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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels (for purposes other than their energy value) create carbon dioxide emissions and also sequester carbon in nonfuel products, ...

2

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

3

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces Title China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and...

4

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide EmissionsCarbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program...

5

Figure 37. Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 37. Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity generation in three cases, 2005-2040 (million metric tons carbon dioxide ...

6

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.into carbon dioxide emissions, we continue to use a factorappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions index, we use conversion factors.conversion factor of pounds of carbon dioxide emitted perappropriate factors to arrive at carbon dioxide emissions.

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

carbon dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dioxide emissions dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Total annual carbon dioxide emissions by country, 2005 to 2009 (million metric tons). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords carbon dioxide emissions EIA world Data text/csv icon total_carbon_dioxide_emissions_from_the_consumption_of_energy_2005_2009million_metric_tons.csv (csv, 12.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

9

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

10

Why do carbon dioxide emissions weigh more than the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Why do carbon dioxide emissions weigh more than the original fuel? Carbon dioxide emissions weigh more than the original fuel because during complete ...

11

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California Title Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in...

12

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Title Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...

13

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California and Spatial Disaggregated Estimate of Energy-related Carbon Dioxide for California...

14

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries Extended discussion here Carbon emissions per capita 1973 vs. 1991 by major end use. (Denmark comparison is 1972 and 1991) With the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto approaching, there is a great deal of excitement over policies designed to reduce future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels. At COP-3, more than 130 nations will meet to create legally binding targets for CO2 reductions. Accordingly, we have analyzed the patterns of emissions arising from the end uses of energy (and electricity production) in ten industrialized countries, with surprising and, in some cases, worrisome results. The surprise is that emissions in many countries in the early 1990s were lower than in the 1970s in an absolute sense and on a per capita basis; the worry

15

Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions --A New Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calculating Residential Carbon Dioxide Emissions -- A New Approach Larry Hughes, Kathleen Bohan to submit an annual national greenhouse gas inventory to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate different sectors and their associated greenhouse gas emissions (principally carbon dioxide, methane

Hughes, Larry

16

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

17

Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 18. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases, 2005-2040 (million metric tons) Extended Policies No Sunset

18

Average prices for spot sulfur dioxide emissions allowances at ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The weighted average spot price for sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions allowances awarded to winning bidders at Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) annual auction on ...

19

Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PNNL-14537 Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results S.J. Smith E;PNNL-14537 Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results PNNL Research Report Joint Global Change Research Institute 8400 Baltimore Avenue College Park, Maryland 20740 #12;PNNL-14537

Hultman, Nathan E.

20

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2010. ” AugustChina’s Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in ManufacturingChina’s Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/biogenic_emissions.html Cost: Free References: EPA, 40 CFR Part 60[1] Tailoring Rule[2] Biogenic Emissions[3] The 'EPA Climate Change - Green House Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide

22

Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Projected (million metric tons) 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008...

25

Figure 5. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in four ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Reference High Oil/Gas Resouce CO2$15 CO2$15HR Released: May 2, 2013 Figure 5. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in four ...

26

World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of carbon dioxide form combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

Schmalensee, Richard

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

World energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions : 1950-2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may contribute to long-term climate change, are projected through 2050 using reduced form models estimated with national-level panel data for the period ...

Schmalensee, Richard.; Stoker, Thomas M.; Judson, Ruth A.

28

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions down in 2011 - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions fell 2.4% in 2011 compared to the level in 2010. Several factors combined to produce this drop, including slower ...

29

Short-Term Energy Carbon Dioxide Emissions Forecasts August 2009  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Supplement to the Short-Term Energy Outlook. Short-term projections for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions of the three fossil fuels: coal, natural gas, and petroleum.

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2012  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2012 October 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 2013 U.S. Energy...

31

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions declined in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions in 2012 were the lowest in the United States since 1994, at 5.3 billion metric tons of CO 2 (see figure above).

32

Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Model  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Description of the procedures for estimating carbon dioxide emissions in the Short-Term Energy Outlook

Information Center

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

William Watson

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Do energy taxes decrease carbon dioxide emissions?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This paper investigates the environmental effectiveness of the Swedish energy taxes. That is, whether these have decreased the CO2 emissions and how they have… (more)

Sundqvist, Patrik

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

International Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Carbon Intensity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions.

37

OpenEI - sulfur dioxide emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:en.openei.orgdatasetstaxonomyterm4600 en Hourly Energy Emission Factors for Electricity Generation in the United States http:en.openei.orgdatasetsnode488...

38

Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

2 Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions in this table. ... non-combustion use of fossil fuels.

39

Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy consumption are excluded from total emissions in this ... non-combustion use of fossil ...

40

Options for reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements in energy efficiency can significantly reduce the annual growth in greenhouse gas emissions. Such improvements occur when energy intensity is reduced; no reduction in energy services is required. Using the concept of cost of conserved energy'' to develop conservation supply curves similar to resource supply curves, researchers consistently find that electricity and natural gas savings of nearly 50% of current consumption are possible for US buildings. Such reductions in energy consumption directly reduce emissions of greenhouse gases. To capture these savings, we must continue to develop energy-efficient technologies and strategies. This paper describes three recent energy-efficient technologies that benefited from energy conservation research and development (R D) funding: high-frequency ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows. Other advanced technologies and strategies of spectrally selective windows, superwindows, electrochromic windows, advanced insulation, low-flow showerheads, improved recessed lamp fixtures, whitening surfaces and planting urban trees, daylighting, and thermal energy storage are also discussed. 33 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potter. 1996. Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis. DB-1015. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center, U.S. Department of...

42

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Global warming and global dioxide emission: An empirical study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the dynamic relationship between global surface temperature (global warming) and global carbon dioxide emission (CO{sub 2}) is modelled and analyzed by causality and spectral analysis in the time domain and frequency domain, respectively. Historical data of global CO{sub 2} emission and global surface temperature anomalies over 129 years from 1860-1988 are used in this study. The causal relationship between the two phenomena is first examined using the Sim and Granger causality test in the time domain after the data series are filtered by ARIMA models. The Granger causal relationship is further scrutinized and confirmed by cross-spectral and multichannel spectral analysis in the frequency domain. The evidence found from both analyses proves that there is a positive causal relationship between the two variables. The time domain analysis suggests that Granger causality exists between global surface temperature and global CO{sub 2} emission. Further, CO{sub 2} emission causes the change in temperature. The conclusions are further confirmed by the frequency domain analysis, which indicates that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission causes climate warming because a high coherence exists between the two variables. Furthermore, it is proved that climate changes happen after an increase in CO{sub 2} emission, which confirms that the increase in CO{sub 2} emission does cause global warming. 27 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs.

Linyan Sun [Xian Jiaotong Univ., Shaanxi (China); Wang, M. [Saint Mary`s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Table 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review September 2013 159 Table 12.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by Source

45

Livscykelanalys för koldioxidutsläpp frĺn flerbostadshus; Life Cycle Analysis of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Residential Buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Today, about 15 to 20 percent of Sweden’s total emission of carbon dioxide can be traced to the household sector. By examining apartment blocks… (more)

Palmborg, Sofia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of ... other biomass. 3 Natural gas, excluding supplemental gaseous fuels.

47

Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

48

Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. 10 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

49

Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary. ... 6 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

50

Table 11.2a Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

6 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

51

Table 11.2b Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section.

52

Table 11.2c Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

9 Wood and wood-derived fuels. ... table. See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section.

53

Table 11.2e Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood 6: Waste 7: Total: ... See Note, "Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion," at end of section. R=Revised. P=Preliminary.

54

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Overview. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states (Figure 1), whether considered on an absolute or per capita basis.

55

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

56

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

58

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

59

Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 111. Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in three cases with three levels of emissions fees, 2000-2040 (million metric tons)

60

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Can the envisaged reductions of fossil fuel CO2 emissions beGoulden. 2008. Where do Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissionsof season-averaged fossil fuel CO 2 emissions (Riley et

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The carbon dioxide emissions game: Playing the net  

SciTech Connect

Concern about rising concentrations of carbon dioxide in the earth`s atmosphere has led to calls for the United States and other countries to reduce carbon emissions. These concerns resulted in the signing of the Framework Convention on Climate Change at the United Nations Conference on the Environment and Development in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992. The Framework calls for nations to develop action plans for limiting emissions of carbon and other greenhouse gases. In December 1992, in accordance with the Framework, the US Government released for public comment its National Action Plan for Global Climate Change (US Department of State, 1992). The Action Plan detailed steps for reducing carbon emissions by 93 to 130 million metric tons (MMT) by 2000. Some of the steps included in the Action Plan were reforming regulations, setting energy standards, promoting research and development of new energy technologies, expanding the use of alternative-fueled vehicles, and planting trees to sequester carbon. This paper explores the economic implications of implementing a much larger tree-planting program than the one presented in the Action Plan. Whereas the Action Plan estimated that 5 to 9 MMT of carbon (MMTC) could be sequestered in 2000 (with perhaps threefold increases in sequestration in later years when trees are growing the fastest), the program being considered in this analysis annually sequesters as much as 231 MMTC during its peak years. Our analysis focuses on how much the costs of stabilizing US carbon emissions at 1990 levels are reduced when economic criteria alone determine the number of trees that will be used. Our results show that when the focus is shifted from stabilization of gross emissions to net emissions the cost reductions are dramatic, about 20 to 80 percent depending on the assumed cost of trees. Political and institutional obstacles to the formation of such a cost effective response are explored in the conclusions.

Richards, K.R.; Edmonds, J.A.; Rosenthal, D.H.; Wise, M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Bioenergy Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers have recently argued that there is a 'critical climate accounting error' and that we should say 'goodbye to carbon neutral' for bioenergy. Many other analysts have published opionions on the same topic, and the US Environmental Protection Agency posted a specific call for information. The currently burning questions for carbon accounting is how to deal with bioenergy. The questions arises because, unlike for fossil fuels, burning of biomass fuels represents part of a cycle in which combustion releases back to the atmosphere carbon that was earlier removed from the atmosphere by growing plants. In a sustainable system, plants will again remove the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the atmosphere. Conceptually, it is clear that there are no net emissions of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} if biomass is harvested and combusted at the same rate that biomass grows and removes CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. The problem lies in the fact that growth and combustion do not occur at the same time or in the same place, and our accounting system boundaries - spatial and temporal - frequently do not provide full and balanced accounting. When the first comprehensive guidelines for estimating national greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were put together by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, they noted that it has been argued that CO{sub 2} emissions resulting from bioenergy consumption should not be included in a country's official emission inventory because there are no net emissions if the biomass is produced sustainably, and if the biomass is not produced sustainably, the loss of carbon will be captured as part of the accounting for emissions from land-use change. In the same philosophical vein, the Kyoto Protocol provides that emissions or sinks of CO{sub 2} from land-use change and forestry activities be measured as the 'verifiable changes in carbon stocks'. From these has grown the convention that emissions from biomass fuels are generally not counted as part of emissions inventories, and biomass energy is sometimes referred to as being 'carbon neutral.' But what happens when a forest is harvested for fuel but takes 60 years to regrow or when biomass is harvested in a country that is not party to an international accord but is burned in a country that is party to an international accord? Biomass energy is only truly 'carbon neutral' if we get the system boundaries right. They need to make sure that the accounting methodology is compatible with our needs and realities in management and policy.

Marland, Gregg [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Manufacturing sector carbon dioxide emissions in nine OECD countries 1973--87: A Divisia index decomposition to changes in fuel mix, emission coefficients, industry structure, energy intensities, and international structure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper the reduction in energy-related manufacturing carbon dioxide emissions for nine OECD countries in the period 1973 to 1987 is analyzed. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from energy use data. The emphasis is on carbon dioxide intensities, defined as emissions divided by value added. The overall manufacturing carbon dioxide intensity for the nine OECD countries was reduced by 42% in the period 1973--1987. Five fuels are specified together with six subsectors of manufacturing. Carbon dioxide emissions are estimated from fossil fuel consumption, employing emissions coefficients for gas, oil and solids. In addition, electricity consumption is specified. For electricity use an emission coefficient index is calculated from the shares of fossil fuels, nuclear power and hydro power used to generate electricity, and the efficiency in electricity generation from these energy sources. A Divisia index approach is used to sort out the contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity from different components. The major finding is that the main contribution to reduced carbon dioxide intensity is from the general reduction in manufacturing energy intensity, most likely driven by economic growth and increased energy prices, giving incentives to invest in new technology and new industrial processes. There is also a significant contribution from reduced production in the most carbon dioxide intensive subsectors, and a contribution from higher efficiency in electricity generation together with a larger nuclear power share at the expense of oil. 19 refs., 5 figs., 11 tabs.

Torvanger, A. (Senter for Anvendt Forskning, Oslo (Norway) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

SciTech Connect

This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores 5 our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e. maps); how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions 10 from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% 15 confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. The information discussed in this manuscript synthesizes global, regional and national fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions, their distributions, their transport, and the associated uncertainties.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Breon, F.-M. [CEA/DSM/LSCE, Gif sur Yvette, France; Ciais, P. [LSCE/CEA, Gif-sur-Yvette, France; Davis, S. [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Erickson, D [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Gregg, J. S. [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Jacobson, Andrew [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Marland, Gregg [Appalachian State University; Miller, J. [NOAA ESRL and CIRES; Oda, T [NOAA ESRL/Boulder, CO/Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere, Colorado State Univ.; Oliver, J. G. J. [PBL Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency, Bilthoven, The Netherlands; Raupach, Michael [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Rayner, P [University of Melbourne, Australia; Treanton, K. [Energy Statistics Division, International Energy Agency, Paris, France

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Carbon dioxide emission index as a mean for assessing fuel quality  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission index, defined as the amount of CO{sub 2} released per unit of energy value, was used to rate gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The direct utilization of natural gas is the most efficient option. The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas for production of liquid fuels represents a significant decrease in fuel value of the former. The fuel value of liquids, such as gasoline, diesel oil, etc. is lower than that of natural gas. Blending gasoline with ethanol obtained either from bio-mass or via synthesis may decrease fuel value of the blend when CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the production of ethanol are included in total emissions. The introduction of liquid fuels produced by pyrolysis and liquefaction of biomass would result in the increase in the CO{sub 2} emissions. The CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of coal and petroleum coke are much higher than those from gaseous and liquid fuels. However, for petroleum coke, this is offset by the high value gaseous and liquid fuels that are simultaneously produced during coking. Conversion of low value fuels such as coal and petroleum coke to a high value chemicals via synthesis gas should be assessed as means for replacing natural gas and making it available for fuel applications.

Furimsky, E. [IMAF Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

67

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Report #: DOE/EIA-0573(2005) Released Date: November 2006 Next Release Date: Not applicable Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing Mark Schipper 1 , Energy Information Administration (EIA) Abstract Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

68

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cement Industry, An Energy Perspective", U.S. Department ofDioxide Emissions for Energy Use in U.S. Cement Production (3. Primary Energy Consumption in U.S. Cement Production by

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions down in 2011 - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions fell 2.4% in 2011 compared to the level in 2010. Several factors combined to produce this drop, including slower ...

70

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004 These data represent energy use and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions associated with cropland production in the U.S. Energy use and emissions occurring on the farm are referred to as on-site energy and on-site emissions. Energy use and emissions associated with cropland production that occur off the farm (e.g., use of electricity, energy and emissions associated with fertilizer and pesticide production) are referred to as off-site energy and off-site emissions. The combination of on-site and off-site energy and carbon is referred to as total energy and total carbon, respectively. Data provided here are for on-site and total energy and associated CO2 emissions. Units are Megagram C for CO2 estimates and Gigajoule for energy

71

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Focus Area: Geothermal Power Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/PubDetails.aspx?Action=View& Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carben-version-3-multisector-carbon-d Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The CarBen model enables users to conduct wedge anlayses of scenarios for mitigating U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. The spreadsheet-based tool relies upon expert opinion for scenario formulation and is not intended to be used

72

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the

73

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

Huffman, Gerald P

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

74

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electricity consumption. Car usage and home heating involvesto a population shift. Car Usage and Emissions We begin with

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views

76

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

77

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

78

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State Energy Data System ... the program provided an economic incentive for coal-fired power plants to reduce emissions by installing pollution contro ...

79

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

80

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 26, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions East South Central EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

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81

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 30, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 75.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

82

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source- Middle Atlantic Source- Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 22, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

83

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

84

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Pacific Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 29, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Pacific Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific- Reference Case (xls, 74.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

85

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

86

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 25, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

87

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 23, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions East North Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

88

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source, New England Source, New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 21, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England- Reference Case (xls, 73.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

89

Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Alabama",2.103862865,76.71236863,2.835897119,17.71721059,33.37693698,132.7462762 "Alaska",2.497277997,3.042968925,1.789261448,16.61816292,14.7795124,38.72718369 "Arizona",2.373783271,54.37078005,2.325955921,4.76376875,32.07874715,95.91303514 "Arkansas",2.566776983,32.30865878,2.320262268,8.646911643,20.27679552,66.11940519 "California",15.93482613,43.49564577,28.92778352,67.46363514,213.9882899,369.8101805 "Colorado",4.150125234,39.85763155,7.82954551,14.90850811,29.73188961,96.47770002

90

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

91

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 24, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA west north central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

92

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 27, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

93

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 28, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Mountain Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

94

Fast-regenerable sulfur dioxide adsorbents for diesel engine emission control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are sorbents and devices for controlling sulfur oxides emissions as well as systems including such sorbents and devices. Also disclosed are methods for making and using the disclosed sorbents, devices and systems. In one embodiment the disclosed sorbents can be conveniently regenerated, such as under normal exhaust stream from a combustion engine, particularly a diesel engine. Accordingly, also disclosed are combustion vehicles equipped with sulfur dioxide emission control devices.

Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Generation of Electric Power in the United States 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The President issued a directive on April 15, 1999, requiring an annual report summarizing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by electricity generation in the United States, including both utilities and nonutilities. In response, this report is jointly submitted by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Information Center

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

Trends and breaks in per-capita carbon dioxide emissions, 1870-2028  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider per-capita carbon dioxide emission trends in 16 early developed countries over the period 1870-2028. Using a multiple-break time series method we find more evidence for very early downturns in per-capita trends ...

Lanne, Markku

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Carbon Dioxide Emissions of the City Center of Firenze, Italy: Measurement, Evaluation, and Source Partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An eddy covariance station was installed in the city center of Firenze, Italy, to measure carbon fluxes at half-hourly intervals over a mostly homogeneous urban area. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission observations made over an initial period of 3.5 ...

A. Matese; B. Gioli; F. P. Vaccari; A. Zaldei; F. Miglietta

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon Dioxide Emission Pathways Avoiding Dangerous Ocean Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases could lead to undesirable effects on oceans in coming centuries. Drawing on recommendations published by the German Advisory Council on Global Change, levels of unacceptable global marine change (so-...

K. Kvale; K. Zickfeld; T. Bruckner; K. J. Meissner; K. Tanaka; A. J. Weaver

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrated Database (eGRID), and the National Oceanic andProtection Agency’s eGRID, or Emissions & GenerationDatabase data base 21 . The eGRID data base contains the

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (DB-1015) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1015 This data has been updated. Please see NDP-081. Contributed by: James W. Raich 1 and Christopher S. Potter2 1Department of Botany Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 USA Email: jraich@iastate.edu 2NASA Ames Research Center MS 242-2 Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA Email: cpotter@gaia.arc.nasa.gov Prepared by L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Date Published: March, 1996 (Revised for the web: 2002) The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center is a part of the Environmental Sciences Division of the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290. The ORNL is managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

102

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

103

Using Vehicle Taxes to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions Rates of New Passenger Vehicles: Evidence from France, Germany, and Sweden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

France, Germany, and Sweden link vehicle taxes to the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions rates of passenger vehicles. Based on new vehicle registration data from 2005–2010, a vehicle’s tax is negatively correlated with its ...

Klier, Thomas

104

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. Iron and Steel sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the U.S. 26 Energy Conservation SupplyDioxide Emissions from Energy For U.S. Steel Production (2 Final Energy Use for U.S. Steel Production (

Worrell, Ernst; Martin, N.; Price, L.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Temporal and Spatial Distribution of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Use in North America  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Refinements in the spatial and temporal resolution of North American fossil-fuel carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions provide additional information about anthropogenic aspects of the carbon cycle. In North America, the seasonal and spatial patterns ...

J. S. Gregg; L. M. Losey; R. J. Andres; T. J. Blasing; G. Marland

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon DioxideStructural Factors Affecting Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn Price China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Marlene Arens Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the Department of Energy under contract No.DE- AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6106E ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

108

Inventory of Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Carbon Management Strategic Initiative (CMSI) is a lab-wide initiative to position the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) as a leader in science, technology and policy analysis required to understand, mitigate and adapt to global climate change as a nation. As part of an effort to walk the talk in the field of carbon management, PNNL conducted its first carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions inventory for the 2007 calendar year. The goal of this preliminary inventory is to provide PNNL staff and management with a sense for the relative impact different activities at PNNL have on the lab’s total carbon footprint.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Kora, Angela R.; Shankle, Steve A.; Fowler, Kimberly M.

2009-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

109

Livscykelanalys av flerbostadshus – energieffektiviseringsĺtgärder för minskade koldioxidutsläpp; Life Cycle Analysis of Residential Buildings - Energy Efficiency Measures for Decreasing Carbon Dioxide Emissions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The importance of energy- and environmental issues has increased, and the work towards reducing carbon dioxide emissions plays a major part. The European Union… (more)

Hedin, Hanna

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions with Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration in Deep Geological Formations  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration (CCS) in deep geological formations has quickly emerged as an important option for reducing greenhouse emissions. If CCS is implemented on the scale needed for large reductions in CO2 emissions, a billion of tonnes or more of CO2 will be sequestered annually a 250 fold increase over the amount sequestered annually today. Sequestering these large volumes will require a strong scientific foundation of the coupled hydrological-geochemical-geomechanical processes that govern the long term fate of CO2 in the subsurface. Methods to characterize and select sequestration sites, subsurface engineering to optimize performance and cost, safe operations, monitoring technology, remediation methods, regulatory oversight, and an institutional approach for managing long term liability are also needed.

