factor'' of 82 was required to manipulate the heat loading of the first tungsten layer such that the time of melting corresponded to the observed decay. The power at destruction was 141 MW/cm/sup 2/ and the integrated energy at destruction was 2.0 J/cm/sup 2/. 82 refs., 66 figs., 10 tabs.

Hockaday, M.Y.P.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

150

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

151

Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns E. A. Celarier,1 E. J. Brinksma the standard nitrogen dioxide (NO2) data product (Version 1.0.), which is based on measurements made), Validation of Ozone Monitoring Instrument nitrogen dioxide columns, J. Geophys. Res., 113, D15S15, doi:10

152

of carbon dioxide containing 12 but the low concentration of 14  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of carbon dioxide containing 12 C and 13 C, but the low concentration of 14 C has made its measurement in carbon dioxide extremely difficult. Using an ultrasensitive technique called saturated carbon at values well below radiocarbon's natural abundance in carbon dioxide. In their technique

Zare, Richard N.

153

PIV Measurements in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer within and above a Mature Corn Canopy. Part I: Statistics and Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements just within and above a mature corn canopy have been performed to clarify the small-scale spatial structure of the turbulence. The smallest resolved scales are about 15 times the Kolmogorov length ...

R. van Hout; W. Zhu; L. Luznik; J. Katz; J. Kleissl; M. B. Parlange

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ARM - Measurement - Precipitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsPrecipitation govMeasurementsPrecipitation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Precipitation All liquid or solid phase aqueous particles that originate in the atmosphere and fall to the earth's surface. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems DISDROMETER : Impact Disdrometer LDIS : Laser Disdrometer MWRHF : Microwave Radiometer - High Frequency

155

ARM - Measurement - Virtual temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsVirtual temperature govMeasurementsVirtual temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Virtual temperature The virtual temperature Tv = T(1 + rv/{epsilon}), where rv is the mixing ratio, and {epsilon} is the ratio of the gas constants of air and water vapor ( 0.622). Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems MWRP : Microwave Radiometer Profiler RWP : Radar Wind Profiler

156

Calculated and measured gas formation in beryllium samples irradiated in the high flux materials testing reactor BR2  

SciTech Connect

Beryllium samples have been irradiated in BR2, the materials testing reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN at Mol, Belgium, up to fission fluence values of 5.2 10{sup 22} n/cm{sup 2} at low temperature. The gas formation (helium, tritium), as measured by SCK/CEN, as well as the induced swelling of the beryllium samples and the enhancement of the swelling due to annealing have been presented at the 17th SOFT Conference (Rome, 14--18 Sept., 1992). Since this conference, helium measurements on the same samples have been carried out at RI and calculations of the gas production have been performed, taking into account the various formation schemes. The experimental results from SCK/CEN and from RI are compared with the calculated gas formations.

De Raedt, C.M.; Sannen, L.F.; Vanmechelen, P.J. [SCK/CEN, Mol (Belgium); Oliver, B.M. [Rockwell International Corp., Canoga Park, CA (United States). Rocketdyne Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Carbon Dioxide Reforming of Methane to Syngas by Thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments were conducted on syngas preparation from dry reforming of methane by carbon dioxide with a DC arc plasma at atmospheric pressure. In all experiments, nitrogen gas was used as the working gas for thermal plasma to generate a high-temperature jet into a horizontal tube reactor. A mixture of methane and carbon dioxide was fed vertically into the jet. In order to obtain a higher conversion rate of methane and carbon dioxide, chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency, parametric screening studies were conducted, in which the volume ratio of carbon dioxide to methane in fed gases and the total flux of fed gases were taken into account. Results showed that carbon dioxide reforming of methane to syngas by thermal plasma exhibited a larger processing capacity, higher conversion of methane and carbon dioxide and higher chemical energy efficiency and fuel production efficiency. In addition, thermodynamic simulation for the reforming process was conducted. Experimental data agreed well with the thermodynamic results, indicating that high thermal efficiency can be achieved with the thermal plasma reforming process.

Sun Yanpeng (???); Nie Yong (??); Wu Angshan (???); Ji Dengxiang (???); Yu Fengwen (???); Ji Jianbing (???)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Measurement of gas species, temperatures, coal burnout, and wall heat fluxes in a 200 MWe lignite-fired boiler with different overfire air damper openings  

SciTech Connect

Measurements were performed on a 200 MWe, wall-fired, lignite utility boiler. For different overfire air (OFA) damper openings, the gas temperature, gas species concentration, coal burnout, release rates of components (C, H, and N), furnace temperature, and heat flux and boiler efficiency were measured. Cold air experiments for a single burner were conducted in the laboratory. The double-swirl flow pulverized-coal burner has two ring recirculation zones starting in the secondary air region in the burner. As the secondary air flow increases, the axial velocity of air flow increases, the maxima of radial velocity, tangential velocity and turbulence intensity all increase, and the swirl intensity of air flow and the size of recirculation zones increase slightly. In the central region of the burner, as the OFA damper opening widens, the gas temperature and CO concentration increase, while the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and coal particles ignite earlier. In the secondary air region of the burner, the O{sub 2} concentration, NOx concentration, coal burnout, and release rates of components (C, H, and N) decrease, and the gas temperature and CO concentration vary slightly. In the sidewall region, the gas temperature, O{sub 2} concentration, and NOx concentration decrease, while the CO concentration increases and the gas temperature varies slightly. The furnace temperature and heat flux in the main burning region decrease appreciably, but increase slightly in the burnout region. The NOx emission decreases from 1203.6 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 0% to 511.7 mg/m{sup 3} (6% O{sub 2}) for a damper opening of 80% and the boiler efficiency decreases from 92.59 to 91.9%. 15 refs., 17 figs., 3 tabs.

Jianping Jing; Zhengqi Li; Guangkui Liu; Zhichao Chen; Chunlong Liu [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). School of Energy Science and Engineering

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is carbon dioxide? is carbon dioxide? CO2 Dipole Carbon Dioxide Carbon dioxide (chemical name CO2) is a clear gas composed of one atom of carbon (C) and two atoms of oxygen (O). Carbon dioxide is one of many chemical forms of carbon on the Earth. It does not burn, and in standard temperature and pressure conditions it is stable, inert, and non-toxic. Carbon dioxide occurs naturally in small amounts (about 0.04%) in the Earth's atmosphere. The volume of CO2 in the atmosphere is equivalent to one individual in a crowd of 2,500. Carbon dioxide is produced naturally by processes deep within the Earth. This CO2 can be released at the surface by volcanoes or might be trapped in natural underground geologic CO2 deposits, similar to underground deposits of oil and natural gas. As a major greenhouse gas, CO2 helps create and

160

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the Ecliptic is known...Helios, Ulysses, and Wind...covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind....

G. Le Chat; K. Issautier; N. Meyer-Vernet

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.  

SciTech Connect

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

FUJITA,E.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Refractive index of tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Dielectric constant of tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

165

Estimation of net ecosystem carbon exchange for the conterminous United States by combining MODIS and AmeriFlux data  

SciTech Connect

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a modified regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using eddy flux NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE well (r = 0.73, p < 0.001). We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day interval in 2005 using spatially explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE as determined from measurements and the literature. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets over large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Chen, Jiquan; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Law, Beverly E.; Litvak, Marcy; Ma, Siyan; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Noormets, Asko; Oechel, Walter C.; Oren, Ram; Richardson, Andrew D.; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Starr, Gregory; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.; Paw, Kyaw; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Viscosity of Carbon Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

26 July 1912 research-article The Viscosity of Carbon Dioxide P. Phillips The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings...

1912-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Photosynthesis and carbon dioxide fixation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Photosynthesis and carbon dioxide fixation ... Photosynthetic pigments, photosystems, the Calvin cycle, the Hatch-Slack pathway, photorespiration, and photosynthetic yield improvement. ...

Muriel B. Bishop; Carl B. Bishop

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

EVALUATION OF PROTON-CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR USE IN A SULFUR-DIOXIDE DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER  

SciTech Connect

The chemical stability, sulfur dioxide transport, ionic conductivity, and electrolyzer performance have been measured for several commercially available and experimental proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for use in a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). The SDE's function is to produce hydrogen by using the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, a sulfur based electrochemical/thermochemical hybrid cycle. Membrane stability was evaluated using a screening process where each candidate PEM was heated at 80 C in 60 wt. % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 24 hours. Following acid exposure, chemical stability for each membrane was evaluated by FTIR using the ATR sampling technique. Membrane SO{sub 2} transport was evaluated using a two-chamber permeation cell. SO{sub 2} was introduced into one chamber whereupon SO{sub 2} transported across the membrane into the other chamber and oxidized to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at an anode positioned immediately adjacent to the membrane. The resulting current was used to determine the SO{sub 2} flux and SO{sub 2} transport. Additionally, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were prepared from candidate membranes to evaluate ionic conductivity and selectivity (ionic conductivity vs. SO{sub 2} transport) which can serve as a tool for selecting membranes. MEAs were also performance tested in a HyS electrolyzer measuring current density versus a constant cell voltage (1V, 80 C in SO{sub 2} saturated 30 wt% H2SO{sub 4}). Finally, candidate membranes were evaluated considering all measured parameters including SO{sub 2} flux, SO{sub 2} transport, ionic conductivity, HyS electrolyzer performance, and membrane stability. Candidate membranes included both PFSA and non-PFSA polymers and polymer blends of which the non-PFSA polymers, BPVE-6F and PBI, showed the best selectivity.

Hobbs, D.; Elvington, M.; Colon-Mercado, H.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

169

The effect of absorbent grid preparation method on precision and accuracy of ambient nitrogen dioxide measurements using Palmes passive diffusion tubes   

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A few studies have suggested that the precision and accuracy of measurement of NO2 by Palmes-type passive diffusion tube (PDT) are affected by the method of preparation of the triethanolamine (TEA) absorbent coating on the ...

Heal, Mathew R

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes (State College, PA); Zhang, Yinzhi (State College, PA); Kuchta, Matthew E. (State College, PA); Andresen, John M. (State College, PA); Fauth, Dan J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-based zenith sky abundances and in situ gas cross sections for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, in situ ambient absorption gas cell mea- surements for ozone and nitrogen dioxide, and ground-based zenith for ozone and nitrogen dioxide that are retrieved from measured spectra of the zenith sky

Dirksen, Ruud

172

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

Not Available

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Estimation of Net Ecosystem Carbon Exchange for the Conterminous UnitedStates by Combining MODIS and AmeriFlux Data  

SciTech Connect

Eddy covariance flux towers provide continuous measurements of net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) for a wide range of climate and biome types. However, these measurements only represent the carbon fluxes at the scale of the tower footprint. To quantify the net exchange of carbon dioxide between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere for regions or continents, flux tower measurements need to be extrapolated to these large areas. Here we used remotely-sensed data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) instrument on board NASA's Terra satellite to scale up AmeriFlux NEE measurements to the continental scale. We first combined MODIS and AmeriFlux data for representative U.S. ecosystems to develop a predictive NEE model using a regression tree approach. The predictive model was trained and validated using NEE data over the periods 2000-2004 and 2005-2006, respectively. We found that the model predicted NEE reasonably well at the site level. We then applied the model to the continental scale and estimated NEE for each 1 km x 1 km cell across the conterminous U.S. for each 8-day period in 2005 using spatially-explicit MODIS data. The model generally captured the expected spatial and seasonal patterns of NEE. Our study demonstrated that our empirical approach is effective for scaling up eddy flux NEE measurements to the continental scale and producing wall-to-wall NEE estimates across multiple biomes. Our estimates may provide an independent dataset from simulations with biogeochemical models and inverse modeling approaches for examining the spatiotemporal patterns of NEE and constraining terrestrial carbon budgets for large areas.

Xiao, Jingfeng; Zhuang, Qianlai; Baldocchi, Dennis D.; Law, Beverly E.; Richardson, Andrew D.; Chen, Jiquan; Oren, Ram; Starr, Gregory; Noormets, Asko; Ma, Siyan; Verma, Shashi B.; Wharton, Sonia; Wofsy, Steven C.; Bolstad, Paul V.; Burns, Sean P.; Cook, David R.; Curtis, Peter S.; Drake, Bert G.; Falk, Matthias; Fischer, Marc L.; Foster, David R.; Gu, Lianhong; Hadley, Julian L.; Hollinger, David Y.; Katul, Gabriel G.; Litvak, Marcy; Martin, Timothy A.; Matamala, Roser; McNulty, Steve; Meyers, Tilden P.; Monson, Russell K.; Munger, J. William; Oechel, Walter C.; U, Kyaw Tha Paw; Schmid, Hans Peter; Scott, Russell L.; Sun, Ge; Suyker, Andrew E.; Torn, Margaret S.

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

175

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide from the post-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide dioxide separation and sequestration because the lower cost of carbon dioxide separation from for injection of carbon dioxide into oil or gas-bearing formations. An advantage of sequestration involving

176

Reducing carbon dioxide to products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method reducing carbon dioxide to one or more products may include steps (A) to (C). Step (A) may bubble said carbon dioxide into a solution of an electrolyte and a catalyst in a divided electrochemical cell. The divided electrochemical cell may include an anode in a first cell compartment and a cathode in a second cell compartment. The cathode may reduce said carbon dioxide into said products. Step (B) may adjust one or more of (a) a cathode material, (b) a surface morphology of said cathode, (c) said electrolyte, (d) a manner in which said carbon dioxide is bubbled, (e), a pH level of said solution, and (f) an electrical potential of said divided electrochemical cell, to vary at least one of (i) which of said products is produced and (ii) a faradaic yield of said products. Step (C) may separate said products from said solution.

Cole, Emily Barton; Sivasankar, Narayanappa; Parajuli, Rishi; Keets, Kate A

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

178

Recuperative supercritical carbon dioxide cycle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power plant includes a closed loop, supercritical carbon dioxide system (CLS-CO.sub.2 system). The CLS-CO.sub.2 system includes a turbine-generator and a high temperature recuperator (HTR) that is arranged to receive expanded carbon dioxide from the turbine-generator. The HTR includes a plurality of heat exchangers that define respective heat exchange areas. At least two of the heat exchangers have different heat exchange areas.

Sonwane, Chandrashekhar; Sprouse, Kenneth M; Subbaraman, Ganesan; O'Connor, George M; Johnson, Gregory A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illness in children. Part II: Assessment of exposure to nitrogen dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Repeated measurements of nitrogen dioxide were obtained from 1988 to 1991 in the homes of 1,205 infants living in Albuquerque, NM. Passive diffusion samplers were used to obtain a series of two-week integrated measurements from the home of each infant for use in a cohort study of the relation of residential exposure to nitrogen dioxide and respiratory illnesses. Information on stove use and time spent inside the residence was collected at two-week and two-month intervals, respectively. During the winter, in the bedrooms of homes with gas cooking stoves, mean nitrogen dioxide concentrations were 21 parts per billion (ppb); mean concentrations in the living room and kitchen were 29 ppb and 34 ppb, respectively. In homes with electric cooking stoves, the mean bedroom concentration was 7 ppb during the winter. Lower indoor concentrations were observed during the summer in homes with both gas and electric stoves. On average, infants spent approximately 12.3 hours per day in their bedrooms, 7.3 hours in the living rooms, 35 minutes in the kitchens, and 3.8 hours out of their homes. (As a condition of participation, none of the infants spent more than 20 hours per week in day care outside of their homes). The mean time infants spent in the kitchen during cooking was approximately nine minutes per day. We tested whether exposures of infants living in homes with gas stoves could be reasonably estimated by measurements in the bedroom in comparison with time-weighted average concentrations based on time-activity data and simultaneous nitrogen dioxide measurements in the kitchen, living room, and bedroom. In 1,937 two-week intervals from 587 infants, 90% of time-weighted exposure (on the three-level classification used in this study) estimates were in agreement with estimates based on bedroom concentrations alone.

