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1

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2. Carbon Dioxide Emissions 2.1. Total carbon dioxide emissions Annual U.S. carbon dioxide emissions fell by 419 million metric tons in 2009 (7.1 percent), to 5,447 million metric tons (Figure 9 and Table 6). The annual decrease-the largest over the 19-year period beginning with the 1990 baseline-puts 2009 emissions 608 million metric tons below the 2005 level, which is the Obama Administration's benchmark year for its goal of reducing U.S. emissions by 17 percent by 2020. The key factors contributing to the decrease in carbon dioxide emissions in 2009 included an economy in recession with a decrease in gross domestic product of 2.6 percent, a decrease in the energy intensity of the economy of 2.2 percent, and a decrease in the carbon intensity of energy supply of

2

EIA - AEO2011 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 Early Release Overview 1 Early Release Overview Release Date: December 16, 2011 | Next Release Date: January 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2011) Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Figure DataAfter falling by 3 percent in 2008 and nearly 7 percent in 2009, largely driven by the economic downturn, total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to 2005 levels (5,980 million metric tons) until 2027, and then rise by an additional 5 percent from 2027 to 2035, reaching 6,315 million metric tons in 2035 (Figure 13). Energy-related CO2 emissions grow by 0.2 percent per year from 2005 to 2035. Emissions per capita fall by an average of 0.8 percent per year from 2005 to 2035, as growth in demand for electricity and transportation fuels is moderated by higher energy prices, effi ciency standards, State RPS requirements, and Federal

3

EIA - AEO2010 - Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Accounting for carbon diioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from biomass energy combustion CO2 emissions from the combustion of biomass [75] to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in AEO2010. According to current international convention [76], carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time [77]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

4

EIA - AEO2013 Early Release Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Energy-Related CO2 Emissions Total U.S. energy-related CO2 emissions do not return to their 2005 level (5,997 million metric tons) by the end of the AEO2013 projection period.6 Growth in demand for transportation fuels is moderated by rising fuel prices and new, stricter federal CAFE standards for model years 2017 to 2025, which reduce transportation emissions from 2018 until they begin to rise near the end of the projection period. Transportation emissions in 2040 are 26 million metric tons below the 2011 level. Largely as a result of the inclusion of the new CAFE standards in AEO2013, transportation-related CO2 emissions in 2035 are 94 million metric tons below their level in the AEO2012 Reference case. State RPS requirements and abundant low-cost natural gas help shift the

5

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Greenhouse Gas Tables (1990-2009) Table Title Formats Overview 1 U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential 2 U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors 3 Distribution of total U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by end-use sector 4 World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by region 5 Greenhouse gases and 100-year net global warming potentials Carbon dioxide emissions 6 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from energy and industry 7 U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by end-use sector 8 U.S. carbon dioxide emission from residential sector energy consumption 9 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from commercial sector energy consumption 10 U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sector energy consumption

6

carbon dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

dioxide emissions dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Total annual carbon dioxide emissions by country, 2005 to 2009 (million metric tons). Compiled by Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords carbon dioxide emissions EIA world Data text/csv icon total_carbon_dioxide_emissions_from_the_consumption_of_energy_2005_2009million_metric_tons.csv (csv, 12.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2005 - 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote Usefulness of the dataset Average vote Your vote Ease of access Average vote Your vote Overall rating

7

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview Diagram Notes [a] CO2 emissions related to petroleum consumption (includes 64 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [b] CO2 emissions related to coal consumption (includes 0.3 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [c] CO2 emissions related to natural gas consumption (includes 13 MMTCO2 of non-fuel-related emissions). [d] Excludes carbon sequestered in nonfuel fossil products. [e] CO2 emissions from the plastics portion of municipal solid waste (11 MMTCO2) combusted for electricity generation and very small amounts (0.4 MMTCO2) of geothermal-related emissions.

8

EIA - AEO2010 - Emissions projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Projections Emissions Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Emissions Projections Figure 93. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2008 and 2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 94. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Figure 95. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 2000-2035 Click to enlarge » Figure source and data excel logo Growth of carbon dioxide emissions slows in the projections Federal and State energy policies recently enacted will stimulate increased use of renewable technologies and efficiency improvements in the future, slowing the growth of energy-related CO2 emissions through 2035. In the Reference case, emissions do not exceed pre-recession 2007 levels until 2025. In 2035, energy-related CO2 emissions total 6,320 million metric tons, about 6 percent higher than in 2007 and 9 percent higher than in 2008 (Figure 93). On average, emissions in the Reference case grow by 0.3 percent per year from 2008 to 2035, compared with 0.7 percent per year from 1980 to 2008.

9

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1. Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview 1.1 Total emissions Total U.S. anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse gas emissions in 2009 were 5.8 percent below the 2008 total (Table 1). The decline in total emissions-from 6,983 million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent (MMTCO2e) in 2008 to 6,576 MMTCO2e in 2009-was the largest since emissions have been tracked over the 1990-2009 time frame. It was largely the result of a 419-MMTCO2e drop in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions (7.1 percent). There was a small increase of 7 MMTCO2e (0.9 percent) in methane (CH4) emissions, and an increase of 8 MMTCO2e (4.9 percent), based on partial data, in emissions of man-made gases with high global warming potentials (high-GWP gases). (Draft estimates for emissions of HFC and PFC

10

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contacts Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry.lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have been possible. In particular we would like to thank Erin Beddingfield, Keith Forbes, Kristin Igusky, Makely Lyon, Michael Mondshine, and Richard Richards. We also wish to acknowledge the

11

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2008 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2005, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 7 percent. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 72 percent. Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 (Percent per Year). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

12

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Relaated Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2007 Chapter 7 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2004, non-OECD emissions of carbon dioxide were greater than OECD emissions for the first time. In 2030, carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 57 percent. Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center on 202-585-8800. Figure Data Figure 78. World energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is the most abundant anthropogenic (human-caused) greenhouse

13

EIA - 2010 International Energy Outlook - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2007, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 17 percent. In the IEO2010 Reference case, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from non-OECD countries in 2035 are about double those from OECD countries. Overview Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, world energy use continues to be at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2010 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions29 grow from 29.7 billion metric tons in 2007 to 33.8 billion metric tons in 2020 and 42.4 billion metric tons in 2035 (Table 18).30

14

EIA - Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environment Environment Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U. S. Release Date: March 31, 2011 | Next Release Date: Report Discontinued | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0573(2009) This report-the eighteenth annual report-presents the U.S. Energy Information Administration's latest estimates of emissions for carbon dioxide, methane, nitrous oxide, and other greenhouse gases. Download the GHG Report Introduction For this report, activity data on coal and natural gas consumption and electricity sales and losses by sector were obtained from the January 2011 Monthly Energy Review (MER). In keeping with current international practice, this report presents data on greenhouse gas emissions in million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data can be converted to carbon equivalent units by

15

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2009 Chapter 8 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In 2006, non-OECD energy-related emissions of carbon dioxide exceeded OECD emissions by 14 percent. In 2030, energy-related carbon dioxide emissions from the non-OECD countries are projected to exceed those from the OECD countries by 77 percent. Figure 80. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2006-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 81. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 82. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel in IEO2008 and IEO2009, 2006, 2015, and 2030 (billion metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

16

CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSION REDUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.5 Primary Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions for Selected US Chemical Subsectors in 1994 ...............................................................................................................16 Table 2.7 1999 Energy Consumption and Specific Energy Consumption (SEC) in the U.S. Cement Efficiency Technologies and Measures in Cement Industry.................22 Table 2.9 Energy Consumption

Delaware, University of

17

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Nitrous Oxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4. Nitrous Oxide Emissions 4.1 Total emissions U.S. nitrous oxide emissions in 2009 were 4 MMTCO2e (1.7 percent) below their 2008 total (Table 22). Sources of U.S. nitrous oxide emissions include agriculture, energy use, industrial processes, and waste management (Figure 22). The largest source is agriculture (73 percent), and the majority of agricultural emissions result from nitrogen fertilization of agricultural soils (87 percent of the agriculture total) and management of animal waste (13 percent). U.S. nitrous oxide emissions rose from 1990 to 1994, fell from 1994 to 2002, and returned to an upward trajectory from 2003 to 2007, largely as a result of increased use of synthetic fertilizers. Fertilizers are the primary contributor of emissions from nitrogen fertilization of soils, which grew by more than 30 percent from

18

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 Figure 77. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2003-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 80. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2004-2030 Figure 80 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 81. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Liquids Combustion by Region, 1990-2030 Figure 81 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

19

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Figure 75. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2005-2030 Figure 75 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 76. World Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1990-2030 Figure 76 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 77. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 77 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 78. U.S. Energy-Related Carbon Dioide Emissions in IEO2007 and IEO2008, 2005-2030 Figure 78 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure 79. Average Annual Growth in Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the Non-OECD Economies, 2005-2030 Figure 79 Data. Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

20

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Special Topic: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing 1 Report #: DOE/EIA-0573(2005) Released Date: November 2006 Next Release Date: Not applicable Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions in U.S. Manufacturing Mark Schipper 1 , Energy Information Administration (EIA) Abstract Based on the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA), this paper presents historical energy-related carbon dioxide emission estimates for energy-intensive sub-sectors and 23 industries. Estimates are based on surveys of more than 15,000 manufacturing plants in 1991, 1994, 1998, and 2002. EIA is currently developing its collection of manufacturing data for 2006.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Table-Figure Notes and Sources  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A1. Notes and Sources A1. Notes and Sources Tables Chapter 1: Greenhouse gas emissions overview Table 1. U.S. emissions of greenhouse gases, based on global warming potential, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the data contained in the previous EIA report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2008, DOE/EIA-0573(2008) (Washington, DC, December 2009). Global warming potentials: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, Climate Change 2007: The Physical Science Basis: Errata (Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, 2008), website http://ipcc-wg1.ucar.edu/wg1/Report/AR4WG1_Errata_2008-12-01.pdf. Table 2. U.S. greenhouse gas intensity and related factors, 1990-2009: Sources: Emissions: EIA estimates. Data in this table are revised from the

22

Estimated Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2008: United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions in the United States have been constructed from publicly available data and estimates of state-level energy use patterns. Approximately 5,800 million metric tons of carbon dioxide were emitted throughout the United States for use in power production, residential, commercial, industrial, and transportation applications in 2008. Carbon dioxide is emitted from the use of three major energy resources: natural gas, coal, and petroleum. The flow patterns are represented in a compact 'visual atlas' of 52 state-level (all 50 states, the District of Columbia, and one national) carbon dioxide flow charts representing a comprehensive systems view of national CO{sub 2} emissions. Lawrence Livermore National Lab (LLNL) has published flow charts (also referred to as 'Sankey Diagrams') of important national commodities since the early 1970s. The most widely recognized of these charts is the U.S. energy flow chart (http://flowcharts.llnl.gov). LLNL has also published charts depicting carbon (or carbon dioxide potential) flow and water flow at the national level as well as energy, carbon, and water flows at the international, state, municipal, and organizational (i.e. United States Air Force) level. Flow charts are valuable as single-page references that contain quantitative data about resource, commodity, and byproduct flows in a graphical form that also convey structural information about the system that manages those flows. Data on carbon dioxide emissions from the energy sector are reported on a national level. Because carbon dioxide emissions are not reported for individual states, the carbon dioxide emissions are estimated using published energy use information. Data on energy use is compiled by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (U.S. EIA) in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). SEDS is updated annually and reports data from 2 years prior to the year of the update. SEDS contains data on primary resource consumption, electricity generation, and energy consumption within each economic sector. Flow charts of state-level energy usage and explanations of the calculations and assumptions utilized can be found at: http://flowcharts.llnl.gov. This information is translated into carbon dioxide emissions using ratios of carbon dioxide emissions to energy use calculated from national carbon dioxide emissions and national energy use quantities for each particular sector. These statistics are reported annually in the U.S. EIA's Annual Energy Review. Data for 2008 (US. EIA, 2010) was updated in August of 2010. This is the first presentation of a comprehensive state-level package of flow charts depicting carbon dioxide emissions for the United States.

Smith, C A; Simon, A J; Belles, R D

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Coal  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has developed factors for estimating the amount of carbon dioxide emitted, accounting for differences among coals, to reflect the changing "mix" of coal in U.S. coal consumption.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Supplement to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 July 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Further Sensitivity Analysis of Hypothetical Policies to Limit Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views

25

EIA Energy Efficiency-Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links for the  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Energy Related Greenhouse Gas Emissions Links Posted Date: May 2007 Page Last Modified: September 2010 EIA Links Disclaimer: These pages contain hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links provide additional information that may be useful or interesting and are being provided consistent with the intended purpose of the EIA website. EIA does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. EIA does not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked websites, the views they express, or the products and services they offer. Government Agencies / Associations Energy Information Administration - Annual Energy Outlook: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to fuel consumption. Among fossil fuel types, coal has the highest carbon content, natural gas the lowest, and petroleum in between. In the AEO2006 reference case, the shares of these fuels change slightly from 2004 to 2030, with more coal and less petroleum and natural gas. The combined share of carbon-neutral renewable and nuclear energy is stable from 2004 to 2030 at 14 percent

26

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions from Estuaries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide and methane emissions from estuaries are reviewed in relation with biogeochemical processes and carbon cycling. In estuaries, carbon dioxide and methane emissions show a large spatial and temporal ...

Gwenal Abril; Alberto Vieira Borges

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - High-GWP gases  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5. High-GWP gases 5. High-GWP gases 5.1. Total emissions Greenhouse gases with high global warming potential (high-GWP gases) are hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), perfluorocarbons (PFCs), and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which together represented 3 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions in 2009. Emissions estimates for the high-GWP gases are provided to EIA by the EPA's Office of Air and Radiation. The estimates for emissions of HFCs not related to industrial processes or electric transmission are derived from the EPA Vintaging Model. Emissions from manufacturing and utilities are derived by the EPA from a mix of public and proprietary data, including from the EPA's voluntary emission reduction partnership programs. For this year's EIA inventory, 2008 values for HFC-23 from HCFC-22

28

Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abating greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions on a national level involves substantial investment efforts, though part of these may be regained soon.1 On a global level, the costs of the available options are likely to ...

Catrinus J. Jepma; Che Wah Lee

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Club Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We examine convergence in carbon dioxide emissions among 128 countries for the period 1960...2 emissions among all the countries under scrutiny in...

Ekaterini Panopoulou; Theologos Pantelidis

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2008 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 97. Carbon dioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2006 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 98. Carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rising Energy Consumption Increases Carbon Dioxide Emissions Without capture and sequestration, CO2 emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels are proportional to the carbon content of the fuel. Coal has the highest carbon content and natural gas the lowest, with petroleum in between. In the AEO2008 reference case, the shares of these fuels change

31

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Atlantic South Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 25, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA South Atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - South Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

32

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 24, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA west north central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

33

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 27, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA West South Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - West South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

34

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mountain Mountain Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 28, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Mountain Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Mountain- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

35

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Central South Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 26, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions East South Central EIA Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East South Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.3 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

36

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 30, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - United States- Reference Case (xls, 75.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

37

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Pacific Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 29, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO carbon dioxide emissions EIA Pacific Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - Pacific- Reference Case (xls, 74.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

38

EIA - The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003-Carbon Dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The National Energy Modeling System: An Overview 2003 Carbon Dioxide and Methane Emissions The emissions policy submodule, part of the integrating module, estimates the energy–related emissions of carbon dioxide and methane. Carbon dioxide emissions are dependent on the fossil fuel consumed, the carbon content of the fuel, and the fraction of the fuel consumed in combustion. The product of the carbon dioxide coefficient and the combustion fraction yields a carbon dioxide emission factor. For fuel uses of fossil energy, the combustion fractions are assumed to be 0.99 for liquid fuels and 0.995 for gaseous fuels. The carbon dioxide potential of nonfuel uses of energy, such as asphalt and petrochemical feedstocks, is assumed to be sequestered in the product and not released to the atmosphere. The coefficients for carbon dioxide emissions are updated each year from the Energy Information Administration’s annual, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States.17

39

EIA - Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world's carbon dioxide emissions? International Energy Outlook 2010 Will carbon capture and storage reduce the world'ss carbon dioxide emissions? The pursuit of greenhouse gas reductions has the potential to reduce global coal use significantly. Because coal is the most carbon-intensive of all fossil fuels, limitations on carbon dioxide emissions will raise the cost of coal relative to the costs of other fuels. Under such circumstances, the degree to which energy use shifts away from coal to other fuels will depend largely on the costs of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from coal-fired plants relative to the costs of using other, low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources. The continued widespread use of coal could rely on the cost and availability of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technologies that capture carbon dioxide and store it in geologic formations.

40

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Emissions from Energy Use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions from Energy Use Emissions from Energy Use Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Emissions from Energy Use Figure 81. Carbon diioxide emissions by sector and fuel, 2007 and 2030 (million metric tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 82. Sulfur dioxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Figure 83. Nitrogen oxide emissions from electricity generation, 1995-2030 (million short tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. figure data Rate of Increase in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Slows in the Projections Even with rising energy prices, growth in energy use leads to increasing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Sandia National Laboratories: reducing carbon dioxide emissions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide emissions Measurements of Thermal Stratification in a Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition Engine On February 27, 2013, in CRF, Energy, Facilities, News, News &...

42

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Land use  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6. Land use 6. Land use 6.1. Total land use, land use change, and forests This chapter presents estimates of carbon sequestration (removal from the atmosphere) and emissions (release into the atmosphere) from forests, croplands, grasslands, and residential areas (urban trees, grass clippings, and food scraps) in the United States. In 2008, land use, land use change, and forests were responsible for estimated net carbon sequestration of 940 MMTCO2e (Table 31), representing 16 percent of total U.S. CO2 emissions. The largest sequestration category in 2008 was forest lands and harvested wood pools,49 with estimated sequestration increasing from 730 MMTCO2e in 1990 to 792 MMTCO2e in 2008. The second-largest carbon sequestration category was urban trees,50 responsible for 57 MMTCO2e in 1990 and 94

43

sulfur dioxide emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

sulfur dioxide emissions sulfur dioxide emissions Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides

44

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Central North Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 23, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions East North Central Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source - East North Central- Reference Case (xls, 74.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

45

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source, New England Source, New England Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 21, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions New England Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source, New England- Reference Case (xls, 73.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

46

AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source- Middle Atlantic Source- Middle Atlantic Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 22, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses million metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent. The data is broken down into residential, commercial, industrial, transportation, electric power, and total by fuel. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO carbon dioxide emissions middle atlantic Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Sector and Source- Middle Atlantic- Reference Case (xls, 74.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

47

EIA  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

World and U.S. World and U.S. Energy Data and Projections Presentation for Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee November 3, 2003 Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator U.S. Energy Information Administration Outline * World energy data and projections to 2025 * EIA/IEA nuclear outlook * Energy security and greenhouse gas implications * U.S. energy data and projections to 2025 * Scenarios for U.S. nuclear energy * Key Uncertainties 2.9% 2.3% 2.3% 4.0% 5.1% 3.7% US Western Europe Other Industrial EE/FSU Developing Asia Other Developing 0.0% 1.0% 2.0% 3.0% 4.0% 5.0% 6.0% Average Annual Increase in GDP by Region, 2000-2025 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 History Projections EE/FSU Developing Industrialized Energy Intensity by Region, 1970-2025 207 243 285 311 349 368 404 433 481

48

Contact Us - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Environmental Experts Environmental Experts Fax: 202-586-3045 Biodiesel/Ethanol Anthony Radich 202-586-0504 anthony.radich@eia.gov Carbon Dioxide - U.S. Projections (STEO and AEO) Perry Lindstrom 202-586-0934 perry.lindstrom@eia.gov Electric Power Emissions Kevin Lillis 202-586- 3704 kevin.lillis@eia.gov Electric Power Sector Pollutant Emissions - Modeling and Projections Robert Smith 202-586-9413 robert.smith@eia.gov Greenhouse Gases - Modeling and Analysis Yanna Antypas 202-586-1420 yanna.antypas@eia.gov Greenhouse Gases and International Carbon Dioxide Emissions Perry Lindstrom 202-586-0934 perry.lindstrom@eia.gov International Carbon Dioxide Emissions - Current Data Karen Griffin 202-586-1537 karen.griffin@eia.gov Perry Lindstrom 202-586-0934 perry.lindstrom@eia.gov

49

"1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Emission Factors" Fuel Emission Factors" "(From Appendix H of the instructions to Form EIA-1605)" "1. Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for Stationary Combustion1" "Fuel ",,"Emission Factor ",,"Units" "Coal2" "Anthracite",,103.69,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Bituminous",,93.28,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Sub-bituminous",,97.17,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Lignite",,97.72,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Electric Power Sector",,95.52,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Industrial Coking",,93.71,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Other Industrial",,93.98,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Residential/Commercial",,95.35,,"kg CO2 / MMBtu" "Natural Gas3"

50

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

6 6 Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Industrialized Countries Extended discussion here Carbon emissions per capita 1973 vs. 1991 by major end use. (Denmark comparison is 1972 and 1991) With the third Conference of the Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto approaching, there is a great deal of excitement over policies designed to reduce future carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels. At COP-3, more than 130 nations will meet to create legally binding targets for CO2 reductions. Accordingly, we have analyzed the patterns of emissions arising from the end uses of energy (and electricity production) in ten industrialized countries, with surprising and, in some cases, worrisome results. The surprise is that emissions in many countries in the early 1990s were lower than in the 1970s in an absolute sense and on a per capita basis; the worry

51

Graph Model for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Metallurgical Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mathematical models are presented for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from metallurgical processes. The article also presents ... in graph form to calculate transit and net emissions of carbon dioxide based o...

Yu. N. Chesnokov; V. G. Lisienko; A. V. Lapteva

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon dioxide emissions per 1,000 cubic feet of natural gas. In this case, there is much less energy

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

World Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 2050  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-U" relation with a within- sample peak between carbon dioxide emissions (and energy use) per capita and perWorld Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1950 ? 2050 Richard Schmalensee, Thomas M. Stoker, andRuth A. Judson* Emissions of carbon dioxide from combustion of fossil fuels, which may

54

International Energy Outlook 2006 - Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Eneregy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions International Energy Outlook 2006 Chapter 7: Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could affect patterns of energy use around the world and alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 65. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 1990-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Figure 66. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Fuel Type, 1980-2030 (Billion Metric Tons). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the

55

Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Convergence or Divergence?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Understanding and considering the distribution of per capita carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions is important in designing international climate change ... incentives for participation. I evaluate historic internation...

Joseph E. Aldy

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2009-Process-Related Emissions in the  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector International Energy Outlook 2009 Process-Related Emissions in the Industrial Sector Carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector result from both energy use and production processes. Together, energy- and process-related emissions in the industrial sector account for about one-fourth of global carbon dioxide emissions.a Process-related emissions are a direct byproduct of production. Because releases of carbon dioxide are inherent in the production of iron and steel, cement, and aluminum, the potential for reducing process-related emissions is limited. As a result, carbon abatement will face significant technological challenges in the industrial sector. In addition, there are no economical substitutes for these materials or their production processes, and none is likely be available in the near term.

57

Do Consumers Select Food Products Based on Carbon Dioxide Emissions?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study investigates whether consumers select foods based on the levels of carbon dioxide emissions by a real choice experiment. Respondents are...2 emissions under no monetary incentives. The willingness to.....

Keiko Aoki; Kenju Akai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

By the Numbers: A Visual Chronicle of Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2-eq.) emissions are now considered a de facto indicator ... this chapter highlights the size and scope of carbon emissions at multiple levelscountries, cities, industrial...

Tonya Boone; Ram Ganeshan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

EIA - AEO2010 - Updated State air emissions regulations  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Updated State air emissions regulations Updated State air emissions regulations Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Updated State air emissions regulations Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative The Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI) is a program that includes 10 Northeast States that have agreed to curtail and reverse growth in their CO2 emissions. The RGGI program includes all electricity generating units with a capacity of at least 25 mega-watts and requires an allowance for each ton of CO2 emitted [30]. The first year of mandatory compliance was in 2009. Each participating State was provided a CO2 budget consisting of a history-based baseline with a cushion for emissions growth, so that meeting the cap is expected to be relatively easy initially and become more stringent in subsequent years. The requirements are expected to cover 95 percent of CO2 emissions from the region's electric power sector. Overall, the RGGI States as a whole must maintain covered emissions at a level of 188 million tons CO2 for the next 4 years, after which a mandatory 2.5-percent annual decrease in CO2 emissions through 2018 is expected to reduce the total for covered CO2 emissions in the RGGI States to 10 percent below the initial calculated bud-get. Although each State was given its own emissions budget, allowances are auctioned at a uniform price across the entire region.

60

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Dioxide Emissions Associated with Bioenergy and Other Biogenic Sources Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy, Climate Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels, - Landfill Gas, - Waste to Energy, Greenhouse Gas Phase: Evaluate Options Resource Type: Publications, Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.epa.gov/climatechange/emissions/biogenic_emissions.html Cost: Free References: EPA, 40 CFR Part 60[1] Tailoring Rule[2] Biogenic Emissions[3] The 'EPA Climate Change - Green House Gas Emissions - Carbon Dioxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GLOBAL EMISSIONS Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, largely carbon dioxide (CO2) from the combustion. Figure 1 Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions: 1850­2030 1850 1860 1870 1880 1890 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940- related CO2 emissions have risen 130-fold since 1850--from 200 million tons to 27 billion tons a year

Green, Donna

62

Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, DOE/EIA-0573(2009)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

March 2011 www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009 ii Contacts This report, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 2009, was prepared under the general direction of John Conti, Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis, and Paul Holtberg, Team Leader, Analysis Integration Team. General questions concerning the content of this report may be directed to the Office of Communications at 202/586-8800. Technical information concerning the content of the report may be obtained from Perry Lindstrom at 202/586-0934 (email, perry. lindstrom@eia.gov). Without the assistance of Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), this report would not have

63

Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in different sectors in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, we analyze differences in per capita carbon dioxide emissions from 1996 to 2010 in six sectors across 28 provinces in China and examine the ?-convergence, stochastic convergence and ?-convergence of these emissions. We also investigate the factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector. The results show that per capita carbon dioxide emissions in all sectors converged across provinces from 1996 to 2010. Factors that impact the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions in each sector vary: GDP (gross domestic product) per capita, industrialization process and population density impact convergence in the Industry sector, while GDP per capita and population density impact convergence in the Transportation, Storage, Postal, and Telecommunications Services sector. Aside from GDP per capita and population density, trade openness also impacts convergence in the Wholesale, Retail, Trade, and Catering Service sector. Population density is the only factor that impacts convergence in the Residential Consumption sector.