Benson, Dr. Sally [Stanford University; Cole, David R [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions  

SciTech Connect

A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

Huffman, Gerald P.

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

112

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special

115

Measuring Sulphur Dioxide (SO2) Emissions in October, 2010 Catastrophic Eruption from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Volcano in Java, Indonesia with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) José A. Morales-Collazo Geology This paper discusses sulfur dioxide (SO2) cloud emissions from Merapi Volcano in Java, Indonesia during, Indonesia. In October 26th , 2010, a catastrophic eruption was reported from Merapi causing nearly 386

Gilbes, Fernando

116

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

117

MINIMIZING NET CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS BY OXIDATIVE CO-PYROLYSIS OF COAL/BIOMASS BLENDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid fuels vary significantly with respect to the amount of CO{sub 2} directly produced per unit heating value. Elemental carbon is notably worse than other solid fuels in this regard, and since carbon (char) is an intermediate product of the combustion of almost all solid fuels, there is an opportunity to reduce specific CO{sub 2} emissions by reconfiguring processes to avoid char combustion wholly or in part. The primary goal of this one-year Innovative Concepts project is to make a fundamental thermodynamic assessment of three modes of solid fuel use: (1) combustion, (2) carbonization, and (3) oxidative pyrolysis, for a wide range of coal and alternative solid fuels. This period a large set of thermodynamic calculations were carried out to assess the potential of the three processes. The results show that the net carbon dioxide emissions and the relative ranking of the different processes depends greatly on the particular baseline fossil fuel being displaced by the new technology. As an example, in a baseline natural gas environment, it is thermodynamically more advantageous to carbonize biomass than to combust it, and even more advantageous to oxidatively pyrolyze the biomass.

Robert Hurt; Todd Lang

2001-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

Dynamics of nitrogen and greenhouse gas emission under elevated carbon dioxide in semi-arid cropping systems in Australia and China.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Within less than 50 years, atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration [CO2] will likely be double that observed in 1950. In this higher [CO2] world the sustainability… (more)

Lam, Shu Kee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Evaluation of Sludge Characteristics and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants in China by Mass and Energy Balances  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy balances were used to evaluate the characteristics of sludge and to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions in the WWTPs in this study. To avoid the errors, mass balances by TP have been used to calibrate the relating data before making energy ... Keywords: Sludge, CEP, mass balance, energy balance, carbon dioxide

Gan Wang; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Gan Wang; Hongxun Hou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emissions. In this paper, energy use and CO 2 emissions ofinformation, this paper estimates industrial energy-relatedenergy-intensive products. Emissions from manufacturing of textiles, and paper

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 11.1 Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multiplying by 12/44. 9 Includes electric power sector use of ...

122

Table 11.2d Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Energy Consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Metric tons of carbon dioxide can be converted to metric tons of carbon equivalent by multiplying by 12/44. 8 Fuel ethanol minus denaturant. 2 Carbo ...

123

Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide Emission Factors Applicable to Wastewater Wet Wells.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Transport of wastewater in sewer networks causes potential problems associated with gases which include ammonia, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrogen sulfide and methane, in regard… (more)

Mudragaddam, Madhuri

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generatingFuel use, CO 2 emissions, and CO 2 emission factors of ten largest California electricity generating

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The potential for control of carbon dioxide emissions from integrated gasification/combined-cycle systems  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification/combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation, a process that reduces CO{sub 2} production through efficient fuel used is amenable to CO{sub 2} capture. This paper presents a comparison of energy systems that encompass fuel supply, an IGCC system, CO{sub 2} recovery using commercial technologies, CO{sub 2} transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering in geological reservoirs. The intent is to evaluate the energy-efficiency impacts of controlling CO{sub 2} in such systems and to provide the CO{sub 2} budget, or an to equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. The value used for the ``equivalent CO{sub 2}`` budget is 1 kg/kWh CO{sub 2}. The base case for the comparison is a 457-MW IGCC system that uses an air-blown Kellogg-Rust-Westinghouse (KRW) agglomerating fluidized-bed gasifier, Illinois No. 6 bituminous coal, and in-bed sulfur removal. Mining, preparation, and transportation of the coal and limestone result in a net system electric power production of 454 MW with a 0.835 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate. For comparison, the gasifier output is taken through a water-gas shift to convert CO to CO{sub 2} and then processed in a glycol-based absorber unit to recover CO{sub 2} Prior to the combustion turbine. A 500-km pipeline then transports the CO{sub 2} for geological sequestering. The net electric power production for the system with CO{sub 2} recovery is 381 MW with a 0.156 kg/kwh CO{sub 2} release rate.

Livengood, C.D.; Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels: A procedure for estimation and results for 1950-1982. Tellus 36B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (C02) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: 1) updating the 1950 to present time series of C02 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 2) extending this time series back to 1751, 3) gridding the data at 1 ' by 1 ' resolution, and 4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of C02 from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5 % over 1990 levels to 6188 x lo6 metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement wit % two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distriiution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of C02 emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population

Robert J. Andres; Gregg Marl; Tom Boden; Steve Bischof

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions from Pulverized Coal-Fired Boilers by Dry Removal with Lime and Limestone Sorbants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past decade increasing concern over the potential environmental impact associated with the emissions of both gaseous and particulate pollutants has resulted in the promulgation of strict regulatory standards governing such emissions. In this regard, particular attention has been placed upon the control of sulfur dioxide (SO2) from major fuel burning installations. The provisions of the 1977 Amendments to the Clean Air Act which relate to the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) and the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) have made consideration of this problem of significant additional importance in the context of increased coal utilization. There exist three general methods for the control of sulfur dioxide emissions from pulverized coal-fired boiler equipment. These are: (1) coal cleaning to remove pyritic sulfur, (2) conventional wet, nonregenerable scrubbing with alkaline slurry and solution processes, and (3) dry processes which involve direct introduction of lime or limestone into the firebox, or a spray dryer operated with nonregenerable alkaline sorbents coupled with a fabric filter collector. Equipment requirements, SO2 removal criteria, general economics, and potential applications of these latter two approaches within category (3) will be discussed.

Schwartz, M. H.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Alignment-dependent fluorescence emission induced by tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from lower-lying orbitals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that fluorescence emission induced by strong field tunnel ionization of carbon dioxide from its lower-lying orbitals exhibits a peculiar molecular alignment dependence. The experimentally measured alignment-dependence of the fluorescence agrees with the alignment-dependence of the ionization probability calculated in the framework of the strong field approximation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of an all-optical approach for shedding more light on the ionization mechanisms of molecules from their lower-lying orbitals in tunnel ionization regime.

Yao, Jinping; Jia, Xinyan; Hao, Xiaolei; Zeng, Bin; Jing, Chenrui; Chu, Wei; Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Xie, Hongqiang; Zhang, Chaojin; Zhao, Zengxiu; Chen, Jing; Liu, Xiaojun; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A New Method for Production of Titanium Dioxide Pigment - Eliminating CO2 Emission  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project was to demonstrate the potential of a new process technology to reduce the energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emission from the production of titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) pigment. TiO{sub 2} is one of the most commonly used minerals in the chemical manufacturing industry. It has been commercially processed as a pigment since the early 1900's, and has a wide variety of domestic and industrial applications. TiO{sub 2} pigment is currently produced primarily by the use of the so called ?chloride process?. A key step of the chloride process relies on high temperature carbo-chlorination of TiO{sub 2} bearing raw materials, hence producing large quantities of CO{sub 2}. The new method uses a chemical/metallurgical sequential extraction methodology to produce pigment grade TiO{sub 2} from high-TiO{sub 2} slag. The specific project objectives were to 1) study and prove the scientific validity of the concept, 2) understand the primary chemical reactions and the efficiency of sequential extraction schemes, 3) determine the properties of TiO{sub 2} produced using the technology, and 4) model the energy consumptions and environmental benefits of the technology. These objectives were successfully met and a new process for producing commercial quality TiO{sub 2} pigment was developed and experimentally validated. The process features a unique combination of established metallurgical processes, including alkaline roasting of titania slag followed by leaching, solvent extraction, hydrolysis, and calcination. The caustic, acidic, and organic streams in the process will also be regenerated and reused in the process, greatly reducing environmental waste. The purpose and effect of each of these steps in producing purified TiO{sub 2} is detailed in the report. The levels of impurities in our pigment meet the requirements for commercial pigment, and are nearly equivalent to those of two commercial pigments. Solvent extraction with an amine extractant proved to be extremely effective in achieving these targets. A model plant producing 100,000 tons TiO{sub 2} per year was designed that would employ the new method of pigment manufacture. A flow sheet was developed and a mass and energy balance was performed. A comparison of the new process and the chloride process indicate that implementation of the new process in the US would result in a 21% decrease in energy consumption, an annual energy savings of 42.7 million GJ. The new process would reduce CO{sub 2} emissions by 21% in comparison to the chloride process, an annual reduction of 2.70 million tons of CO{sub 2}. Since the process equipment employed in the new process is well established in other industrial processes and the raw materials for the two processes are identical we believe the capital, labor and materials cost of production of pigment grade TiO{sub 2} using the new method would be at least equivalent to that of the chloride process. Additionally, it is likely that the operating costs will be lower by using the new process because of the reduced energy consumption. Although the new process technology is logical and feasible based on its chemistry, thermodynamic principles, and experimental results, its development and refinement through more rigorous and comprehensive research at the kilogram scale is needed to establish it as a competitive industrial process. The effect of the recycling of process streams on the final product quality should also be investigated. Further development would also help determine if the energy efficiency and the environmental benefits of the new process are indeed significantly better than current commercial methods of pigment manufacture.

Fang, Zhigang Zak [University of Utah] [University of Utah

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

130

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Carbon Dioxide Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Consumption and Cement Manufacture, (2011) Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission...

131

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

132

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

133

Evaluation of metrics and baselines for tracking greenhouse gas emissions trends: Recommendations for the California climate action registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002. Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for thein Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the

Price, Lynn; Murtishaw, Scott; Worrell, Ernst

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment. Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. Highlights Short-Term Energy Outlook ...

135

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

136

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

137

How much of U.S. carbon dioxide emissions are associated with ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. Environment. Greenhouse gas data, ... CO2 emissions from U.S. electricity generation by ...

138

Reducing Emissions of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, and Mercury from Electric Power Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senators Bob Smith, George Voinovich, and Sam Brownback to examine the costs of specific multi-emission reduction strategies

J. Alan Beamon

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Estimating carbon dioxide emissions factors for the California electric power sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Data Report; emissions from imports calculated using U.S.source of energy in the Southwest U.S. Thus, imports from

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 - Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon Dioxide Emissions Annual Energy Outlook 2006 with Projections to 2030 Higher Energy Consumption Forecast Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure 107. Carbn dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2004 and 2030 (million metric tons). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. Figure data CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

142

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

Information Center

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Comparison of two U.S. power-plant carbon dioxide emissions data sets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Estimates of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} emissions are needed to address a variety of climate-change mitigation concerns over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. We compared two data sets that report power-plant CO{sub 2} emissions in the conterminous U.S. for 2004, the most recent year reported in both data sets. The data sets were obtained from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Environmental Protection Agency's eGRID database. Conterminous U.S. total emissions computed from the data sets differed by 3.5% for total plant emissions (electricity plus useful thermal output) and 2.3% for electricity generation only. These differences are well within previous estimates of uncertainty in annual U.S. fossil-fuel emissions. However, the corresponding average absolute differences between estimates of emissions from individual power plants were much larger, 16.9% and 25.3%, respectively. By statistical analysis, we identified several potential sources of differences between EIA and eGRID estimates for individual plants. Estimates that are based partly or entirely on monitoring of stack gases (reported by eGRID only) differed significantly from estimates based on fuel consumption (as reported by EIA). Differences in accounting methods appear to explain differences in estimates for emissions from electricity generation from combined heat and power plants, and for total and electricity generation emissions from plants that burn nonconventional fuels (e.g., biomass). Our analysis suggests the need for care in utilizing emissions data from individual power plants, and the need for transparency in documenting the accounting and monitoring methods used to estimate emissions. 19 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Katherine V. Ackerman; Eric T. Sundquist [U.S. Geological Survey, Woods Hole, MA (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

144

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in cropland production and management influence energy consumption and emissions of CO2 from fossil-fuel combustion. A method was developed to calculate on-site and off-site energy and CO2 emissions for cropping practices in the US at the county scale. Energy consumption and emissions occur on-site from the operation of farm machinery and occur off-site from the manufacture and transport of cropland production inputs, such as fertilizers, pesticides, and agricultural lime. Estimates of fossil-fuel consumption and associated CO2 emissions for cropping practices enable (a) the monitoring of energy and emissions with changes in land management, and (b) the calculation and balancing of regional and national carbon budgets. Results indicate on-site energy use and total energy use (i.e., the sum of on-site and off-site) on US croplands in 2004 ranged from 1.6-7.9 GJ ha-1 yr-1 and from 5.5-20.5 GJ ha-1 yr-1, respectively. On-site and total CO2 emissions in 2004 ranged from 23-176 kg C ha-1 yr-1 and from 91-365 kg C ha-1 yr-1, respectively. During the period of this analysis (1990-2004), national total energy consumption for crop production ranged from 1204-1297 PJ yr-1 (Petajoule = 1 1015 Joule) with associated total fossil CO2 emissions ranging from 22.0-23.2 Tg C yr-1 (Teragram = 1 1012 gram). The annual proportion of on-site CO2 to total CO2 emissions changed depending on the diversity of crops planted. Adoption of reduced tillage practices in the US from 1990 to 2004 resulted in a net emissions reduction of 2.4 Tg C.

West, Tristram O. [ORNL; Brandt, Craig C [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Nelson, Richard G [ORNL; Hellwinckel, Chad M [ORNL; De La Torre Ugarte, Daniel G [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

key resources for national energy consumption data in ChinaNBS published 2008 national energy consumption by industrialnational level, carbon emission factors for electricity consumption are calculated based on the energy

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In AEO2013, the 2030 values have fallen to 5,523 million metric tons for total energy-related CO 2 emissions, with 1,874 million metric tons (34 percent) ...

147

Sulfur Dioxide Regulations (Ohio)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This chapter of the law establishes that the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency provides sulfur dioxide emission limits for every county, as well as regulations for the emission, monitoring and...

148

Are there basic physical constraints on future anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global Climate Models (GCMs) provide forecasts of future climate warming using a wide variety of highly sophisticated anthropogenic CO2 emissions models as input, each based on the evolution of four emissions "drivers": population p, standard of living g, energy productivity (or efficiency) f and energy carbonization c. The range of scenarios considered is extremely broad, however, and this is a primary source of forecast uncertainty. Here, it is shown both theoretically and observationally how the evolution of the human system can be considered from a surprisingly simple thermodynamic perspective in which it is unnecessary to explicitly model two of the emissions drivers: population and standard of living. Specifically, the human system grows through a self-perpetuating feedback loop in which the consumption rate of primary energy resources stays tied to the historical accumulation of global economic production - or p times g - through a time-independent factor of 9.7 +/- 0.3 milliwatts per inflation-adjuste...

Garrett, Timothy J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Impact of Electric Passenger Transport Technology under an Economy-Wide Climate Policy in the United States: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Coal Use, and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to be an economic means of reducing direct (or tailpipe) carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector. However, without a climate policy that places a limit on CO2 emissions from the electric generation sector, the net impact of widespread deployment of PHEVs on overall U.S. CO2 emissions is not as clear. A comprehensive analysis must consider jointly the transportation and electricity sectors, along with feedbacks to the rest of the energy system. In this paper, we use the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s MiniCAM model to perform an integrated economic analysis of the penetration of PHEVs and the resulting impact on total U.S. CO2 emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

An evaluation of the ramp metering effectiveness in reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we develop a methodology to estimate the effectiveness of ramp metering in reducing CO2 emissions. Ramp metering is one of several Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) applications to control traffic flow. In this paper in order to ... Keywords: CO2 Reduction, Greenhouse Gas, Intelligent Transportation System, Ramp Metering, State Preference Analysis, TSIS Simulation

Sang-Hoon Bae; Tae-Young Heo; Byoung-Yong Ryu

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Electricity Load and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Effects of a Carbon Price in the Short Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

acceptable levels will require a dramatic de-carbonization of the electric generation sector in the U.S. One increasingly discussed way to meet this policy goal is to put an explicit price on carbon emissions, either through a tax or a trading scheme. ...

Adam Newcomer; Seth Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis and optimization of the Graz cycle : a coal fired power generation scheme with near-zero carbon dioxide emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Humans are releasing record amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels in power generation plants. With mounting evidence that this carbon dioxide is a leading cause of global ...

Alexander, Brentan R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable &

154

Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data and Data Plots from Project Vulcan  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Explore the Vulcan website for the Vulcan gridded data, methodological details, publications, plots and analysis.[Taken from "About Project Vulcan" at http://www.purdue.edu/eas/carbon/vulcan/index.php]Also, see the peer-reviewed paper that provides a "core" description for this project: Gurney, K.R., D. Mendoza, Y. Zhou, M Fischer, S. de la Rue du Can, S. Geethakumar, C. Miller (2009) The Vulcan Project: High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emissions fluxes for the United States, Environ. Sci. Technol., 43, doi:10.1021/es900,806c.

Gurney, Kevin [PI and spokesperson for the Vulcan Collaboration

155

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for thefactors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for theemissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

HFC Emissions Estinating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Dioxide Emissions Reporting Year: January – December, 200x Agent Type GWP Total Emission by Agent Type, kg Equivalent CO2 Emission by ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

159

Sonochemical reduction of carbon dioxide.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels and cement production are responsible for approximately 75% of the increase of carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration in the… (more)

Koblov, Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for thefactors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

draft). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for theemissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution  

SciTech Connect

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

164

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: EMISS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three types of emission factors are currently included: carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, nitrous oxide. Emissions factors are specified separately for six different end-use...

165

Recovery Act: Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Re-utilization of Industrial Carbon Dioxide for Algae Production Using a Phase Change Material Background Worldwide carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from human activity have...

166

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: April 9, 2007 4: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on AddThis.com... Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector began to

167

Applications of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies in reducing emissions from fossil-fired power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to investigate the global contribution of carbon capture and storage technologies to mitigating climate change. Carbon capture and storage is a technology that comprises the separation of from carbon dioxide industrial- and energy-related sources, transport to a storage location (e.g., saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields), and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. The carbon dioxides emitted directly at the power stations are reduced by 80 to 90%. In contrast, the life cycle assessment shows substantially lower reductions of greenhouse gases in total (minus 65 to 79%).

Balat, M.; Balat, H.; Oz, C. [University of Mahallesi, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ozawa Meida. 2001. “Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Globalpost-combustion capture of carbon dioxide. ” InternationalIPCC Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage:

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Shahar Hod

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

172

Bulk emission by higher-dimensional black holes: almost perfect blackbody radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the Hawking radiation emitted into the bulk by $(D+1)$-dimensional Schwarzschild black holes. It is well-known that the black-hole spectrum departs from exact blackbody form due to the frequency dependence of the `greybody' factors. For intermediate values of $D$ ($3\\leq D\\lesssim10$), these frequency-dependent factors may significantly modify the spectrum of the emitted radiation. However, we point out that for $D\\gg1$, the typical wavelengths in the black-hole spectrum are much {\\it shorter} than the size of the black hole. In this regime, the greybody factors are well described by the geometric-optics approximation according to which they are almost frequency-independent. Following this observation, we argue that for higher-dimensional black holes with $D\\gg1$, the total power emitted into the bulk should be well approximated by the analytical formula for perfect blackbody radiation. We test the validity of this analytical prediction with numerical computations.

Hod, Shahar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

IEP - Carbon Dioxide: Regulatory Drivers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP - Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Regulatory Drivers In July 7, 2009 testimony before the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works, Secretary of Energy Steven Chu made the following statements:1 "...Overwhelming scientific evidence shows that carbon dioxide from human activity has increased the atmospheric level of CO2 by roughly 40 percent, a level one- third higher than any time in the last 800,000 years. There is also a consensus that CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions have caused our planet to change. Already, we have seen the loss of about half of the summer arctic polar ice cap since the 1950s, a dramatically accelerating rise in sea level, and the loss of over two thousand cubic miles of glacial ice, not on geological time scales but over a mere hundred years.

174

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

175

The Future Trajectory of US CO2 Emissions: The Role of State vs. Aggregate Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1998, World carbon dioxide emissions 1950 - 2050, Review ofof us greenhouse gas emissions and sinks:1990 - 2001, EPAper capita carbon dioxide emissions, Harvard Department of

Auffhammer, Maximilian; Steinhauser, Ralf

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The US department of Energy's R&D program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through beneficial uses of carbon dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. (2011); DOI: 10.1002/ghg Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd | Greenhouse Gas Sci Technol. (2011); DOI: 10.1002/ghg Perspective Correspondence to: Darin Damiani, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, 3610 Collins Ferry Road, Morgantown, WV 26507, USA. E-mail: darin.damiani@netl.doe.gov † This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA. Received June 24, 2011; revised July 26, 2011; accepted July 27, 2011 Published online at Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com) DOI: 10.1002/ghg.35 The US Department of Energy's R&D program to reduce greenhouse gas emissions through benefi cial uses of carbon dioxide † Darin Damiani and John T. Litynski, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of

177

Effects of ozone exposure on 'Golden' papaya fruit by photoacoustic phase-resolved method: Physiological changes associated with carbon dioxide and ethylene emission rates during ripening  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work addresses the effects of ozone activity on the physiology of 'Golden' papaya fruit. Depth profile analysis of double-layer biological samples was accomplished using the phase-resolved photoacoustic spectroscopy. The feasibility of the method was demonstrated by singling out the spectra of the cuticle and the pigment layers of papaya fruit. The same approach was used to monitor changes occurring on the fruit during ripening when exposed to ozone. In addition, one has performed real time studies of fluorescence parameters and the emission rates of carbon dioxide and ethylene. Finally, the amount of pigments and the changes in waxy cuticle have been monitored. Results indicate that a fruit deliberately subjected to ozone at a level of 6 ppmv underwent ripening sooner (at least 24-48 h) than a fruit stored at ambient conditions. Moreover, ozone caused a reduction in the maximum quantum yield of photosynthetic apparatus located within the skin of papaya fruit.