Lambert, W.E.; Samet, J.M.; Hunt, W.C.; Skipper, B.J.; Schwab, M.; Spengler, J.D. (Univ. of New Mexico Medical Center, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Heat transfer and pressure drop of supercritical carbon dioxide flowing in several printed circuit heat exchanger channel patterns  

SciTech Connect

Closed-loop Brayton cycles using supercritical carbon dioxide (SCO{sub 2}) show potential for use in high-temperature power generation applications including High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) and Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactors (SFR). Compared to Rankine cycles SCO{sub 2} Brayton cycles offer similar or improved efficiency and the potential for decreased capital costs due to a reduction in equipment size and complexity. Compact printed-circuit heat exchangers (PCHE) are being considered as part of several SCO{sub 2} Brayton designs to further reduce equipment size with increased energy density. Several designs plan to use a gas cooler operating near the pseudo-critical point of carbon dioxide to benefit from large variations in thermophysical properties, but further work is needed to validate correlations for heat transfer and pressure-drop characteristics of SCO{sub 2} flows in candidate PCHE channel designs for a variety of operating conditions. This paper presents work on experimental measurements of the heat transfer and pressure drop behavior of miniature channels using carbon dioxide at supercritical pressure. Results from several plate geometries tested in horizontal cooling-mode flow are presented, including a straight semi-circular channel, zigzag channel with a bend angle of 80 degrees, and a channel with a staggered array of extruded airfoil pillars modeled after a NACA 0020 airfoil with an 8.1 mm chord length facing into the flow. Heat transfer coefficients and bulk temperatures are calculated from measured local wall temperatures and local heat fluxes. The experimental results are compared to several methods for estimating the friction factor and Nusselt number of cooling-mode flows at supercritical pressures in millimeter-scale channels. (authors)

Carlson, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 839 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Kruizenga, A. [Sandia National Laboratory (United States); Anderson, M.; Corradini, M. [Univ. of Wisconsin - Madison, 839 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration ProjeCt Background Since September 2000, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been transported from the Dakota Gasification Plant in North Dakota through a 320-km pipeline and injected into the Weyburn oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada. The CO 2 has given the Weyburn field, discovered 50 years ago, a new life: 155 million gross barrels of incremental oil are slated to be recovered by 2035 and the field is projected to be able to store 30 million tonnes of CO 2 over 30 years. CO 2 injection began in October of 2005 at the adjacent Midale oilfield, and an additional 45-60 million barrels of oil are expected to be recovered during 30 years of continued operation. A significant monitoring project associated with the Weyburn and Midale commercial

182

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

The authors' long-term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure, and adsorbent types. The originally-stated, major objectives of the current project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen, and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coals being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. As this project developed, an important additional objective was added to the above original list. Namely, we were encouraged to interact with industry and/or governmental agencies to utilize our expertise to advance the state of the art in coalbed adsorption science and technology. As a result of this additional objective, we participated with the Department of Energy and industry in the measurement and analysis of adsorption behavior as part of two distinct investigations. These include (a) Advanced Resources International (ARI) DOE Project DE-FC26-00NT40924, ''Adsorption of Pure Methane, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide and Their Mixtures on Wet Tiffany Coal'', and (b) the DOE-NETL Project, ''Round Robin: CO{sub 2} Adsorption on Selected Coals''. These activities, contributing directly to the DOE projects listed above, also provided direct synergism with the original goals of our work. Specific accomplishments of this project are summarized below in three broad categories: experimentation, model development, and coal characterization.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; J.E. Fitzgerald; Z. Pan; M. Sudibandriyo

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Net Environmental Effects of Carbon Dioxide Reduction Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of policy measures have been proposed to reduce the emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2). However, policies which reduce CO2 emissions will also decrease the emissions of greenhouse-relevant gases methane are overlooked the net effect of CO2 reduction policies on global warming is understated. Thus, emissions of all

184

Carbon Dioxide: Threat or Opportunity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tion will be by direct combustion for the generation of power, but an increasing proportion will be con verted to syngas for chemical and fuel uses. Coal gasification is projected to become a major industry in the next decade. For every ton of coal... entering the gasification process, 1.88 lons of carbon dio xide are produced. This carbon dioxide is removed in virtually pure form by existing technology. This same technology can be applied to remove carbon dioxide from stack gases produced by power...

McKinney, A. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from ambient air could compensate for all carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Such capture would, for example, make it possible to use liquid, carbon-based fuels in cars or airplane...

K.S. Lackner

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions from Estuaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries are reviewed in relation with biogeochemical processes and carbon cycling. In estuaries, carbon dioxide and methane emissions show a large spatial and temporal ...

Gwenaël Abril; Alberto Vieira Borges

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Using Dry, Regenerable Sorbents  

SciTech Connect

This report describes research conducted between July 1, 2006 and September 30, 2006 on the use of dry regenerable sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal combustion flue gas. Modifications to the integrated absorber/ sorbent regenerator/ sorbent cooler system were made to improve sorbent flow consistency and measurement reliability. Operation of the screw conveyor regenerator to achieve a sorbent temperature of at least 120 C at the regenerator outlet is necessary for satisfactory carbon dioxide capture efficiencies in succeeding absorption cycles. Carbon dioxide capture economics in new power plants can be improved by incorporating increased capacity boilers, efficient flue gas desulfurization systems and provisions for withdrawal of sorbent regeneration steam in the design.

David A. Green; Thomas O. Nelson; Brian S. Turk; Paul D. Box Raghubir P. Gupta

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

188

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt executive summary Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) referS to the Set of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts of power stations and from other

189

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide levels inside and outside homes and the implications on health effects research ...

John D. Spengler; Benjamin G. Ferris Jr.; Douglas W. Dockery; Frank E. Speizer

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained during the Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16C)  

SciTech Connect

This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to obtain total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), total alkalinity (TALK), hydrographic, and chemical data during the Research Vessel Thomas Washington Expedition TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (Section P16C). Conducted as a part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, on August 31, 1991, and finished in Honolulu, Hawaii, on October 1, 1991. WOCE Meridional Section P16C along 150{degree}W and between 18{degree}S and 19{degree}N was completed during the 31-day expedition. All 105 hydrographic and 8 large-volume stations were completed to the full water column depth. Station spacing was 30 nautical miles (nm), except between 3{degree}N and 3{degree}S where it was 10 nm. Twenty-five bio-optics stations were sampled for the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study, and at 21 stations carbon dioxide measurements were provided for the US Department of Energy`s CO{sub 2} program. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Section P16C included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth sensor; and bottle salinity, oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbon (CFC)-11, CFC-12, TCO{sub 2}, and TALK. In addition, potential temperatures were calculated from the measured variables.

Goyet, C. [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA (United States); Guenther, P.R.; Keeling, C.D.; Talley, L.D. [Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kozyr, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Sampling Activity Date - 2008 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09082006 to 10242006) by the eddy...

192

Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Concentrations on the Rise as Kyoto Era Fades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to on-site measurements by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations reached 391.3 parts per million (ppm) in 2011, up from 388.56 ppm in 2010 and fro...

Xing Fu-Bertaux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

ARM - Measurement - Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

downwelling irradiance downwelling irradiance ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Longwave broadband downwelling irradiance The total diffuse and direct radiant energy, at wavelengths longer than approximately 4 {mu}m, that is being emitted downwards. Categories Radiometric Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments BSRN : Baseline Solar Radiation Network BRS : Broadband Radiometer Station CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems

194

Single Membrane Reactor Configuration for Separation of Hydrogen, Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the project was to develop a novel complementary membrane reactor process that can consolidate two or more downstream unit operations of a coal gasification system into a single module for production of a pure stream of hydrogen and a pure stream of carbon dioxide. The overall goals were to achieve higher hydrogen production efficiencies, lower capital costs and a smaller overall footprint than what could be achieved by utilizing separate components for each required unit process/operation in conventional coal-to-hydrogen systems. Specifically, this project was to develop a novel membrane reactor process that combines hydrogen sulfide removal, hydrogen separation, carbon dioxide separation and water-gas shift reaction into a single membrane configuration. The carbon monoxide conversion of the water-gas-shift reaction from the coal-derived syngas stream is enhanced by the complementary use of two membranes within a single reactor to separate hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Consequently, hydrogen production efficiency is increased. The single membrane reactor configuration produces a pure H{sub 2} product and a pure CO{sub 2} permeate stream that is ready for sequestration. This project focused on developing a new class of CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for this new process concept. Several approaches to make CO{sub 2}-selective membranes for high-temperature applications have been tested. Membrane disks using the technique of powder pressing and high temperature sintering were successfully fabricated. The powders were either metal oxide or metal carbonate materials. Experiments on CO{sub 2} permeation testing were also performed in the temperature range of 790 to 940 C for the metal carbonate membrane disks. However, no CO{sub 2} permeation rate could be measured, probably due to very slow CO{sub 2} diffusion in the solid state carbonates. To improve the permeation of CO{sub 2}, one approach is to make membranes containing liquid or molten carbonates. Several different types of dual-phase membranes were fabricated and tested for their CO{sub 2} permeation in reducing conditions without the presence of oxygen. Although the flux was quite low, on the order of 0.01-0.001 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min, the selectivity of CO{sub 2}/He was almost infinite at temperatures of about 800 C. A different type of dual-phase membrane prepared by Arizona State University (ASU) was also tested at GTI for CO{sub 2} permeation. The measured CO{sub 2} fluxes were 0.015 and 0.02 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min at 750 and 830 C, respectively. These fluxes were higher than the previous flux obtained ({approx}0.01 cc STP/cm{sup 2}/min) using the dual-phase membranes prepared by GTI. Further development in membrane development should be conducted to improve the CO{sub 2} flux. ASU has also focused on high temperature permeation/separation experiments to confirm the carbon dioxide separation capabilities of the dual-phase membranes with La{sup 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCF6482) supports infiltrated with a Li/Na/K molten carbonate mixture (42.5/32.5/25.0 mole %). The permeation experiments indicated that the addition of O{sub 2} does improve the permeance of CO{sub 2} through the membrane. A simplified membrane reactor model was developed to evaluate the performance of the process. However, the simplified model did not allow the estimation of membrane transport area, an important parameter for evaluating the feasibility of the proposed membrane reactor technology. As a result, an improved model was developed. Results of the improved membrane reactor model show that the membrane shift reaction has promise as a means to simplify the production of a clean stream of hydrogen and a clean stream of carbon dioxide. The focus of additional development work should address the large area required for the CO{sub 2} membrane as identified in the modeling calculations. Also, a more detailed process flow diagram should be developed that includes integration of cooling and preheating feed streams as well as particulate removal so that stea

Micheal Roberts; Robert Zabransky; Shain Doong; Jerry Lin

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Carbon dioxide emissions and governance: A nonparametric analysis for the G-20  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper applies nonparametric estimators to examine the carbon dioxide emissions–governance relationship. By using data for the twenty largest economies (Group of twenty, G-20) the dynamics of the considered relationship are analyzed for the time period 1996–2010. Six governance measures are included in our analysis (Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence, Government Effectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law and Control of Corruption) as have been defined by the World Bank. The empirical findings reveal a high nonlinear relationship between countries' carbon dioxide emissions and the examined governance measures. The results reveal significant differences on the number of governance measures influencing countries' carbon dioxide emission levels. It is evident that these differences are subject to countries' specific regional and development variations. Finally, it appears that increasing the quality of countries' different governance factors does not always result to lower carbon dioxide emission levels.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Klaus S. Lackner (kl2010@columbia.edu; 212-854-0304) Columbia University 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 Patrick Grimes (pgrimes@worldnet.att.net; 908-232-1134) Grimes Associates Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 Hans-J. Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov; 505-667-7265) Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O.Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Abstract The goal of carbon sequestration is to take CO 2 that would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere and put it in safe and permanent storage. Most proposed methods would capture CO 2 from concentrated sources like power plants. Indeed, on-site capture is the most sensible approach for large sources and initially offers the most cost-effective avenue to sequestration. For distributed, mobile sources like cars, on-board capture at affordable cost would not be

197

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

198

IEP - Carbon Dioxide: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Regulatory Drivers In July 7, 2009 testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu made the following statements:1 "...Overwhelming scientific evidence shows that carbon dioxide from human activity has increased the atmospheric level of CO2 by roughly 40 percent, a level one- third higher than any time in the last 800,000 years. There is also a consensus that CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions have caused our planet to change. Already, we have seen the loss of about half of the summer arctic polar ice cap since the 1950s, a dramatically accelerating rise in sea level, and the loss of over two thousand cubic miles of glacial ice, not on geological time scales but over a mere hundred years.

199

Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,922,792 entitled "Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a neutralization/sequestration method that concomitantly treats bauxite residues from aluminum production processes, as well as brine wastewater from oil and gas production processes. The method uses an integrated approach that coincidentally treats multiple industrial waste by-product streams. The end results include neutralizing caustic

200

Dielectric constant of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) pyridine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) ethylbenzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dielectric constant of the mixture (1) water; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 1,4-dimethylbenzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) toluene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Refractive index of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 1-methylnapthalene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Viscosity of the mixture (1) 1,3-dioxolane; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Viscosity of the mixture (1) water; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 1,3-dimethylbenzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) benzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrofuran; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Viscosity of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 1,2-dimethylbenzene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture in the Presence of Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-Organic Frameworks with Precisely Designed Interior for Carbon Dioxide Capture preservation of the IRMOF structure. Carbon dioxide capture from combustion sources such as flue gas in power this carbon capture challenge. The preferred method for measuring the efficiency of a given material

Yaghi, Omar M.

213

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and airsea CO2 fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Short communication Satellite-derived surface water pCO2 and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern for the estimation of the partial pressure of carbon dioxide (pCO2) and air­sea CO2 fluxes in the northern South), respectively, the monthly pCO2 fields were computed. The derived pCO2 was compared with the shipboard pCO2

214

Measurement of carbon capture efficiency and stored carbon leakage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Data representative of a measured carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) concentration and of a measured oxygen (O.sub.2) concentration at a measurement location can be used to determine whether the measured carbon dioxide concentration at the measurement location is elevated relative to a baseline carbon dioxide concentration due to escape of carbon dioxide from a source associated with a carbon capture and storage process. Optionally, the data can be used to quantify a carbon dioxide concentration increase at the first location that is attributable to escape of carbon dioxide from the source and to calculate a rate of escape of carbon dioxide from the source by executing a model of gas-phase transport using at least the first carbon dioxide concentration increase. Related systems, methods, and articles of manufacture are also described.

Keeling, Ralph F.; Dubey, Manvendra K.

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

215

An analysis of the impact of having uranium dioxide mixed in with plutonium dioxide  

SciTech Connect

An assessment was performed to show the impact on airborne release fraction, respirable fraction, dose conversion factor and dose consequences of postulated accidents at the Plutonium Finishing Plant involving uranium dioxide rather than plutonium dioxide.

MARUSICH, R.M.

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

Protat, Alain

217

Putting the pressure on carbon dioxide | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Putting the pressure on carbon dioxide Improving the chances for fuel recovery and carbon sequestration Artwork from this research graces the cover of Environmental Science...

218

Club Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine convergence in carbon dioxide emissions among 128 countries for the period 1960–...2 emissions among all the countries under scrutiny in...

Ekaterini Panopoulou; Theologos Pantelidis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Particle Export and Resuspension Fluxes in The Western North Atlantic  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sediment traps were deployed at several locations throughout the Western North Atlantic to measure export and resuspension fluxes. Unpublished nephelometer profiles were examined prior ... bottom boundary layer. ...

Wilford D. Gardner; Mary Jo Richardson

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

Vallino, Joseph J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Sediment-water fluxes of mercury in Lavaca Bay, Texas  

SciTech Connect

The aqueous flux of inorganic Hg and monomethyl Hg from sediments to the water column was determined at several sites in Lavaca Bay, an estuary along the Texas Coast, historically impacted by Hg discharges. Diffusive fluxes were calculated at 15 sites using interstitial pore water gradients and compared to direct flux measurements obtained at two sites using benthic flux chambers. The diffusive flux of monomethyl mercury (MMHg), when modeled as a chloride species, varied over 3 orders /of magnitude from 0.2 to 1500 ng m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. Diffusive fluxes determined at a single site revealed that MMHg fluxes varied seasonally; maximal fluxes occurred in late winter to early spring. Flux chamber deployments at an impacted site revealed t hat MMHg was the Hg species entering the water column from sediments and the flux was not in steady-state; there was a strong diurnal signal with most of the MMHg flux occurring during dark periods. The flux of inorganic Hg was smaller and not as easily discernible by this method. The MMHg flux during the dark period was about 6 times greater than the estimated diffusional flux for MMHgCl, suggesting that biological and/or chemical processes near the sediment-water interface were strongly mediating the sediment-water exchange of MMHg.

Gill, G.A. [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States)] [Texas A and M Univ., Galveston, TX (United States); Bloom, N.S. [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States)] [Frontier Geosciences Inc., Seattle, WA (United States); Cappellino, S. [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)] [Parametrix, Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Dobbs, C.; McShea, L. [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States)] [Aluminum Co. of America, Point Comfort, TX (United States); Mason, R. [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.] [Univ. of Maryland, Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.; Rudd, J.W.M. [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.] [Dept. of Fisheries and Oceans, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada). Freshwater Inst.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

223

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis May 2005 MIT LFEE 2005 are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2) price (baseline IGCC), and IGCC with pre-investments that make future retrofit for CO2 capture less expensive (pre

224

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

225

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...1978012175 air atmosphere biosphere carbon...Predicting future atmospheric carbon dioxide levels...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth, which...synchronization rate of 16 khz and the picture...the interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

226

ARM - CLASIC Measurement Platforms  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

provide spaceborne measurements, including surface albedo, surface fluxes, soil moisture remote sensing (Polarimetric Scanning Radiometer), vegetation indices and derived...

227

Dynamics of carbon dioxide emissions, crystallization, and magma ascent: hypotheses, theory, and applications to volcano monitoring at Mount St. Helens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Measurements of CO2 fluxes from open-vent volcanos are rare, yet may offer special capabilities for monitoring volcanos and forecasting activity. The measured fluxes of CO2 and SO2 from Mount St. Helens decrease...

David M. Harris; William I. Rose

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Haverford Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer August 1, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy...

229

Table 2. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emisssions...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel million metric tons of carbon dioxide shares State Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Alabama...