Juan Wang; Kezhong Zhang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

65

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analysis & Projections Analysis & Projections International Energy Outlook 2013 Release Date: July 25, 2013 | Next Release Date: July 2014 (See release cycle changes) | correction | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0484(2013) Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Overview Figure 140. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2040 figure data Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions-those emissions produced through the combustion of liquid fuels, natural gas, and coal-account for much of the world's anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. As a result, energy consumption is an important component of the global climate change debate. In the IEO2013 Reference case, which does not assume new policies to limit greenhouse gas emissions, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions47

66

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates #12 Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission es- timates / by Bas Subject headings: satellite retrieval / nitrogen dioxide / ozone / air pollution / emis- sion estimates

Haak, Hein

67

Contact Us - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S. Energy  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

International Experts International Experts Fax: (202) 586-9753 Supporting Information: Country Analysis Briefs, cabs@eia.gov Midterm Energy Projections Linda Doman 202-586-1041 Fax: 202-586-3045 linda.doman@eia.gov Petroleum Market Short-Term Projections Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov World Oil Market Disruption Analysis Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Contingency Analysis / Regional Issues Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Supporting Information: International Energy Statistics Carbon Dioxide Emissions Karen Griffin 202-586-1357 karen.griffin@eia.gov Coal-All Topics Joel Lou 202-586-1457 joel.lou@eia.gov Crude Oil Exports, Imports, and Refining Erik Kreil 202-586-6573 erik.kreil@eia.gov Crude Oil Production and Crude Oil Reserves Patricia Smith 202-586-6925 patricia.smith@eia.gov

68

The effect of the Kyoto Protocol on carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the impact of the Kyoto Protocol on world emissions of a greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide. We use a large unbalanced panel data ... the effects of the international agreement. While carbon

Risa Kumazawa; Michael S. Callaghan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Figure 3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions" " (million metric tons)" ,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011,2012,2013,2014,2015,2016,2017,2018,2019,2020,2021,2022,2023,2024,2025,2026,2027,2028,...

70

Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 ERRATA Analysis of Strategies for Reducing Multiple Emissions from Electric Power Plants: Sulfur Dioxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Carbon Dioxide, and Mercury and a Renewable Portfolio Standard July 2001 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This Service Report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Contacts This report was prepared by the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Energy Information Adminis- tration. General questions concerning the report may be directed to Mary J. Hutzler (202/586-2222, mhutzler @eia.doe.gov), Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting, Scott B. Sitzer (202/586-2308,

71

Global carbon dioxide emissions scenarios: Sensitivity to social and technological factors in three regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2100 AD are decomposed ... intensity (energy use per unit GDP) and carbon intensity (carbon dioxide emissions per unit energy). These emissions factors are further subdivided...

Christopher Yang; Stephen H. Schneider

72

Global Carbon Dioxide Emissions Scenarios: Sensitivity to Social and Technological Factors in Three Regions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emissions from 1990 to 2100 AD are decomposed ... intensity (energy use per unit GDP) and carbon intensity (carbon dioxide emissions per unit energy). These emissions factors are further subdivided...

Christopher Yang; Stephen H. Schneider

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Historical Sulfur Dioxide Emissions 1850-2000: Methods and Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A global, self-consistent estimate of sulfur dioxide emissions over the last one and a half century were estimated by using a combination of bottom-up and best available inventory methods including all anthropogenic sources. We find that global sulfur dioxide emissions peaked about 1980 and have generally declined since this time. Emissions were extrapolated to a 1{sup o} x 1{sup o} grid for the time period 1850-2000 at annual resolution with two emission height levels and by season. Emissions are somewhat higher in the recent past in this new work as compared with some comprehensive estimates. This difference is largely due to our use of emissions factors that vary with time to account for sulfur removals from fossil fuels and industrial smelting processes.

Smith, Steven J.; Andres, Robert; Conception , Elvira; Lurz, Joshua

2004-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

74

United States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

75

Carbon dioxide emissions from the U.S. electricity sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As climate change negotiators from around the world prepared together in 1996 to consider new international targets and policies for greenhouse-gas reductions, the US Department of Energy asked the authors to review the options available to the electricity sector to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. The charge was to focus on supply-side options and utility demand-side management (DSM) programs because other researchers were considered energy efficiency options for the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors. The next section presents the EIA baseline projections of electricity production, use, and CO{sub 2} emissions to the year 2010. Subsequent sections briefly summarize the options available to the electricity industry to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions, speculate on how industry restructuring might affect the ability of the industry and its regulators to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions, and discuss the policies available to affect those emissions: research and development, voluntary programs, regulation, and fiscal policies.

Hirst, E.; Baxter, L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Where do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go? An analysis based on radiocarbon observations and an atmospheric transport model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?do fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from California go?1 distribution of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Marketable permits for controlling sulphur dioxide emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe research sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) into the nature of the auctions described in the bills. The research was undertaken at the request of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce to assess how various provisions in the bills might affect the workings of the market. Because the project called for the analysis of market mechanisms that do not now exist, a laboratory'' approach was applied in which artificial markets are created using computerized trading, volunteer subjects, and cash incentives to mimic the markets being studied. Dr. Mark Isaac, at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Jamie Kruse, at the University of Colorado, led teams that designed and conducted the laboratory experiments. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Hale, D.R. (USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)); Bjornstad, D.J. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Marketable permits for controlling sulphur dioxide emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe research sponsored by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) into the nature of the auctions described in the bills. The research was undertaken at the request of the House Committee on Energy and Commerce to assess how various provisions in the bills might affect the workings of the market. Because the project called for the analysis of market mechanisms that do not now exist, a ``laboratory`` approach was applied in which artificial markets are created using computerized trading, volunteer subjects, and cash incentives to mimic the markets being studied. Dr. Mark Isaac, at the University of Arizona, and Dr. Jamie Kruse, at the University of Colorado, led teams that designed and conducted the laboratory experiments. 4 figs., 5 tabs.

Hale, D.R. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States); Bjornstad, D.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Emissions of Carbon Dioxide from Tar Sands Plants in Canada  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Emissions of Carbon Dioxide from Tar Sands Plants in Canada ... When the CO2 emissions from the production of synthetic crude, refining, and utilization of fuels are combined, the emissions from utilization account for about 80 and about 70% of the emitted CO2 when fluid coking and delayed coking processes are considered, respectively. ... The combined production of 1 million barrels a day of synthetic crude would emit ?46 million tonnes of CO2 annually, which accounts for less than 8% of the Canadian CO2 emissions. ...

Edward Furimsky

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

On the potential economic costs of cutting carbon dioxide emissions in Portugal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to estimate the impact of reducing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion activities on economic ... 6,340. More importantly, and since carbon dioxide emissions are l...

Alfredo Marvo Pereira; Rui Manuel Marvo Pereira

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Auction design and the market for sulfur dioxide emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 created a market for electric utility emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO2). Recent papers have argued that flaws in the design of the auctions that are part of this market have ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The Projected Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Legislation on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;The Projected Impacts of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reduction Legislation on Electricity Prices on the projected prices of electricity and the use of electric energy in the state of Indiana. The analysis allowances and offsets, shifting production technology from coal-fired baseload resources to a combination

83

Climate Change: Global growth of carbon dioxide emissions continues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

After declining 1.5% in 2009, global carbon dioxide emissions rose 5.8% in 2010, the largest yearly jump in two decades, according to a Worldwatch Institute report released on April 28. Worldwatch is a Washington, D.C.-based, environmental think tank. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

Testing for Convergence in Carbon Dioxide Emissions Using a Century of Panel Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper tests the convergence in per-capita carbon dioxide emissions for a collection of developed and developing...

Joakim Westerlund; Syed A. Basher

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Convergence behavior of carbon dioxide emissions in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In view of global warming, the concept of a low carbon world economy has been brought to center stage. In this paper, a systematical empirical investigation of the convergence behavior of carbon dioxide emissions in China is conducted based on provincial data for the period of 19952011. Using the log t test developed by Phillips and Sul (2007), evident divergence at the country level and convergence to three steady state equilibriums at provincial level was identified. Furthermore, estimates from the ordered logit model uncover important determinants underlying the formation of clubs, including the per capita GDP, energy consumption structure, energy intensity, and initial levels of economic development. The results from this study contribute to a more in-depth understanding of the carbon dioxide emissions status quo in China and serves as reference when launching region-based emissions mitigation policies.

Yiming Wang; Pei Zhang; Dake Huang; Changda Cai

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Environment - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment Environment Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Summary Electric Power Plant Environmental International Emissions All Environment Data Reports Analysis & Projections Carbon/Greenhouse Gas Emissions International Other Environmental Issues Projections All Reports EIA's latest Short-Term Energy Outlook for carbon dioxide emissions › chart showing U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, released monthly. Extending current energy policies would reduce U.S. energy use, carbon dioxide emissions › Graph of total energy-related co2 emissions, as explained in the article text Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Today in Energy, April 30, 2013. Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide are projected to decline ›

87

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

G: Key Assumptions for the IEO2005 Kyoto Protocol Case G: Key Assumptions for the IEO2005 Kyoto Protocol Case Energy-Related Emissions of Greenhouse Gases The System for the Analysis of Global energy Markets (SAGE)—the model used by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to prepare the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) mid-term projections—does not include non-energy-related emissions of greenhouse gases, which are estimated at about 15 to 20 percent of total greenhouse gas emissions, based on inventories submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). SAGE models global energy supply and demand and, therefore, does not address agricultural and other non-energy-related emissions. EIA implicitly assumes that percentage reductions of non-energy-related emissions and their associated abatement costs will be similar to those for energy-related emissions. Non-energy-related greenhouse gas emissions are likely to grow faster than energy-related emissions; however, the marginal abatement costs for non-energy-related greenhouse gas emissions are not known and cannot be estimated reliably. In SAGE, each region’s emissions reduction goal under the Kyoto Protocol is based only on the corresponding estimate of that region’s energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, as determined by EIA data. It is assumed that the required reductions will also be proportionately less than if all gases were included.

88

Energy use and sulphur dioxide emissions in Asia  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a review of energy use in 22 selected countries of Asia and estimates the anthropogenic emission of sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) for the selected countries, both at national and disaggregated sub-country-regional levels. The paper also makes a comparative assessment of the Asian countries in terms of SO{sub 2} emission intensity (i.e. emission per GDP), emission per capita and emission density (i.e. emission per unit area). Total SO{sub 2} emission in the region was estimated to be about 38 million tons in 1990 Five countries, China, India, South Korea, Japan and Thailand, accounted for over 91% of the regional SO{sub 2} emission. Coal use had the dominant share (81%) of the total emission from the region. Among the economic sectors, industry contributed the largest share (49%) to the total emissions of the selected countries as a whole, followed by the power sector (30%). These findings suggest the need for mitigation strategies focussed on the industry and power sectors of the major emitting countries in Asia. 20 refs., 10 tabs.

Shrestha, R.M.; Bhattacharya, S.C.; Malla, S. [Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)] [Asian Inst. of Technology, Bangkok (Thailand)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Performance Comparison of Two Fuzzy Based Models in Predicting Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Many studies have been carried out worldwide to predict carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions using various methods. Most of the methods...2 emissions are not immediately known. This paper offers...2 emissions in Malays...

Herrini Mohd Pauzi; Lazim Abdullah

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Carbon dioxide emissions, impact on Malaysia's manufacturing productivity growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods used to measure productivity growth generally ignore the pollutants that are produced by the industrial processes. For example, pollutant emissions generated as undesirable output, apart from the main output of Malaysia's manufacturing sector, are excluded from the productivity accounting framework. This study aims at an extended productivity measure that takes pollutants into account by internalisation of Carbon dioxide (CO2) as a measure of air pollutant emissions into the production function, as an unpriced input. The results show that there was a slowdown in the contribution of total factor productivity (TFP) growth in general, and a negative impact of CO2 emissions produced by the sector in particular, compared to other productivity indicators of the sector when CO2 is internalised in the models.

Elsadig Musa Ahmed

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MASTER THESIS IN AQUATIC PHOTOCHEMISTRY Sunlight-induced carbon dioxide emissions from lakes The emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2) from inland waters are substantial on a global scale. Yet, the fundamental question remains open which proportion of these CO2 emissions is induced by sunlight via photochemical

Uppsala Universitet

92

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes of the air-sea system. The perturbation, dIc, includes carbon emissions and changes in the terrestrial), Analytical relationships between atmospheric carbon dioxide, carbon emissions, and ocean processes, Global

Follows, Mick

93

U.S. States - Rankings - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Rankings Rankings Additional State Rankings Consumption Total Energy per Capita Prices Natural Gas Electricity Environment Carbon Dioxide Emissions Expenditures Total Energy per Capita Production Total Energy Crude Oil Natural Gas Coal Electricity More State Ranking Tables › Notes & Sources Consumption Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Consumption Per Capita Expenditures Total Energy per Capita: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Expenditures Per Capita Production Total Energy: EIA, State Energy Data System, Total Energy Production Crude Oil: EIA, Petroleum Supply Annual, Crude Oil Production Natural Gas: EIA, Natural Gas Annual, Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals and Production Coal: EIA, Annual Coal Report, Coal Production and Number of Mines by State

94

State Externalities Policy and Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Who Bears the Risks of Future Regulation?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

ITEM...: In January 1991, representatives of 38 state consumer advocacy offices and 17 environmental organizations warned utilities that failures to anticipate future carbon-dioxide-emission cost i...

Ralph Cavanagh; Ashok Gupta; Dan Lashof; Marika Tatsutani

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

13, 2013 13, 2013 EIA releases analysis of state-level energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions vary significantly across states. An analysis of state-level emissions data from 2000 through 2010 released today by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) shows that the overall size of a state, as well as the available fuels, types of businesses, climate, and population density, play a role in both total and per capita emissions. For example, some states are located near abundant hydroelectric supplies, while others contain abundant coal resources. The term "energy-related carbon dioxide emissions" as used in the analysis, includes emissions released at the location where fossil fuels are used, not where they are produced.

96

Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary Satellite observations of ozone and nitrogen dioxide: from retrievals to emission estimates be inferred for important trace gases such as ozone (O3) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). Chemical transport models.11 to 3.79. Total nitrogen dioxide columns can be retrieved from space in the 405­465 nm window

Haak, Hein

97

Carbon dioxide emission reduction using molten carbonate fuel cell systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The contribution of the molten carbonate fuel cell system (MCFCs) to carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction in power application is analyzed. \\{MCFCs\\} can separate and concentrate CO2 emitted from traditional thermal power plants (PPs) without reducing the plant's overall energy efficiency. \\{MCFCs\\} can also be used by itself as an effective CO2 separator or concentrator by managing the anode gas stream to increase the heat utilization of the system. The CO2 separated and concentrated by \\{MCFCs\\} is most effectively captured by condensation. \\{MCFCs\\} is currently used as a CO2 separator only to a limited extent due to its high cost and relatively small scale operation. However, \\{MCFCs\\} will substantially contribute to reduce CO2 emissions in power generation applications in the near future.

Jung-Ho Wee

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Table 22. Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual Total Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual (million metric tons) 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 AEO 1982 AEO 1983 AEO 1984 AEO 1985 AEO 1986 AEO 1987 AEO 1989* AEO 1990 AEO 1991 AEO 1992 AEO 1993 5009 5053 5130 5207 5269 5335 5401 5449 5504 5562 5621 5672 5724 5771 5819 5867 5918 5969 AEO 1994 5060 5130 5185 5240 5287 5335 5379 5438 5482 5529 5599 5658 5694 5738 5797 5874 5925 AEO 1995 5137 5174 5188 5262 5309 5361 5394 5441.3 5489.0 5551.3 5621.0 5679.7 5727.3 5775.0 5841.0 5888.7 AEO 1996 5182 5224 5295 5355 5417 5464 5525 5589 5660 5735 5812 5879 5925 5981 6030 AEO 1997 5295 5381 5491 5586 5658 5715 5781 5863 5934 6009 6106 6184 6236 6268 AEO 1998 5474 5621 5711 5784 5893 5957 6026 6098 6192 6292 6379 6465 6542 AEO 1999 5522 5689 5810 5913 5976 6036 6084 6152 6244 6325 6418 6493 AEO 2000

100

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Dioxide Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Carbon Dioxide Emissions/Carbon Dioxide Budget Trading Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Connecticut

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Carbon Dioxide Emissions in the U.S. Economy: A Structural Decomposition Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the impact of various influences on carbon dioxide emissions. It incorporates methodological refinements of input-output...2 emissions in the U.S. over the 1972 ... as...

Stephen D. Casler; Adam Rose

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A decomposition analysis of carbon dioxide emissions in the Chinese nonferrous metal industry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The nonferrous metal industry (NMI) of China consumes large amounts of energy and associated emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2) are very high. Actions to reduce CO 2 emissions and ener...

Y. Shi; T. Zhao

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Investigation of Energy, Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Costs in Single Point Incremental Forming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The LCA of sheet metal forming processes is lacking in studies of sustainability issues and quantification of energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. This paper summarizes an investigation of the...2 emissions

Kadra Branker; David W. Adams

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Impact of Light-Duty Vehicle Emissions on 21st Century Carbon Dioxide Concentrations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impact of light-duty passenger vehicle emissions on global carbon dioxide concentrations was estimated using the MAGICC reduced-form climate model combined with the PNNL contribution to the CCSP scenarios product. Our central estimate is that tailpipe light duty vehicle emissions of carbon-dioxide over the 21st century will increase global carbon dioxide concentrations by slightly over 12 ppmv by 2100.

Smith, Steven J.; Kyle, G. Page

2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

105

CARBON DECLINE Report shows record drop for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions in 2012  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CARBON DECLINE Report shows record drop for U.S. carbon dioxide emissions in 2012 ... U.S. carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels fell 3.8% last year to the lowest level since 1994, according to a report released last week by the Energy Information Administration. ... Consequently, looking just at carbon emissions and production, 2012 marks the largest annual drop in carbon emissions per GDP since 1948 when records were first kept. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Bioenergy Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Researchers have recently argued that there is a 'critical climate accounting error' and that we should say 'goodbye to carbon neutral' for bioenergy. Many other analysts have published opionions on the same topic, and the US Environmental Protection Agency posted a specific call for information. The currently burning questions for carbon accounting is how to deal with bioenergy. The questions arises because, unlike for fossil fuels, burning of biomass fuels represents part of a cycle in which combustion releases back to the atmosphere carbon that was earlier removed from the atmosphere by growing plants. In a sustainable system, plants will again remove the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from the atmosphere. Conceptually, it is clear that there are no net emissions of the greenhouse gas CO{sub 2} if biomass is harvested and combusted at the same rate that biomass grows and removes CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. The problem lies in the fact that growth and combustion do not occur at the same time or in the same place, and our accounting system boundaries - spatial and temporal - frequently do not provide full and balanced accounting. When the first comprehensive guidelines for estimating national greenhouse gas emissions and sinks were put together by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, they noted that it has been argued that CO{sub 2} emissions resulting from bioenergy consumption should not be included in a country's official emission inventory because there are no net emissions if the biomass is produced sustainably, and if the biomass is not produced sustainably, the loss of carbon will be captured as part of the accounting for emissions from land-use change. In the same philosophical vein, the Kyoto Protocol provides that emissions or sinks of CO{sub 2} from land-use change and forestry activities be measured as the 'verifiable changes in carbon stocks'. From these has grown the convention that emissions from biomass fuels are generally not counted as part of emissions inventories, and biomass energy is sometimes referred to as being 'carbon neutral.' But what happens when a forest is harvested for fuel but takes 60 years to regrow or when biomass is harvested in a country that is not party to an international accord but is burned in a country that is party to an international accord? Biomass energy is only truly 'carbon neutral' if we get the system boundaries right. They need to make sure that the accounting methodology is compatible with our needs and realities in management and policy.

Marland, Gregg [ORNL

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,705,749,796 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 4,082,889 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 2,367,431 Carbon Dioxide (thousand...

108

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,947,100 36 Emissions Sulfur Dioxide (short tons) 52 49 Nitrogen Oxide (short tons) 673 50 Carbon Dioxide (thousand metric...

109

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Environment - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable &

110

A fast method for updating global fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We provide a fast and efficient method for calculating global annual mean carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels by combining data from an established data set with BP annual statistics. Using this method it is possible to retrieve an updated estimate of global CO2 emissions six months after the actual emissions occurred. Using this data set we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions have increased by over 40% from 1990 to 2008 with an annual average increase of 3.7% over the five-year period 2003?2007. In 2008 the growth rate in the fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions was smaller than in the preceding five years, but it was still over 2%. Global mean carbon dioxide emissions in 2008 were 8.8?GtC? yr?1. For the latter part of the last century emissions of carbon dioxide have been greater from oil than from coal. However during the last few years this situation has changed. The recent strong increase in fossil fuel CO2 emissions is mainly driven by an increase in emissions from coal, whereas emissions from oil and gas to a large degree follow the trend from the 1990s.

G Myhre; K Alterskj?r; D Lowe

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Review of accounting for carbon dioxide emissions from tourism at different spatial scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon dioxide emission from tourism, as a focus of man-land relationship in tourism industry in the 21st century, is a vital index reflecting its effect on environment change. The article summarizes the contents of carbon dioxide emissions from tourism at different scales such as world, nation, region and unit. These results indicate that: (1) the accounting of the carbon dioxide emissions from tourism began from global and national scales at the end of the last century, then to regional and basic scales. (2) The Carbon dioxide emissions from tourism are mainly from high-developed countries and regions in terms of space, from the minority high-spending tourists in terms of behavior, from high-speed vehicles, high-grade accommodations and high-level tourism activities in terms of tourism element. The carbon dioxide emissions per capita of developing countries and regions are less than one tenth in developed countries and regions. As for the proportion of total emission, tourism transportation accounts for the largest, generally more than 65%, followed by accommodation, and the last is tourism activity. (3) Based on the systemic analysis of these coefficients of accounting carbon dioxide emissions in tourism, the paper indicates that there are progresses in the consistency of coefficients at global scale and diversity of coefficients at national, regional and unit scales, while the coefficients of developed countries and regions are higher than those of developing countries and regions. In addition, some recommendations including coefficients have given to China.

Yu-guo Tao; Zhen-fang Huang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

>Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis (NDP-058a) Prepared by Antoinette L. Brenkert Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290 Date Published: February 1998 (Revised for the Web: 2003) CONTENTS Abstract Documentation file for Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Data Base NDP-058a (2-1998) Abstract Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring for 1995 on a One Degree Grid Cell Basis. (March 1998) Antoinette L. Brenkert DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058.2003 This data package presents the gridded (one degree latitude by one degree longitude) summed emissions from fossil-fuel burning, hydraulic cement

113

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Emissions Monitoring Combined Heat and Power Carbon Dioxide18.7 to 36.8 *Combined Heat and Power (CHP) ** Uncertaintiesin electric and Combined Heat and Power (CHP) plants, diesel

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

The relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth: quantile panel-type analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper samples the data of 138 countries during the 19712007 period, and performs an empirical test to validate the relationship between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth. It first performs panel ...

Kuan-Min Wang

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Current status of waste to power generation in Japan and resulting reduction of carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We discuss the current status of waste to power generation (WPG) in Japan and various scenarios involving indirect reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by WPG. The number of WPG facilities ... power plants. If t...

Masaki Takaoka; Nobuo Takeda; Naruo Yamagata

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Some operational aspects and applications of dividing wall columns: energy requirements and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

During the end of 20th century and beginning of the 21st, oil prices reached 100 USD per barrel, and more attention was given to environmental regulations on carbon dioxide emissions. As a result, applications of...

Ral Delgado-Delgado; Salvador Hernndez

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Methane and carbon dioxide emissions and nitrogen turnover during liquid manure storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of the greenhouse gas (GHG) methane...4) have increased significantly during the twentieth century (IPCC 2001). Compared to carbon dioxide (CO2), the amounts of CH4 are low in the atmosphe...

Sven G. Sommer; Sren O. Petersen; Peter Srensen

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Carbon dioxide emissions and governance: A nonparametric analysis for the G-20  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper applies nonparametric estimators to examine the carbon dioxide emissionsgovernance relationship. By using data for the twenty largest economies (Group of twenty, G-20) the dynamics of the considered relationship are analyzed for the time period 19962010. Six governance measures are included in our analysis (Voice and Accountability, Political Stability and Absence of Violence, Government Effectiveness, Regulatory Quality, Rule of Law and Control of Corruption) as have been defined by the World Bank. The empirical findings reveal a high nonlinear relationship between countries' carbon dioxide emissions and the examined governance measures. The results reveal significant differences on the number of governance measures influencing countries' carbon dioxide emission levels. It is evident that these differences are subject to countries' specific regional and development variations. Finally, it appears that increasing the quality of countries' different governance factors does not always result to lower carbon dioxide emission levels.

George E. Halkos; Nickolaos G. Tzeremes

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Carbon dioxide sequestration in petrochemical industries with the aim of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions to acceptable levels is arguably the greatest...2 increase in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide sequestration that consists of separation, transportation and...2..., is one...

Maryam Takht Ravanchi; Saeed Sahebdelfar

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions Emissions International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic Data - Emissions Figure 103. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035 Figure 104. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 105. U.S.energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel in IEO2009 and IEO2010, 2007, 2015, and 2035 Figure 106. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 107. Average annual growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the Non-OECD economies, 2007-2035 Figure 108. World carbon dioxide emissions from liquids combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 109. World carbon dioxide emissions from natural gas combustion, 1990-2035 Figure 110. World carbon dioxide emissions from coal combustion, 1990-2035

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Cropland Production in the United States, 1990-2004 These data represent energy use and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions associated with cropland production in the U.S. Energy use and emissions occurring on the farm are referred to as on-site energy and on-site emissions. Energy use and emissions associated with cropland production that occur off the farm (e.g., use of electricity, energy and emissions associated with fertilizer and pesticide production) are referred to as off-site energy and off-site emissions. The combination of on-site and off-site energy and carbon is referred to as total energy and total carbon, respectively. Data provided here are for on-site and total energy and associated CO2 emissions. Units are Megagram C for CO2 estimates and Gigajoule for energy

122

Carbon dioxide emission, institutional quality, and economic growth: Empirical evidence in Malaysia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In view of Malaysia's status as a fast-growing economy with accelerating carbon dioxide emissions, a better understanding of the relationship between economic growth and pollution is vital to the policy makers. This paper, therefore, attempts to investigate the existence of long run relationship among carbon dioxide emission, institutional quality, exports, and economic growth and further examines the causal relationship among these variables in Malaysia for the period 19842008. From the bounds test, it is found that a long run relationship does exist among the variables, even using different conditioning information sets. A positive and significant interaction term between carbon dioxide emission and institutional quality indicator (i.e. law and order) implies that good institutional quality is important in controlling carbon dioxide emission in the process of economic development. The results for Granger causality tests further confirm the importance of institutional frameworks in reducing carbon dioxide emissions since institutional quality is found not only affects economic growth directly, but also indirectly via carbon dioxide emissions. This indicates that sound institutional frameworks are essential for Malaysia to achieve high economic growth without sacrificing its environment.

Lin-Sea Lau; Chee-Keong Choong; Yoke-Kee Eng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Convergence in Per Capita Carbon Dioxide Emissions Among G7 Countries: A TAR Panel Unit Root Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The subject of this paper is the examination the convergence of per capita carbon dioxide emissions of the G7 countries during the 1960 ... Kingdom was the transition country whose per capita carbon dioxide (CO2

Nilgun Cil Yavuz; Veli Yilanci

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Changes in carbon dioxide emissions and LMDI-based impact factor decomposition: the Xinjiang Uygur autonomous region as a case  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Studies on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at provincial level can provide a scientific...2 reduction policies. We studied the variation of CO2 emissions of primary energy consumption and its influencing...2 emission

Li Zhang; Jun Lei; Xuan Zhou; XiaoLei Zhang; Wen Dong; Yu Yang

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects:? A Life Cycle Assessment Approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions with Enhanced Oil Recovery Projects:? A Life Cycle Assessment Approach ... This capacity corresponds approximately to storing the emissions of a 5 MW power plant emitting 65 tons of CO2 per day for almost 1800 years27 or 14 years from a 300 MW coal power plant where 8000 tons of CO2 is captured per day. ... To overcome this CO2 emission problem, there is great interest, esp. in Canada, to capture carbon dioxide and utilize it as a flooding agent for the enhanced oil recovery (EOR) process. ...