Correa, Savio Figueira; Brito Paiva, Luisa; Mota do Couto, Flavio; Gomes da Silva, Marcelo; Silva Sthel, Marcelo; Vargas, Helion [Laboratorio de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Avenida Alberto Lamego 2000, Parque California 28013-602, Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Mota, Leonardo [Laboratorio de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Avenida Alberto Lamego 2000, Parque California 28013-602, Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Fraunhofer Institut fuer Bauphysik, Nobelstrasse 12, Vaihingen 70569, Stuttgart, Baden Wuerttemberg (Germany); Goncalves de Oliveira, Jurandi [Laboratorio de Melhoramento Genetico Vegetal, Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro, Avenida Alberto Lamego 2000, Parque California 28013-602, Campos dos Goytacazes, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Miklos, Andras [Fraunhofer Institut fuer Bauphysik, Nobelstrasse 12, Vaihingen 70569, Stuttgart, Baden Wuerttemberg (Germany)

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

179

HEEP – A Program for Tracking Fire Protection Emissions of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... HEEP are as follows: • “Emission” for the ... values to equivalent emissions of carbon dioxide ... used to calculate carbon dioxide (CO2) equivalence for ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

180

Environment energy-related emissions. For example, the clearing of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Environment Note. Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Biomass Energy Combustion. Carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analytical Framework to Evaluate Emission Control Systems for Marine Engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide Table 2-4 Overall Weighted Average Emission FactorsCarbon dioxide .. 18 Figure 2-4 PM 2.5 Mass Emission Factors

Jayaram, Varalakshmi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

available free of charge - include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon...

183

Large Scale U.S. Unconventional Fuels Production and the Role of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in Reducing Their Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the role that carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies could play in reducing greenhouse gas emissions if a significant unconventional fuels industry were to develop within the United States. Specifically, the paper examines the potential emergence of a large scale domestic unconventional fuels industry based on oil shale and coal-to-liquids (CTL) technologies. For both of these domestic heavy hydrocarbon resources, this paper models the growth of domestic production to a capacity of 3 MMB/d by 2050. For the oil shale production case, we model large scale deployment of an in-situ retorting process applied to the Eocene Green River formation of Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming where approximately 75% of the high grade oil shale resources within the United States lies. For the CTL case, we examine a more geographically dispersed coal-based unconventional fuel industry. This paper examines the performance of these industries under two hypothetical climate policies and concludes that even with the wide scale availability of cost effective carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies, these unconventional fuels production industries would be responsible for significant increases in CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The oil shale production facilities required to produce 3MMB/d would result in net emissions to the atmosphere of between 3000-7000 MtCO2 in addition to storing potentially 1000 to 5000 MtCO2 in regional deep geologic formations in the period up to 2050. A similarly sized domestic CTL industry could result in 4000 to 5000 MtCO2 emitted to the atmosphere in addition to potentially 21,000 to 22,000 MtCO2 stored in regional deep geologic formations over the same period up to 2050. Preliminary analysis of regional CO2 storage capacity in locations where such facilities might be sited indicates that there appears to be sufficient storage capacity, primarily in deep saline formations, to accommodate the CO2 from these industries. However, additional analyses plus detailed regional and site characterization is needed, along with a closer examination of competing storage demands.

Dooley, James J.; Dahowski, Robert T.

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

184

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated. Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human ...

185

8 FEBRUARY 2008 VOL 319 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org730 n 2006, China's carbon dioxide emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

year over the last 27 years, while its CO2 emissions have increased by only 5.4% per year (1­3), corre)--a remarkable achievement, as energy consumption generally grows faster thanGDPduringtheearlystagesofindustrial- ization. One important reason for this was the government's emphasis on energy efficiency. China's per

186

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2001  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

carbon dioxide emissions, total greenhouse gas emissions, sector-specific emissions, and emissions by fuel type. Nonfuel uses of fossil fuels, principally petroleum,

187

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

188

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

189

Emissions of greenhouse gases in the United States 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Energy Information Administration (EIA) annual report on US emissions of greenhouse gases. This report presents estimates of US anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and several other greenhouse gases for 1988 through 1994. Estimates of 1995 carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and halocarbon emissions are also provided, although complete 1995 estimates for methane are not yet available. Emissions of carbon dioxide increased by 1.9% from 1993 to 1994 and by an additional 0.8% from 1994 to 1995. Most carbon dioxide emissions are caused by the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, which is strongly related to economic growth, energy prices, and weather. The US economy grew rapidly in 1994 and slowed in 1995. Estimated emissions of methane increased slightly in 1994, as a result of a rise in emissions from energy and agricultural sources. Estimated nitrous oxide emissions increased by 1.8% in 1995, primarily due to increased use of nitrogen fertilizers and higher output of chemicals linked to nitrous oxide emissions. Estimated emissions of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) and perfluorocarbons (PFCs), which are known to contribute to global warming, increased by nearly 11% in 1995, primarily as a result of increasing substitution for chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). With the exception of methane, the historical emissions estimates presented in this report are only slightly revised from those in last year`s report.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

An option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide global greenhouse effect including estimates for reduced CO/sub 2/ emissions technologies  

SciTech Connect

A new technical option for the coal industry in dealing with the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect has been devised. The option concerns a ''hydrogen economy'' based on coal. We have developed a very efficient process called HYDROCARB, which effectively splits coal into carbon and hydrogen. This process produces a clean, pure carbon fuel from coal for application in both mobile and stationary heat engines. We are suggesting that coal refineries be built based on this technology. A co-product of the process is a hydrogen-rich gas. If one is concerned about the greenhouse effect, then either all or part of the carbon can be withheld and either mainly or only the hydrogen is used as fuel. If one desires to attain the ultimate, and eliminate all CO/sub 2/ emissions from coal, then all of the carbon can be stored and only the hydrogen used. The option is still open for utilizing the clean carbon, which would be placed in monitored retrievable storage, not unlike the strategic petroleum reserve (SPR). Should the greenhouse effect be found to be a myth in the future, the carbon would be taken out of storage and utilized as a clean fuel, the impurities having been previously removed. This concept can be valuable to the coal industry in response to the arguments of the anti-coal critics. Total capital cost estimates have been made to replace all conventional coal burning power plants in the US with technologies that eliminate emissions of CO/sub 2/. These include removal, recovery and disposal of CO/sub 2/, nuclear, solar, photovoltaics, biomass, and HYDROCARB. 12 refs., 1 fig. 4 tabs.

Steinberg, M.

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO2 with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aircraft observation of carbon dioxide at 8-13km altitudedecade, measurements of carbon dioxide (CO ) from space haveEmission Spectrome- ter (TES) carbon dioxide (CO ) satellite

Kulawik, S.S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Lessons Learned from Natural and Industrial Analogues for Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Deep Geological Formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and E.R. Slatick, Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal,oxygen-deficiency is a factor. CARBON DIOXIDE - CO 2 MSDS (Carbon Dioxide will be reached before oxygen-deficiency is a factor.

Benson, Sally M.; Hepple, Robert; Apps, John; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Lippmann, Marcelo

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Value of Post-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage Technologies in a World with Uncertain Greenhouse Gas Emissions Constraints  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By analyzing how the largest CO2 emitting electricity generating region in the United States, the East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR), responds to hypothetical constraints on greenhouse gas emissions, the authors demonstrate that there is an enduring role for post combustion CO2 capture technologies. The utilization of pulverized coal with carbon dioxide capture and storage (PC+CCS) technologies is particularly significant in a world where there is significant uncertainty about the future evolution of climate policy and in particular uncertainty about the rate at which the climate policy will become more stringent. The paper’s analysis shows that within this one large, heavily coal-dominated electricity generating region, as much as 20-40 GW of PC+CCS could be in operation before the middle of this century. Depending upon the state of PC+CCS technology development and the evolution of future climate policy, the analysis shows that these CCS systems could be mated to either already existing PC units or PC units that are currently under construction, announced and planned units, as well as PC units that could continue to be built for a number of decades even in the face of a climate policy. In nearly all the cases analyzed here, these PC+CCS generation units are compliments to a much larger deployment of CCS-enabled coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants. The analysis presented here shows that the combined deployment of PC+CCS and IGCC+CCS units within this one region of the U.S. could result in the potential capture and storage of between 3.2 and 4.9 billion tones of CO2 before the middle of this century in the region’s deep geologic storage formations.

Wise, Marshall A.; Dooley, James J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Geographic patterns of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement production, and gas flaring on a one degree by one degree grid cell basis: 1950 to 1990  

SciTech Connect

Data sets of one degree latitude by one degree longitude carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon (C) per year from anthropogenic sources have been produced for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO{sub 2} emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions. Global, regional and national annual estimates for 1950 through 1992 were published previously. Those national, annual CO{sub 2} emission estimates were based on statistics on fossil-fuel burning, cement manufacturing and gas flaring in oil fields as well as energy production, consumption and trade data, using the methods of Marland and Rotty. The national annual estimates were combined with gridded one-degree data on political units and 1984 human populations to create the new gridded CO{sub 2} emission data sets. The same population distribution was used for each of the years as proxy for the emission distribution within each country. The implied assumption for that procedure was that per capita energy use and fuel mix is uniform over a political unit. The consequence of this first-order procedure is that the spatial changes observed over time are solely due to changes in national energy consumption and nation-based fuel mix. Increases in emissions over time are apparent for most areas.

Brenkert, A.L. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; Andres, R.J. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Inst. of Northern Engineering; Marland, G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Fung, I. [Univ. of Victoria, British Columbia (Canada)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies; Matthews, E. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)]|[National Aeronautics and Space Administration, New York, NY (United States). Goddard Inst. for Space Studies

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofMcNeil et al Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (Keywords Greenhouse gas emissions, emissions scenarios,

McNeil, Michael A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

SPATIAL AND SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL-FUEL COMBUSTION; GLOBAL, REGIONAL, AND NATIONAL POTENTIAL FOR SUSTAINABLE BIOENERGY FROM RESIDUE BIOMASS AND MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Combustion of fossil fuels releases carbon dioxide (CO2) into the atmosphere, and has led to an increase in the atmospheric concentration of CO2. CO2 is… (more)

Gregg, Jay Sterling

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

NETL: News Release - Reining in CO2 Emissions....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reining in CO2 Emissions.... DOE Selects Eight Innovative Projects to Capture and Store Carbon Dioxide from Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - New ways to capture carbon dioxide from...

198

NATURAL GAS VARIABILITY IN CALIFORNIA: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS AND DEVICE PERFORMANCE EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF POLLUTANT EMISSIONS FROM RESIDENTIAL APPLIANCES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

emission factors for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides,  nitrogen dioxideemission factors were determined for carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, nitrogen dioxide

Singer, Brett C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Net carbon dioxide sequestration in U.S. urban trees, yard trimmings, and food scraps : 35: Emissions of carbon dioxide from biofuel/bioenergy use by sector and fuel

200

A RIAF Interpretation for the Past Higher Activity of the Galactic Center Black Hole and the 511 keV Annihilation Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are several lines of evidence that the super-massive black hole at the Galactic center had higher activities in the past than directly observed at present. Here I show that these lines of evidence can quantitatively and consistently be explained if the mean accretion rate during the past ~10^7 yrs has been ~10^{3-4} times higher than the current rate, by the picture of radiatively inefficient accretion flow (RIAF) and associated outflow that has been successfully applied to Sgr A*. I argue that this increased rate and its duration are theoretically reasonable in the Galactic center environment, while the accretion rate suddenly dropped about 300 years ago most likely because of the shell passage of the supernova remnant Sgr A East. The chance probability of witnessing Sgr A* in such a low state is not extremely small (~0.5%). The outflow energetics is sufficient to keep the hot (~8 keV) diffuse gas observed in the Galactic center region. Then, I show that a significant amount of positrons should have been created around the event horizon during the higher activity phase, and injected into interstellar medium by the outflow. The predicted positron production rate and propagation distance are close to those required to explain the observed 511 keV annihilation line emission from the Galactic bulge, giving a natural explanation for the large bulge-to-disk ratio of the emission. The expected injection energy into interstellar medium is about 1 MeV, which is also favorable as an explanation of the 511 keV line emission.

Tomonori Totani

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Carbon dioxide and climate: a bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This bibliography with abstracts presents 394 citations retrieved from the Energy Data Base of the Department of Energy Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The citations cover all aspects of the climatic effects of carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. These include carbon cycling, temperature effects, carbon dioxide control technologies, paleoclimatology, carbon dioxide sources and sinks, mathematical models, energy policies, greenhouse effect, and the role of the oceans and terrestrial forests.

Ringe, A.C. (ed.)

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dissociation of carbon dioxide in atmospheric pressure microchannel plasma devices.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Plasma discharge of carbon dioxide at atmospheric pressure was successfully demonstrated in microchannel plasma devices at breakdown voltages lower than 1 kVRMS. Optical emissions of… (more)

Oh, Taegon

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

What Can China Do? China's Best Alternative Outcome for Energy Efficiency and CO2 Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions. The model uses generation dispatch algorithms, efficiency levels, and capacity factors

G. Fridley, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

205

DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION OF NEW PROCESSES CONSUMING CARBON DIOXIDE IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Estimation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions....................................... 6 2. Greenhouse Gas Emissions........................................................ 8 C. Carbon Dioxide ­ A Greenhouse Gas................................................ 9 1. Sources............................................................... 3 B. Greenhouse Effect and Climate Change............................................. 4 1

Pike, Ralph W.

206

Carbon dioxide disposal in solid form  

SciTech Connect

Coal reserves can provide for the world`s energy needs for centuries. However, coal`s long term use may be severely curtailed if the emission of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is not eliminated. We present a safe and permanent method of carbon dioxide disposal that is based on combining carbon dioxide chemically with abundant raw materials to form stable carbonate minerals. We discuss the availability of raw materials and potential process designs. We consider our initial rough cost estimate of about 3{cents}/kWh encouraging. The availability of a carbon dioxide fixation technology would serve as insurance in case global warming, or the perception of global warming, causes severe restrictions on carbon dioxide emissions. If the increased energy demand of a growing world population is to be satisfied from coal, the implementation of such a technology would quite likely be unavoidable.

Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Sharp, D.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wendt, C.H. [Auxon Corp., (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

207

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: July 16, 2007 8: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #478: July 16, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector on AddThis.com...

208

The effect of elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide mixing ratios on the emission of Volatile organic compounds from Corymbia citriodora and Tristaniopsis laurina.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bibliography: p. 120-124. Introduction  – Environmental factors affecting the emission of biogenic Volatile organic compounds  – Materials and experimental procedures  – Quantification using sold-phase microextraction… (more)

Camenzuli, Michelle

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

SciTech Connect

Characterizing flow patterns and mixing of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} is important for effectively using atmospheric measurements to constrain emissions inventories. Here we used measurements and a model of atmospheric radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) to investigate the distribution and fluxes of atmospheric fossil fuel CO{sub 2} across the state of California. We sampled {sup 14}C in annual C{sub 3} grasses at 128 sites and used these measurements to test a regional model that simulated anthropogenic and ecosystem CO{sub 2} fluxes, transport in the atmosphere, and the resulting {sup 14}C of annual grasses ({Delta}{sub g}). Average measured {Delta}{sub g} in Los Angeles, San Francisco, the Central Valley, and the North Coast were 27.7 {+-} 20.0, 44.0 {+-} 10.9, 48.7 {+-} 1.9, and 59.9 {+-} 2.5{per_thousand}, respectively, during the 2004-2005 growing season. Model predictions reproduced regional patterns reasonably well, with estimates of 27.6 {+-} 2.4, 39.4 {+-} 3.9, 46.8 {+-} 3.0, and 59.3 {+-} 0.2{per_thousand} for these same regions and corresponding to fossil fuel CO{sub 2} mixing ratios (Cf) of 13.7, 6.1, 4.8, and 0.3 ppm. {Delta}{sub g} spatial heterogeneity in Los Angeles and San Francisco was higher in the measurements than in the predictions, probably from insufficient spatial resolution in the fossil fuel inventories (e.g., freeways are not explicitly included) and transport (e.g., within valleys). We used the model to predict monthly and annual transport patterns of fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} within and out of California. Fossil fuel CO{sub 2} emitted in Los Angeles and San Francisco was predicted to move into the Central Valley, raising Cf above that expected from local emissions alone. Annually, about 21, 39, 35, and 5% of fossil fuel emissions leave the California airspace to the north, east, south, and west, respectively, with large seasonal variations in the proportions. Positive correlations between westward fluxes and Santa Ana wind conditions were observed. The southward fluxes over the Pacific Ocean were maintained in a relatively coherent flow within the marine boundary layer, while the eastward fluxes were more vertically dispersed. Our results indicate that state and continental scale atmospheric inversions need to consider areas where concentration measurements are sparse (e.g., over the ocean to the south and west of California), transport within and across the marine boundary layer, and terrestrial boundary layer dynamics. Measurements of {Delta}{sub g} can be very useful in constraining these estimates.

Riley, W.J.; Hsueh, D.Y.; Randerson, J.T.; Fischer, M.L.; Hatch, J.G.; Pataki, D.E.; Wang, W.; Goulden, M.L.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Analysis of data for the carbon dioxide capture domain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To tackle the global concern for adverse impact of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the post combustion carbon dioxide (CO"2) capture technology is commonly adopted for reducing industrial CO"2 emissions, for example, from power generation plants. The ... Keywords: Carbon dioxide capture, Data modeling, Expert validation, Neural networks, Sensitivity analysis

Yuxiang Wu; Christine W. Chan

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

The use of onboard diagnostics to reduce emissions in automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The emissions from automobiles are very harmful and include gases such as Carbon Dioxide, Nitrous Oxide, and Sulfur Dioxide. One of the main reasons OBD was created was to control emissions however it currently only monitors ...

Perez, Alberto, Jr

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

213

Air Quality Responses to Changes in Black Carbon and Nitrogen Oxide Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005). Particulate emissions from construction activities.M. S. , (2000b). In-use emissions from heavy- duty dieseland nitrogen dioxide emissions from gasoline- and diesel-

Millstein, Dev

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

215

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Latest Estimates Latest Estimates Atmos CO2 Level 397.31 ppm Fossil CO2 Emissions 9,167 MMT Carbon Global Temp Anomaly +0.56°C / +1.01°F Global Sea Level Rise +2.9 ± 0.4 mm/y Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) is the primary climate-change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). CDIAC is located at DOE's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and includes the World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases. CDIAC's data holdings include estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and land-use changes; records of atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active trace gases; carbon cycle and terrestrial carbon management datasets and analyses; and

216

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9: July 23, 2007 9: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479: July 23, 2007 U.S. Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector, 1990-2006 on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #479:

217

Greenhouse gas emissions in biogas production systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Augustin J et al. Automated gas chromatographic system forof the atmospheric trace gases methane, carbon dioxide, andfuel consumption and of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from

Dittert, Klaus; Senbayram, Mehmet; Wienforth, Babette; Kage, Henning; Muehling, Karl H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Characterization of Emissions and Occupational Exposure ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Topic Summary: Study conducted to evaluate the GHG emissions and ... supplied by Polycontrols Inc.), and frozen carbon dioxide (CO2) and ...

219

REPORT: Characterization of Emissions and Occupational ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 23, 2007 ... carbon dioxide (CO2) and SF6 (both provided by Lunt ... under similar parameters to characterize emissions and byproducts as the cover gases ...

220

NETL: Emissions Characterization - TVA Cumberland Plant Plume...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cumberland Power Plant Plume Study Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions at the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) Cumberland fossil plant (CUF) at Cumberland City, Tennessee will...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arizona (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arizona. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arizona to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 818 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Associations of health, physical activity and weight status with motorised travel and transport carbon dioxide emissions: a cross-sectional, observational study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(‘active travel’) substitutes for at least some motorised travel and thereby reduces CO2 emissions [e.g. 12]. This assump- tion is supported by the finding that energy expenditure from walking is negatively correlated with fossil fuel use from car driving... About your local pedestrian and cycling routes Continued 11 About your work or place of study S E C T I O N E Sedentary occupation You spend most of your time sitting (e.g. in an office, driving a vehicle). Standing occupation You spend most of your time...