230

carbon dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dioxide emissions dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Total annual carbon dioxide emissions by country, 2005 to 2009 (million metric tons). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords carbon dioxide emissions EIA world Data text/csv icon total_carbon_dioxide_emissions_from_the_consumption_of_energy_2005_2009million_metric_tons.csv (csv, 12.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

231

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

232

Muon Flux at the Geographical South Pole  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The muon flux at the South-Pole was measured for five zenith angles, $0^{\\circ}$, $15^{\\circ}$, $35^{\\circ}$, $82.13^{\\circ}$ and $85.15^{\\circ}$ with a scintillator muon telescope incorporating ice Cherenkov tank detectors as the absorber. We compare the measurements with other data and with calculations.

X. Bai; T. K. Gaisser; A. Karle; K. Rawlins; G. M. Spiczak; Todor Stanev

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

233

Optical absorption band at 5.8 eV associated with the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} centers in amorphous silicon dioxide: Optical absorption and EPR measurements  

SciTech Connect

Line shape modifications induced by thermal treatment in the optical absorption and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) signals associated with the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} center are experimentally investigated in various types of {gamma}-irradiated amorphous silicon dioxide (a-SiO{sub 2}). The g values of the EPR main resonance line of the E{sub {gamma}}{sup '} center show a shift correlated with the peak energy variation of the absorption band at about 5.8 eV associated with this defect. These spectroscopic changes are proposed to originate from structural modifications of the defect environment. The correlation is theoretically explained considering that the spin-orbit interaction couples the g-tensor's elements and the electronic energy level distribution of the defect. Our results suggest that the optical band at 5.8 eV is due to an intracenter electron promotion from the Si-O bonding states to the dangling bond of the O{identical_to}Si moiety.

Agnello, S.; Buscarino, G.; Gelardi, F. M.; Boscaino, R. [Department of Physical and Astronomical Sciences, University of Palermo, Via Archirafi 36, I-90123 Palermo (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Lidar Scanning of Momentum Flux in and above the Atmospheric Surface Layer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methods to measure the vertical flux of horizontal momentum using both continuous wave and pulsed Doppler lidar profilers are evaluated. The lidar measurements are compared to momentum flux observations performed with sonic anemometers over flat ...

J. Mann; A. Peña; F. Bingöl; R. Wagner; M. S. Courtney

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the greenhouse effect? is the greenhouse effect? Greenhouse Effect Greenhouse Effect The greenhouse effect is used to describe the phenomenon whereby the Earth's atmosphere traps solar radiation, caused by the presence of gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapor (H2O), in the atmosphere that allow incoming sunlight to pass through but absorb heat radiated back from the Earth's surface, resulting in higher temperatures. The greenhouse effect gets its name from what actually happens in a greenhouse. In a greenhouse, short wavelength visible sunlight shines through the glass panes and warms the air and the plants inside. The radiation emitted from the heated objects is of longer wavelength and is unable to pass through the glass barrier, maintaining a warm temperature

236

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MaCarthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic phosphors. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM); Borella, Henry M. (Santa Barbara, CA); Cates, Michael R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Turley, W. Dale (Santa Barbara, CA); MacArthur, Charles D. (Clayton, OH); Cala, Gregory C. (Dayton, OH)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

The determination of neutron flux in the Texas A & M triga reactor during pulse and steady-state operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state operation. Neutron flux measurement during a pulse presents an additional problem in that the flux levels vary during the rapid rise and fall in reactor power. The power level transient of the reactor was followed, using the current output of a boron-10... as a flux monitor only at low power. levels or neutron fluxes. The antimony flux monitor in the steady-state flux measurement showed the same type of increase in flux magni- tude as that of the pulse measurement. The high flux values at steady...

O'Donnell, John Joseph

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Carbon dioxide sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals  

SciTech Connect

The dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution has caused concerns about global warming. Fossil-fuel-fired power plants contribute approximately one third of the total human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Increased efficiency of these power plants will have a large impact on carbon dioxide emissions, but additional measures will be needed to slow or stop the projected increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. By accelerating the naturally occurring carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals it is possible to sequester carbon dioxide in the geologically stable mineral magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonation of two classes of magnesium silicate minerals, olivine (Mg2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4), was investigated in an aqueous process. The slow natural geologic process that converts both of these minerals to magnesite can be accelerated by increasing the surface area, increasing the activity of carbon dioxide in the solution, introducing imperfections into the crystal lattice by high-energy attrition grinding, and in the case of serpentine, by thermally activating the mineral by removing the chemically bound water. The effect of temperature is complex because it affects both the solubility of carbon dioxide and the rate of mineral dissolution in opposing fashions. Thus an optimum temperature for carbonation of olivine is approximately 185 degrees C and 155 degrees C for serpentine. This paper will elucidate the interaction of these variables and use kinetic studies to propose a process for the sequestration of the carbon dioxide.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

243

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Sediments 10...efforts to increase energy efficiency; efforts...sources, including renewable and nuclear energy; and investment...repositories. Offshore geological repositories...between Scotland and Norway and far out of...

Daniel P. Schrag

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

245

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Deborah Bergfeld, William C. Evans, James F. Howle, Christopher D. Farrar (2006) Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Bergfeld,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386973

246

Displacement of crude oil by carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DISPLACEMENT OF CRUDE OIL BY CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by OLUSEGUN OMOLE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in part';al fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1980 Major Subject...: Petroleum Engineering DISPLACEMENT OF CRUDE OIL BY CARBON DIOXIDE A Thesis by OLUSEGUN OMOLE Approved as to style and content by: hairman of Committee / (Member (Member (Member (Hea o Depart ent December 1980 ABSTRACT Displacement of Crude Oil...

Omole, Olusegun

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.0.4 Radiance Radiance is the energy flux density per solid angle.[W/(m2 � steradian)] 6.0.5 Radiant Intensity Radiant intensity is the energy flux per solid angle [W/steradian] (radiometry) 6.0.6 Intensity Intensity)· ^Ndt (6.4) Intensity is again measured in [W/m2 ] 6.0.7 Fluence Fluence is radiant energy per area

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

248

Dielectric constant of the mixture (1) ethane-1,2-diol; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Refractive index of the mixture (1) ethane-1,2-diol; (2) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Dielectric constant of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Refractive index of the mixture (1) tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; (2) 2-(2-hydroxyethoxy)-ethanol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Substance name(s): tetrahydrothiophene-1,1-dioxide; tetrahydrothiophene-S,S-dioxide; tetrahydro-thiophene-1,1 ... ,1-dioxide; thiacyclopentane dioxide; tetramethylene sulfone; tetrahydrothiophene 1...

Ch. Wohlfarth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The Next Generation of Canadian Solar Flux Monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 10.7 cm solar radio flux (F10.7), provided by the National Research Council of Canada since 1947, is widely used as an index of solar activity and as a proxy for other solar quantities that are harder to measure. Over recent years needs have arisen that are difficult to meet with solar flux measurements at a single wavelength. F10.7 comprises contributions from multiple emission mechanisms. To separate these, multi-wavelength measurements are needed. A new instrument is under construction that will measure fluxes precisely in six bands at 2.8, 3.6, 6.0, 10.7, 18 and 21 cm.

Kenneth F Tapping; Donald C Morton

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented.

Gershenson, M. (Naval Coastal Systems Lab., Panama City, FL (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: April 9, 2007 4: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on AddThis.com... Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector began to

255

Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

localization that limits the present measurements. The knowledge thus gained will have input not only to fusion research, but to may ques- tions of basic plasma physics....

256

Measurement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the Department of Physics & Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2005 Approved: A. E. Champagne, Advisor J. C. Blackmon, Reader C. Iliadis, Reader ABSTRACT Ryan P. Fitzgerald: Measurement of...

257

High flux compact neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Flux Compact Neutron Generators ‡ J. Reijonen §,1 , T-Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at thevoltage feed through of the generator is shown in Fig. 4.

Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Flux, Volume 1, Issue 1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; Table of Contents flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory PG. 3 ... What is Flux? An introduction to our new publication. PG. 4 ... How Magnet...

259

Flux-linkage characteristics of switched reluctance motor  

SciTech Connect

An important requirement in modeling of switched reluctance motor (SRM) is the knowledge of its flux-linkage characteristics. Idealization of the flux-linkage characteristics will result in a model which cannot predict the performance of the machine with sufficient accuracy. It is necessary therefore to determine flux-linkage characteristics as closely as possible. In this paper, the method of finding the flux-linkage characteristics is explained. The same is demonstrated on a commercially available 4 KW, 8/6 pole OULTON SRM. The validity of the test result is checked by computing the static torque characteristics based on the measured flux-linkage characteristics and comparing it with the experimentally measured static torque characteristics. The sources of measurement error are discussed.

Ramanarayanan, V.; Venkatesha, L.; Panda, D. [Indian Inst. of Science, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Carbon dioxide capture process with regenerable sorbents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to remove carbon dioxide from a gas stream using a cross-flow, or a moving-bed reactor. In the reactor the gas contacts an active material that is an alkali-metal compound, such as an alkali-metal carbonate, alkali-metal oxide, or alkali-metal hydroxide; or in the alternative, an alkaline-earth metal compound, such as an alkaline-earth metal carbonate, alkaline-earth metal oxide, or alkaline-earth metal hydroxide. The active material can be used by itself or supported on a substrate of carbon, alumina, silica, titania or aluminosilicate. When the active material is an alkali-metal compound, the carbon-dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate bicarbonate. When the active material is an alkaline-earth metal, the carbon dioxide reacts with the metal compound to generate carbonate. Spent sorbent containing the bicarbonate or carbonate is moved to a second reactor where it is heated or treated with a reducing agent such as, natural gas, methane, carbon monoxide hydrogen, or a synthesis gas comprising of a combination of carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The heat or reducing agent releases carbon dioxide gas and regenerates the active material for use as the sorbent material in the first reactor. New sorbent may be added to the regenerated sorbent prior to subsequent passes in the carbon dioxide removal reactor.

Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA); Hoffman, James S. (Library, PA)

2002-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Thermal neutron flux perturbation due to indium foils in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

press) 13. Axford, R. A. , and Day, G. M. , personnel communication. 14. Ritchie, R. H. , Thermal Neutron Flux De ression, Health Physics Division Annual Prog. Rep. July, 1958, ORNL-2806, p. 133. 27 i 5, Walker, J. V. , "The Measurement of Absolute... Fluxes in Water and Graphite, " 'ORNL- 2842, 204 (f959). ...

Stinson, Ronald Calvin

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Carbon Dioxide Sorption Isotherms and Matrix Transport Rates for Non-Powdered Coal  

SciTech Connect

For enhanced coalbed methane/carbon dioxide sequestration field projects, carbon dioxide isotherms and the rate of diffusion of the carbon dioxide from the cleats into the matrix are important parameters for predicting how much carbon dioxide actually will be sequestered under various operating conditions. Manometric (or pressure swing) experiments on powdered coal provide a quick, simple, and relatively inexpensive method for measuring sorption isotherms. However, determination of the rate of transport from cleat into matrix from the rate of gas pressure drop is difficult, if not impossible. (The characteristic time constant for the transport depends on the cleat spacing as well as the rate of diffusion.) Manometric measurements often yield isotherms that are extremely problematic in the region of the carbon dioxide critical point; perhaps even worse, available data seem to indicate that the sorption isotherms measured for powders are much larger than the isotherms of coal cores. Measurements on centimeter-sized samples can take weeks or months to reach equilibrium; for such equilibration times gas leakage rates that would be of no significance in powdered-coal measurements can completely invalidate manometric measurements on coal cores. We have tested and used a simple, inexpensive method for measuring isotherms and carbon dioxide transport rates in coal cores. One or more cores are placed in a simple pressure vessel, and a constant pressure is maintained in the vessel by connecting it to a gas supply (which contains a very large amount of gas compared to amount that could leak over the course of the experiment). From time to time the gas supply is shut off, the sample is removed, and its weight is recorded at ambient pressure at frequent time intervals for a period of about one hour. The sample is then returned to the pressure vessel, the carbon dioxide pressure restored to its previous value, and the equilibration resumed until the next sample weighing. For a point on the isotherm, the process is repeated until the sample weight reaches a constant value (i.e., typically equilibration times of several weeks). The slope of a plot of sample weight vs. square root of elapsed desorption time gives a measurement for the rate of diffusion. In order to advance all three experimental methods, results from this “ambient-pressure gravimetry” method were compared with data obtained by conventional manometry and by computer tomography. The isotherm and “diffusion” rate measured for the core can be directly used in simulators for reservoir engineering studies of coalseam sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane production.

Smith, D.H.; Jikich, S.; Seshadri, K.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

264

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

265

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Kevin T. Raterman (ratekt@inel.gov; 208-526-5444) Michael McKellar (mgq@inel.gov; 208-526-1346) Anna Podgorney (poloak@inel.gov; 208-526-0064) Douglas Stacey (stacde@inel.gov; 208-526-3938) Terry Turner (tdt@inel.gov; 208-526-8623) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2110 Brian Stokes (bxs9@pge.com; 415-972-5591) John Vranicar (jjv2@pge.com; 415-972-5591) Pacific Gas & Electric Company 123 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Introduction Many analysts 1,2,3 identify carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA)

266

Reaction of titanium polonides with carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

It has been ascertained that heating titanium and tantalum in carbon dioxide to temperatures of 500 or 800/sup 0/C alters the composition of the gas phase, causing the advent of carbon monoxide and lowering the oxygen content. Investigation of the thermal stability of titanium polonides in a carbon dioxide medium has shown that titanium mono- and hemipolonides are decomposed at temperatures below 350/sup 0/C. The temperature dependence of the vapor pressure of polonium produced in the decomposition of these polonides in a carbon dioxide medium have been determined by a radiotensimetric method. The enthalpy of the process, calculated from this relationship, is close to the enthalpy of vaporization of elementary polonium in vacuo.

Abakumov, A.S.; Malyshev, M.L.; Reznikova, N.F.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Carbon dioxide emissions, impact on Malaysia's manufacturing productivity growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods used to measure productivity growth generally ignore the pollutants that are produced by the industrial processes. For example, pollutant emissions generated as undesirable output, apart from the main output of Malaysia's manufacturing sector, are excluded from the productivity accounting framework. This study aims at an extended productivity measure that takes pollutants into account by internalisation of Carbon dioxide (CO2) as a measure of air pollutant emissions into the production function, as an unpriced input. The results show that there was a slowdown in the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) growth in general, and a negative impact of CO2 emissions produced by the sector in particular, compared to other productivity indicators of the sector when CO2 is internalised in the models.

Elsadig Musa Ahmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide;#12;Summary The tourism sector is not only affected by climate change but also has an impact on the Earth of such measures, we calculated the climate efficiency of the tourism sector in the case of Switzerland.We defined

Fischlin, Andreas

269

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

270

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

271

Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

12 SCIENCE Breath is a mixture of nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide, water vapour, inert gases. On the basis of proton affinity, the major constituents of air and breath (nitrogen, oxygen, carbon dioxide

272

A methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide flooding performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A methodology was developed for forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding performance quickly and reliably. The feasibility of carbon dioxide flooding in the Dollarhide Clearfork "AB" Unit was evaluated using the methodology. This technique is very...

Marroquin Cabrera, Juan Carlos

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Graph Model for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Metallurgical Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mathematical models are presented for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from metallurgical processes. The article also presents ... in graph form to calculate transit and net emissions of carbon dioxide based o...

Yu. N. Chesnokov; V. G. Lisienko; A. V. Lapteva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and carbon dioxide (CO2) all appear in anomalously high concentrations near the hot springs and at the junction of the Fumarole Valley and the HSBV. This indicates either that Hg is being lost from a reservoir due to boiling and steam loss, probably northwest of the junction, or erosion has carried these elements in sediment from the higher elevation manifestations. The presence of such volatiles in

275

E-Print Network 3.0 - arterial carbon dioxide Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

reactivity. inserm-00495071... , manufactured nanoparticles, especially carbon or titanium dioxide nanoparticles, could be relevant surrogate... of carbon or titanium dioxide...

276

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions per 1,000 cubic feet of natural gas. In this case, there is much less energy

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

The Momentum flux in two-phase flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The average momentum flux at a section of a pipe with twophase upflow has been measured by the impulse technique. Steamwater and air-water mixtures were tested in one-inch and onehalf inch nominal pipes. Homogeneous ...

Andeen, Gerry B.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designed amyloid fibers as materials for selective carbon dioxide capture Dan Lia,b,c,1 , Hiroyasu demonstrate that amyloids, self-assembling protein fibers, are effective for selective carbon dioxide capture formation rate is fast enough to capture carbon dioxide by dynamic separation, undiminished by the presence

279

Array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of titanium dioxide nanostructures for solar energy utilization includes a plurality of nanotubes, each nanotube including an outer layer coaxial with an inner layer, where the inner layer comprises p-type titanium dioxide and the outer layer comprises n-type titanium dioxide. An interface between the inner layer and the outer layer defines a p-n junction.