Anne-Christine Aycaguer; Miriam Lev-On; Arthur M. Winer

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Environmental Kuznets Curve for carbon dioxide emissions: lack of robustness to heterogeneity?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). As indicated by Wagner (2008), the series of per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and per capita carbon focuses solely on the energy consumption, carbon dioxide ( 2CO ) emissions and economic growth nexus in countries' energy efficiencies and cross-country differences in the 2CO emissions trajectories are accounted

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

127

Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A survey of diffuse CO2 efflux, soil temperature and soil-gas chemistry over areas of localized vegetation-kill on and around the resurgent dome of Long Valley caldera California was performed to evaluate the premise that gaseous and thermal anomalies are related to renewed intrusion of magma. Some kill sites are long-lived features and others have developed in the past few years. Total anomalous CO2 emissions from the

128

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CarBen Version 3: Multisector Carbon Dioxide Emissions Accounting Tool Focus Area: Geothermal Power Topics: Policy, Deployment, & Program Impact Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/PubDetails.aspx?Action=View& Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carben-version-3-multisector-carbon-d Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance The CarBen model enables users to conduct wedge anlayses of scenarios for mitigating U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. The spreadsheet-based tool relies upon expert opinion for scenario formulation and is not intended to be used

129

The POETICs of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japan: an urban and institutional extension of the IPAT identity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study applies the POETICs framework (population, organization, environment, technology, institutions and culture) to an analysis of industrial carbon dioxide emissions in Japanese cities. The inclusion of in...

Stephan Scholz

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Comparison of Two U.S. Power-Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data Sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Two U.S. Power-Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions Data Sets ... The varying proportions of CO2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio (?13C), with a range of about 2 . ... The large range of carbon emissions within the bituminous rank class suggests that rank-specific carbon emission factors are provincial rather than global. ...

Katherine V. Ackerman; Eric T. Sundquist

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iron and steel production consumes enormous quantities of energy, especially in developing countries where outdated, inefficient technologies are still used to produce iron and steel. Carbon dioxide emissions from steel production, which range between 5 and 15% of total country emissions in key developing countries (Brazil, China, India, Mexico, and South Africa), will continue to grow as these countries develop and as demand for steel products such as materials, automobiles, and appliances increases. In this report, we describe the key steel processes, discuss typical energy-intensity values for these processes, review historical trends in iron and steel production by process in five key developing countries, describe the steel industry in each of the five key developing countries, present international comparisons of energy use and carbon dioxide emissions among these countries, and provide our assessment of the technical potential to reduce these emissions based on best-practice benchmarking. Using a best practice benchmark, we find that significant savings, in the range of 33% to 49% of total primary energy used to produce steel, are technically possible in these countries. Similarly, we find that the technical potential for reducing intensities of carbon dioxide emissions ranges between 26% and 49% of total carbon dioxide emissions from steel production in these countries.

Price, L.K.; Phylipsen, G.J.M.; Worrell, E.

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Income inequality and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Chinese urban households  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper draws on Chinese survey data to investigate variations in carbon dioxide emissions across households with different income levels. Rich households generate more emissions per capita than poor households via both their direct energy consumption and their higher expenditure on goods and services that use energy as an intermediate input. An econometric analysis confirms a positive relationship between emissions and income and establishes a slightly increasing marginal propensity to emit (MPE) over the relevant income range. The redistribution of income from rich to poor households is therefore shown to reduce aggregate household emissions, suggesting that the twin pursuits of reducing inequality and emissions can be achieved in tandem.

Jane Golley; Xin Meng

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Energy, carbon dioxide emissions, carbon taxes and the Chinese economy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Given the global characteristics of climate change and China's potential importance as a source of CO2 emissions, advocates of controlling CO2 emissions call for substantial efforts in China. However, the Chinese...

ZhongXiang Zhang

134

Table 4. 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " 2010 State energy-related carbon dioxide emission shares by sector " "percent of total" ,"Shares" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation" "Alabama",0.01584875241,0.5778871607,0.02136328943,0.1334667239,0.2514340736 "Alaska",0.06448385239,0.0785744956,0.0462016929,0.4291084798,0.3816314793 "Arizona",0.02474932909,0.5668758159,0.02425067581,0.04966758421,0.334456595 "Arkansas",0.03882032779,0.4886410984,0.03509200153,0.1307772146,0.3066693577 "California",0.04308920353,0.1176161395,0.07822332929,0.1824277392,0.5786435885 "Colorado",0.04301641968,0.4131279202,0.08115394032,0.1545280216,0.3081736982

135

EIA - Eia.gov BETA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Feedback Policy Feedback Policy Policy for public posting Feedback Period Closed This project is closed for further comment, however, comments previously submitted can still be viewed to the right. EIA is currently analyzing the feedback and will be making changes to this web product as needed in preparation for public launch. Suggestions will be implemented depending on the number received, technical or other accessibility issues reported, and the availability of resources to implement any particular suggestion. Thanks for helping us to make EIA's products better! of feedback submitted during beta testing of EIA experimental web products: User feedback of beta products is moderated. EIA will review all feedback submissions within one business day. EIA reserves the right to edit feedback for brevity and grammar

136

About EIA - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

EIA resources Single Sign On (only available inside EIA) Employee Self Service (ESS) Outlook Web Access (OWA) IntranetInsideEIA (only available inside EIA) EIA VPN...

137

The Greenness of Cities: Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Urban Development  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emissions index, we use conversion factors. To determine theof Energy. 11 This conversion factor includes only thebe using different conversion factors for electricity in

Glaeser, Edward L.; Kahn, Matthew E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Table 1. State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by year (2000 - 2010)" "million metric tons carbon dioxide" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,," 2000 to 2010 " "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",140.4264977,131.9521389,136.7103146,137.2323195,139.6896437,141.493798,143.9716001,146.076107,139.2224128,119.7962734,132.7462762,-0.05469211069,-7.680221558 "Alaska",44.32104312,43.40375114,43.56121812,43.5078746,46.76217106,48.06229125,45.79367017,44.11576503,39.46205329,37.91867389,38.72718369,-0.1262122693,-5.593859429 "Arizona",85.96984024,88.33838336,87.66914741,89.29026566,96.58329461,96.7032775,100.0087541,102.1950438,103.1458188,94.63481918,95.91303514,0.1156591064,9.943194897

139

Table 3. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by sector " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" "State","Commercial","Electric Power","Residential","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Alabama",2.103862865,76.71236863,2.835897119,17.71721059,33.37693698,132.7462762 "Alaska",2.497277997,3.042968925,1.789261448,16.61816292,14.7795124,38.72718369 "Arizona",2.373783271,54.37078005,2.325955921,4.76376875,32.07874715,95.91303514 "Arkansas",2.566776983,32.30865878,2.320262268,8.646911643,20.27679552,66.11940519 "California",15.93482613,43.49564577,28.92778352,67.46363514,213.9882899,369.8101805 "Colorado",4.150125234,39.85763155,7.82954551,14.90850811,29.73188961,96.47770002

140

Table 2. 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " 2010 state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel " "million metric tons of carbon dioxide" ,,,,,," Shares " "State","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas ","Total","Coal","Petroleum","Natural Gas" "Alabama",67.81545193,35.95576449,28.97505976,132.7462762,0.5108651925,0.2708608145,0.218273993 "Alaska",1.364880388,19.58916888,17.77313443,38.72718369,0.03524347131,0.5058247724,0.4589317562 "Arizona",43.2377726,34.82066125,17.85460129,95.91303514,0.4508018387,0.3630440972,0.1861540641 "Arkansas",27.72445786,23.82768621,14.56726112,66.11940519,0.4193089424,0.3603735717,0.2203174859 "California",5.157135123,241.2575077,123.3955377,369.8101805,0.01394535736,0.6523820067,0.3336726359

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141

Table 5. Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 201  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" Per capita energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by state (2000 - 2010)" "metric tons carbon dioxide per person" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"Change" ,,,,,,,,,,,,"2000 to 2010" "State",2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percent","Absolute" "Alabama",31.54590416,29.56352198,30.5739632,30.56483509,30.96927578,31.14605742,31.33283758,31.52225314,29.78727412,25.44798199,28.06679306,-0.1102872527,-3.479111105 "Alaska",70.60324067,68.51009907,67.8551127,67.17588806,70.92646205,72.04509462,67.81012638,64.8863351,57.56413017,54.58358965,54.63289567,-0.2261984697,-15.97034499 "Arizona",16.64049197,16.65546102,16.08173855,15.97087112,16.77174168,16.18743942,16.15392734,16.06780183,15.87052371,14.3654833,14.36549251,-0.1367146759,-2.274999466

142

Coping with carbon: a near-term strategy to limit carbon dioxide emissions from power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dioxide from power stations. According to the...source, natural gas. On top of this...can be applied to gas-fired plants too...build large power stations. Individual plants...A nuclear power station is both cost effective...lower greenhouse gas emissions than any...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Carbon Dioxide Emissions of the City Center of Firenze, Italy: Measurement, Evaluation, and Source Partitioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An eddy covariance station was installed in the city center of Firenze, Italy, to measure carbon fluxes at half-hourly intervals over a mostly homogeneous urban area. Carbon dioxide (CO2) emission observations made over an initial period of 3.5 ...

A. Matese; B. Gioli; F. P. Vaccari; A. Zaldei; F. Miglietta

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions including Ammonia, Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide Don Stedman, Gary Bishop, Allison Peddle, University of Denver Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry Denver CO 80208. www.feat.biochem.du.edu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Road Motor Vehicle Emissions including Ammonia, Sulfur Dioxide and Nitrogen Dioxide Don Stedman Nitrogen dioxide: Less than 5% of the NOx BUT with an outstanding peak for the 2007 MY in Fresno 0. Nitrogen dioxide: less than 5% of NOx except the Fresno fleet containing the 2007 Sprinter ambulances. #12;

Denver, University of

145

EIA - Eia.gov BETA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Read our feedback policy. Read our feedback policy. Project Feedback Feedback Period Closed This project is closed for further comment, however, comments previously submitted can still be viewed to the right. EIA is currently analyzing the feedback and will be making changes to this web product as needed in preparation for public launch. Suggestions will be implemented depending on the number received, technical or other accessibility issues reported, and the availability of resources to implement any particular suggestion. Thanks for helping us to make EIA's products better! None have been submitted and reviewed for this project. Be the first! Feedback Policy Policy for public posting of feedback submitted during beta testing of EIA experimental web products: User feedback of beta products is moderated. EIA will review all

146

Energy consumption, carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth: The case of Saudi Arabia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper investigates the dynamic causal relationships between energy consumption, energy price and economic activity in Saudi Arabia based on a demand side approach. We use a Johansen multivariate cointegration approach and incorporate CO2 emissions as a control variable. The results indicate that there exists at least a long-run relationship between energy consumption, energy price, carbon dioxide emissions, and economic growth. Furthermore, a long-run unidirectional causality stands from energy consumption to economic growth and CO2 emissions, bidirectional causality between carbon dioxide emissions and economic growth, and a long-run unidirectional causality runs from energy price to economic growth and CO2 emissions. In the short-run, there is unidirectional causality running from CO2 emissions to energy consumption and economic output and from energy price to CO2 emissions. Even though, the energy-led growth hypothesis is valid, the share of energy consumption in explaining economic growth is minimal. Energy price is the most important factor in explaining economic growth. Hence, policies aimed at reducing energy consumption and controlling for CO2 emissions may not reduce significantly Saudi?s economic growth. Investing in the use of renewable energy sources like solar and wind power is an urgent necessity to control for fossil fuel consumption and CO2 emissions.

Atef Saad Alshehry; Mounir Belloumi

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Carbon Dioxide Emission Pathways Avoiding Dangerous Ocean Impacts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases could lead to undesirable effects on oceans in coming centuries. Drawing on recommendations published by the German Advisory Council on Global Change, levels of unacceptable global marine change (so-...

K. Kvale; K. Zickfeld; T. Bruckner; K. J. Meissner; K. Tanaka; A. J. Weaver

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

State Emissions Estimates  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Estimates of state energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Because energy-related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) constitutes over 80 percent of total emissions, the state energy-related CO 2 emission levels provide a good indicator of the relative contribution of individual states to total greenhouse gas emissions. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) emissions estimates at the state level for energy-related CO 2 are based on data contained in the State Energy Data System (SEDS). 1 The state-level emissions estimates are based on energy consumption data for the following fuel categories: three categories of coal (residential/commercial, industrial, and electric power sector); natural gas; and ten petroleum products including-- asphalt and road oil, aviation gasoline, distillate fuel, jet fuel, kerosene, liquefied petroleum gases

149

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 EIA Conference 2010 Session 7: Natural Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context Moderator: Glen Sweetnam, EIA Speakers: Michelle Foss, University of Texas Benjamin Schlesinger, Benjamin Schlesinger and Assoc., Inc. Andrew Slaughter, Shell Moderator and Speaker Biographies Glen Sweetnam, EIA In October 2005, Glen Sweetnam was named Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). This Division produces the International Energy Outlook and two congressionally mandated reports on U.S. greenhouse gas emissions. Mr. Sweetnam has 25 years of leadership experience in the energy industry in both the private and public sectors. Prior to joining EIA, he worked at senior levels for both energy merchants and exploration and production

150

EIA-812  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9612 9612 A completed form must be received by the 20th calendar day following the end of the report month. Forms may be submitted using one of the following methods: Month For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp OOG.SURVEYS@eia.gov Mailing Address of Contact (e.g., PO Box, RR): If the physical and mailing addresses are the same, only complete the physical address. FORM EIA-812 MONTHLY PRODUCT PIPELINE REPORT Comments: Identify any unusual aspects of your reporting month's operations. (To separate one comment from another, press ALT+ENTER.) This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and

151

EIA-820  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA ID NUMBER: EIA ID NUMBER: If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: If any Respondent Identification Data has changed since the last report, enter an "X" in the box: Company Name: Forms may be submitted using one of the following methods: Doing Business As: Site Name: Email: Terminal Control Number (TCN): Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 City: State: Zip: - Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Questions? Call: 202-586-6281 Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Mailing Address of Contact (e.g., PO Box, RR): If the physical and mailing addresses are the same, only complete the physical address. FORM EIA-820 REPORT YEAR 2014 This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and

152

Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions » Gridded Estimates for Benchmark Years Geographic Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil-Fuel Burning, Hydraulic Cement Production, and Gas Flaring on a One Degree by One Degree Grid Cell Basis: 1950 to 1990 (NDP-058) data Data image ASCII Text Documentation PDF file PDF file Contributors R. J. Andres, G. Marland, I. Fung, and E. Matthews (contributors) DOI DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.ndp058 This data package presents data sets recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of thousand metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1950, 1960, 1970, 1980, and 1990. Detailed geographic information on CO2 emissions can be critical in understanding the pattern of the atmospheric and biospheric response to these emissions.

153

Accounting for carbon dioxide emissions: A matter of time  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...country can support consumption of goods and services...internal combustion engine. So, how much...emissions to the consumption of particular goods...internationally traded fossil fuels, foodstuffs...underemphasize the role of consumption of goods and services...from selling the fuel. Those who use...

Ken Caldeira; Steven J. Davis

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Short run effects of a price on carbon dioxide emissions from U.S. electric generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The price of delivered electricity will rise if generators have to pay for carbon dioxide emissions through an implicit or explicit mechanism. There are two main effects that a substantial price on CO{sub 2} emissions would have in the short run (before the generation fleet changes significantly). First, consumers would react to increased price by buying less, described by their price elasticity of demand. Second, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions would change the order in which existing generators are economically dispatched, depending on their carbon dioxide emissions and marginal fuel prices. Both the price increase and dispatch changes depend on the mix of generation technologies and fuels in the region available for dispatch, although the consumer response to higher prices is the dominant effect. We estimate that the instantaneous imposition of a price of $35 per metric ton on CO{sub 2} emissions would lead to a 10% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions in PJM and MISO at a price elasticity of -0.1. Reductions in ERCOT would be about one-third as large. Thus, a price on CO{sub 2} emissions that has been shown in earlier work to stimulate investment in new generation technology also provides significant CO{sub 2} reductions before new technology is deployed at large scale. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Adam Newcomer; Seth A. Blumsack; Jay Apt; Lester B. Lave; M. Granger Morgan [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A new method for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from transportation at fine spatial  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at fine spatial scales are useful to both modelers and decision makers who are faced with the problem of global warming and climate change. Globally, transport related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing. This letter presents a new method based on the volume-preserving principle in the areal interpolation literature to disaggregate transportation-related CO2 emission estimates from the county-level scale to a 1?km2 grid scale. The proposed volume-preserving interpolation (VPI) method, together with the distance-decay principle, were used to derive emission weights for each grid based on its proximity to highways, roads, railroads, waterways, and airports. The total CO2 emission value summed from the grids within a county is made to be equal to the original county-level estimate, thus enforcing the volume-preserving property. The method was applied to downscale the transportation-related CO2 emission values by county (i.e.?parish) for the state of Louisiana into 1?km2 grids. The results reveal a more realistic spatial pattern of CO2 emission from transportation, which can be used to identify the emission 'hot spots'. Of the four highest transportation-related CO2 emission hotspots in Louisiana, high-emission grids literally covered the entire East Baton Rouge Parish and Orleans Parish, whereas CO2 emission in Jefferson Parish (New Orleans suburb) and Caddo Parish (city of Shreveport) were more unevenly distributed. We argue that the new method is sound in principle, flexible in practice, and the resultant estimates are more accurate than previous gridding approaches.

Yuqin Shu; Nina S N Lam; Margaret Reams

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

EIA: Jobs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jobs at the Energy Information Administration en-us Sun, Jobs at the Energy Information Administration en-us Sun, 22 Dec 2013 12:01:24 EST EIA logo http://www.eia.gov/global/images/logos/eia_logo_250.png http://www.eia.gov/ US Energy Information Administration Survey Statistician - GS-1530-13 https://www.usajobs.gov/getjob/viewdetails/353781300 Sun, 22 Dec 2013 12:01:24 EST Announcement Number: DOE-HQ-EI-13-00519-MPClosing Date: 12 November 2013 Supervisory Survey Statistician - GS-1530-15 https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/349986100 Sun, 22 Dec 2013 12:01:24 EST Announcement Number: DOE-HQ-EI-13-504-MPClosing Date: 04 September 2013 Supervisory Survey Statistician - GS-1530-15 https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/349986400 Sun, 22 Dec 2013 12:01:24 EST Announcement Number: DOE-HQ-EI-13-504-CRClosing Date: 04

157

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Global Patterns of Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Soils on a 0.5 Degree Grid Cell Basis (DB-1015) DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/lue.db1015 This data has been updated. Please see NDP-081. Contributed by: James W. Raich 1 and Christopher S. Potter2 1Department of Botany Iowa State University Ames, IA 50011 USA Email: jraich@iastate.edu 2NASA Ames Research Center MS 242-2 Moffett Field, CA 94035 USA Email: cpotter@gaia.arc.nasa.gov Prepared by L.M. Olsen. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Date Published: March, 1996 (Revised for the web: 2002) The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center is a part of the Environmental Sciences Division of the OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY (ORNL) and is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6290. The ORNL is managed by University of Tennessee-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

158

Energy Use and Carbon Emissions:  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 World Energy Use and Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 1980-2001 April 2004 Energy Information Administration Contacts Staff from the Office of Energy Markets and End Use (EMEU), Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (EMCID) prepared this report. General questions concerning the content of the report may be referred to Mark Rodekohr (Mark.Rodekohr@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-1130), Director of EMCID; or Lowell Feld (Lowell.Feld@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9502), Leader of the Contingency Information Team. Specific questions about the report should be referred to Nathan Wilson (Nathan.Wilson@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-9883). 1 Table of Contents CONTACTS .......................................................................................................................

159

Accounting for Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Biomass Energy Combustion (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions from the combustion of biomass to produce energy are excluded from the energy-related CO2 emissions reported in Annual Energy Outlook 2010. According to current international convention, carbon released through biomass combustion is excluded from reported energy-related emissions. The release of carbon from biomass combustion is assumed to be balanced by the uptake of carbon when the feedstock is grown, resulting in zero net emissions over some period of time]. However, analysts have debated whether increased use of biomass energy may result in a decline in terrestrial carbon stocks, leading to a net positive release of carbon rather than the zero net release assumed by its exclusion from reported energy-related emissions.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

"Table 21. Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" Total Energy Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Projected vs. Actual" "Projected" " (million metric tons)" ,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,2011 "AEO 1994",5060,5129.666667,5184.666667,5239.666667,5287.333333,5335,5379,5437.666667,5481.666667,5529.333333,5599,5657.666667,5694.333333,5738.333333,5797,5874,5925.333333,5984 "AEO 1995",,5137,5173.666667,5188.333333,5261.666667,5309.333333,5360.666667,5393.666667,5441.333333,5489,5551.333333,5621,5679.666667,5727.333333,5775,5841,5888.666667,5943.666667 "AEO 1996",,,5181.817301,5223.645142,5294.776326,5354.687297,5416.802205,5463.67395,5525.288005,5588.52771,5660.226888,5734.87972,5812.398031,5879.320068,5924.814575,5981.291626,6029.640422,6086.804077,6142.120972

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2007 - Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2007 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2007 (IEO2007) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2007 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2007 (AEO2007), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2007 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

162

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2008-Preface  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface International Energy Outlook 2008 Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2030, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2008 (IEO2008) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2030. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2008 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). IEO2008 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade

163

Using Vehicle Taxes to Reduce Carbon Dioxide Emissions Rates of New Passenger Vehicles: Evidence from France, Germany, and Sweden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

France, Germany, and Sweden link vehicle taxes to the carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions rates of passenger vehicles. Based on new vehicle registration data from 20052010, a vehicles tax is negatively correlated with its ...

Klier, Thomas

164

From Sulfur Dioxide to Greenhouse Gases: Trends and Events Shaping Future Emissions Trading Programs in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The success of the United States sulfur dioxide (SO2...) trading program has led to worldwide interest in emissions trading. The program has become a model for ... a theoretical option discussed only by economist...

Joseph Kruger

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide from soil receiving urban wastewater for maize (Zea mays L.) cultivation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigated how amending maize with wastewater at 120kg N ha?1 affected crop growth, soil characteristics and emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) compared to plants ferti...

Fabin Fernndez-Luqueo; Vernica Reyes-Varela

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Press Room - Press Releases - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6, 2011 6, 2011 EIA examines alternate scenarios for the future of U.S. energy WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) today released the complete version of Annual Energy Outlook 2011 (AEO2011), which includes 57 sensitivity cases that show how different assumptions regarding market, policy, and technology drivers affect the previously released Reference case projections of energy production, consumption, technology, and market trends and the direction they may take in the future. "EIA's projections indicate strong growth in shale gas production, growing use of natural gas and renewables in electric power generation, declining reliance on imported liquid fuels, and projected slow growth in energy-related carbon dioxide emissions in the absence of new policies

167

Conceptual design of syngas production systems with almost net-zero carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work describes three different configurations of syngas production processes using a combination of SMR (steam methane reforming) and DRM (dry reforming of methane). The ideal SMR+DRM process ensures the maximum product yield, the heat-integrated SMR+DRM process fulfills the maximum heat recovery, and the stand-alone SMR+DRM process effectively suppress net CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions. Through specific optimization algorithms, the syngas production systems subject to almost net-zero CO2 emissions are successfully verified by simulations in Aspen Plus environment.

Wei Wu; Hsiao-Tung Yang; Jenn-Jiang Hwang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Estimation of carbon dioxide emission in highway construction: a case study in southwest region of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The large-scale transportation infrastructure construction in developing countries such as China requires emission estimation method for better project design. This study proposed an empirical method to estimate carbon dioxide (CO2) emission which was generated from highway construction based on four real projects in southwest region of China. The proposed method estimated the total emission from different steps of construction process (raw material production, material transportation and onsite construction) by different project types (e.g. subgrade, pavement, bridge, and tunnels). The results show that in general over 80 percent of the CO2 emission was generated from raw material production; the onsite construction and material transportation only accounted for 10 and 3 percent of the whole CO2 emission, respectively. Moreover, the CO2 emission from bridge and tunnel constructions was much larger than subgrade and pavement construction. The total CO2 emission from road, bridge and tunnel constructions was 5229kg/m, 35,547kg/m and 42,302kg/m, respectively. The empirical estimation method of the CO2 emission proposed in this study can be considered as references for CO2 emission estimation in other regions which are similar as southwest region of China.

Xianwei Wang; Zhengyu Duan; Lingsheng Wu; Dongyuan Yang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

EIA-801  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA ID NUMBER: If any Respondent Identification Data has changed since the last report, enter an "X" in the box: Company Name: Doing Business As: Email: Fax: (202) 586-1076 Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Questions? Call: 202-586-3307 Email address: Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Day Mo FORM EIA-801 WEEKLY BULK TERMINAL REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the

170

EIA-800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FORM EIA-805 FORM EIA-805 WEEKLY BULK TERMINAL AND BLENDER REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA Day Mo Mailing Address of Contact (e.g., PO Box, RR): If the physical and

171

EIA Cases  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 eia-cases Office of Hearings and Appeals 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC, 20585 202-287-1566 en TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. http://energy.gov/oha/downloads/tee-0073-matter-cole-distributing-inc TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc.

172

EIA - 2008 Conference Presentation Videos  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presentations & Conferences > Conferences > EIA 2008 Energy Conference > EIA 2008 Energy Conference Videos EIA Documentary - produced for 2008 EIA Conference Content on this page...

173

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated How the Carbon Emissions Were Estimated Carbon dioxide emissions are the main component of greenhouse gas emissions caused by human activity. Carbon dioxide is emitted mostly as a byproduct of the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, although certain industrial processes (e.g., cement manufacture) also emit carbon dioxide. The estimates of energy-related carbon emissions require both data on the energy use and carbon emissions coefficients relating energy use to the amount of carbon emitted. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the main source of data on U.S. energy use. Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the United States 1998 used annual data provided by energy suppliers. However, to obtain more detail on how different sectors use energy, the emissions estimates in Energy and GHG Analysis rely data from on surveys of energy users, such as manufacturing establishments and commercial buildings.