Goodman, Anna; Brand, Christian; Ogilvie, David; on behalf of the iConnect consortium

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Kansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Kansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Kansas to be $1.08 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,816 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Michigan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Michigan to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,542 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Virginia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Virginia to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,600 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nevada (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nevada. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nevada to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 944 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Nebraska (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Nebraska. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Nebraska to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.1 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,840 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Indiana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Indiana to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,684 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Arkansas (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Arkansas. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Arkansas to be $1.15 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.7 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,507 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Ohio (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Ohio. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Ohio to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,343 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Utah (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Utah. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Utah to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 828 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reduction, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Georgia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Georgia. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Georgia to be $2.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,628 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Idaho (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Idaho. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Idaho to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 906 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maryland (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Michigan. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maryland to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,581 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New York (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policy makers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New York. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New York to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.5 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,230 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The emissions policy submodule, part of the integrating module, estimates the energy–related emissions of carbon dioxide and methane. Carbon dioxide emissions are dependent on the fossil fuel consumed, the carbon content of the fuel, and the fraction of the fuel consumed in combustion. The product of the carbon dioxide coefficient and the combustion fraction yields a carbon dioxide emission factor. For fuel uses of fossil energy, the combustion fractions are assumed to be 0.99 for liquid fuels and 0.995 for gaseous fuels. The carbon dioxide potential of nonfuel uses of energy, such as asphalt and petrochemical feedstocks, is assumed to be sequestered in the product and not released to the atmosphere. The coefficients for carbon dioxide emissions are updated each year from the Energy Information Administration’s annual, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States.17

237

Experimental investigation of carbon dioxide trapping due to capillary retention in deep saline aquifers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Carbon dioxide (CO2) is by far the most significant greenhouse gas released by human activities through fossil fuel combustion. In order to minimize CO2 emissions… (more)

Li, Xinqian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Development of a Carbon Dioxide Micro Gas Sensor with Integrated AgCl Reference Electrode.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ăăIn recent years, high carbon dioxide emissions not only result in serious air pollution and greenhouse effect, but also cause water acidification and decrease the… (more)

Hung, Wei-Che

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Emissions estimation for lignite-fired power plants in Turkey  

SciTech Connect

The major gaseous emissions (e.g. sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, and carbon monoxide), some various organic emissions (e.g. benzene, toluene and xylenes) and some trace metals (e.g. arsenic, cobalt, chromium, manganese and nickel) generated from lignite-fired power plants in Turkey are estimated. The estimations are made separately for each one of the thirteen plants that produced electricity in 2007, because the lignite-fired thermal plants in Turkey are installed near the regions where the lignite is mined, and characteristics and composition of lignite used in each power plant are quite different from a region to another. Emission factors methodology is used for the estimations. The emission factors obtained from well-known literature are then modified depending on local moisture content of lignite. Emission rates and specific emissions (per MWh) of the pollutants from the plants without electrostatic precipitators and flue-gas desulfurization systems are found to be higher than emissions from the plants having electrostatic precipitators and flue -gas desulfurization systems. Finally a projection for the future emissions due to lignite-based power plants is given. Predicted demand for the increasing generation capacity based on the lignite-fired thermal power plant, from 2008 to 2017 is around 30%. 39 refs., 13 figs., 10 tabs.

Nurten Vardar; Zehra Yumurtaci [Yildiz Technical University Mechanical Engineering Faculty, Istanbul (Turkey)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration with Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbonation of industrial alkaline residues can be used as a CO2 sequestration technology to reduce carbon dioxide emissions. In this study, alkaline Ca-rich flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum samples were carbonated to a varying extent. These materials ... Keywords: FGD gypsum, carbonation, carbon dioxide

Hongqi Wang; Ningning Sun; Rona J. Donahoe

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Tennessee (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Tennessee. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Tennessee to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,321 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Wisconsin (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Wisconsin. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Wisconsin to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.2 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,476 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in North Carolina (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in North Carolina. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in North Carolina to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,558 million gallons.

Not Available

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in West Virginia (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in West Virginia. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in West Virginia to be $1.0 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.3 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,763 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Massachusetts (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Massachusetts. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, seven states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Massachusetts to be $1.4 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,293 million gallons.

Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in South Dakota (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in South Dakota. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in South Dakota to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 4.0 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,795 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Pennsylvania. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Pennsylvania to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 3.4 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,837 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Montana (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Montana. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Montana to be $1.2 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.9 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,207 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in New Mexico (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in New Mexico. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in New Mexico to be $1.1 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.6 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,117 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Economic Benefits, Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Emissions Reductions, and Water Conservation Benefits from 1,000 Megawatts (MW) of New Wind Power in Maine (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy?s Wind Powering America Program is committed to educating state-level policymakers and other stakeholders about the economic, CO2 emissions, and water conservation impacts of wind power. This analysis highlights the expected impacts of 1000 MW of wind power in Maine. Although construction and operation of 1000 MW of wind power is a significant effort, six states have already reached the 1000-MW mark. We forecast the cumulative economic benefits from 1000 MW of development in Maine to be $1.3 billion, annual CO2 reductions are estimated at 2.8 million tons, and annual water savings are 1,387 million gallons.

Not Available

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

EIA - Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? International Energy Outlook 2010 Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world'ss carbon dioxide emissions? The pursuit of greenhouse gas reductions has the potential to reduce global coal use significantly. Because coal is the most carbon-intensive of all fossil fuels, limitations on carbon dioxide emissions will raise the cost of coal relative to the costs of other fuels. Under such circumstances, the degree to which energy use shifts away from coal to other fuels will depend largely on the costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants relative to the costs of using other, low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources. The continued widespread use of coal could rely on the cost and availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies that capture carbon dioxide and store it in geologic formations.

252

Thermophysical Properties of Carbon Dioxide and CO2-Rich Mixtures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions; and will help maintain the nation's leader- ship in the export of gas turbine equipment. In this NETL-managed project, the National Institute of...

253

Canada, carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

One of the major contributors to the greenhouse effect is carbon dioxide from the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and natural gas. Even with its low population density, Canada, on a per capita basis, has the dubious distinction of being the world's fourth largest producer of carbon from carbon dioxide. This paper considers the impact of Canadian carbon dioxide emissions on the greenhouse effect in light of the 1988 Conference on the Changing Atmosphere's recommendations. A computer model has been developed that, when using anticipated Canadian fossil fuel demands, shows that unless steps are taken immediately, Canada will not be able to meet the conference's proposed carbon dioxide reduction of 20 percent of 1988 levels by the year 2005, let alone meet any more substantial cuts that may be required in the future.

Hughes, L.; Scott, S. (Dept. of Mathematics and Computing Science, Saint Mary' s Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3C3 (CA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carbon dioxide emissions. The model uses generation dispatch algorithms, efficiency levels, and capacity factorsemissions factors for fuel and electricity. Table A-3.3.2 Energy Savings, Costs, and Carbon Dioxide

Zhou, Nan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agency (IEA), 2004c. CO2 emissions from fuel combustion,of Carbon Dioxide Emissions on GNP Growth: Interpretation ofD. , 2000. Special Report on Emissions Scenarios: Report of

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2004  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

257

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2002  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2005  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

259

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1996  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1995  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1994  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1999  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1997  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 1998  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2001  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2003  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report presents the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Carbon Dioxide Compression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. © C opyright 2009 Carbon Dioxide Compression DOE – EPRI – NIST ... Greenhouse gas sequestration Page 5. 5 © C opyright 2009 ...

2013-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

269

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and...

270

Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing Reducing Diesel Engine Emissions 2 0 1 0 Green TransporTaTion TechnoloGies Compared to traditional gasoline engines, diesel engines require less maintenance, generate energy more efficiently, and produce less carbon dioxide emissions. But when uncontrolled, diesel engines churn out harmful emissions like particu- late matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO x ). Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory are currently working to develop

271

Methane Emissions - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Equivalent; Estimated 2003 ... for about 8.7 percent of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions when weighted by methane’s global warming potential factor.

272

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

273

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Beyond Tailpipe Emissions Greenhouse Gas Emissions for Electric and Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Driving your vehicle can yield both greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from your vehicle's tailpipe and GHG emissions related to the production of the fuel used to power your vehicle. For example, activities associated with fuel production such as feedstock extraction, feedstock transport to a processing plant, and conversion of feedstock to motor fuel, as well as distribution of the motor fuel, can all produce GHG emissions. The Fuel Economy and Environment Label provides a Greenhouse Gas Rating, from 1 (worst) to 10 (best), based on the vehicle's tailpipe carbon dioxide emissions only, and this rating does not reflect any GHG emissions associated with fuel production.

274

OpenEI - carbon dioxide emissions  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

http:www.eia.govforecastsaeoindex.cfm
...

275

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

by B.D. Hong and E. R. Slatick. Note: This article was originally published in Energy Information Administration, Quarterly Coal Report, January-April 1994, DOE/EIA ...

276

Marketable permits for controlling sulphur dioxide emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe research sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) into the nature of the auctions described in the bills. The research was undertaken at the request of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce to assess how various provisions in the bills might affect the workings of the market. Because the project called for the analysis of market mechanisms that do not now exist, a laboratory'' approach was applied in which artificial markets are created using computerized trading, volunteer subjects, and cash incentives to mimic the markets being studied. Dr. Mark Isaac, at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Jamie Kruse, at the University of Colorado, led teams that designed and conducted the laboratory experiments. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Hale, D.R. (USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)); Bjornstad, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Marketable permits for controlling sulphur dioxide emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe research sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) into the nature of the auctions described in the bills. The research was undertaken at the request of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce to assess how various provisions in the bills might affect the workings of the market. Because the project called for the analysis of market mechanisms that do not now exist, a ``laboratory`` approach was applied in which artificial markets are created using computerized trading, volunteer subjects, and cash incentives to mimic the markets being studied. Dr. Mark Isaac, at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Jamie Kruse, at the University of Colorado, led teams that designed and conducted the laboratory experiments. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Hale, D.R. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Bjornstad, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Weekly Wrap-Up: Testing Wind Blades, Converting Carbon Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Chu announced six projects that aim to find ways of convert captured carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into useful products. The innovative projects -...

279

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 Expenditures include taxes where data are available. 5 In chained (2005) dollars. See "Chained Dollars" in Glossary. 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption.

280

EPA rule requires SO 2 emissions reduction from Texas coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Starting in 2012, power plants in 23 states must meet new sulfur dioxide (SO 2) emissions caps in order to comply with the Cross State Air Pollution ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

282

A Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Vortex Contactor for Carbon Dioxide Separations Kevin T. Raterman (ratekt@inel.gov; 208-526-5444) Michael McKellar (mgq@inel.gov; 208-526-1346) Anna Podgorney (poloak@inel.gov; 208-526-0064) Douglas Stacey (stacde@inel.gov; 208-526-3938) Terry Turner (tdt@inel.gov; 208-526-8623) Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-2110 Brian Stokes (bxs9@pge.com; 415-972-5591) John Vranicar (jjv2@pge.com; 415-972-5591) Pacific Gas & Electric Company 123 Mission Street San Francisco, CA 94105 Introduction Many analysts 1,2,3 identify carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) capture and separation as a major roadblock in efforts to cost effectively mitigate greenhouse gas emissions via sequestration. An assessment 4 conducted by the International Energy Agency (IEA)

283

Higher Education  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Education » Education » Higher Education Higher Education Explore the multiple dimensions of a career at LANL: work with brilliant minds in an inclusive environment rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Education Janelle Vigil-Maestas Community Programs Office (505) 665-4329 Email "The partnership between LANL and regional colleges creates opportunities for students like me to attain challenging and rewarding careers." - Sherry Salas Bachicha Higher Education Resources for Undergraduates, Graduates & Postdocs Opportunities LANL Foundation Scholarships LANL Post Doc Program Programs Certificate in Environmental Monitoring (pdf) Community College Institute (CCI) (pdf) Computer Science and Information Technology Pipeline Program (ADIT/HPC Division) (pdf)

284

The Carbon Emission Analysis System Design of Coal-Fired Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide is the main cause of global warming, that emission has been the world's attention. and the power industry is an important source of carbon dioxide emissions, this paper try to design the system of power plants for carbon emissions coal-fired ... Keywords: Analysis system, Carbon emissions, Energy saving

Han Jieping; Zhang Chengzhen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Method for dissolving plutonium dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for dissolving plutonium dioxide comprises adding silver ions to a nitric acid-hydrofluoric acid solution to significantly speed up dissolution of difficultly soluble plutonium dioxide.

Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Bulk separation of carbon dioxide from natural gas  

SciTech Connect

In the bulk separation of carbon dioxide from feedstocks containing same in admixture with relatively nonsorbable gases using a zeolitic molecular sieve to adsorb selectively the carbon dioxide, higher product purity is attained by terminating the adsorption stroke using the feedstock while the bed still has capacity to adsorb more carbon dioxide at the same conditions, then purging the void space hydrocarbons from the bed using product carbon dioxide at a high partial pressure, and finally desorbing the bed by pressure reduction. (3 claims)

Collins, J.J.

1973-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

287

Emissions & Emission Controls - FEERC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions and Emission Controls In conjunction with the research efforts at FEERC to improve fuel efficiency and reduce petroleum use, research on emissions is conducted with two...

288

Solar-thermal hybridization of Advanced Zero Emissions Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide emissions from power production are believed to have significant contributions to the greenhouse effect and global warming. Alternative energy resources, such as solar radiation, may help abate emissions but ...

El Khaja, Ragheb Mohamad Fawaz

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Constraining the Ratio of Global Warming to Cumulative CO2 Emissions Using CMIP5 Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenarios and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Constraining the ratio of global warming to cumulative CO2 emissions using CMIP5 simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of warming to cumulative emissions of carbon dioxide has been shown to be approximately independent of time and emissions scenario, and directly relates emissions to temperature. It is therefore a potentially important tool for climate ...

Nathan P. Gillett; Vivek K. Arora; Damon Matthews; Myles R. Allen

291

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States, 2000 Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Executive Summary on the Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. These estimates are based on activity data and applied emissions factors and not on measured or metered emissions monitoring.

Perry Lindstrom

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

CYCLIC CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CARBON DIOXIDE STIMULATION ("Huff-and-Puff') (A well-stimulation method) Cyclic CO 2 stimulation is a single-well operation that is developing as a method of rapidly producing oil....

293

SRD 134 Carbon Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

> Return to SRD 134, Index of Semiconductor Process Gases. CARBON DIOXIDE. MW [1]. 44.010. NBP [1]. 194.75 K. TP [1]. 216.59 K. CO 2. Pc [1]. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

294

Harmful Exhaust Emissions Monitoring of Road Vehicle Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Road vehicle improve the quality of people's life, however harmful vehicle exhaust emissions, such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), hydrocarbon (HC), and sulphur dioxide (SO2), have become more and more unacceptable ... Keywords: optic absorption spectroscopy based gas sensor, harmful exhaust emission monitoring, engine vibration

Chuliang Wei; Zhemin Zhuang; H. Ewald; A. I. Al-Shamma'a

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

A technical and economic analysis of a natural gas combined cycle power plant with carbon dioxide capture using membrane separation technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and storage (CCS) is a key technology to reduce anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate the potential effects of climate… (more)

Ducker, Michael Jay

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geothermal Electrical Production CO2 Emissions Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Emission of ?greenhouse gases? into the environment has become an increasing concern. Deregulation of the electrical market will allow consumers to select power suppliers that utilize ?green power.? Geothermal power is classed as ?green power? and has lower emissions of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour of electricity than even the cleanest of fossil fuels, natural gas. However, previously published estimates of carbon dioxide emissions are relatively old and need revision. This study estimates that the average carbon dioxide emissions from geothermal and fossil fuel power plants are: geothermal 0.18 , coal 2.13, petroleum 1.56 , and natural gas 1.03 pounds of carbon dioxide per kilowatt-hour respectively.

K. K. Bloomfield (INEEL); J. N. Moore (Energy and Geoscience Institute)

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Methane and carbon dioxide production from simulated anaerobic degradation of cattle carcasses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study evaluates methane and carbon dioxide production after land burial of cattle carcasses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Disposal of animal mortalities is often overlooked in evaluating the environmental impacts of animal production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer we quantify annual emissions from cattle carcass disposal in the United States as 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. - Abstract: Approximately 2.2 million cattle carcasses require disposal annually in the United States. Land burial is a convenient disposal method that has been widely used in animal production for disposal of both daily mortalities as well as during catastrophic mortality events. To date, greenhouse gas production after mortality burial has not been quantified, and this study represents the first attempt to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from land burial of animal carcasses. In this study, anaerobic decomposition of both homogenized and unhomogenized cattle carcass material was investigated using bench-scale reactors. Maximum yields of methane and carbon dioxide were 0.33 and 0.09 m{sup 3}/kg dry material, respectively, a higher methane yield than that previously reported for municipal solid waste. Variability in methane production rates were observed over time and between reactors. Based on our laboratory data, annual methane emissions from burial of cattle mortalities in the United States could total 1.6 Tg CO{sub 2} equivalents. Although this represents less than 1% of total emissions produced by the agricultural sector in 2009, greenhouse gas emissions from animal carcass burial may be significant if disposal of swine and poultry carcasses is also considered.

Yuan Qi; Saunders, Samuel E. [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States); Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L., E-mail: sbartelt2@unl.edu [Department of Civil Engineering, Peter Kiewit Institute, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Omaha, NE (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

298

BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metallic Inclusions in Uranium Dioxide", LBL-11117 (1980).in Hypostoichiornetric Uranium Dioxide 11 , LBL-11095 (OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa L. Yang and

Yang, Rosa L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 Figure 75 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 76 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in IEO2007 and IEO2008, 2005-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

300

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 80. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 80 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 81. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Liquids Combustion by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 81 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao increase in Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over the past five decades, specific ways to reduce. Early age carbonation curing of concrete is an effective measure to sequester recovered CO2 in lime

Barthelat, Francois

302

DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations DOE Seeks Applications for Tracking Carbon Dioxide Storage in Geologic Formations February 19, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to enhance the capability to simulate, track, and evaluate the potential risks of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in geologic formations. Geologic storage is considered to be a key technological solution to mitigate CO2 emissions and combat climate change. DOE anticipates making multiple project awards under this FOA and, depending on fiscal year 2009 appropriations, may be able to provide up to $24 million to be distributed among selected recipients. This investment is

303

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics Recycling Carbon Dioxide to Make Plastics May 20, 2013 - 1:31pm Addthis Novomer’s thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Novomer's thermoplastic pellets incorporate waste CO2 into a variety of consumer products. Why is this important? By using CO2 that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere, the process has the potential to cut greenhouse gas emissions while simultaneously reducing petroleum consumption and producing useful products for American consumers. The world's first successful large-scale production of a polypropylene carbonate (PPC) polymer using waste carbon dioxide (CO2) as a key raw material has resulted from a projected funded in part by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy.

304

Coal Bed Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE R. Stanton (rstanton@usgs.gov; 703-648-6462) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 R. Flores (rflores@usgs.gov; 303-236-7774) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 P.D. Warwick (pwarwick@usgs.gov; 703-648-6469) H. Gluskoter (halg@usgs.gov; 703-648-6429) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 G.D. Stricker (303-236-7763) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 Introduction Geologic sequestration of CO 2 generated from fossil fuel combustion may be an environmentally attractive method to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Of the geologic options, sequestering CO

305

Carbon Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents Dioxide Capture Process with Regenerable Sorbents sorbent material. Additionally, the design of the system incorporates a cross- flow moving-bed reactor where the gas flows horizontally through a "panel" of solid sorbent that is slowly moving down-wards under gravity flow. With the expanded use of fossil fuels expected throughout the world, the increase in CO 2 emissions may prove to contribute even more significantly to global climate change. To address this problem, carbon sequestration scientists and engineers have proposed a number of methods to remove CO 2 from gas streams, such as chemical absorption with a solvent, membrane separation, and cryogenic fractionation. However, all of these methods are expensive and possibly cost-prohibitive for a specific application.

306

Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fill Depleted Uranium (DU) Dioxide Fill DU dioxide in the form of sand may be used to fill the void spaces in the waste package after the package is loaded with SNF. This...

307

METHOD OF SINTERING URANIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This patent relates to a method of sintering uranium dioxide. Uranium dioxide bodies are heated to above 1200 nif- C in hydrogen, sintered in steam, and then cooled in hydrogen. (AEC)

Henderson, C.M.; Stavrolakis, J.A.

1963-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

308

Available Technologies: Acceleration of Carbon Dioxide ...  

APPLICATIONS OF TECHNOLOGY: Carbon dioxide capture and sequestration; ADVANTAGES: Accelerated capture of carbon dioxide; Effective at extremely dilute (nanomolar ...

309

Ionic Liquid Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Separation  

SciTech Connect

Recent scientific studies are rapidly advancing novel technological improvements and engineering developments that demonstrate the ability to minimize, eliminate, or facilitate the removal of various contaminants and green house gas emissions in power generation. The Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) shows promise for carbon dioxide mitigation not only because of its higher efficiency as compared to conventional coal firing plants, but also due to a higher driving force in the form of high partial pressure. One of the novel technological concepts currently being developed and investigated is membranes for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation, due to simplicity and ease of scaling. A challenge in using membranes for CO2 capture in IGCC is the possibility of failure at elevated temperatures or pressures. Our earlier research studies examined the use of ionic liquids on various supports for CO2 separation over the temperature range, 37°C-300°C. The ionic liquid, 1-hexyl-3methylimidazolium Bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide, ([hmim][Tf2N]), was chosen for our initial studies with the following supports: polysulfone (PSF), poly(ether sulfone) (PES), and cross-linked nylon. The PSF and PES supports had similar performance at room temperature, but increasing temperature caused the supported membranes to fail. The ionic liquid with the PES support greatly affected the glass transition temperature, while with the PSF, the glass transition temperature was only slightly depressed. The cross-linked nylon support maintained performance without degradation over the temperature range 37-300°C with respect to its permeability and selectivity. However, while the cross-linked nylon support was able to withstand temperatures, the permeability continued to increase and the selectivity decreased with increasing temperature. Our studies indicated that further testing should examine the use of other ionic liquids, including those that form chemical complexes with CO2 based on amine interactions. The hypothesis is that the performance at the elevated temperatures could be improved by allowing a facilitated transport mechanism to become dominant. Several amine-based ionic liquids were tested on the cross-linked nylon support. It was found that using the amine-based ionic liquid did improve selectivity and permeability at higher temperature. The hypothesis was confirmed, and it was determined that the type of amine used also played a role in facilitated transport. Given the appropriate aminated ionic liquid with the cross-linked nylon support, it is possible to have a membrane capable of separating CO2 at IGCC conditions. With this being the case, the research has expanded to include separation of other constituents besides CO2 (CO, H2S, etc.) and if they play a role in membrane poisoning or degradation. This communication will discuss the operation of the recently fabricated ionic liquid membranes and the impact of gaseous components other than CO2 on their performance and stability.

Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

310

An Analysis of Measures to Reduce the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of California's Personal Computers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2002). Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for thefactors for California of 9.2 megajoules per kilowatt-hour (MJ/kWh) and 0.4 kilograms of carbon dioxide

Horvath, A; Masanet, Eric

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

CO2 emissions, Nuclear energy, Renewable energy and Economic growth in Taiwan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??When the government decided to energy policy, we must first understand the energy and economic growth with a causal link between carbon dioxide emissions, this… (more)

Lin, Yi-Ching

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

How do CO2 emissions vary with the business cycle? An empirical study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There are various explanations that may be attributed to an increased or decreased amount of carbon dioxide emissions during an economic downturn. My thesis aims… (more)

Eichelberger, Nicole

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The carbon dioxide dilemma  

SciTech Connect

The effect of burning fossil fuels on the global climate is discussed. It may be that as we produce carbon dioxide by burning fossil fuels, we create a greenhouse effect which causes temperatures on earth to rise. Implications of changes in global temperatures are discussed.

Edelson, E.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Carbon dioxide sensor  

SciTech Connect

The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Measuring of exhaust gas emissions using absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an optical fibre sensor for the detection of NOx (NO2 and NO) and CO2 in the exhaust system of a road vehicle. The measurement is based on a free path interaction zone which is interrogated using ... Keywords: absorption spectroscopy, air pollution, carbon dioxide, emissions measurement, exhaust gas emissions, gas sensors, infrared, nitrogen dioxide, nitrogen oxide, optical fibre sensors, ultraviolet, vehicle emissions

Eamonn Hawe; Gerard Dooly; Colin Fitzpatrick; Paul Chambers; Elfed Lewis; W. Z. Zhao; T. Sun; K. T. V. Grattan; M. Degner; H. Ewald; S. Lochmann; G. Bramman; C. Wei; D. Hitchen; J. Lucas; A. Al-Shamma'a; E. Merlone-Borla; P. Faraldi; M. Pidria

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is the greenhouse effect? is the greenhouse effect? Greenhouse Effect Greenhouse Effect The greenhouse effect is used to describe the phenomenon whereby the Earth's atmosphere traps solar radiation, caused by the presence of gases, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapor (H2O), in the atmosphere that allow incoming sunlight to pass through but absorb heat radiated back from the Earth's surface, resulting in higher temperatures. The greenhouse effect gets its name from what actually happens in a greenhouse. In a greenhouse, short wavelength visible sunlight shines through the glass panes and warms the air and the plants inside. The radiation emitted from the heated objects is of longer wavelength and is unable to pass through the glass barrier, maintaining a warm temperature

317

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

318

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

is carbon dioxide? is carbon dioxide? CO2 Dipole Carbon Dioxide Carbon dioxide (chemical name CO2) is a clear gas composed of one atom of carbon (C) and two atoms of oxygen (O). Carbon dioxide is one of many chemical forms of carbon on the Earth. It does not burn, and in standard temperature and pressure conditions it is stable, inert, and non-toxic. Carbon dioxide occurs naturally in small amounts (about 0.04%) in the Earth's atmosphere. The volume of CO2 in the atmosphere is equivalent to one individual in a crowd of 2,500. Carbon dioxide is produced naturally by processes deep within the Earth. This CO2 can be released at the surface by volcanoes or might be trapped in natural underground geologic CO2 deposits, similar to underground deposits of oil and natural gas. As a major greenhouse gas, CO2 helps create and

319

CARBON DIOXIDE FIXATION.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar carbon dioxide fixation offers the possibility of a renewable source of chemicals and fuels in the future. Its realization rests on future advances in the efficiency of solar energy collection and development of suitable catalysts for CO{sub 2} conversion. Recent achievements in the efficiency of solar energy conversion and in catalysis suggest that this approach holds a great deal of promise for contributing to future needs for fuels and chemicals.

FUJITA,E.

2000-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

320

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EMISSIONS OF NITROUS OXIDE AND METHANE FROM CONVENTIONAL AND ALTERNATIVE FUEL MOTOR VEHICLES from motor vehicles because unlike emissions of CO2, which are relatively easy to estimate, emissions-related emissions. In the U.S., for example, emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the production and use of motor

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

322

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

323

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 97. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2006 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 98. Carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rising Energy Consumption Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Without capture and sequestration, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. Coal has the highest carbon content and natural gas the lowest, with petroleum in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the shares of these fuels change

324

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the process through which carbon is cycled through the air, ground, plants, animals, and fossil fuels. People and animals inhale oxygen from the air and exhale carbon dioxide...

325

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

327

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

328

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Gasification combined cycle: Carbon dioxide recovery, transport, and disposal  

SciTech Connect

Initiatives to limit carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) emissions have drawn considerable interest to integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power generation. This process can reduce C0[sub 2] production because of its higher efficiency, and it is amenable to C0[sub 2] capture, because C0[sub 2] can be removed before combustion and the associated dilution with atmospheric nitrogen. This paper presents a process-design baseline that encompasses the IGCC system, C0[sub 2] transport by pipeline, and land-based sequestering of C0[sub 2] in geological reservoirs.The intent of this study is to provide the C0[sub 2] budget, or an equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget, associated with each of the individual energy-cycle steps. Design capital and operating costs for the process are included in the full study but are not reported in the present paper. The value used for the equivalent C0[sub 2]'' budget will be 1 kg C0[sub 2]/kWh[sub e].

Doctor, R.D.; Molburg, J.C.; Thimmapuram, P.; Berry, G.F.; Livengood, C.D. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Johnson, R.A. (USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

The authors' long term goal is to develop accurate prediction methods for describing the adsorption behavior of gas mixtures on solid adsorbents over complete ranges of temperature, pressure and adsorbent types. The major objectives of the project are to: (1) measure the adsorption behavior of pure CO{sub 2}, methane, nitrogen and their binary and ternary mixtures on several selected coals having different properties at temperatures and pressures applicable to the particular coal being studied, (2) generalize the adsorption results in terms of appropriate properties of the coals, to facilitate estimation of adsorption behavior for coals other than those studied experimentally, (3) delineate the sensitivity of the competitive adsorption of CO{sub 2}, methane and nitrogen to the specific characteristics of the coal on which they are adsorbed; establish the major differences (if any) in the nature of this competitive adsorption on different coals, and (4) test and/or develop theoretically-based mathematical models to represent accurately the adsorption behavior of mixtures of the type for which measurements are made. The specific accomplishments of this project during this reporting period are summarized below in three broad categories outlining experimentation, model development, and coal characterization. (1) Experimental Work: Our adsorption apparatus was reassembled, and all instruments were tested and calibrated. Having confirmed the viability of the experimental apparatus and procedures used, adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on wet Fruitland coal were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia). These measurements showed good agreement with our previous data and yielded an expected uncertainty of about 2%. Preparations are underway to measure adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on two other coals. (2) Model Development: The experimental data were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of various adsorption models, including the Langmuir/loading ratio correlation, two-dimensional cubic equations of state, and the local density model. In general, all models performed well for Type I adsorption exhibited by methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide up to 8.3 MPa (average deviations within 2%). However, for pressures higher than 8.3 MPa (1200 psia), carbon dioxide produced multilayer adsorption behavior similar to Type IV adsorption. Our results to date indicate that the SLD model may be a suitable choice for modeling multilayer coalbed gas adsorption. However, model improvements are required to (a) account for coal heterogeneity and structure complexity, and (b) provide for more accurate density predictions. (3) Coal Characterization: We have identified several well-characterized coals for use in our adsorption studies. The criteria for coal selection has been guided by the need for coals that (a) span the spectrum of properties encountered in coalbed methane production (such as variation in rank), and (b) originate from coalbed methane recovery sites (e.g., San Juan Basin, Black Warrior Basin, etc.). At Pennsylvania State University, we have completed calibrating our instruments using a well-characterized activated carbon. In addition, we have conducted CO{sub 2} and methane uptakes on four samples, including (a) a widely used commercial activated carbon, BPL from Calgon Carbon Corp.; (b) an Illinois No.6 bituminous coal from the Argonne Premium Coal sample bank; (c) a Fruitland Intermediate coal sample; (d) a dry Fruitland sample. The results are as expected, except for a greater sensitivity to the outgassing temperature. ''Standard'' outgassing conditions (e.g., 383.2 K, overnight), which are often used, may not be appropriate for gas storage in coalbeds. Conditions that are more representative of in-situ coal (approximately 313.2 K) may be much more appropriate. In addition, our results highlight the importance of assessing the degree of approach to adsorption equilibrium.

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

Uncertainty analysis of capacity estimates and leakage potential for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The need to address climate change has gained political momentum, and Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a technology that is seen as being feasible for the mitigation of carbon dioxide emissions. However, there is ...

Raza, Yamama

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Process for sequestering carbon dioxide and sulfur dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for sequestering carbon dioxide, which includes reacting a silicate based material with an acid to form a suspension, and combining the suspension with carbon dioxide to create active carbonation of the silicate-based material, and thereafter producing a metal salt, silica and regenerating the acid in the liquid phase of the suspension.

Maroto-Valer, M. Mercedes (State College, PA); Zhang, Yinzhi (State College, PA); Kuchta, Matthew E. (State College, PA); Andresen, John M. (State College, PA); Fauth, Dan J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

333

Just the Basics: Vehicle Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Are Exhaust Are Exhaust Emissions? In most heavily settled areas of the U.S., the personal automobile is the single greatest producer of harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. Exhaust emissions are generated by the fuel-air mixture burning in internal combus- tion engines, both gasoline-powered and diesel-powered. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation within the vehicle when it is stopped, and again during fueling. The constituents of car (gasoline and diesel) and truck (diesel) emissions vary depending on fuel type and indi- vidual vehicle operating characteris- tics. The bulk of vehicular emissions are composed of water vapor, carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and oxygen (in unconsumed air). There are other pollutants, such as carbon monoxide, nitrogen oxides, unburned fuel, and

334

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Total atmospheric emissivities for a tropical climate  

SciTech Connect

The total atmospheric flux emissivities as a function of water vapor optical depth are reported for meteorological condtions in Thailand. The water vapor optical depth was first calculated as a function of height up to 12 km from the annual average upper air pressures, temperature, and dew points at Bangkok. The flux emissivity was then computed using tabulated data for the flux emissivities of water vapor, carbon dioxide, and ozone at 20/sup 0/C. (SPH)

Exell, R.H.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Carbon dioxide and climate  

SciTech Connect

Scientific and public interest in greenhouse gases, climate warming, and global change virtually exploded in 1988. The Department's focused research on atmospheric CO{sub 2} contributed sound and timely scientific information to the many questions produced by the groundswell of interest and concern. Research projects summarized in this document provided the data base that made timely responses possible, and the contributions from participating scientists are genuinely appreciated. In the past year, the core CO{sub 2} research has continued to improve the scientific knowledge needed to project future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations, to estimate climate sensitivity, and to assess the responses of vegetation to rising concentrations of CO{sub 2} and to climate change. The Carbon Dioxide Research Program's goal is to develop sound scientific information for policy formulation and governmental action in response to changes of atmospheric CO{sub 2}. The Program Summary describes projects funded by the Carbon Dioxide Research Program during FY 1990 and gives a brief overview of objectives, organization, and accomplishments.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Photocatalytic Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Methanol.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The photocatalytic conversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methanol was investigated. The procedure for the carbon dioxide conversion was carried out using a small scale… (more)

Okpo, Emmanuel

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 January Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important...

339

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery The simulation provides an important approach to estimate...

340

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",2008,2039,2000,1971,1892,109...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",194,205,206,216,200,251,...

342

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",484,494,510,562,511,578,620...

343

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",343,340,385,429,377,399,...

344

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",99,103,107,108,97,111,10...

345

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",760,723,765,812,770,518...

346

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",14281,14240,14060,1...

347

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",165,161,155,177,187,174,...

348

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",57,58,67,67,65,50,73,5...

349

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",1169,1151,1149,1126,...

350

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Coal",293,304,281,207,217,194...

351

Graphene Coating-enabled Surface Plasmon Coupled Emission ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... phase-matching constraints with tunable nonreciprocity factor and potentially ... ALICE in Wonderland - A Story of Carbon Nanotube Electron Emission in Space .... Methyl Orange with the Magnesium Hydroxide /Titanium Dioxide Composite ...

352

Table 1.5 Energy Consumption, Expenditures, and Emissions ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Consumption per Capita: Energy Expenditures 1: Energy ... 2009. 94,559,407 [R] 308 : 1,061,220 [R] ... 2 Carbon dioxide emissions from energy consumption. See Table 11.1.

353

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Time Series USA Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimates of monthly carbon dioxide emissions and associated 13C values from fossil-fuel consumption in the U.S.A. In Trends: A Compendium of Data on Global Change Carbon...

354

NETL: Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Demonstration of a Novel Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle Utilizing Pressurized Oxy-Combustion in Conjunction with Cryogenic Compression Project No.: DE-FE0009395 Southwest Research Institute (SwRI) is developing a novel supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) advanced power system utilizing pressurized oxy-combustion in conjunction with cryogenic compression. The proposed power system offers a leap in overall system efficiency while producing an output stream of sequestration ready CO2 at pipeline pressures. The system leverages developments in pressurized oxy-combustion technology and recent developments in sCO2 power cycles to achieve high net cycle efficiencies and produce CO2 at pipeline pressures without requiring additional compression of the flue gas.

355

electricity emission factors | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

emission factors emission factors Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

356

Technical progress in the development of zero emission coal technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We present an update on the development of technologies required for the Zero Emission Carbon (ZEC) concept being pursued by ZECA Corporation. The concept has a highly integrated design involving hydrogasification, a calcium oxide driven reforming step that includes simultaneous C02 separation, coal compatible fuel cells for electricity production and heat recovery, and a closed loop gas system in which coal contaminants are removed either as liquids or solids. The process does not involve any combustion and as such has neither smokestack nor air emissions. An independent assessment of the concept by Nexant, a Bcchtel affiliated company, suggests a net efficiency of approximately 70% for conversion of the higher heat value fuel energy into electrical output. This is even after the penalties of carbon dioxide separation and pressurization to 1000 psi are taken into account. For carbon dioxide sequestration a variety of options are being considered, which include enhanced oil recovery in the near-term and mineral carbonation as a long-term approach. We report on our early results in the development of sulfur tolerant anode materials for solid oxide fuel cells; a critical analysis of the calcium oxide - calcium carbonate cycle; trace element removal; and the recent results of hydrogasification tests.

Ziock, H. J. (Hans-Joachim); Anthony, E. J.; Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Guthrie, G. D. (George D.); Johnson, A. A. (Alan A.); Kramer, A. (Andrew); Lackner, K. S. (Klaus S.); Lau, Francis,; Mukundan, R. (Rangachary); Robison, Thomas W.; Roop, B. J. (Bobbi J.); Ruby, J. D. (John D.); Smith, B. F. (Barbara F.); Wang, J. (Joseph)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Household carbon dioxide production in relation to the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

A survey of 655 households from eastern suburbs of Melbourne was undertaken to determine householders[prime] attitudes to, and understanding of, the greenhouse effect. Carbon dioxide emissions resulting from car, electricity and gas use were computed and household actions which could reduce CO[sub 2] emissions were addressed. Preliminary analysis of the results indicates that householders in this area are aware of, and concerned about, the greenhouse effect, although their understanding of its causes is often poor. Many appreciate the contribution of cars, but are unclear about the relative importance of other household activities. Carbon dioxide emissions from the three sources examined averaged 21[center dot]2 tonnes/year per household and 7[center dot]4 tonnes/year per person. Electricity was the largest contributor (8[center dot]6 tonnes/year), cars the next largest (7[center dot]7 tonnes/year) and gas third (5[center dot] tonnes/year) per household. Emissions varied considerably from household to household. There was a strong positive correlation between availability of economic resources and household CO[sub 2] output from all sources. Carbon dioxide production, particularly from car use, was greater from households which were most distant from a railway station, and from larger households, and numbers of children in the household had little effect on emissions. There were also some economics of scale for households containing more adults. Understanding the causes of the greenhouse bore little relation to change in CO[sub 2] emissions; being concerned about it was associated with a small reduction; but actual actions to reduce car use and household heating, however motivated, produced significant reductions. 12 refs., 9 figs., 6 tabs.

Stokes, D.; Lindsay, A.; Marinopoulos, J.; Treloar, A.; Wescott, G. (Deakin Univ., Clayton (Australia))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmount, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

Cobalt carbonyl catalyzed olefin hydroformylation in supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of olefin hydroformylation is provided wherein an olefin reacts with a carbonyl catalyst and with reaction gases such as hydrogen and carbon monoxide in the presence of a supercritical reaction solvent, such as carbon dioxide. The invention provides higher yields of n-isomer product without the gas-liquid mixing rate limitation seen in conventional Oxo processes using liquid media.

Rathke, J.W.; Klingler, R.J.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Trade, transport, and sinks extend the carbon dioxide responsibility of countries: An editorial essay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Globalization and the dynamics of ecosystem sinks need be considered in post-Kyoto climate negotiations as they increasingly affect the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere. Currently, the allocation of responsibility for greenhouse gas mitigation is based on territorial emissions from fossil-fuel combustion, process emissions and some land-use emissions. However, at least three additional factors can significantly alter a country's impact on climate from carbon dioxide emissions. First, international trade causes a separation of consumption from production, reducing domestic pollution at the expense of foreign producers, or vice versa. Second, international transportation emissions are not allocated to countries for the purpose of mitigation. Third, forest growth absorbs carbon dioxide and can contribute to both carbon sequestration and climate change protection. Here we quantify how these three factors change the carbon dioxide emissions allocated to China, Japan, Russia, USA, and European Union member countries. We show that international trade can change the carbon dioxide currently allocated to countries by up to 60% and that forest expansion can turn some countries into net carbon sinks. These factors are expected to become more dominant as fossil-fuel combustion and process emissions are mitigated and as international trade and forest sinks continue to grow. Emission inventories currently in wide-spread use help to understand the global carbon cycle, but for long-term climate change mitigation a deeper understanding of the interaction between the carbon cycle and society is needed. Restructuring international trade and investment flows to meet environmental objectives, together with the inclusion of forest sinks, are crucial issues that need consideration in the design of future climate policies. And even these additional issues do not capture the full impact of changes in the carbon cycle on the global climate system.

Peters, Glen P [Center for International Climate and Energy Research (CICERO), Oslo, Norway; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hertwich, Edgar G. [Norwegian University of Science and Technology; Saikku, Laura [University of Helsinki

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO decommissioning of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage wells. The manual builds on lessons learned through NETL research; the experiences of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships' (RCSPs) carbon capture, utilization, and storage (CCUS) field tests; and the acquired knowledge of industries that have been actively drilling wells for more than 100 years. In addition, the BPM provides an overview of the well-

363

METHOD OF MAKING PLUTONIUM DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented For converting both trivalent and tetravalent plutonium oxalate to substantially pure plutonium dioxide. The plutonium oxalate is carefully dried in the temperature range of 130 to300DEC by raising the temperature gnadually throughout this range. The temperature is then raised to 600 C in the period of about 0.3 of an hour and held at this level for about the same length of time to obtain the plutonium dioxide.

Garner, C.S.

1959-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

364

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

365

Methanol fuel vehicle demonstration: Exhaust emission testing. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ford Motor Company converted four stock 1986 Ford Crown Victoria sedans to methanol flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs). During 143,108 operational miles from 1987 to 1990, the FFVs underwent more than 300 dynamometer driving tests to measure exhaust emissions, catalytic activity, fuel economy, acceleration, and driveability with gasoline and methanol blend fuels. Dynamometer driving tests included the Federal Test Procedure (FTP), the Highway Fuel Economy Test, and the New York City Cycle. Exhaust emission measurements included carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), non- oxygenated hydrocarbons, organic material hydrocarbon equivalent (OMHCE), formaldehyde, and methanol. Catalytic activity was based on exhaust emissions data from active and inactive catalysts. OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} were usually lower with M85 (85% methanol, 15% gasoline) than with gasoline for both active and inactive catalysts when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near normal operating temperatures. CO was higher with M85 than with gasoline when initial engine and catalyst temperatures were at or near ambient temperature. Formaldehyde and methanol were higher with M85. Active catalyst FTP OMHCE, CO, and NO{sub x} increased as vehicle mileage increased, but increased less with M85 than with gasoline. Energy based fuel economy remained almost constant with changes in fuel composition and vehicle mileage.

Hyde, J.D. [New York State Dept. of Environmental Conservation, Albany, NY (US). Automotive Emissions Lab.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Galactic Diffuse Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interactions of cosmic rays with interstellar nucleons and photons make the Milky Way a bright, diffuse source of high-energy {gamma}-rays. Observationally, the results from EGRET, COMPTEL, and OSSE have now been extended to higher energies by ground-based experiments, with detections of diffuse emission in the Galactic center reported by H.E.S.S. in the range above 100 GeV and of diffuse emission in Cygnus by MILAGRO in the TeV range. In the range above 100 keV, INTEGRAL SPI has found that diffuse emission remains after point sources are accounted for. I will summarize current knowledge of diffuse {gamma}-ray emission from the Milky Way and review some open issues related to the diffuse emission -- some old, like the distribution of cosmic-ray sources and the origin of the 'excess' of GeV emission observed by EGRET, and some recently recognized, like the amount and distribution of molecular hydrogen not traced by CO emission -- and anticipate some of the advances that will be possible with the Large Area Telescope on GLAST. We plan to develop an accurate physical model for the diffuse emission, which will be useful for detecting and accurately characterizing emission from Galactic point sources as well as any Galactic diffuse emission from exotic processes, and for studying the unresolved extragalactic emission.