Qiu, Xiaofeng; Parans Paranthaman, Mariappan; Chi, Miaofang; Ivanov, Ilia N; Zhang, Zhenyu

2014-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide Water vapor #12;Atmospheric composition (parts per million by volume) · Nitrogen (N2) 780Thermal Infrared Radiation and Carbon Dioxide in the Atmosphere Bill Satzer 3M Company #12;Outline,840 · Oxygen (O2) 209,460 · Argon (Ar) 9340 · Carbon dioxide (CO2) 394 · Methane (CH4) 1.79 · Ozone (O3) 0

Olver, Peter

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-U" relation with a within- sample peak between carbon dioxide emissions (and energy use) per capita and perWorld Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 Ã? 2050 Richard Schmalensee, Thomas M. Stoker, andRuth A. Judson* Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may

282

Glutamate Surface Speciation on Amorphous Titanium Dioxide and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Glutamate Surface Speciation on Amorphous Titanium Dioxide and Hydrous Ferric Oxide D I M I T R I (HFO) and titanium dioxide exhibit similar strong attachment of many adsorbates including biomolecules on amorphous titanium dioxide. The results indicate that glutamate adsorbs on HFO as a deprotonated divalent

Sverjensky, Dimitri A.

283

Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomatics, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada. J.Faculty of Forestry and Geomatics, Université Laval, Quebec,Quebec, Canada. Department of Geography, Queen’s University

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ecosystem carbon dioxide fluxes after disturbance in forests of North America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

photosynthesizing vegetation, biomass combustion in the caseevent, such as biomass combustion, harvest removals, or

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

286

CARBON DIOXIDE AND OUR OCEAN LEGACY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to energy-consuming activities that burn fossil fuels. On a yearly basis, the average Ameri- can produces 22 of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere, or nearly half of the fossil fuel carbon emissions over this period sea life that depend on the health and avail- ability of these shelled organisms. At present, ocean

287

Predicting Future Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Levels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...re-quired 5-Mhz bandwidth...interstellar plasma. For UHF frequencies of 500 Mhz, this amounts...chang-ing the atmospheric carbon dioxide...in the polar areas. Although...The shaded area indicates the...per-missible atmospheric CO2 level might...emission rates are largest between 2000...

U. Siegenthaler; H. Oeschger

1978-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

288

Synthetic fuels, carbon dioxide and climate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The observed increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) has been attributed to the use of fossil fuels. There is concern that the generation and use of synthetic fuels derived from oil shale and coal will accelerate the increase of CO2.

Alex R. Sapre; John R. Hummel; Ruth A. Reck

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Introduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Global update 2005. Primary sources of air pollutants include combustion products from power generationIntroduction Air Quality and Nitrogen Dioxide Air pollution can be defined as "the presence effects to man and/or the environment". (DEFRA) "Clean air is considered to be a basic requirement

290

Hydroelectric Reservoirs -the Carbon Dioxide and Methane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydroelectric Reservoirs - the Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions of a "Carbon Free" Energy an overview on the greenhouse gas production of hydroelectric reservoirs. The goals are to point out the main how big the greenhouse gas emissions from hydroelectric reservoirs are compared to thermo-power plants

Fischlin, Andreas

291

Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

292

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

293

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage Project Summary Full Title: Techno-Economic Models for Carbon Dioxide Compression, Transport, and Storage & Correlations for Estimating Carbon Dioxide Density and Viscosity Project ID: 195 Principal Investigator: David McCollum Brief Description: This project addresses several components of carbon capture and storage (CCS) costs, provides technical models for determining the engineering and infrastructure requirements of CCS, and describes some correlations for estimating CO2 density and viscosity. Keywords: Pipeline, transportation, greenhouse gases (GHG), costs, technoeconomic analysis Purpose Estimate costs of carbon dioxide capture, compression, transport, storage, etc., and provide some technical models for determining the engineering and

294

Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

Mace, Gerald

295

High Flux Isotope Reactor power upgrade status  

SciTech Connect

A return to 100-MW operation is being planned for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Recent improvements in fuel element manufacturing procedures and inspection equipment will be exploited to reduce hot spot and hot streak factors sufficiently to permit the power upgrade without an increase in primary coolant pressure. Fresh fuel elements already fabricated for future use are being evaluated individually for power upgrade potential based on their measured coolant channel dimensions.

Rothrock, R.B.; Hale, R.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Cheverton, R.D. [Delta-21 Resources Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative

297

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

298

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

299

Biophysical regulations of carbon fluxes of a steppe and a cultivated cropland in semiarid Inner Mongolia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biophysical regulations of carbon fluxes of a steppe and a cultivated cropland in semiarid Inner, such as energy and material fluxes, associated with the land conversions. The carbon fluxes, including net land-use settings ­ a typical steppe and a crop field in Inner Mongolia ­ were measured in the growing

Chen, Jiquan

300

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa SIO Air Sampling Network » Mauna Loa Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Record from Mauna Loa DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/atg.035 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.F. Keeling, S.C. Piper, A.F. Bollenbacher and J.S. Walker Carbon Dioxide Research Group Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California La Jolla, California 92093-0444, U.S.A. Period of Record 1958-2008 Methods Air samples at Mauna Loa are collected continuously from air intakes at the top of four 7-m towers and one 27-m tower. Four air samples are collected each hour for the purpose of determining the CO2 concentration. Determinations of CO2 are made by using a Siemens Ultramat 3 nondispersive infrared gas analyzer with a water vapor freeze trap. This analyzer registers the concentration of CO2 in a stream of air flowing at ~0.5

302

Carbon dioxide utilization and seaweed production  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide utilization and seaweed production dioxide utilization and seaweed production V.R.P.Sinha World Bank Project Bangladesh Fisheries Research Institute, Mymensingh, Bangladesh e-mails; vrpsinha@ mymensingh.net, vidyut_s@hotmail.com Lowell Fraley L.D. Fraley & Associates, LLC, P.O. Box 1525, Sugarland, TX 77487, USA, e-mail idf@hia.net BS Chowdhry ISS Consultants, Inc. 13111 Westheimer, Suite 303, Houston, Texas 77077, USA, e-mail bsc@issci.com Abstract: Stronger growth in many plants stimulated by increased CO 2 concentration should lead to greater biological productivity with an expected increase in the photosynthetic storage of carbon. Thus, the biosphere will serve as a sink for CO 2 , though it will also act as a source too, because of respiration. Normally net photosynthesis dominates in summer and

303

Coal Bed Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE R. Stanton (rstanton@usgs.gov; 703-648-6462) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 R. Flores (rflores@usgs.gov; 303-236-7774) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 P.D. Warwick (pwarwick@usgs.gov; 703-648-6469) H. Gluskoter (halg@usgs.gov; 703-648-6429) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 G.D. Stricker (303-236-7763) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 Introduction Geologic sequestration of CO 2 generated from fossil fuel combustion may be an environmentally attractive method to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Of the geologic options, sequestering CO

304

The urgent need for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The danger of global warming has put in question the use of fossil fuels which constitute the most abundant and most reliable energy resource. Meeting the ever growing world demand for cheap energy, while simultaneously achieving the required drastic reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions can only be accomplished by actively preventing carbon dioxide generated in the combustion of fuels from accumulating in the atmosphere, i.e. by sequestration. Sequestration is possible and economically viable and is currently the only realistic solution to the dilemma of CO{sub 2} emissions. The authors have developed a very promising approach that disposes of carbon dioxide by chemically combining it in an exothermic reaction with readily available minerals to form carbonates. The resulting carbonates are stable solids that are known to be environmentally benign and to be stable on geological time scales. This stands in contrast to most other methods that do not appear to fully solve the long term problem.

Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Jensen, R.; Ziock, H.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries Extended discussion here Carbon emissions per capita 1973 vs. 1991 by major end use. (Denmark comparison is 1972 and 1991) With the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto approaching, there is a great deal of excitement over policies designed to reduce future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels. At COP-3, more than 130 nations will meet to create legally binding targets for CO2 reductions. Accordingly, we have analyzed the patterns of emissions arising from the end uses of energy (and electricity production) in ten industrialized countries, with surprising and, in some cases, worrisome results. The surprise is that emissions in many countries in the early 1990s were lower than in the 1970s in an absolute sense and on a per capita basis; the worry

306

Measurement of Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide in Beverage Headspace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......n i m u m recovery o f 9 5...o prevent water condensation, c o l u...headspace at atmospheric pressure...distilled water (7). Results...Volume on Recovery Gas pressure...with 97% recovery. The method...soaked in water before insertion......

Joanne M. Cook; Richard L. Karelitz; David E. Dalsis

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Hybrid Microfabricated Device for Field Measurement of Atmospheric Sulfur Dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is also now generally agreed that forthcoming major volcanic eruptions will sensitively monitored for increasing sulfur gas emissions as indicated by increasing seismic activity. ... (12)?Fish, B. R.; Durham, J. L. Environ. ...

Shin-Ichi Ohira; Kei Toda; Shin-Ichiro Ikebe; Purnendu K. Dasgupta

2002-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

308

Measurement of Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Carbon Dioxide in Beverage Headspace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......wine. W h e n fully extended, the needle could pierce a 2-in. cork closure without disturbing the bottle seal. Metal bottle caps and cans could also be pierced. A gas-tight seal was provided by a thick silicone septum. W h e n sampling......

Joanne M. Cook; Richard L. Karelitz; David E. Dalsis

1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Carbon dioxide in Arctic and subarctic regions  

SciTech Connect

A three year research project was presented that would define the role of the Arctic ocean, sea ice, tundra, taiga, high latitude ponds and lakes and polar anthropogenic activity on the carbon dioxide content of the atmosphere. Due to the large physical and geographical differences between the two polar regions, a comparison of CO/sub 2/ source and sink strengths of the two areas was proposed. Research opportunities during the first year, particularly those aboard the Swedish icebreaker, YMER, provided additional confirmatory data about the natural source and sink strengths for carbon dioxide in the Arctic regions. As a result, the hypothesis that these natural sources and sinks are strong enough to significantly affect global atmospheric carbon dioxide levels is considerably strengthened. Based on the available data we calculate that the whole Arctic region is a net annual sink for about 1.1 x 10/sup 15/ g of CO/sub 2/, or the equivalent of about 5% of the annual anthropogenic input into the atmosphere. For the second year of this research effort, research on the seasonal sources and sinks of CO/sub 2/ in the Arctic will be continued. Particular attention will be paid to the seasonal sea ice zones during the freeze and thaw periods, and the tundra-taiga regions, also during the freeze and thaw periods.

Gosink, T. A.; Kelley, J. J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Advective Flux in Relation to Net Ecosystem CO2 Exchange at the NIWOT Ridge Ameriflux Site  

SciTech Connect

This report describes final progress made on measurements of advective CO2 flux to the overall forest carbon budget at the Niwot Ridge Ameriflux site in Colorado.

Russell K. Monson

2005-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

311

Heat flux solarimeter  

SciTech Connect

The solarimeter presented in this work is easy to assemble. It is calibrated and its performance is validated by means of Hottel's method. Finally, the curves obtained with this solarimeter are compared to the ones obtained with a commercial solarimeter. This device is based on the evaluation of the heat flow in a metal rod. In consequence, measurements are not affected by ambient temperature variations. On the other hand, there is a linear relationship between the temperatures measured at the rod ends and the incident radiation, as can be concluded both from the theory of its operation and the calibration lines obtained. The results obtained from the global irradiance measurements in the area of Los Polvorines (Buenos Aires Province), together with a preliminary evaluation of the solarimeter's response time, are presented in this work. (author)

Sartarelli, A.; Vera, S.; Cyrulies, E. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Echarri, R. [Instituto de Desarrollo Humano, Univ. Nac. de Gral. Sarmiento (IDH, UNGS), Los Polvorines (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET) (Argentina); Samson, I. [INTEC (Instituto Tecnologico Santo Domingo), Santo Domingo (Dominican Republic)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Electron energy spectra, fluxes, and day-night asymmetries of 8B solar neutrinos from measurements with NaCl dissolved in the heavy-water detector at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Results are reported from the complete salt phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory experiment in which NaCl was dissolved in the H22O (“D2O”) target. The addition of salt enhanced the signal from neutron capture as compared to the pure D2O detector. By making a statistical separation of charged-current events from other types based on event-isotropy criteria, the effective electron recoil energy spectrum has been extracted. In units of 106cm-2s-1, the total flux of active-flavor neutrinos from B8 decay in the Sun is found to be 4.94-0.21+0.21(stat)-0.34+0.38(syst) and the integral flux of electron neutrinos for an undistorted B8 spectrum is 1.68-0.06+0.06(stat)-0.09+0.08(syst); the signal from (?x,e) elastic scattering is equivalent to an electron-neutrino flux of 2.35-0.22+0.22(stat)-0.15+0.15(syst). These results are consistent with those expected for neutrino oscillations with the so-called large mixing angle parameters and also with an undistorted spectrum. A search for matter-enhancement effects in the Earth through a possible day-night asymmetry in the charged-current integral rate is consistent with no asymmetry. Including results from other experiments, the best-fit values for two-neutrino mixing parameters are ?m2=(8.0-0.4+0.6)×10-5 eV2 and ?=33.9-2.2+2.4 degrees.

B. Aharmim et al. (SNO Collaboration)

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nimesulide adsorbed on silica aerogel using supercritical carbon dioxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Silica aerogel (SA) was loaded with nimesulide, a drug model compound, to demonstrate the potentiality of adsorption processes based on the usage of supercritical carbon dioxide to treat poorly water-soluble drugs, forming new kinds of drug delivery systems. Adsorption isotherms and kinetics were measured and described by models. The effect of pressure, temperature and solution concentration on loaded SA were also studied. Modelling of kinetic data showed that the sorption process was best described by a pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherm data were best fitted by the Freundlich isotherm. The drug/SA composites were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray microanalysis, and FT-IR. Release kinetics of the adsorbed drug were also evaluated by in vitro dissolution tests. Results showed that nimesulide can be uniformly dispersed into the aerogel and that the release rate of nimesulide from the composite, constituted by drug and silica aerogel, is much faster than that of the crystalline drug.

Giuseppe Caputo; Mariarosa Scognamiglio; Iolanda De Marco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Water-in-carbon dioxide emulsions: Formation and stability  

SciTech Connect

Stable water-in-carbon dioxide (W/C) emulsions, for either liquid or supercritical CO{sub 2} containing up to 70 vol % water, are formed with various molecular weight perfluoropolyether ammonium caroxylate surfactants. Water droplet sizes ranging from 3 to 10 {micro}m were determined by optical microscopy. From conductivity measurements, an inversion to C/W emulsions results from a decrease in CO{sub 2} density or salinity at constant pressure, a decrease in surfactant molecular weight, or an increase in temperature. Emulsions become more stable with a change in any of these formulation variables away from the balanced state, which increases interfacial tensions and interfacial tension gradient enhancing Marangoni-Gibbs stabilization. This type of stability is enhanced with an increase in the molecular weight of the surfactant tails, which increases the thickness of the stabilizing films between droplets. W/C emulsions formed with the 7,500 molecular weight surfactant were stable for several days.

Lee, C.T. Jr.; Psathas, P.A.; Johnston, K.P.; Grazia, J. de; Randolph, T.W.

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

315

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

SciTech Connect

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, 336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's proposal to participate with a group of international organizations in an experiment to evaluate the dispersion and diffusion of liquid carbon dioxide droplets in ocean waters. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Final Environmental Assessment Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment

317

Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DU Dioxide Fill DU Dioxide Fill Improving Repository Performance by Using DU Dioxide Fill Fills may improve repository performance by acting as sacrificial materials, which delay the degradation of SNF uranium dioxide. Because fill and SNF have the same chemical form of uranium (uranium dioxide), the DU dioxide in a repository is the only fill which has the same behavior as that of the SNF. In the natural environment, some uranium ore deposits have remained intact for very long periods of time. The outer parts of the ore deposit degrade while the inner parts of the deposit are protected. The same approach is proposed herein for protecting SNF. The application could use half or more of the DU inventory in the United States. Behavior of Uranium and Potential Behavior of a Waste Package with SNF and Fill

318

Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nano-Enabled Titanium Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide

319

Flux, Vol. 1, Issue 2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

&24; flux a publication of the national high magnetic field laboratory Introduction &24; In a weak economy, U.S. research funding tends to become more heavily weighted toward applied...

320

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Background Although alkanolamine solvents, such as monoethanolamine (MEA), and solvent blends have been developed as commercially-viable options for the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from waste gases, natural gas, and hydrogen streams, further process improvements are required to cost-effectively capture CO 2 from power plant flue gas. The promotion of potassium carbonate (K

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Plasmoids as magnetic flux ropes  

SciTech Connect

Observational constraints on the magnetic topology and orientation of plasmoids is examined using a magnetic field model. The authors develop a magnetic flux rope model to examine whether principal axis analysis (PAA) of magnetometer signatures from a single satellite pass is sufficient to determine the magnetic topology of plasmoids and if plasmoid observations are best explained by the flux rope, closed loop, or large-amplitude wave picture. Satellite data are simulated by extracting the magnetic field along a path through the model of a magnetic flux rope. They then examine the results using PAA. They find that the principal axis directions (and therefore the interpretation of structure orientation) is highly dependent on several parameters including the satellite trajectory through the structure. Because of this they conclude that PAA of magnetometer data from a single satellite pass is insufficient to differentiate between magnetic closed loop and flux rope models. They also compare the model results to ISEE 3 magnetometer data of plasmoid events in various coordinate frames including principal axis and geocentric solar magnetospheric. They find that previously identified plasmoid events that have been explained as closed loop structures can also be modeled as flux ropes. They also searched the literature for previously reported flux rope and closed loop plasmoid events to examine if these structures had any similarities and/or differences. The results of the modeling efforts and examination of both flux rope and plasmoid events lead them to favor the flux rope model of plasmoid formation, as it is better able to unify the observations of various magnetic structures observed by ISEE 3.