174

EIA-819  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Site Name: Terminal Control Number (TCN): Email: Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Questions? Call: 202-586-9612 Product Code 190 Comments: Identify products reported as "Other Oxygenates" (code 445) in Part 4 and any unusual aspects of your reporting month's operations. (To separate one comment from another, press ALT+ENTER.) Nameplate Capacity Fuel Ethanol Nameplate Production Capacity Item Description FORM EIA-819 MONTHLY OXYGENATE REPORT

175

Intention to change activities that reduce carbon dioxide emissions related to worry about global climate change consequences  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Introduction Mitigating the global climate change requires actions at different levels including that lay people change their consumption patterns, which cause emissions of greenhouse gases. Recent research suggests that inducing affects such as fear and worry may have positive effects. Objective To investigate whether worry in addition to personalized information about emissions of carbon dioxide would influence lay people's intentions to change consumption-related personal activities causing carbon-dioxide emissions. Method A municipality-provided tool to calculate their annual carbon dioxide emissions was used by 135 university students who after being informed about negative consequences of global climate change stated their intentions to change a number of personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions during the following 12 months. They also rated how worried they were about eight global climate change consequences. Results Intentions to change travel, energy use at home, food consumption, involvement in environmental organizations, and support of environmental policies increased with worry. An interaction was also observed such that high-emitters intentions to invest in energy-efficient infrastructure increased more with worry than did low- and medium-emitters intentions. Conclusions In line with recent research positing that affect increases preventive actions, the hypothesis was supported that intentions to change personal activities to reduce carbon dioxide emissions increased with participants worry about the consequences of global climate change.

E.-L. Sundblad; A. Biel; T. Grling

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Carbon dioxide emissions intensity of Portuguese industry and energy sectors: A convergence analysis and econometric approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Given the relevance of energy and pollution issues for industrialised countries and the importance of industry and energy sectors to the achievement of their economic and environmental goals, it is important to know if there is a common pattern of emissions intensity, fuel intensity and energy intensity, between industries, to know if it justifies a more specific application of energy policies between sectors, which sectors have the greatest potential for reducing energy use and which are the long term effects of those specific variables on the mitigation of emissions. We found that although there is literature on decomposition of effects that affect emissions, the study of the convergence and of the relationships between these variables does not include ratios or effects that result from the decomposition analysis. Thus, the above questions are not answered, much less for the Portuguese reality. The purpose of this paper is to study: (i) the existence of convergence of some relevant ratios as Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions intensity, CO2 emissions by fossil fuel consumption, fossil fuel intensity, energy intensity and economic structure, between industry and energy sectors in Portugal, and (ii) the influence that the consumption of fossil fuels, the consumption of aggregate energy and GDP have on CO2 emissions, and the influence that the ratios in which CO2 emissions intensity decomposes can affect that variable, using an econometric approach, namely Panel corrected standard errors estimator. We concluded that there is sigma convergence for all ratios with exception of fossil fuel intensity. Gamma convergence verifies for all ratios, with exception of CO2 emissions by fossil fuel. From the econometric approach we concluded that the considered variables have a significant importance in explaining CO2 emissions and CO2 emissions intensity.

Victor Moutinho; Margarita Robaina-Alves; Jorge Mota

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Abstract--Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused by an increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this project is to provide the airport manager at major airports, such as Dulles International Airport of emissions offset. The case study of this project will be Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD Abstract-- Historic data shows an increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions at airports caused

178

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

179

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

180

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

182

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

183

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Arizona Electricity Profile 2010 Arizona profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arizona) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,392 15 Electric Utilities 20,115 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 6,277 16 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,750,957 12 Electric Utilities 91,232,664 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 20,518,293 17 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 33 33 Nitrogen Oxide 57 17 Carbon Dioxide 55,683 15 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 43 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 31 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,099 35 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 21 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 72,831,737 20

184

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

185

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

186

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

187

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

188

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

189

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

190

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

191

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

192

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

193

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

194

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

195

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Mexico Electricity Profile 2010 New Mexico profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Mexico) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,130 36 Electric Utilities 6,345 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,785 36 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,251,542 37 Electric Utilities 30,848,406 33 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,403,136 37 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 15 38 Nitrogen Oxide 56 19 Carbon Dioxide 29,379 31 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 42 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 5 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,787 11 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 39 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,428,344 38

196

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

197

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Ohio Electricity Profile 2010 Ohio profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Ohio) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 33,071 8 Electric Utilities 20,179 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,892 7 Net Generation (megawatthours) 143,598,337 7 Electric Utilities 92,198,096 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,400,241 7 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 610 1 Nitrogen Oxide 122 3 Carbon Dioxide 121,964 4 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 9.4 1 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 17 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,872 8 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 154,145,418 4 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,329,797 9

198

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Arkansas Electricity Profile 2010 Arkansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Arkansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,981 25 Electric Utilities 11,488 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,493 24 Net Generation (megawatthours) 61,000,185 25 Electric Utilities 47,108,063 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,892,122 27 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 74 22 Nitrogen Oxide 40 29 Carbon Dioxide 34,018 28 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 22 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 24 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,229 29 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 29 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 48,194,285 27

199

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

200

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile West Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 West Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (West Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 16,495 24 Electric Utilities 11,719 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,775 19 Net Generation (megawatthours) 80,788,947 20 Electric Utilities 56,719,755 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 24,069,192 13 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 105 20 Nitrogen Oxide 49 23 Carbon Dioxide 74,283 12 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.9 20 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 25 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,027 5 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 34 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,031,803 33

202

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Vermont Electricity Profile 2010 Vermont profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Vermont) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 1,128 50 Electric Utilities 260 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 868 43 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,619,990 49 Electric Utilities 720,853 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,899,137 35 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide * 51 Nitrogen Oxide 1 50 Carbon Dioxide 8 51 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 51 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.2 51 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3 51 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 51 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 5,594,833 48 Direct Use (megawatthours) 19,806 47

203

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Mississippi Electricity Profile 2010 Mississippi profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Mississippi) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 15,691 26 Electric Utilities 10,858 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,833 18 Net Generation (megawatthours) 54,487,260 28 Electric Utilities 40,841,436 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,645,824 28 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 59 26 Nitrogen Oxide 31 32 Carbon Dioxide 26,845 32 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 26 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 30 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,086 36 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 28 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 49,687,166 26

204

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Wisconsin Electricity Profile 2010 Wisconsin profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wisconsin) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 17,836 23 Electric Utilities 13,098 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,738 20 Net Generation (megawatthours) 64,314,067 24 Electric Utilities 45,579,970 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,734,097 18 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 145 12 Nitrogen Oxide 49 25 Carbon Dioxide 47,238 19 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 9 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.7 20 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,619 16 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 22 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 68,752,417 21

205

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

206

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Hampshire Electricity Profile 2010 New Hampshire profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Hampshire) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,180 43 Electric Utilities 1,132 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,048 32 Net Generation (megawatthours) 22,195,912 42 Electric Utilities 3,979,333 41 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 18,216,579 19 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 34 32 Nitrogen Oxide 6 46 Carbon Dioxide 5,551 43 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 17 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 46 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 551 47 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,890,074 47 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,712,938 45

207

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

208

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

209

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

210

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

211

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Missouri Electricity Profile 2010 Missouri profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Missouri) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,739 18 Electric Utilities 20,360 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,378 39 Net Generation (megawatthours) 92,312,989 18 Electric Utilities 90,176,805 12 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,136,184 46 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 233 8 Nitrogen Oxide 56 18 Carbon Dioxide 78,815 10 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 6 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 26 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,882 7 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 17 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 86,085,117 15

212

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

213

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

214

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

215

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

216

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

217

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 North Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 6,188 40 Electric Utilities 4,912 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,276 40 Net Generation (megawatthours) 34,739,542 39 Electric Utilities 31,343,796 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,395,746 41 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 116 17 Nitrogen Oxide 52 21 Carbon Dioxide 31,064 30 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 7.3 3 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.3 6 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,971 6 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 42 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 12,956,263 41

218

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

219

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Minnesota Electricity Profile 2010 Minnesota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Minnesota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,715 27 Electric Utilities 11,547 22 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,168 31 Net Generation (megawatthours) 53,670,227 29 Electric Utilities 45,428,599 23 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,241,628 32 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 57 27 Nitrogen Oxide 44 27 Carbon Dioxide 32,946 29 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 27 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 18 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,353 21 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 23 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 67,799,706 22

220

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Maryland Electricity Profile 2010 Maryland profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maryland) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,516 33 Electric Utilities 80 47 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,436 9 Net Generation (megawatthours) 43,607,264 33 Electric Utilities 2,996 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 43,604,268 9 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 28 Nitrogen Oxide 25 34 Carbon Dioxide 26,369 33 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 29 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 29 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,333 24 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 65,335,498 24 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 36,082,473 31

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile York Electricity Profile 2010 New York profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New York) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 39,357 6 Electric Utilities 11,032 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 28,325 5 Net Generation (megawatthours) 136,961,654 9 Electric Utilities 34,633,335 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 102,328,319 5 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 62 25 Nitrogen Oxide 44 28 Carbon Dioxide 41,584 22 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 40 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.7 44 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 669 42 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,623,573 7 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 79,119,769 18

222

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 North Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (North Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,674 12 Electric Utilities 25,553 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,121 34 Net Generation (megawatthours) 128,678,483 10 Electric Utilities 121,251,138 3 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 7,427,345 34 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 131 14 Nitrogen Oxide 57 16 Carbon Dioxide 73,241 13 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 31 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 34 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,255 28 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 9 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 136,414,947 5

223

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

224

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Iowa Electricity Profile 2010 Iowa profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Iowa) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,592 28 Electric Utilities 11,282 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,310 30 Net Generation (megawatthours) 57,508,721 26 Electric Utilities 46,188,988 21 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,319,733 30 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 108 18 Nitrogen Oxide 50 22 Carbon Dioxide 47,211 20 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 4.1 11 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 14 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,810 10 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 31 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 45,445,269 28

225

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Illinois Electricity Profile 2010 Illinois profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Illinois) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 44,127 5 Electric Utilities 4,800 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 39,327 3 Net Generation (megawatthours) 201,351,872 5 Electric Utilities 12,418,332 35 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 188,933,540 3 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 232 9 Nitrogen Oxide 83 8 Carbon Dioxide 103,128 6 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.5 25 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 38 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,129 34 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 144,760,674 6 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 77,890,532 19

226

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Louisiana Electricity Profile 2010 Louisiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Louisiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 26,744 14 Electric Utilities 16,471 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 10,272 10 Net Generation (megawatthours) 102,884,940 16 Electric Utilities 51,680,682 19 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 51,204,258 8 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 126 15 Nitrogen Oxide 75 11 Carbon Dioxide 58,706 14 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.7 21 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 21 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,258 27 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 18 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 85,079,692 16

227

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

228

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Dakota Electricity Profile 2010 South Dakota profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Dakota) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,623 45 Electric Utilities 2,994 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 629 48 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,049,636 46 Electric Utilities 8,682,448 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,367,188 47 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 43 Nitrogen Oxide 12 43 Carbon Dioxide 3,611 47 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 23 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 8 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 792 41 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 46 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,356,149 42

229

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

230

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Massachusetts Electricity Profile 2010 Massachusetts profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Massachusetts) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,697 31 Electric Utilities 937 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 12,760 8 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,804,824 34 Electric Utilities 802,906 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 42,001,918 10 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 35 31 Nitrogen Oxide 17 38 Carbon Dioxide 20,291 36 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 34 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 39 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,045 38 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,123,422 26 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 31,822,942 34

231

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Nebraska Electricity Profile 2010 Nebraska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nebraska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,857 38 Electric Utilities 7,647 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 210 50 Net Generation (megawatthours) 36,630,006 36 Electric Utilities 36,242,921 30 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 387,085 50 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 65 24 Nitrogen Oxide 40 30 Carbon Dioxide 24,461 34 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.9 12 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 9 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 19 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 36 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 29,849,460 35

232

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Montana Electricity Profile 2010 Montana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Montana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 5,866 41 Electric Utilities 2,340 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,526 27 Net Generation (megawatthours) 29,791,181 41 Electric Utilities 6,271,180 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,520,001 14 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 22 35 Nitrogen Oxide 21 35 Carbon Dioxide 20,370 35 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 35 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 22 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,507 18 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 13,423,138 41 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,803,422 43

233

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Maine Electricity Profile 2010 Maine profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Maine) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 4,430 42 Electric Utilities 19 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,410 25 Net Generation (megawatthours) 17,018,660 43 Electric Utilities 1,759 49 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,016,901 22 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 12 42 Nitrogen Oxide 8 44 Carbon Dioxide 4,948 44 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.6 36 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 33 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 641 44 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,531,568 45 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 151,588 51 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 11,379,980 10

234

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

235

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Florida Electricity Profile 2010 Florida profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Florida) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) FRCC/SERC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 59,147 3 Electric Utilities 50,853 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,294 13 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,095,935 3 Electric Utilities 206,062,185 1 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 23,033,750 15 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 160 11 Nitrogen Oxide 101 5 Carbon Dioxide 123,811 2 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 37 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 35 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,191 31 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 231,209,614 3

236

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Hawaii Electricity Profile 2010 Hawaii profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Hawaii) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,536 47 Electric Utilities 1,828 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 708 47 Net Generation (megawatthours) 10,836,036 45 Electric Utilities 6,416,068 38 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,419,968 38 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 17 36 Nitrogen Oxide 21 36 Carbon Dioxide 8,287 42 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.4 16 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.3 2 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,686 13 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 48 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 10,016,509 44

237

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

238

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

239

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

240

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile California Electricity Profile 2010 California profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (California) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 67,328 2 Electric Utilities 28,689 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 38,639 4 Net Generation (megawatthours) 204,125,596 4 Electric Utilities 96,939,535 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 107,186,061 4 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 47 Nitrogen Oxide 80 9 Carbon Dioxide 55,406 16 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) * 49 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 41 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 598 46 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 258,525,414 2 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 240,948,673 2

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241

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Tennessee Electricity Profile 2010 Tennessee full report Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Tennessee) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,417 19 Electric Utilities 20,968 11 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 450 49 Net Generation (megawatthours) 82,348,625 19 Electric Utilities 79,816,049 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,532,576 45 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 138 13 Nitrogen Oxide 33 31 Carbon Dioxide 48,196 18 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 14 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.9 40 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,290 26 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 13 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 103,521,537 10

242

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

243

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile District of Columbia Electricity Profile 2010 District of Columbia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (District of Columbia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Petroleum Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 790 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 790 46 Net Generation (megawatthours) 199,858 51 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 199,858 51 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 1 49 Nitrogen Oxide * 51 Carbon Dioxide 191 50 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 8.8 2 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 4.0 3 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,104 1 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,876,995 43 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 3,388,490 50 Energy-Only Provider Sales (megawatthours) 8,488,505 12

244

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Virginia Electricity Profile 2010 Virginia profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Virginia) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 24,109 16 Electric Utilities 19,434 15 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,676 21 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,966,456 21 Electric Utilities 58,902,054 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,064,402 25 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 120 16 Nitrogen Oxide 49 24 Carbon Dioxide 39,719 25 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 15 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.5 23 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,200 30 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 10 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 113,806,135 7

245

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Delaware Electricity Profile 2010 Delaware profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Delaware) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,389 46 Electric Utilities 55 48 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,334 29 Net Generation (megawatthours) 5,627,645 50 Electric Utilities 30,059 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,597,586 36 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 13 41 Nitrogen Oxide 5 47 Carbon Dioxide 4,187 45 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 7 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 16 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,640 15 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 11,605,932 44 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 7,582,539 46

246

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Colorado Electricity Profile 2010 Colorado profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Colorado) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 13,777 30 Electric Utilities 9,114 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,662 22 Net Generation (megawatthours) 50,720,792 30 Electric Utilities 39,584,166 28 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,136,626 31 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 45 29 Nitrogen Oxide 55 20 Carbon Dioxide 40,499 24 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.0 32 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.4 10 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,760 12 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 27 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 52,917,786 24

247

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Kansas Electricity Profile 2010 Kansas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kansas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/SPP Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 12,543 32 Electric Utilities 11,732 20 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 812 45 Net Generation (megawatthours) 47,923,762 32 Electric Utilities 45,270,047 24 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,653,716 44 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 41 30 Nitrogen Oxide 46 26 Carbon Dioxide 36,321 26 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 33 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 13 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,671 14 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 32 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 40,420,675 30

248

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

249

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Pennsylvania Electricity Profile 2010 Pennsylvania profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Pennsylvania) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 45,575 4 Electric Utilities 455 44 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 45,120 2 Net Generation (megawatthours) 229,752,306 2 Electric Utilities 1,086,500 42 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 228,665,806 2 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 387 3 Nitrogen Oxide 136 2 Carbon Dioxide 122,830 3 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.7 13 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 27 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,179 32 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 148,963,968 5 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 114,787,417 6

250

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Wyoming Electricity Profile 2010 Wyoming profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Wyoming) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,986 37 Electric Utilities 6,931 31 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,056 41 Net Generation (megawatthours) 48,119,254 31 Electric Utilities 44,738,543 25 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,380,711 42 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 67 23 Nitrogen Oxide 61 15 Carbon Dioxide 45,703 21 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.1 19 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.8 7 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,094 2 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 40 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 17,113,458 39

251

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Kentucky Electricity Profile 2010 Kentucky profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Kentucky) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC/SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 20,453 21 Electric Utilities 18,945 16 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,507 38 Net Generation (megawatthours) 98,217,658 17 Electric Utilities 97,472,144 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 745,514 48 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 249 7 Nitrogen Oxide 85 7 Carbon Dioxide 93,160 7 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.6 5 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.9 15 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,091 3 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 14 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 93,569,426 12

252

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Michigan Electricity Profile 2010 Michigan profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Michigan) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) MRO/RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 29,831 11 Electric Utilities 21,639 10 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,192 14 Net Generation (megawatthours) 111,551,371 13 Electric Utilities 89,666,874 13 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 21,884,497 16 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 254 6 Nitrogen Oxide 89 6 Carbon Dioxide 74,480 11 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 5.0 8 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.8 19 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,472 20 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 103,649,219 12 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 94,565,247 11

253

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Alabama Electricity Profile 2010 Alabama profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alabama) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 32,417 9 Electric Utilities 23,642 7 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,775 12 Net Generation (megawatthours) 152,150,512 6 Electric Utilities 122,766,490 2 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 29,384,022 12 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 218 10 Nitrogen Oxide 66 14 Carbon Dioxide 79,375 9 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 3.2 18 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 36 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,150 33 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 15 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 90,862,645 13

254

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Connecticut Electricity Profile 2010 Connecticut profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Connecticut) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) NPCC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 8,284 35 Electric Utilities 160 46 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 8,124 15 Net Generation (megawatthours) 33,349,623 40 Electric Utilities 65,570 45 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 33,284,053 11 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 2 48 Nitrogen Oxide 7 45 Carbon Dioxide 9,201 41 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.1 48 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 49 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 608 45 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 30,391,766 35 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 13,714,958 40

255

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Utah Electricity Profile 2010 Utah profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Utah) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 7,497 39 Electric Utilities 6,648 32 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 849 44 Net Generation (megawatthours) 42,249,355 35 Electric Utilities 39,522,124 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,727,231 43 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 25 34 Nitrogen Oxide 68 13 Carbon Dioxide 35,519 27 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.3 38 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 3.6 4 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,853 9 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 37 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 28,044,001 36

256

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Carolina Electricity Profile 2010 South Carolina profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (South Carolina) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 23,982 17 Electric Utilities 22,172 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 1,810 35 Net Generation (megawatthours) 104,153,133 14 Electric Utilities 100,610,887 6 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,542,246 39 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 106 19 Nitrogen Oxide 30 33 Carbon Dioxide 41,364 23 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 30 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 45 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 876 40 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 19 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 82,479,293 17

257

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Alaska Electricity Profile 2010 Alaska profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Alaska) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) -- Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 2,067 48 Electric Utilities 1,889 39 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 178 51 Net Generation (megawatthours) 6,759,576 48 Electric Utilities 6,205,050 40 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 554,526 49 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 3 46 Nitrogen Oxide 16 39 Carbon Dioxide 4,125 46 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 41 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 5.2 1 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,345 23 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 50 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 6,247,038 47

258

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Nevada Electricity Profile 2010 Nevada profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Nevada) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 11,421 34 Electric Utilities 8,713 29 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 2,708 33 Net Generation (megawatthours) 35,146,248 38 Electric Utilities 23,710,917 34 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 11,435,331 29 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 44 Nitrogen Oxide 15 40 Carbon Dioxide 17,020 38 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 46 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.0 37 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,068 37 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 33,772,595 33 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 32,348,879 32

259

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Washington Electricity Profile 2010 Washington profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Washington) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 30,478 10 Electric Utilities 26,498 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,979 26 Net Generation (megawatthours) 103,472,729 15 Electric Utilities 88,057,219 14 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 15,415,510 23 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 39 Nitrogen Oxide 21 37 Carbon Dioxide 13,984 39 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.3 47 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.4 50 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 298 49 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 90,379,970 16 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 88,116,958 14

260

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Oregon Electricity Profile 2010 Oregon profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oregon) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 14,261 29 Electric Utilities 10,846 27 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,415 28 Net Generation (megawatthours) 55,126,999 27 Electric Utilities 41,142,684 26 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 13,984,316 26 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 16 37 Nitrogen Oxide 15 42 Carbon Dioxide 10,094 40 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 44 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.6 47 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 404 48 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 46,025,945 30 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 44,525,865 29

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Texas Electricity Profile 2010 Texas profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Texas) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SERC/SPP/TRE/WECC Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 108,258 1 Electric Utilities 26,533 4 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 81,724 1 Net Generation (megawatthours) 411,695,046 1 Electric Utilities 95,099,161 9 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 316,595,885 1 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 430 2 Nitrogen Oxide 204 1 Carbon Dioxide 251,409 1 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.3 28 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 1.1 32 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,346 22 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 358,457,550 1

262

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Indiana Electricity Profile 2010 Indiana profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Indiana) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Coal Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 27,638 13 Electric Utilities 23,008 8 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 4,630 23 Net Generation (megawatthours) 125,180,739 11 Electric Utilities 107,852,560 5 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,328,179 20 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 385 4 Nitrogen Oxide 120 4 Carbon Dioxide 116,283 5 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 6.8 4 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.1 12 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2,048 4 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 11 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 105,994,376 8

263

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Oklahoma Electricity Profile 2010 Oklahoma profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Oklahoma) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) SPP Primary Energy Source Gas Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 21,022 20 Electric Utilities 16,015 18 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 5,006 17 Net Generation (megawatthours) 72,250,733 22 Electric Utilities 57,421,195 17 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 14,829,538 24 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 85 21 Nitrogen Oxide 71 12 Carbon Dioxide 49,536 17 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 2.6 24 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 2.2 11 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1,512 17 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 25 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 57,845,980 23

264

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Jersey Electricity Profile 2010 New Jersey profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (New Jersey) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) RFC Primary Energy Source Nuclear Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 18,424 22 Electric Utilities 460 43 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 17,964 6 Net Generation (megawatthours) 65,682,494 23 Electric Utilities -186,385 50 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 65,868,878 6 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 14 40 Nitrogen Oxide 15 41 Carbon Dioxide 19,160 37 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 45 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.5 48 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 643 43 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 79,179,427 20 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 50,482,035 25

265

EIA - State Electricity Profiles  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Idaho Electricity Profile 2010 Idaho profile Table 1. 2010 Summary Statistics (Idaho) Item Value U.S. Rank NERC Region(s) WECC Primary Energy Source Hydroelectric Net Summer Capacity (megawatts) 3,990 44 Electric Utilities 3,035 36 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 955 42 Net Generation (megawatthours) 12,024,564 44 Electric Utilities 8,589,208 37 Independent Power Producers & Combined Heat and Power 3,435,356 40 Emissions (thousand metric tons) Sulfur Dioxide 7 45 Nitrogen Oxide 4 48 Carbon Dioxide 1,213 49 Sulfur Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 1.2 39 Nitrogen Oxide (lbs/MWh) 0.8 43 Carbon Dioxide (lbs/MWh) 222 50 Total Retail Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 38 Full Service Provider Sales (megawatthours) 22,797,668 37

266

EIA Electric Power Forms  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Forms Electric Power Forms EIA Electric Power Forms Listing of Publicly Available and Confidential Data EIA's statistical surveys encompass each significant electric supply and demand activity in the United States. Most of the electric power survey forms resulting data elements are published, but respondent confidentiality is required. The chart below shows the data elements for each survey form and how each data element is treated in regard to confidentiality. Data Categories Data collection forms EIA- 411 EIA- 826 EIA- 860 EIA- 860M EIA- 861 EIA- 923 Frame Information Utility identification and iocation -- -- -- -- X -- Plant identification and iocation -- -- -- X -- X Generation and fuel Latitude and longitude -- -- X -- -- --

267

EIA-912 Instructions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

OMB No. 1905-0175 Expiration Date: 12312017 EIA-912 WEEKLY UNDERGROUND NATURAL GAS STORAGE REPORT INSTRUCTIONS PURPOSE The Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form...

268

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Ali Hasanbeigi, Lynn Price China Energy Group Energy Analysis and Environmental Impacts Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Marlene Arens Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research (ISI) January 2013 This work was supported by the China Sustainable Energy Program of the Energy Foundation and Dow Chemical Company (through a charitable contribution) through the Department of Energy under contract No.DE- AC02-05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY LBNL-6106E ii Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States

269

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in energy-intensive industries in key developing countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The industrial sector is the most important end-use sector in developing countries in terms of energy use and was responsible for 50% of primary energy use and 53% of associated carbon dioxide emissions in 1995 (Price et al., 1999). The industrial sector is extremely diverse, encompassing the extraction of natural resources, conversion of these resources into raw materials, and manufacture of finished products. Five energy-intensive industrial subsectors account for the bulk of industrial energy use and related carbon dioxide emissions: iron and steel, chemicals, petroleum refining, pulp and paper, and cement. In this paper, we focus on the steel and cement sectors in Brazil, China, India, and Mexico.1 We review historical trends, noting that China became the world's largest producer of cement in 1985 and of steel in 1996. We discuss trends that influence energy consumption, such as the amount of additives in cement (illustrated through the clinker/cement ratio), the share of electric arc furnaces, and the level of adoption of continuous casting. To gauge the potential for improvement in production of steel and cement in these countries, we calculate a ''best practice'' intensity based on use of international best practice technology to produce the mix of products manufactured in each country in 1995. We show that Brazil has the lowest potential for improvement in both sectors. In contrast, there is significant potential for improvement in Mexico, India, and especially China, where adoption of best practice technologies could reduce energy use and carbon dioxide emissions from steel production by 50% and cement production by 37%. We conclude by comparing the identified potential for energy efficiency improvement and carbon dioxide emissions reduction in these key developing countries to that of the U.S. This comparison raises interesting questions related to efforts to improve energy efficiency in developing countries, such as: what is the appropriate role of industrialized countries in promoting the adoption of low carbon technologies, how do international steel and cement companies influence the situation, and how can such information be used in the context of Clean Development Mechanism in the Kyoto Protocol?