Digel, Seth W.; /SLAC

2007-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

Global emissions inventories  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric chemistry determines the concentrations of most of the important greenhouse gases except for carbon dioxide. The rate of removal of the greenhouse gases from the atmosphere is also controlled by atmospheric chemistry. The indirect effects of chemical forcing resulting from the chemical interactions of other species can also affect the concentrations of radiatively important gases such as ozone. In order to establish the contribution of any possible climatic change attributable to individual greenhouse gases, spatially and temporally resolved estimates of their emissions need to be established. Unfortunately, for most of the radiatively important species the global magnitudes of their individual fluxes are not known to better than a factor of two and their spatial distributions are even more poorly characterized. Efforts to estimate future projections of potential impacts and to monitor international agreements will require continued research to narrow the uncertainties of magnitude and geographical distribution of emissions.

Dignon, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Process-Related Emissions in the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector International Energy Outlook 2009 Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector result from both energy use and production processes. Together, energy- and process-related emissions in the industrial sector account for about one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions.a Process-related emissions are a direct byproduct of production. Because releases of carbon dioxide are inherent in the production of iron and steel, cement, and aluminum, the potential for reducing process-related emissions is limited. As a result, carbon abatement will face significant technological challenges in the industrial sector. In addition, there are no economical substitutes for these materials or their production processes, and none is likely be available in the near term.

369

RESULTS FROM THE U.S. DOE 2006 SAVE ENERGY NOW ASSESSMENT INITIATIVE: DOE's Partnership with U.S. Industry to Reduce Energy Consumption, Energy Costs, and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the wake of Hurricane Katrina and other severe storms in 2005, natural gas supplies were restricted, prices rose, and industry sought ways to reduce its natural gas use and costs. In October 2005, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Secretary Bodman launched his Easy Ways to Save Energy campaign with a promise to provide energy assessments to 200 of the largest U.S. manufacturing plants. A major thrust of the campaign was to ensure that the nation's natural gas supplies would be adequate for all Americans, especially during home heating seasons. In a presentation to the National Press Club on October 3, 2005, Secretary Bodman said: 'America's businesses, factories, and manufacturing facilities use massive amounts of energy. To help them during this period of tightening supply and rising costs, our Department is sending teams of qualified efficiency experts to 200 of the nation's most energy-intensive factories. Our Energy Saving Teams will work with on-site managers on ways to conserve energy and use it more efficiently.' DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP) responded to the Secretary's campaign with its Save Energy Now initiative, featuring a new and highly cost-effective form of energy assessments. The approach for these assessments drew heavily on the existing resources of ITP's Technology Delivery component. Over the years, ITP-Technology Delivery had worked with industry partners to assemble a suite of respected software decision tools, proven assessment protocols, training curricula, certified experts, and strong partnerships for deployment. Because of the program's earlier activities and the resources that had been developed, ITP was prepared to respond swiftly and effectively to the sudden need to promote improved industrial energy efficiency. Because of anticipated supply issues in the natural gas sector, the Save Energy Now initiative strategically focused on natural gas savings and targeted the nation's largest manufacturing plants--those that consume a total of 1 trillion British thermal units (Btu) or more annually. The approximately 6800 U.S. facilities that fall into this category collectively account for about 53% of all energy consumed by industry in the United States. The 2006 Save Energy Now energy assessments departed from earlier DOE plant assessments by concentrating solely on steam and process heating systems, which are estimated to account for approximately 74% of all natural gas use for manufacturing. The assessments also integrated a strong training component designed to teach industrial plant personnel how to use DOE's steam or process heating opportunity assessment software tools. This approach had the advantages of promoting strong buy-in of plant personnel for the assessment and its outcomes and preparing them better to independently replicate the assessment process at the company's other facilities. The Save Energy Now initiative also included provisions to help plants that applied for but did not qualify for assessments (based on the 1 trillion Btu criterion). Services offered to these plants included (1) an assessment by one of DOE's 26 university-based Industrial Assessment Centers (IACs), (2) a telephone consultation with a systems expert at the DOE's Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Information Center, or (3) other technical materials and services available through ITP (e.g., the Save Energy Now CD). By the end of 2006, DOE had completed all 200 of the promised assessments, identifying potential natural gas savings of more than 50 trillion Btu and energy cost savings of about $500 million. These savings, if fully implemented, could reduce CO2 emissions by 4.04 million metric tons annually. These results, along with the fact that a large percentage of U.S. energy is used by a relatively small number of very large plants, clearly suggest that assessments are an expedient and cost-effective way to significantly affect large amounts of energy use. Building on the success of the 2006 initiative, ITP has expanded the effort in 2007 with the goal of conducting 250 more asse

Wright, Anthony L [ORNL; Martin, Michaela A [ORNL; Gemmer, Bob [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy; Scheihing, Paul [U.S. Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program; Quinn, James [U.S. Department of Energy

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Calculating the probability of injected carbon dioxide plumes encountering faults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Change Special Report on Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage,Probability of Injected Carbon Dioxide Plumes Encounteringthe probability of injected carbon dioxide encountering and

Jordan, P.D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions Glossary: Energy-Related Carbon Emissions For additional terms, refer to: the Glossary of Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 for additional greenhouse gas related terms, the Glossary of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for additional manufacturing terms, and Appendix F of Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 for descriptions of the major industry groups. British Thermal Unit: The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 pound of water by 1 degree Fahrenheit. One quadrillion Btu is 1015 Btu, or 1.055 exajoules. Btu: See British Thermal Unit. Carbon Dioxide: A colorless, odorless, non-poisonous gas that is a normal part of Earth's atmosphere. Carbon dioxide is a product of fossil-fuel combustion as well as other processes. It is considered a greenhouse gas as it traps heat radiated into the atmosphere and thereby contributes to the potential for global warming.

372

Zero emission coal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We discuss a novel, emission-free process for producing hydrogen or electricity from coal. Even though we focus on coal, the basic design is compatible with any carbonaceous fuel. The process uses cyclical carbonation of calcium oxide to promote the production of hydrogen from carbon and water. The carbonation of the calcium oxide removes carbon dioxide from the reaction products and provides the additional energy necessary to complete hydrogen production without additional combustion of carbon. The calcination of the resulting calcium carbonate is accomplished using the high temperature waste heat from solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC), which generate electricity from hydrogen fuel. Converting waste heat back to useful chemical energy allows the process to achieve very high conversion efficiency from fuel energy to electrical energy. As the process is essentially closed-loop, the process is able to achieve zero emissions if the concentrated exhaust stream of CO{sub 2} is sequestered. Carbon dioxide disposal is accomplished by the production of magnesium carbonate from ultramafic rock. The end products of the sequestration process are stable naturally occurring minerals. Sufficient rich ultramafic deposits exist to easily handle all the world's coal.

Ziock, H.; Lackner, K.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

374

Vehicle Emission Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics Vehicle Emission Basics November 22, 2013 - 2:07pm Addthis Vehicle emissions are the gases emitted by the tailpipes of vehicles powered by internal combustion engines, which include gasoline, diesel, natural gas, and propane vehicles. Vehicle emissions are composed of varying amounts of: water vapor carbon dioxide (CO2) nitrogen oxygen pollutants such as: carbon monoxide (CO) nitrogen oxides (NOx) unburned hydrocarbons (UHCs) volatile organic compounds (VOCs) particulate matter (PM) A number of factors determine the composition of emissions, including the vehicle's fuel, the engine's technology, the vehicle's exhaust aftertreatment system, and how the vehicle operates. Emissions are also produced by fuel evaporation during fueling or even when vehicles are

375

Carbon dioxide sequestration: When and how much  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze carbon dioxide (CO sequestration as a strategy to manage future climate change in an optimal economic growth framework. We approach the problem in two ways: first, by using a simple analytical model, and second, by using a numerical optimization model which allows us to explore the problem in a more realistic setting. CO sequestration is not a perfect substitute for avoiding CO2 production because CO2 leaks back to the atmosphere and hence imposes future costs. The “efficiency factor ” of CO2 sequestration can be expressed as the ratio of the avoided emissions to the economically equivalent amount of sequestered CO2 emissions. A simple analytical model in terms of a net-present value criterion suggests that short-term sequestration methods such as afforestation can be somewhat ( 60 %) efficient, while long term sequestration (such as deep aquifer or deep ocean sequestration) can be very ( 90%) efficient. A numerical study indicates that CO2 sequestration methods at a cost within the range of present estimates reduce the economically optimal CO2 concentrations and climate related damages. The potential savings associated with CO2 sequestration is equivalent in our utilitarian model to a one-time investment of several percent of present gross world product. 1 1

Klaus Keller; Zili Yang; Matt Hall; David F. Bradford

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge sector is believed to be responsible for 28.4% of our greenhouse gas emissions (see figure), including 33% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCs

377

Environmental Emissions from Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide.

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Environmental Emissions From Energy Technology Systems: The Total Fuel Cycle  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary report that compares emissions during the entire project life cycle for a number of fossil-fueled and renewable electric power systems, including geothermal steam (probably modeled after The Geysers). The life cycle is broken into Fuel Extraction, Construction, and Operation. The only emission covered is carbon dioxide. (DJE 2005)

San Martin, Robert L.

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

$36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture DOE to Provide $36 Million to Advance Carbon Dioxide Capture July 31, 2008 - 2:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that it will provide $36 million for 15 projects aimed at furthering the development of new and cost-effective technologies for the capture of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the existing fleet of coal-fired power plants. "Currently, the existing U.S. coal fleet accounts for over half of all electricity generated in this country," U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman said. "The projects announced today will combat climate change and help meet current and future energy needs by curbing CO2 emissions from existing coal-fired plants."

380

U.S. zero emission coal alliance techology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For coal to maintain its major role in supplying the world's energy, eventually all emissions to the atmosphere must be eliminated. Not only must conventional pollutants, like sulfur compounds and dust particles be kept out of the air, but also the far larger quantities of carbon dioxide that result from the combustion of carbon. We present a new technology for coal-based power that generates hydrogen from carbon and water, avoids emissions to the atmosphere, and disposes of the carbon dioxide as inert, solid mineral carbonates. Based on the available resources, coal power is sustainable for centuries. Our zero emission technology makes coal energy as clean as renewable energy.

Lackner, K. S. (Klaus S.); Ziock, H. J. (Hans-Joachim)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration ProjeCt Background Since September 2000, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been transported from the Dakota Gasification Plant in North Dakota through a 320-km pipeline and injected into the Weyburn oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada. The CO 2 has given the Weyburn field, discovered 50 years ago, a new life: 155 million gross barrels of incremental oil are slated to be recovered by 2035 and the field is projected to be able to store 30 million tonnes of CO 2 over 30 years. CO 2 injection began in October of 2005 at the adjacent Midale oilfield, and an additional 45-60 million barrels of oil are expected to be recovered during 30 years of continued operation. A significant monitoring project associated with the Weyburn and Midale commercial

382

Reaction products of chlorine dioxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Concern over the presence of trihalomethanes and other chlorinated by-products in chlorinedisinfected drinking water has led to extensive investigations of treatment options for controlling these by-products. Among these treatment options is the use of an alternative disinfectant such as chlorine dioxide. Although chlorine dioxide does not react to produce trihalomethanes, considerable evidence does exist that chlorine dioxide, like chlorine, will produce other organic by-products. The literature describes chlorinated and nonchlorinated derivatives including acids, epoxides, quinones, aldehydes, disulfides, and sulfonic acids that are products of reactions carried out under conditions that are vastly different from those experienced during drinking water treatment. Evidence is beginning to emerge, however, that some by-products in these categories may be produced. Certain specific volatile aldehydes and halogenated derivatives as determined by the total organic halogen parameter are among those by-products that have been measured.

Alan A. Stevens

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HYBRID HETEROGENEOUS CATALYSTS FOR HYDROGENATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE Lucia M. Petkovic, Harry W. Rollins, Daniel M. Ginosar, and Kyle C. Burch Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625 Idaho Falls, ID 83415-2208 Introduction Anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide, a gas often associated with global warming, have increased considerably since the beginning of the industrial age.1 In the U.S., stationary CO2 sources, such as electricity generation plants, produce about one-third of the anthropogenic CO2 generation. Reports2 indicate that the power required to recover 90% of the CO2 from an integrated coal-fired power-plant is about 10% of the power-plant capacity. This energy requirement can be reduced to less than 1% if the recovered CO2 is applied to the production of synthetic fuels. However, the lack of efficient catalysts along with the costs of energy and hydrogen has prevented the development of technologies for direct hydrogenation of CO2.3 Although the cost of hydrogen for hydrogenating CO2 is not economically attractive at present, the future production of hydrogen by nuclear power sources could completely change this scenario.2 Still, an efficient catalyst will be essential for commercial application of those processes. The objective of the work presented here was the development of hybrid catalysts for one-step carbon dioxide hydrogenation to liquid fuels. The hybrid catalysts, which were prepared by two novel techniques, included a copper/zinc oxide catalytic function distributed within an acidic zeolitic matrix. Results of catalyst activity and selectivity studies at atmospheric pressure are presented in this contribution. Experimental Catalysts were prepared by two novel techniques and under several different conditions to produce copper/zinc oxide/zeolite materials. Once synthesized, samples were pelletized and the fraction between 40-60 mesh was utilized for the experiments. Two hundred milligrams of catalyst were loaded in a U-tube stainless steel reactor and a flow of 100 cm3/min of a 10:90 H2:Ar mixture was passed through the catalyst bed while the temperature was increased from room temperature to 513 K at 1.8 K/min and held at 513 K for 15 h. A reactant gas mixture composed by 10 cm3/min of CO2 and 30 cm3/min of H2 was then passed through the catalyst bed and the reaction products monitored by on-line gas chromatographic analyses using an SRI Multiple Gas Analyzer #2 equipped with 3 columns (MoleSieve 13X, Hayesep-D, and MXT-1) and 3 detectors (TCD, FID, and FID-methanizer). This GC system allowed for quantification of inert gases, CO, CO2, methanol, dimethylether, higher alcohols, water, and hydrocarbons up to C20. One hundred milligrams of a commercial syngas-to-methanol catalyst along with the same amount of a commercial zeolite catalyst was utilized under the same reaction conditions for comparison purposes. These catalysts were utilized either in two-layers (Com1) or mixed together (Com2). Results and Discussion Under the conditions applied in this study, the main reaction products were CO, CH3OH, CH3OCH3, and H2O. Methanol and dimethylether production rates and selectivities with respect to CO formation are presented in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Although the activity of the synthesized catalysts did not surpass the commercial catalysts, the selectivity to oxygenates with respect to CO on most of the synthesized catalysts were better than on the commercial catalysts. For example, cat

Licia M. Petkovic; Harry W. Rollins; Daniel M. Ginosar; Kyle C. Burch

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

385

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)-Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Agency/Company /Organization: Oak Ridge National Laboratory Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: GHG inventory, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/emis/meth_reg.html Country: United States, Canada, Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Venezuela, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Luxembourg, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, United Kingdom, Uzbekistan, Iran, Kuwait, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Algeria, Egypt, South Africa, Australia, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Malaysia, New Zealand, Pakistan, Philippines, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand

386

SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

387

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

Erbium diffusion in silicon dioxide layers prepared by magnetron sputtering, chemical vapor deposition, and thermal growth has been investigated by secondary ion mass spectrometry, and diffusion coefficients have been extracted from simulations based on Fick's second law of diffusion. Erbium diffusion in magnetron sputtered silicon dioxide from buried erbium distributions has in particular been studied, and in this case a simple Arrhenius law can describe the diffusivity with an activation energy of 5.3{+-}0.1 eV. Within a factor of two, the erbium diffusion coefficients at a given temperature are identical for all investigated matrices.

Lu Yingwei; Julsgaard, B.; Petersen, M. Christian [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Jensen, R. V. Skougaard [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Pedersen, T. Garm; Pedersen, K. [Department of Physics and Nanotechnology, Aalborg University, DK-9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Larsen, A. Nylandsted [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Interdisciplinary Nanoscience Center-iNANO, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

388

OXYGEN DIFFUSION IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IN HYPOSTOICHIOMETRIC URANIUM DIOXIDE Kee Chul Kim Ph.D.727-366; Figure 1. Oxygen-uranium phase-equilibrium _ystem [18]. uranium dioxide powders and 18 0 enriched carbon

Kim, Kee Chul

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Potential Impact of Carbon Dioxide on Potable Groundwater: A Controlled Release Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capturing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources and injecting them deep underground in geologic formations is one of several options being considered to offset the effects of CO2 emissions. To provide information about geologic storage of CO2 to the public and regulators, industry needs to carefully study all potential environmental risks, including the potential for CO2 movement from deep storage sites into shallow aquifers containing ...

2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

390

NREL: News - NREL Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

013 013 NREL Calculates Emissions and Costs of Power Plant Cycling Necessary for Increased Wind and Solar in the West September 24, 2013 New research from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) quantifies the potential impacts of increasing wind and solar power generation on the operators of fossil-fueled power plants in the West. To accommodate higher amounts of wind and solar power on the electric grid, utilities must ramp down and ramp up or stop and start conventional generators more frequently to provide reliable power for their customers - a practice called cycling. The study finds that the carbon emissions induced by more frequent cycling are negligible (<0.2%) compared with the carbon reductions achieved through the wind and solar power generation evaluated in the study. Sulfur dioxide

391

Flame Inhibition by Ferrocene, Carbon Dioxide, and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flame Inhibition by Ferrocene, Carbon Dioxide, and Trifluoromethane Blends: Synergistic ... a straight sided schlieren image which is captured by a ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Atmospheric Trace Gases, Carbon Isotopes, Radionuclides, and Aerosols: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Data from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Some of the collections may also be included in the CDIAC publication titled Trends Online: A Compendium of Global Change Data. Most datasets, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. Information related to atmospheric carbon dioxide data includes: Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Carbon Isotopes • Atmospheric carbon dioxide records from Mauna Loa, Hawaii • Monthly atmospheric CO2 mixing ratios and other data from the NOAA/CMDL continuous monitoring network • Data from the CSIRO GASLAB Flask Sampling Network • Atmospheric CO2 records from continuous measurements at Jubany Station, Antarctica and from 10 sites in the SIO air sampling network • Historical data from the extended Vostok ice core (2003) and the Siple Station ice core (1997) • Historical records from the Law Dome DE08, DE08-2, and DSS ice cores (1998) • AmeriFlux Carbon Dioxide, Water Vapor, and Energy Balance Measurements • Data from the Canadian Background Air Pollution Monitoring Network • Flask Samples from at U.S.S.R.-Operated Sites (1991) • The CISIRO (Australia) Monitoring Program from Aircraft for 1972-1981 • CO2 Concentrations in Surface Water and the Atmosphere during 1986-1989 NOAA/PMEL Cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans • Surface Water and Atmospheric CO2 and Nitrous Oxide Observations by Shipboard Automated Gas Chromatography: Results from Expeditions Between 1977 and 1990 (1992) • IPCC Working Group 1, 1994: Modeling Results Relating Future Atmospheric CO2 Concentrations to Industrial Emissions (1995). New datasets are added when available to the category of atmospheric carbon dioxide.

393

EIA projections for carbon dioxide emissions reflect changes in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards and other policies and measures at local, state, and federal levels ...

394

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation, home heating (fuel oil and natural gas) andgas and fuel oil to form an estimate of total home heatingfrom home heating. In general, places that use fuel oil have

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Have a question, comment, or suggestion for a future article? Send your feedback to todayinenergy@eia.gov

396

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

wastewater treatment or manure management processes; CO2 from the combustion of biogas collected from biological decomposition of waste in landfills, wastewater treatment or...

397

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

serve a generator with a nameplate capacity of 15 MW or more, or fossil-fuel fired boilers or indirect heat exchangers with a maximum input heat capacity of 250 MMBtuhr or...

398

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

subsidize the areas that have less energy usage and tax theareas with more energy usage. Third, even with an optimal? t ) , the difference in energy usage times the difference

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Transit Database, the 2001 Residential Energy Consumptionuse this energy consumption data to estimate national levelNational Transit Database, the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

EIA projections for carbon dioxide emissions reflect changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... The lowered projections reflect both market and policy developments that have reduced recent and projected ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

all of the predicted gas usage numbers in census tracts thatto multiply fuel and gas usage by the standard conversionoil and natural gas) and electricity usage. We use data from

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Portland, OR Syracuse, NY Albany, NY New York, NY Salt LakeRI Syracuse, NY New York, NY Albany, NY Tacoma, WA Salt LakeTN/A~S Tulsa, OK Albany-Schene~Y MO~L St. New York-Nort~J

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Estimating Carbon Dioxide Emissions Factors for the California Electric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for 1990. 6 By late 1999, California's CAISO utilities had divested most of their thermal power plants By late 1999, California's CAISO utilities had divested most of their thermal power plants to independent release), processing, and delivery of fuels to the power plant; or by utilities' support services (e

404

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are...

405

Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel ... acid rain program in the eastern half of the United States. ... and settlements under the Clean Air Act's New Source Review ...

406

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of regional disparity. Detroit leads the country in homelower in Chicago than in Detroit. The fourth column showsless than suburbanites. In Detroit, central city residents

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

Shale, Correll C. (Morgantown, WV); Cross, William G. (Morgantown, WV)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

408

Carbon dioxide emissions grow in the residential sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Accounting for this increased CO 2 share is the 19-fold growth in residential ... illustrates the importance of the relationship of power plant ...

409

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions declined in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... which shifted power generation from the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel ...