Moldwin, M.B.; Hughes, W.J. (Boston Univ., MA (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyamine-Tethered Porous Polymer Networks for Carbon Dioxide Capture from Flue Gas Previous Next List Weigang Lu, Julian P. Sculley, Daqiang Yuan, Rajamani Krishna, Zhangwen Wei,...

323

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Key Policy Issues and Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key...

324

Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Synthesis, Structure, and Carbon Dioxide Capture Properties of Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks Previous Next List Anh Phan, Christian J. Doonan, Fernando J. Uribe-Romo, Carolyn B....

325

Dissociation of carbon dioxide in atmospheric pressure microchannel plasma devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma discharge of carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure was successfully demonstrated in microchannel plasma devices at breakdown voltages lower than 1 kVRMS. Optical emissions of… (more)

Oh, Taegon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Carbon dioxide sequestration underground laser based detection system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon dioxide (CO 2) is a known greenhouse gas. Due to the burning of fossil fuels by industrial and power plants the atmospheric concentration of… (more)

Barr, Jamie Lynn.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

328

Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Convergence or Divergence?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding and considering the distribution of per capita carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is important in designing international climate change ... incentives for participation. I evaluate historic internation...

Joseph E. Aldy

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

THE PHOTOSPHERIC ENERGY AND HELICITY BUDGETS OF THE FLUX-INJECTION HYPOTHESIS  

SciTech Connect

The flux-injection hypothesis for driving coronal mass ejections (CMEs) requires the transport of substantial magnetic energy and helicity flux through the photosphere concomitant with the eruption. Under the magnetohydrodynamics approximation, these fluxes are produced by twisting magnetic field and/or flux emergence in the photosphere. A CME trajectory, observed 2000 September 12 and fitted with a flux-rope model, constrains energy and helicity budgets for testing the flux-injection hypothesis. Optimal velocity profiles for several driving scenarios are estimated by minimizing the photospheric plasma velocities for a cylindrically symmetric flux-rope magnetic field subject to the flux budgets required by the flux-rope model. Ideal flux injection, involving only flux emergence, requires hypersonic upflows in excess of the solar escape velocity 617 km s{sup -1} over an area of 6 x 10{sup 8} km{sup 2} to satisfy the energy and helicity budgets of the flux-rope model. These estimates are compared with magnetic field and Doppler measurements from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager on 2000 September 12 at the footpoints of the CME. The observed Doppler signatures are insufficient to account for the required energy and helicity budgets of the flux-injection hypothesis.

Schuck, P. W., E-mail: peter.schuck@nasa.go [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Room 250, Building 21 Space Weather Laboratory, Code 674, Heliophysics Science Division, 8801 Greenbelt Rd., Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: CO2 and heat fluxes were measured over a six-week period (09/08/2006 to 10/24/2006) by the eddy covariance (EC) technique at the Horseshoe Lake tree kill (HLTK), Mammoth Mountain, CA, a site with complex terrain and high, spatially heterogeneous CO2 emission rates. EC CO2 fluxes ranged from 218 to 3500 g m- 2 d- 1 (mean = 1346 g m- 2 d- 1). Using footprint modeling, EC CO2 fluxes were compared to CO2 fluxes measured by

331

Flux noise in high-temperature superconductors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Spontaneously created vortex-antivortex pairs are the predominant source of flux noise in high-temperature superconductors. In principle, flux noise measurements allow to check theoretical predictions for both the distribution of vortex-pair sizes and for the vortex diffusivity. In this paper the flux-noise power spectrum is calculated for the highly anisotropic high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+?, both for bulk crystals and for ultrathin films. The spectrum is basically given by the Fourier transform of the temporal magnetic-field correlation function. We start from a Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless-type theory and incorporate vortex diffusion, intrapair vortex interaction, and annihilation of pairs by means of a Fokker-Planck equation to determine the noise spectrum below and above the superconducting transition temperature. We find white noise at low frequencies ? and a spectrum proportional to 1/?3/2 at high frequencies. The crossover frequency between these regimes strongly depends on temperature. The results are compared with earlier results of computer simulations.

Carsten Timm

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Divertor Heat Flux Mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly-shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6 MW m{sup -2} to 0.5-2 MW m{sup -2} in small-ELM 0.8-1.0 MA, 4-6 MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

Soukhanovskii, V A; Maingi, R; Gates, D A; Menard, J E; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L; Bell, M G; Bell, R E; Boedo, J A; Bush, C E; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Mueller, D

2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method for extracting and sequestering carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO.sub.2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO.sub.2 from a gaseous environment.

Rau, Gregory H. (Castro Valley, CA); Caldeira, Kenneth G. (Livermore, CA)

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

334

Capture of carbon dioxide by hybrid sorption  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition, process and system for capturing carbon dioxide from a combustion gas stream. The composition has a particulate porous support medium that has a high volume of pores, an alkaline component distributed within the pores and on the surface of the support medium, and water adsorbed on the alkaline component, wherein the proportion of water in the composition is between about 5% and about 35% by weight of the composition. The process and system contemplates contacting the sorbent and the flowing gas stream together at a temperature and for a time such that some water remains adsorbed in the alkaline component when the contact of the sorbent with the flowing gas ceases.

Srinivasachar, Srivats

2014-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

335

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

SciTech Connect

Many analysts identify carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas Research and Development Programme cited separation costs from $35 to $264 per tonne of CO2 avoided for a conventional coal fired power plant utilizing existing capture technologies. Because these costs equate to a greater than 40% increase in current power generation rates, it appears obvious that a significant improvement in CO2 separation technology is required if a negative impact on the world economy is to be avoided.

Raterman, Kevin Thomas; Mc Kellar, Michael George; Turner, Terry Donald; Podgorney, Anna Kristine; Stacey, Douglas Edwin; Stokes, B.; Vranicar, J.

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect

The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical model.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Carbon dioxide capture and storage: Seven years after the IPCC special report  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) entails separating carbon dioxide from coal-, biomass- or gas ... or other large industrial sources, transporting the carbon dioxide by pipeline, injecting it deep undergr...

Haroon Kheshgi; Heleen de Coninck…

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas extinction. We retrieve ozone and nitrogen dioxide number densities and aerosol extinction from transmission), Retrieval of ozone and nitrogen dioxide concentrations from Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III

339

6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

6/4/2013 Page 1 of 12 Nitrogen Dioxide SOP Standard Operating Procedures Nitrogen Dioxide and Nitric Oxide Print a copy and insert into your laboratory the precautions and safe handling procedures for the use of Nitrogen Dioxide

Cohen, Ronald C.

340

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

Haak, Hein

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Study of stellar wind energy flux: from the Sun to Beltegeuse  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study examines the solar wind energy flux from 17 years of Ulysses measurements at different heliolatitudes completed by multi?instrument observations. The solar wind energy flux is almost constant nearly independant on wind speed and solar activity. We then compare the energy flux of the Sun to the stellar wind fluxes in addition to the luminosity fluxes from young stars to supergiants. A share processus of origin and acceleration of the main?sequence stars and cool giants’ winds is suggested. T?Tauri stars’winds show a possible result of an accretion powered wind.

G. Le Chat; N. Meyer?Vernet; K. Issautier

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Adsorption of methane and carbon dioxide on gas shale and pure mineral samples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We have measured methane and carbon dioxide adsorption isotherms at 40 °C on gas shale samples from the Barnett, Eagle Ford, Marcellus and Montney reservoirs. Carbon dioxide isotherms were included to assess its potential for preferential adsorption, with implications for its use as a fracturing fluid and/or storage in depleted shale reservoirs. To better understand how the individual mineral constituents that comprise shales contribute to adsorption, measurements were made on samples of pure carbon, illite and kaolinite as well. We were able to successfully fit all adsorption data for both gases in accordance with a Langmuir isotherm model. Our results show carbon dioxide to have approximately 2–3 times the adsorptive capacity of methane in both the pure mineral constituents and actual shale samples. In addition to obvious microstructural and compositional differences between real rocks and pure minerals, we hypothesize that water adsorption plays an important role in regulating surface area availability for other molecules to adsorb. The resultant volumetric swelling strain was also measured as a function of pressure/adsorption. We observe both clay and pure carbon to swell an amount that is approximately linearly proportional to the amount of adsorption.

Robert Heller; Mark Zoback

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Parametric amplification by coupled flux qubits  

SciTech Connect

We report parametric amplification of a microwave signal in a Kerr medium formed from superconducting qubits. Two mutually coupled flux qubits, embedded in the current antinode of a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator, are used as a nonlinear element. Shared Josephson junctions provide the qubit-resonator coupling, resulting in a device with a tunable Kerr constant (up to 3?×?10{sup ?3}) and a measured gain of about 20?dB. This arrangement represents a unit cell which can be straightforwardly extended to a quasi one-dimensional quantum metamaterial with large tunable Kerr nonlinearity, providing a basis for implementation of wide-band travelling wave parametric amplifiers.

Rehák, M.; Neilinger, P.; Grajcar, M. [Department of Experimental Physics, Comenius University, SK-84248 Bratislava (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Slovak Academy of Science, 845 11 Bratislava (Slovakia); Oelsner, G.; Hübner, U.; Meyer, H.-G. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Il'ichev, E. [Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, P.O. Box 100239, D-07702 Jena (Germany); Novosibirsk State Technical University, 20 K. Marx Ave., 630092 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

344

Thermality of the Hawking flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

Matt Visser

2014-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

345

Role of Pyrazine-N,N?-dioxide in [W(CN)8]n?-Based Hybrid Networks: Anion?? Interactions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Role of Pyrazine-N,N?-dioxide in [W(CN)8]n?-Based Hybrid Networks: Anion?? Interactions ... The cyanide-bridged skeleton shows mixed square-octagonal grid type topology. ... Magnetic measurements were performed using the equipment purchased from the Large Research Infrastructure Fund of the Polish Ministry of Science and Higher Education (decision no. ...

Robert Podgajny; Dawid Pinkowicz; Bernard Czarnecki; Marcin Kozie?; Szymon Chor??y; Magdalena Wis; Wojciech Nitek; Micha? Rams; Barbara Sieklucka

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

346

Carbon dioxide adsorption and methanation on ruthenium  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption and methanation of carbon dioxide on a ruthenium-silica catalyst were studied using temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) and temperature-programmed reaction (TPR). Carbon dioxide adsorption was found to be activated; CO/sub 2/ adsorption increased significantly as the temperature increased from 298 to 435 K. During adsorption, some of the CO/sub 2/ dissociated to carbon monoxide and oxygen; upon hydrogen exposure at room temperature, the oxygen reacted to water. Methanation of adsorbed CO and of adsorbed CO/sub 2/, using TPR in flowing hydrogen, yielded a CH/sub 4/ peak with a peak temperature of 459 K for both adsorbates, indicating that both reactions follow the same mechanism after adsorption. This peak temperature did not change with initial surface coverage of CO, indicating that methanation is first order in CO coverage. The desorption and reaction spectra for Ru/SiO/sub 2/ were similar to those previously obtained for Ni/SiO/sub 2/, but both CO/sub 2/ formation and CH/sub 4/ formation proceeded faster on Ru. Also, the details of CO desorption and the changes in CO/sub 2/ and CO desorptions with initial coverage were different on the two metals. 5 figures, 3 tables.

Zagli, E.; Falconer, J.L.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Materials Compatibility and Aging for Flux and Cleaner Combinations.  

SciTech Connect

A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

Archuleta, Kim; Piatt, Rochelle

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

349

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902836  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.200902836 Highly Selective CO2 Capture in Flexible 3D Coordination Polymer Networks** Hye-Sun Choi and Myunghyun Paik Suh* Carbon dioxide capture has been warming, and the development of efficient methods for capturing CO2 from industrial flue gas has become

Paik Suh, Myunghyun

350

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study by Anusha Kothandaraman Students #12;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture by Chemical Absorption: A Solvent Comparison Study by Anusha with electricity generation accounting for 40% of the total1 . Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is one

351

Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

i Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Topical Report Prepared Pilot Plant Study of Carbon Dioxide Capture by Aqueous Monoethanolamine Ross Edward Dugas, M capture using monoethanolamine (MEA). MEA is an appropriate choice for a baseline study since

Rochelle, Gary T.

352

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000431  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture DOI: 10.1002/anie.201000431 Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New] Carbon capture and storage (CCS) schemes embody a group of technologies for the capture of CO2 from power to the atmosphere could be reduced by 80­90% for a modern conventional power plant equipped with carbon capture

353

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application Arthur VALLERON a,b , Christophe, Engineering Materials Department The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

354

Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, USA ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes the results of an investigation on carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in concrete. Concrete mixtures were not air entrained. Concrete mixtures were made containing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

355

Method for synthesis of titanium dioxide nanotubes using ionic liquids  

SciTech Connect

The invention is directed to a method for producing titanium dioxide nanotubes, the method comprising anodizing titanium metal in contact with an electrolytic medium containing an ionic liquid. The invention is also directed to the resulting titanium dioxide nanotubes, as well as devices incorporating the nanotubes, such as photovoltaic devices, hydrogen generation devices, and hydrogen detection devices.

Qu, Jun; Luo, Huimin; Dai, Sheng

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

356

Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in Bacteriological Incubators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in...Method for Increasing Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide in...experience with water-jacket incubators...that the area of water used be the maximum...does not create condensation. For culturing...was made of the recovery of Mycobacterium...

Alfred G. Karslon; Patrick E. Caskey

1969-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide, Global Warming, and Michael Crichton's "State of Fear" Bert W. Rust Mathematical- tioned the connection between global warming and increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide by pointing out of these plots to global warming have spilled over to the real world, inviting both praise [4, 17] and scorn [15

Rust, Bert W.

358

The surface science of titanium dioxide Ulrike Diebold*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The surface science of titanium dioxide Ulrike Diebold* Department of Physics, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70118, USA Manuscript received in final form 7 October 2002 Abstract Titanium dioxide is reviewed on the adsorption and reaction of a wide variety of inorganic molecules (H2, O2, H2O, CO, CO2, N2

Diebold, Ulrike

359

Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Super-Eddington Fluxes During Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been known for nearly three decades that the energy spectra of thermonuclear X-ray bursts are often well fit by Planck functions with temperatures so high that they imply a super-Eddington radiative flux at the emitting surface, even during portions of bursts when there is no evidence of photospheric radius expansion. This apparent inconsistency is usually set aside by assuming that the flux is actually sub-Eddington and that the fitted temperature is so high because the spectrum has been distorted by the energy-dependent opacity of the atmosphere. Here we show that the spectra predicted by currently available conventional atmosphere models appear incompatible with the highest precision measurements of burst spectra made using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, such as during the 4U 1820–30 superburst and a long burst from GX 17+2. In contrast, these measurements are well fit by Bose-Einstein spectra with high temperatures and modest chemical potentials. Such spectra are very similar to Planck spectra. They imply surface radiative fluxes more than a factor of 3 larger than the Eddington flux. We find that segments of many other bursts from many sources are well fit by similar Bose-Einstein spectra, suggesting that the radiative flux at the emitting surface also exceeds the Eddington flux during these segments. We suggest that burst spectra can closely approximate Bose-Einstein spectra and have fluxes that exceed the Eddington flux because they are formed by Comptonization in an extended, low-density radiating gas supported by the outward radiation force and confined by a tangled magnetic field.

Stratos Boutloukos; M. Coleman Miller; Frederick K. Lamb

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

ORNL/CDIAC-143 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U Prepared by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY Oak Ridge

362

Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitrogen dioxide based on a widely tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Faraday rotation spectroscopy of nitrogen dioxide based on a widely tunable external cavity quantum: Faraday Rotation Spectroscopy, external-cavity quantum cascade laser, nitrogen dioxide, trace

363

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide /...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces Synchrotron X-ray Studies of Super-critical Carbon Dioxide Reservoir Rock Interfaces...