Price, Lynn; Worrell, Ernst; Phylipsen, Dian

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EIA-800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Site Name: Site Name: Email: Terminal Control Number (TCN): Fax : (202) 586-1076 Physical Address of Contact (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Secure File Transfer: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Questions? Call: 202-586-6281 Ext: Product Code 990 490 491 492 493 Product Code 399 400 401 % % Comments: Identify any unusual aspects of your reporting month's operations. (To separate one comment from another, press ALT+ENTER.) Weighted Average API Gravity (at 60 o F) PART 4. SULFUR CONTENT AND API GRAVITY OF CRUDE OIL (Report either 030 or 040 but not both) o API Weighted Average Sulfur Content Input 040 FORM EIA-810 MONTHLY REFINERY REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and

271

EIA-817  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Email: Email: Physical Address (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 Secure File Transfer: City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Questions? Call: 202-586-6254 FORM EIA-817 MONTHLY TANKER AND BARGE MOVEMENTS REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or

272

EIA-800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Email: Email: Floor, Suite): Fax: (202) 586-1076 City: State: Zip: - Secure File Transfer: Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Questions? Call: 202-586-3307 Email address: PADD 2 PADD 3 PADD 4 PADD 5 Mailing Address of Contact (e.g., PO Box, RR): If the physical and mailing addresses are the same, only complete the physical address. Comments: Identify any unusual aspects of your reporting week's operations. (To separate one comment from another, press ALT+ENTER.) For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) Quantities entered below should be the weekly equivalent of those reported monthly to the Energy Information Administration by your company on Form EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report".

273

EIA-800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Please complete all date fields. Please complete all date fields. FALSE 2 End of Week Stocks Production Forms may be submitted using one of the following methods: PART 3. OXYGENATE ACTIVITY (Thousand Barrels) A completed form must be received by 5 p.m. Eastern Time on the Monday following the end of the report period. For the PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) software, call (202) 586-9659. (See Form instructions, pg 1.) FORM EIA-809 WEEKLY OXYGENATE REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the

274

EIA-816  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6281 6281 Receipts During Month Inputs During Month Production During Month Shipments During Month Plant Fuel Use & Losses 247 Pentanes Plus Isobutane Normal Butane 249 Month 220 243 Ethane Propane Stocks End of Month Product Code Stocks Beginning of Month FORM EIA-816 MONTHLY NATURAL GAS LIQUIDS REPORT A completed form must be received by the 20th calendar day following the end of the report month. This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. See Instructions for further details on

275

EIA-814  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6106 6106 Total Number of Line Entries Reported 0 Total Quantity Reported (Thousand Barrels) 0 Month FORM EIA-814 MONTHLY IMPORTS REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA

276

EIA-815  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3536 3536 FORM EIA-815 MONTHLY BULK TERMINAL AND BLENDER REPORT This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly makes to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction. PART 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA Month A completed form must be received by the 20th calendar day

277

EIA-800  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA 1. RESPONDENT IDENTIFICATION DATA PART 2. SUBMISSION/RESUBMISSION INFORMATION Year REPORT PERIOD: If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: EIA ID NUMBER: If any Respondent Identification Data has changed since the last report, enter an "X" in the box: Company Name: Doing Business As: Site Name: Email: Terminal Control Number (TCN): Fax: (202) 586-1076 Physical Address of Contact (e.g., Street Address, Building Number, Secure File Transfer: Floor, Suite): City: State: Zip: - Electronic Transmission: City: State: Zip: - Contact Name: Questions? Call: 202-586-3307 Phone No.: Ext: Fax No.: Email address: Day Mailing Address of Contact (e.g., PO Box, RR): If the physical and mailing addresses are the same, only complete the physical address.

278

Taxing Car-produced Carbon Dioxide Emissions: Matching the Cure to the Disease  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions produced by cars is a linear (albeit fuel specific) function of the amount of fuel consumed. Because CO2 emissions generate social costs, through their effect on climate change, which escape the price mechanism, a tax on CO2 is indicated. An ideal tax would alter the consumer prices so that they match the marginal social costs. This setting thus calls for a specific tax on fuel equal to the value of externality resulting from the combustion of a unit of fuel. Since such tax scheme is readily available, we study to what extent the existing CO2 tax policies make use of it. We find that they do only to a limited extent. Thus our policy prescription is to drop existing CO2 taxes and use the existing fuel taxes to adjust fuel prices so that they match the marginal social costs related to burning of fuel.

Petr David; Josef Montag

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Remote measurement of sulfur dioxide emissions using an ultraviolet light sensitive video system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote measurements of SO/sub 2/ emissions and plume velocities were made with a portable ultraviolet light-sensitive video system and compared with EPA in-stack compliance measurement methods. The instrument system measures the ultraviolet light absorption of SO/sub 2/ and movement of SO/sub 2/ fluctuations in the effluent plume and relates these measurements to the SO/sub 2/ concentration and velocity of the plume. Laboratory and field tests were conducted to establish the potential for using this technique for rapid surveillance of SO/sub 2/ emissions. The effects caused by submicron aerosols also were investigated. The field tests were performed on two occasions. On the first occasion, SO/sub 2/ and plume velocity measurements were made at a typical coal-fired power plant with flue gas desulfurization (FGD) controls (concentrations ranged from 80 to 365 ppm). The second occasion involved participation in an urban particulate modeling study, which resulted in routine SO/sub 2/ emission measurements performed at 12 industrial sites. The results of smoke generator and field tests indicate that the sulfur dioxide concentration of smoke stack emissions can be made with an accuracy less than +/-120 ppm (relative to the EPA stack test compliance method), provided the particulate opacity of the emissions is less than 22 percent. The velocity measurement feature of the instrument correlated poorly with the EPA compliance method for stack gas velocity.

McElhoe, H.B.; Conner, W.D.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Carbon dioxide emission index as a mean for assessing fuel quality  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emission index, defined as the amount of CO{sub 2} released per unit of energy value, was used to rate gaseous, liquid and solid fuels. The direct utilization of natural gas is the most efficient option. The conversion of natural gas to synthesis gas for production of liquid fuels represents a significant decrease in fuel value of the former. The fuel value of liquids, such as gasoline, diesel oil, etc. is lower than that of natural gas. Blending gasoline with ethanol obtained either from bio-mass or via synthesis may decrease fuel value of the blend when CO{sub 2} emissions produced during the production of ethanol are included in total emissions. The introduction of liquid fuels produced by pyrolysis and liquefaction of biomass would result in the increase in the CO{sub 2} emissions. The CO{sub 2} emissions from the utilization of coal and petroleum coke are much higher than those from gaseous and liquid fuels. However, for petroleum coke, this is offset by the high value gaseous and liquid fuels that are simultaneously produced during coking. Conversion of low value fuels such as coal and petroleum coke to a high value chemicals via synthesis gas should be assessed as means for replacing natural gas and making it available for fuel applications.

Furimsky, E. [IMAF Group, Ottawa, ON (Canada)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 EIA Conference 2009 Session 10: Greenhouse Gas Emissions: What's Next? Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Howard Gruenspecht (EIA) Speakers: Joe Aldy (Executive Office of the President) Greg Dotson (House Committee on Energy and Commerce) Joe Goffman (Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works) Andrea Spring (House Committee on Energy and Commerce) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Howard Gruenspecht is Acting Administrator of the Energy Information Administration. Over the past 25 years, he has worked extensively on electricity policy issues, regulations affecting motor fuels and vehicles,

282

Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into Fischer-Tropsch synthesis to lower carbon dioxide emissions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for producing liquid fuels includes the steps of gasifying a starting material selected from a group consisting of coal, biomass, carbon nanotubes and mixtures thereof to produce a syngas, subjecting that syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) to produce a hyrdrocarbon product stream, separating that hydrocarbon product stream into C1-C4 hydrocarbons and C5+ hydrocarbons to be used as liquid fuels and subjecting the C1-C4 hydrocarbons to catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) to produce hydrogen and carbon nanotubes. The hydrogen produced by CDH is recycled to be mixed with the syngas incident to the FTS reactor in order to raise the hydrogen to carbon monoxide ratio of the syngas to values of 2 or higher, which is required to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. This is accomplished with little or no production of carbon dioxide, a greenhouse gas. The carbon is captured in the form of a potentially valuable by-product, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT), while huge emissions of carbon dioxide are avoided and very large quantities of water employed for the water-gas shift in traditional FTS systems are saved.

Huffman, Gerald P

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

283

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Comparison of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Embodied Energy in Four Renewable Electricity Generation Technologies in New Zealand ... Fugitive emissions from geothermal fields were noted, though not added to the result for geothermal power generation, but all other CO2 emissions pertaining to this study arose from construction, maintenance, and decommissioning of power stations, since renewable technologies (apart from geothermal) do not emit CO2 during normal operation. ... Hondo, H. Life cycle GHG emission analysis of power generation systems: Japanese case Energy 2005, 30 ( 11?12 SPEC. ...

Bridget M. Rule; Zeb J. Worth; Carol A. Boyle

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 SR/OIAF-CNEAF/2008-04 The Impact of Increased Use of Hydrogen on Petroleum Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions September 2008 Energy Information Administration Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. Unless referenced otherwise, the information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Service Reports are prepared by the Energy Information Administration upon special

285

The tractor and semitrailer routing problem with many-to-many demand considering carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The tractor and semitrailer routing problem with many-to-many demand (TSRP-MMD) is investigated in this study. The TSRP-MMD extends the existing studies on the rollonrolloff vehicle routing problem (RRVRP) to a many-to-many problem with an intercity line-haul network background. To demonstrate and utilize the energy efficiency of the tractor and semitrailer combination, the TSRP-MMD takes carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions per ton-kilometer as the objective. Because the problem is NP-hard, a modified Clarke and Wright Savings heuristic algorithm (CW) followed by an improvement phase and a local search phase is developed to solve the TSRP-MMD. The integer program is used to find optimum solutions for small-scale problems. The computational results show that the developed heuristics can be efficiently used to solve the problem.

Hongqi Li; Tan Lv; Yanran Li

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Estimating carbon dioxide emission factors for the California electric power sector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry (''Registry'') was initially established in 2000 under Senate Bill 1771, and clarifying legislation (Senate Bill 527) was passed in September 2001. The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has been asked to provide technical assistance to the California Energy Commission (CEC) in establishing methods for calculating average and marginal electricity emissions factors, both historic and current, as well as statewide and for sub-regions. This study is exploratory in nature. It illustrates the use of three possible approaches and is not a rigorous estimation of actual emissions factors. While the Registry will ultimately cover emissions of all greenhouse gases (GHGs), presently it is focusing on carbon dioxide (CO2). Thus, this study only considers CO2, which is by far the largest GHG emitted in the power sector. Associating CO2 emissions with electricity consumption encounters three major complications. First, electricity can be generated from a number of different primary energy sources, many of which are large sources of CO2 emissions (e.g., coal combustion) while others result in virtually no CO{sub 2} emissions (e.g., hydro). Second, the mix of generation resources used to meet loads may vary at different times of day or in different seasons. Third, electrical energy is transported over long distances by complex transmission and distribution systems, so the generation sources related to electricity usage can be difficult to trace and may occur far from the jurisdiction in which that energy is consumed. In other words, the emissions resulting from electricity consumption vary considerably depending on when and where it is used since this affects the generation sources providing the power. There is no practical way to identify where or how all the electricity used by a certain customer was generated, but by reviewing public sources of data the total emission burden of a customer's electricity supplier can b e found and an average emissions factor (AEF) calculated. These are useful for assigning a net emission burden to a facility. In addition, marginal emissions factors (MEFs) for estimating the effect of changing levels of usage can be calculated. MEFs are needed because emission rates at the margin are likely to diverge from the average. The overall objective of this task is to develop methods for estimating AEFs and MEFs that can provide an estimate of the combined net CO2 emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to California electricity customers. The method covers the historic period from 1990 to the present, with 1990 and 1999 used as test years. The factors derived take into account the location and time of consumption, direct contracts for power which may have certain atypical characteristics (e.g., ''green'' electricity from renewable resources), resource mixes of electricity providers, import and export of electricity from utility owned and other sources, and electricity from cogeneration. It is assumed that the factors developed in this way will diverge considerably from simple statewide AEF estimates based on standardized inventory estimates that use conventions inconsistent with the goals of this work. A notable example concerns the treatment of imports, which despite providing a significant share of California's electricity supply picture, are excluded from inventory estimates of emissions, which are based on geographical boundaries of the state.

Marnay, Chris; Fisher, Diane; Murtishaw, Scott; Phadke, Amol; Price, Lynn; Sathaye, Jayant

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",36386135,29 "IPP & CHP",3016826,45 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",22075,32 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",54205,17 "Carbon Dioxide...

288

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",622570,43 "IPP & CHP",5947100,36 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",52,49 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",673,50 "Carbon Dioxide (thousand...

289

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",106615302,4 "IPP & CHP",10220172,31 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",22136,31 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",13114,41 "Carbon Dioxide...

290

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",36817,45 "IPP & CHP",36080727,11 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",7998,41 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",12954,42 "Carbon Dioxide...

291

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",41532785,26 "IPP & CHP",11023916,29 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",42846,27 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",49591,22 "Carbon Dioxide...

292

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"..Electric Utilities",8955,48 "..IPP & CHP",37800788,10 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",44601,26 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",23976,34 "..Carbon Dioxide...

293

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",44603847,22 "IPP & CHP",20401831,19 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",92438,16 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",42160,26 "Carbon Dioxide...

294

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",75183893,14 "IPP & CHP",54561838,7 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",391088,1 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",100300,4 "Carbon Dioxide...

295

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",56188401,17 "IPP & CHP",14550834,24 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",61385,23 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",39433,28 "Carbon Dioxide...

296

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Electric Utilities",92821769,8 "IPP & CHP",3933913,43 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",71280,21 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",24538,33 "Carbon Dioxide...

297

Anthropogenic Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Ocean Acidification: The Potential Impacts on Ocean Biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most of the focus in recent years on the potential impacts of rising levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere linked to anthropogenic activities ... oceans as a consequence of the influx of carbon dioxide absor...

William C. G. Burns

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Coal-Fired Power Plants in Greece in Relation to Mined Lignite Quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide emissions were shown to vary with the calorific value and carbonate content of lignite burned at three large power plants. ... The annual carbon dioxide emissions, Q, in a lignite-fired power plant can be calculated on the basis of the total carbon mass balance, using the following formula:(18)Specific emission factor, Qs, expressed in tons of CO2 generated per MW h is given bywhere Q is the annual CO2 emissions (in tons), Qs is the specific CO2 emissions (in tons MW?1 h?1), L is the annual lignite consumption (in tons/year), CL is the total carbon content of lignite on an as-received basis (%), W is the annual production of bottom ash ( in tons/year), CW is the total carbon content of bottom ash on an as-received basis (%), F is the annual production of fly ash (in tons/year), CF is the total carbon content of fly ash on an as-received basis (%), and E is the annual production of electricity ( in MW h). ... The carbon dioxide emitted as a product of combustion of coal (fossil fuels) is currently responsible for over 60% of the enhanced greenhouse effect. ...

Despina Vamvuka; Michael Galetakis

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

FORM EIA-28  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FORM EIA-28 - Financial Reporting System FORM EIA-28 - Financial Reporting System Sch 5111 Sch 5110 EIA-28 Financial Reporting System Sch 5100 -- Page 1 of 1 2010 Reporting Year January 2011 Instructions i Contents Updates to Instructions for Reporting Year 2009 ....................................................................................................................ii I. General Instructions ................................................................................................................................................................ 1 A. Purpose and Legislative Authority..................................................................................................................................... 1 B. Filing Requirements...........................................................................................................................................................

300

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions In the coming decades, responses to environmental issues could affect patterns of energy use around the world. Actions to limit greenhouse gas emissions could alter the level and composition of energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by energy source. Figure 67. World Carbon Dioxide Emissions by Region, 2002-2025 (Gigawatts). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800. Figure Data Carbon dioxide is one of the most prevalent greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. Anthropogenic (human-caused) emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels for energy, and as a result world energy use has emerged at the center of the climate change debate. In the International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) reference case, world

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

An assessment of operations of oil-exporting countries in terms of energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy consumption and carbon dioxide emissions from 16 oil-exporting countries are studied using Data Envelopment Analysis using indicators representing economic growth, energy consumption and emissions. The analysis for 1996 shows that Norway, Gabon and Nigeria are efficient and that Russia is inefficient. Malmquist Productivity Index analysis shows that there is progress in achieving higher values of GDP and non-fossil fuel consumption and in achieving lower values of fossil fuel consumption and carbon emissions in the year 1996 when compared with 1992 for Norway, Russia, Mexico, Algeria, Libya, Gabon and Oman.

Ramakrishnan Ramanathan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions Overview Figure 110. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 1990-2035. figure data Because anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide result primarily from the combustion of fossil fuels, energy consumption is at the center of the climate change debate. In the IEO2011 Reference case, world energy-related carbon dioxide emissions increase from 30.2 billion metric tons in 2008 to 35.2 billion metric tons in 2020 and 43.2 billion metric tons in 2035. Much of the growth in emissions is attributed to developing, non-OECD nations that continue to rely heavily on fossil fuels to meet fast-paced growth in energy demand. Non-OECD emissions total 28.9 billion metric tons in 2035, or about 73 percent above the 2008 level. In comparison, OECD emissions

303

EIA - Electric Power Data  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey-level Detail Data Files Survey-level Detail Data Files Electric power data are collected on survey instruments. Data collection is mandated by Congress to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding. The most widely used data are disseminated in reports, such as the Electric Power Monthly and the Electric Power Annual. Publicly available electric power data is available down to the plant level in the Electricity Data Browser and in detailed spreadsheets by survey below. Description Data availability State-level data (consolidated across forms) Contains electricity generation; fuel consumption; emissions; retail sales, revenue, number of customers, and retail prices; generating capacity; and financial data. 1990-2012 (monthly and annual) Electric power sales and revenue data - monthly (Form EIA-826)

304

EIA Writing Style Guide  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

EIA Writing Style Guide EIA Writing Style Guide U.S. Energy Information Administration Office of Communications This publication is available on the EIA employee intranet and at: www.eia.gov/eiawritingstyleguide.pdf U.S. government publications are not subject to copyright protection, but you should acknowledge EIA as the source if you use or reproduce this content. November 2012 Contents Introduction .................................................................................................................................................. 1 Quick Tips-Style, Writing, and Grammar Tips ............................................................................................ 5 Chapter 1. Editorial Voice and Words and Phrases To Avoid ....................................................................... 7

305

EIA - Supplement Tables - Contact  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 For Further Information . . . The Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO2008) was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), under the direction of John J. Conti (john.conti@eia.doe.gov, 202-586-2222), Director, Integrated Analysis and Forecasting; Paul D. Holtberg (paul.holtberg@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-1284), Director, Demand and Integration Division; Joseph A. Beamon (jbeamon@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2025), Director, Coal and Electric Power Division; A. Michael Schaal (michael.schaal@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-5590), Director, Oil and Gas Division; Glen E. Sweetnam (glen.sweetnam@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2188), Director, International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division; and Andy S. Kydes (akydes@eia.doe.gov, 202/586-2222), Senior Technical Advisor.

306

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.4 Commercial Environmental Emissions  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

6 6 2009 Methane Emissions for U.S. Commercial Buildings Energy Production, by Fuel Type (1) Fuel Type Petroleum 0.5 Natural Gas 26.8 Coal 0.3 Wood 0.4 Electricity (2) 50.5 Total 78.5 Note(s): Source(s): MMT CO2 Equivalent 1) Sources of emissions include oil and gas production, processing, and distribution; coal mining; and utility and site combustion. Carbon Dioxide equivalent units are calculated by converting methane emissions to carbon dioxide emissions (methane's global warming potential is 23 times that of carbon dioxide). 2) Refers to emissions of electricity generators attributable to the buildings sector. EIA, Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S. 2009, Mar. 2011, Table 18, p. 37 for energy production emissions; EPA, Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

307

EIA - Forecasts and Analysis of Energy Data  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Preface Preface This report presents international energy projections through 2025, prepared by the Energy Information Administration, including outlooks for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2005 (IEO2005) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2025. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2005 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2005 (AEO2005), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Although the IEO typically uses the same reference case as the AEO, IEO2005 has adopted the October futures case from AEO2005 as its reference case for the United States. The October futures case, which has an assumption of higher world oil prices than the AEO2005 reference case, now appears to be a more likely projection. The reference case prices will be reconsidered for the next AEO. Based on information available as of July 2005, the AEO2006 reference case will likely reflect world oil prices higher than those in the IEO2005 reference case.

308

Evaluation of Sludge Characteristics and Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Full-scale Wastewater Treatment Plants in China by Mass and Energy Balances  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Energy balances were used to evaluate the characteristics of sludge and to calculate the carbon dioxide emissions in the WWTPs in this study. To avoid the errors, mass balances by TP have been used to calibrate the relating data before making energy ... Keywords: Sludge, CEP, mass balance, energy balance, carbon dioxide

Gan Wang; Yongzhen Peng; Shuying Wang; Gan Wang; Hongxun Hou

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

State-Level Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions, 2000-2009  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Press Releases Presentations Congressional Testimony Radio Spots Enter Search Term(s): Search eia.gov A-Z Index A-Z Index A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U...

310

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program`s Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Current emission trends for nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds by month and state: Methodology and results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents estimates of monthly sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), and nonmethane voltatile organic compound (VOC) emissions by sector, region, and state in the contiguous United States for the years 1975 through 1988. This work has been funded as part of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program's Emissions and Controls Task Group by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE). The DOE project officer is Edward C. Trexler, DOE/FE Office of Planning and Environment.

Kohout, E.J.; Miller, D.J.; Nieves, L.A.; Rothman, D.S.; Saricks, C.L.; Stodolsky, F.; Hanson, D.A.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

EIA Radio test  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 10, 2012 September 10, 2012 Test of Energy News Radio Service This is a test audio file of the U.S. Energy Information Administration's energy news radio service to be launched on Tuesday, September 11 th with the release of EIA's monthly Short-Term Energy Outlook. EIA's radio service will provide free short broadcast stories on EIA energy data reports and analysis to radio stations nationwide. The stories will be recorded in MP3 format and can be downloaded from EIA's radio service webpage at www.eia.gov/radio. The first broadcast stories will be posted around noon Eastern Time on Sept. 11 after the release of EIA's monthly Short Term Energy Outlook forecast. These initial stories will focus on the outlook for U.S. gasoline prices, crude oil production and natural gas production.

313

EIA: What's New  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

What's New at the Energy Information Administration What's New at the Energy Information Administration en-us Sun, 19 Jan 2014 12:00:44 EST EIA logo http://www.eia.gov/images/eia_small_new_1.gif http://www.eia.gov US Energy Information Administration Cold weather led to record-high natural gas storage withdrawals http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=14651 Fri, 17 Jan 2014 00:00:00 EST (Fri, 17 Jan 2014) Last week's widespread, record-breaking cold weather had significant effects across virtually all segments of the U.S. natural gas market. The frigid temperatures led to record highs in demand, storage withdrawals, and prices. Spot coal price trends vary across key basins during 2013 http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=14631 Thu, 16 Jan 2014 00:00:00 EST (Thu, 16 Jan 2014) Spot steam coal price trends varied across

314

EIA-411 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Database Form EIA-411 - Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report Data Invalid Regional Entities Names Release Date: December 22, 2011 Next Release Date: November 2012...

315

EIA - Natural Gas Publications  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data collected on Form EIA-914 (Monthly Natural Gas Production Report) for Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Other States...

316

DOE/EIA-0306  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

(EIA), Office of Energy Markets and End Use under the directorship of Wray Smith (202633-8544). General supervision of the report was provided by Kenneth A. Vagts,...

317

eia191.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

EIA-191 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Storage Field Name Reservoir Name Location State Location County Total Storage Field Capacity (Mcf) Maximum...

318

Energy use and carbon dioxide emissions in the steel sector in key developing countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

intensities and the carbon emission factor for each process.through fuel switching. Carbon emissions factors used infor reduction in carbon emissions was slightly larger than

Price, Lynn; Phylipsen, Dian; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Energy efficiency and carbon dioxide emissions reduction opportunities in the U.S. cement industry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Table 2. Energy Consumption, Carbon Emissions Coefficients,and Carbon Emissions from Energy Consumption, and CarbonEnergy Related Carbon Emissions Fuel Energy Use Carbon (

Martin, Nathan; Worrell, Ernst; Price, Lynn

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Carbon Dioxide Emissions and Concentrations on the Rise as Kyoto Era Fades  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

According to on-site measurements by the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations reached 391.3 parts per million (ppm) in 2011, up from 388.56 ppm in 2010 and fro...

Xing Fu-Bertaux

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Urbanisation, energy consumption, and carbon dioxide emissions in China: A panel data analysis of Chinas provinces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Global warming resulting from rapid economic growth across the world has become a worldwide threat. The coordination of development of urbanisation, energy consumption, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions therefore forms an important issue; it has attracted considerable attention from both governments and researchers in recent years. This study investigated the relationship between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions over the period 19952011, using a panel data model, based on the data for 30 Chinese provinces. The potential to reduce CO2 emissions was also analysed. The results indicated that per capita CO2 emissions in China were characterised by conspicuous regional imbalances during the period studied; in fact, per capita CO2 emissions decrease gradually from the eastern coastal region to the central region, and then to the western region. Urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions were found to present a long run bi-directional positive relationship, the significance of which was discovered to vary between provinces as a result of the scale of their respective economies. In addition, a bi-directional causal relationship was found to exist between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions: specifically, a bi-directional positive causal relationship exists between CO2 emissions and urbanisation, as well as between energy consumption and CO2 emissions, and a one way positive causal relationship exists from urbanisation to energy consumption. Scenario simulations further demonstrated that whilst Chinas per capita and total CO2 emissions will increase continuously between 2012 and 2020 under all of the three scenarios developed in this study, the potential to achieve reductions is also high. A better understanding of the relationship between urbanisation, energy consumption, and CO2 emissions will help China to realise the low-carbon economic development.

Shaojian Wang; Chuanglin Fang; Xingliang Guan; Bo Pang; Haitao Ma

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A2. Glossary A2. Glossary Acid stabilization: A circumstance where the pH of the waste mixture in an animal manure management system is maintained near 7.0, optimal conditions for methane production. Aerobic bacteria: Microorganisms living, active, or occurring only in the presence of oxygen. Aerobic decomposition: The breakdown of a molecule into simpler molecules or atoms by microorganisms under favorable conditions of oxygenation. Aerosols: Airborne particles. Afforestation: Planting of new forests on lands that have not been recently forested. Agglomeration: The clustering of disparate elements. Airshed: An area or region defined by settlement patterns or geology that results in discrete atmospheric conditions. Albedo: The fraction of incident light or electromagnetic radiation that is

323

eia912.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Month Month 2 0 Address 2: City: State: Zip: - to meet the due date.) (Volume of gas in the reservoir that is in addition to the base gas.) Working Gas as of Friday 9:00 AM (Million Cubic Feet) Producing Region Complete and return form no later than 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time on Monday. If this is a resubmission, enter an "X" in the box: EIA ID NUMBER: ATTN: EIA-912 Energy Information Administration, EI-45 U. S. Department of Energy (202) 586-2849 912 Company Name: oog.eia912@eia.gov Fax No.: Email: Ext: Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Fax to: Address 1: Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/notice912.jsp Questions? Email address: Comments: Please explain in this section any unusual data reports. For example, explain any change in working gas as a result of changes in the number or capacity

324

EIA | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA EIA Dataset Summary Description The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates. Source EIA Date Released June 30th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Energy Consumption Energy Expenditures energy prices energy production SEDS State energy data States US Data text/csv icon Complete SEDS dataset as csv (may be too big for Excel) (csv, 40.6 MiB)

325

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Issuestrends  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

electricity use electricitydemandemissionsCO2 (carbon dioxide) 10232014 Weather-driven energy intensity increase led to higher energy-related emissions in 2013 emissionsCO2...