410

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

n Seattle-Evere~A Sacramento, CA Albuquerque, NM Providence-OH~N K~N TN Portland-Vanc~R Sacramento, CA Riverside-San ~AMI Miami-Hialeah~L Sacramento, CA Seattle-Evere~A Raleigh-

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1 Published The ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce the release of the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1: Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 3.1. Data set prepared by J.T. Randerson, G.R. van der Werf, L. Giglio, G.J. Collatz, and P.S. Kasibhatla. This data set provides monthly burned area, and monthly and annual fire emissions data from July 1996 to February 2012. Emissions data are available for carbon (C), dry matter (DM), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), hydrogen (H2), nitrous oxide (N2O), nitrogen oxides (NOx), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), organic carbon (OC), black carbon (BC), particulate matter 2.5 micron (PM2p5), total particulate matter (TPM), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) among others. The C4 fraction of

412

Method for dissolving plutonium dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The fluoride-catalyzed, non-oxidative dissolution of plutonium dioxide in HNO.sub.3 is significantly enhanced in rate by oxidizing dissolved plutonium ions. It is believed that the oxidation of dissolved plutonium releases fluoride ions from a soluble plutonium-fluoride complex for further catalytic action.

Tallent, Othar K. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Translating Energy Efficiency into CO2 Emissions Reduction: A Modeling Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a methodology that EPRI has developed to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though energy efficiency is intuitively recognized to reduce carbon emissions, one barrier to its broader application is the lack of precision in attributing emissions reductions to specific program activities. Coarse estimates based on utilities' average emissions factors, while straightforward to calculate, do not provide enough specificity on emissions reductions...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

414

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

415

Carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

The current status and outlook for carbon dioxide in the immediate future has been examined by Kenneth M. Stern of Chem Systems Inc. Stern. Most of the tonnage carbon dioxide being used for EOR comes from natural gas wells. Major projects are now in progress to develop natural carbon dioxide sources and to transport the gas via pipeline to the injection region. These projects and the maximum permissible cost of carbon dioxide at current petroleum prices are discussed. Potential sources include exhaust gases from power plants, natural gas processing plants, chemical plants, and natural carbon dioxide wells.

Not Available

1986-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

416

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

417

Table 7. Electric Power Industry Emissions Estimates, 1990 Through 2010 (Thousan  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Emission Type",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010 "Sulfur Dioxide" " Petroleum","*","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*" " Other Renewables1","-","-","-","-","-","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*","*"

418

Global Carbon Emissions in the Coming Decades: The Case of China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Decline in China’s National Energy Consumption in the LateNational Laboratory, Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center; 1950-2006 emissions data are derived from revised total energy consumption

Levine, Mark D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Particulate emissions from combustion of biomass in conventional combustion (air) and oxy-combustion conditions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Oxy-fuel combustion is a viable technology for new and existing coal-fired power plants, as it facilitates carbon capture and thereby, can reduce carbon dioxide emissions.… (more)

Ruscio, Amanda

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since 1992 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Novel Dual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

amine modified membrane capable of economically and efficiently removing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the flue gas of coal-fired power plants. The use of such an...

422

U.S. energy-related CO 2 emissions in early 2012 lowest since ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions resulting from energy use during the first quarter of 2012 were the lowest in two decades for any January-March period.

423

1996 update on compliance and emissions trading under the U.S. acid rain program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 1997This paper reports on the second year of compliance with the sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions-reduction and -trading provisions of the Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA). The material is intended ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Unanticipated Consequences of Regional Greenhouse Gas Policies: Criteria Emissions and the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiave.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) has been developed by 10 Northeastern and Mid-Atlantic states in an attempt to curb emissions of carbon dioxide (C02)… (more)

Olesniewicz, Timothy J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,922,792 entitled "Method for Sequestering Carbon Dioxide and Sulfur Dioxide Utilizing a Plurality of Waste Streams." Disclosed in this patent is the invention of a neutralization/sequestration method that concomitantly treats bauxite residues from aluminum production processes, as well as brine wastewater from oil and gas production processes. The method uses an integrated approach that coincidentally treats multiple industrial waste by-product streams. The end results include neutralizing caustic

426

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

427

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Capturing Carbon Dioxide From Air Klaus S. Lackner (kl2010@columbia.edu; 212-854-0304) Columbia University 500 West 120th Street New York, NY 10027 Patrick Grimes (pgrimes@worldnet.att.net; 908-232-1134) Grimes Associates Scotch Plains, NJ 07076 Hans-J. Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov; 505-667-7265) Los Alamos National Laboratory P.O.Box 1663 Los Alamos, NM 87544 Abstract The goal of carbon sequestration is to take CO 2 that would otherwise accumulate in the atmosphere and put it in safe and permanent storage. Most proposed methods would capture CO 2 from concentrated sources like power plants. Indeed, on-site capture is the most sensible approach for large sources and initially offers the most cost-effective avenue to sequestration. For distributed, mobile sources like cars, on-board capture at affordable cost would not be

428

Carbon Dioxide Compression and Transportation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the state of the art regarding carbon dioxide CO2 compression and transportation in the United States and Canada. The primary focus of the report was on CO2 compression because it is a significant cost and energy penalty in carbon capture and storage CCS. The secondary focus of the report was to document the state of the art of CO2 pipeline transportation in the United States and Canada.

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

429

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Carbon Dioxide: Threat or Opportunity?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the past century, fossil fuel consumption has added carbon dioxide to the atmosphere at rapidly increasing rates. The prospect of further acceleration of this rate by turning from petroleum to coal has alarmed climatologists because of possible catastrophic long term effects on world climate. An alternative to discharging carbon dioxide into the atmosphere is to find new uses. One possible use is in 'Biofactories'. Biofactories may be achieved by exploiting two new developing technologies: Solar (Photosynthesis) energy, and genetic engineering. Some exciting new developments in genetic engineering will be touched on together with established bio-engineering-aquaculture, hydroponics, yeast, pharmaceutical production, fermentation, single cell protein, etc. A 'bio-factory' will be described, with a feed stream of carbon dioxide, water, nutrients containing sulfur, nitrogen, phosphorus and trace elements, and living culture interacting with light under controlled conditions to yield food and raw materials. Candidate products will be suggested and a few of the problems anticipated. Engineering and logistic requirements will be outlined and the economic impact assessed.

McKinney, A. R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Power Plant Emission Reductions Power Plant Emission Reductions Using a Generation Performance Standard by J. Alan Beamon, Tom Leckey, and Laura Martin There are many policy instruments available for reducing power plant emissions, and the choice of a policy will affect compliance decisions, costs, and prices faced by consumers. In a previous analysis, the Energy Information Administration analyzed the impacts of power sector caps on nitrogen oxides (NO x ), sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ), and carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, assuming a policy instru- ment patterned after the SO 2 allowance program created in the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. 1 This report compares the results of that work with the results of an analysis that assumes the use of a dynamic generation performance standard (GPS) as an instrument for reducing CO 2 emissions. 2 In general, the results of the two analyses are similar: to reduce

432

Coiled tubing drilling with supercritical carbon dioxide  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for increasing the efficiency of drilling operations by using a drilling fluid material that exists as supercritical fluid or a dense gas at temperature and pressure conditions existing at a drill site. The material can be used to reduce mechanical drilling forces, to remove cuttings, or to jet erode a substrate. In one embodiment, carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) is used as the material for drilling within wells in the earth, where the normal temperature and pressure conditions cause CO.sub.2 to exist as a supercritical fluid. Supercritical carbon dioxide (SC--CO.sub.2) is preferably used with coiled tube (CT) drilling equipment. The very low viscosity SC--CO.sub.2 provides efficient cooling of the drill head, and efficient cuttings removal. Further, the diffusivity of SC--CO.sub.2 within the pores of petroleum formations is significantly higher than that of water, making jet erosion using SC--CO.sub.2 much more effective than water jet erosion. SC--CO.sub.2 jets can be used to assist mechanical drilling, for erosion drilling, or for scale removal. A choke manifold at the well head or mud cap drilling equipment can be used to control the pressure within the borehole, to ensure that the temperature and pressure conditions necessary for CO.sub.2 to exist as either a supercritical fluid or a dense gas occur at the drill site. Spent CO.sub.2 can be vented to the atmosphere, collected for reuse, or directed into the formation to aid in the recovery of petroleum.

Kolle , Jack J. (Seattle, WA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Version 2 Global Fire Emissions Database Available  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Fire Emissions Database Available Global Fire Emissions Database Available The ORNL DAAC announces the release of the data set "Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 2 (GFEDv2)." This data set, which supersedes and replaces the Global Fire Emissions Database, Version 1 (GFEDv1), consists of 1 degree x 1 degree gridded monthly burned area, fuel loads, combustion completeness, and fire emissions of carbon (C), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHC), molecular hydrogen (H2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), nitrous oxide (N2O), particulate matter (PM2.5), total particulate matter (TPM), total carbon (TC), organic carbon (OC), and black carbon (BC) for the time period January 1997 - December 2004. For more information or to access this data set, please see the Vegetation

434

Study of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Power Cycle for Low Grade Heat Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research on supercritical carbon dioxide power cycles has been mainly focused on high temperature applications, such as Brayton cycle in a nuclear power plant. This paper conducts a comprehensive study on the feasibility of a CO2-based supercritical power cycle for low-grade heat conversion. Energy and exergy analyses of the cycle were conducted to discuss the obstacles as well as the potentials of using supercritical carbon dioxide as the working fluid for supercritical Rankine cycle, Carbon dioxide has desirable qualities such as low critical temperature, stability, little environmental impact and low cost. However, the low critical temperature might be a disadvantage for the condensation process. Comparison between a carbon dioxide-based supercritical Rankine cycle and an organic fluid-based supercritical Rankine cycle showed that the former needs higher pressure to achieve the same efficiency and a heat recovery system is necessary to desuperheat the turbine exhaust and pre-heat the pressure charged liquid.

Vidhi, Rachana [University of South Florida, Tampa; Goswami, Yogi D. [University of South Florida, Tampa; Chen, Huijuan [University of South Florida, Tampa; Stefanakos, Elias [University of South Florida, Tampa; Kuravi, Sarada [University of South Florida, Tampa; Sabau, Adrian S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE FROM FLUE GAS USING DRY REGENERABLE SORBENTS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to develop a simple and inexpensive process to separate CO{sub 2} as an essentially pure stream from a fossil fuel combustion system using a regenerable sorbent. The sorbents being investigated in this project are primarily alkali carbonates, and particularly sodium carbonate and potassium carbonate, which are converted to bicarbonates through reaction with carbon dioxide and water vapor. Bicarbonates are regenerated to carbonates when heated, producing a nearly pure CO{sub 2} stream after condensation of water vapor. This quarter, electrobalance tests suggested that higher temperature calcination of trona leds to reduced carbonation activity in subsequent cycles, but that calcination in dry carbon dioxide did not result in decreased activity relative to calcination in helium. Following higher temperature calcination, sodium bicarbonate (SBC) No.3 has greater activity than either coarse or fine grades of trona. Fixed bed testing of calcined SBC No.3 at 70 C confirmed that high rates of carbon dioxide absorption are possible and that the resulting product is a mixture of Wegscheider's salt and sodium carbonate. In fluidized bed testing of supported potassium carbonate, very rapid carbonation rates were observed. Activity of the support material complicated the data analysis. A milled, spherical grade of SBC appeared to be similar in attrition and abrasion characteristics to an unmilled, less regularly shaped SBC. The calcination behavior, at 107 C, for the milled and unmilled materials was also similar.

David A. Green; Brian S. Turk; Jeffrey W. Portzer; Raghubir P.Gupta; William J. McMichael; Ya Liang; Douglas P. Harrison

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

TABLE OF CONTENTS Carbon Dioxide Reduction Metallurgy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical Utilization of Sequestered Carbon Dioxide as a. Booster of Hydrogen ... CO2 Capture and Sequestration – Implications for the Metals. Industry.

437

Atmospheric carbon dioxide and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a non-technical review of the problems associated with atmospheric carbon dioxide and the resulting greenhouse effect. (TEM)

Firestine, M.W. (ed.)

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Carbon Ion Pump for Carbon Dioxide Removal  

coal fired power plants; oil or gas fired power plants; cement production; bio-fuel combustion; Separation of carbon dioxide from other combustion ...

439

Carbon Dioxide Transportation and Sequestration Act (Illinois...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

process for the issuance of a certificate of authority by an owner or operator of a pipeline designed, constructed, and operated to transport and to sequester carbon dioxide...

440

Scientists Crack Materials Mystery of Vanadium Dioxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dec 1, 2010 ... Using a condensed physics theory to explain the observed phase behaviors of vanadium dioxide, ORNL scientists have discovered that the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

NETL: News Release - Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

19, 2004 19, 2004 Frio Formation Test Well Injected With Carbon Dioxide Researchers Perform Small Scale, Short Term Carbon Sequestration Field Test HOUSTON, TX - In the first U.S. field test to investigate the ability of brine formations to store greenhouse gasses, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy are closely monitoring 1,600 tons of carbon dioxide that were injected into a mile-deep well in Texas in October. The test is providing unique data to help investigators understand the viability of geologic sequestration as a means of reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The Frio Brine Pilot experimental site is 30 miles northeast of Houston, in the South Liberty oilfield. Researchers at the University of Texas at Austin's Bureau of Economic Geology drilled a 5,753 foot injection well earlier this year, and developed a nearby observation well to study the ability of the high-porosity Frio sandstone formation to store carbon dioxide.

442

Appendix B: CArBon dioxide CApture teChnology SheetS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

sorbents sorbents B-14 Pre-Combustion sorbents u.s. DePartment of energy aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture r&D Program: teChnology uPDate, may 2013 aDvanCeD Carbon DioxiDe CaPture teChnology for low-rank Coal integrateD gasifiCation CombineD CyCle (igCC) systems primary project goals TDA will investigate the technical and economic advantages of using an integrated carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sorbent and water-gas shift (WGS) catalyst system in an integrated gasifi- cation combined cycle (IGCC) power plant, fueled with low-rank coal, and designed to capture more than 90% of the CO 2 emissions. technical goals * TDA will evaluate the physical mix of the sorbent and catalyst pellets within the same

443

Fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of tripled fuel-economy vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents estimates of the fill fuel-cycle energy and emissions impacts of light-duty vehicles with tripled fuel economy (3X vehicles) as currently being developed by the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV). Seven engine and fuel combinations were analyzed: reformulated gasoline, methanol, and ethanol in spark-ignition, direct-injection engines; low-sulfur diesel and dimethyl ether in compression-ignition, direct-injection engines; and hydrogen and methanol in fuel-cell vehicles. Results were obtained for three scenarios: a Reference Scenario without PNGVs, a High Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for 60% of new light-duty vehicle sales by 2030, and a Low Market Share Scenario in which PNGVs account for half as many sales by 2030. Under the higher of these two, the fuel-efficiency gain by 3X vehicles translated directly into a nearly 50% reduction in total energy demand, petroleum demand, and carbon dioxide emissions. The combination of fuel substitution and fuel efficiency resulted in substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), sulfur oxide, (SO{sub x}), and particulate matter smaller than 10 microns (PM{sub 10}) for most of the engine-fuel combinations examined. The key exceptions were diesel- and ethanol-fueled vehicles for which PM{sub 10} emissions increased.

Mintz, M. M.; Vyas, A. D.; Wang, M. Q.

1997-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

444

Emission Factors For Formaldehyde - Home | Energy Analysis ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Emissions of TMPB-DIB (a plasticizer found in vinyl products) were found to be higher than values reported in comparable housing by Hodgson et al.,3.

445

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases catalog of databases and reports  

SciTech Connect

Data products and reports made available by the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Environmental Sciences Division, Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), and the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) provide coverage in a number of areas relevant to the greenhouse effect and global climate change. Such areas include records of the concentration of carbon dioxide and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated carbon dioxide on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea level. Currently, in its eighth revision, this catalog provides information about the data products and reports available through CDIAC.

Burtis, M.D. [comp.

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

FETC Programs for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

SciTech Connect

Mark Twain once quipped that everyone talks about the weather but no one does anything about it. With interest in global climate change on the rise, researchers in the fossil-energy sector are feeling the heat to provide new technology to permit continued use of fossil fuels but with reduced emissions of so-called `greenhouse gases.` Three important greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide, are released to the atmosphere in the course of recovering and combusting fossil fuels. Their importance for trapping radiation, called forcing, is in the order given. In this report, we briefly review how greenhouse gases cause forcing and why this has a warming effect on the Earth`s atmosphere. Then we discuss programs underway at FETC that are aimed at reducing emissions of methane and carbon dioxide.

Ruether, J.A.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Carbon reduction emissions in South Africa  

SciTech Connect

This project is a feasibility study for a control system for existing backup generators in South Africa. The strategy is to install a system to enable backup generators (BGs) to be dispatched only when a large generator fails. Using BGs to provide ''ten minute reserve'' will save energy and reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by an estimated nearly 500,000 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Temchin, Jerome

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

448

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide storage professor Martin Blunt executive summary Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) referS to the Set of technologies developed to capture carbon dioxide (Co2) gas from the exhausts raises new issues of liability and risk. the focus of this briefing paper is on the storage of carbon

449

ORNL DAAC, Effects of Increased Carbon Dioxide, Dec. 11, 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increased Carbon Dioxide on Vegetation The ORNL DAAC announces the release of a data set entitled "Effects of Elevated Carbon Dioxide on Litter Chemistry and Decomposition." The...

450

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program...

451

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania...

452

Haverford Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer Haverford College Researchers Create Carbon Dioxide-Separating Polymer August 1, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy...

453

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

454

Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

455

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color Roofing Research Project Nano-Enabled Titanium Dioxide Ultraviolet Protective Layers for Cool-Color...

456

THE HIGH TEMPERATURE BEHAVIOR OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Products in Irradiated Uranium Dioxide," UKAEA Report AERE-OF METALLIC INCLUSIONS IN URANIUM DIOXIDE Rosa Lu Yang (Chemical State of Irradiated Uranium- Plutonium Oxide Fuel

Yang, Rosa Lu.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Carbon Dioxide Capture/Sequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Carbon Dioxide CaptureSequestration Tax Deduction (Kansas) Eligibility Commercial Industrial Utility Program...

458

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

459

The marginal effects of the price for carbon dioxide: quantifying the effects on the market for electric generation in Florida  

SciTech Connect

Greater emphasis on public policy aimed at internalizing the societal cost of carbon dioxide emissions leads to more questions about the economic impacts of that policy. In cooperation with the State of Florida's Department of Environmental Protection, the authors have constructed a model to simulate the dispatch of electric generating units to serve electric load in the state - and obtained some counterintuitive results. (author)

Kury, Theodore J.; Harrington, Julie

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

460

Recovery of Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Using a Membrane Reactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Carbon Dioxide in Advanced Fossil Energy Conversion Processes Using a Membrane Reactor Ashok S. Damle * Research Triangle Institute P.O. Box 12194 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 Phone: (919) 541-6146 Fax: (919) 541-6965 E-mail: adamle@rti.org Thomas P. Dorchak National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 880, Mail Stop C04 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Phone: (304) 285-4305 E-mail: tdorch@netl.doe.gov Abstract Increased awareness of the global warming trend has led to worldwide concerns regarding "greenhouse gas" emissions, with CO 2 being the single greatest contributor to global warming. Fossil fuels (i.e., coal, oil, and natural gas) currently supply over 85% of the world's energy needs, and their utilization is the major source of the anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost open-path Instrument for Low Cost open-path Instrument for monItorIng atmospherIC Carbon DIoxIDe at sequestratIon sItes Background Growing concern over the effect on global climate of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere may lead to the curtailment of CO 2 emissions. One potential course of action by industry to reduce GHG emissions is the subsurface disposal of CO 2 . An important requirement of such disposal is verification that the injected gases remain in place and do not leak to the surface. Perhaps the most direct evidence of a successful sequestration project is the lack of a detectable CO 2 concentration above the background level in the air near the ground. Although measurement of CO 2 concentration can be performed, it is

462

Short-Term Carbon Dioxide Exchange and Environmental Factors in a Boreal Fen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction Northern peatlands are important contributors to the global carbon cycle. In cold and moist climatic conditions, boreal peatlands have sequestered large amounts of atmospheric carbon during the past few thousand years (GORHAM 1991). The carbon balance in mires depends on the rates of photosynthesis and respiration which are affected by both the long-term and the short-term variations in environmental factors. So far, more emphasis has been put on the annual carbon balance of mires, and short-term dynamics have received less attention. However, a relationship between the carbon dioxide and methane cycling has been proposed as newly photosynthesized carbon provides substrates for methanogenesis substrates and promotes methane emissions (WHITING & CHANTON 1993). To analyze the connection between green plant photosynthesis and methane emissions, we need to analyze the short-term dynamics of carbon dioxide exchange. Consequently, we use earlier data (ALM et al. 1997) to study

Anu Kettunen

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

QSO hosts and companions at higher redshifts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review presents the current state of work on QSO hosts and companions at redshifts above 1. This includes the properties of QSO host galaxies, such as size, scale length, and luminosity, and morphology, as they appear to change with redshift and radio activity. This leads to a view of how the properties of galaxies that host QSOs change with cosmic time. I also review studies of the galaxy companions to QSOs at higher redshifts, and studies of the emission line gas in and around higher redshift QSOs. These topics should see great progress in the next decade.