364

Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Emerging Technologies » Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project Carbon Dioxide Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project The U.S. Department of Energy is currently conducting research into carbon dioxide (CO2) heat pump water heaters. This project will employ innovative techniques to adapt water heating technology to meet U.S. market requirements, including specifications, cost, and performance targets. Carbon dioxide is a refrigerant with a global warming potential (GWP) of 1. The CO2 heat pump water heater research seeks to develop an improved life cycle climate performance compared to conventional refrigerants. For example, R134a, another type of refrigerant, has a GWP of 1,300. Project Description This project seeks to develop a CO2-based heat pump water heater (HPWH)

365

Microbial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Conversion to Methane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent conversion to Methane By Nirupam Pal Associate Professor California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Email : npal@calpoly.edu Phone : (805) 756-1355 INTRODUCTION The rising level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been of growing concern in recent years. The increasing levels of carbon dioxide, the most dominant component of greenhouse gases, contribute to global warming and changing global weather patterns which could potentially lead to catastrophic events that could threaten life in every form on this planet. The level of carbon dioxide in the worlds atmosphere has increased from about 280 ppm in 1850 to the current level of approximately 350 ppm. There are several natural sources and sinks of

366

DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands May 14, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - As a complementary document to the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada issued in November 2008, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has now released a report that provides an initial estimate of the potential to store carbon dioxide (CO2) underneath millions of acres of Federal lands. The report, Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands, estimates and characterizes the storage potential that lies beneath some of the more than 400 million acres of Federal land available for lease.

367

Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Innovative Concepts for Beneficial Reuse of Carbon Dioxide Funding for 12 projects to test innovative concepts for the beneficial use of carbon dioxide (CO2) was announced by the U.S. Department of Energy. The awards are part of $1.4 billion in funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for projects that will capture carbon dioxide from industrial sources. These 12 projects will engage in a first phase feasibility study that will examine beneficial uses in a variety of ways, including mineralization to carbonates directly through conversion of CO2 in flue gas; the use of CO2 from power plants or industrial applications to grow algae/biomass; and conversion of CO2 to fuels and chemicals. Each project will be subject to

368

Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

Perry, Robert James (Niskayuna, NY); Lewis, Larry Neil (Scotia, NY); O'Brien, Michael Joseph (Clifton Park, NY); Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev (Latham, NY); Kniajanski, Sergei (Clifton Park, NY); Lam, Tunchiao Hubert (Clifton Park, NY); Lee, Julia Lam (Niskayuna, NY); Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona (Ballston Spa, NY)

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

369

Haverford Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haverford College Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer August 1, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Hopper Rebecca Raber, rraber@haverford.edu, +1 610 896 1038 gtoc.jpg Carbon dioxide gas separation is important for many environmental and energy applications. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to characterize a two-dimensional hydrocarbon polymer, PG-ES1, that uses a combination of surface adsorption and narrow pores to separate carbon dioxide from nitrogen, oxygen, and methane gases. Image by Joshua Schrier, Haverford College. Carbon dioxide is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activities, such as the combustion of fossil fuels for energy and

370

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

371

JOURNALDE PHYSIQUE Colloque C6, supplkment au no 8, Tome 39, aolit 1978,page C6-619 FLUX-FLOW VOLTAGE PULSES I N SUPERCONDUCTORS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

tension pnoduite par le mou- vement d'un vortex ou tube de flux. Abstract.- A new theoretical method for the calculation of the measured voltage pulse produced by a moving flux vortex or flux tube is described the superconductor, the lo- + cal flux density contribution bi from vortex i is large only within about XB

Boyer, Edmond

372

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...generated by a column of water of equal height to...commonly filled with water and is connected...tortuously, to the ground surface. However...integrity and the remediation of abandoned wells...flux through the ground surface or seabed...build-up in lake waters can be monitored...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Eddy covariance fluxes and vertical concentration gradient measurements of NO and NO[subscript 2] over a ponderosa pine ecosystem: observational evidence for within-canopy chemical removal of NO[subscript x  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exchange of NO[subscript x] (NO+NO[subscript 2]) between the atmosphere and biosphere is important for air quality, climate change, and ecosystem nutrient dynamics. There are few direct ecosystem-scale measurements of the ...

Min, K.-E.

374

Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost open-path Instrument for Low Cost open-path Instrument for monItorIng atmospherIC Carbon DIoxIDe at sequestratIon sItes Background Growing concern over the effect on global climate of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere may lead to the curtailment of CO 2 emissions. One potential course of action by industry to reduce GHG emissions is the subsurface disposal of CO 2 . An important requirement of such disposal is verification that the injected gases remain in place and do not leak to the surface. Perhaps the most direct evidence of a successful sequestration project is the lack of a detectable CO 2 concentration above the background level in the air near the ground. Although measurement of CO 2 concentration can be performed, it is

375

Acoustically sensing the presence of methane and carbon dioxide in underground coal mine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A WSN can be used to continuously sense monitor and transmit data to a centralized control station in a under ground coal mine. A fact limiting the possibility is the presence of highly humid condition in UG coal mines. Current sensors cannot work continuously over prolonged period in UG coal mine environment. This paper describes a multi-aspect data fusion approach for acoustical sensors which make it possible to measure the build up of methane and carbon dioxide in UG coal mine environment. Suggested approach takes time of flight phase and attenuation of sonic pulses to determine the build up of methane and carbon dioxide. Suggested approach is more power efficient in comparison to existing sensors. A temperature sensor is used to accommodate change in characteristics of sonic pulses.

A. Singh; M. Radhakrishna

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nitrous Oxide Fluxes from the Gulf of Mexico "Dead Zone" Primary Investigator: Craig Stow -NOAA GLERL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forecasts require accurate estimates of greenhouse gas emission rates. Currently, there are few measurements Management Research Laboratory Overview Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming oxide is a potent greenhouse gas with a global warming potential ~300 times that of carbon dioxide

377

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Monitoring of nitrogen dioxide in and around an  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Recognising that nitrogen dioxide (NO2) may be the primary air contaminant released from an Oman liquid natural gas (LNG) plant, this study has been designed with emphasis on this pollutant. The dispersion of NO2 was examined and compared with measured data during the period from 23 February to 1 April 2001. The observed concentrations were obtained by using NO2 diffusion tubes to monitor the spatial distribution of NO2 concentrations around at four sites downwind of the plant site. The Industrial Source Complex Short-Term (ISCST) dispersion model was used to predict concentrations at the same sites and for the same time period. Evaluation of the results showed that the model predicted concentrations lower than those observed. However, the comparisons showed that the relationship between the modelled and measured concentrations was consistent. The model also allows the detailed description of predicted concentrations in contour map form. Generally, the predicted concentrations were found to be lower than the permissible limit values, with the maximum ground-level concentrations being found much closer to the plant. On the basis of this study, it can be stated that the Oman LNG plant would not cause any significant deterioration in air quality.

Sabah A. Abdul-Wahab

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Measurements - Ion Beams - Radiation Effects Facility / Cyclotron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Beams Available Beams Beam Change Times Measurements Useful Graphs Measurements The beam uniformity and flux are determined using an array of five detectors. Each...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Layered solid sorbents for carbon dioxide capture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid sorbent for the capture and the transport of carbon dioxide gas is provided having at least one first layer of a positively charged material that is polyethylenimine or poly(allylamine hydrochloride), that captures at least a portion of the gas, and at least one second layer of a negatively charged material that is polystyrenesulfonate or poly(acryclic acid), that transports the gas, wherein the second layer of material is in juxtaposition to, attached to, or crosslinked with the first layer for forming at least one bilayer, and a solid substrate support having a porous surface, wherein one or more of the bilayers is/are deposited on the surface of and/or within the solid substrate. A method of preparing and using the solid sorbent is provided.

Li, Bingyun; Jiang, Bingbing; Gray, McMahan L; Fauth, Daniel J; Pennline, Henry W; Richards, George A

2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

382

The lifetime of excess atmospheric carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Since the beginning of the industrial revolution human activity has significantly altered biogeochemical cycling on a global scale. The uncertainties of future climate change rests partly on issues of physical-climate system dynamics and their representation in general circulation models. However understanding the carbon cycle is a key to comprehending the changing terrestrial biosphere and to developing a reasonable range of future concentrations of greenhouse gases. The authors look at correction of model uncertainties in the examination of the lifetime of carbon dioxide. The two difficulties analysed are as follows: (1) most model-derived estimates of the relaxation of the concentration of CO2 reveal a function which is not always well approximated by weighted sums of exponentials; (2) the function c(t) is quite sensitive to assumptions about the terrestrial biosphere and the relaxation experiment. 51 refs., 15 figs., 7 tabs.

Moore, B. III; Braswell, B.H. (Univ. of New Hampshire, Durham, NH (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

What do we (not) know theoretically about solar neutrino fluxes?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar model predictions of 8B and p-p neutrinos agree with the experimentally-determined fluxes (including oscillations): phi(pp)_{measured} = (1.02 +- 0.02 +- 0.01)phi(pp)_{theory}, and phi(8B)_{measured} =(0.88 +- .04 +- 0.23)phi(8B)_{theory}, 1 sigma experimental and theoretical uncertainties, respectively. We use improved input data for nuclear fusion reactions, the equation of state, and the chemical composition of the Sun. The solar composition is the dominant uncertainty in calculating the 8B and CNO neutrino fluxes; the cross section for the 3He(4He, gamma)7Be reaction is the largest uncertainty for the calculated 7Be neutrino flux.

John N. Bahcall; M. H. Pinsonneault

2004-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

384

On the Chaotic Flux Dynamics in a Long Josephson Junction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux dynamics in an annular long Josephson junction is studied. Three main topics are covered. The first is chaotic flux dynamics and its prediction via Melnikov integrals. It turns out that DC current bias cannot induce chaotic flux dynamics, while AC current bias can. The existence of a common root to the Melnikov integrals is a necessary condition for the existence of chaotic flux dynamics. The second topic is on the components of the global attractor and the bifurcation in the perturbation parameter measuring the strength of loss, bias and irregularity of the junction. The global attractor can contain co-existing local attractors e.g. a local chaotic attractor and a local regular attractor. In the infinite dimensional phase space setting, the bifurcation is very complicated. Chaotic attractors can appear and disappear in a random fashion. Three types of attractors (chaos, breather, spatially uniform and temporally periodic attractor) are identified. The third topic is ratchet effect. Ratchet effect can be achieved by a current bias field which corresponds to an asymmetric potential, in which case the flux dynamics is ever lasting chaotic. When the current bias field corresponds to a symmetric potential, the flux dynamics is often transiently chaotic, in which case the ratchet effect disappears after sufficiently long time.

Z. C. Feng; Y. Charles Li

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

385

Intraosseous Venography with Carbon Dioxide in Percutaneous Vertebroplasty: Carbon Dioxide Retention in Renal Veins  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the present study was to determine the frequency of gas retention in the renal vein following carbon dioxide intraosseous venography in the prone position and, while citing references, to examine its onset mechanisms. All percutaneous vertebroplasties performed at our hospital from January to December 2005 were registered and retrospectively analyzed. Of 43 registered procedures treating 79 vertebrae, 28 procedures treating 54 vertebrae were analyzed. Vertebral intraosseous venography was performed using carbon dioxide as a contrast agent in all percutaneous vertebroplasty procedures. In preoperative and postoperative vertebral CT, gas retention in the renal vein and other areas was assessed. Preoperative CT did not show gas retention (0/28 procedures; 0%). Postoperative CT confirmed gas retention in the renal vein in 10 of the 28 procedures (35.7%). Gas retention was seen in the right renal vein in 8 procedures (28.6%), in the left renal vein in 5 procedures (17.9%), in the left and right renal veins in 3 procedures (10.7%), in vertebrae in 22 procedures (78.6%), in the soft tissue around vertebrae in 14 procedures (50.0%), in the spinal canal in 12 procedures (42.9%), and in the subcutaneous tissue in 5 procedures (17.9%). In conclusion, in our study, carbon dioxide gas injected into the vertebra frequently reached and remained in the renal vein.

Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: kome64@yo.rim.or.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo; Tokuda, Takanori; Nomura, Motoo; Terada, Jiro; Kamata, Minoru; Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

388

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

SciTech Connect

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Terpolymerization of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a high molecular weight terpolymer of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide stable to 280.degree. C. and containing as little as 36 mol % ethylene and about 41-51 mol % sulfur dioxide; and to the method of producing said terpolymer by irradiation of a liquid and gaseous mixture of ethylene, sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide by means of Co-60 gamma rays or an electron beam, at a temperature of about 10.degree.-50.degree. C., and at a pressure of about 140 to 680 atmospheres, to initiate polymerization.

Johnson, Richard (Shirley, NY); Steinberg, Meyer (Huntington Station, NY)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy loss characteristics of heavy ions in nitrogen, carbon dioxide, argon, hydrocarbon gases and tradescantia tissue

Dennis, J A

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and carbon dioxide. Introduction Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from the burning of fossil fuels 20 metric tons of carbon dioxide per capita are released annually into the atmosphere.1a,b CarbonStorage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks

Yaghi, Omar M.

392

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 Carbon Flux to the Atmosphere From Land-use Changes: 1850 to 1990 (NDP-050/R1) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.ndp050 data Data PDF PDF The PDF of NDP-050/R1 (body of report, plus appendices A through E) and tellus51b.pdf (Appendix F, reprint of Houghton paper in Tellus, Vol. 51B; copyright 1999 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and reprinted with kind permission from the publisher) Contributors Richard A. Houghton Joseph L. Hackler The Woods Hole Research Center Woods Hole, Massachusetts Please Note: Revised data through the year 2000 are available in CDIAC's Trends Online. Prepared by Robert M. Cushman Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Environmental Sciences Division Publication No. 5054 Date Published: February 2001 Prepared for the Environmental Sciences Division Office of Biological and Environmental Research

393

Innovative Geothermal Startup Will Put Carbon Dioxide To Good Use |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geothermal Startup Will Put Carbon Dioxide To Good Use Geothermal Startup Will Put Carbon Dioxide To Good Use Innovative Geothermal Startup Will Put Carbon Dioxide To Good Use March 17, 2011 - 2:09pm Addthis A basic overview of GreenFire's process to convert CO2 into electricity. | Photo courtesy of GreenFire. A basic overview of GreenFire's process to convert CO2 into electricity. | Photo courtesy of GreenFire. JoAnn Milliken What does this project do? GreenFire Energy will conduct the first field demonstration of a CO2-based geothermal system. Getting geothermal power with CO2 instead of water would be particularly beneficial in the arid Southwestern U.S., where water is scarce. Geothermal power holds enormous opportunities to provide affordable, clean energy that avoids greenhouse gases like carbon dioxide (CO2). That's

394

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/biogenic_emissions.html Cost: Free References: EPA, 40 CFR Part 60[1] Tailoring Rule[2] Biogenic Emissions[3] The 'EPA Climate Change - Green House Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide

395

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 107. Carbn dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2004 and 2030 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at

396

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

397

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics May 20, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Novomer’s thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Novomer's thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Why is this important? By using CO2 that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere, the process has the potential to cut greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously reducing petroleum consumption and producing useful products for American consumers. The world's first successful large-scale production of a polypropylene carbonate (PPC) polymer using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) as a key raw material has resulted from a projected funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy.

398

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) Carbon Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting The purpose of this law is to: Establish a legal and regulatory framework for the permitting of carbon dioxide sequestration operations; Designate a state agency responsible for establishing standards and

399

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks | Center for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture in Metal-Organic Frameworks Previous Next List Kenji Sumida , David L. Rogow , Jarad A. Mason , Thomas M. McDonald , Eric D. Bloch , Zoey R. Herm , Tae-Hyun...

400

A versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

versatile metal-organic framework for carbon dioxide capture and cooperative catalysis Previous Next List Jinhee Park, Jian-Rong Li, Ying-Pin Chen, Jiamei Yu, Andrey A. Yakovenko,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Carbon dioxide capture under ambient conditions using 2-chloroethylamine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is the first case applying 2-haloethylamine to CO2 capture. The prospect of global warming and the urgent need to reduce atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide has prompted actions at many levels. The c...

Junhua Wang; Xiqin Zhang; Yun Zhou

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon dioxide capture-related gas adsorption and separation in metal-organic frameworks Previous Next List Jian-Rong Li, Yuguang Ma, M. Colin McCarthy, Julian Sculley, Jiamei Yu,...

403

Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials | Center...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture: Prospects for New Materials Previous Next List D. M. D'Alessandro, B. Smit, and J. R. Long, Angew. Chem.-Int. Edit. 49 (35), 6058 (2010) DOI: 10.1002...

404

Ownership of Carbon Dioxide Captured by Clean Coal Project (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation stipulates that the Railroad Commission of Texas automatically acquires the title to any carbon dioxide captured by a clean coal project in the state. The Bureau of Economic...

405

Carbon dioxide dissolution in structural and stratigraphic traps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO[subscript 2]) in structural and stratigraphic traps is a viable option to reduce anthropogenic emissions. While dissolution of the CO[subscript 2] stored in these traps ...

Hesse, M. A.

406

Manganese carbonate additive for manganese dioxide-containing nonaqueous cells  

SciTech Connect

A nonaqueous cell employing a manganese dioxide-containing solid cathode having a minor amount of manganese carbonate to improve the pulse voltage capability of the cell at low temperatures such as -10/sup 0/ C.

Langan, R.A.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Electrochemically-mediated amine regeneration for carbon dioxide separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a new strategy for carbon dioxide (CO?) separations based on amine sorbents, which are electrochemically-mediated to facilitate the desorption and regeneration steps of the separation cycle. The ...