326

ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM U.S. LARGE CITIES Risa Patarasuk1, Darragh O'Keeffe1, Yang Song1, Igor Razlivano1, Kevin R. Gurney1, and Preeti Rao2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASSESSING CARBON DIOXIDE EMISSIONS FROM U.S. LARGE CITIES Risa Patarasuk1, Darragh O'Keeffe1, Yang University, 2Jet Propulsion Laboratory Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, a primary greenhouse gas emissions from natural gas, coal, and petroleum sources. We use a `bottom-up' approach in which CO2

Hall, Sharon J.

327

Worldwide, accelerating glacier loss provides independent and startling evidence that global warming is occurring1 It is now clear that the Earth is warming rapidly due to man-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trap-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other heat-trap- ping gases, which blanket the planet and cause temperatures future limits on carbon emissions. · Electricity consumers should opt for "green power" where imperative that emissions of the main heat-trapping gas, car- bon dioxide (CO2), are significantly reduced

Combes, Stacey A.

328

About EIA - Policies - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Information Quality Guidelines Information Quality Guidelines "Independent Statistics & Analysis." Background of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Office of Management and Budget Information Quality Guidelines Department of Energy Information Quality Guidelines EIA Information Quality Guidelines Objectivity Utility Integrity Influential Information - Transparency and Reproducibility EIA Information Subject to Information Quality Guidelines Questions about EIA Information and Requests for Correction of Disseminated Information Not in Compliance with Information Quality Guidelines 1. Background of EIA EIA, created by Congress in 1977, is a statistical agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and is one of the ten principal statistical agencies in the Federal government. EIA provides policy-independent data,

329

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Sector Sector U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol.

330

EIA publications directory 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enacted in 1977, the Department of Energy (DOE) Organization Act established the Energy Information Administration (EIA) as the Department`s independent statistical and analytical agency, with a mandate to collect and publish data and prepare analyses on energy production, consumption, prices, resources, and projections of energy supply and demand. This edition of the EIA Publications Directory contains titles and abstracts of periodicals and one-time reports produced by EIA from January through December 1994. The body of the Directory contains citations and abstracts arranged by broad subject categories: metadata, coal, oil and gas, nuclear, electricity, renewable energy/alternative fuels, multifuel, end-use consumption, models, and forecasts.

NONE

1995-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Carbon Dioxide Capture from Large Point Sources Project No.: FG02-04ER83925 SBIR CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Commercial hollow fiber membrane cartridge [6" (D) X 17" (L)] Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. developed and tested a carbon dioxide (CO2) removal system for flue gas streams from large point sources that offers improved mass transfer rates compared to conventional technologies. The project fabricated perfluorinated membranes on hydrophobic hollow fiber membrane contactors, demonstrated CO2 removal from a simulated flue gas mixture via amine absorption using the fabricated membranes, examine chemical compatibility of the membrane with amines, and demonstrate enhanced stability of the perfluoro-coated membranes. In addition, an economic analysis was performed to demonstrate that the perfluoro-coated

332

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Carbon Dioxide Recovery from Flue Gas using Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbents Project No.: FG02-04ER83885 SBIR Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Virtual Depiction of a Carbon-Supported Amine Sorbent Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. has completed a small business innovative research (SBIR) project that initiated development of a novel sorbent for the removal of carbon dioxide (CO2) from combustion flue gas. The primary goal of this project wa s to develop a process using a supported amine for CO2 capture that exhibits better system efficiency, lower cost, and less corrosion than current aqueous amine-based processes. The project was to demonstrate performance of carbon-supported amine sorbents under simulated flue gas conditions. Three tasks were undertaken:

333

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

334

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

335

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

336

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

337

Spatial effects of carbon dioxide emissions from residential energy consumption: A county-level study using enhanced nocturnal lighting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract As the worlds largest developing country and greenhouse gas emitter, Chinas residential energy consumption (REC) is now responsible for over 11% of the countrys total energy consumption. In this paper, we present a novel method that utilizes spatially distributed information from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Programs Operational Linescan System (DMSPOLS) and human activity index (HAI) to test the hypothesis that counties with similar carbon dioxide emissions from REC are more spatially clustered than would be expected by chance. Our results revealed a high degree of county-level clustering in the distribution of emissions per capita. However, further analysis showed that high-emission counties tended to be surrounded by counties with relatively low per capita GDP levels. Therefore, our results contrasted with other evidence that REC emissions were closely related to GDP levels. Accordingly, we stress the need for the consideration of other factors in determining emission patterns, such as residential consumption patterns (e.g., consumer choices, behavior, knowledge, and information diffusion).

Heli Lu; Guifang Liu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy Links Page - EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Publications & Reports > Energy Links Page Publications & Reports > Energy Links Page Related Energy Links Energy Companies Coal & Other Electricity Foreign Integrated Natural Gas Transmission, Distribution, and Marketing News Services and Periodicals Oil & Gas Exploration and Production Petroleum Refining, Marketing, and Transportation State Owned U.S. Integrated Government Agencies Other DOE National Laboratories Federal Energy States Universities Trade Associations & Other Trade Associations Other Associations International Statistics Energy Services Other Energy Sites EIA Links Disclaimer These pages contain hypertext links to information created and maintained by other public and private organizations. These links provide additional information that may be useful or interesting and are being provided consistent with the intended purpose of the EIA Web site. EIA does not control or guarantee the accuracy, relevance, timeliness, or completeness of this outside information. EIA does not endorse the organizations sponsoring linked websites and we do not endorse the views they express or the products/services they offer.

339

2013 EIA Energy Conference  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

conference energy 2013 eia June 17-18, 2013 JW Marriott Washington, DC Welcome to the 2013 EIA Energy Conference. This year's conference highlights one of the more dynamic times in energy that I can remember: skyrocketing growth in U.S. oil and natural gas production, principally from shales, which leads to challenges and opportunities here and around the world for suppliers, consumers, policymakers, and, of course, EIA. Your participation in discussions over the next two days is crucial as we begin a dialogue about the forces that are remaking the energy world at an accelerating pace. We have again this year invited colleagues from both within and outside EIA to present their views on a host of topical energy issues. We look forward to hearing from a distinguished group of speakers

340

Form EIA-861 Instructions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT INSTRUCTIONS FORM EIA-861 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 9.0 hrs PURPOSE Form EIA-861 collects information on the status of electric power industry participants involved in the generation, transmission, and distribution of electric energy in the United States, its territories, and Puerto Rico. The data from this form are used to accurately maintain the EIA list of electric utilities, to draw samples for other electric power surveys, and to provide input for the following EIA reports: Electric Power Monthly, Monthly Energy Review, Electric Power Annual, Annual Energy Outlook, and Annual Energy Review. The data collected on this form are used to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EIA-411 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-411 Data Form EIA-411 Data Release Date: January 28, 2013 Next Release Date: November 2013 Form EIA-411, “Coordinated Bulk Power Supply and Demand Program Report” Form EIA-411 collects electric reliability information from the Nation’s power system planners about the electricity supply, both capacity and energy, that is needed to serve current demand and for future growth. The reported data can be used to examine such issues as: the reliability of the U.S. electricity system; projections which assess future demand growth and plans for constructing new generating and transmission facilities; and consequences of unavailable or constrained capacity on usage of the existing generation base. Reliability of the electric power system covers three areas:

342

EIA COPY. Tear  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

COPY. COPY. Tear out, complete, and return to: Energy Information Administration: EI-441 Mail Station: BG-094 FORSTL U.S. Department of Energy Washington, D.C. 20585 Attn: Form EIA-176 SHORT FORM A2. Form EIA-176, Short Form Figure Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 220 nonutility nonutility nonutility nonutility Energy Information Administration / Natural Gas Annual 1996 221 5.4.4.2 EIA-176, ANNUAL REPORT OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS SUPPLY AND DISPOSITION, 19 RESPO NDENT CO PY Page 3 PART V: CONTINUATION, DISPOSITION OF NATURAL AND SUPPLEMENTAL GAS WITHIN OR TRANSPORTED OUT OF REPORT STATE 1.0 Control No. 2.0 Company Name 3.0 Report State 4.0 Resubmittal EIA Date Volume (Mcf at 14.73 psia) e or f Cost or Revenue (Including taxes) e or f 5.4.4 Other Nonutility Power Producer Sales

343

FORM EIA-846(F)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

other establishments. Report the shell capacity, i.e., the design capacity of storage tanks. EIA-810 ID NUMBER (At bottom of section I) - Establishments that submit the Monthly...

344

2009 Revisions EIA-914  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

for Texas, which was partially the cause for the review of the EIA-914, which, in turn, led to the development and implementation of this new methodology. Downward revisions in...

345

EIA-757 Instructions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

operators may submit their responses via mail to: U.S. Department of Energy Oil & Gas Survey, EIA-757 Ben Franklin Station P.O. Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 COPIES OF...

346

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide Emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Climate Efficient Is Tourism in Switzerland? An Assessment of Tourism's Carbon Dioxide;#12;Summary The tourism sector is not only affected by climate change but also has an impact on the Earth of such measures, we calculated the climate efficiency of the tourism sector in the case of Switzerland.We defined

Fischlin, Andreas

347

EIA publications directory 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This edition of the EIA Publications Directory contains titles and abstracts of periodicals and one-time reports produced by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) from January through December 1996. The body of the Directory contains citations and abstracts arranged by broad subject categories; metadata, coal, oil and gas, nuclear, electricity, renewable and energy/alternative fuels, multifuel, end-use consumption, models, and forecasts.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

EIA publications directory 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This edition of the EIA Publications Directory contains 68 titles and abstracts of periodicals and one time reports produced by EIA from January through December 1997. The body of the Directory contains citations and abstracts arranged by broad subject categories; (1) MetaData, (2) Coal, (3) Oil (4) Natural gas, (5) Nuclear, (6) Electricity, (7) Renewable energy and Alternative fuels, (8) Multifuel, (9) End use consumption, (10) Models, and (11) Forecasts.

NONE

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

EIA Publications Directory 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This directory contains abstracts and ordering information for individual issues of semiannual, annual, biennial, and triennial Energy Information Administration (EIA) periodicals, analysis reports, Service Reports, and model documentations. This edition covers periodicals and one-time reports produced by EIA from January through December 1995. The citations and abstracts are arranged by broad subject categories: metadata, coal, oil/gas, nuclear, electricity, renewable energy/alternative fuels, multifuel, end-use consumption, models, and forecasts. Indexes are provided.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

EIA-411 Data File  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Form EIA-411 Database Form EIA-411 Database Form EIA-411 - “Coordinated Bulk Power Supply Program Report” Data Coverage and Data Quality Release Date: December 22, 2011 Next Release Date: November 2012 In 2008, the Form EIA-411 became a mandatory collection for all schedules except No. 7 (Transmission Outages) which will continue to be a voluntary filing. The Form EIA-411 collects information about regional electricity supply and demand projections for a five-year advance period and information on the transmission system and supporting facilities. Editing of the data is done by each of the various reliability regions. The data collected on this form are used by the U.S. Department of Energy to monitor the current status and trends of the electric power industry and to evaluate the future reliability of the industry. Each of the reliability regions of the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) is asked to submit Form EIA-411 after compiling data furnished by utilities and other electricity suppliers within their regions to NERC. NERC then compiles and coordinates these reports and provides the data to the Energy Information Administration.

351

Carbon dioxide emissions and change in prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States: An ecological study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent studies suggest that increasing levels of the greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (CO2), may influence weight gain and thus may play a role in rising trends in obesity and diabetes. We conducted an ecological study to examine the associations between CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and changes in the prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the United States. County-level data on CO2 emissions, prevalence of obesity and diagnosed diabetes, other sociodemographic factors and neighborhood characteristics related to urbanicity, and fine particles (PM2.5) between 2004 and 2008 were obtained from the Vulcan Project, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and American Community Survey. Linear mixed effect modeling of 3019 counties for the associations between average CO2 emissions and changes in diabetes and obesity prevalence between 2004 and 2008 was performed. The average obesity and diabetes prevalence increased between 2004 and 2008 by 3.65% (SD: 1.88%) and 1.65% (SD: 1.70%), respectively. A marginally significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in obesity prevalence was found with adjustment for sociodemographic factors, indicators of urbanicity and spatial autocorrelation (p-trend=0.06). The association became weaker and nonsignificant with further adjustment for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.17). There was a significant positive association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence before controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.05) but the association became null after controlling for PM2.5 (p-trend=0.49), suggesting that PM2.5 is a critical confounder in the association between CO2 emission and changes in diabetes prevalence. This study does not support the hypothesis that CO2 emissions, a leading driver of climate change, may be linked to increasing trends in obesity and diabetes, though there was an indication of possible link between CO2 and obesity.

Alexander R. Zheutlin; Sara D. Adar; Sung Kyun Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

U.S. Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Trading Program: Results and Further Applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of emissions trading (cap and trade) is gaining worldwide...2 have been reduced annually from sources participating in the US SO2 emissions trading program. Ambient SO2 levels and sulfate deposition have ...

Stephanie Rose Benkovic; Joseph Kruger

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Framework to Analyze the Reduction Potential of Life Cycle Carbon Dioxide Emissions of Passenger Cars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Automobile manufacturers are increasingly obligated to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions of their vehicle fleets. In this paper a framework to analyze the reduction potential of the life cycle CO2 emissions of ...

Christoph Herrmann; Karsten Kieckhfer

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

4. Comparison of Coal Consumption to Coal Generation Sources: * 1990-1997-EIA, Form EIA-759, "Monthly Power Plant Report," and Form EIA-867, Annual Nonutility Power Producer...

355

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Carbon Dioxide Capture  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Carbon Dioxide Capture by Absorption with Potassium Carbonate Project No.: FC26-02NT41440 Pilot Plant at the University of Texas Pilot Plant at the University of Texas The University of Texas at Austin investigated an improved process for CO2 capture by alkanolamine absorption that uses an alternative solvent, aqueous potassium carbonate (K2CO3) promoted by piperazine (PZ). If successful, this process would use less energy for CO2 capture than the conventional monoethanolamine (MEA) scrubbing process. An improved capture system would mean a relative improvement in overall power plant efficiency. The project developed models to predict the performance of absorption/stripping of CO2 using the improved solvent and perform a pilot plant study to validate the process models and define the range of feasible

356

EIA - Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Methane Emissions  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

credit for renewable energy, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas combustion. Wastewater treatment, including both domestic wastewater (about two-thirds) and industrial...

357

EIA - 2008 New Electric Power EIA-923 Form  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Report Form EIA-920 - Combined Heat and Power Plant Report Form EIA-423 - Monthly Cost and Quality of Fuels for Electric Plants FERC Form 423 - Monthly Report of Cost and...

358

China's Industrial Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Manufacturing Subsectors and in Selected Provinces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conversion Factors methodology as well as conversion factors used for the CO 2related emissions. Conversion Factors This study uses the

Lu, Hongyou

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

The road from Kyoto: The evolution of carbon dioxide emissions from energy use in IEA countries  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Building on earlier analysis of energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions in 13 member countries of the International Energy Agency (IEA), the authors quantify energy use and carbon emissions for nearly three dozen activities and economic branches from the early 1970s to the mid 1990s. They show how lifestyles, economic structure, and overall economic growth affect the structure and rate of CO{sub 2} emissions. Similarly they show how energy intensities, final fuel mixes, and utility fuel mixes shape emissions. Using Laspeyres indices, they calculate the relative importance of each of these factors in affecting sectoral and total emissions over time. They focus on consumer sectors, homes and personal travel, but extend the analysis to all sectors of the economies studied. The authors find that emissions reductions in all sectors after 1990 have been slower than in the previous fifteen years, a period that saw emissions reductions in spite of economic growth. Manufacturing and households led the reductions in most cases, but progress has slowed markedly. In almost all cases, emissions from the transportation sector showed the least reduction and indeed some increases. Findings do not give an optimistic view of the recently concluded accords at the Third Conference of Parties (COP-3) in Kyoto, Japan. The authors conclude that the current rate of energy saving and fuel switching must be greatly accelerated if the IEA countries studied here are to affect reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions to meet their Kyoto targets.

Schipper, L.; Unander, F.; Marie, C.; Gorham, R.; Justus, D.; Ting, M.; Khrushch, M.; Krackeler, T.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

An equitable, efficient and implementable scheme to control global carbon dioxide emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We design an international scheme to control global externalities in which autonomous regions choose their own emissions levels in anticipation of interregional resource transfers implemented by an internation...

Arthur J. Caplan; Emilson C. D. Silva

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Acronyms Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 GDP Gross domestic product AEO Annual Energy Outlook LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 NGL Natural gas liquids AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Btu British thermal units NOx Nitrogen oxides CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy OCS Outer Continental Shelf CHP Combined heat and power OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation CO2 Carbon dioxide and Development CTL Coal-to-liquids OPEC Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries CSAPR Cross-State Air Pollution Rule RFS Renewable Fuels Standard EIA U.S. Energy Information Administration RPS Renewable Portfolio Standard

362

Form EIA-920 - 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Administration Administration Form EIA-920 (2004/2005) COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS Form Approval OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 11/30/2007 PURPOSE Form EIA-920 Combined Heat and Power Plant Report collects information from combined heat and power (CHP) plants in the United States. Data collected on this form include electric power generation, fuel consumption, fuel heat content, and fossil fuel stocks. These data are used to monitor the status and trends of the electric power industry, and appear in many EIA publications, including: Electric Power Monthly and Annual, Monthly and Annual Energy Reviews, Natural Gas Monthly and Annual, Quarterly Coal Report, and the Renewable Energy Annual. Further information can be found at

363

Form EIA-767  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-767 (2005) STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANT OPERATION AND DESIGN REPORT Form Approved OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 11/30/2007 PURPOSE Form EIA-767 collects information annually from all U.S. plants with a total existing or planned organic-fueled or combustible renewable steam-electric unit that has a generator nameplate rating of 10 megawatts or larger. This report is used for economic analyses conducted by the Department of Energy. The data from this form appear in the Electric Power Annual and the Annual Energy Review. The data collected on this form are used to monitor the current status and trends in the electric power industry and to evaluate the future of the industry. REQUIRED RESPONDENTS A Form EIA-767 must be completed and filed for each existing, under-construction, or planned

364

EIA April 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Conference,Washington 7th-8th April 2008 EIA Conference,Washington 7th-8th April 2008 © 2008, Cambridge Energy Research Associates, Inc. No portion of this presentation may be reproduced, reused, or otherwise distributed in any form without prior written consent. Headlines * Complex multi-component system - many possible outcomes * Large volumes of data - robust methodology * Current paradigms will change in future * Total liquids capacity has not peaked * Liquids capacity will continue to grow through 2017 * No imminent peak/ no precipitous fall thereafter * CERA's is not the most optimistic view * Complexion of risks evolving - geopolitical, execution. * Eventually liquids supply will struggle to meet demand * The 'undulating plateau' will emerge - but not before 2030 2 EIA Conference,Washington 7th-8th April 2008

365

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Carbon dioxide emissions, economic growth, industrial structure, and technical efficiency: Empirical evidence from Ghana, Senegal, and Morocco on the causal dynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigated the short-run causal relationships and the long-run equilibrium relationships among carbon dioxide emissions, economic growth, technical efficiency, and industrial structure for three African countries. Using Bounds cointegration approach the result showed evidence of multiple long-run equilibrium relationships for Ghana and Senegal but a one-way long-run equilibrium relationship for Morocco. The result from the Toda and Yomamoto granger causality test showed a mix of bidirectional, unidirectional, and neutral relationships for all countries. Whilst in Senegal carbon dioxide emission was not found to be a limiting factor to economic growth; it was found to act as a limiting factor to economic growth in Morocco and Ghana. Lastly, the result from the variance decomposition analysis revealed that economic growth contributes largely to changes in future carbon dioxide emissions in Senegal and Morocco whilst in Ghana technical efficiency contributes largely to changes in future variations in carbon dioxide emissions. These results have important policy implications for these countries' energy efficiency systems.

Philip Kofi Adom; William Bekoe; Franklin Amuakwa-Mensah; Justice Tei Mensah; Ebo Botchway

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EIA | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA EIA Home Sfomail's picture Submitted by Sfomail(48) Member 17 May, 2013 - 12:42 EIA officially recognizes utility rate database on OpenEI EIA OpenEI Utility Rates OpenEI and U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Good news, everyone! The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) now officially recognizes the OpenEI utility rate database. Up until just a few months ago, the EIA website stated: Wzeng's picture Submitted by Wzeng(50) Contributor 8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added! EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder Visualizations for users to browse and discover interesting trends. This dynamic chart, also called a motion chart, allows users to view changing data over time with four

368

A Novel Collaboration Paradigm for Reducing Energy Consumption and Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Data Centres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research and innovation projects to reduce the energy consumption The Computer...this topic. This research project designed energy-aware optimization policies...an unpredicted renewable energy surplus (typically solar or wind). This low emission......

D. Rincn; A. Agust-Torra; J.F. Botero; F. Raspall; D. Remondo; X. Hesselbach; M.T. Beck; H. de Meer; F. Niedermeier; G. Giuliani

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide emissions from pelletized and nonpelletized poultry litter incorporated into soil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

While several studies have shown that the addition of animal manures to soil can increase N2O and CO2 emissions, limited information is available on the effect that manure physical characteristics can have on the...

M. L. Cabrera; S. C. Chiang; W. C. Merka; O. C. Pancorbo; S. A. Thompson

370

Technologies for Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from Fossil Fuel Fired Installations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

All mitigation scenarios proposed to date either tend so slow down the rate of atmospheric CO2 emissions or level out the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. A unique system has been devised which offers a metho...

M. Steinberg

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide concentrations in Santiago de Chile associated with traffic emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO/CO2 ratios have been measured in different locations of Santiago de Chile city. Measurements were carried out in a tunnel (prevailing emissions from cars with catalytic converter) and close to heavy traffic st...

Mara A. Rubio; Irene Fuenzalida

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Form EIA-906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases 906, EIA-920, and EIA-923 Databases Dataset Summary Description The EIA-906, EIA-920, EIA-923 and predecessor forms provide monthly and annual data on generation and fuel consumption at the power plant and prime mover level. A subset of plants, steam-electric plants 10 MW and above, also provides boiler level and generator level data. Data for utility plants are available from 1970, and for non-utility plants from 1999. Beginning with January 2004 data collection, the EIA-920 was used to collect data from the combined heat and power plant (cogeneration) segment of the non-utility sector; also as of 2004, nonutilities filed the annual data for nonutility source and disposition of electricity. Beginning in 2007, environmental data was collected on Schedules 8A - 8F of the Form 923 and includes by-product

373

Form EIA-871A  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Approval Approval OMB No.: 1905-0145 Expires: 11/30/2002 Form EIA-871A U.S. Department of Energy Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey for 1999 BUILDING QUESTIONNAIRE TABLE OF CONTENTS About This Questionnaire ...................................................................................................... 3 Section A. Building Size and Age Square Footage .................................................................................................... 5 Floors .................................................................................................................... 8 Year Constructed .................................................................................................. 9 Section B. Principal Building Activity

374

About EIA - Policies - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About EIA About EIA Copyrights and Reuse Public domain and use of EIA content U.S. Government publications are in the public domain and are not subject to copyright protection. You may use and/or distribute any of our data, files, databases, reports, graphs, charts, and other information products that are on our website or that you receive through our email distribution service. However, if you use or reproduce any of our information products, you should use an acknowledgment, which includes the publication date, such as: "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration (Oct 2008)." Quoting EIA content and translations When quoting EIA text, the acknowledgment should clearly indicate which text is EIA content and which is not. When translating EIA content into

375

About EIA - Budget - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About EIA About EIA Budget and Performance EIA receives funding for its activities with an annual appropriation from Congress. EIA's budget request falls under the purview of the House and Senate Appropriations Subcommittees on Energy and Water Development. The fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget provides $99.5 million for EIA, a decrease of $5.5 million, or -5.2 percent, from the FY 2012 level. The FY 2013 funding level maintains EIA's core energy statistics, analyses, and forecasting programs, and allows the agency to deliver this information to its customers in the most efficient and effective means. EIA will focus on the following areas: Conduct the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Complete the collection of data for CBECS 2012, which is the only

376

Analysis and optimization of the Graz cycle : a coal fired power generation scheme with near-zero carbon dioxide emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Humans are releasing record amounts of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere through the combustion of fossil fuels in power generation plants. With mounting evidence that this carbon dioxide is a leading cause of global ...

Alexander, Brentan R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

New York MARKAL: An evaluation of carbon dioxide emission control strategies in New York State  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A MARKAL model was developed for the State of New York. It represents the state's energy system as a set of typical technologies for generating, converting, and using energy as it evolves over a 45-year period. NYMARKAL was applied here in demonstration analyses to explore strategies to reduce 2 emissions. NYMARKAL was installed at the State Energy Office and in the Offices of the New York Power Pool. Example scenarios showed that it is more difficult and more expensive to reduce carbon emissions in New York State than in the United States as a whole. Were a common carbon tax instituted, it would have less effect in New York and most carbon emissions reduction would take place elsewhere in the country where it is more cost-effective. Alternatively, were all states required to reduce CO2 emissions by an equal percentage (say by 20 per cent), the cost per unit emissions reduction to New York would be much greater than in the rest of the country.

Leonard D. Hamilton

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Evaluation of carbon dioxide emission control strategies in New York State. Final report, 1990--1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A MARKAL model was developed for the State of New York. It represents the state`s energy system as a set of typical technologies for generating, converting, and using energy as it evolves over a 45-year period. NYMARKAL was applied here in demonstration analyses to explore strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. NYMARKAL was installed at the State Energy Office and in the Offices of the New York Power Pool. Staff members from both organizations and other state agencies were trained in its use. Example scenarios showed that it is more difficult and more expensive to reduce carbon emissions in New York State than in the United States as a whole. Were a common carbon tax instituted, it would have less effect in New York and most carbon emissions reduction would take place elsewhere in the country where it is more cost-effective. Alternatively, were all states required to reduce CO{sub 2} emission an equal percentage (say by 20%), the cost per unit emissions reduction to New York would be much greater than in the rest of the country.

Morris, S.C.; Lee, J.; Goldstein, G.; Hill, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Evaluation of carbon dioxide emission control strategies in New York State  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A MARKAL model was developed for the State of New York. It represents the state's energy system as a set of typical technologies for generating, converting, and using energy as it evolves over a 45-year period. NYMARKAL was applied here in demonstration analyses to explore strategies to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. NYMARKAL was installed at the State Energy Office and in the Offices of the New York Power Pool. Staff members from both organizations and other state agencies were trained in its use. Example scenarios showed that it is more difficult and more expensive to reduce carbon emissions in New York State than in the United States as a whole. Were a common carbon tax instituted, it would have less effect in New York and most carbon emissions reduction would take place elsewhere in the country where it is more cost-effective. Alternatively, were all states required to reduce CO{sub 2} emission an equal percentage (say by 20%), the cost per unit emissions reduction to New York would be much greater than in the rest of the country.