J. B. Hutchings

2001-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

464

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Near-Zero Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Near-Zero Emissions Oxy-Combustion Flue Gas Purification Project No.: DE-NT0005341 Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment Praxair oxy-combustion test equipment. Praxair Inc. will develop a near-zero emissions flue gas purification technology for existing coal-fired power plants retrofit with oxy-combustion technology. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and mercury (Hg) will be reduced by at least 99 percent, and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions will be reduced by greater than 90 percent without the need for wet flue gas desulfurization and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). Two separate processes are proposed depending on the sulfur content of the coal. For high-sulfur coal, SO2 and NOx will be recovered as product sulfuric acid and nitric acid, respectively, and Hg will be recovered as

465

CDIAC::Carbon Emission::Introduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Introduction Introduction Each year the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) generates estimates of carbon releases from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production. Emissions from fossil-fuel burning represent the largest anthropogenic source of carbon to the atmosphere and are an important contributor to elevated atmospheric CO2 levels. CDIAC produces annual fossil-fuel CO2 emission time series at global and national scales and these time series serve as building blocks for other data products including gridded (1 x 1) emission time series. Details regarding the methods used to produce these time series and data products may be found on the CDIAC website. This new interface allows users to query, visualize, and download the latest CDIAC fossil-fuel CO2 emission estimates. In the future, additional

466

Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbon dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.

Luebke, D.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Myers, C.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Potential Impact of Carbon Dioxide on Potable Groundwater: A Controlled Release Experiment: 2013 Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Separating carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gases emitted by power stations that burn fossil fuels and injecting the CO2 deep underground is one method being considered on a commercial-scale to prevent emissions from reaching the atmosphere. Although full-scale commercial deployment of CO2 capture and storage (CCS) from a power station has not been performed to date, small-scale pilot projects have demonstrated that CCS is technically feasible. The high cost of ...

2013-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

468

NETL: Carbon Dioxide 101 FAQs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

What are people doing now to manage CO2? What are people doing now to manage CO2? SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi SECARB's injection operations at the Mississippi test site in Escatawpa, Mississippi. A combined portfolio of carbon management options is being implemented to reduce current emission levels associated with energy production while enhancing energy security and building the technologies and knowledge base for export to other countries faced with reducing emissions. The U.S. portfolio includes: (1) use fuels with reduced carbon intensity - renewables, nuclear, and natural gas; (2) adopt more efficient technologies on both the energy demand and supply sides; and (3) use carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. CCS is a viable emission management option

469

Higher powers in gravitation  

SciTech Connect

We consider the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmologies of theories of gravity that generalize the Einstein-Hilbert action by replacing the Ricci scalar R with some function f(R). The general asymptotic behavior of these cosmologies is found, at both early and late times, and the effects of adding higher and lower powers of R to the Einstein-Hilbert action is investigated. The assumption that the highest powers of R should dominate the Universe's early history, and that the lowest powers should dominate its future is found to be inaccurate. The behavior of the general solution is complicated, and while it can be the case that single powers of R dominate the dynamics at late times, it can be either the higher or lower powers that do so. It is also shown that it is often the lowest powers of R that dominate at early times, when approach to a bounce or a Tolman solution are generic possibilities. Various examples are considered, and both vacuum and perfect fluid solutions are investigated.

Clifton, Timothy [Department of Astrophysics, University of Oxford, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

470

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Bruce A. Mc Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Today society faces important prevalent greenhouse gas (carbon dioxide - CO2), it is important in the total picture. According

McCarl, Bruce A.

471

CATALYST EVALUATION FOR A SULFUR DIOXIDE-DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermochemical processes are being developed to provide global-scale quantities of hydrogen. A variant on sulfur-based thermochemical cycles is the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process which uses a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) to produce the hydrogen. Testing examined the activity and stability of platinum and palladium as the electrocatalyst for the SDE in sulfuric acid solutions. Cyclic and linear sweep voltammetry revealed that platinum provided better catalytic activity with much lower potentials and higher currents than palladium. Testing also showed that the catalyst activity is strongly influenced by the concentration of the sulfuric acid electrolyte.

Hobbs, D; Hector Colon-Mercado, H

2007-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

472

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2001 - Table 2. Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors (Kilograms-carbon equivalent per million Btu) Fuel Type Carbon Dioxide Coefficient at Full Combustion Combustion Fraction Adjusted Emissions Factor Petroleum Motor Gasoline 19.36 0.990 19.17 Liquefied Petroleum Gas Used as Fuel 17.18 0.995 17.09 Used as Feedstock 16.88 0.200 3.38 Jet Fuel 19.33 0.990 19.14 Distillate Fuel 19.95 0.990 19.75 Residual Fuel 21.49 0.990 21.28 Asphalt and Road Oil 20.62 0.000 0.00 Lubricants 20.24 0.600 12.14 Petrochemical Feedstocks 19.37 0.200 3.87 Kerosene 19.72 0.990 19.52 Petroleum Coke 27.85 0.500 13.93 Petroleum Still Gas 17.51 0.995 17.42 Other Industrial 20.31 0.990 20.11 Coal Residential and Commercial 26.00 0.990 25.74 Metallurgical 25.56 0.990 25.30 Industrial Other 25.63 0.990 25.38 Electric Utility1 25.76 0.990 25.50 Natural Gas

473

NETL: Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Electrochemical Membranes for Carbon Dioxide Capture and Power Generation Project No.: DE-FE0007634 FuelCell Energy, Inc. has developed a novel system concept for the separation of carbon dioxide (CO2) from greenhouse gas (GHG) emission sources using an electrochemical membrane. The proposed membrane has its genesis from the company's patented Direct FuelCell® (DFC®) technology. The prominent feature of the DFC membrane is its capability to produce power while capturing CO2 from the flue gas from a pulverized coal (PC) plant. The DFC membrane does not require flue gas compression as it operates on the principles of electrochemistry, resulting in net efficiency gains. The membrane utilizes a fuel (different from the plant flue gas, such as coal-derived syngas, natural gas, or a renewable resource) as the driver for the combined carbon capture and electric power generation. The electrochemical membrane consists of ceramic-based layers filled with carbonate salts, separating CO2 from the flue gas. Because of the electrode's high reaction rates, the membrane does not require a high CO2 concentration in its feed gas. The planar geometry of the membrane offers ease of scalability to large sizes suitable for deployment in PC plants, which is an important attribute in membrane design. The membrane has been tested at the laboratory scale, verifying the feasibility of the technology for CO2 separation from simulated flue gases of PC plants as well as combined cycle power plants and other industrial facilities. Fuel Cell Energy, Inc. is advancing the technology to a maturity level suitable for adaption by industry for pilot-scale demonstration and subsequent commercial deployment.

474

Science Taking Higher  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4, 1997 4, 1997 Number 7 f Science Taking Higher Profile in Capital continued on page 8 INSIDE 2 Computers and Accelerators 4 Inventions 6 Sloan Digital Sky Survey upon the Clinton Administration and the 105th Congress to increase the nation's investment in scientific research and education. This awareness of science issues emanating from the nation's capital has heartened many of those toiling in the country's laboratories and universities; however, researchers interviewed for this article also said they are closely observing how the rhetoric translates into increased funding as the appropriations process plays out. "I see these [initiatives] as demonstrations of the underlying support of basic science in the community and in Congress," said Jeffrey Photo courtesy

475

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks for Clean Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of Hydrogen, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Highly Porous Covalent Organic Frameworks projects aimed at using hydrogen as a clean fuel for automobiles and producing clean energy by designing achieve higher storage capacities for hydrogen, (1) (a) Leaf, D.; Verolmec, H. J. H.; Hunt, W. F., Jr. En

Yaghi, Omar M.

476

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Coal Seams  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide in Coal Seams K. Schroeder (schroede@netl.doe.gov; 412.386.5910) U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236...

477

Carbon Dioxide Variability and Atmospheric Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hourly values of the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO) formed the basis for an investigation of concentration fluctuations on daily to monthly time scales. In agreement with earlier studies we found no ...

James C. Sadler; Colin S. Ramage; Arnold M. Hori

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Turning unwanted carbon dioxide into electricity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and use it as a tool to boost electric power. Turning unwanted carbon dioxide into electricity Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov High Resolution Image The...

479

Regulating carbon dioxide capture and storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This essay examines several legal, regulatory and organizational issues that need to be addressed to create an effective regulatory regime for carbon dioxide capture and storage ("CCS"). Legal, regulatory, and organizational ...

De Figueiredo, Mark A.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Thorium dioxide: properties and nuclear applications  

SciTech Connect

This is the sixth book on reactor materials published under sponsorship of the Naval Reactors Office of the United States Department of Energy, formerly the United States Atomic Energy Commission. This book presents a comprehensive compilation of the most significant properties of thorium dioxide, much like the book Uranium Dioxide: Properties and Nuclear Applications presented information on the fuel material used in the Shippingport Pressurized Water Reactor core.

Belle, J.; Berman, R.M. (eds.)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions higher" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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481

Copper mercaptides as sulfur dioxide indicators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Organophosphine copper(I) mercaptide complexes are useful as convenient and semiquantitative visual sulfur dioxide gas indicators. The air-stable complexes form 1:1 adducts in the presence of low concentrations of sulfur dioxide gas, with an associated color change from nearly colorless to yellow-orange. The mercaptides are made by mixing stoichiometric amounts of the appropriate copper(I) mercaptide and phosphine in an inert organic solvent.

Eller, Phillip G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kubas, Gregory J. (Los Alamos, NM)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monthly Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions: Isomass of Emissions Gridded by One Degree Latitude by One Degree Longitude image Navigate CDIAC image About CDIAC Information on CDIAC's...

483

SEQUESTERING CARBON DIOXIDE IN COALBEDS  

SciTech Connect

During the present reporting period, six complementary tasks involving experimentation, model development, and coal characterization were undertaken to meet our project objectives: (1) A second adsorption apparatus, utilizing equipment donated by BP Amoco, was assembled. Having confirmed the reliability of this additional experimental apparatus and procedures, adsorption isotherms for CO{sub 2}, methane, ethane, and nitrogen on wet Fruitland coal and on activated carbon were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia). These measurements showed good agreement with our previous data and yielded an expected uncertainty of about 3%. The addition of this new facility has allowed us to essentially double our rate of data production. (2) Adsorption isotherms for pure CO{sub 2}, methane, and nitrogen on wet Illinois-6 coal and on activated carbon were measured at 319.3 K (115 F) and pressures to 12.4 MPa (1800 psia) on our first apparatus. The activated carbon measurements showed good agreement with literature data and with measurements obtained on our second apparatus. The expected uncertainty of the data is about 3%. The Illinois-6 adsorption measurements are a new addition to the existing database. Preparations are underway to measure adsorption isotherms for pure methane, carbon dioxide and nitrogen on DESC-8 coal. (3) Adsorption from binary mixtures of methane, nitrogen and CO{sub 2} at a series of compositions was also measured on the wet Fruitland coal at 319.3 K (115 F), using our first apparatus. The nominal compositions of these mixtures are 20%/80%, 40%/60%, 60%/40%, and 80%/20%. The experiments were conducted at pressures from 100 psia to 1800 psia. The expected uncertainty for these binary mixture data varies from 2 to 9%. (4) A study was completed to address the previously-reported rise in the CO{sub 2} absolute adsorption on wet Fruitland coal at 115 F and pressures exceeding 1200 psia. Our additional adsorption measurements on Fruitland coal and on activated carbon show that: (a) the Gibbs adsorption isotherm for CO{sub 2} under study exhibits typical adsorption behavior for supercritical gas adsorption, and (b) a slight variation from Type I absolute adsorption may be observed for CO{sub 2}, but the variation is sensitive to the estimates used for adsorbed phase density. (5) The experimental data were used to evaluate the predictive capabilities of various adsorption models, including the Langmuir/loading ratio correlation, a two-dimensional cubic equation of state (EOS), a new two-dimensional (2-D) segment-segment interactions equation of state, and the simplified local density model (SLD). Our model development efforts have focused on developing the 2-D analog to the Park-Gasem-Robinson (PGR) EOS and an improved form of the SLD model. The new PGR EOS offers two advantages: (a) it has a more accurate repulsive term, which is important for reliable adsorption predictions, and (b) it is a segment-segment interactions model, which should more closely describe the gas-coal interactions during the adsorption process. In addition, a slit form of the SLD model was refined to account more precisely for heterogeneity of the coal surface and matrix swelling. In general, all models performed well for the Type I adsorption exhibited by methane, nitrogen, and carbon dioxide up to 8.3 MPa (average deviations within 2%). In comparison, the SLD model represented the adsorption behavior of all fluids considered within 5% average deviations, including the near-critical behavior of carbon dioxide beyond 8.3 MPa (1200 psia). Work is in progress to (a) derive and implement the biporous form of the SLD model, which would expand the number of structural geometries used to represent the heterogeneity of coal surface; and (b) extend the SLD model to mixture predictions. (6) Proper reduction of our adsorption data requires accurate gas-phase compressibility (Z) factors for methane, ethane, nitrogen and carbon dioxide and their mixtures to properly analyze our experimental adsorption data. A careful evaluation of t

K.A.M. Gasem; R.L. Robinson, Jr.; L.R. Radovic

2001-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

484

Experimental and analytic studies to model kinetics and mass transport of carbon dioxide sequstration in depleted carbonate reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

There is undeniable evidence that concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere is rising at an increasingly rapid rate primarily as the result of burning fossil fuels. Although the debate continues, most of the scientific community believes that higher levels of atmospheric CO2 will lead to a significant warming of the Earth’s climate and that there is already evidence that this is occurring. There are two ways to ameliorate this problem. One is to significantly reduce production of CO2, which is primarily a political-economic problem, and the other is to remove CO2 from emissions and/or the atmosphere and find some way to sequester it. Several possible ways to sequester CO2 are under investigation or have been suggested. These include removal by chemical reaction, deep seabed disposal, and pumping supercritical CO2 into various subsurface environments. Sequestration of carbon dioxide in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a viable option, with a possible economic spin-off from the recovery of significant gas reserves. At the elevated temperatures and pressures encountered in reservoirs, carbon dioxide behaves as a supercritical fluid. Under these conditions, little was known regarding the, diffusion of carbon dioxide in natural gas, and displacement of natural gas by carbon dioxide. A major objective of this research was to obtain the necessary data to model these processes. Also, the added CO2 will react with reservoir waters that are often chemically complex high ionic strength brines making them more acidic. This can result in the dissolution of calcium carbonate (calcite) that is a common host rock or sandstone cement in reservoirs and lead to potentially serious problems for CO2 injection and the integrity of the reservoir. It was consequently a second major objective of this project to determine calcite solubility and dissolution kinetics in solutions representative of subsurface brines and produce a general dissolution rate equation. Both objectives were accomplished. Reservoir simulations indicated a large amount of CO2 would be sequestered, with the amount depending on reservoir water saturation. Simulation results also indicate a significant amount of natural gas could be produced. For an 80-acre pattern, natural gas production was calculated to be 3.2 BSCF or 63% of remaining gas-in-place for 30% reservoir water saturation. Gas revenues would help defray the cost of CO2 sequestration. Therefore, CO2 sequestration in depleted gas reservoirs appears to be a win-win technology. Considerable effort went into testing and refining the ability to predict calcite solubility in brines using a Pitzer-equation based computer model, with particular difficulties being encountered in solutions with high dissolved calcium concentrations. After that was accomplished, calcite dissolution kinetics were determined a wide range of brine compositions both including and not including potential inhibitors from 25 to 83 oC and a CO2 partial pressure from 0.1 to 1 atm. The reaction was found to be first order for undersaturations of 0.2 to ~1 and was surface controlled. The rate constant was fit to a multiple regression model, thus making it possible to predict calcite dissolution rates over a wide range of solution compositions, partial pressures of CO2 and temperature. Results indicate that equilibrium is likely to be reached relatively quickly in front of an advancing supercritical CO2 fluid.

Morse, John W; Mamora, Daulat

2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software MOBILE6 Vehicle Emission Modeling Software Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: MOBILE6 Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Transportation Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm Cost: Free References: http://www.epa.gov/oms/m6.htm MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon Dioxide (CO2), Particulate Matter (PM), and toxics from cars, trucks, and motorcycles under various conditions. MOBILE6 is an emission factor model for predicting gram per mile emissions of Hydrocarbons (HC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Carbon

486

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

487

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

CARBON DIOXIDE UPTAKE STUDIES IN ALGAE GROWN IN WATER AND DEUTERIUM OXIDE  

SciTech Connect

A procedure is described for studying carbon dioxide uptake in algae using C/sup 14/-labeled sodium bicarbonate as the source of carbon dioxide, Actively dividing, water grown and deuterium oxide adapted, Scenedesmus obliquus and Chlorella vulgaris were employed in the studies. Uptake comparisons were made over pH range 6 to 9 using appropriate buffer systems. Uptake was fairly constant in the range pH 6 to 8 for both the aqueous and deuterated algae. Above pH 8 uptake dropped markedly. In general, the deuterated algae showed between 1O and 30% lower uptake than ordinary algae. Greater chlorophyll content is associated with higher carbon dioxide uptake. (auth)

Blake, M.I.; Kaganove, A.S.; Katz, J.J.

1962-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Carbon-dioxide-controlled ventilation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In-House Energy Management (IHEM) Program has been established by the U.S. Department of Energy to provide funds to federal laboratories to conduct research on energy-efficient technology. The Energy Sciences Department of Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was tasked by IHEM to research the energy savings potential associated with reducing outdoor-air ventilation of buildings. By monitoring carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) levels in a building, outdoor air provided by the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system can be reduced to the percentage required to maintain satisfactory CO{sub 2} levels rather than ventilating with a higher outdoor-air percentage based on an arbitrary minimum outdoor-air setting. During summer months, warm outdoor air brought into a building for ventilation must be cooled to meet the appropriate cooling supply-air temperature, and during winter months, cold outdoor air must be heated. By minimizing the amount of hot or cold outdoor air brought into the HVAC system, the supply air requires less cooling or heating, saving energy and money. Additionally, the CO{sub 2} levels in a building can be monitored to ensure that adequate outdoor air is supplied to a building to maintain air quality levels. The two main considerations prior to implementing CO{sub 2}-based ventilation control are its impact on energy consumption and the adequacy of indoor air quality (IAQ) and occupant comfort. To address these considerations, six portable CO{sub 2} monitors were placed in several Hanford Site buildings to estimate the adequacy of office/workspace ventilation. The monitors assessed the potential for reducing the flow of outdoor-air to the buildings. A candidate building was also identified to monitor various ventilation control strategies for use in developing a plan for implementing and assessing energy savings.

McMordie, K.L.; Carroll, D.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Electrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide by rhenium and manganese polypyridyl catalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for reduction of carbon dioxide. IR-SpectroelectrochemicalElectrocatalytic reduction of carbon dioxide mediated by Re(Reduction of Carbon Dioxide to Carbon Monoxide Mediated by (

Smieja, Jonathan Mark

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Thermal dissociation behavior and dissociation enthalpies of methane-carbon dioxide mixed hydrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Methane– Title: Carbon Dioxide Mixed Hydrates Tae-Hyukof methane with carbon dioxide in hydrate has been proposedsequestration of carbon dioxide ( CO 2 ) and/or production

Kwon, T.H.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Experiments on sorption properties of gamma-manganese dioxide under isothermal conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To characterize promising solid desiccant materials for solar desiccant cooling applications, we measured the sorption properties of gamma-manganese dioxide under isothermal conditions using gravimetric methods. Tests were performed at 20/sup 0/C and 40/sup 0/C, a flow rate of about 110 cm/sup 3//min, a pressure of 1 atm, and relative humidities between 3% and 90%. We found the equilibrium water capacity of gamma-manganese dioxide to be much lower than that of silica gel (5% compared with 37% to 40%). The uncertainty in the manganese dioxide capacity calculation is relatively high (+-14%) because of the low sorption capacity of the small sample available (less than 0.3 g). Because of its low adsorption capacity, it cannot be used as a stand-alone desiccant in desiccant dehumidifiers. It may be used in composites with silica gel if its moisture diffusivity is considerably higher than that of silica gel. The moisture diffusivity in manganese dioxide and silica gel/manganese dioxide composites needs to be assessed and compared with that of silica gel for evaluating the composites as advanced desiccants.

Zangrando, F.; Choudhury, K.; Pesaran, A.A.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Investigation of the carbon dioxide sorption capacity and structural deformation of coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations causing the global energy and environmental crises, geological sequestration of carbon dioxide is now being actively considered as an attractive option to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. One of the important strategies is to use deep unminable coal seams, for those generally contain significant quantities of coal bed methane that can be recovered by CO2 injection through enhanced coal bed natural gas production, as a method to safely store CO2. It has been well known that the adsorbing CO2 molecules introduce structural deformation, such as distortion, shrinkage, or swelling, of the adsorbent of coal organic matrix. The accurate investigations of CO2 sorption capacity as well as of adsorption behavior need to be performed under the conditions that coals deform. The U.S. Department of Energy-National Energy Technology Laboratory and Regional University Alliance are conducting carbon dioxide sorption isotherm experiments by using manometric analysis method for estimation of CO2 sorption capacity of various coal samples and are constructing a gravimetric apparatus which has a visual window cell. The gravimetric apparatus improves the accuracy of carbon dioxide sorption capacity and provides feasibility for the observation of structural deformation of coal sample while carbon dioxide molecules interact with coal organic matrix. The CO2 sorption isotherm measurements have been conducted for moist and dried samples of the Central Appalachian Basin (Russell County, VA) coal seam, received from the SECARB partnership, at the temperature of 55 C.

Hur, Tae-Bong; Fazio, James; Romanov, Vyacheslav; Harbert, William

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Impacts of High Resolution Extreme Events on U.S. Energy Demand and CO{sub 2} Emissions in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect

Progress is reported in these areas: Validation of temperature and precipitation extremes; Time of emergence of severe heat stress in the United States; Quantifying the effects of temperature extremes on energy demand and carbon dioxide emissions.

Diffenbaugh, Noah [Stanford University

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

495

Saving Fuel, Reducing Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lower greenhouse gas emissions from electricity productionAssessment of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Plug-in Hybridof national greenhouse gas emissions. Both motor vehicle

Kammen, Daniel M.; Arons, Samuel M.; Lemoine, Derek M.; Hummel, Holmes

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...