Stern, Michael C. (Michael Craig)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Syngas Production Using Carbon Dioxide Reforming: Fundamentals and Perspectives  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Syngas can be produced from a variety of different hydrocarbon molecules by the catalysed reaction with steam, carbon dioxide or oxygen (or with various combinations of these) at high temperatures. This chapte...

Julian R. H. Ross

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Do Consumers Select Food Products Based on Carbon Dioxide Emissions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates whether consumers select foods based on the levels of carbon dioxide emissions by a real choice experiment. Respondents are...2 emissions under no monetary incentives. The willingness to.....

Keiko Aoki; Kenju Akai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in different sectors in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we analyze differences in per capita carbon dioxide emissions from 1996 to 2010 in six sectors across 28 provinces in China and examine the ?-convergence, stochastic convergence and ?-convergence of these emissions. We also investigate the factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector. The results show that per capita carbon dioxide emissions in all sectors converged across provinces from 1996 to 2010. Factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector vary: GDP (gross domestic product) per capita, industrialization process and population density impact convergence in the Industry sector, while GDP per capita and population density impact convergence in the Transportation, Storage, Postal, and Telecommunications Services sector. Aside from GDP per capita and population density, trade openness also impacts convergence in the Wholesale, Retail, Trade, and Catering Service sector. Population density is the only factor that impacts convergence in the Residential Consumption sector.

Juan Wang; Kezhong Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

By the Numbers: A Visual Chronicle of Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-eq.) emissions are now considered a de facto indicator ... this chapter highlights the size and scope of carbon emissions at multiple levels—countries, cities, industrial...

Tonya Boone; Ram Ganeshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The effect of the Kyoto Protocol on carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the impact of the Kyoto Protocol on world emissions of a greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. We use a large unbalanced panel data ... the effects of the international agreement. While carbon

Risa Kumazawa; Michael S. Callaghan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Optical properties of nanostructured silicon-rich silicon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have conducted a study of the optical properties of sputtered silicon-rich silicon dioxide (SRO) thin films with specific application for the fabrication of erbium-doped waveguide amplifiers and lasers, polarization ...

Stolfi, Michael Anthony

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Control strategies for supercritical carbon dioxide power conversion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The supercritical carbon dioxide (S-C02) recompression cycle is a promising advanced power conversion cycle which couples well to numerous advanced nuclear reactor designs. This thesis investigates the dynamic simulation ...

Carstens, Nathan, 1978-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Demonstration in Developing Countries: Analysis of Key Policy Issues and Barriers Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/15536/carb Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-dioxide-capture-and-storage-de Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance This report discusses the value of carbon capture and storage (CCS)

416

New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control New and Underutilized Technology: Carbon Dioxide Demand Ventilation Control October 4, 2013 - 4:23pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for carbon dioxide (CO2) demand ventilation control within the Federal sector. Benefits Demand ventilation control systems modulate ventilation levels based on current building occupancy, saving energy while still maintaining proper indoor air quality (IAQ). CO2 sensors are commonly used, but a multiple-parameter approach using total volatile organic compounds (TVOC), particulate matter (PM), formaldehyde, and relative humidity (RH) levels can also be used. CO2 sensors control the outside air damper to reduce the amount of outside air that needs to be conditioned and supplied to the building when

417

Figure 3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions" " (million metric tons)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,...

418

Thermal neutron flux contours from criticality event  

SciTech Connect

The generation of thermal neutron flux contours from a criticality event is demonstrated for an idealized building with a criticality event in one of the rooms. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code is used to calculate the thermal neutron flux.

Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Carbon dioxide capture: an assessment of plausible ranges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The projections of energy related carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in the Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) serve as point of departure for an assessment of plausible ranges of CO2 emissions that could be avoided through CO2 capture and storage measures. Scenario and time dependent, sector and fuel specific capture factors are developed for eleven world regions to estimate the proportion of CO2 resulting from fossil fuel and biomass combustion/conversion that might be practical to capture and store. The capture factors are applied to the original CO2 emissions scenarios at a highly disaggregated level. The results are summed up and presented. The results indicate that it might be possible to capture and store a significant quantity of energy related CO2, especially in the second quarter of this century. Yet the amounts of CO2 still being emitted remain considerable, suggesting that other technologies will also be needed if the threat of climate change requires large reductions of CO2 emissions over the next few decades.

Ferenc L. Toth; Hans-Holger Rogner

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

High-flux solar photon processes  

SciTech Connect

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Catalytic Transformation of Waste Catalytic Transformation of Waste Carbon Dioxide into Valuable Products Background Many industrial processes contribute large amounts of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to the earth's atmosphere. In an effort to reduce the amount of CO 2 released to the atmosphere, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is funding efforts to develop CO 2 capture and storage technologies. In addition to permanent storage of CO 2 in underground reservoirs, some

422

Project Profile: 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and its partners, under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), aim to demonstrate a multi-megawatt power cycle using supercritical carbon dioxide (s-CO2) as the working fluid. The use of carbon dioxide instead of steam allows higher power-cycle efficiency and cycle components that are more compact.

423

Tethered catalysts for the hydration of carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided that substantially increases the efficiency of CO.sub.2 capture and removal by positioning a catalyst within an optimal distance from the air-liquid interface. The catalyst is positioned within the layer determined to be the highest concentration of carbon dioxide. A hydrophobic tether is attached to the catalyst and the hydrophobic tether modulates the position of the catalyst within the liquid layer containing the highest concentration of carbon dioxide.

Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Jr., Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Lightstone, Felice C; Stolaroff, Joshuah K

2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

424

Relaxation of spheromak configurations with open flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The relaxation of several kink unstable equilibria with open flux representative of spheromaks sustained by dc helicity injection is studied by means of three-dimensional resistivemagnetohydrodynamic simulations. No external driving is applied but the initial conditions are chosen to reproduce the current profiles existing in a gun driven spheromak which has a high current density in the open flux region and a low current density in the closed flux region. The growth and nonlinear saturation of various unstable modes the dynamo action which converts toroidal flux into poloidal flux and the evolution of the ? profile ( ? = ? 0 J ? B / B 2 ) are studied. An initial condition is found which results in a dynamo that produces enough poloidal flux to compensate the resistive losses occurred during a characteristic time of the instability. The flux amplification factor around which this case oscillates is consistent with existing experimental data. During the relaxation the central open flux tube develops a helical distortion and the closed flux surfaces are destroyed. After the relaxation event close flux surfaces form again but the final profiles are not fully relaxed and the central open flux tube remains distorted. The effect of the Lundquist number on the evolution and its impact on the required level of fluctuations are evaluated. Finally the dynamics of the system for different current levels in the open flux region is studied.

Pablo Luis García-Martínez; Ricardo Farengo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Today's Material Gauss' Law and Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the contents of the box, the box must contain zero net electric charge. Slide 27-31 #12;Gauss' Law and Flux: · The Concept of Flux · Calculating Electric Flux · Symmetry · Gauss's Law · Using Gauss's Law · Conductors that the box must contain net positive electric charge. Slide 27-29 #12;© 2013 Pearson Education, Inc

Ashlock, Dan

426

ARM - Measurement - Trace gas concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration govMeasurementsTrace gas concentration ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Trace gas concentration The amount per unit volume of trace gases other than carbon dioxide, ozone and water vapor, typically measured in conjunction with in situ aerosol measurements, e.g. carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO : Carbon Monoxide Mixing Ratio System

427

Energy flux and dissipation in Luzon Strait: two tales of two Matthew H. Alford  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and 300 m, respectively. Energy fluxes exceeding 60 kW m-1 were measured at spring tide at the western endEnergy flux and dissipation in Luzon Strait: two tales of two ridges Matthew H. Alford Applied-mail: malford@apl.washington.edu 2 #12;ABSTRACT Internal-tide generation, propagation and dissipation

Talley, Lynne D.

428

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids. To this end, we present (1) the physical properties of CO2 key to its transport in the

429

ARM - PI Product - Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & ProductsAtmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics & Radiative Flux 1997.01.01 - 2010.12.31 Site(s) NSA SGP TWP General Description This data product contains atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

430

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Sensitivity of Radiative Fluxes and Heating Rates to Cloud Microphysics S. F. Iacobellis and R. C. J. Somerville Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California G. M. McFarquhar University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Urbana, Illinois D. L. Mitchell Desert Research Institute Reno, Nevada Introduction A single-column model (SCM) is used to examine the sensitivity of basic quantities such as atmospheric radiative heating rates and surface and top of atmosphere (TOA) radiative fluxes to various parameter- izations of clouds and cloud microphysics. The SCM was run at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains (SGP), Tropical Western Pacific (TWP), and North Slope of Alaska (NSA) sites using forcing data derived from forecast products. The forecast

431

Fate of False Vacuum in Superconducting Flux Qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a similarity between the scenario of fate of false vacuum in cosmology at early universe and the situation in where the quantum state decays in superconducting Flux qubit. This is due to the fact that both cases have two homogeneous stable equilibrium states in scalar field, which in quantum theory, could penetrate through the barrier in different possibilities and hence considered unstable decaying in time. In quantum computation, decay rate is among the most important factors in characteristics of the system like coherency, reliability, measurement fidelity, etc. In this considered potential, the decay rate from the penetrating (False vacuum) state to the stable (absolute minimum) state is achieved to leading order in Planck constant by the approach of Instanton model. In case of the superconducting flux qubit having thin barrier potential, the decay rate is calculated and its relations with actual set of parameters in flux qubit design are introduced.

Rad, Ali Izadi; Fardmanesh, Mehdi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Fate of False Vacuum in Superconducting Flux Qubits  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a similarity between the scenario of fate of false vacuum in cosmology at early universe and the situation in where the quantum state decays in superconducting Flux qubit. This is due to the fact that both cases have two homogeneous stable equilibrium states in scalar field, which in quantum theory, could penetrate through the barrier in different possibilities and hence considered unstable decaying in time. In quantum computation, decay rate is among the most important factors in characteristics of the system like coherency, reliability, measurement fidelity, etc. In this considered potential, the decay rate from the penetrating (False vacuum) state to the stable (absolute minimum) state is achieved to leading order in Planck constant by the approach of Instanton model. In case of the superconducting flux qubit having thin barrier potential, the decay rate is calculated and its relations with actual set of parameters in flux qubit design are introduced.

Ali Izadi Rad; Hesam Zandi; Mehdi Fardmanesh

2014-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

433

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge. 3 figures.

Noel, B.W.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

434

Remote high-temperature insulatorless heat-flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A remote optical heat-flux gauge for use in extremely high temperature environments is described. This application is possible because of the use of thermographic phosphors as the sensing media, and the omission of the need for an intervening layer of insulator between phosphor layers. The gauge has no electrical leads, but is interrogated with ultraviolet or laser light. The luminescence emitted by the two phosphor layers, which is indicative of the temperature of the layers, is collected and analyzed in order to determine the heat flux incident on the surface being investigated. The two layers of thermographic phosphor must be of different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. Spatial heat-flux measurements can be made by scanning the light across the surface of the gauge.

Noel, Bruce W. (Espanola, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Scaling and profiles of heat flux during partial detachment in DIII-D  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the scaling of the peak divertor heat flux and total divertor plate power in partially detached divertor (PDD) discharges in DIII-D, as a function of input power and radiated power. The peak divertor heat flux in the attached plasma increases linearly with input power, but saturates in the detached cases. The total divertor plate power remains linear with input power in both the attached and detached plasmas. This is consistent with the fact that the heat flux peak is reduced from the attached case but other areas receive increased radiant heating from the detached plasma. The divertor plate radiant heating is linear with input power because the total radiated power from the entire plasma is a linear function of input power in both attached and detached plasma. In the private flux region, radiated heat flux absorbed on the target plate calculated from bolometer data is enough to account for the measured plate heating. Approximately half of the overall plate heating power in detached plasma is due to absorbed radiation. By mapping the divertor heat flux before and during the PDD to flux coordinates, and comparing with a flux mapping of inserted bolometer and tangential TV data, they have verified that the radiated power is emitted from the same flux surfaces on which heat flux is reduced.

Lasnier, C.J.; Hill, D.N.; Allen, S.L.; Fenstermacher, M.E.; Porter, G.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Leonard, A.W.; Petrie, T.W. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

QUANTIFICATION OF HEAT FLUX FROM A REACTING THERMITE SPRAY  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing the combustion behaviors of energetic materials requires diagnostic tools that are often not readily or commercially available. For example, a jet of thermite spray provides a high temperature and pressure reaction that can also be highly corrosive and promote undesirable conditions for the survivability of any sensor. Developing a diagnostic to quantify heat flux from a thermite spray is the objective of this study. Quick response sensors such as thin film heat flux sensors can not survive the harsh conditions of the spray, but more rugged sensors lack the response time for the resolution desired. A sensor that will allow for adequate response time while surviving the entire test duration was constructed. The sensor outputs interior temperatures of the probes at known locations and utilizes an inverse heat conduction code to calculate heat flux values. The details of this device are discussed and illustrated. Temperature and heat flux measurements of various thermite spray conditions are reported. Results indicate that this newly developed energetic material heat flux sensor provides quantitative data with good repeatability.

Eric Nixon; Michelle Pantoya

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Techniques and Review of Absolute Flux Calibration from the Ultraviolet to the Mid-Infrared  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The measurement of precise absolute fluxes for stellar sources has been pursued with increased vigor since the discovery of the dark energy and the realization that its detailed understanding requires accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of redshifted Ia supernovae in the rest frame. The flux distributions of spectrophotometric standard stars were initially derived from the comparison of stars to laboratory sources of known flux but are now mostly based on calculated model atmospheres. For example, pure hydrogen white dwarf (WD) models provide the basis for the HST CALSPEC archive of flux standards. The basic equations for quantitative spectrophotometry and photometry are explained in detail. Several historical lab based flux calibrations are reviewed; and the SEDs of stars in the major on-line astronomical databases are compared to the CALSPEC reference standard spectrophotometry. There is good evidence that relative fluxes from the visible to the near-IR wavelength of ~2.5 micron are currently accu...

Bohlin, Ralph C; Tremblay, P -E

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

439

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1° distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

SciTech Connect

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric neutrino flux Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a prediction of a measurable flux of extragalactic high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs... used the result from the SuperKamiokande ... Source: Bahcall, John -...

442

TURBULENT HEAT FLUXES ABOVE A SUBURBAN RESERVOIR – A CASE STUDY FROM GERMANY  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the objective of quantifying turbulent sensible (QH) and latent (QE) heat fluxes above a suburban reservoir, a micro-meteorological turbulence measurement campaign using the eddy-covariance technique was carried out between June and November ...

Anja Goldbach; Wilhelm Kuttler

443

Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling page? For detailed information on Gas Flux Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Gas Flux Sampling Add.png Add a new Gas Flux Sampling...

444

Carbon dioxide, the feedstock for using renewable energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Extrapolation of world energy consumption between 1990 and 2007 to the future reveals the complete exhaustion of petroleum, natural gas, uranium and coal reserves on Earth in 2040, 2044, 2049 and 2054, respectively. We are proposing global carbon dioxide recycling to use renewable energy so that all people in the whole world can survive. The electricity will be generated by solar cell in deserts and used to produce hydrogen by seawater electrolysis at t nearby desert coasts. Hydrogen, for which no infrastructures of transportation and combustion exist, will be converted to methane at desert coasts by the reaction with carbon dioxide captured by energy consumers. Among systems in global carbon dioxide recycling, seawater electrolysis and carbon dioxide methanation have not been performed industrially. We created energy-saving cathodes for hydrogen production and anodes for oxygen evolution without chlorine formation in seawater electrolysis, and ideal catalysts for methane formation by the reaction of carbon dioxide with hydrogen. Prototype plant and industrial scale pilot plant have been built.

K Hashimoto; N Kumagai; K Izumiya; Z Kato

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications on the global $\\theta_{13}$ knowledge today. First, Double Chooz, in its final configuration, is the only experiment benefiting from a negligible reactor flux error due to a $\\sim$90\\% geometrical suppression. Second, Daya Bay and RENO could benefit from their partial geometrical cancellation, yielding a potential $\\sim$50\\% error suppression, thus significantly improving the global $\\theta_{13}$ precision today. And third, we illustrate the rationale behind further error suppression upon the exploitation of the inter-reactor error correlations, so far neglected. So, our publication is a key step forward in the context of high precision neutrino reactor experiments providing insight on the suppression of their intrinsic flux error uncertainty, thus affecting past and current experimental results, as well as the design of future experiments.

Andi Cucoanes; Pau Novella; Anatael Cabrera; Muriel Fallot; Anthony Onillon; Michel Obolensky; Frederic Yermia

2015-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Capacitively coupled RF voltage probe having optimized flux linkage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An RF sensor having a novel current sensing probe and a voltage sensing probe to measure voltage and current. The current sensor is disposed in a transmission line to link all of the flux generated by the flowing current in order to obtain an accurate measurement. The voltage sensor is a flat plate which operates as a capacitive plate to sense voltage on a center conductor of the transmission line, in which the measured voltage is obtained across a resistance leg of a R-C differentiator circuit formed by the characteristic impedance of a connecting transmission line and a capacitance of the plate, which is positioned proximal to the center conductor.