Morris, S.C.; Lee, J.; Goldstein, G.; Hill, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Data  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international petroleum; carbon dioxide emissions; and data unit conversions...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

egawatthours)",108166078,14 "..Electric Utilities",80483027,13 "..IPP & CHP",27683051,13 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",236974,5 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

382

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",89949689,18 "..Electric Utilities",89155630,10 "..IPP & CHP",794059,49 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",188502,7 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

383

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",34217293,40 "..Electric Utilities",32782885,31 "..IPP & CHP",1434407,48 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",63695,22 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

384

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",37809744,34 "..Electric Utilities",8955,48 "..IPP & CHP",37800788,10 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",44601,26 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

385

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

megawatthours)",116681763,11 "..Electric Utilities",107715547,3 "..IPP & CHP",8966216,33 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",81095,20 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

386

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",36125159,37 "..Electric Utilities",31983457,32 "..IPP & CHP",4141702,42 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",87193,18 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

387

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",44424691,32 "..Electric Utilities",39949146,28 "..IPP & CHP",4475545,39 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",32947,30 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

388

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",52193624,30 "..Electric Utilities",42338049,24 "..IPP & CHP",9855576,32 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",36629,28 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

389

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",91804321,17 "..Electric Utilities",88747138,11 "..IPP & CHP",3057183,44 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",149797,10 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

390

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

megawatthours)",114695729,12 "..Electric Utilities",99680685,6 "..IPP & CHP",15015044,23 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",286156,3 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

391

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",27804784,41 "..Electric Utilities",8486142,38 "..IPP & CHP",19318641,20 "Emissions",, "..Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",16510,35 "..Nitrogen Oxide (short...

392

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",56675404,27 "Electric Utilities",43385936,23 "IPP & CHP",13289468,27 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",105699,14 "Nitrogen Oxide (short...

393

The Impact of Electric Passenger Transport Technology under an Economy-Wide Climate Policy in the United States: Carbon Dioxide Emissions, Coal Use, and Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have the potential to be an economic means of reducing direct (or tailpipe) carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector. However, without a climate policy that places a limit on CO2 emissions from the electric generation sector, the net impact of widespread deployment of PHEVs on overall U.S. CO2 emissions is not as clear. A comprehensive analysis must consider jointly the transportation and electricity sectors, along with feedbacks to the rest of the energy system. In this paper, we use the Pacific Northwest National Laboratorys MiniCAM model to perform an integrated economic analysis of the penetration of PHEVs and the resulting impact on total U.S. CO2 emissions.

Wise, Marshall A.; Kyle, G. Page; Dooley, James J.; Kim, Son H.

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Carbon Dioxide Emission Factors for U.S. Coal by Origin and Destination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In-ground coal quality data, including C, S, ash, fixed carbon, and heating values, are from COALQUAL (11), IGS (12), and Keystone (13, 14). ... For example, examination of 2082 bituminous Kentucky coals led Sakulpitakphon et al. (28) to reject the notion that a single CO2 emission factor can be used as typical for any given rank of coal. ... Quick, J. C.; Tabet, D. E.; Wakefield, S.; Bon, R. L. Optimizing Technology to Reduce Mercury and Acid Gas Emissions from Electric Power Plants: A GIS Study of Coal Chemistry, ...

Jeffrey C. Quick

2010-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

395

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 EIA Conference 2010 Session 3: EIA's 2010 Annual Energy Outlook Highlights Moderator: Paul Holtberg, EIA Speakers: John Conti, EIA Tom R. Eizember, Exxon Mobil Corporation Mary Novak, IHS Global Insight Moderator and Speaker Biographies Paul Holtberg, EIA Paul D. Holtberg is Director of the Demand and Integration Division in the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting at the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Mr. Holtberg joined EIA in July of 2002. At EIA, he works with three other Divisions to complete the Annual Energy Outlook. Previously, he had been a Senior Policy Analyst with RAND Corporation in Arlington, Virginia and spent almost 20 years with the Gas Research Institute. Mr. Holtberg received his B.A. in economics from the State University of

396

Carbon dioxide emissions under different soil tillage systems in mechanically harvested sugarcane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Soil tillage and other methods of soil management may influence CO2 emissions because they accelerate the mineralization of organic carbon in the soil. This study aimed to quantify the CO2 emissions under conventional tillage (CT), minimum tillage (MT) and reduced tillage (RT) during the renovation of sugarcane fields in southern Brazil. The experiment was performed on an Oxisol in the sugarcane-planting area with mechanical harvesting. An undisturbed or no-till (NT) plot was left as a control treatment. The CO2 emissions results indicated a significant interaction (p??2 of CO2 in CT, and 51.7 and 5.5 g m?2 of CO2 in RT and MT respectively. The amount of C lost in the form of CO2 due to soil tillage practices was significant and comparable to the estimated value of potential annual C accumulation resulting from changes in the harvesting system in Brazil from burning of plant residues to the adoption of green cane harvesting. The CO2 emissions in the CT system could respond to a loss of 80% of the potential soil C accumulated over one year as result of the adoption of mechanized sugarcane harvesting. Meanwhile, soil tillage during the renewal of the sugar plantation using RT and MT methods would result in low impact, with losses of 12% and 2% of the C that could potentially be accumulated during a one year period.

A M Silva-Olaya; C E P Cerri; N La Scala Jr; C T S Dias; C C Cerri

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Survey Forms Survey Forms Changes to Petroleum Supply Survey Forms for 2013 Released: November 27, 2012 Federal Register Notice The U.S. Energy Information Administration is requesting comments on the following proposed 2013 Petroleum Supply survey forms: EIA-800, Weekly Refinery and Fractionator Report EIA-801, Weekly Bulk Terminal Report EIA-802, Weekly Product Pipeline Report EIA-803, Weekly Crude Oil Report EIA-804, Weekly Imports Report EIA-805, Weekly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report EIA-809, Weekly Oxygenate Report EIA-22M, Monthly Biodiesel Production Report EIA-810, Monthly Refinery Report EIA-812, Monthly Product Pipeline Report EIA-813, Monthly Crude Oil Report EIA-814, Monthly Imports Report EIA-815, Monthly Bulk Terminal and Blender Report EIA-816, Monthly Natural Gas Plant Liquids Report

398

EIA-Annual Energy Outlook 2010 Early Release Overview  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Analyses > Annual Energy Outlook Early Release > Overview Analyses > Annual Energy Outlook Early Release > Overview Annual Energy Outlook Early Release Overview Full Printer-Friendly Version Overview Energy Trends to 2035 | Economic Growth | Energy Prices | Energy Consumption by Sector | Energy Consumption by Primary Fuel | Energy Intensity | Energy Production and Imports | Electricity Generation | Energy-Related Carbon Dioxide Emissions | Energy Trends to 2035 In preparing the Annual Energy Outlook 2010 (AEO2010), the Energy Information Administration (EIA) evaluated a wide range of trends and issues that could have major implications for U.S. energy markets. This overview focuses primarily on one case, the AEO2010 reference case, which is presented and compared with the updated Annual Energy Outlook 2009 (updated AEO2009) reference case released in April 20091 (see Table 1 below). Because of the uncertainties inherent in any energy market projection, particularly in periods of high price volatility, rapid market transformation, or active changes in legislation, the reference case results should not be viewed in isolation. Readers are encouraged to review the alternative cases when the complete AEO2010 publication is released in order to gain perspective on how variations in key assumptions can lead to different outlooks for energy markets.

399

eia910.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Address 2: Address 2: City: State: Zip: - 1. Report State (Enter one of the following States in the box): Georgia, New York, 2. To how many end-use customers did you sell natural gas? 3. 4. For companies reporting sales in all States except Georgia: 5. For companies reporting sales in Georgia: PART 2. SUBMISSION INFORMATION (Dollars) Do not report negative numbers or decimals. You may report in either Thousand cubic feet (Mcf) or in Therms. Indicate unit of measure by placing an "X" in the appropriate box. Commercial Residential Commercial Residential Form may be submitted using one of the following methods: Mail to: ATTN: EIA-910 (Dollars) Commercial Residential Mcf Call: Email address: (877) 800 - 5261 Secure File Transfer: https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp

400

EIA Energy Efficiency-  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

- Energy Efficiency, energy consumption - Energy Efficiency, energy consumption savings households, buildings, industry & vehicles Energy Savings Links Home > Households, Buildings & Industry > Energy Efficiency > Energy Savings Energy Savings saving energy in all sectors Last Page Modified: August 2010 All Sectors, Home, Commercial Building , Automobile Transportation, Manufacturing, Federal Government Program, Nonprofit and Other Organizations These links are provided solely as a service to our customers, and therefore should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any position of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). In addition, EIA does not guarantee the content or accuracy of any information presented in linked sites. If you have an "Energy Savings" web site that may be an appropriate link for this site, please contact us if you wish to be listed on this page.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Form EIA-920 - 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

20 (2004/2005) 20 (2004/2005) |COMBINED HEAT AND POWER PLANT REPORT INSTRUCTIONS|Form Approval OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 11/30/2007 | |PURPOSE|Form EIA-920 Combined Heat and Power Plant Report collects information from combined heat and power (CHP) plants in the United States. Data collected on this form include electric power generation, fuel consumption, fuel heat content, and fossil fuel stocks. These data are used to monitor the status and trends of the electric power industry, and appear in many EIA publications, including: Electric Power Monthly and Annual, Monthly and Annual Energy Reviews, Natural Gas Monthly and Annual, Quarterly Coal Report, and the Renewable Energy Annual. Further information can be found at

402

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8, 2000 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X N a t u r a l G a s F u t u r e P r i c e , H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e , a n d W e s t T e x a s I n t e r m e d i a t e C r u d e O...

403

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0, 1999 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 ....

404

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6, 2001 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X N a t u r a l G a s F u t u r e s N e a r - M o n t h C o n t r a c t S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e , H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e , a...

405

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8, 1999 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 ....

406

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

19, 2001 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X N a t u r a l G a s F u t u r e s N e a r - M o n t h C o n t r a c t S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e , H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e ,...

407

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5, 1997 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 3 . 2 5 3 . 5 0 3 ....

408

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9, 1997 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 Dollars Per Million...

409

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, 2000 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 ....

410

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4, 1997 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 3 . 2 5 3 . 5 0 3 ....

411

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

, 2001 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X N a t u r a l G a s F u t u r e s N e a r - M o n t h C o n t r a c t S e t t l e m e n t P r i c e , H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e , a...

412

EIA Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4, 1997 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 5 2 . 0 0 2 . 2 5 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 5 3 . 0 0 Dollars Per Million...

413

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

8, 2000 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 ....

414

EIA Energy Information Administration  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

9, 1999 http:www.eia.doe.gov N Y M E X F u t u r e P r i c e s v s H e n r y H u b S p o t P r i c e s 1 . 5 0 1 . 7 0 1 . 9 0 2 . 1 0 2 . 3 0 2 . 5 0 2 . 7 0 2 . 9 0 3 . 1 0 3 ....

415

About EIA - Website - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About EIA.gov About EIA.gov Screen capture of www.eia.gov Our website, EIA.gov, is the primary communication channel for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) and serves as the agency's world-wide energy information point of contact for: Federal, state, and local governments The academic and research communities Businesses and industry Foreign governments and international organizations The news media Financial institutions The general public From January-December 2012, there were 22 million visitor sessions to the site, averaging 183 million visits per month. The site consists of approximately 500K files of all types that support our wide range of products, 41 email subscription lists, four Application Programming Interface (API) data sets, and 11 RSS feeds. EIA has forged a tradition of

416

About EIA - Policies - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About EIA About EIA Privacy Statement and Security Policy Privacy statement This website (http://www.eia.gov/) is provided as a public energy information service of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. stock photo EIA.gov utilizes web measurement software tools in order to improve the efficiency of our website and to provide a better user experience for our customers. If you visit this site to read or download information, you should know that EIA collects and stores a standard set of Internet-related information, such as an Internet Protocol (IP) address, the date and time, the type of browser and operating system used, the page(s) visited, and if you linked to the EIA website from another website, the address of that website. The Office of Management and Budget (OMB) classifies this as a Tier 2 usage

417

E/EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E/EIA E/EIA -0278 U.S. Depa rtme nt of Energ y Energ y Inform ation Admi nistra tion Assis tant Admi nistra tor for Progr am Deve lopme nt Office of the Cons umpt ion Data Syste m June 1981 01377 9 = 4530 : FED Non res ide ntia l Bui ldin gs u/w & Ene rgy Con sum ptio n Sur vey : Fu el Ch ara cte ris tic s an d Co ns erv ati on Pra cti ces Prepared by: Lynn D. Patinkin, Phillip Windell, Dwight: K. French, Leigh Carleton, Lynda T. Carlson, Kenneth A. Vagts, Leslie Whitaker, Tom Woteki, Wilbert Laird, and Laura Wong. IMPORTANT NOTICE As required by government regulation, EIA will conduct the annual review of our mailing list during the next several weeks. If you are on the mailing list, you will soon receive a post card listing your name and address as they appear on our files. If you wish to continue to receive our publications, you must mail

418

PURPOSE The Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-820,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Refinery Report, is used to collect data on current and projected capacities of all operable petroleum refineries. The data appear on EIAs website at www.eia.doe.gov and in numerous government publications. WHO MUST SUBMIT Form EIA-820 is mandatory pursuant to Section 13 (b) of the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275) and must be completed by all operating and idle petroleum refineries (including new refineries under construction) and refineries shutdown during the previous year, located in the 50

unknown authors

419

EIA-914 Review April 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Results of the EIA-914 Review Results of the EIA-914 Review April 2010 Background In January 2009, in Texas, there was a significant change from the December 2008 production estimate. Most of the change was due to the annual update of the sample and estimation process, not a real change in production. A few months later, it became apparent that a growing difference between the EIA-914 based production estimates and estimates publish by the State of Texas had occurred in the latter part of 2008. These two situations prompted EIA to initiate an outside review of the EIA-914 methodologies. ICF International was contracted to review the entire EIA-914 program. ICF was directed to review the areas listed below, identify any problems or concerns, and suggest remedies or

420

OpenEI Community - EIA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

officially officially recognizes utility rate database on OpenEI http://en.openei.org/community/blog/eia-officially-recognizes-utility-rate-database-openei OpenEI and U.S. Energy Information Administration (<span class=EIA)" src="http://en.openei.org/community/files/openei_eia.jpg" style="width:325px; height:162px; float:right" title="" />Good news, everyone! The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) now officially recognizes the OpenEI utility rate database. Up until just a few months ago, the EIA website stated:eia-officially-recognizes-utility-rate-database-openei" target="_blank">read more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Carbon-dioxide emissions trading and hierarchical structure in worldwide finance and commodities markets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a highly interdependent economic world, the nature of relationships between financial entities is becoming an increasingly important area of study. Recently, many studies have shown the usefulness of minimal spanning trees (MST) in extracting interactions between financial entities. Here, we propose a modified MST network whose metric distance is defined in terms of cross-correlation coefficient absolute values, enabling the connections between anticorrelated entities to manifest properly. We investigate 69 daily time series, comprising three types of financial assets: 28 stock market indicators, 21 currency futures, and 20 commodity futures. We show that though the resulting MST network evolves over time, the financial assets of similar type tend to have connections which are stable over time. In addition, we find a characteristic time lag between the volatility time series of the stock market indicators and those of the EU CO2 emission allowance (EUA) and crude oil futures (WTI). This time lag is given by the peak of the cross-correlation function of the volatility time series EUA (or WTI) with that of the stock market indicators, and is markedly different (>20 days) from 0, showing that the volatility of stock market indicators today can predict the volatility of EU emissions allowances and of crude oil in the near future.

Zeyu Zheng, Kazuko Yamasaki, Joel N. Tenenbaum, and H. Eugene Stanley

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

422

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Getting Started  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Getting Started Getting Started Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Getting Started Form EIA-1605 may seem daunting at first, even for entities that have reported under the original program. That's why EIA has developed the Getting Started page to help entities take a systematic approach to reporting their emissions and reductions. The Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program suggests that prospective reporters familiarize themselves with the specific requirements for reporting their entity's inventory and reductions by answering the questions embodied in the 10 steps below. In addition, EIA has prepared the interactive Getting Started tool to help reporters determine what parts of Form EIA-1605 they need to complete. Getting Started Tool Getting Started PDF Tables

423

EIA-Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program - Why Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Why Report Why Report Voluntary Reporting of Greenhouse Gases Program Why Report What Is the Purpose of Form EIA-1605? Form EIA-1605 provides the means for the voluntary reporting of greenhouse gas emissions, reductions, and sequestration under Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. The purpose of the Voluntary Reporting Program is to encourage corporations, government agencies, non-profit organizations, households, and other private and public entities to submit annual reports of their greenhouse gas emissions, emission reductions, and sequestration activities. Form EIA-1605 provides a means for voluntary reporting that is complete, reliable, and consistent. How Will My Entity Benefit From Reporting? There are a number of ways for your entity to benefit from reporting, including:

424

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions AEO 2011 Emissions from energy use Emissions AEO 2011 Emissions from energy use exec summary Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over ...Read full section Renewable fuel use grows at a faster rate than fossil fuel use ...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends Renewable Fuel Standard and California Low ...Read full section Outlook for U.S. coal production is affected ...Read full section Concerns about future GHG policies affect ...Read full section Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below ...Read full section Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide are reduced by ...Read full section Nitrogen oxide emissions show little change from ...Read full section Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions are sensitive to ...Read full section Carbon dioxide fee cases generally increase the use of ...Read full

425

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Emissions AEO 2011 Emissions from energy use Emissions AEO 2011 Emissions from energy use exec summary Executive Summary Coal's share of electric power generation falls over ...Read full section Renewable fuel use grows at a faster rate than fossil fuel use ...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends Renewable Fuel Standard and California Low ...Read full section Outlook for U.S. coal production is affected ...Read full section Concerns about future GHG policies affect ...Read full section Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below ...Read full section Power plant emissions of sulfur dioxide are reduced by ...Read full section Nitrogen oxide emissions show little change from ...Read full section Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions are sensitive to ...Read full section Carbon dioxide fee cases generally increase the use of ...Read full

426

National Gateway GWPC/EIA  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Developing a National Gateway to oil and gas well data Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission Midyear Issues Summit May 19, 2014 | Biloxi, MS By Adam Sieminski, EIA Administrator...

427

eia-191_Nov2014.xls  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

EIA-191 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Storage Field Name Reservoir Name Location State Location County Total Storage Field Capacity (Mcf) Maximum...

428

OpenEI - EIA  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Data Data System (SEDS) Complete Dataset through 2009 http://en.openei.org/datasets/node/883 The State Energy Data System (SEDS) is compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration's (EIA); it is a comprehensive database of energy statistics by state (and includes totals for the entire US). SEDS includes estimates of energy production, consumption, prices, and expenditures broken down by energy source and sector. Annual estimates are available from 1960 - 2009 for production and consumption estimates and from 1970 - 2009 for price and expenditure estimates.

License
Type of

429

eia176.xls  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 1 7 6 EIA-176 Ben Franklin Station Address 2: City: State: Zip: - Distribution company - investor owned Storage operator Distribution company - municipally owned Synthetic natural gas (SNG) plant operator Distribution company - privately owned Producer Distribution company - cooperative Distribution company - other ownership Interstate pipeline (FERC regulated) Intrastate pipeline B. Vehicles Powered by Alternative Fuels Does your company's vehicle fleet include vehicles powered by alternative fuels? No D. Sales/Acquisitions No or sale this year? If Yes, please describe the sale or acquisition in the Comments box below. Page 1 C. Customer Choice Program Participating Eligible If there is a Customer Choice program available in your service territory, enter the number

430

FORM EIA-846(F)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No. 1905-0169: Approval Expires March 31,1989 No. 1905-0169: Approval Expires March 31,1989 FORM EIA-846(F) (6-S-86) U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE .(djSS^X BUREAU OF THE CENSUS ^p^TlJ^v ACTING AS COLLECTING AND COMPILING AGENT FOR / NOTICE - Response to this inquiry is required by lew (Federal Energy Administration Act of 1 974, as amended, P.L. 93-275). By Section 9 of Title 1 3, U.S. Code, your report to the Census Bureau is

431

About EIA - Policies - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

About EIA About EIA CIPSEA Reporting stock photo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) reports annually to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) on what information it protects using the confidentiality provisions of Subtitle A of the Confidential Information Protection and Statistical Efficiency Act of 2002 (CIPSEA), Title V of the E-Government Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-347). The annual report to OMB identifies what EIA surveys use CIPSEA to protect information and also includes the number of persons designated as agents who are authorized to access information protected under CIPSEA. Annual CIPSEA reports: 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 About EIA Our Work Mission & Overview Product & Services Customer & Stakeholder Engagement Accomplishments for 2013

432

About EIA - Ourwork - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Customer & Stakeholder Engagement at EIA Customer & Stakeholder Engagement at EIA The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) has a broad range of customers and stakeholders, and we engage with them in a variety of ways. There's at least one quality common to each of these relationships: We listen and are open to change. We want to continue to improve our ability to fulfill EIA's mission to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. Below are some examples of our interactions, meetings, surveys, and presentations to customers and stakeholders that help us collect feedback, get expert advice, and refine and improve our analysis and processes. Outreach to external organizations Through many different outreach avenues, EIA works with external

433

EIA-423 and Schedule 2 of EIA-923  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Historic Form EIA-423 & FERC-423 Detailed Data Historic Form EIA-423 & FERC-423 Detailed Data Beginning in 2008, data on monthly deliveries of fossil fuels to both utility and nonutility generating facilities are collected on Schedule 2 of the newer Form EIA-923 -- See EIA-923 detailed data Schedule 2. Survey form EIA-423 collected monthly nonutility fuel receipts and fuel quality files on plants with a fossil-fueled nameplate generating capacity of 50 or more megawatts. Detailed data are provided here on monthly deliveries of fossil fuels to nonutility generating facilities are included at the specific energy source, quantity of fuel delivered, the Btu content, sulfur content, ash content, coal mine state and county (or country) of origin, coal mine type (surface/underground), as well as the supplier of the fuel. Fuel cost data collected on this survey is not be made available to the public because it is protected.

434

About EIA - Ourwork - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Mission and Overview Mission and Overview The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the nation's premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the U.S. Government. photo of the James Forrestal building EIA conducts a comprehensive data collection program that covers the full spectrum of energy sources, end uses, and energy flows. EIA also prepares informative energy analyses, monthly short-term forecasts of energy market

435

EIA new releases, November--December 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thus publication contains information compiled by the Energy information administration (EIA) on the following topics: heating fuel supplies; alternative fuel vehicles; natural gas production; clean air laws and coal transportation; EIA`s world Wide Web Site; EIA`s CD-ROM; Press Releases; Microfiched products; electronic publishing; new reports; machine-readable files; how to order EIA publications; and Energy Data Information Contracts.

NONE

1996-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

436

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

to organizing the highly successful second annual Boy and Girl Scout Merit BadgePatch Day, EIA also accepted several awards recognizing its innovative work. This year, EIA...

437

Review of EIA Oil Production Outlooks  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Review of EIA oil production outlooks For 2014 EIA Energy Conference July 15, 2014 | Washington, DC By Samuel Gorgen, Upstream Analyst Overview Gorgen, Tight Oil Production Trends...

438

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9 9 EIA Conference 2009 Session 9: Investing in Oil and Natural Gas - Opportunities and Barriers Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Bruce Bawks (EIA) Speakers: Susan Farrell (PFC Energy) John Felmy (American Petroleum Institute) Michelle Foss (University of Texas) Paul Sankey (Deutsche Bank) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Bruce Bawks, EIA Investing in Oil and Natural Gas Opportunities and Barriers PDF Icon pdf Powerpoint Icon ppt Bruce Bawks joined the Energy Information Administration in 1984. Since February 2004, he has been the team leader of EIA's financial analysis

439

2011Form EIA-902 Instructions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

FORM EIA-902 ANNUAL GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP SHIPMENTS REPORT GENERAL INFORMATION AND INSTRUCTIONS I. Purpose Form EIA-902 is designed to provide the data necessary for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), a part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to carry out its responsibilities tracking heat pump shipments in the geothermal heat pump industry and reporting information concerning the size and status of the industry. The data collected will be published in the Renewable Energy Annual and also be available through EIA's Internet site at http://www.eia.gov/fuelrenewable.html. II. Who Should Respond to This Survey This report is mandatory and required pursuant to the authority granted to the Department of Energy (DOE) by the Federal Energy Information Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-

440

EIA Cases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EIA Cases EIA Cases EIA Cases RSS February 14, 2011 TEE-0073 - In the Matter of Cole Distributing, Inc. On December 13, 2010, Cole Distributing, Inc. (Cole) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). The firm requests that it be permanently relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-782B, entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report." As explained below, we have determined that Cole's request should be denied. February 14, 2011 TEE-0076 - In the Matter of Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. On February 18, 2011, Brodeur's Oil Service, Inc. (Brodeur's) filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 EIA Conference 2009 Session 6: Financial Markets and Short-Term Energy Prices Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Tancred Lidderdale (EIA) Speakers: Jeffrey Harris (Commodity Futures Trading Commission) Robert McCullough (McCullough Research) Adam E. Sieminski (Deutsche Bank) Robert Weiner (George Washington University) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Tancred Lidderdale, EIA Tancred Lidderdale is the supervisor of the team that produces that the Short-Term Energy Outlook for the Energy Information Administration. Before joining EIA in 1991, he worked for 12 years with Atlantic Richfield Company

442

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presentations & Conferences > Conferences > EIA 2008 Energy Conference Presentations & Conferences > Conferences > EIA 2008 Energy Conference Energy Information Administration 2008 Energy Conference: 30 Years of Energy Information and Analysis Conference Videos now available Click presenter name to download PDF of presentation. Monday, April 7 7:30am- 9:00am Registration 9:00am- 10:30am Opening Session Welcome - Guy Caruso, EIA Administrator Keynote Speakers - Secretary Samuel Bodman (full text of speech), Secretary James Schlesinger Distinguished Guest Speaker - Daniel Yergin (Cambridge Energy Research Associates, Inc.) 10:30am- 11:00am Break 11:00am- 12:30pm Concurrent Sessions EIA Program Review and Assessment: Responding to Change Moderator: Howard Gruenspecht (EIA) Panel: Denny Ellerman (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Lori Krauss (Office of Management and Budget), Kathy Cooper (Southern Methodist University)

443

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2012 April 2012 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383ER(2012) Acronyms List of Acronyms AB 32 Global Warming Solutions Act of 2006 LDVs Light-duty vehicles AEO Annual Energy Outlook LFMM Liquid Fuel Market Module AEO20011 Annual Energy Outlook 2011 LNG Liquefied natural gas AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 MACT Maximum achievable control technology bpd barrels per day MATS Mercury and Air Toxics Standards Btu British thermal units mpg miles per gallon CAFE Corporate Average Fuel Economy NGL National gas liquids CAIR Clean Air Interstate Rule NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration CHP Combined heat and power NOx Nitrogen oxides CO2 Carbon dioxide OCS Outer Continental Shelf CTL Coal-to-liquids OECD Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development

444

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plenary Session Plenary Session EIA Conference 2010 Plenary Session Welcome - Richard Newell, Administrator, Energy Information Administration Keynote Address - Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy Keynote Address - Dr. Philip Sharp, President, Resources for the Future Keynote Address - Steve Bolze, President & CEO, Power & Water, GE Energy Infrastructure Luncheon Speaker - Dr. Lawrence H. Summers, Director of the National Economic Council; Introduction by David Jhirad, SAIS Welcome Remarks, Keynote Addresses, Luncheon Speaker, and Introductions Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard G. Newell was sworn in on August 3, 2009 as the seventh Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Dr. Newell is on leave from his position as the Gendell Associate Professor of Energy and Environmental Economics at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment. Previously he served as the Senior Economist for energy and environment on the President's Council of Economic Advisers. He also spent many years as a Senior Fellow at Resources for the Future (RFF), an independent, non-partisan environmental and resource economics research institution in Washington, DC. He has published widely on the economics of markets and policies for energy, the environment, and related technologies, particularly alternatives for reducing greenhouse gas emissions and achieving other energy and environmental goals.