Moore, James A. (Powell, TN); Sparks, Dennis O. (Maryville, TN)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

447

Metamaterial anisotropic flux concentrators and magnetic arrays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A metamaterial magnetic flux concentrator is investigated in detail in combination with a Halbach cylinder of infinite length. A general analytical solution to the field is determined and the magnetic figure of merit is determined for a Halbach cylinder with a flux concentrator. It is shown that an ideal flux concentrator will not change the figure of merit of a given magnet design, while the non-ideal will always lower it. The geometric parameters producing maximum figure of merit, i.e. the most efficient devices, are determined. The force and torque between two concentric Halbach cylinders with flux concentrators is determined and the maximum torque is found. Finally, the effect of non-ideal flux concentrators and the practical use of flux concentrators, as well as demagnetization issues, is discussed.

Bjørk, R; Bahl, C R H

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

The ebullition of hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane, carbon dioxide and total gaseous mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gaseous species depends of their solubility in the water. Since CH4 is relatively insoluble, ebullition-product of the respiration and is highly soluble in the water, leading ofte h- 1 . Measurements of H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 trapped gas concentrations and fluxes were used

O'Driscoll, Nelson

449

New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground February 5, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis The Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, Texas, is funded by the Energy Department through the 2009 Recovery Act. It is managed by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo credit Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities. The Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, Texas, is funded by the Energy Department through the 2009 Recovery Act. It is managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo credit Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen

450

NETL: News Release - DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 2009 4, 2009 DOE Report Assesses Potential for Carbon Dioxide Storage Beneath Federal Lands Newly Released Document Complements 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas Washington, D.C. - As a complementary document to the U.S. Department of Energy's Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada issued in November 2008, the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory has now released a report that provides an initial estimate of the potential to store carbon dioxide (CO2) underneath millions of acres of Federal lands. MORE INFO Read the report The report, Storage of Captured Carbon Dioxide Beneath Federal Lands, estimates and characterizes the storage potential that lies beneath some of the more than 400 million acres of Federal land available for lease.

451

New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground New Texas Oil Project Will Help Keep Carbon Dioxide Underground February 5, 2013 - 12:05pm Addthis The Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, Texas, is funded by the Energy Department through the 2009 Recovery Act. It is managed by the Office of Fossil Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo credit Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities. The Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen production facilities in Port Arthur, Texas, is funded by the Energy Department through the 2009 Recovery Act. It is managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory. | Photo credit Air Products and Chemicals hydrogen

452

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

453

Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) Underground storage of natural gas, liquid hydrocarbons, and carbon dioxide (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality regulates the underground storage of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons and carbon dioxide. Prior to the use of any underground reservoir for the storage of natural gas and prior to the exercise of eminent domain by any person, firm, or corporation having such right under laws of the state of Louisiana, the commissioner, shall have found all of the following:

454

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

455

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide cleaning of plutonium parts  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical fluid carbon dioxide is under investigation in this work for use as a cleaning solvent for the final cleaning of plutonium parts. These parts must be free of organic residue to avoid corrosion in the stockpile. Initial studies on stainless steel and full-scale mock-up parts indicate that the oils of interest are easily and adequately cleaned from the metal surfaces with supercritical fluid carbon dioxide. Results from compatibility studies show that undesirable oxidation or other surface reactions are not occurring during exposure of plutonium to the supercritical fluid. Cleaning studies indicate that the oils of interest are removed from the plutonium surface under relatively mild conditions. These studies indicate that supercritical fluid carbon dioxide is a very promising cleaning medium for this application.

Hale, S.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

456

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Surface Flux Intercomparison Between the MM5 Model and Observations During the Storm-Scale Observations Regional Measurement Program-Fronts Experiment Systems Test 1992 J. Dudhia and S. P. Oncley Mesoscale and Microscale Meteorology Division Atmospheric Technology Division National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction Mesoscale model 5 (MM5) is being used as a data assimilation tool for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program. There is a need to verify that the model physics is consistent with observations under a range of conditions. Surface fluxes of heat, moisture, and momentum are a particular area of uncertainty in the model owing to their dependence on surface properties, some of which are time-dependent. The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

457

Gas Hydrate Equilibrium Measurements for Multi-Component Gas Mixtures and Effect of Ionic Liquid Inhibitors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrate inhibition data from a newly commissioned micro bench top reactor, a high-pressure autoclave and a rocking cell. The conditions for hydrate formation for pure methane and carbon dioxide were also measured, for validation purposes. The measured data...

Othman, Enas Azhar

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Capture of green-house carbon dioxide in Portland cement  

SciTech Connect

A novel process has been developed to sequester green-house carbon dioxide produced by the cement industry in precast cement products. Typically, 10--24 wt % of CO{sub 2} produced by calcination of calcium carbonate during clinkering of the cement may be captured. The carbonation process also cures the cement paste within minutes into hard bodies. The process maintains high pH conditions during curing, to allow conventional steel reinforcement of concrete. The process will save time and money to the cement industry, and at the same time, help them to comply with the Clean Air Act by sequestering the green-house carbon dioxide.

Wagh, A.S.; Singh, D.; Pullockaran, J.; Knox, L.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

NOVEL CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR HIGH TEMPERATURE CARBON DIOXIDE SEPARATION  

SciTech Connect

This project is aimed at demonstrating technical feasibility for a lithium zirconate based dense ceramic membrane for separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas at high temperature. The research work conducted in this reporting period was focused on several fundamental issues of lithium zirconate important to the development of the dense inorganic membrane. These fundamental issues include material synthesis of lithium zirconate, phases and microstructure of lithium zirconate and structure change of lithium zirconate during sorption/desorption process. The results show difficulty to prepare the dense ceramic membrane from pure lithium zirconate, but indicate a possibility to prepare the dense inorganic membrane for carbon dioxide separation from a composite lithium zirconate.

Jerry Y.S. Lin; Jun-ichi Ida

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Carbon dioxide effects research and assessment program: flux of organic carbon by rivers to the oceans. [Lead abstract  

SciTech Connect

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 15 papers presented in this workshop report. The state of knowledge about the role of rivers in the transport, storage and oxidation of carbon is the subject of this report. (KRM)

None

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide flux measurement" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Carbon Dioxide Corrosion and Inhibition Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Introduction ­ EIS ­ Tafel · Results · Conclusions · Summary · Future Work · Acknowledgements #12;Background) ­ Tafel plots Electrochemical Cell #12;Introduction · Working electrode ­ high purity iron ­ Polishing = Zreal + Zim Rp 1/Corr Rate #12;Tafel · Measures corrosion rate directly · Measures iCORR from A and C

Petta, Jason

462

Measurement of Thermal Neutron Flux in Photo-Neutron Source  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Photo-Neutron Source (PNS) project is a study ... design, simulation and construction an accelerator based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). The system uses ... medical linear accelerat...

A. Taheri; A. Torkamani; A. Pazirandeh…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Based Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Carbon Dioxide-Based Heat Pump Water Heater Research Project on AddThis.com...

464

SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbo-Expander and Heat Exchangers on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components

465

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant richness

Minnesota, University of

466

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence arbuscular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Seven years of carbon dioxide enrichment, nitrogen fertilization and plant diversity influence by examining the joint effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) enrichment, nitrogen (N) fertilization and plant enrichment, community composition, grassland, niche partitioning hypothesis, nitrogen fertilization, plant

Minnesota, University of

467

Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon Nanoparticle Exposure on Lung Function During: Layachi S, Rogerieux F, Robidel F, Lacroix G, Bayat S (2012) Effet of Combined Nitrogen Dioxide and Carbon

Boyer, Edmond

468

Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Ocean Acidification: The Potential Impacts on Ocean Biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the focus in recent years on the potential impacts of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere linked to anthropogenic activities ... oceans as a consequence of the influx of carbon dioxide absor...

William C. G. Burns

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the potential economic costs of cutting carbon dioxide emissions in Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion activities on economic ... €6,340. More importantly, and since carbon dioxide emissions are l...

Alfredo Marvão Pereira; Rui Manuel Marvão Pereira

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Global carbon dioxide emissions scenarios: Sensitivity to social and technological factors in three regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2100 AD are decomposed ... intensity (energy use per unit GDP) and carbon intensity (carbon dioxide emissions per unit energy). These emissions factors are further subdivided...

Christopher Yang; Stephen H. Schneider

471

Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions Scenarios: Sensitivity to Social and Technological Factors in Three Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2100 AD are decomposed ... intensity (energy use per unit GDP) and carbon intensity (carbon dioxide emissions per unit energy). These emissions factors are further subdivided...

Christopher Yang; Stephen H. Schneider

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Low energy secondary cosmic ray flux (gamma rays) monitoring and its constrains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temporal variation of secondary cosmic rays (SCR) flux was measured during the several full and new moon and days close to them at Department of Physics, University of Mumbai, Mumbai (Geomagnetic latitude: 10.6 N), India. The measurements were done by using NaI (Tl) scintillation detector with energy threshold of 200 keV. The SCR flux shows sudden enhancement for approximately about 2 hour in counts during couple of events out of all experimental observations. The maximum Enhancement SCR flux is about 200% as compared to the diurnal trend of SCR temporal variations. Weather parameters (temperature and relative humidity) were continuously monitored during all observation. The influences of geomagnetic field, interplanetary parameters and tidal effect on SCR flux have been considered. Summed spectra corresponding to enhancement duration indicates appearance of atmospheric radioactivity which shows single gamma ray line. Detail investigation revealed the presence of radioactive Ar 41 . This measurements puts lim...

Raghav, Anil; Yadav, Virendra; Bijewar, Nitinkumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Testing for Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Using a Century of Panel Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper tests the convergence in per-capita carbon dioxide emissions for a collection of developed and developing...

Joakim Westerlund; Syed A. Basher

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Measurements and Calculations on Heliostat Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The HERMES (Heliostat and Receiver Measuring System) has proved to ... for measurements of high solar fluxes from complete heliostat fields. The relevant measured data were heliostat field efficiency, beam qualit...

W. Schiel; G. Lemperle

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog MIT Global warming Carbon mitigation Low carbon energy technologies Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is the only technology that can reduce CO2 emissions

477

Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage 07-003 April 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage by 07-003 April 2007 M.A. de Figueiredo, H.J. Herzog, P.L. Joskow, K.A. Oye, and D.M. Reiner #12;#12;Regulating Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage M.A. de to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal

478

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis Ram Chandra Sekar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar;2 #12;3 Carbon Dioxide Capture in Coal-Fired Power Plants: A Real Options Analysis by Ram Chandra Sekar technologies are valued using the "real options" valuation methodology in an uncertain carbon dioxide (CO2

479

An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy- ture,'' which refers to the direct removal of carbon dioxide from the ambient air. Air capture has to be changing (e.g., Jones, 2008). By contrast, the capture and storage of carbon dioxide from power plants has

Colorado at Boulder, University of

480

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scaling up carbon dioxide capture and storage: From megatons to gigatons Howard J. Herzog MIT warming Carbon mitigation Low carbon energy technologies Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) Carbon. Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a process consisting of the separation of CO2

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481

Interference of a short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide with allergic airways responses to allergenic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interference of a short-term exposure to nitrogen dioxide with allergic airways responses, 4 (2002) 251-260" DOI : 10.1080/096293502900000113 #12;Abstract Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is a common and may depend to concentration of pollutant. Keywords: Mouse model of asthma; nitrogen dioxide; air

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

482

Clathrate hydrate equilibrium data for the gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Clathrate hydrate equilibrium data for the gas mixture of carbon dioxide and nitrogen the mole fraction of CO2 in the carbon dioxide + nitrogen + cyclopentane mixed hydrate phase, both defined;2 {water +carbon dioxide + nitrogen}, the equilibrium pressure of the mixed hydrate is reduced by 0.95 up

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

483

Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring Instrument  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring; published 28 August 2008. [1] We present an approach to infer ground-level nitrogen dioxide (NO2), Ground-level nitrogen dioxide concentrations inferred from the satellite-borne Ozone Monitoring

Martin, Randall

484

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates be inferred for important trace gases such as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chemical transport models.11 to 3.79. Total nitrogen dioxide columns can be retrieved from space in the 405­465 nm window

Haak, Hein

485

A global single-sensor analysis of 20022011 tropospheric nitrogen dioxide trends observed from space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A global single-sensor analysis of 2002­2011 tropospheric nitrogen dioxide trends observed from nitrogen dioxide trends observed from space, J. Geophys. Res., 117, D16309, doi:10.1029/2012JD017571. 1. Introduction [2] Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is one of most prominent air pollutants and is emitted primarily

Haak, Hein

486

Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Click Here for Full Article Indirect validation of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide retrieved from nitrogen dioxide retrieved from the OMI satellite instrument: Insight into the seasonal variation of the hydroxyl radical (OH). Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is an indicator of surface air quality that is associated

Dirksen, Ruud

487

The Implied Cost of Carbon Dioxide under the Cash for Clunkers Christopher R. Knittel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Implied Cost of Carbon Dioxide under the Cash for Clunkers Program Christopher R. Knittel of the implied cost of carbon dioxide reductions under the Cash for Clunker program. The estimates suggest pollutants. Conservative estimates of the implied carbon dioxide cost exceed $365 per ton; best case scenario

Rothman, Daniel

488

Monitoring Molecular Adsorption on High-Area Titanium Dioxide via Modulated Diffraction of Visible Light  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letters Monitoring Molecular Adsorption on High-Area Titanium Dioxide via Modulated Diffraction and evaluation of organic chemical adsorption on various titanium dioxide surfaces. The strategy is illustrated thin films of titanium dioxide (TiO2), with micrometer-sized features, were prepared on transparent

489

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public Utility District  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System Comments submitted by Grant County Public paper: Carbon Dioxide Footprint of the Northwest Power System, dated September 13, 2007. The Grant done a very thorough job of assessing the current and future carbon dioxide footprints of the Northwest

490

Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

A. C. Hayes; Gerard Jungman

2012-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

491

The Solar Wind Power from Magnetic Flux  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Observations of the fast, high-latitude solar wind throughout Ulysses' three orbits show that solar wind power correlates remarkably well with the Sun's total open magnetic flux. These observations support a recent model of the solar wind energy and particle sources, where magnetic flux emergence naturally leads to an energy flux proportional to the strength of the large-scale magnetic field. This model has also been shown to be consistent with X-ray observations of the Sun and a variety of other stars over 12 decades of magnetic flux. The observations reported here show that the Sun delivers ~600 kW Wb?1 to power the solar wind, and that this power to magnetic flux relation has been extremely stable over the last 15 years. Thus, the same law that governs energy released in the corona and from other stars also applies to the total energy in the solar wind.

N. A. Schwadron; D. J. McComas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Supercritical Carbon Dioxide / Reservoir Rock Chemical Interactions Project Description Supercritical CO2 is currently becoming a more common fluid for extracting volatile oil and fragrance compounds from various raw materials that are used in perfumery. Furthermore, its use as a heat transmission fluid is very attractive because of the greater uptake capability of heat from hot reservoir rock, compared with that of water. However, one concern was the reactivity of CO2 with clay and rock minerals in aqueous and non-aqueous environments. So if this reaction leads to the formation of water-soluble carbonates, such formation could be detrimental to the integrity of wellbore infrastructure.

493

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 80. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 80 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 81. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Liquids Combustion by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 81 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

494

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 Figure 75 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 76 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in IEO2007 and IEO2008, 2005-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

495

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

496

www.sciam.com SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN 49 Pumping carbon dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and on substitut- ing noncarbon renewable or nuclear en- ergy sources for fossil fuel (coal, oil and natural gas to be surmountable. Carbon Dioxide Capture the combustion of fossil fuels pro- duces huge quantities of carbon and how these developments might af- fect human health and well-being. Our

O'Donnell, Tom

497

Zinc-catalyzed copolymerization of carbon dioxide and propylene oxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dioxide has recently been paid attention in the field of extraction, separation, and reaction medium, its aptitude for both a reaction solvent and a reactant was examined in zinc glutarate-catalyzed reactions. As a result, it was proved that supercritical...

Katsurao, Takumi

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Carbonation Mechanism of Reservoir Rock by Supercritical Carbon Dioxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Project Objectives: Elucidate comprehensively the carbonation reaction mechanisms between supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) and reservoir rocks consisting of different mineralogical compositions in aqueous and non-aqueous environments at temperatures of up to 250ºC, and to develop chemical modeling of CO2-reservior rock interactions.

499

Carbon dioxide flash-freezing applied to ice cream production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(cont.) Carbon dioxide is recompressed from 1.97 x 106 Pa (285 psi) to 3.96 x 106 Pa (575 psi). The process is scaled by increasing the number of nozzles to accommodate the desired flow rate. Only 165 nozzles are required ...

Peters, Teresa Baker, 1981-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Titanium dioxide based high temperature carbon monoxide selective sensor Nancy O. Savagea , Sheikh as a trap for the oxidation products of CO and CH4. Upon oxidation of CO on ALC, carbonate species were detected, whereas the reaction of CH4 produced negligible carbonate species. The insensitivity of the ALC

Dutta, Prabir K.