445

Table 2. 2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emisssions...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

2011 State energy-related carbon dioxide emissions by fuel million metric tons of carbon dioxide shares State Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Total Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Alabama...

446

FORM EIA-846C  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

No. 1905-0169: Approval Expires 04/30/91 No. 1905-0169: Approval Expires 04/30/91 FORM EIA-846C (5-1 89) U.S. DEPARTMENT Of COMMERCE BUREAU OF THE CENSUS ACTING AS COLLECTING AND COMPILING AGENT FOR UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 8 hours per response, including the time of reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send comments regarding this burden estimate or any other aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to the Energy Information Administration, Office of Statistical Standards, El-73, Mail Station: 1H-023 Forrestal, 1000 Independence Avenue, SW, Washington, DC 20485; and to the Office of Information and

447

DOE/EIA-0466  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Profiles of Foreign Direct Investment in U.S. Energy 1983 nun ^^ 4P VM « V'&IS' Published: February 1985 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Ordering information and purchase of this and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the ElA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC. Addresses and telephone numbers appear below. An order form is enclosed for your convenience. National Energy Information Center, El-20 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building Room 1F-048 Washington, D.C. 20585 (202) 252-8800

448

DOE/EIA-0358  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

58 58 Report on the 1980 Manufacturing Industries Energy Consumption Study and Survey of Large Combustors Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. January 1983 ; This publication is avajlable from the Superintendent ofD0eufrients, US.-Government Printing Office.(GPO) Make check or moneyprefer payable to the Superintendent of Documents: You may send your order to the ^Government Printing'Office or the National Energy'fnfbrmation Center. GPOprices are subjeatoxhange without advance notice? ) ; \ x Stock Number: q6;l-*|lp3-00293-5 Price: $5.00; ? ', .' 'I., (:; >'' "- .. Questions on energy statistics1 and the.availabilitypf other-EIA publications and orders for ElAjpublications available for sale trot the-Governrnent Printing Office may 'be. directed tci_th^ National £riergy';/nformation Center. ."' ., "-, ,,-

449

Form EIA-861 Instructions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER ANNUAL ELECTRIC POWER INDUSTRY REPORT Form EIA-861 OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2015 Burden: 9 Hours NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provisions on sanctions and the provisions concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 U.S.C. 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any matter within its jurisdiction.

450

EIA-930 Comments  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

30 Comments 30 Comments Tim Hattaway PowerSouth Energy Cooperative Page 1 PowerSouth Energy Cooperative appreciates the opportunity to comment on the Form EIA-930 report, ''Balancing Authority Operations Report''. We have several concerns with the proposed data collection effort. Some concerns PowerSouth has with the proposal are:  The DOE is seeking hourly information within minutes of the time that it becomes available to the BA in very raw form. Many times, we will not have the data available by 10-minutes after an hour due to meter error, communication glitches, etc. Providing the data in such a way will lead to many errors and gaps with the data being provided.  For a smaller sized BA such as PowerSouth, we are concerned by amount of work that will be

451

EIA Draft Final Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Contango in Cushing? Contango in Cushing? Evidence on Financial-Physical Interactions in the U.S. Crude Oil Market ∗ Louis H. Ederington, Chitru S. Fernando and Kateryna Holland Price College of Business University of Oklahoma 307 West Brooks Street, Norman, OK 73019 Thomas K. Lee Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW, Washington, DC 20585 March 2012 JEL Classifications: oil prices, spot oil markets, oil futures markets, oil storage, cash & carry arbitrage, speculation, index investors. Keywords: G13, G18, Q41. ∗ Author contact information: Ederington: lederington@ou.edu, (405)325-5697; Fernando: cfernando@ou.edu, (405)325-2906; Holland: kateryna.holland@ou.edu; (405)325-5591; Lee: Thomas.Lee@eia.gov; (202)586-0829.

452

Form EIA-851Q  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

ITEM 1: FACILITY INFORMATION ITEM 1: FACILITY INFORMATION Name: County: State: Owner: Type: Rated Capacity: Operating Status: ITEM 2: PRODUCTION Pounds U 3 O 8 October-2013 November-2013 December-2013 Total = 0.0 ITEM 3: PRODUCTION SOURCE Mine name(s) Pounds U 3 O 8 Other type: Pounds U 3 O 8 Total = 0.0 COMMENTS All other information you provide will be used for statistical purposes only. In accordance with the Confidential Information Protection provisions of Title V, Subtitle A of Public Law 107-347 and other applicable Federal laws, your responses will be kept confidential and will not be disclosed in identifiable form to anyone other than employees or agents without your consent. By law, every EIA employee, as well as every agent, is subject to a jail term, a fine of up to $250,000, or both if he or she discloses ANY identifiable

453

EIA Drilling Productivity Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Drilling Productivity Report Drilling Productivity Report For Center on Global Energy Policy, Columbia University October 29, 2013 | New York, NY By Adam Sieminski, Administrator The U.S. has experienced a rapid increase in natural gas and oil production from shale and other tight resources Adam Sieminski, EIA Drilling Productivity Report October 29, 2013 2 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Rest of US Marcellus (PA and WV) Haynesville (LA and TX) Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (ND) Woodford (OK) Fayetteville (AR) Barnett (TX) Antrim (MI, IN, and OH) 0.0 0.4 0.8 1.2 1.6 2.0 2.4 2.8 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008 2010 2012 Eagle Ford (TX) Bakken (MT & ND) Granite Wash (OK & TX) Bonespring (TX Permian) Wolfcamp (TX Permian) Spraberry (TX Permian) Niobrara-Codell (CO) Woodford (OK)

454

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium

455

About EIA - Budget - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Print-friendly PDF Print-friendly PDF EIA Strategic Plan 2011-2015 Mission Defines what we do and keeps us on task as a team producing the right outputs. The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. EIA collects, analyzes, and disseminates independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policymaking, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. EIA is the Nation's premier source of energy information and, by law, its data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. Values Define who we are and keep us from crashing into each other or running

456

EIA - 2008 New Electric Power EIA-860 Form Anticipated Questions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

commercial operations date. Please contact EIA if your situation is different. The wind turbines at my site will start commercial operation over a several month period. How do I...

457

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Presentations, Testimony, Events Presentations, Testimony, Events EIA Conference 2009 Tuesday, April 7 See each session for audio and video presentations! Plenary Session Welcome - Howard Gruenspecht Acting Administrator, Energy Information Administration Keynote Address; The Energy Problem - Dr. Steven Chu, Secretary of Energy The Economics of an Integrated World Oil Market - William D. Nordhaus, Sterling Professor of Economics, Yale University Energy in a Carbon-Constrained World - John W. Rowe, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Exelon Corporation Concurrent Sessions 1. The Future for Transport Demand 2. What's Ahead for Natural Gas Markets? Moderator: Andy Kydes (EIA) Moderator: Steve Harvey (EIA) Speakers: Lew Fulton (International Energy Agency) David Greene (Oak Ridge National Laboratory)

458

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 EIA Conference 2009 Session 5: Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Michael Schaal (EIA) Speakers: Denise Bode (American Wind Energy Association) Bryan Hannegan (Electric Power Research Institute) Matt Hartwig (Renewable Fuels Association) David Humbird (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Michael Schaal, Director of the Energy Information Administration's Oil and Gas Division Renewable Energy in the Transportation and Power Sectors PDF Icon pdf Powerpoint Icon

459

EIA - International Energy Outlook 2010  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

> Graphic data - Highlights > Graphic data - Highlights International Energy Outlook 2010 Graphic data - Highlights Figure 1. World marketed energy consumption, 2007-2035 Figure 2. World marketed energy use by fuel type, 1990-2035 Figure 3. World liquids production, 1990-2035 Figure 4. Net change in world natural gas production by region, 2007-2035 Figure 5. World coal consumption by region, 1990-2035 Figure 6. World net electricity generation by fuel, 2007-2035 Figure 7. World renewable electricity generation by energy source excluding world and hydropower, 2007-2035 Figure 8. World delivered energy consumption in the industrial sector, 2007-2035 Figure 9. World delivered energy consumption in the transportation sector, 2005-2035 Figure 10. World energy-related carbon dioxide emissions, 2007-2035

460

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4: April 9, 2007 4: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions on AddThis.com... Fact #464: April 9, 2007 Carbon Dioxide Emissions Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the transportation sector began to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

EIA: High Oil Prices, GHG Controls Would Help Clean Energy Grow  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The growth of renewable energy and renewable fuels in the United States will be significantly greater under scenarios involving high oil prices and stricter controls on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, according to DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA).

462

DOE/EIA  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA EIA -0515(88 ) Septemb er 1991 Ma nuf act urin g Fue l-Sw itch ing Ca pab ility 198 8 1 6 6 1 : 6 u i i u t i d s n / i u i p s / d w B s s i u s i d B u f j n i o e t n u e w e t / j ; o e o o S I U B S B J ^ B J A / e u f / a / « / j : o ; o y d J M O O i u d g ' w e e 6 1 0 0 - S / 2 - Z 0 2 - 1 X V d 8 G Z C - C 8 Z ( 2 0 3 ) 0 0 ' u o i S u m s e M I U 9 U J U J 9 A O O s n 1 0 l u e p u a t u u s d n s ' 9 u > n ' u i d s - u u e g 1 9 U - 9 8 S 0 0 9 8 - 9 6 9 0 0 ' i u o o u ' f t u i u o i ; s J i s | U ( i u p v U O I I B U J J O J U I : s « o i ( O j s e e j e s j n o g p u e ' s j e o i u n u a u o g d o i a i ' s e s s e j p p v ' | i ? i u A q j e i u a o a g j 0 1 p a i o e i i p a o p i n o g s s o n s u e i s A B j ^ u a u o 6 u | ] u u d l u e i i i u j S A O O a g i U K > J | p d u i e i q o e q A e u i s u o i - u i O u i s e i j o j n d a o « ( t O B m i u i i d j u e u j u j e A o o g n s i u a u m a o a t o 6 u | j e e g J D J a o * A d p s u o ! i e o i u n u j u j o 3 « | 9 t j o U O I I ^ N s , v i 3 j o 1 8 ^ 1 0 j o s u j i » ) u i o j | p a s m p j n d e q A e t u u t x i s a i t q n d s n u DOE/EIA-0515(88) Distribution Category UC-98 Manufacturing Fuel-Switching

463

EIA 176 Query System, 2004  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications EIA 176 Query System 2004 The EIA-176 Query System is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer. For instructions, please refer to the documentation listed below.

464

EIA 176 Query System, 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications EIA 176 Query System 2001 The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer. For instructions, please read the documentation file(s) listed below

465

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 EIA Conference 2009 Session 4: Electric Power Infrastructure: Status and Challenges for the Future Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Scott Sitzer (EIA) Speakers: P. Kumar Agarwal (Federal Energy Regulatory Commission) Timothy J. Brennan (University of Maryland) Mark G. Lauby (North American Electric Reliability Corporation) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Scott Sitzer, Director of the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels Scott Sitzer is Director of the Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). He has been

466

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 EIA Conference 2010 Session 4: Short-Term Energy Prices - What Drivers Matter Most? Moderator: Howard Gruenspecht, EIA Speakers: David M. Arseneau, Federal Reserve Board Guy F. Caruso, Center for Strategic and International Studies Christopher Ellsworth, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Edward L. Morse, Credit Suisse Securities Moderator and Speaker Biographies Howard Gruenspecht, EIA Over the past 25 years, Howard K. Gruenspecht has worked extensively on electricity policy issues, including restructuring and reliability, regulations affecting motor fuels and vehicles, energy-related environmental issues, and economy-wide energy modeling. Before joining EIA, he was a Resident Scholar at Resources for the Future. From 1993 to 2000, Dr. Gruenspecht served as Director of Economic, Electricity and Natural Gas

467

EIA 176 Query System, 2003  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications EIA 176 Query System 2003 The EIA-176 Query System is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer. For instructions, please refer to the documentation read the documentation file(s) listed below.

468

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 EIA Conference 2010 Session 10: Energy and Water: Implications for Energy Development Moderator: Howard Gruenspecht (EIA) Speakers: Shahid Chaudhry, California Energy Commission M. Michael Hightower, Sandia National Laboratories James Richenderfer, Susquehanna River Basin Commission Jeff C. Wright, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Moderator and Speaker Biographies Howard Gruenspecht (EIA) Over the past 25 years, Howard K. Gruenspecht has worked extensively on electricity policy issues, including restructuring and reliability, regulations affecting motor fuels and vehicles, energy-related environmental issues, and economy-wide energy modeling. Before joining EIA, he was a Resident Scholar at Resources for the Future. From 1993 to 2000, Dr. Gruenspecht served as Director of Economic, Electricity and Natural Gas

469

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. C. Lal, R. (2004), Carbon emission from farm operations,facts: Average carbon dioxide emissions resulting fromcalculation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from fuel

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol.

471

Applications of carbon dioxide capture and storage technologies in reducing emissions from fossil-fired power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to investigate the global contribution of carbon capture and storage technologies to mitigating climate change. Carbon capture and storage is a technology that comprises the separation of from carbon dioxide industrial- and energy-related sources, transport to a storage location (e.g., saline aquifers and depleted hydrocarbon fields), and long-term isolation from the atmosphere. The carbon dioxides emitted directly at the power stations are reduced by 80 to 90%. In contrast, the life cycle assessment shows substantially lower reductions of greenhouse gases in total (minus 65 to 79%).

Balat, M.; Balat, H.; Oz, C. [University of Mahallesi, Trabzon (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914: Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Page 1 of 38 EIA-914 Monthly Natural Gas Production Report Data Analysis October 2006 Introduction EIA...

473

Annual Electric Utility Data - Form EIA-906 Database  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Detailed data files > Historic Form EIA-906 Historic Form EIA-906 Detailed Data with previous form data (EIA-759) Historic electric utility data files include information on net...

474

Capture of carbon dioxide from ambient air  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide capture from ambient air could compensate for all carbon dioxide emissions to the atmosphere. Such capture would, for example, make it possible to use liquid, carbon-based fuels in cars or airplane...

K.S. Lackner

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers'' was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. (eds.)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Summary of the presentations at the international workshop on reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the developing world: Assessment of benefits, costs and barriers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ``International Workshop on Reducing Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Developing World: Assessment of Benefits, Costs and Barriers`` was the second workshop held as part of a project being conducted by the International Energy Studies Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, in collaboration with experts from leading institutions across the developing world. The goal of the project is to analyze long-range energy consumption in developing countries and its potential contribution to global climate change. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is supporting this work, the results of which already have made a key contribution to the technical analysis being used as the basis for discussion by the Energy and Industry Sub-group of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). The main purpose of this workshop was two-fold: (1) to discuss the feasibility of implementing the efficiency improvements and fuel switching measures incorporated into the long-term energy scenarios created for 17 developing countries and (2) to examine the costs and benefits of reducing energy-related carbon dioxide emissions generated by developing countries.

Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N. [eds.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Potentials for reductions of carbon dioxide emissions of the industrial sector in transitional economies -- A case study of implementation of absorption chiller and co-generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Central and East European (CEE) countries together with former USSR emitted about 25 percent of the world carbon dioxide emissions, predominantly because of high energy intensity of their industries and dependence on coal. The paper focuses on technologies which would reduce the need for fossil fuel burning by improving energy efficiency in industry. In the process industry, heat demand is usually met by combustion of fossil fuels, cold is produced with electricity. Technical potentials of absorption chillers (AC) and co-generation in the process industry as well as their market penetration potentials are analyses for Slovenia, one of the fastest transforming CEE economies. Technical potentials are not necessarily realized in production. New technology employment in firms depends on several factors. This paper first summarizes the existing models explaining adoption of technology by firms. Then, it focuses selectively on the impact of macro economic and institutional factors and points out which policy instruments could facilitate faster diffusion of the technologies and thereby reduction of energy related carbon dioxide emissions in the industrial sector.

Remec, J. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Faculty of Mechanical Engineering; Dolsak, N. [Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia). Faculty of Economics]|[Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). School of Public and Environmental Affairs

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Adaptation costs for sustainable development and ecological transitions: a presentation of the structural model M3ED with reference to French energy?economy?carbon dioxide emission prospects*  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to assess the adaptation costs associated with the transition to a sustainable development path, taking the example of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy. The model used is based on systems dynamics modelling and energy input-output analysis. This type of approach has the interesting property of precisely defining the nature of interactions between the different economic sectors, and between the economic sectors and the environment. This provides a framework within which to test different types of economic, technology and environment policy. In effect, according to our interests, it is necessary to measure problems of resources allocation or sequential choices between different alternatives why and how a particular solution comes to be selected from a multiplicity of alternatives. First, we characterise the methodological and conceptual specification of the model. Secondly, we locate specific properties of the model linked with both ecological sustainability and economic feasability constraints. Thirdly, a sensitivity test is applied concerning different control policy scenarios for the case of carbon dioxide emissions in the French economy.

Patrick Schembri

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Survey Forms Survey Forms All survey forms used by EIA to collect energy data are listed below. The forms include descriptions and links to survey instructions and additional information. + EXPAND ALL All survey forms by form number (and title) EIA-1, Weekly Coal Monitoring Report--General Industries and Blast Furnaces (Standby Form) EIA-3, Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Manufacturing and Transformation/Processing Coal Plants and Commercial and Institutional Coal Users EIA-4, Weekly Coal Monitoring Report--Coke Plants (Standby Form) EIA-5, Quarterly Coal Consumption and Quality Report, Coke Plants EIA-6Q, Quarterly Coal Report (Standby) EIA-7A, Coal Production and Preparation Report EIA-8A, Coal Stocks Report - Annual EIA-14, Refiners' Monthly Cost Report

480

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",10469269,46 "Electric Utilities",6012748,40 "IPP & CHP",4456521,40 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",16073,37 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",20861,35...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "dioxide emissions eia" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",110904994,13 "Electric Utilities",92799750,9 "IPP & CHP",18105244,21 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",21408,33 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",50391,21...

482

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",129745731,8 "Electric Utilities",75183893,14 "IPP & CHP",54561838,7 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",391088,1 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",100300,4...

483

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",65005678,24 "Electric Utilities",44603847,22 "IPP & CHP",20401831,19 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",92438,16 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",42160,26...

484

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",52556701,29 "Electric Utilities",41532785,26 "IPP & CHP",11023916,29 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",42846,27 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",49591,22...

485

"Sources: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(megawatthours)",36635909,35 "Electric Utilities",30704865,33 "IPP & CHP",5931044,37 "Emissions",, "Sulfur Dioxide (short tons)",16560,34 "Nitrogen Oxide (short tons)",61130,13...

486

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Print friendly PDF Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Print friendly PDF Deputy Administrator E-mail: howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-6351 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties Howard Gruenspecht was named Deputy Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) in March 2003. As the second-in-command at EIA and the agency's top career official, Howard is involved in all aspects of analyzing, and disseminating independent and impartial energy information to promote sound policy-making, efficient markets, and public understanding of energy and its interaction with the economy and the environment. He works closely with

487

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John ContiPrint-friendly PDF Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis E-mail: john.conti@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-2222 Fax: (202) 586-3045 Room: 2H-073 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Duties John Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis and analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets on energy markets; prepares reports on current and future energy use; analyzes the impact of energy policies; and develops advanced techniques for conducting energy information analyses. John also oversees the planning and execution of EIA's analysis and forecasting programs to ensure that EIA

488

About EIA - Ourwork - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Products and Services Products and Services What products and services does EIA have? EIA has lots of energy information, just as our name says. The information is disseminated in different ways, including reports, web products, press releases, databases, and maps. Our information is issued daily, weekly, monthly, annually, and periodically as needed or requested. Some of our products deal with specific energy industries or fuels. Some products contain mostly data; some also have analysis and forecasts. Other products present an integrated view over different fuels or energy uses. The following listing represents a sampling from EIA's varied product line. For a more complete listing, see our Reports and Products page. Daily Product Today in Energy Weekly Products Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report

489

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Senior Executive Biographies Senior Executive Biographies Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Administrator Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012 as the eighth Administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration... Read more > E-mail: adam.sieminski@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-4361 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Howard K. Gruenspecht, Acting Administrator and Deputy Administrator Howard K. Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Biography Howard Gruenspecht was named Deputy Administrator of EIA in March 2003... Read more > E-mail: howard.gruenspecht@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-6351 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 John Conti, Director of the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting John Conti Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis Biography John Conti is the Assistant Administrator for Energy Analysis and analyzes energy supply, demand, and prices including the impact of financial markets... Read more >

490

About EIA - Organization - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Print friendly PDF Adam Sieminski, Administrator Adam Sieminski Print friendly PDF Administrator E-mail: adam.sieminski@eia.gov Phone: (202) 586-4361 Fax: (202) 586-0329 Room: 2H-027 Address: U.S. Energy Information Administration 1000 Independence Avenue, S.W. Washington, DC 20585 Biography Adam Sieminski was sworn in on June 4, 2012, as the eighth administrator of the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). From March 2012 to May 2012, while awaiting confirmation as EIA administrator, Mr. Sieminski served as senior director for energy and environment on the staff of the National Security Council. From 2005 until March 2012, he was the chief energy economist for Deutsche Bank, working with the Bank's global research and trading units. Drawing on extensive industry, government, and academic

491

EIA 176 Query System, 2002  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 EIA Home > Natural Gas > Natural Gas Data Publications EIA 176 Query System 2002 EIA 176 Query System 2002 Release date: February 2, 2004 Next release date: February 2005 The EIA-176 Query system is a Windows-based system which runs under Windows operating systems 95, 98, 2000, NT - 4.0 Service Pack 3 or later. It provides a method of extracting and using the company level data filed on the Form EIA-176, and saving the query results in various media and formats. There are pre-selected data queries, which allow the user to select and run the most often-used queries, as well as the ability to create a customized query. Self-extracting executable files with run-time versions of Access are required to set up the system. You may also download the data tables if you already have Microsoft Access on your computer. For instructions, please read the documentation file(s) listed below.

492

Mitigating greenhouse gas emissions: Voluntary reporting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Voluntary Reporting Program, developed pursuant to Section 1605(b) of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, permits corporations, government agencies, households, and voluntary organizations to report on their emissions of greenhouse gases, and on actions taken that have reduced or avoided emissions or sequestered carbon, to the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This, the second annual report of the Voluntary Reporting Program, describes information provided by the participating organizations on their aggregate emissions and emissions reductions, as well as their emissions reduction or avoidance projects, through 1995. This information has been compiled into a database that includes reports from 142 organizations and descriptions of 967 projects that either reduced greenhouse gas emissions or sequestered carbon. Fifty-one reporters also provided estimates of emissions, and emissions reductions achieved, for their entire organizations. The projects described actions taken to reduce emissions of carbon dioxide from energy production and use; to reduce methane and nitrous oxide emissions from energy use, waste management, and agricultural processes; to reduce emissions of halocarbons, such as CFCs and their replacements; and to increase carbon sequestration.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 7 EIA Conference 2009 Session 7: Energy Data Needs Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Margot Anderson (EIA) Speakers: Jeff Genzer (Duncan, Weinberg, Genzer & Pembroke, P.C.) Philip Hanser (Brattle Group) Shirley Neff (Center for Strategic and International Studies) Frank Rusco (U.S. Government Accountability Office Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Margot Anderson Margot Anderson, Director of the Office of Energy Markets and End Use, Energy Information Administration. Prior to joining the Energy Information Administration, she was Deputy Assistant Secretary for Policy Analysis,

494

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 EIA Conference 2010 Session 6: Regulating Energy Commodities Moderator: Steve Harvey, EIA Speakers: Daniel M. Berkovitz, U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission Sean Cota, Cota & Cota Skip Horvath, Natural Gas Supply Association Deanna L. Newcomb, McDermott Will & Emery LLP Moderator and Speaker Biographies Steve Harvey, EIA Stephen Harvey has been a career member of the SES since 2002 with experience in high-profile public management, public sector operations, and consulting relating to electric and natural gas markets, regulation and enforcement as well as expertise in executive-level leadership and technological innovation. Mr. Harvey is currently the director of the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Office of Oil and Gas, and is responsible for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of information

495

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 3 EIA Conference 2009 Session 3: Meeting the Growing Demand for Liquids Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Glen Sweetnam (EIA) Speakers: Eduardo González-Pier (PEMEX) David Knapp (Energy Intelligence Group) Fareed Mohamedi (PFC Energy) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations Meeting the Growing Demand for Liquids PDF Icon pdf Powerpoint Icon ppt Glen Sweetnam is the Director of the International, Economic, and Greenhouse Gases Division of the Energy Information Administration. This Division produces the International Energy Outlook, the macroeconomic

496

EIA Cases | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

July 17, 2002 July 17, 2002 VEE-0083 - In the Matter of Ken Bettridge Distributing, Inc. On February 28, 2002, Ken Bettridge Distributing, Inc. (Bettridge) of Cedar City, Utah, filed an Application for Exception with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) of the Department of Energy (DOE). In its application, Bettridge requests that it be temporarily relieved of the requirement to prepare and file the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) form entitled "Resellers'/Retailers' Monthly Petroleum Product Sales Report" (Form EIA-782B). As explained below, we have concluded that Bettridge shall be excused from filing Form EIA-782B for one year. June 28, 2002 VEE-0076 - In the Matter of Green Mountain Energy Company On August 23, 2000, the Green Mountain Energy Company (Green Mountain) of

497

EIA - Energy Conferences & Presentations.  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA Conference 2009 Session 1: The Future for Transport Demand Listen to Session: Audio of Session 1 from 2009 EIA Conference Full Session Transcript PDF Icon pdf Moderator: Andy Kydes (EIA) Speakers: Lew Fulton (International Energy Agency) David Greene (Oak Ridge National Laboratory) Lee Schipper (Precourt Institute, Stanford University) Note: Concurrent sessions used a variety of presentation and round table discussion formats. All available presentations have been posted. Moderator and Speaker Bios and Presentations The Future of Transport Demand PDF Icon pdf Powerpoint Icon ppt Andy S. Kydes is the Senior Technical Advisor to the Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting. He performs quality assurance for the design and development of the National Energy Modeling System and acts as senior